Science.gov

Sample records for allowable pumping rates

  1. Optical tracer size differences allow quantitation of active pumping rate versus Stokes-Einstein diffusion in lymphatic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-10-01

    Lymphatic uptake of interstitially administered agents occurs by passive convective-diffusive inflow driven by interstitial concentration and pressure, while the downstream lymphatic transport is facilitated by active propulsive contractions of lymphatic vessel walls. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging in mice was used to measure these central components of lymphatic transport for the first time, using two different-sized molecules-methylene blue (MB) and fluorescence-labeled antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG)-IRDye 680RD. This work confirms the hypothesis that lymphatic passive inflow and active propulsion rates can be separated based upon the relative differences in Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficient. This coefficient specifically affects the passive-diffusive uptake when the interstitial volume and pressure are constant. Parameters such as mean time-to-peak signal, overall fluorescence signal intensities, and number of active peristaltic pulses, were estimated from temporal imaging data. While the mean time to attain peak signal representative of diffusion-dominated flow in the lymph vessels was 0.6±0.2 min for MB and 8±6 min for IgG, showing a size dependence, the active propulsion rates were 3.4±0.8 pulses/min and 3.3±0.5 pulses/min, respectively, appearing size independent. The propulsion rates for both dyes decreased with clearance from the interstitial injection-site, indicating intrinsic control of the smooth muscles in response to interstitial pressure. This approach to size-comparative agent flow imaging of lymphatic function can enable noninvasive characterization of diseases related to uptake and flow in lymph networks.

  2. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may... remote under § 591.304, and shall be terminated or adjusted as warranted. In determining the amount of... commuting to the remote post of duty as compared to transportation expenses (including cost of...

  3. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may... remote under § 591.304, and shall be terminated or adjusted as warranted. In determining the amount of... commuting to the remote post of duty as compared to transportation expenses (including cost of...

  4. Flow Rate In Microfluidic Pumps As A Function Of Tension and Pump Motor Head Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Anthony; McBride, Krista

    2015-03-01

    As the use of microfluidic devices has become more common in recent years the need for standardization within the pump systems has grown. The pumps are ball bearing rotor microfluidic pumps and work off the idea of peristalsis. The rapid contraction and relaxation propagating down a tube or a microfluidic channel. The ball bearings compress the tube (occlusion) and move along part of the tube length forcing fluid to move inside of the tube in the same direction of the ball bearings. When the ball bearing rolls off the area occupied by the microfluidic channel, its walls and ceiling undergo restitution and a pocket of low pressure is briefly formed pulling more of the liquid into the pump system. Before looking to standardize the pump systems it must be known how the tension placed by the pumps bearing heads onto the PDMS inserts channels affect the pumps performance (mainly the flow rate produced). The relationship of the speed at which the bearings on the motor head spin and the flow rate must also be established. This research produced calibration curves for flow rate vs. tension and rpm. These calibration curves allow the devices to be set to optimal user settings by simply varying either the motor head tension or the motor head speed. I would like to acknowledge the help and support of Vanderbilt University SyBBURE program, Christina Marasco, Stacy Sherod, Franck Block and Krista McBride.

  5. An environmental rating for heat pump equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.

    1992-10-01

    The major federal and state regulatory trends that may affect heat pump markets are reviewed. Then the confluence of federal and state regulation, and what it may mean for heat pump markets, is discussed. The conclusion reached, and therefore the assumption for the rest of the paper, is that state regulators will increasingly be managing the environmental impacts associated with alternative heating, cooling, and water heating methods within the framework of Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The input needs of IRP are reviewed, and some shortcomings of existing rating procedures for providing the IRP inputs are identified. Finally, the paper concludes with a brief suggestion on course of action.

  6. Recycle Rate in a Pulsed, Optically Pumped Rubidium Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Wooddy S.; Sulham, Clifford V.; Holtgrave, Jeremy C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A pulsed, optically pumped rubidium laser operating in analogy to the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) system at pump intensities as high as 750 kW/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated with output energies of up to 13 {mu}J/pulse. Output energy is dramatically limited by spin-orbit relaxation rates under these high intensity pump conditions. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume, requiring a high number of cycles per atom during the 2-8 ns duration of the pump pulse. At 550 Torr of ethane, the spin-orbit relaxation rate is too slow to effectively utilize all the incident pump photons. Indeed, a linear dependence of output energy on pump pulse duration for fixed pump energy is demonstrated.

  7. Neutral pumping rates for a next step tokamak ignition device

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Heifetz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Neutral pumping rates are calculated for pump-limiter and divertor options of a next step tokamak ignition device using a method that accounts for the coupled effects of neutral transport and plasma transport. For both pump limiters and divertors the plasma flow into the channel surrounding the neutralizer plate is greatly reduced by the neutral recycling. The fraction of this flow that is pumped can be large (>50%) but in general is dependent on the particular geometry and plasma conditions. It is estimated that pumping speeds greater than or approximately 10/sup 5/ L/s are adequate for the exhaust requirements in the pump-limiter and the divertor cases.

  8. Variable-Rate Pumping Test Analysis for Aquifer Parameter Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, K. H.; Mishra, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    The most common method to infer aquifer properties is based on analysis of drawdown and/or recovery data recorded from pumping tests. The analysis is frequently based on fitting observed pressure responses to appropriate analytical solutions for radial flow towards the pumping well. For mathematical simplicity, analytical solutions are commonly derived for constant-rate pumping conditions. However, often times the pumping rate during the test is varied either intentionally or due to technical difficulties during the test. Using principles of superposition, the constant-rate analytical solutions are frequently applied to analyze pumping tests that are conducted with variable pumping rates. In this study, we propose a novel methodology that approximates a time-varying pumping history as a series of segments with linearly varying pumping rates, and use it to evaluate the effects of pumping variation on aquifer parameter estimation. Our approach is demonstrated using existing analytical solutions for confined aquifers (Mishra and Neuman 2011), but it is also applicable to unconfined and/or leaky aquifers. The methodology is validated using a synthetic pumping test. We also apply our methodology to analyze the pumping test data by inversely estimating the apparent aquifer parameters using the code MADS (http://ees.lanl.gov/staff/monty/codes/mads).

  9. On simulation and analysis of variable-rate pumping tests.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Phoolendra Kumar; Vessilinov, Velimir; Gupta, Hoshin

    2013-01-01

    Analytical solutions for constant-rate pumping tests are widely used to infer aquifer properties. In this note, we implement a methodology that approximates the time-varying pumping record as a series of segments with linearly varying pumping rates. We validate our approach using an analytical solution for a sinusoidally varying pumping test. We also apply our methodology to analyze synthetic test data and compare the results with those from a commonly used method where rate variations are represented by a series of constant-rate steps.

  10. Optimized System to Improve Pumping Rate Stability During Aquifer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. H.; Rasmussen, T. C.; Lyons, C.; Pennell, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties are commonly estimated using aquifer tests, which are based on an assumption of a uniform and constant pumping rate. Uncertainties in the flow rate across the borehole-formation interface can be caused by rapid changes in borehole water levels early in an aquifer test, increasing the dynamic head losses. A system is presented that substantially reduces these sources of uncertainty by explicitly accounting for dynamic head losses. The system optimizes the flow rate at the borehole-formation interface, lending it suitable for any type of aquifer test, including constant, step, or ramped withdrawal and injection, as well as sinusoidal. The system was demonstrated for both withdrawal and injection tests in three aquifers at the Savannah River Site. It employs commonly available components (e.g., datalogger, pressure transducers, a variable-speed pump motor, a flow controller, and flow meters), and is inexpensive, highly mobile, and easily set up. No modifications to the control system were required, though a small number of characteristics of the pumping and monitoring system were added to the operating program. The pumping system provided a statistically-significant, constant flow rate with time. The range in pumping variability (95 percent CI) was from +/-0.0041 gpm to +/-0.0144 gpm, across a wide range in field conditions. Additional analyses show that errors in early time pumping rates cause errors in aquifer property estimates, and that optimizing the pumping rates would provide a more error-free data set for estimating aquifer hydraulic properties.

  11. Optimized system to improve pumping rate stability during aquifer tests.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael H; Rasmussen, Todd C; Lyons, F Comer; Pennell, Kurt D

    2002-01-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties are commonly estimated using aquifer tests, which are based on an assumption of a uniform and constant pumping rate. Substantial uncertainties in the flow rate across the borehole-formation interface can be induced by dynamic head losses, caused by rapid changes in borehole water levels early in an aquifer test. A system is presented that substantially reduces these sources of uncertainty by explicitly accounting for dynamic head losses. The system which employs commonly available components (including a datalogger, pressure transducers, a variable-speed pump motor, a flow controller, and flowmeters), is inexpensive, highly mobile, and easily set up. It optimizes the flow rate at the borehole-formation interface, making it suitable for any type of aquifer test, including constant, step, or ramped withdrawal and injection, as well as sinusoidal. The system was demonstrated for both withdrawal and injection tests in three aquifers at the Savannah River Site. No modifications to the control system were required, although a small number of characteristics of the pumping and monitoring system were added to the operating program. The pumping system provided a statistically significant, constant flow rate with time. The range in pumping variability (95% confidence interval) was from +/- 2.58 x 10(-4) L/sec to +/- 9.07 x 10(-4) L/sec, across a wide range in field and aquifer conditions.

  12. Nonlinear Flow Rate Response to Pumping Frequency and Reduced Hemolysis in the Drastically Under-Occluded Pulsatile Roller Pump.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Lai, Chang Quan; Loh, Ivan Guang Hui; Ong, Thaddaeus Zhongren

    2017-02-01

    Roller pumps are widely used in many medical procedures including cardiopulmonary bypass, left/right ventricular assist, and hemodialysis. However, to date, the problem of the roller pumping mechanism causing significant hemolysis remains unresolved. It has been shown that with under-occlusion of the roller pump, hemolysis can be reduced, but significant reduction of the mean flow rate also takes place due to backflow through the under-occlusion. We performed an investigation of the flow dynamics of an under-occluded roller pump which featured significantly higher amount of under-occlusion than previously investigated. Our results showed that the mean flow rate produced by the pump has a strong, nonlinear dependence on pumping frequency. Mean flow rate generally increases with the pumping frequency and the degree of maximum occlusion except at certain frequencies where sharp reductions were observed. These frequencies coincide with the fundamental frequency of the system and its harmonics, bearing resemblance to the impedance pump, suggesting that the drastically under-occluded roller pump is a unique device that employs the pumping mechanisms of both roller pumping and impedance pumping. At the appropriate frequencies, this under-occluded roller pump could sustain sufficiently high flow rates for clinical uses. Blood damage potential of the under-occluded roller pump was compared to a fully occluded roller pump via the assay of free-plasma hemoglobin, and it was found that the under-occlusion reduced hemolysis by about half for any given flow rate. The drastically under-occluded roller pumping reported in this study, therefore, has the potential of being translated into an improved clinical blood pump.

  13. High Repetition Rate Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser operating at 18.9 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-05-11

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo X-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a pre-determined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The high efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  14. Electronic flow rate controller for a portable insulin infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R T; Zinman, B; Marliss, E B; Albisser, A M

    1980-01-01

    An electronic controller is described that regulates the flow of infusate by controlling the fraction of time that a pump is energized. Using the integral programming capability of the device, any one of 256 possible basal rates between 0 and 49.6% of the maximum rate can be chosen. An externally triggerable single meal-associated pulse can also be configured. The rate during the meal pulse can be any one of the 255 equally spaced rates in the range of 0--99.7%. The duration of this pulse can be chosen in 3-min steps to a maximum of 12.75 h, after which the rate automatically returns to the basal value. The controller consumes a minimum amount of power and can continuously operate a dc motor-driven pump at 3.0 V for 36 h. It drives the pump in an on-off mode in order to control the average flow rate digitally. In this way a significant reduction in the power requirements is realized and the system can be run for many days using small rechargeable batteries. One year of experience with 20 of these controllers was obtained in the research laboratory and clinical investigation unit. The results of this experience indicated the reliability and precision of these controllers, gave insight into their modes of failure, and provided valuable biomedical data for their improvement.

  15. Fiber-based modulated optical reflectance configuration allowing for offset pump and probe beams.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A; Folsom, C; Jensen, C; Ban, H

    2016-12-01

    A new fiber-based modulated optical reflectance configuration is developed in this work. The technique maintains the fiber-based heating laser (pump) and detection laser (probe) in close proximity at a fixed separation distance in a ceramic ferrule. The pump beam periodically heats the sample inducing thermal waves into the sample. The probe beam measures the temperature response at a known distance from the pump beam over a range of heating modulation frequencies. The thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated from the phase response between the input heat flux and the temperature response of a sample having a reflective surface. The unique measurement configuration is ideal for in situ measurements and has many advantages for laboratory-based systems. The design and development of the system are reported along with theoretical justification for the experimental design. The thermal diffusivities of Ge and SiC are measured and found to be within 10% of reported literature values. The diffusivity for SiO2 is measured with a relative difference of approximately 100% from the literature value when the ferrule is in contact with the sample. An additional measurement was made on the SiO2 sample with the ferrule not in contact resulting in a difference of less than 2% from the literature value. The difference in the SiO2 measurement when the ferrule is in contact with the sample is likely due to a parallel heat transfer path through the dual-fiber ferrule assembly.

  16. Fiber-based modulated optical reflectance configuration allowing for offset pump and probe beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, A.; Folsom, C.; Jensen, C.; Ban, H.

    2016-12-01

    A new fiber-based modulated optical reflectance configuration is developed in this work. The technique maintains the fiber-based heating laser (pump) and detection laser (probe) in close proximity at a fixed separation distance in a ceramic ferrule. The pump beam periodically heats the sample inducing thermal waves into the sample. The probe beam measures the temperature response at a known distance from the pump beam over a range of heating modulation frequencies. The thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated from the phase response between the input heat flux and the temperature response of a sample having a reflective surface. The unique measurement configuration is ideal for in situ measurements and has many advantages for laboratory-based systems. The design and development of the system are reported along with theoretical justification for the experimental design. The thermal diffusivities of Ge and SiC are measured and found to be within 10% of reported literature values. The diffusivity for SiO2 is measured with a relative difference of approximately 100% from the literature value when the ferrule is in contact with the sample. An additional measurement was made on the SiO2 sample with the ferrule not in contact resulting in a difference of less than 2% from the literature value. The difference in the SiO2 measurement when the ferrule is in contact with the sample is likely due to a parallel heat transfer path through the dual-fiber ferrule assembly.

  17. Quantification of Na+,K+ pumps and their transport rate in skeletal muscle: functional significance.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben

    2013-10-01

    During excitation, muscle cells gain Na(+) and lose K(+), leading to a rise in extracellular K(+) ([K(+)]o), depolarization, and loss of excitability. Recent studies support the idea that these events are important causes of muscle fatigue and that full use of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (also known as the Na(+),K(+) pump) is often essential for adequate clearance of extracellular K(+). As a result of their electrogenic action, Na(+),K(+) pumps also help reverse depolarization arising during excitation, hyperkalemia, and anoxia, or from cell damage resulting from exercise, rhabdomyolysis, or muscle diseases. The ability to evaluate Na(+),K(+)-pump function and the capacity of the Na(+),K(+) pumps to fill these needs require quantification of the total content of Na(+),K(+) pumps in skeletal muscle. Inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-pump activity, or a decrease in their content, reduces muscle contractility. Conversely, stimulation of the Na(+),K(+)-pump transport rate or increasing the content of Na(+),K(+) pumps enhances muscle excitability and contractility. Measurements of [(3)H]ouabain binding to skeletal muscle in vivo or in vitro have enabled the reproducible quantification of the total content of Na(+),K(+) pumps in molar units in various animal species, and in both healthy people and individuals with various diseases. In contrast, measurements of 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphatase activity associated with the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase may show inconsistent results. Measurements of Na(+) and K(+) fluxes in intact isolated muscles show that, after Na(+) loading or intense excitation, all the Na(+),K(+) pumps are functional, allowing calculation of the maximum Na(+),K(+)-pumping capacity, expressed in molar units/g muscle/min. The activity and content of Na(+),K(+) pumps are regulated by exercise, inactivity, K(+) deficiency, fasting, age, and several hormones and pharmaceuticals. Studies on the α-subunit isoforms of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase have detected a relative increase in their

  18. 40 CFR 74.23 - 1985 Allowable SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.23 1985 Allowable SO2 emissions rate. (a) Data requirements. (1) The designated representative of the combustion source shall... data: (i) Allowable SO2 emissions rate of the combustion source expressed in lbs/mmBtu as defined...

  19. 40 CFR 74.24 - Current allowable SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Current allowable SO2 emissions rate... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.24 Current allowable SO2 emissions rate. The designated representative shall submit the following data: (a)...

  20. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. 78 FR 77670 - Zero Rate Reactive Power Rate Schedules; Notice Allowing Post-Workshop Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Comments On December 11, 2013, a Commission staff-led workshop explored the mechanics of filing reactive... written comments focused on the mechanics of filing reactive power rate schedules for which there is...

  2. On dimensionless parameters for generalization pressure head and flow rate characteristics of centrifugal disk pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, I. E.; Prikhodko, Yu. M.; Chekhov, V. P.; Fomichev, V. P.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental study was performed for operation of a centrifugal disk pump at atmospheric air pressure. The dimensionless parameters were developed for generalization of experimental data on flow rate and head of the pump. The method for calculation of a pumping curve and throttling characteristic was offered through use of semiemperical generalization formulas. The method ensures a good accuracy in calculations, which is proved by comparison of calculation and experimental data for the pump tested.

  3. 78 FR 75483 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances; Commuted Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ...] RIN 3090-AJ40 Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances; Commuted Rate AGENCY: Office of...-117.225 and Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) section 302-7, subpart B. Both of these regulations were... rate shipments. Revises section 302-7.102 to direct the reader to use the tariffs filed with GSA...

  4. 47 CFR 65.700 - Determining the maximum allowable rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determining the maximum allowable rate of return. 65.700 Section 65.700 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES...

  5. 76 FR 48863 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Standard Mileage Rate for Moving Purposes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances--Standard Mileage Rate for Moving Purposes... bulletin. SUMMARY: The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Standard Mileage Rate for moving purposes is the...

  6. High-Repetition-Rate Grazing-Incidence Pumped X-Ray Laser Operating at 18.9 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, R.; Dunn, J.; Patel, P. K.; Price, D. F.; Smith, R. F.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.

    2005-03-01

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing-incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a predetermined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The higher coupling efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and close to saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  7. Stable pumping rates for horizontal wells in bank filtration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Erik I.

    2013-04-01

    We consider common bank filtration systems and develop an explicit analytic solution representing steady, two-dimensional, groundwater flow to a horizontal well near a river in an unconfined aquifer. For the boundary-value problem investigated, we find that a unique solution exists for all negative well discharges. For positive discharges, a maximum value exists which corresponds to the formation of a cusp on the free surface. For positive discharges less than the maximum, the solution is not unique, consisting of two alternate configurations of the free surface. One solution includes a stable free surface on a single-valued physical plane, while the alternate solution includes a looped free surface lying on two sheets of a Riemann surface. Imposing a stability condition on the free surface results in a unique solution to the problem. We use the solution to investigate the behavior of the free surface under varying well discharges to identify stable pumping rates and predict well yield. In particular, we examine the well yield and the stability of the free surface when the head in the horizontal well is maintained at the top of the well screen. This condition is shown to produce a stable free surface for a wide range of well radii; the stability is independent of the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer, the location of the well, or the presence of a skin resistance at the well.

  8. Influence of the radius of the leading edge of worm vanes on the critical cavitation allowance of a pump

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbatenko, I.V.; Khankin, V.P.

    1982-11-01

    This paper theoretically and experimentally investigates the influence of the cylindrical (curved) leading edge of the worm vanes on the cavitation characteristics of the pump. Considers the disruptive flow around the worm wheel with a constant screw spacing (pitch) of an ideal liquid flow. The proposed equations, verified on pumps with worms of different types and sizes with a wide range of attack angles, can be used for the calculation of the sucking capacity of high-speed worm centrifugal pumps.

  9. Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Abdul.Hye, A.B.M.

    1983-10-25

    A pump for injecting chemicals into a well employs a pivot arm for synchronous movement with a well pump. The pivot arm causes reciprocation of a plunger within the body of the chemical pump. The plunger, during its upward stroke causes the entry of chemicals from an outside source into the pump body and, during its downward stroke, causes the exiting of the chemicals into the well. (2 claims.

  10. Assessment of increased sampling pump flow rates in a disposable, inhalable aerosol sampler.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Justin; Sleeth, Darrah K; Handy, Rod G; Pahler, Leon F; Anthony, T Renee; Volckens, John

    2017-03-01

    A newly designed, low-cost, disposable inhalable aerosol sampler was developed to assess workers personal exposure to inhalable particles. This sampler was originally designed to operate at 10 L/min to increase sample mass and, therefore, improve analytical detection limits for filter-based methods. Computational fluid dynamics modeling revealed that sampler performance (relative to aerosol inhalability criteria) would not differ substantially at sampler flows of 2 and 10 L/min. With this in mind, the newly designed inhalable aerosol sampler was tested in a wind tunnel, simultaneously, at flows of 2 and 10 L/min flow. A mannequin was equipped with 6 sampler/pump assemblies (three pumps operated at 2 L/min and three pumps at 10 L/min) inside a wind tunnel, operated at 0.2 m/s, which has been shown to be a typical indoor workplace wind speed. In separate tests, four different particle sizes were injected to determine if the sampler's performance with the new 10 L/min flow rate significantly differed to that at 2 L/min. A comparison between inhalable mass concentrations using a Wilcoxon signed rank test found no significant difference in the concentration of particles sampled at 10 and 2 L/min for all particle sizes tested. Our results suggest that this new aerosol sampler is a versatile tool that can improve exposure assessment capabilities for the practicing industrial hygienist by improving the limit of detection and allowing for shorting sampling times.

  11. Do associated microbial abundances impact marine demosponge pumping rates and tissue densities?

    PubMed

    Weisz, Jeremy B; Lindquist, Niels; Martens, Christopher S

    2008-03-01

    The evolution of marine demosponges has led to two basic life strategies: one involving close associations with large and diverse communities of microorganisms, termed high microbial abundance (HMA) species, and one that is essentially devoid of associated microorganisms, termed low microbial abundance (LMA) species. This dichotomy has previously been suggested to correlate with morphological differences, with HMA species having a denser mesohyl and a more complex aquiferous systems composed of longer and narrower water canals that should necessitate slower seawater filtration rates. We measured mesohyl density for a variety of HMA and LMA sponges in the Florida Keys, and seawater pumping rates for a select group of these sponges using an in situ dye technique. HMA sponges were substantially denser than LMA species, and had per unit volume pumping rates 52-94% slower than the LMA sponges. These density and pumping rate differences suggest that evolutionary differences between HMA and LMA species may have resulted in profound morphological and physiological differences between the two groups. The LMA sponge body plan moves large quantities of water through their porous tissues allowing them to rapidly acquire the small particulate organic matter (POM) that supplies the majority of their nutritional needs. In contrast, the HMA sponge body plan is suited to host large and tightly packed communities of microorganisms and has an aquiferous system that increases contact time between seawater and the sponge/microbial consortium that feeds on POM, dissolved organic matter and the raw inorganic materials for chemolithotrophic sponge symbionts. The two evolutionary patterns represent different, but equally successful patterns and illustrate how associated microorganisms can potentially have substantial effects on host evolution.

  12. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart B of... - Places and Rates at Which Allowances Are Paid

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... coverage Allowance rate(percent) State of Alaska: City of Anchorage and 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius by road 23 City of Fairbanks and 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius by road 23 City of Juneau and 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius by road 23 Rest of the State 25 State of Hawaii: City and County of Honolulu...

  13. 5 CFR 591.104 - Higher initial maximum uniform allowance rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Higher initial maximum uniform allowance rate. 591.104 Section 591.104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE... initial year a new style or type of minimum basic uniform is required for a category of employees,...

  14. 10 kHz repetition rate solid-state dye laser pumped by diode-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, K. M.; Álvarez, M.; Costela, A.; García-Moreno, I.; García, O.; Sastre, R.; Coutts, D. W.; Webb, C. E.

    2003-04-01

    We describe the operation of an all solid-state pulsed dye laser of high repetition rate (10 kHz) pumped by a diode-pumped laser. Three different active media in the form of coin-sized disks were investigated: the dye rhodamine 6G doped in a copolymer of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) [Rh6G/P(MMA:HEMA)], and the dye pyrromethene 567 (PM567) doped in copolymers of MMA with pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) and with pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PETRA) [PM567/P(MMA:PETA) and PM567/P(MMA:PETRA)]. Pump radiation at 527nm was provided by a frequency-doubled diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser Q-switched at 10 kHz. Laser output was observed with an initial average power of 560 mW for Rh6G in P(MMA:HEMA), and with an initial average power of 430 mW for PM567 in P(MMA:PETRA) and 220 mW for PM567 in P(MMA:PETA). In the case of Rh6G/P(MMA:HEMA), the output decreased to about half the initial value after about 6.6 min (or about 4.0 million shots) due to dye degradation. The device constitutes a tunable, all solid-state, high repetition rate laser system possibly suitable for biomedical and dermatological applications.

  15. Pumping Rate Study of a Left Ventricular Assist Device in a Mock Circulatory System.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Yang, Ming; Xu, Liang; Ou, Wenchu; Xu, Zihao; Meng, Fan; Huang, Huan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the hemodynamic influence of the change of pump rate on the cardiovascular system with consideration of heart rate and the resonant characteristics of the arterial system when a reliable synchronous triggering source is unavailable. Hemodynamic waveforms are recorded at baseline conditions and with the pump rate of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) at 55, 60, 66, and 70 beats per minute for four test conditions in a mock circulatory system. The total input work (TIW) and energy equivalent pressure (EEP) are calculated as metrics for evaluating the hemodynamic performance within different test conditions. Experimental results show that TIW and EEP achieve their maximum values, where the pump rate is equal to the heart rate. In addition, it demonstrates that TIW and EEP are significantly affected by changing pump rate of LVAD, especially when the pump rate is closing to the natural frequency of the arterial system. When a reliable synchronous triggering source is not available for LVAD, it is suggested that selecting a pump rate equal to the resonant frequency of the arterial system could achieve better supporting effects.

  16. P. falciparum in vitro killing rates allow to discriminate between different antimalarial mode-of-action.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Laura M; Crespo, Benigno; De-Cózar, Cristina; Ding, Xavier C; Llergo, Jose L; Burrows, Jeremy N; García-Bustos, Jose F; Gamo, Francisco-Javier

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is still the cornerstone for malaria control. Developing drugs against Plasmodium parasites and monitoring their efficacy requires methods to accurately determine the parasite killing rate in response to treatment. Commonly used techniques essentially measure metabolic activity as a proxy for parasite viability. However, these approaches are susceptible to artefacts, as viability and metabolism are two parameters that are coupled during the parasite life cycle but can be differentially affected in response to drug actions. Moreover, traditional techniques do not allow to measure the speed-of-action of compounds on parasite viability, which is an essential efficacy determinant. We present here a comprehensive methodology to measure in vitro the direct effect of antimalarial compounds over the parasite viability, which is based on limiting serial dilution of treated parasites and re-growth monitoring. This methodology allows to precisely determine the killing rate of antimalarial compounds, which can be quantified by the parasite reduction ratio and parasite clearance time, which are key mode-of-action parameters. Importantly, we demonstrate that this technique readily permits to determine compound killing activities that might be otherwise missed by traditional, metabolism-based techniques. The analysis of a large set of antimalarial drugs reveals that this viability-based assay allows to discriminate compounds based on their antimalarial mode-of-action. This approach has been adapted to perform medium throughput screening, facilitating the identification of fast-acting antimalarial compounds, which are crucially needed for the control and possibly the eradication of malaria.

  17. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  18. Syringe-pump-induced fluctuation in all-aqueous microfluidic system implications for flow rate accuracy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zida; Mak, Sze Yi; Sauret, Alban; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-02-21

    We report a new method to display the minute fluctuations induced by syringe pumps on microfluidic flows by using a liquid-liquid system with an ultralow interfacial tension. We demonstrate that the stepper motor inside the pump is a source of fluctuations in microfluidic flows by comparing the frequencies of the ripples observed at the interface to that of the pulsation of the stepper motor. We also quantify the fluctuations induced at different flow rates, using syringes of different diameters, and using different syringe pumps with different advancing distances per step. Our work provides a way to predict the frequency of the fluctuation that the driving syringe pump induces on a microfluidic system and suggests that syringe pumps can be a source of fluctuations in microfluidic flows, thus contributing to the polydispersity of the resulting droplets.

  19. High power high repetition rate VCSEL array side-pumped pulsed blue laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert; Zhao, Pu; Chen, Tong; Xu, Bing; Watkins, Laurence; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High power, kW-class, 808 nm pump modules based on the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology were developed for side-pumping of solid-state lasers. Two 1.2 kW VCSEL pump modules were implemented in a dual side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. The laser output was frequency doubled in a BBO crystal to produce pulsed blue light. With 125 μs pump pulses at a 300 Hz repetition rate 6.1 W QCW 946 nm laser power was produced. The laser power was limited by thermal lensing in the Nd:YAG rod.

  20. Relative Contributions of Geothermal Pumping and Long-Term Earthquake Rate to Seismicity at California Geothermal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, D. A.; Jackson, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In a tectonically active area, a definitive discrimination between geothermally-induced and tectonic earthquakes is difficult to achieve. We focus our study on California's 11 major geothermal fields: Amedee, Brawley, Casa Diablo, Coso, East Mesa, The Geysers, Heber, Litchfield, Salton Sea, Susanville, and Wendel. The Geysers geothermal field is the world's largest geothermal energy producer. California's Department of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources provides field-wide monthly injection and production volumes for each of these sites, which allows us to study the relationship between geothermal pumping activities and seismicity. Since many of the geothermal fields began injecting and producing before nearby seismic stations were installed, we use smoothed seismicity since 1932 from the ANSS catalog as a proxy for tectonic earthquake rate. We examine both geothermal pumping and long-term earthquake rate as factors that may control earthquake rate. Rather than focusing only on the largest earthquake, which is essentially a random occurrence in time, we examine how M≥4 earthquake rate density (probability per unit area, time, and magnitude) varies for each field. We estimate relative contributions to the observed earthquake rate of M≥4 from both a long-term earthquake rate (Kagan and Jackson, 2010) and pumping activity. For each geothermal field, respective earthquake catalogs (NCEDC and SCSN) are complete above at least M3 during the test period (which we tailor to each site). We test the hypothesis that the observed earthquake rate at a geothermal site during the test period is a linear combination of the long-term seismicity and pumping rates. We use a grid search to determine the confidence interval of the weighting parameters.

  1. A study on energy saving rate for variable speed condition of multistage centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sang-Ho; Rakibuzzaman; Kim, Kyung-Wuk; Kim, Hyoung-Ho; Yoon, In Sik; Cho, Min-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being widely used in many industrial and commercial applications. Many of these pumps are being operated at constant speed but could provide energy savings through adjustable speed operations. The purpose of this study was to get the energy saving rates of the multistage centrifugal pump with variable speed conditions. For this investigation an experimental set up of variable flow and pressure system was made to get energy saving rates and numerical analyses are applied to validate the pump performance. The energy saving and therefore the cost saving depends on the specific duty cycle of which the machine operates. Duty cycle is the proportion of time during which a component, device and system is operated. The duty cycle segmented into different flow rates and weighting the average value for each segment by the interval time. The system was operated at 50% or less of the pump capacity. The input power of the system was carried out by pump characteristics curve of each operating point. The energy consumption was done by the product of specific duty cycle and the input power of the system for constant speed and variable speed drive operation. The total energy consumed for constant speed drive pump was 75,770 kW.hr and for variable speed drive pump was 31,700 kW.hr. The total energy saving of the system was 44,070 kW.hr or 58.16% annually. So, this paper suggests a method of implementing an energy saving on variable-flow and pressure system of the multistage centrifugal pump.

  2. Study of application rates of aerosol and pump hair sprays. Final report, July 1986-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, R.R.; Belmont, B.

    1988-03-11

    Application rates of three hair spray dispensing systems, aerosol, pump, and Exxel packaging were determined through a six-week user panel of approximately 300 people. In addition, photochemically reactive organic compounds (PROC) application rates were determined through chemical analysis of the products. The user panel was stratified on the basis of sex, dispenser (pump/aerosol), and age (adult/teen). Weighted-application rates and weighted PROC application rates are included. A Mann-Whitney evaluation was made to evaluate differences between data sets. Product-usage data for both male and female adult groups support the conclusion that increased use of either pumps or Exxel packaging for hair spray would reduce PROC emissions in California. Data from adult groups also indicate that use of Exxel packaging in place of pumps would not reduce PROC. Consumer preference was also sampled. Adult pump users were not very willing to switch to aerosols, but on the order of half of aerosol users were willing to switch to pumps.

  3. Rate-distortion optimal video transport over IP allowing packets with bit errors.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Oztan; Tekalp, A Murat

    2007-05-01

    We propose new models and methods for rate-distortion (RD) optimal video delivery over IP, when packets with bit errors are also delivered. In particular, we propose RD optimal methods for slicing and unequal error protection (UEP) of packets over IP allowing transmission of packets with bit errors. The proposed framework can be employed in a classical independent-layer transport model for optimal slicing, as well as in a cross-layer transport model for optimal slicing and UEP, where the forward error correction (FEC) coding is performed at the link layer, but the application controls the FEC code rate with the constraint that a given IP packet is subject to constant channel protection. The proposed method uses a novel dynamic programming approach to determine the optimal slicing and UEP configuration for each video frame in a practical manner, that is compliant with the AVC/H.264 standard. We also propose new rate and distortion estimation techniques at the encoder side in order to efficiently evaluate the objective function for a slice configuration. The cross-layer formulation option effectively determines which regions of a frame should be protected better; hence, it can be considered as a spatial UEP scheme. We successfully demonstrate, by means of experimental results, that each component of the proposed system provides significant gains, up to 2.0 dB, compared to competitive methods.

  4. Design and optimization of a large flow rate booster pump in SWRO energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Z. N.; Wu, P.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) is a high energy-consumption industry, so energy efficiency is an important issue. Energy recovery systems, which contain a pressure exchanger and a booster pump, are widely used in SWRO plants. As a key part of energy recovery system, the difficulty of designing booster pumps lies in high inlet pressure, high medium causticity and large flow rate. High inlet pressure adds difficulties to seal design, and large flow rate and high efficiency requirement bring high demand for hydraulic design. In this paper, a 625 m3/h booster pump is designed and optimized according to the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation results. The impeller and volute is well designed, a new type of high pressure mechanical seal is applied and axial force is well balanced. After optimization based on blade redesign, the efficiency of the pump was improved. The best efficiency reaches more than 85% at design point according to the CFD simulation result.

  5. Estimation of Distributed Groundwater Pumping Rates in Yolo County,CA—Intercomparison of Two Modeling Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maples, S.; Fogg, G. E.; Harter, T.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of groundwater (GW) budgets and effective management of agricultural GW pumping remains a challenge in much of California's Central Valley (CV) due to a lack of irrigation well metering. CVHM and C2VSim are two regional-scale integrated hydrologic models that provide estimates of historical and current CV distributed pumping rates. However, both models estimate GW pumping using conceptually different agricultural water models with uncertainties that have not been adequately investigated. Here, we evaluate differences in distributed agricultural GW pumping and recharge estimates related to important differences in the conceptual framework and model assumptions used to simulate surface water (SW) and GW interaction across the root zone. Differences in the magnitude and timing of GW pumping and recharge were evaluated for a subregion (~1000 mi2) coincident with Yolo County, CA, to provide similar initial and boundary conditions for both models. Synthetic, multi-year datasets of land-use, precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), and SW deliveries were prescribed for each model to provide realistic end-member scenarios for GW-pumping demand and recharge. Results show differences in the magnitude and timing of GW-pumping demand, deep percolation, and recharge. Discrepancies are related, in large part, to model differences in the estimation of ET requirements and representation of soil-moisture conditions. CVHM partitions ET demand, while C2VSim uses a bulk ET rate, resulting in differences in both crop-water and GW-pumping demand. Additionally, CVHM assumes steady-state soil-moisture conditions, and simulates deep percolation as a function of irrigation inefficiencies, while C2VSim simulates deep percolation as a function of transient soil-moisture storage conditions. These findings show that estimates of GW-pumping demand are sensitive to these important conceptual differences, which can impact conjunctive-use water management decisions in the CV.

  6. Minimally allowed beta beata 0_nu rates from approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James

    2008-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is the only realistic probe of Majorana neutrinos. In the standard scenario, dominated by light neutrino exchange, the process amplitude is proportional to m{sub ee} , the e - e element of the Majorana mass matrix. This is expected to hold true for small {beta}{beta}{nu} rates ({Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}}), even in the presence of new physics. Naively, current data allows for vanishing m{sub ee} , but this should be protected by an appropriate flavor symmetry. All such symmetries lead to mass matrices inconsistent with oscillation phenomenology. Hence, Majorana neutrinos imply nonzero {Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}}. I perform a spurion analysis to break all possible abelian symmetries that guarantee {Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}} = 0 and search for minimally allowed m{sub ee} values. Specifically, I survey 259 broken structures to yield m{sub ee} values and current phenomenological constraints under a variety of scenarios. This analysis also extracts predictions for both neutrino oscillation parameters and kinematic quantities. Assuming reasonable tuning levels, I find that m{sub ee} > 4 x 10{sup -6} eV at 99% confidence. Bounds below this value would indicate the Dirac neutrino nature or the existence of new light (eV-MeV scale) degrees of freedom that can potentially be probed elsewhere. This limit can be raised by improvements in neutrino parameter measurements, particularly of the reactor mixing angle, depending on the best fit parameter values. Such improvements will also significantly constrain the available model space and aid in future constructions.

  7. New hysteroscopy pump to monitor real-time rate of fluid intravasation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Kumar, Alka

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the benefit of monitoring the intravasation rate in addition to the conventional measurement of fluid deficit in hysteroscopic surgical procedures. The intravasation rate is the rate, in milliliters per minute, at which fluid enters the systemic circulation, whereas fluid deficit is the amount of irrigation fluid, in milliliters, already absorbed by the patient. To determine the intravasation rate, a manually operated intravasation monitoring pump was constructed, with which one of us (Dr. Atul Kumar) performed 966 hysteroscopic procedures from May 1993 to February 2010. Because the intravasation rate had to be manually calculated by an assistant, it was decided to replace the assistant with a controller to monitor intravasation rate. The surgical experience gathered from the manually operated pump was used to develop algorithms for the controller. The controller-operated intravasation monitoring pump was constructed, with which 41 hysteroscopic procedures were performed from March 2010 to August 2011. In hysteroscopic procedures, this pump simultaneously displays the real-time intravasation rate and the fluid deficit on an LCD screen.

  8. High-power, high repetition-rate, green-pumped, picosecond LBO optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Florian; Teh, Peh Siong; Lin, Dejiao; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Price, Jonathan H V; Hanna, D C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2012-03-26

    We report on a picosecond, green-pumped, lithium triborate optical parametric oscillator with record-high output power. It was synchronously pumped by a frequency-doubled (530 nm), pulse-compressed (4.4 ps), high-repetition-rate (230 MHz), fiber-amplified gain-switched laser diode. For a pump power of 17 W, a maximum signal and idler power of 3.7 W and 1.8 W was obtained from the optical parametric oscillator. A signal pulse duration of ~3.2 ps was measured and wide tunability from 651 nm to 1040 nm for the signal and from 1081 nm to 2851 nm for the idler was achieved.

  9. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria allow reduced application rates of chemical fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Adesemoye, A O; Torbert, H A; Kloepper, J W

    2009-11-01

    The search for microorganisms that improve soil fertility and enhance plant nutrition has continued to attract attention due to the increasing cost of fertilizers and some of their negative environmental impacts. The objectives of this greenhouse study with tomato were to determine (1) if reduced rates of inorganic fertilizer coupled with microbial inoculants will produce plant growth, yield, and nutrient uptake levels equivalent to those with full rates of the fertilizer and (2) the minimum level to which fertilizer could be reduced when inoculants were used. The microbial inoculants used in the study were a mixture of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains Bacillus amyloliquefaciens IN937a and Bacillus pumilus T4, a formulated PGPR product, and the arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF), Glomus intraradices. Results showed that supplementing 75% of the recommended fertilizer rate with inoculants produced plant growth, yield, and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) uptake that were statistically equivalent to the full fertilizer rate without inoculants. When inoculants were used with rates of fertilizer below 75% of the recommended rate, the beneficial effects were usually not consistent; however, inoculation with the mixture of PGPR and AMF at 70% fertility consistently produced the same yield as the full fertility rate without inoculants. Without inoculants, use of fertilizer rates lower than the recommended resulted in significantly less plant growth, yield, and nutrient uptake or inconsistent impacts. The results suggest that PGPR-based inoculants can be used and should be further evaluated as components of integrated nutrient management strategies.

  10. A compact cryogenic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Caldwell, Shane; Clark, Jason A.; Gulick, Sidney; Hecht, Adam; Lascar, Daniel D.; Levand, Tony; Morgan, Graeme; Orford, Rodney; Savard, Guy; Sharma, Kumar S.; Van Schelt, Jonathon

    2016-04-01

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been designed at Argonne National Laboratory to circulate liquid nitrogen (LN2) in a closed circuit allowing the recovery of excess fluid. The pump can circulate LN2 at rates of 2-10 L/min, into a head of 0.5-3 m. Over four years of laboratory use the pump has proven capable of operating continuously for 50-100 days without maintenance.

  11. Analysis of the flow rate characteristics of valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Wang, Shouyin; Liu, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    Microchannel heat sink with high heat transfer coefficients has been extensively investigated due to its wide application prospective in electronic cooling. However, this cooling system requires a separate pump to drive the fluid transfer, which is uneasy to minimize and reduces their reliability and applicability of the whole system. In order to avoid these problems, valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes is proposed. Fractal-like Y-shape branching tube used in microchannel heat sinks is exploited as no-moving-part valve of the valveless piezoelectric pump. In order to obtain flow characteristics of the pump, the relationship between tube structure and flow rate of the pump is studied. Specifically, the flow resistances of fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes and flow rate of the pump are analyzed by using fractal theory. Then, finite element software is employed to simulate the flow field of the tube, and the relationships between pressure drop and flow rate along merging and dividing flows are obtained. Finally, valveless piezoelectric pumps with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes with different fractal dimensions of diameter distribution are fabricated, and flow rate experiment is conducted. The experimental results show that the flow rate of the pump increases with the rise of fractal dimension of the tube diameter. When fractal dimension is 3, the maximum flow rate of the valveless pump is 29.16 mL/min under 100 V peak to peak (13 Hz) power supply, which reveals the relationship between flow rate and fractal dimensions of tube diameter distribution. This paper investigates the flow characteristics of valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes, which provides certain references for valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes in application on electronic chip cooling.

  12. The appropriate threshold for declaring linkage when allowing sex-specific recombination rates.

    PubMed Central

    Lander, E S; Lincoln, S E

    1988-01-01

    In human genetics, two loci are declared to be linked when the lod score at the maximum likelihood recombination fraction theta exceeds the threshold of 3.0. Since recombination rates differ between the sexes, one can alternatively detect linkage by estimating separate recombination rates, theta m and theta f, for male and female meiosis and examining the corresponding sex-specific lod scores. The question arises: In order to maintain the same chance of falsely declaring linkage, what is the correct threshold for declaring linkage when sex-specific lod scores are used? We show here that the appropriate threshold is about 3.5. If the restriction that theta f greater than theta m is added, the appropriate threshold falls to about 3.25. We also discuss the relative efficiency of detecting linkage by using sex-specific and sex-averaged lod scores. PMID:3177382

  13. Automated Continuous Distraction Osteogenesis May Allow Faster Distraction Rates: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Zachary S.; Tricomi, Brad; Murphy, Brian; Magill, John; Kaban, Leonard B.; Troulis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if automated continuous distraction osteogenesis at rates > 1mm/day would result in clinical and radiographic bone formation in a minipig model. Materials and Methods An automated, continuous, curvilinear distraction device was placed across a mandibular osteotomy in 10 minipigs. After 12 mm of distraction and 24 days fixation, animals were sacrificed and bone healing evaluated. The continuous distraction rates were 1.5 (n=5) and 3 mm/day (n=5). A semiquantitative scale was used to assess ex-vivo clinical appearance of the distraction gap (3= osteotomy not visible; 2= <50%; 1= >50%; 0= 100% visible); stability (3 = no mobility; 2 and 1 = mobility in 2 or 1 plane respectively; 0= mobility in 3 planes); radiographic density (4 = 100% gap opaque, 3= >75%, 2 = 50% – 75%, 1= <50%, or 0 = radiolucent). Groups of 4 minipigs distracted discontinuously at 1, 2, and 4 mm/day served as controls. Results The continuous DO 1.5 mm/day group had significantly higher scores for appearance and radiographic density compared to the discontinuous 4 mm/day group. The continuous DO 3mm/day group had significantly higher scores for appearance and radiographic density compared to the discontinuous 4 mm/day group, and higher stability compared to the discontinuous 2 and 4 mm/day groups. Conclusions Results of this preliminary study indicate that continuous DO at rates of 1.5 and 3.0 mm/day produces better bone formation when compared to discontinuous DO at rates faster than 1mm/day. PMID:23499159

  14. On the probability of exceeding allowable leak rates through degraded steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cizelj, L.; Sorsek, I.; Riesch-Oppermann, H.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses some possible ways of predicting the behavior of the total leak rate through the damaged steam generator tubes. This failure mode is of special concern in cases where most through-wall defects may remain In operation. A particular example is the application of alternate (bobbin coil voltage) plugging criterion to Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking at the tube support plate intersections. It is the authors aim to discuss some possible modeling options that could be applied to solve the problem formulated as: Estimate the probability that the sum of all individual leak rates through degraded tubes exceeds the predefined acceptable value. The probabilistic approach is of course aiming at reliable and computationaly bearable estimate of the failure probability. A closed form solution is given for a special case of exponentially distributed individual leak rates. Also, some possibilities for the use of computationaly efficient First and Second Order Reliability Methods (FORM and SORM) are discussed. The first numerical example compares the results of approximate methods with closed form results. SORM in particular shows acceptable agreement. The second numerical example considers a realistic case of NPP in Krsko, Slovenia.

  15. Unsteady flow characteristic of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump under different flow-rate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Chen, Desheng; Xu, Wenjing; Jin, Yingzi; Zhu, Zuchao

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the unsteady flow characteristics in centrifugal pump, the flow field in a low-specific-speed centrifugal pump with complex impeller is numerically simulated under different conditions. The RNG κ-ɛ turbulence model and sliding mesh are adopted during the process of computation. The results show that the interaction between impeller and volute results in the unstable flow of the fluid, which causes the uneven distribution of pressure fluctuations around the circumference of volute. Besides the main frequency and its multiple frequency of pressure fluctuations in the centrifugal pump, the frequency caused by the long blades of complex impeller also plays a dominant role in the low-frequency areas. Furthermore, there exists biggish fluctuation phenomenon near the tongue. The composition of static pressure fluctuations frequency on the volute wall and blade outlet is similar except that the fluctuation amplitude near the volute wall reduces. In general, the different flow rates mainly have influence on the amplitude of fluctuation frequency in the pump, while have little effect on the frequency composition.

  16. Harmonically pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator with multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-12-26

    We report a multi-gigahertz (GHz) repetition-rate femtosecond MgO:PPLN optical parametric oscillator (OPO) harmonically pumped by a 75.6 MHz Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KGW laser. By fractionally increasing the OPO cavity length, we obtained OPO operation up to the 493rd harmonic of the pump laser repetition rate, corresponding to a repetition rate as high as 37.3 GHz. Using a 1.5% output coupler, we are able to extract signal pulses with up to 260 mW average power at the 102nd harmonic (7.7 GHz) and 90 mW at the 493rd harmonic (37.3 GHz) under 2 W pump power. The measured relative standard deviations of the fundamental and the 102nd harmonic signal power were recorded to be 0.5% and 2.1%, respectively. The signal pulse durations at different harmonics were measured in the range of 160-230 fs.

  17. Electromagnetically-Actuated Reciprocating Pump for High-Flow-Rate Microfluidic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ming-Tsun; Zhong, Jian-Hao; Lee, Chia-Yen

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an electromagnetically-actuated reciprocating pump for high-flow-rate microfluidic applications. The pump comprises four major components, namely a lower glass plate containing a copper microcoil, a middle PMMA plate incorporating a PDMS diaphragm with a surface-mounted magnet, upper PMMA channel plates, and a ball-type check valve located at the channel inlet. When an AC current is passed through the microcoil, an alternating electromagnetic force is established between the coil and the magnet. The resulting bi-directional deflection of the PDMS diaphragm causes the check-valve to open and close; thereby creating a pumping effect. The experimental results show that a coil input current of 0.4 A generates an electromagnetic force of 47 mN and a diaphragm deflection of 108 μm. Given an actuating voltage of 3 V and a driving frequency of 15 Hz, the flow rate is found to be 13.2 mL/min under zero head pressure conditions. PMID:23201986

  18. 38 CFR 21.3131 - Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35. 21.3131 Section 21.3131 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Commonwealth Army, or as a Philippine Scout as defined in § 3.40 (b), (c), or (d) of this chapter, payments...

  19. 38 CFR 21.3131 - Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35. 21.3131 Section 21.3131 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Commonwealth Army, or as a Philippine Scout as defined in § 3.40 (b), (c), or (d) of this chapter, payments...

  20. 38 CFR 21.3131 - Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35. 21.3131 Section 21.3131 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Commonwealth Army, or as a Philippine Scout as defined in § 3.40 (b), (c), or (d) of this chapter, payments...

  1. 38 CFR 21.3131 - Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35. 21.3131 Section 21.3131 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Commonwealth Army, or as a Philippine Scout as defined in § 3.40 (b), (c), or (d) of this chapter, payments...

  2. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  3. High energy picosecond Yb:YAG CPA system at 10 Hz repetition rate for pumping optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Klingebiel, Sandro; Wandt, Christoph; Skrobol, Christoph; Ahmad, Izhar; Trushin, Sergei A; Major, Zsuzsanna; Krausz, Ferenc; Karsch, Stefan

    2011-03-14

    We present a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system based on diode-pumped Yb:YAG. The stretched ns-pulses are amplified and have been compressed to less than 900 fs with an energy of 200 mJ and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. This system is optically synchronized with a broadband seed laser and therefore ideally suited for pumping optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) stages on a ps-timescale.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation in a Centrifugal Pump at Low Flow Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lei; Cao, Shu-Liang; Wang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Bao-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Based on the full cavitation model which adopts homogeneous flow supposition and considering the compressibility effect on cavitation flow to modify the re-normalization group k-in turbulence model by the density function, a computational model is developed to simulate cavitation flow of a centrifugal pump at low flow rate. The Navier-Stokes equation is solved with the SIMPLEC algorithm. The calculated curves of net positive suction head available (NPSHa) HNPSHa agree well with the experimental data. The critical point of cavitation in centrifugal pump can be predicted precisely, and the NPSH critical values derived from simulation are consistent with the experimental data. Thus the veracity and reliability of this computational model are verified. Based on the result of numerical simulation, the distribution of vapor volume fraction in the impeller and pressure at the impeller inlet are analyzed. Cavities first appear on the suction side of the blade head near the front shroud. A large number of cavities block the impeller channels, which leads to the sudden drop of head at the cavitation critical point. With the reduction of NPSHa, the distribution of pressure at the impeller inlet is more uniform.

  5. Long-term pretreatment with proton pump inhibitor and Helicobacter pylori eradication rates

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seung Bae; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Jong-Yul; Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether proton pump inhibitor (PPI) pretreatment influences Helicobacter pylori eradication rate. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed H. pylori-infected patients who were treated with a standard triple regimen (PPI, amoxicillin 1 g, and clarithromycin 500 mg, all twice daily for 7 d). The diagnosis of H. pylori infection and its eradication was assessed with the rapid urease test, histological examination by silver staining, or the 13C-urea breath test. We divided the patients into two groups: one received the standard eradication regimen without PPI pretreatment (Group A), and the other received PPI pretreatment (Group B). The patients in Group B were reclassified into three groups based on the duration of PPI pretreatment: Group B-I (3-14 d), Group B-II (15-55 d), and Group B-III (≥ 56 d). RESULTS: A total of 1090 patients were analyzed and the overall eradication rate was 80.9%. The cure rate in Group B (81.2%, 420/517) was not significantly different from that in Group A (79.2%, 454/573). The eradication rates in Group B-I, B-II and B-III were 80.1% (117/146), 81.8% (224/274) and 81.4% (79/97), respectively. CONCLUSION: PPI pretreatment did not affect H. pylori eradication rate, regardless of the medication period. PMID:24574779

  6. Estimation of Leak Rate from the Emergency Pump Well in L-Area Complex Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2005-12-19

    This report provides an estimate of the leak rate from the emergency pump well in L-basin that is to be expected during an off-normal event. This estimate is based on expected shrinkage of the engineered grout (i.e., controlled low strength material) used to fill the emergency pump well and the header pipes that provide the dominant leak path from the basin to the lower levels of the L-Area Complex. The estimate will be used to provide input into the operating safety basis to ensure that the water level in the basin will remain above a certain minimum level. The minimum basin water level is specified to ensure adequate shielding for personnel and maintain the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' concept of radiological exposure. The need for the leak rate estimation is the existence of a gap between the fill material and the header pipes, which penetrate the basin wall and would be the primary leak path in the event of a breach in those pipes. The gap between the pipe and fill material was estimated based on a full scale demonstration pour that was performed and examined. Leak tests were performed on full scale pipes as a part of this examination. Leak rates were measured to be on the order of 0.01 gallons/minute for completely filled pipe (vertically positioned) and 0.25 gallons/minute for partially filled pipe (horizontally positioned). This measurement was for water at 16 feet head pressure and with minimal corrosion or biofilm present. The effect of the grout fill on the inside surface biofilm of the pipes is the subject of a previous memorandum.

  7. Front end for high-repetition rate thin disk-pumped OPCPA beamline at ELI-beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jonathan T.; Novák, Jakub; Antipenkov, Roman; Batysta, František; Zervos, Charalampos; Naylon, Jack A.; Mazanec, TomáÅ.¡; Horáček, Martin; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2015-02-01

    The ELI-Beamlines facility, currently under construction in Prague, Czech Republic, will house multiple high power laser systems with varying pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates. Here we present the status of a high repetition rate beamline currently under construction with target parameters of 20 fs pulse duration, 100 mJ pulse energy, and 1 kHz repetition rate. Specifically we present the Yb:YAG thin disk lasers which are intended to pump picosecond OPCPA, synchronization between pump and signal pulses in the OPCPA, and the first stages of OPCPA.

  8. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  9. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  10. Increasing the pump-up rate to polarize 3He gas using spin-exchange optical pumping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wai Tung; Tong, Xin; Rich, Dennis; Liu, Yun; Fleenor, Michael; Ismaili, Akbar; Pierce, Joshua; Hagen, Mark; Dadras, Jonny; Robertson, J. Lee

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, polarized 3He gas has increasingly been used as neutron polarizers and polarization analyzers. Two of the leading methods to polarize the 3He gas are the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) method and the meta-stable exchange optical pumping (MEOP) method. At present, the SEOP setup is comparatively compact due to the fact that it does not require the sophisticated compressor system used in the MEOP method. The temperature and the laser power available determine the speed, at which the SEOP method polarizes the 3He gas. For the quantity of gas typically used in neutron scattering work, this speed is independent of the quantity of the gas required, whereas the polarizing time using the MEOP method is proportional to the quantity of gas required. Currently, using the SEOP method to polarize several bar-liters of 3He to 70% polarization would require 20-40 h. This is an order of magnitude longer than the MEOP method for the same quantity of gas and polarization. It would therefore be advantageous to speed up the SEOP process. In this article, we analyze the requirements for temperature, laser power, and the type of alkali used in order to shorten the time required to polarize 3He gas using the SEOP method.

  11. Determining starting basal rates of insulin infusion for insulin pump users: a comparison between methods

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Nelson; Shearer, Daniel; Tildesley, Hamish G; Aydin Plaa, Jessica; Pottinger, Betty; Pawlowska, Monika; White, Adam; Priestman, Anne; Ross, Stuart A; Tildesley, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the accuracy and safety of presently available methods of estimating starting basal insulin rates for patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes, and to compare them against an empirically derived standard basal rate and a newly developed regression formula. Research design and methods Data on 61 patients with type 1 diabetes on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy and 34 patients with type 2 diabetes on CSII were reviewed. Patient data were first analyzed for correlations between initial patient parameters and final basal rates. Starting basal rates were then retrospectively calculated for these patients according to the weight-based method (WB-M), the total daily dose (TDD) of insulin method (TDD-M), a flat empiric value, and a new formula developed by regression analysis of clinical data. These 4 methods were subsequently compared in their accuracy and potential risk of hypoglycemia. Results For type 1 diabetes, patient weight and TDD of long-acting insulin correlated with final basal rates. Both the regression formula and the TDD-M appeared safer than the WB-M and empirical estimates. For type 2 diabetes, only patient TDD of long-acting insulin correlated with final basal rates. The regression formula was significantly more accurate for patients with type 2 diabetes overall, but the TDD-M estimate was marginally safer. Conclusions The pre-existing TDD-M was found to be the safest presently recommended estimate of initial basal rates for pump initiation in both type 1 and 2 diabetes. The best-fit regression was found to have potential use for type 2 CSII initiation. PMID:26977305

  12. Computer Simulator for OTEC System Design : Pump Control of Flow Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Uehara, Haruo

    The purpose of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is to extract power from temperature differences existing in the oceans. The OTEC system design mainly comprises an OTEC plant design and an OTEC control design. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of a computer simulator for the OTEC system design. The computer simulator, constructed by a computer with A/D and D/A converters, produces analogue input and output signals which are equivalent to those of an actual OTEC plant. By using the computer simulator of an OTEC plant, we can estimate properties of any OTEC plant easily, economically and safely. The computer simulator also plays an important role in detecting difficulties in designing the OTEC controller. We furthermore described the procedure for designing the OTEC controller as follows: (i) statement of the control objective, (ii) modeling of the controlled object, (iii) application of control theory to the model, (iv) characterization of the detector and the input signal part, and (v) construction of the controller. We constructed the computer simulator and the controller for pump flow rate as part of the OTEC plant. We then obtained satisfactory control performance for flow rate control of experiments.

  13. Generation of 220 mJ nanosecond pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate with excellent beam quality in a diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system.

    PubMed

    Wandt, Christoph; Klingebiel, Sandro; Siebold, Mathias; Major, Zsuzsanna; Hein, Joachim; Krausz, Ferenc; Karsch, Stefan

    2008-05-15

    A novel all-diode-pumped master oscillator power amplifier system based on Yb:YAG crystal rods has been developed. It consists of a Q-switched oscillator delivering 3 mJ, 6.4 ns pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate and an additional four-pass amplifier, which boosts the output energy to 220 mJ, while a close to TEM(00) beam quality could be observed. Additionally a simulation of the amplification was written that allows for further scaling considerations.

  14. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Milne, Christopher J; Amarasinghe, Dimali C V; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; van der Veen, Renske M; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Johnson, Steven L; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; van Mourik, Frank; Abela, Rafael; Chergui, Majed

    2011-06-01

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  15. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Frederico A.; Milne, Christopher J.; Amarasinghe, Dimali C. V.; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; Veen, Renske M. van der; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Mourik, Frank van; Chergui, Majed; Johnson, Steven L.; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; Abela, Rafael

    2011-06-15

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  16. Distributor-type fuel injection pump having injection rate control function for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, S.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a distributor-type fuel injection pump for an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders and a plurality of fuel injection valves for injecting fuel into respective ones of the cylinders. The fuel injection pump includes a plunger arranged for concurrent reciprocating and rotative motion in response to rotation of the engine to perform pressure delivery and distribution of fuel into the cylinders of the engine. The plunger has a first portion and a second portion having different diameters from each other, a first pump working chamber defined by the first portion, and a second pump working chamber defined by the second portion. Fuel delivery passageways are arranged for communication with the first pump working chamber and lead to respective ones of the fuel injection valves of the engine. A communication passageway is arranged for communicating the second pump working chamber with the fuel delivery passageways and a drain passageway is arranged for communicating the communication passageway with a zone under a lower pressure of the pump.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart II of... - Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density B Appendix B to Subpart II of Part 63 Protection of...—Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density EC01MY92.046...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart II to... - Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density B Appendix B to Subpart II to Part 63 Protection of...—Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density EC01MY92.046...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart II of... - Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density B Appendix B to Subpart II of Part 63 Protection of...—Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density EC01MY92.046...

  20. LD pumped high-repetition-rate high-power 532nm Nd:YAG/LBO solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Liu, Dongyu; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Hu, Haowei; Zhang, Guangju; Yao, Yifei

    2013-09-01

    Diode pumped solid state 532 nm green laser is widely required for many industrial, medical and scientific applications. Among most of these applications, high power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) green laser output is demanded. This can be efficiently achieved through a diode-side-pumped acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with an intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG). In our experiment, LBO crystal is used for the second harmonic generation of high-average-power lasers of near infrared (NIR) range, though its effective NLO coefficient deff is relatively small. It is because of its high damage threshold (greater than 2.5 GW/cm2), large acceptance angle, small walk-off angle, and the nonhygroscopic characteristic. In this paper, we reported a high-repetition-rate high-power diode-side-pumped AO Q-switched Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. A plane-plane cavity with two rods, two AO Q-switches and the type II critical phase-matched LBO at room temperature were employed. Under the LD pump power of 480 W, 95.86 W at 1064 nm wavelength was achieved when the repetition rate was 15 kHz, and the 532 nm average output power of 44.77 W was obtained, with a pulse width of 111.7 ns, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 46.7% from 1064 nm to 532 nm. The 532 nm average output power was 40.10 W at a repetition rate of 10 kHz with a pulse width of 78.65 ns. The output characteristics of the SHG varying with the pumping current and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the laser were also investigated. Further improvement of the SHG is under study.

  1. 38 CFR 21.3131 - Rates-educational assistance allowance-38 U.S.C. chapter 35.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maximum allowance is not initially authorized. 2 See footnote 5 of § 21.4270(c) for measurement of full... approving agency or the actual cost to the eligible spouse or surviving spouse, whichever is less. VA... maximum allowance is not initially authorized. 2 See footnote 5 of § 21.4270(c) for measurement of...

  2. Global warming mitigation by sulphur loading in the stratosphere: dependence of required emissions on allowable residual warming rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.; Chernokulsky, Alexandr V.; Karpenko, Andrey A.; Mokhov, Igor I.

    2010-07-01

    An approach to mitigate global warming via sulphur loading in the stratosphere (geoengineering) is studied, employing a large ensemble of numerical experiments with the climate model of intermediate complexity IAP RAS CM. The model is forced by the historical+SRES A1B anthropogenic greenhouse gases+tropospheric sulphates scenario for 1860-2100 with additional sulphur emissions in the stratosphere in the twenty-first century. Different ensemble members are constructed by varying values of the parameters governing mass, horizontal distribution and radiative forcing of the stratospheric sulphates. It is obtained that, given a global loading of the sulphates in the stratosphere, among those studied in this paper latitudinal distributions of geoengineering aerosols, the most efficient one at the global basis is that peaked between 50° N and 70° N and with a somewhat smaller burden in the tropics. Uniform latitudinal distribution of stratospheric sulphates is a little less efficient. Sulphur emissions in the stratosphere required to stop the global temperature at the level corresponding to the mean value for 2000-2010 amount to more than 10 TgS/year in the year 2100. These emissions may be reduced if some warming is allowed to occur in the twenty-first century. For instance, if the global temperature trend S g in every decade of this century is limited not to exceed 0.10 K/decade (0.15 K/decade), geoengineering emissions of 4-14 TgS/year (2-7 TgS/year) would be sufficient. Even if the global warming is stopped, temperature changes in different regions still occur with a magnitude up to 1 K. Their horizontal pattern depends on implied latitudinal distribution of stratospheric sulphates. In addition, for the stabilised global mean surface air temperature, global precipitation decreases by about 10%. If geoengineering emissions are stopped after several decades of implementation, their climatic effect is removed within a few decades. In this period, surface air

  3. A field comparison of BTEX mass flow rates based on integral pumping tests and point scale measurements.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Michael; Dietrich, Peter

    2011-03-25

    Measuring contaminant flow rates at control cross sections is the most accurate method to evaluate natural attenuation processes in the saturated subsurface. In most instances, point scale measurement is the method of choice due to practical reasons and cost factors. However, at many field sites, the monitoring network is too sparse for a reliable estimation of contaminant and groundwater flow rates. Therefore, integral pumping tests have been developed as an alternative. In this study, we compare mass flow rates obtained by integral pumping test results and point scale data. We compare results of both methods with regard to uncertainties due to estimation errors and mass flow estimations based on two different point scale networks. The differences between benzene and groundwater flow rate estimates resulting from point scale samples and integral pumping tests were 6.44% and 6.97%, respectively, demonstrating the applicability of both methods at the site. Point scale-based data, especially with use of cost efficient Direct-Push technique, can be applied to show the contaminant distribution at a site and may be followed by a denser point scale network or an integral method. Nevertheless, a combination of both methods decreases uncertainties.

  4. Low-pump-power, low-phase-noise, and microwave to millimeter-wave repetition rate operation in microcombs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Lee, Hansuek; Chen, Tong; Vahala, Kerry J

    2012-12-07

    Microresonator-based frequency combs (microcombs or Kerr combs) can potentially miniaturize the numerous applications of conventional frequency combs. A priority is the realization of broadband (ideally octave spanning) spectra at detectable repetition rates for comb self-referencing. However, access to these rates involves pumping larger mode volumes and hence higher threshold powers. Moreover, threshold power sets both the scale for power per comb tooth and also the optical pump. Along these lines, it is shown that a class of resonators having surface-loss-limited Q factors can operate over a wide range of repetition rates with minimal variation in threshold power. A new, surface-loss-limited resonator illustrates the idea. Comb generation on mode spacings ranging from 2.6 to 220 GHz with overall low threshold power (as low as 1 mW) is demonstrated. A record number of comb lines for a microcomb (around 1900) is also observed with pump power of 200 mW. The ability to engineer a wide range of repetition rates with these devices is also used to investigate a recently observed mechanism in microcombs associated with dispersion of subcomb offset frequencies. We observe high-coherence phase locking in cases where these offset frequencies are small enough so as to be tuned into coincidence. In these cases, a record-low microcomb phase noise is reported at a level comparable to an open-loop, high-performance microwave oscillator.

  5. Nectar intake rate is modulated by changes in sucking pump activity according to colony starvation in carpenter ants.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Josens, Roxana

    2008-05-01

    Dynamics of fluid feeding has been deeply studied in insects. However, the ability to vary the nectar-intake rate depending only on the carbohydrate deprivation has been clearly demonstrated only in Camponotus mus ants. When insect morphometry and fluid properties remain constant, changes in intake rate could only be attributed to variations in sucking pump activity. Previous records of the electrical activity generated during feeding in C. mus have revealed two different signal patterns: the regular (RP, frequencies: 2-5 Hz) and the irregular (IP, frequencies: 7-12 Hz). This work studies the mechanism underlying food intake-rate modulation in ants by analysing whether these patterns are involved. Behaviour and electrical activity generated by ants at different starvation levels were analysed during feeding on sucrose solutions. Ants were able to modulate the intake rate for a variety of sucrose concentrations (10, 40 and 60%w/w). The IP only occurred for 60% of solutions and its presence did not affect the intake rate. However, during the RP generated under the starved state, we found frequencies up to 7.5 Hz. RP frequencies positively correlated with the intake-rate for all sucrose concentrations. Hence, intake-rate modulation according to sugar deprivation is mainly achieved by the ant's ability to vary the pumping frequency.

  6. Photothermal analysis of polymeric dye laser materials excited at different pump rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchowic, Ricardo; Scaffardi, Lucía B.; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; Sastre, Roberto; Acun~A, Alberto Ulises

    2003-02-01

    The photothermal properties and heat diffusion of polymeric lasers, made up from solutions of Rhodamine 6G in solid matrices of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with different amounts of the cross-linking monomer ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and copolymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate have been studied through photothermal deflection spectroscopy. The heat load that is due to the pumping process was quantified as a function of the pump excitation repetition frequency (0.25-10 Hz), determining the time-dependent temperature changes at different locations within the laser matrix. A theoretical model, which reproduces these changes with high accuracy, was developed on the basis of the heat-diffusion equation of optically dense fluids. The observed thermal effects became important for impairing the laser stability at pump repetition frequencies higher than 1 Hz. In addition, the irreversible optical changes produced in the laser matrices at high pump fluence values (>1 J/cm2) were also analyzed. These effects originate, most likely, from a two-step photothermal mechanism.

  7. Compassionate Allowances

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to content Social Security Search Menu Languages Sign in / up Compassionate Allowances Featured Items Compassionate Allowances Conditions CAL conditions are selected using information received ...

  8. Yb:YAG Innoslab amplifier: efficient high repetition rate subpicosecond pumping system for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Riedel, R; Willner, A; Mans, T; Schnitzler, C; Russbueldt, P; Dolkemeyer, J; Seise, E; Gottschall, T; Hädrich, S; Duesterer, S; Schlarb, H; Feldhaus, J; Limpert, J; Faatz, B; Tünnermann, A; Rossbach, J; Drescher, M; Tavella, F

    2011-07-01

    We report on a Yb:YAG Innoslab laser amplifier system for generation of subpicsecond high energy pump pulses for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) at high repetition rates. Pulse energies of up to 20 mJ (at 12.5 kHz) and repetition rates of up to 100 kHz were attained with pulse durations of 830 fs and average power in excess of 200 W. We further investigate the possibility to use subpicosecond pulses to derive a stable continuum in a YAG crystal for OPCPA seeding.

  9. High-peak-power, high-repetition-rate LD end-pumped Nd:YVO4 burst mode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Fa, Xin; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Fan, Rongwei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A compact high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate burst mode laser is achieved by an acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YVO4 1064 nm laser directly pumped at 878.6 nm. Pulse trains with 10-100 pulses are obtained using acousto-optical Q-switch at repetition rates of 10-100 kHz under a pulsed pumping with a 1 ms duration. At the maximum pump energy of 108.5 mJ, the pulse energy of 10 kHz burst mode laser reaches 44 mJ corresponding to a single pulse energy of 4.4 mJ and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 40.5 %.The maximum peak power of ~468.1 kW at 10 kHz is obtained with a pulse width of 9.4 ns. The beam quality factor is measured to be M 2 ~1.5 and the pulse jitter is estimated to be less than 1 % in both amplitude and time region.

  10. Calculation of the Rate of Combustion of a Metallized Composite Solid Propellant with Allowance for the Size Distribution of Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryazov, V. A.; Krainov, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    A physicomathematical model of combustion of a metallized composite solid propellant based on ammonium perchlorate has been presented. The model takes account of the thermal effect of decomposition of a condensed phase (c phase), convection, diffusion, the exothermal chemical reaction in a gas phase, the heating and combustion of aluminum particles in the gas flow, and the velocity lag of the particles behind the gas. The influence of the granulometric composition of aluminum particles escaping from the combustion surface on the linear rate of combustion has been investigated. It has been shown that information not only on the kinetics of chemical reactions in the gas phase, but also on the granulometric composition of aluminum particles escaping from the surface of the c phase into the gas, is of importance for determination of the linear rate of combustion.

  11. 41 CFR Appendix B to Chapter 301 - Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance B Appendix B to Chapter 301 Public Contracts.... 301, App. B Appendix B to Chapter 301—Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions...

  12. 41 CFR Appendix B to Chapter 301 - Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance B Appendix B to Chapter 301 Public Contracts.... 301, App. B Appendix B to Chapter 301—Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions...

  13. Pumps in wearable ultrafiltration devices: pumps in wuf devices.

    PubMed

    Armignacco, Paolo; Garzotto, Francesco; Bellini, Corrado; Neri, Mauro; Lorenzin, Anna; Sartori, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The wearable artificial kidney (WAK) is a device that is supposed to operate like a real kidney, which permits prolonged, frequent, and continuous dialysis treatments for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Its functioning is mainly related to its pumping system, as well as to its dialysate-generating and alarm/shutoff ones. A pump is defined as a device that moves fluids by mechanical action. In such a context, blood pumps pull blood from the access side of the dialysis catheter and return the blood at the same rate of flow. The main aim of this paper is to review the current literature on blood pumps, describing the way they have been functioning thus far and how they are being engineered, giving details about the most important parameters that define their quality, thus allowing the production of a radar comparative graph, and listing ideal pumps' features.

  14. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  15. High-Acquisition-Rate Single-Shot Pump-Probe Measurements Using Time-Stretching Method

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masataka; Minami, Yasuo; Johnson, Courtney L.; Salmans, Parker D.; Ellsworth, Nicholas R.; Takeda, Jun; Johnson, Jeremy A.; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances of ultrafast spectroscopy allow the capture of an entire ultrafast signal waveform in a single probe shot, which greatly reduces the measurement time and opens the door for the spectroscopy of unrepeatable phenomena. However, most single-shot detection schemes rely on two-dimensional detectors, which limit the repetition rate of the measurement and can hinder real-time visualization and manipulation of signal waveforms. Here, we demonstrate a new method to circumvent these difficulties and to greatly simplify the detection setup by using a long, single-mode optical fiber and a fast photodiode. Initially, a probe pulse is linearly chirped (the optical frequency varies linearly across the pulse in time), and the temporal profile of an ultrafast signal is then encoded in the probe spectrum. The probe pulse and encoded temporal dynamics are further chirped to nanosecond time scales using the dispersion in the optical fiber, thus, slowing down the ultrafast signal to time scales easily recorded with fast detectors and high-bandwidth electronics. We apply this method to three distinct ultrafast experiments: investigating the power dependence of the Kerr signal in LiNbO3, observing an irreversible transmission change of a phase change material, and capturing terahertz waveforms. PMID:27876881

  16. High-Acquisition-Rate Single-Shot Pump-Probe Measurements Using Time-Stretching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masataka; Minami, Yasuo; Johnson, Courtney L.; Salmans, Parker D.; Ellsworth, Nicholas R.; Takeda, Jun; Johnson, Jeremy A.; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances of ultrafast spectroscopy allow the capture of an entire ultrafast signal waveform in a single probe shot, which greatly reduces the measurement time and opens the door for the spectroscopy of unrepeatable phenomena. However, most single-shot detection schemes rely on two-dimensional detectors, which limit the repetition rate of the measurement and can hinder real-time visualization and manipulation of signal waveforms. Here, we demonstrate a new method to circumvent these difficulties and to greatly simplify the detection setup by using a long, single-mode optical fiber and a fast photodiode. Initially, a probe pulse is linearly chirped (the optical frequency varies linearly across the pulse in time), and the temporal profile of an ultrafast signal is then encoded in the probe spectrum. The probe pulse and encoded temporal dynamics are further chirped to nanosecond time scales using the dispersion in the optical fiber, thus, slowing down the ultrafast signal to time scales easily recorded with fast detectors and high-bandwidth electronics. We apply this method to three distinct ultrafast experiments: investigating the power dependence of the Kerr signal in LiNbO3, observing an irreversible transmission change of a phase change material, and capturing terahertz waveforms.

  17. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  18. Smog O3 Production Rate in California Air: Marker Compounds Allow Checks on Source Attribution to Fire and Other Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R. B.; Esswein, R. F.; Cai, C.; Kaduwela, A.; Kulkarni, S.; Blake, D. R.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Fried, A.; Huey, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    We are able to attribute sources of both radical reactivity and NO that determined the smog-chemical production rate of ozone, P(O3), for NASA's wide-ranging sampling of California air in June, 2008, part of the ARCTAS intensive. We relate formaldehyde, HCHO, and reactive nitrogen oxides, NOx, to a variety of distinct "marker" species that identify origins. We have labeled the sources and markers as (i) Fire emissions (CH3CN), (ii) Biogenic emissions (Isoprene), (iii) Urban/business emissions (CHCl3), (iv) Transport-related fuel consumption, (SO2), and (v) Refining/Port emissions ("residual" toluene). We use multiple linear regression with some appropriate restrictions. We achieve R-squared or explained variance of 88% for HCHO (VOC's) and 60% for NOx. HCHO and NOx are slowly evolving measures of potential ozone generation. The two related but radiation-influenced measures j (HCHO->H+HCO) x [HCHO] and [NO] quantitatively, but non-linearly, relate to instantaneous ozone production in California air, with R-squared of 86-93%, just as in New York City (Chatfield et al., Atmos. Environ., 2010). Maps of attribution for 650 samples from the Port of San Diego to the Northern Sierra foothills, and offshore -— all show huge variability in source attributions for VOCs and NOx. They indicate a widespread fire-emission influence on VOCs as they produce peroxy radicals, but show no positive influence on NOx, in fact consuming NOx from other sources. Comparisons with simulations help to refine our attribution classes and also to check balances of VOC emissions in available inventories. The use of the P(O3) measures is directly translatable to a method for estimate smog-ozone production rate from space, as data from another intensive, DISCOVER-AQ, show. (Left) A rare example where all sources contribute significantly, with markers and tentative attributions marked. (Right) Three different situations describing the control of smog ozone production, all from the same geographic

  19. Time-delay when updating infusion rates in the Graseby 3400 pump results in reduced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Elie; Mandel, Jeff E

    2014-01-01

    Infusion pumps are commonly used for infusion of drugs for physiologic control, and infusion rate has been demonstrated to affect the parameters of pharmacokinetic models. In attempting to develop a model that explained this behavior, we examined the behavior of the Graseby 3400 syringe pump under a range of flow conditions and with variations in syringe characteristics. Two issues were identified: start-up loss (the difference between actual and ideal delivery on initial infusion) and update loss (the difference between actual and ideal delivery when transmitting a command to change infusion rate). Under worst-case conditions, this may result in a 20-second period of zero delivery during start-up, and when updating infusion rates once per second, zero output. These effects are influenced by syringe characteristics and vary sufficiently as to make it impossible to isolate this effect from the pharmacokinetic process being controlled. The implications of this for previous published results and clinical application of target-controlled infusions are discussed.

  20. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  1. High-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond pulses from a quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG system.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Witte, Stefan; Morgenweg, Jonas; Altmann, Robert K; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2013-08-15

    We report on a high-power quasi-CW pumped Nd:YAG laser system, producing 130 mJ, 64 ps pulses at 1064 nm wavelength with a repetition rate of 300 Hz. Pulses from a Nd:YVO(4) oscillator are first amplified by a regenerative amplifier to the millijoule level and then further amplified in quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG modules. Pulsed diode pumping enables a high gain at repetition rates of several hundred hertz, while keeping thermal effects manageable. Birefringence compensation and multiple thermal-lensing-compensated relay-imaging stages are used to maintain a top-hat beam profile. After frequency doubling, 75 mJ pulses are obtained at 532 nm. The intensity stability is better than 1.1%, which makes this laser an attractive pump source for a high-repetition-rate optical parametric amplification system.

  2. Pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a gas-oil production system for pumping formation fluid in a well through a tubing string within which a down hole pump connects to a hydraulic stroking device through a rod string providing the pump including a plunger reciprocally driven by the hydraulic stroking device toward an upper terminal position during a plunger upstroke. The rod string normally supports the weight of a column of fluid and toward a lower terminal position at the end of a plunger downstroke during which the weight of the column fluid is normally transferred to the tubing string through fluid within the pump. The method for detecting when the well is pumped off comprises: supplying working fluid to the hydraulic stroking device to raise the hydraulic stroking device and thereby move the plunger from the lower terminal position to the upper terminal position; and removing the working fluid at a controlled rate from the hydraulic stroking device.

  3. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently

  4. Energy saving pump and pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.C.

    1983-08-02

    A centrifugal pump and a pumping system are disclosed that recover hydraulic energy in response to flow capacity reduction and spontaneously provide a recirculating flow at low capacities when pump cooling is needed. From a upstream source the fluid is guided by two suction lines to two parallel pumping mechanisms housed by a common discharge casing. Said pumping mechanisms have a combined hydraulic characteristic that the first pumping mechanism will force a reverse flow through the second pumping mechanism, when pump discharge is reduced by the system below a certain low flow rate. The reverse flow will then return to the upstream fluid source through a suction line. The pump is the protected from overheating by a circulating flow at low flow capacities. At the same time, said reverse flow generates a turbine action on the second pumping mechanism and transmits the contained hydraulic energy back to the rotor and thereby results in power saving at low flow capacities.

  5. High-power, variable repetition rate, picosecond optical parametric oscillator pumped by an amplified gain-switched diode.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Florian; Chen, Kang K; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Gawith, Corin B E; Mackenzie, Jacob I; Hanna, David C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that is synchronously pumped by a fiber-amplified gain-switched laser diode. At 24W of pump power, up to 7.3W at 1.54microm and 3.1W at 3.4microm is obtained in separate output beams. The periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO(3) OPO operates with ~17ps pulses at a fundamental repetition rate of 114.8MHz but can be switched to higher repetition rates up to ~1GHz. Tunabilty between 1.4microm and 1.7microm (signal) and 2.9microm and 4.4microm (idler) is demonstrated by translating the nonlinear crystal to access different poling-period gratings and typical M(2) values of 1.1 by 1.2 (signal) and 1.6 by 3.2 (idler) are measured at high power for the singly resonant oscillator.

  6. Effect of the pump rate and loss perturbations on the lasing dynamics of a Fabry-Perot laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N; Ledenev, V I

    2010-11-13

    Transition from generation of the fundamental mode to generation of the fundamental and first modes is studied numerically under the action of nonstationary asymmetric perturbations of pump rate and loss distributions in the active medium layer. It is shown that emergence of perturbations directly leads to excitation of the first mode with significant amplitude. The regime of two-mode lasing in the presence of perturbations is shown to appear at a pump rate that is smaller than the threshold one for two-mode lasing in the absence of perturbations. It is found that the first-mode amplitude has a maximum at a frequency of intermode beatings of an unfilled Fabry-Perot resonator. It is also determined that emergence of nonstationary asymmetric perturbations leads to an increase in the average intensity of the fundamental mode. Various transition regimes to two-mode lasing are compared in different types and periods of perturbations. The operability of the scheme controlling the mode composition of laser radiation is considered. (lasers)

  7. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart II to... - Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density B Appendix B to Subpart II to Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart II to... - Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum Allowable Thinning Rates as a Function of As Supplied VOC Content and Thinner Density B Appendix B to Subpart II to Part 63 Protection of... Shipbuilding and Ship Repair (Surface Coating) Pt. 63, Subpt. II, App. B Appendix B to Subpart II to Part...

  9. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Robert P.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    1999-06-01

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been filly investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an improved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verifi and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  10. Study on solid-liquid two-phase unsteady flow characteristics with different flow rates in screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. N.; Y Wang, H.; Han, W.; Ma, W.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    The screw centrifugal pump is used as an object, and the unsteady numerical simulation of solid-liquid two-phase flow is carried out under different flow rate conditions in one circle by choosing the two-phase flow of sand and water as medium, using the software FLUENT based on the URANS equations, combining with sliding mesh method, and choosing the Mixture multiphase flow model and the SIMPLE algorithm. The results show that, with the flow rate increasing, the change trends for the pressure on volute outlet are almost constant, the fluctuation trends of the impeller axial force have a little change, the pressure and the axial force turn to decrease on the whole, the radial force gradually increases when the impeller maximum radius passes by half a cycle near the volute outlet, and the radial force gradually decreases when the maximum radius passes by the other half a cycle in a rotation cycle. The distributions of the solid particles are very uneven under a small flow rate condition on the face. The solid particles under a big flow rate condition are distributed more evenly than the ones under a small flow rate condition on the back. The theoretical basis and reference are provided for improving its working performance.

  11. Slurry pumping: Pump performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Taccani, R.; Pediroda, V.; Reini, M.; Giadrossi, A.

    2000-07-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being used increasingly for transportation of slurries through pipelines. To design a slurry handling system it is essential to have a knowledge of the effects of suspended solids on the pump performance. A new test loop has been realized in the laboratory of the Energetics Department of the University of Trieste which allows pump performance to be determined at various pump speeds, with many different mixture concentrations and rheologies. The pump test rig consists of 150 mm diameter pipe with facilities for measuring suction and discharge pressure, flowrate, pump input power and speed, slurry density and temperature. In particular flowrate is measured by diverting flow into a weighing tank and timing a specified volume of slurry. An automatic PC based data acquisition system has been implemented. Preliminary tests with clear water show that performance can be measured with good repeatability and accuracy. The new test rig is used to verify the range of validity of the correlations to predict pump performance, available in literature and of that proposed by authors. This correlation, based on a Neural Network and not on a predefined analytical expression, can be easily improved with new experimental data.

  12. Insulin Pump Therapy Is Associated with Lower Rates of Retinopathy and Peripheral Nerve Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Zabeen, Bedowra; Craig, Maria E.; Virk, Sohaib A.; Pryke, Alison; Chan, Albert K. F.; Cho, Yoon Hi; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z.; Hing, Stephen; Donaghue, Kim C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of microvascular complications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI). Research Design and Methods Prospective cohort of 989 patients (aged 12–20 years; diabetes duration >5 years) treated with CSII or MDI for >12 months. Microvascular complications were assessed from 2000–14: early retinopathy (seven-field fundal photography), peripheral nerve function (thermal and vibration threshold testing), autonomic nerve abnormality (heart rate variability analysis of electrocardiogram recordings) and albuminuria (albumin creatinine ratio/timed overnight albumin excretion). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine the relationship between treatment and complications rates, adjusting for socio-economic status (SES) and known risk factors including HbA1c and diabetes duration. Results Comparing CSII with MDI: HbA1C was 8.6% [70mmol/mol] vs. 8.7% [72 mmol/mol]) (p = 0.7), retinopathy 17% vs. 22% (p = 0.06); microalbuminuria 1% vs. 4% (p = 0.07), peripheral nerve abnormality 27% vs. 33% (p = 0.108) and autonomic nerve abnormality 24% vs. 28% (p = 0.401). In multivariable GEE, CSII use was associated with lower rates of retinopathy (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.029) and peripheral nerve abnormality (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.95, p = 0.026), but not albuminuria (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.10–2.17, p = 0.33). SES was not associated with any of the complication outcomes. Conclusions In adolescents, CSII use is associated with lower rates of retinopathy and peripheral nerve abnormality, suggesting an apparent benefit of CSII over MDI independent of glycemic control or SES. PMID:27050468

  13. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Verena

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue. PMID:27980606

  14. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Röhrle, Oliver; Neumann, Verena; Heidlauf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue.

  15. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions.

  16. Origin of dc voltage in type II superconducting flux pumps: field, field rate of change, and current density dependence of resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Matsuda, K.; Fu, L.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Dong, Q.; Baghdadi, M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting flux pumps are the kind of devices which can generate direct current into superconducting circuit using external magnetic field. The key point is how to induce a dc voltage across the superconducting load by ac fields. Giaever (1966 IEEE Spectr. 3 117) pointed out flux motion in superconductors will induce a dc voltage, and demonstrated a rectifier model which depended on breaking superconductivity. van de Klundert et al (1981 Cryogenics 21 195, 267) in their review(s) described various configurations for flux pumps all of which relied on inducing the normal state in at least part of the superconductor. In this letter, following their work, we reveal that a variation in the resistivity of type II superconductors is sufficient to induce a dc voltage in flux pumps and it is not necessary to break superconductivity. This variation in resistivity is due to the fact that flux flow is influenced by current density, field intensity, and field rate of change. We propose a general circuit analogy for travelling wave flux pumps, and provide a mathematical analysis to explain the dc voltage. Several existing superconducting flux pumps which rely on the use of a travelling magnetic wave can be explained using the analysis enclosed. This work can also throw light on the design and optimization of flux pumps.

  17. Laser-diode pumped self-mode-locked praseodymium visible lasers with multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate efficient laser-diode pumped multi-gigahertz (GHz) self-mode-locked praseodymium (Pr3+) visible lasers with broadband spectra from green to deep red for the first time to our knowledge. With a Pr3+-doped GdLiF4 crystal, stable self-mode-locked visible pulsed lasers at the wavelengths of 522 nm, 607 nm, 639 nm, and 720 nm have been obtained with the repetition rates of 2.8 GHz, 3.1 GHz, 3.1 GHz, and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The maximum output power was 612 mW with the slope efficiency of 46.9% at 639 nm. The mode-locking mechanism was theoretically analyzed. The stable second-harmonic mode-locking with doubled repetition frequency was also realized based on the Fabry-Perot effect formed in the laser cavity. In addition, we find that the polarization directions were turned with lasing wavelengths. This work may provide a new way for generating efficient ultrafast pulses with high- and changeable-repetition rates in the visible range.

  18. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  19. Whole blood pumping with a microthrottle pump

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Johnston, I. D.; Tan, C. K. L.; Tracey, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that microthrottle pumps (MTPs) display the capacity to pump solid phase suspensions such as polystyrene beads which prove challenging to most microfluidic pumps. In this paper we report employing a linear microthrottle pump (LMTP) to pump whole, undiluted, anticoagulated, human venous blood at 200 μl min−1 with minimal erythrocyte lysis and no observed pump blockage. LMTPs are particularly well suited to particle suspension transport by virtue of their relatively unimpeded internal flow-path. Micropumping of whole blood represents a rigorous real-world test of cell suspension transport given blood’s high cell content by volume and erythrocytes’ relative fragility. A modification of the standard Drabkin method and its validation to spectrophotometrically quantify low levels of erythrocyte lysis by hemoglobin release is also reported. Erythrocyte lysis rates resulting from transport via LMTP are determined to be below one cell in 500 at a pumping rate of 102 μl min−1. PMID:21264059

  20. Yb-fiber-laser-pumped, high-repetition-rate picosecond optical parametric oscillator tunable in the ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Samanta, G K; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Aadhi, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2014-05-19

    We report a compact tunable 240-MHz picosecond source for the ultraviolet based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a signal-resonant MgO:sPPLT optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 532 nm in the green by the second harmonic of a mode-locked Yb-fiber laser at 80-MHz repetition rate. By deploying a 30-mm-long multi-grating MgO:sPPLT crystal for the OPO and a 5-mm-long BiB(3)O(6) crystal for internal doubling, we have generated tunable UV radiation across 317-340.5 nm, with up to 30 mW at 334.5 nm. The OPO also provides tunable visible signal in the red, across 634-681 nm, and mid-infrared idler radiation over 2429-3298 nm, with as maximum signal power of 800 mW at 642 nm. The signal pulses have a temporal duration of 12 ps at 665 nm and exhibit high spatial beam quality with Gaussian profile. The signal power is recorded to be naturally stable with a fluctuation of 1.4% rms over 14 hours, while UV power degradation has been observed and studied.

  1. Spin-scattering rates in metallic thin films measured by ferromagnetic resonance damping enhanced by spin-pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, C. T.; Shaw, J. M.; Nembach, H. T.; Silva, T. J.

    2015-06-14

    We determined the spin-transport properties of Pd and Pt thin films by measuring the increase in ferromagnetic resonance damping due to spin-pumping in ferromagnetic (FM)-nonferromagnetic metal (NM) multilayers with varying NM thicknesses. The increase in damping with NM thickness depends strongly on both the spin- and charge-transport properties of the NM, as modeled by diffusion equations that include both momentum- and spin-scattering parameters. We use the analytical solution to the spin-diffusion equations to obtain spin-diffusion lengths for Pt and Pd. By measuring the dependence of conductivity on NM thickness, we correlate the charge- and spin-transport parameters, and validate the applicability of various models for momentum-scattering and spin-scattering rates in these systems: constant, inverse-proportional (Dyakanov-Perel), and linear-proportional (Elliot-Yafet). We confirm previous reports that the spin-scattering time appears to be shorter than the momentum scattering time in Pt, and the Dyakanov-Perel-like model is the best fit to the data.

  2. Spin-scattering rates in metallic thin films measured by ferromagnetic resonance damping enhanced by spin-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, C. T.; Shaw, J. M.; Nembach, H. T.; Silva, T. J.

    2015-06-01

    We determined the spin-transport properties of Pd and Pt thin films by measuring the increase in ferromagnetic resonance damping due to spin-pumping in ferromagnetic (FM)-nonferromagnetic metal (NM) multilayers with varying NM thicknesses. The increase in damping with NM thickness depends strongly on both the spin- and charge-transport properties of the NM, as modeled by diffusion equations that include both momentum- and spin-scattering parameters. We use the analytical solution to the spin-diffusion equations to obtain spin-diffusion lengths for Pt and Pd. By measuring the dependence of conductivity on NM thickness, we correlate the charge- and spin-transport parameters, and validate the applicability of various models for momentum-scattering and spin-scattering rates in these systems: constant, inverse-proportional (Dyakanov-Perel), and linear-proportional (Elliot-Yafet). We confirm previous reports that the spin-scattering time appears to be shorter than the momentum scattering time in Pt, and the Dyakanov-Perel-like model is the best fit to the data.

  3. Evaluation of remifentanil anesthesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery using heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Shu, Aihua; Zhan, Leyun; Fang, Haibin; Lv, En; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Mingyu; Wang, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) was used in the present study to evaluate a target-controlled approach compared with a constant-rate infusion for remifentanil anesthesia during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OP-CABG) surgery. A total of 65 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status II or III, who were aged 60-85 years and scheduled for OP-CABG, were selected for the study. All patients were administered an intramuscular premedication of 10 mg morphine and 0.3 mg scopolamine. In group I, remifentanil was infused using a target-controlled approach at 1.5-5.0 ng/ml, and in group II, remifentanil was infused at a constant-rate of 0.05-1.0 μg/kg/min and at additional single increments of 1 μg/kg when appropriate. The heart rate and other hemodynamic monitoring indices of the patients, including the mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, were monitored at various time points, including prior to induction (T0), at extubation (performed intraoperatively; T7) and at 24 h post-surgery. The HRV indices, including total power (TP), low frequency (LF) and the LF/high frequency (HF) ratio of power (LF/HF), were reduced following induction at T0 and remained low at 24 h post-surgery. At T5 (right coronary or left circumflex artery anastomosis) and T7 (tracheal extubation), all the HRV indices, with the exception of the HF power, were significantly increased (P<0.05). Additionally, the TP, LF and LF/HF values in group II were higher at T5 compared with those in group I (P<0.05). Remifentanil target-controlled infusion is superior to constant-rate infusion in suppressing the stress response during OP-CABG, maintaining the balance of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and promoting the recovery of the autonomic function following surgery.

  4. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, R. Menanteau, S.

    2016-01-15

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10{sup 5} K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  5. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, R.; Menanteau, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>105 K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  6. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, R; Menanteau, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10(5) K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  7. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  8. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations.

  9. Changes in rumen microbiota composition and in situ degradation kinetics during the dry period and early lactation as affected by rate of increase of concentrate allowance.

    PubMed

    Dieho, K; van den Bogert, B; Henderson, G; Bannink, A; Ramiro-Garcia, J; Smidt, H; Dijkstra, J

    2017-04-01

    Changes in rumen microbiota and in situ degradation kinetics were studied in 12 rumen-cannulated Holstein Friesian dairy cows during the dry period and early lactation. The effect of a rapid (RAP) or gradual (GRAD) postpartum (pp) rate of increase of concentrate allowance was also investigated. Cows were fed for ad libitum intake and had free access to a mixed ration consisting of chopped wheat straw (dry period only), grass silage, corn silage, and soybean meal. Treatment consisted of either a rapid (1.0 kg of dry matter/d; n = 6) or gradual (0.25 kg of dry matter/d; n = 6) increase of concentrate allowance (up to 10.9 kg of dry matter/d), starting at 4 d pp. In whole rumen contents, bacterial community composition was assessed using samples from 50, 30, and 10 d antepartum (ap), and 3, 9, 16, 30, 44, 60, and 80 d pp, and protozoal and archaeal community composition using samples from 10 d ap, and 16 and 44 d pp. Intake of fermentable organic matter, starch, and sugar was temporarily greater in RAP than GRAD at 16 d pp. Bacterial community richness was higher during the dry period than during the lactation. A rapid increase in concentrate allowance decreased bacterial community richness at 9 and 16 d pp compared with a gradual increase in concentrate allowance, whereas from 30 d pp onward richness of RAP and GRAD was similar. In general, the relative abundances of Bacteroidales and Aeromonadales were greater, and those of Clostridiales, Fibrobacterales, and Spirochaetales were smaller, during the lactation compared with the dry period. An interaction between treatment and sampling day was observed for some bacterial community members, and most of the protozoal and archaeal community members. Transition to lactation increased the relative abundance of Epidinium and Entodinium, but reduced the relative abundance of Ostracodinium. Archaea from genus Methanobrevibacter dominated during both the dry period and lactation. However, during lactation the abundance of the

  10. High levels of isotope elimination improve precision and allow individual-based measurements of metabolic rates in animals using the doubly labeled water method

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Masaki; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Maki; Oda, Emiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Oka, Nariko; Yoda, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Doubly labeled water (DLW) can be used to measure energy expenditure in free-ranging animals, but questions have been raised about its accuracy in different species or contexts. We investigated whether differences in the extent of isotope elimination affects the precision and accuracy of the DLW method, which can vary according to the experimental design or metabolic rate of the species. Estimated total energy expenditure by the DLW method (TEEdlw) was compared with actual total energy expenditure simultaneously measured via respirometry (TEEresp) in streaked shearwaters Calonectris leucomelas, a pelagic seabird. Subjects were divided into three groups with different experimental conditions: at rest on the ground for 24 h (Group A) or for 48 h (Group B), and at rest on the water for 24 h (Group C). TEEdlw in Group A matched TEEresp, whereas there was an overestimation of TEEdlw in both Groups B and C compared with TEEresp. However, compared with Group A, TEEdlw in Groups B and C had reduced the isotopic analytical variability and thus higher precision. The best regression model (TEEdlw = 1.37 TEEresp − 14.12) showed a high correlation (R2 = 0.82) between TEEdlw and TEEresp and allows a correction factor for field metabolic rates in streaked shearwaters. Our results demonstrate that the commonly made assumption that the DLW method is not appropriate for individual-based estimates may be incorrect in certain circumstances. Although a correction factor may be necessary when using the DLW method to estimate metabolic rate, greater levels of isotope eliminations provides DLW estimates with high precision, which can adequately represent relative individual estimates. Nevertheless, the DLW method, should be used with caution when characterizing interspecies difference of energy expenditures. PMID:26611463

  11. High levels of isotope elimination improve precision and allow individual-based measurements of metabolic rates in animals using the doubly labeled water method.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Masaki; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Maki; Oda, Emiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Oka, Nariko; Yoda, Ken

    2015-11-01

    Doubly labeled water (DLW) can be used to measure energy expenditure in free-ranging animals, but questions have been raised about its accuracy in different species or contexts. We investigated whether differences in the extent of isotope elimination affects the precision and accuracy of the DLW method, which can vary according to the experimental design or metabolic rate of the species. Estimated total energy expenditure by the DLW method (TEEdlw) was compared with actual total energy expenditure simultaneously measured via respirometry (TEEresp) in streaked shearwaters Calonectris leucomelas, a pelagic seabird. Subjects were divided into three groups with different experimental conditions: at rest on the ground for 24 h (Group A) or for 48 h (Group B), and at rest on the water for 24 h (Group C). TEEdlw in Group A matched TEEresp, whereas there was an overestimation of TEEdlw in both Groups B and C compared with TEEresp. However, compared with Group A, TEEdlw in Groups B and C had reduced the isotopic analytical variability and thus higher precision. The best regression model (TEEdlw = 1.37 TEEresp - 14.12) showed a high correlation (R(2) = 0.82) between TEEdlw and TEEresp and allows a correction factor for field metabolic rates in streaked shearwaters. Our results demonstrate that the commonly made assumption that the DLW method is not appropriate for individual-based estimates may be incorrect in certain circumstances. Although a correction factor may be necessary when using the DLW method to estimate metabolic rate, greater levels of isotope eliminations provides DLW estimates with high precision, which can adequately represent relative individual estimates. Nevertheless, the DLW method, should be used with caution when characterizing interspecies difference of energy expenditures.

  12. The study of stability on a laser-diode-pumped high-power high-repetition-rate intracavity frequency-doubled 532-nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shi-yong; Yao, Jian-Quan; Xu, De-gang; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Bai-gang; Zhou, Jia-ning; Wang, Peng

    2005-01-01

    High power laser-diode-pumped 532nm laser sources (including continuous wave and high repetition rate operation) are directly used for precise processing of metals and plastics. Furthermore, high power green laser will be used in some fields such as ocean exploration, laser probe and underwater communication. Recently, we reported a 110W diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG intracavity frequency doubled high stability 532nm laser. In the experiment, we found that the average output power of second harmonic fluctuated acutely with the variety of pumping current. Moreover, the length of arms between the mirrors were very sensitive to this cavity. We consider that one of the reason is the focus length of thermal lens of Nd:YAG rod alter with the variational pumping current, which makes the cavity be unstable. We consider the KTP crystal as a thin lens for its short length. As thermal lensing effect of the Nd:YAG rod is quite severe, so we consider it as thermal lensing medium. By ray matrix methods, we have obtained the stable regions and beam waist radii distribution in the flat-concave cavity. In our experiment, we used a pump head consisting of 80 diode bars with pentagon pump model and employed flat-concave cavity structure in order to achieve high stability output and increase output power. The total cavity length is 505mm. By using an acousto-optic Q-switching with high diffraction loss and the KTP crystal which is type II phase matching, 110 W high stability 532nm laser is achieved. The experimental result is in good agreement with the calculation.

  13. Morphological adaptation of rumen papillae during the dry period and early lactation as affected by rate of increase of concentrate allowance.

    PubMed

    Dieho, K; Bannink, A; Geurts, I A L; Schonewille, J T; Gort, G; Dijkstra, J

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the morphological adaptation of rumen papilla, which plays an important role in volatile fatty acid absorption, in dry and early lactation dairy cattle is limited. Therefore, macro- and microscopic changes in papilla morphology during the dry period and lactation and the effect of rate of increase of concentrate allowance were studied. Samples were collected from 12 rumen-cannulated Holstein Friesian dairy cows during a pretreatment period, 50, 30, and 10 d antepartum (the dry period) and 3 d postpartum (pp), and a treatment period, 9, 16, 30, 44, 60, and 80 d pp. Cows had free access to either a dry period ration [27% grass silage, 27% corn silage, 35% wheat straw, and 11% soybean meal on a dry matter (DM) basis] or a basal lactation ration (42% grass silage, 41% corn silage, and 17% soybean meal on a DM basis, and 0.9 kg of DM/d concentrate). Treatment consisted of either a rapid (1.0 kg of DM/d; RAP; n=6) or gradual (0.25 kg of DM/d; GRAD; n=6) increase of concentrate allowance (up to 10.9 kg of DM/d), starting at d 4 pp, aimed at creating a contrast in rumen-fermentable organic matter (FOM) intake. Papillae were collected from the ventral, ventral blind, and dorsal blind rumen sacs and measured digitally. Intake of DM (11.9 kg/d) and FOM (5.7 kg/d) did not change during the pretreatment period, but increased during the treatment period to 24.5 and 15.0 kg/d at 80 d pp, respectively. Concentrate treatment and sampling day interacted for FOM intake, which was 22% greater in RAP at 16 d pp compared with GRAD. Papilla surface area decreased during the pretreatment period by 19% to 28.0mm(2) at 3 d pp, thereafter increasing to 63.0mm(2) at 80 d pp. Concentrate treatment and sampling day interacted for surface area, which was greater in RAP compared with GRAD at 16 (46.0 vs. 33.2mm(2)), 30 (55.4 vs. 41.2mm(2)), and 44 (60.5 vs. 49.7 mm(2)) days pp, showing that papillae can respond to a rapid rate of increase of FOM intake by increasing growth rate

  14. Design considerations for bearingless rotary pumps.

    PubMed

    Kung, R T; Hart, R M

    1997-07-01

    The designs of rotary blood pumps have shown substantial technical progress over recent years, especially contact bearing designs. However, the concern for potential thromboembolism remains and can only be eliminated by the use of bearingless pumps. Bearingless designs can be achieved through the application of magnetic, hydrodynamic, and hydrostatic forces or a proper combination of these forces. Although a purely magnetically suspended, actively controlled system can be designed, judicious use of hydraulic forces can allow simplification of device configuration and control. In this study, bearingless designs were evaluated for both axial and centrifugal pump configurations. Trade-offs between shear rates and bearing leak rates were considered based upon constraints imposed by hemolysis and residence time. These principles were used for determining the design feasibility of a rotary pump using combined magnetic and hydraulic stabilizing forces.

  15. Enzymatic creatinine assays allow estimation of glomerular filtration rate in stages 1 and 2 chronic kidney disease using CKD-EPI equation.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Nils; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Cavalier, Etienne; Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Froissart, Marc; Piéroni, Laurence; Delanaye, Pierre

    2014-01-20

    The National Kidney Disease Education Program group demonstrated that MDRD equation is sensitive to creatinine measurement error, particularly at higher glomerular filtration rates. Thus, MDRD-based eGFR above 60 mL/min/1.73 m² should not be reported numerically. However, little is known about the impact of analytical error on CKD-EPI-based estimates. This study aimed at assessing the impact of analytical characteristics (bias and imprecision) of 12 enzymatic and 4 compensated Jaffe previously characterized creatinine assays on MDRD and CKD-EPI eGFR. In a simulation study, the impact of analytical error was assessed on a hospital population of 24084 patients. Ability using each assay to correctly classify patients according to chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages was evaluated. For eGFR between 60 and 90 mL/min/1.73 m², both equations were sensitive to analytical error. Compensated Jaffe assays displayed high bias in this range and led to poorer sensitivity/specificity for classification according to CKD stages than enzymatic assays. As compared to MDRD equation, CKD-EPI equation decreases impact of analytical error in creatinine measurement above 90 mL/min/1.73 m². Compensated Jaffe creatinine assays lead to important errors in eGFR and should be avoided. Accurate enzymatic assays allow estimation of eGFR until 90 mL/min/1.73 m² with MDRD and 120 mL/min/1.73 m² with CKD-EPI equation.

  16. Development of a surface micromachined spiral-channel viscous pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilani, Mohammad Ibrahim

    This work introduces a new pump, called the spiral pump, which targets the surface micromachining technology. We demonstrate the possibility of realizing the spiral pump geometry in standard surface micromachining, lay out the theoretical foundation for its operation, and conduct an objective assessment for its practicality. The spiral pump is a shear-driven viscous pump, which works by rotating a disk with a spiral groove at a close proximity over a stationary plate. Fluid contained in the spiral groove between the stationary plate and the rotating disk, is subject to a net tangential viscous stress, which allows it to be transported against an imposed pressure difference. A number of spiral pumps were fabricated in 5 levels of polysilicon using Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel Surface Micromachining Technology, SUMMiT, and the fabricated micropump were tested in dry-run mode using electrostatic probing and optical microscopy. To achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spiral micropump operation, an analytical model was developed for the flow field in the spiral channel of the pump using an approximation which replaces the spiral channel with an equivalent straight channel with appropriate dimensions and boundary conditions. An analytical solution for this model at the lubrication limit relates the flow rate, torque and power consumption of the spiral pump to the pressure difference and rotation rate. The model was validated using macroscale experiments conducted on a scaled up spiral pump model, which involved a quantitative characterization of the spiral pump performance. Those experiments validate the developed theory and help assess the practicality of the spiral pump concept. In addition to the spiral pump, two positive-displacement ring-gear pumps were designed and fabricated in this work. The feasibility of surface micromachined ring-gear pumps is briefly investigated in this work, and compare to that of the spiral micropump.

  17. Electrokinetic pumps and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip M. Paul

    2000-03-01

    Flow and ionic transport in porous media are central to electrokinetic pumping as well as to a host of other microfluidic devices. Electrokinetic pumping provides the ability to create high pressures (to over 10,000 psi) and high flow rates (over 1 mL/min) with a device having no moving parts and all liquid seals. The electrokinetic pump (EKP) is ideally suited for applications ranging from a high pressure integrated pump for chip-scale HPLC to a high flow rate integrated pump for forced liquid convection cooling of high-power electronics. Relations for flow rate and current fluxes in porous media are derived that provide a basis for analysis of complex microfluidic systems as well as for optimization of electrokinetic pumps.

  18. Determination of electron-impact transfer rate coefficients between argon 1s2 and 1s3 states by laser pump-probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, E. A. D.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Sadeghi, N.

    2013-10-01

    In a microwave argon plasma, the electron-impact population transfers between the first four excited states of argon are studied by time-resolved laser pump-probe technique. Metastable atoms in the 1s5 state (in Paschen's notation) are selectively pumped up to the 2p3 state, with a nanosecond pulsed dye laser tuned to the 706 nm argon transition and the temporal response of the densities in the 1s3, 1s4 and 1s5 states are monitored by time-resolved laser diode absorption. The electron density and temperature are also measured by Thomson scattering along the plasma column for different pressures. The rate coefficient measured for the 1s3 to 1s2 state transfer, for which only rough estimations exist in the literature is found to be 9 × 10-13 m3 s-1, almost five times larger than the value commonly assumed.

  19. Does an Open Recirculation Line Affect the Flow Rate and Pressure in a Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support Circuit With a Centrifugal or Roller Pump?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Spencer, Shannon B; Woitas, Karl; Glass, Kristen; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of an open or closed recirculation line on flow rate, circuit pressure, and hemodynamic energy transmission in simulated neonatal extracorporeal life support (ECLS) systems. The two neonatal ECLS circuits consisted of a Maquet HL20 roller pump (RP group) or a RotaFlow centrifugal pump (CP group), Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator, and Biomedicus arterial and venous cannulae (8 Fr and 10 Fr) primed with lactated Ringer's solution and packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 200 to 600 mL/min (200 mL/min increments) with a closed or open recirculation line at 36°C. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. In the RP group, the preoxygenator flow did not change when the recirculation line was open while the prearterial cannula flow decreased by 15.7-20.0% (P < 0.01). Circuit pressure, total circuit pressure drop, and hemodynamic energy delivered to patients also decreased (P < 0.01). In the CP group, the prearterial cannula flow did not change while preoxygenator flow increased by 13.6-18.8% (P < 0.01). Circuit pressure drop and hemodynamic energy transmission remained the same. The results showed that the shunt of an open recirculation line could decrease perfusion flow in patients in the ECLS circuit using a roller pump, but did not change perfusion flow in the circuit using a centrifugal pump. An additional flow sensor is needed to monitor perfusion flow in patients if any shunts exist in the ECLS circuit.

  20. Substitution rate and milk yield response to corn silage supplementation of late-lactation dairy cows grazing low-mass pastures at 2 daily allowances in autumn.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Prieto, L A; Peyraud, J L; Delagarde, R

    2011-07-01

    Feed costs in dairy production systems may be decreased by extending the grazing season to periods such as autumn when grazing low-mass pastures is highly probable. The aim of this autumn study was to determine the effect of corn silage supplementation [0 vs. 8 kg of dry matter (DM) of a mixture 7:1 of corn silage and soybean meal] on pasture intake (PI), milk production, and grazing behavior of dairy cows grazing low-mass ryegrass pastures at 2 daily pasture allowances (PA; low PA=18 vs. high PA=30 kg of DM/cow above 2.5 cm). Twelve multiparous Holstein cows were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 14-d periods. Pre-grazing pasture mass and pre-grazing plate meter pasture height averaged 1.8 t of DM/ha (above 2.5 cm) and 6.3 cm, respectively. The quality of the offered pasture (above 2.5 cm) was low because of dry conditions before and during the experiment (crude protein=11.5% of DM; net energy for lactation=5.15 MJ/kg of DM; organic matter digestibility=61.9%). The interaction between PA and supplementation level was significant for PI but not for milk production. Supplementation decreased PI from 11.6 to 7.6 kg of DM/d at low PA and from 13.1 to 7.3 kg of DM/d at high PA. The substitution rate was, therefore, lower at low than at high PA (0.51 vs. 0.75). Pasture intake increased with increasing PA in unsupplemented treatments, and was not affected by PA in supplemented treatments. Milk production averaged 13.5 kg/d and was greater at high than at low PA (+1.4 kg/d) and in supplemented than unsupplemented treatments (+5.2 kg/d). Milk fat concentration averaged 4.39% and was similar between treatments. Milk protein concentration increased from 3.37 to 3.51% from unsupplemented to supplemented treatments, and did not vary according to PA. Grazing behavior parameters were only affected by supplementation. On average, daily grazing time decreased (539 vs. 436 min) and daily ruminating time increased (388 vs. 486 min) from 0 to 8 kg of supplement DM. The PI

  1. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  2. Pump tank divider plate for sump suction sodium pumps

    DOEpatents

    George, John A.; Nixon, Donald R.

    1977-01-01

    A circular plate extends across the diameter of "sump suction" pump, with a close clearance between the edge of the plate and the wall of the pump tank. The plate is located above the pump impeller, inlet and outlet flow nozzles but below the sodium free surface and effectively divides the pump tank into two separate chambers. On change of pump speed, the close fitting flow restriction plate limits the rate of flow into or out of the upper chamber, thereby minimizing the rate of level change in the tank and permitting time for the pump cover gas pressure to be varied to maintain an essentially constant level.

  3. [Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Magallón Pedrera, I; Soto Torres, I

    1999-11-01

    Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps allow one to administer pharmaceuticals in hospitals as well as in primary health care centers and furthermore these pumps present multiple advantages for patients and their families since they make it possible to carry out treatment in a patient's home while at the same time lowering the costs involved. The authors analyze the most out standing aspects of portable peristaltic perfusion pumps along with their characteristics, installation, programming, and how to turn them on; in addition, the authors list the maintenance care which these pumps require.

  4. On-line PWR RHR pump performance testing following motor and impeller replacement

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarzo, J.T.

    1996-12-01

    On-line maintenance and replacement of safety-related pumps requires the performance of an inservice test to determine and confirm the operational readiness of the pumps. In 1995, major maintenance was performed on two Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Residual Heat Removal (RHR) Pumps. A refurbished spare motor was overhauled with a new mechanical seal, new motor bearings and equipped with pump`s `B` impeller. The spare was installed into the `B` train. The motor had never been run in the system before. A pump performance test was developed to verify it`s operational readiness and determine the in-situ pump performance curve. Since the unit was operating, emphasis was placed on conducting a highly accurate pump performance test that would ensure that it satisfied the NSSS vendors accident analysis minimum acceptance curve. The design of the RHR System allowed testing of one train while the other was aligned for normal operation. A test flow path was established from the Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) through the pump (under test) and back to the RWST. This allowed staff to conduct a full flow range pump performance test. Each train was analyzed and an expression developed that included an error vector term for the TDH (ft), pressure (psig), and flow rate (gpm) using the variance error vector methodology. This method allowed the engineers to select a test instrumentation system that would yield accurate readings and minimal measurement errors, for data taken in the measurement of TDH (P,Q) versus Pump Flow Rate (Q). Test results for the `B` Train showed performance well in excess of the minimum required. The motor that was originally in the `B` train was similarly overhauled and equipped with `A` pump`s original impeller, re-installed in the `A` train, and tested. Analysis of the `A` train results indicate that the RHR pump`s performance was also well in excess of the vendors requirements.

  5. 41 CFR 301-74.10 - May the conference lodging allowance ever exceed 25 percent above the lodging per diem rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May the conference... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.10 May...

  6. 41 CFR 301-74.10 - May the conference lodging allowance ever exceed 25 percent above the lodging per diem rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May the conference... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.10 May...

  7. 41 CFR 301-74.10 - May the conference lodging allowance ever exceed 25 percent above the lodging per diem rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May the conference... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.10 May...

  8. 41 CFR 301-74.10 - May the conference lodging allowance ever exceed 25 percent above the lodging per diem rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the conference... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.10 May...

  9. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  10. Future directions in 980-nm pump lasers: submarine deployment to low-cost watt-class terrestrial pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulgazov, Vadim N.; Jackson, Gordon S.; Lascola, Kevin M.; Major, Jo S.; Parke, Ross; Richard, Tim; Rossin, Victor V.; Zhang, Kai

    1999-09-01

    . Since the failure rate allowable for an amplifier is not a function of the number of pumps employed in the amplifier, the allowable failure rate of an individual pump laser is decreasing for next-generation amplifiers. This will lead to specifications for terrestrial pumps well below 1000 FIT, and may lead to the case where high power amplifiers need laser pump reliability to approach 100 FIT. In addition, 980 nm laser diodes are now being deployed in submarine systems where failure rates lower than 100 FIT are commonly specified. It is obvious that both terrestrial and submarine markets are pushing allowable failure rates for pumps for optical amplifiers to continually decrease. A second push for improvement is in the output power of 980 nm pump modules. There exist a number of motivations for increasing the output power of pump lasers. First, each additional channel in a DWDM system requires additional power. To first order, a doubling in channel count implies a doubling in pump power. Second, larger amplifiers require multiple pumps. Higher output power from pump modules allows for fewer pumps, less complicated control systems and smaller size amplifiers. The discussion of this paper will focus on how current development progress of 980 nm laser diodes addresses these issues: better reliability and higher output powers.

  11. Measuring swirl at a model scale of 1:1 for vertically submersible pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fockert, A.; Verhaart, F. I. H.; Czarnota, Z.; Rajkumar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Intakes of large pump stations are often designed with the aid of hydraulic modeling. The approach flow to pumps is tested for adverse hydraulic phenomena, such as pre-swirl, velocity variations and vortices. Most commonly, the limits for these phenomena are taken from the ANSI/HI 9.8-2012 standard - Rotodynamic Pumps for Pump Intake Design. The standard, however, does not explain how real pumps respond to swirl, uneven velocity distribution or vortices. The present joined study between Deltares and Xylem aims to bridge this gap. At the Deltares pump sump test facility, two identical pump compartments were built according to the ANSI/HI 9.8-2012 standard. In one of the compartments, a submersible, vertical column pump (Flygt PL7020) was installed, while a 1:1 scale model of that pump was installed in the other compartment. This arrangement allowed measurements of both pump performance (pump head and input power as a function of flow rate) and the model parameters (pre-rotation and vortex occurrence) for nearly identical approach flow conditions. By varying the geometry of the approach channels, the asymmetry of the flow was varied to produce various degrees of pre-swirl including values in excess of the commonly accepted limit of 5 degrees. This paper describes the measurement setup, the results of the measurements with the model pump and the measurement plan for the prototype pump.

  12. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  13. DIRECT CURRENT ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, A.H.

    1957-11-01

    An improved d-c electromagnetic pump is presented in which the poles, and consequently the magetic gap at the poles, are tapered to be wider at the upstream end. In addition, the cross section of the tube carryiQ the liquid metal is tapered so that the velocity of the pumped liquid increases in the downstream direction at a rate such that the counter-induced voltage in the liquid metal remains constant as it traverses the region between the poles. This configuration compensates for the distortion of the magnetic field caused by the induced voltage that would otherwise result in the lowering of the pumping capacity. This improved electromagnetic pump as practical application in the pumping of liquid metal coolants for nuclear reactors where conventional positive displacement pumps have proved unsatisfactory due to the high temperatures and the corrosive properties of the liquid metals involved.

  14. Demonstration of a 100 Hz repetition rate gain-saturated diode-pumped table-top soft x-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Brendan A; Wernsing, Keith A; Curtis, Alden H; Furch, Federico J; Luther, Bradley M; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a gain-saturated table-top soft x-ray laser at 100 Hz repetition rate. The laser generates an average power of 0.15 mW at λ=18.9  nm, the highest laser power reported to date from a sub-20-nm wavelength compact source. Picosecond laser pulses of 1.5 μJ energy were produced at λ=18.9  nm by amplification in a Mo plasma created by tailoring the temporal intensity profile of single pump pulses with 1 J energy produced by a diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Lasing was also obtained in the 13.9 nm line of Ni-like Ag. These results increase by an order of magnitude the repetition rate of plasma-based soft x-ray lasers opening the path to milliwatt average power table-top lasers at sub-20 nm wavelengths.

  15. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaki, M.

    1986-01-07

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump for delivering fuel to the cylinders of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a pump housing with a fuel chamber therein to which fuel is supplied from a fuel tank; means for compressing fuel in the pump chamber and delivering the compressed fuel to the engine cylinders with such means including a pump plunger adapted to be reciprocated so as to introduce fuel into the pump chamber and to pressurize the introduced fuel; spill means for spilling to a low-pressure side on a fuel tank side the compressed fuel which was pressurized in the pump chamber to be delivered from the pump chamber to the engine cylinders, the spill mechanism including a spill passage communicating with the pump chamber and including a solenoid valve located in the spill passage for opening and closing the spill passage with predetermined timing; escape for allowing the compressed fuel pressurized in the pump chamber to escape to the low-pressure side of the fuel tank side.

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Jitter and the minimal pulse repetition rate of a diode-pumped passively Q-switched solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovolov, M. I.; Shatalov, A. F.

    2008-10-01

    The jitter of radiation pulses from diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and Nd3+:Ca3Ga2Ge3O12 (Nd:CGGG) crystal lasers is studied. It is found that the jitter j depends on the laser pulse repetition rate f as j = A/fγ. It is shown that the minimal pulse repetition rate fL of the laser is determined by the jitter parameters A and γ and is equal to A1/(γ-1). For the Nd:YAG and Nd:CGGG lasers, fL was 14 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively.

  17. Fuel pumping system and method

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, Scott F.; Wang, Lifeng ,

    2006-12-19

    A fuel pumping system that includes a pump drive is provided. A first pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a first flow of pressurized fuel. A second pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a second flow of pressurized fuel. A first solenoid is operatively connected to the first pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the first flow of pressurized fuel. A second solenoid is operatively connected to the second pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the second flow of pressurized fuel.

  18. Fuel Pumping System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, Scott F.; Wang, Lifeng

    2005-12-13

    A fuel pumping system that includes a pump drive is provided. A first pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a first flow of pressurized fuel. A second pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a second flow of pressurized fuel. A first solenoid is operatively connected to the first pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the first flow of pressurized fuel. A second solenoid is operatively connected to the second pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the second flow of pressurized fuel.

  19. Rod pumping and proppant flowback at the Lost Hills Field

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, I.G.

    1995-12-31

    Proppant flowback from hydraulically fractured wells can lead to sand wear on the pump barrel and plunger and increased pulling costs on rod pumped wells. Two approaches for lengthening run times of the pumps were tried. One approach was to install pumps that will allow production of a sand laden fluid. Pressure actuated plunger (PAP) pumps were field tested and showed an average increase of 81.6% in run time. These split ring wiper pumps clean the barrel of sand prior to the passing of the plunger. The other approach was to keep the sand and from entering the pumps. When down hole filters were utilized, run life of the pumps with the filters increases 135%. Well pulling cost savings of $11.91 per well-day and $9.24 per well-day are documented for the PAP pumps and filters, respectively. Application guidelines based on the sand loading rate and gross liquid production of the wells are presented, as well as some operational experiences.

  20. 33 CFR 157.126 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.126 Pumps. (a) Crude oil must be supplied to the COW machines by COW system pumps or cargo pumps. (b) The pumps under paragraph...) A sufficient pressure and flow is supplied to allow the simultaneous operation of those COW...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1135 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Pumps. (a) Water to the water spray system must be supplied by: (1) A pump that is only for the use of... allowed under paragraph (d) of this section, each pump for each water spray system must have the capacity... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumps. 154.1135 Section 154.1135 Shipping COAST...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1135 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pumps. (a) Water to the water spray system must be supplied by: (1) A pump that is only for the use of... allowed under paragraph (d) of this section, each pump for each water spray system must have the capacity... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pumps. 154.1135 Section 154.1135 Shipping COAST...

  3. 46 CFR 154.1135 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pumps. (a) Water to the water spray system must be supplied by: (1) A pump that is only for the use of... allowed under paragraph (d) of this section, each pump for each water spray system must have the capacity... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pumps. 154.1135 Section 154.1135 Shipping COAST...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1135 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pumps. (a) Water to the water spray system must be supplied by: (1) A pump that is only for the use of... allowed under paragraph (d) of this section, each pump for each water spray system must have the capacity... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumps. 154.1135 Section 154.1135 Shipping COAST...

  5. 46 CFR 154.1135 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pumps. (a) Water to the water spray system must be supplied by: (1) A pump that is only for the use of... allowed under paragraph (d) of this section, each pump for each water spray system must have the capacity... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumps. 154.1135 Section 154.1135 Shipping COAST...

  6. Insulin pumps: from inception to the present and toward the future.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, F M; Smith, F J; Keady, S; Taylor, K M G

    2010-04-01

    As an alternative to the usual insulin injections, insulin pumps have been introduced as an advanced method of insulin delivery for managing type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. This review documents the history of insulin pump development and the production of 'smart pumps' that offer patients greater dosing accuracy, flexibility, and ease of use. This has resulted in an increase in the number of insulin pump users around the world. This paper also provides a comprehensive survey of the pumps currently available on the market and their specifications. Unique features of each product and the drawbacks are addressed in the review. The future direction of insulin pump development is targeted toward closing the loop, to allow feedback control between an insulin pump and a glucose sensor, and hence finer adjustment of insulin delivery rates as required.

  7. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  8. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  9. Heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, P. V.

    1982-11-01

    Heat pumps for residential/commercial space heating and hot tap water make use of free energy of direct or indirect solar heat and save from about 40 to about 70 percent of energy if compared to a conventional heating system with the same energy basis. In addition, the electrically driven compressor heat pump is able to substitute between 40% (bivalent alternative operation) to 100% (monovalent operation) of the fuel oil of an oilfired heating furnace. For average Central European conditions, solar space heating systems with high solar coverage factor show the following sequence of increasing cost effectiveness: pure solar systems (without heat pumps); heat pump assisted solar systems; solar assisted heat pump systems; subsoil/water heat pumps; air/water heat pumps; air/air heat pumps.

  10. Nature's pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven

    1994-10-01

    Although diverse in both form and function, the fluid-forcing devices in organisms have many of the capabilities and limitations of pumps of human design. Nature's pumps certainly look quite different from those of our technology, but all of them perform the same task. The author examines a few of these with an eye toward technological parallels and the two functional classes -- positive-displacement pumps and fluid-dynamic pumps.

  11. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Luscomb, D.A.

    1984-05-22

    A fuel injection pump including a plunger and a piston movably disposed in a pumping chamber, means for initiating fuel injection and means for terminating fuel injection, the plunger periodically pressurizing fuel in a pressure chamber and the piston spaced from the plunger and allowing a metering chamber to fill with a metered quantity of fuel to be injected to an engine. The means for initiating injection comprises a pilot valve having a solenoid to selectively operate between either of two states and a control valve movable between first and second positions in response to the state of pilot valve, the first position filling the metering chamber with the metered quantity of fuel. The pilot valve determines the fuel quantity to be delivered to the engine relative to a signal from an electronic controller. An accumulator is pressurized during each cycle of the plunger to provide pressurized fuel during a metering phase. A variable orifice adjusts the rate of flow during the time fuel is being metered to metering chamber.

  12. Role of self-caught fish in total fish consumption rates for recreational fishermen: Average consumption for some species exceeds allowable intake.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption focus on recreational or subsistence fishing, on awareness and adherence to advisories, consumption patterns, and contaminants in fish. Yet the general public obtains their fish from commercial sources. In this paper I examine fish consumption patterns of recreational fishermen in New Jersey to determine: 1) consumption rates for self-caught fish and for other fish, 2) meals consumed per year, 3) average meal size, and average daily intake of mercury, and 4) variations in these parameters for commonly-consumed fish, and different methods of computing intake. Over 300 people were interviewed at fishing sites and fishing clubs along the New Jersey shore. Consumption patterns of anglers varied by species of fish. From 2 to 90 % of the anglers ate the different fish species, and between 9 and 75 % gave fish away to family or friends. Self-caught fish made up 7 to 92 % of fish diets. On average, self-caught fish were eaten for only 2 to 6 months of the year, whereas other fish (commercial or restaurant) were eaten up to 10 months a year. Anglers consumed from 5 to 36 meals of different fish a year, which resulted in intake of mercury ranging from 0.01 to 0.22 ug/kg/day. Average intake of Mako shark, swordfish, and tuna (sushi, canned tuna, self-caught tuna) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's oral, chronic reference dose for mercury of 0.1 ug/kg/day. However, computing intake using consumption for the highest month results in average mercury intake exceeding the reference dose for striped bass and bluefish as well. These data, and the variability in consumption patterns, have implications for risk assessors, risk managers, and health professionals.

  13. Role of self-caught fish in total fish consumption rates for recreational fishermen: Average consumption for some species exceeds allowable intake

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption focus on recreational or subsistence fishing, on awareness and adherence to advisories, consumption patterns, and contaminants in fish. Yet the general public obtains their fish from commercial sources. In this paper I examine fish consumption patterns of recreational fishermen in New Jersey to determine: 1) consumption rates for self-caught fish and for other fish, 2) meals consumed per year, 3) average meal size, and average daily intake of mercury, and 4) variations in these parameters for commonly-consumed fish, and different methods of computing intake. Over 300 people were interviewed at fishing sites and fishing clubs along the New Jersey shore. Consumption patterns of anglers varied by species of fish. From 2 to 90 % of the anglers ate the different fish species, and between 9 and 75 % gave fish away to family or friends. Self-caught fish made up 7 to 92 % of fish diets. On average, self-caught fish were eaten for only 2 to 6 months of the year, whereas other fish (commercial or restaurant) were eaten up to 10 months a year. Anglers consumed from 5 to 36 meals of different fish a year, which resulted in intake of mercury ranging from 0.01 to 0.22 ug/kg/day. Average intake of Mako shark, swordfish, and tuna (sushi, canned tuna, self-caught tuna) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s oral, chronic reference dose for mercury of 0.1 ug/kg/day. However, computing intake using consumption for the highest month results in average mercury intake exceeding the reference dose for striped bass and bluefish as well. These data, and the variability in consumption patterns, have implications for risk assessors, risk managers, and health professionals. PMID:23914136

  14. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyama, A.; Nishimura, T.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump comprising: (a) engageable first and second cam members, the first cam member reciprocating axially as the first cam member moves angularly relative to the second cam member when the first and second cam members are in engagement; (b) means for urging the first cam member toward the second cam member to engage the first and second cam members; (c) a plunger connected to the first cam member for reciprocation with the first cam member, the plunger defining at least a part of a pumping chamber, the pumping chamber contracting and expanding as the plunger reciprocates; (d) means for allowing fuel to move into the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber expands in a fuel intake stroke; (e) means for allowing the fuel to move out of the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber contracts in a fuel compression stroke; and (f) means for resisting movement of the plunger in at least part of the fuel compression stroke and relieving resistance to the movement of the plunger in the fuel intake stroke wherein the resisting means comprises a piston slidably mounted on the plunger, a spring urging the piston to seat the piston on a shoulder on the plunger so that the piston reciprocates as the plunger reciprocates, wherein the piston is seated on the shoulder in the fuel compression stroke and separates from the shoulder against the force of the spring in the fuel intake stroke, a second fluid chamber at least partially defined by the piston.

  15. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF.

  16. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  17. Modeling transient gain dynamics in a cladding-pumped Yb-doped fiber ampliefier pulsed at low repetition rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, G. C.; Wright, M.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of 1-50 kHz repetition rate, pulsed Yb-fiber amplifiers show peak powers to 10 kW with half-widths < 30 ns, consistent with commercial amplifier performance. This device is a potential source for deep space-communication.

  18. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  19. Microfluidic reflow pumps.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Bryan; Tsai, Long-Fang; Anderson, Ryan R; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2015-07-01

    A new microfluidic pump, termed a reflow pump, is designed to operate with a sub-μl sample volume and transport it back and forth between two pneumatically actuated reservoirs through a flow channel typically containing one or more sensor surfaces. The ultimate motivation is to efficiently use the small sample volume in conjunction with convection to maximize analyte flux to the sensor surface(s) in order to minimize sensor response time. In this paper, we focus on the operational properties of the pumps themselves (rather than the sensor surfaces), and demonstrate both two-layer and three-layer polydimethylsiloxane reflow pumps. For the three-layer pump, we examine the effects of reservoir actuation pressure and actuation period, and demonstrate average volumetric flow rates as high as 500 μl/min. We also show that the two-layer design can pump up to 93% of the sample volume during each half period and demonstrate integration of a reflow pump with a single-chip microcantilever array to measure maximum flow rate.

  20. SHINE Vacuum Pump Test Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Gregg A; Peters, Brent

    2013-09-30

    Normetex pumps used world-wide for tritium service are no longer available. DOE and other researchers worldwide have spent significant funds characterizing this pump. Identification of alternate pumps is required for performance and compatibility with tritium gas. Many of the pumps that could be used to meet the functional performance requirements (e.g. pressure and flow conditions) of the Normetex pump have features that include the use of polymers or oils and greases that are not directly compatible with tritium service. This study assembles a test system to determine the flow characteristics for candidate alternate pumps. These tests are critical to the movement of tritium through the SHINE Tritium Purification System (TPS). The purpose of the pump testing is two-fold: (1) obtain baseline vacuum pump characteristics for an alternate (i.e. ''Normetex replacement'') pump intended for use in tritium service; and (2) verify that low pressure hydrogen gas can be transported over distances up to 300 feet by the candidate pumps. Flow rates and nominal system pressures have been identified for the SHINE Mo-99 production process Tritium Purification System (TPS). To minimize the line sizes for the transfer of low pressure tritium from the Neutron Driver Accelerator System (NDAS) to the primary processing systems in the TPS, a ''booster'' pump has been located near the accelerator in the design. A series of pump tests were performed at various configurations using hydrogen gas (no tritium) to ensure that this concept is practical and maintains adequate flow rates and required pressures. This report summarizes the results of the tests that have been performed using various pump configurations. The current design of the Tritium Purification System requires the ''booster'' pump to discharge to or to be backed by another vacuum pump. Since Normetex pumps are no longer manufactured, a commercially available Edwards scroll pump will be used to back the booster pump. In this

  1. Jarvik 2000 pump technology and miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Jarvik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Blood-pump miniaturization has made amazing progress, reducing the pump diameter to one-tenth of the size of previous positive displacement pumps. In particular, axial-flow-pump technology allows tiny pumps running at high speeds to deliver from 2 to 10 L/min. A review of the background inventions of the Jarvik 2000 technology is presented, together with the reason that making pumps smaller than demanded by the particular application for which they are designed is counterproductive. Pump miniaturization is nearing its practical limit. The optimization of performance and patient outcomes should remain our primary design goal.

  2. Indexes of pumps for oil field pumping units

    SciTech Connect

    Ibragimov, E.S.

    1995-07-01

    As reported previously, a series of oil field pumping units has been developed with power outputs of 125, 250, 500, and 1000 kW, designed for injecting working fluids in cementing operations in oil and gas wells, hydraulic fracturing of formations, washing out sand plugs, and other production operations. The units are designed for the use of three-plunger pumps with individual power outputs of 125 or 500 kW. In the 250- and 1000-kW units, two such pumps are used. The 1000-kW pumping unit serves mainly for deep-penetration hydraulic fracturing of formations, and also for fracturing deep formations. The hydraulic fracturing process does not require the use of units with two pumps; this has been demonstrated by experience, both here and in other countries. All units intended for use in hydraulic fracturing are built with a single pump, transmission, and drive. Pumping units for well cementing must have two pumps that will give a high delivery rate. At the start of the operation, a single pump can be used to feed water into the cement mixer, with the second pump used to transfer the cement slurry to the well. Then both pumps are connected to the slurry injection line. The operation of these pumps is described.

  3. Numerical study of pressure fluctuations transfer law in different flow rate of turbine mode in a prototype pump turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. K.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, J. T.; Qin, D. Q.; Wei, X. Z.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation using SST k-w turbulence model was carried out, to predict pressure fluctuation transfer law in turbine mode. Three operating points with different mass flow rates are simulated. The results of numerical simulation show that, the amplitude and frequency of pressure fluctuations in different positions are very different. The transfer law of amplitude and frequency of pressure fluctuations change with different position and different mass flow rate. Blade passing frequency (BPF) is the first dominant frequency in vaneless space, while component in this frequency got smaller in the upstream and downstream of vaneless space when the mass flow is set. Furthermore triple blade passing frequency (3BPF) component obtained a different transfer law through the whole flow passage. The amplitude and frequency of pressure fluctuations is also different in different circumference position of vaneless space. When the mass flow is different, the distribution of pressure fluctuations in circumference is different. The frequency component of pressure fluctuations in all the positions is different too.

  4. Optical pump wavelength dependence in visible-pump visible-probe spectroscopy of noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahota, Derek G.; Lobo, Calvin; Duch, Konrad; Dodge, J. Steven

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a femtosecond visible-pump visible-probe reflectometer with individually tunable pump and probe photon energies. The spectrometer has been used to study optically thick films of the noble metals Au and Cu over a wide variety of pump fluences and photon energies. Through comparison between experimental measurements and two-temperature model (TTM) simulations, we estimate an electron-phonon coupling constant, g, of 2.37 ±0.11 x10^16 Wm-3K-1 for Au and 1.19 ±0.13 x10^17 Wm-3K-1 for Cu, consistent with previous studies. The variation of the optical pump parameters allows a more accurate determination of the electron-phonon coupling constant. The relaxation rate, τ, of the thermally excited electrons is shown to be strongly dependent on the peak electron temperature of the excited sample, and only weakly dependent on the pump photon energy. The static dielectric constant is found to significantly underestimate the dependence of the differential reflectivity on the pump photon energy.

  5. A 1 kHz A-scan rate pump-probe laser-ultrasound system for robust inspection of composites.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Shtokolov, Alex; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We recently built a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aircraft composites and demonstrated its greatly improved sensitivity and stability compared with current noncontact systems. It is also very attractive in terms of cost, stability to environmental noise and surface roughness, simplicity in adjustment, footprint, and flexibility. A new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is a key component of this all-optical LU pump-probe system. Very high A-scan rates can be achieved because no reference arm or stabilization feedback are needed. Here, we demonstrate LU system performance at 1000 A-scans/s combined with a fast 2-D translator operating at a scanning speed of 100 mm/s with a peak acceleration of 10 m/s(2) in both lateral directions to produce parallel B-scans at high rates. The fast scanning strategy is described in detail. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of noise equivalent pressure, was further improved to be only 8.3 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a noncontact ultrasonic detector of this dimension used to inspect aircraft composites.

  6. 4.0 μm, high repetition rate periodically poled magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by steep leading edge pulsed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Liu, Qiang; Ji, Encai; Chen, Hailong; Gong, Mali

    2014-10-10

    A high repetition rate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) generating an idler laser with a wavelength as long as 4.0 μm at 200 and 400 kHz was demonstrated in this paper. The OPO was pumped by a master oscillator power amplifier structure fiber laser with excellent characteristics. The pump pulse from the fiber laser had a steep leading edge, which was theoretically proved to improve the OPO's performance, compared with the Gaussian pump pulse. A homemade periodically poled magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate crystal with a grating period of 29 μm was employed in our experiment. By optimizing the resonator, 2.75 and 1.67 W idler lasers were finally achieved at repetition rates as high as 200 and 400 kHz, respectively, with a wavelength as long as 4.0 μm. The conversion efficiencies were 12.03% and 7.31%, respectively.

  7. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  8. Introduction to Design and Analysis of High Speed Pumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    decades because of the use of more efficient CFD methods and sophisticated non intrusive measurement techniques allowing to take into account the flow...the head equivalent to the vapour pressure of the liquid at a particular temperature. For a given mass flow rate, pump total head suddenly decrease

  9. Multiphase pumping - operation & control

    SciTech Connect

    Salis, J. de; Marolies, C. de; Falcimaigne, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews field issues related to the planning, installation and operation of the helico-axial multiphase pumps. Interest for multiphase production, which leads to simpler and smaller in-field installations, is primarily dictated by the need for more a cost effective production system. Multiphase pumping is essentially a means of adding energy to the unprocessed effluent which enables the liquid/gas mixture to be transported over long distances without the need for prior separation. The Poseidon helico-axial pumps, under normal operating conditions, are largely unaffected by process fluctuations at pump inlet (changes in pressure, liquid or gas flow rate). They have demonstrated a stable behavior (self-adaptive capability with regards to instantaneous changes). A multiphase pump set is designed to operate under changing/fluctuating process conditions. An important issue related to pump operability and flexibility has to do with the driver selection: fixed speed vs. variable speed. In some cases a fixed speed drive provides sufficient operational flexibility. In other cases variable speed can be chosen. Pump operation & control strategies are presented and discussed.

  10. Insulin pumps and their use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wollitzer, Adrienne D; Zisser, Howard; Jovanovic, Lois

    2010-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy has continued to increase, both as obesity drives up the rate of glucose intolerance itself and as improvements in diabetes and infertility treatments allow more women with diabetes to become and remain pregnant into the third trimester. With this increase has come a concomitant increase in the number of pregnant women using insulin to control their blood glucose in pregnancy. This review seeks to identify advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump use in pregnancy, as compared to a more traditional multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin regimen. Insulin pumps have not yet been shown to offer superior glucose control compared to MDI insulin, and thus many healthcare practitioners and health insurance companies are hesitant to adopt such a practice; however, insulin pumps often facilitate ease of usage of insulin and promote postpartum insulin use when indicated. Although only a small percentage of pregnant women with diabetes in the United States currently use insulin pumps, we believe that insulin pumps may represent a superior mode of insulin delivery for many women with diabetes in pregnancy.

  11. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  12. Equations determine reasonable rod pump submergence depth

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yongquan; Cai Wizhong

    1997-03-24

    A reasonable rod pump submergence depth can be calculated by combining fluid level changes with piston travel. Submergence depth is affected by the pump fill factor, reservoir fluid viscosity, rod pump type, and pumping parameters such as pump diameter, polished-rod stroke length, and pumping speed. Fluid level velocity can be obtained with an energy balance, and piston travel rate is based on the polished-rod travel. The paper describes the pump fill factor, piston travel velocity, fluid level rise, flow coefficient, reasonable submergence depth, and results from equations.

  13. Satellite Propellant Pump Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Veres, Joseph P.; Hah, Chunill; Nerone, Anthony L.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Fraser, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn initiated a satellite propellant pump technology demonstration program. The goal was to demonstrate the technologies for a 60 percent efficient pump at 1 gpm flow rate and 500 psia pressure rise. The pump design and analysis used the in-house developed computer codes named PUMPA and HPUMP3D. The requirements lead to a 4-stage impeller type pump design with a tip diameter of 0.54 inches and a rotational speed of 57,000 rpm. Analyses indicated that flow cavitation was not a problem in the design. Since the flow was incompressible, the stages were identical. Only the 2-stage pump was designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested for demonstration. Water was selected as the surrogate fluid for hydrazine in this program. Complete mechanical design including stress and dynamic analyses were conducted. The pump was driven by an electric motor directly coupled to the impellers. Runs up to 57,000 rpm were conducted, where a pressure rise of 200 psia at a flow rate of 0.8 gpm was measured to validate the design effort.

  14. A two-atom electron pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, B.; Riwar, R.-P.; Voisin, B.; Dupont-Ferrier, E.; Wacquez, R.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; Splettstoesser, J.; Jehl, X.

    2013-03-01

    With the development of single-atom transistors, consisting of single dopants, nanofabrication has reached an extreme level of miniaturization. Promising functionalities for future nanoelectronic devices are based on the possibility of coupling several of these dopants to each other. This already allowed to perform spectroscopy of the donor state by d.c. electrical transport. The next step, namely manipulating a single electron over two dopants, remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate electron pumping through two phosphorus donors in series implanted in a silicon nanowire. While quantized pumping is achieved in the low-frequency adiabatic regime, we observe remarkable features at higher frequency when the charge transfer is limited either by the tunnelling rates to the electrodes or between the two donors. The transitions between quantum states are modelled involving a Landau-Zener transition, allowing to reproduce in detail the characteristic signatures observed in the non-adiabatic regime.

  15. A two-atom electron pump

    PubMed Central

    Roche, B.; Riwar, R.-P.; Voisin, B.; Dupont-Ferrier, E.; Wacquez, R.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; Splettstoesser, J.; Jehl, X.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of single-atom transistors, consisting of single dopants, nanofabrication has reached an extreme level of miniaturization. Promising functionalities for future nanoelectronic devices are based on the possibility of coupling several of these dopants to each other. This already allowed to perform spectroscopy of the donor state by d.c. electrical transport. The next step, namely manipulating a single electron over two dopants, remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate electron pumping through two phosphorus donors in series implanted in a silicon nanowire. While quantized pumping is achieved in the low-frequency adiabatic regime, we observe remarkable features at higher frequency when the charge transfer is limited either by the tunnelling rates to the electrodes or between the two donors. The transitions between quantum states are modelled involving a Landau–Zener transition, allowing to reproduce in detail the characteristic signatures observed in the non-adiabatic regime. PMID:23481389

  16. High-power LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier at 1 kHz repetition rate with volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for broadening and compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ming-Liang; Chen, Li-Yuan; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Pulse width of 8.7 ps was broadened to 102.2, 198 ps with single and double pass the VBG respectively. When the 102.2 ps pulse was injected into 1 kHz repetition rate of LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier (RA), pulse width of 87.5 ps at 1 kHz was obtained with the pulse energy of 9.4 mJ, the beam quality of M^2 factor was 1.2. The pulse width was compressed to 32.7 ps with a single pass VBG and the pulse energy reduced to 8.8 mJ, and the power density was up to 15.2 GW/cm2, the stability for pulse to pulse rms is about 0.6 %, beam pointing was about 35 μrad. In addition, when 198 ps pulse was injected into RA, pulse width of 156 ps was obtained which energy was 9.6 mJ, the pulse width was compressed to 38 ps by double passing the VBG, the pulse energy decreased to 8.5 mJ. Chirped VBG is a new way to obtain high-intensity picosecond pulse laser system simple and smaller.

  17. 42. (Credit JTL) No. 3 low service pumping engine built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. (Credit JTL) No. 3 low service pumping engine built in 1920 by Worthington Pump and Machinery Corp. (No. 2 low service pump is submerged in 1911-1912 pump pit on Cross Bayou). This engine was built with 9", 15" and 24"x24" cylinders and could pump 5 mgd; grating covers pump pit opening. Elevator in cage at extreme left descends to pit bottom allowing easier access than spiral stairway. Electric low service pump motor to left also; pump located in bottom of pit. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  18. Viability study of oscillatory flow pumps using bimorph piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatanabe, Sandro L.; Pires, Rogério F.; Choi, Andres; Nakasone, Paulo H.; Silva, Emílio C. N.

    2007-04-01

    Precision flow pumps have been widely studied over the last three decades. They have been applied in the areas of Biology, Pharmacy and Medicine in applications usually related to the dosage of medicine and chemical reagents. In addition, thermal management solutions for electronic devices have also been recently developed using these kinds of pumps offering better performance with low noise and low power consumption. In a previous work, the working principle of a pump based on the use of a bimorph piezoelectric actuator inserted in a fluid channel to generate flow was presented. In this work, a novel configuration of this piezoelectric flow pump that consists of a flow pump using two bimorph piezoelectric actuators in parallel configuration has been studied and it is presented. This configuration was inspired on fish swimming modes. The complete cycle of pump development was conducted, consisting in designing, manufacturing, and experimental characterization steps. Load-loss and flow rate characterization experimental tests were conducted, generating data that allows us to analyze the influence of geometric parameters in the pump performance. Comparisons among numerical and experimental results were made to validate the computational results and improve the accuracy of the implemented models.

  19. LOX/LH2 vane pump for auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.; Ulbricht, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive displacement pumps offer potential efficiency advantages over centrifugal pumps for future low thrust space missions. Low flow rate applications, such as space station auxiliary propulsion or dedicated low thrust orbiter transfer vehicles, are typical of missions where low flow and high head rise challenge centrifugal pumps. The positive displacement vane pump for pumping of LOX and LH2 is investigated. This effort has included: (1) a testing program in which pump performance was investigated for differing pump clearances and for differing pump materials while pumping LN2, LOX, and LH2; and (2) an analysis effort, in which a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code was developed and exercised. An overview of the theoretical framework of the performance analysis computer code is presented, along with a summary of analysis results. Experimental results are presented for pump operating in liquid nitrogen. Included are data on the effects on pump performance of pump clearance, speed, and pressure rise. Pump suction performance is also presented.

  20. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  1. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  2. Well pump controller

    SciTech Connect

    Pikna, R. G.

    1985-04-02

    A device for automatically controlling the pumping of fluids from a well of the type using a walking beam and positive displacement pump to provide efficient utilization of the pumping equipment and energy required therefor, and to obtain efficient flow rates from the wall. A sensor detects the position of the walking beam at a predetermined position on the up-stroke of its pumping cycle and generates a signal to a control unit. a diaphram detects the pressure differential between the well casing pressure and the fluid delivery tube pressure. The diaphram moves a spring biased plunger which actuates a switch upon a predetermined pressure differential existing between the casing and delivery tube which sends a second signal to the control unit. The control unit upon receiving both signals maintains the pumping unit energizes until the pressure differential on the diaphram drops to a predetermined value preventing the plunger from actuating the switch. The control unit will deenergize the pumping unit if both signals are not received at the appropriate time. The sensitivity of the diaphram actuated switch is adjustable by changing the biasing force of the spring on the plunger.

  3. Fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, P.D.; Nesselrode, F.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a fuel pump. It includes: a fuel reservoir member, the fuel reservoir member being formed with fuel chambers, the chambers comprising an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, means to supply fuel to the inlet chamber, means to deliver fuel from the outlet chamber to a point of use, the fuel reservoir member chambers also including a bypass chamber, means interconnecting the bypass chamber with the outlet chamber; the fuel pump also comprising pump means interconnecting the inlet chamber and the outlet chamber and adapted to suck fuel from the fuel supply means into the inlet chamber, through the pump means, out the outlet chamber, and to the fuel delivery means; the bypass chamber and the pump means providing two substantially separate paths of fuel flow in the fuel reservoir member, bypass plunger means normally closing off the flow of fuel through the bypass chamber one of the substantially separate paths including the fuel supply means and the fuel delivery means when the bypass plunger means is closed, the second of the substantially separate paths including the bypass chamber when the bypass plunger means is open, and all of the chambers and the interconnecting means therebetween being configured so as to create turbulence in the flow of any fuel supplied to the outlet chamber by the pump means and bypassed through the bypass chamber and the interconnecting means.

  4. Supercritical waste oxidation pump investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.; Garcia, K.

    1993-02-01

    This report investigates the pumping techniques and pumping equipment that would be appropriate for a 5,000 gallon per day supercritical water oxidation waste disposal facility. The pumps must boost water, waste, and additives from atmospheric pressure to approximately 27.6 MPa (4,000 psia). The required flow ranges from 10 gpm to less than 0.1 gpm. For the higher flows, many commercial piston pumps are available. These pumps have packing and check-valves that will require periodic maintenance; probably at 2 to 6 month intervals. Several commercial diaphragm pumps were also discovered that could pump the higher flow rates. Diaphragm pumps have the advantage of not requiring dynamic seals. For the lower flows associated with the waste and additive materials, commercial diaphragm pumps. are available. Difficult to pump materials that are sticky, radioactive, or contain solids, could be injected with an accumulator using an inert gas as the driving mechanism. The information presented in this report serves as a spring board for trade studies and the development of equipment specifications.

  5. Report on New Pumping System Software on Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skids

    SciTech Connect

    HORNER, T.M.

    2001-04-19

    This report documents the details of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and the Data Table Access Module (DTAM) logic developed for the new pumping system employed for saltwell pumping. The new system is planned first for pumping A-101 where Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''F'' is located. The new pump requires a bump start under certain conditions that will be controlled by the PLC. The bump start is to ensure sufficient water to the pump bearing cavities. The PLC logic is required to control the shutdown of the injection pump that supplies the water to the saltwell pump bearing cavities. Allowance to start and stop the injection pump will be controlled by the PLC at the PIC skid. This report is written for PIC skid ''P'', but will apply to other PIC skids where the new pumping system is deployed. The logic will remain the same, but the ladder rung-numbers may change from skid to skid.

  6. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  7. Heat driven pulse pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  8. Custom Unit Pump Design and Testing for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the pre-flight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion , and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated between 40 and 240 lbm/hr flowrate, 35 to 100 F

  9. Quasi-flat-top frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser for pumping of high-power Ti:sapphire amplifiers at a 0.1 Hz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Victor; Kalinchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Chvykov, Vladimir; Mourou, Gerard; Krushelnick, Karl

    2008-04-20

    A Nd:glass laser based on a novel design delivers up to 120 J energy pulses with a quasi-flat-top spatial profile at a 0.1 Hz repetition rate. The laser output is frequency-doubled with 50% efficiency and used to pump Ti:sapphire amplifiers. The developed design is perspective for use in the currently contemplated next step in ultra-high-intensity laser development.

  10. Evaluation of Failed Crane Chempumps Used During Salt Well Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    ELSEN, J.J.

    2000-09-18

    The Interim Stabilization Project is responsible for removing pumpable interstitial liquid from remaining single shelled tanks and transferring the waste to safer double-shelled tanks. This waste transfer is conducted by installing a saltwell pumping system within the designated single shell tank, and transferring the waste to double shelled tank using approved transfer lines. The saltwell pumping system is placed within a saltwell screen installed into the tank waste, the screen is designed to allow gravity flow of liquid into the screen and prevent solids from entering the pumping system. A foot valve consisting of a venturi jet and nozzle creates a suction, picking up waste at an equal rate as the out flow transfer rate of the saltwell system. A centrifugal pump is used to create the motive force across the eductor and drive the waste through the associated system piping and transfer lines leading to the double shelled tanks. The centrifugal pump that has typically been used in the saltwell pumping system installations is the Crane Chempump, model GA-1 1/2 K with 4 3/4 inch impeller. The following evaluation is not intended to be an all inclusive analysis of the operation of a saltwell system and associated pump. This evaluation will detail some of the noted failures in specific saltwell systems and document those findings. Due to the large number of saltwell systems installed over the duration of the Stabilization Project, only those saltwell systems installed over the last two years within S, SX, U, A and AX tank farms, shall be included in this evaluation. After identification of the pump failures mechanism, recommendations shall be identified to address potential means of improving overall operational efficiency and reducing overall equipment failures.

  11. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  12. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  13. Pump efficiency in solar-energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Study investigates characteristics of typical off-the-shelf pumping systems that might be used in solar systems. Report includes discussion of difficulties in predicting pump efficiency from manufacturers' data. Sample calculations are given. Peak efficiencies, flow-rate control, and noise levels are investigated. Review or theory of pumps types and operating characteristics is presented.

  14. Livestock water pumping with wind and solar power

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in pumping technologies have allowed for efficient use of renewable energies like wind and solar to power new pumps for remote water pumping. A helical type, positive displacement pump was developed a few years ago and recently modified to accept input from a variable power sourc...

  15. Hydraulic optimization of "S" characteristics of the pump-turbine for Xianju pumped storage plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. C.; Zheng, J. S.; Cheng, J.; Shi, Q. H.

    2012-11-01

    The pump-turbine with a rated power capacity of 375MW each at Xianju pumped storage plant is the most powerful one under construction in China. In order to avoid the instability near no-load conditions, the hydraulic design of the pump-turbine has been optimized to improving the "S" characteristic in the development of the model pump-turbine. This paper presents the cause of "S" characteristic of a pump-turbine by CFD simulation of the internal flow. Based on the CFD analysis, the hydraulic design optimization of the pump-turbine was carried out to eliminate the "S" characteristics of the machine at Xianju pumped storage plant and a big step for removing the "S" characteristic of a pump-turbine has been obtained. The model test results demonstrate that the pump-turbine designed for Xianju pumped storage plant can smoothly operate near no-load conditions without an addition of misaligned guide vanes.

  16. Pump controller testing on wind turbines used in water pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, B.D.; Clark, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    Pump controllers for wind-electric water pumping systems were tested on several different size wind turbines at the USDA - Agricultural Research Service, Bushland, Texas. All the wind turbines tested used permanent magnet alternators which generated 3-phase, AC electricity. The wind turbines tested varied in rated power from 1 kW to 10 kW at a wind speed of about 12 m/s. The 3-phase submersible motors tested were all rated at 230 V and the rated power varied from 0.38 kW to 5.6 kW. The pump controllers tested ranged from simple (on/off at certain frequency) to moderately sophisticated (low/high cut-in/cut-out frequency selection with thermal protection for submersible motors). No inverters were used on any of the pumping systems in order to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of the pumping systems. An inverter isn`t necessary for off-the-shelf AC motors and pumps if the voltage to frequency ratio is maintained between 3 and 4. A voltage to frequency ratio of 3 to 4 was obtained on all the pump controllers tested from the cut-in wind speed to a 13 m/s wind speed by adding the proper capacitance on all three phases. Capacitance was varied on all of the pump controllers tested and it was discovered that optimal capacitance for maximum water pumping performance varied with windspeed. Problems which occurred during the testing which could have been prevented with a modification of the controller were: no water pumping when sufficient winds were available, inability to stop the wind turbine in high winds, blade failures, burned up motors.

  17. A self-priming, roller-free, miniature, peristaltic pump operable with a single, reciprocating actuator.

    PubMed

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Ramunas, John; Santiago, Juan G

    2010-05-01

    We present a design for a miniature self-priming peristaltic pump actuated with a single linear actuator, and which can be manufactured using conventional materials and methods. The pump is tolerant of bubbles and particles and can pump liquids, foams, and gases. We explore designs actuated by a motor (in depth) and a shape memory alloy (briefly); and briefly present a manually actuated version. The pump consists of a Delrin acetal plastic body with two integrated valves, a flexible silicone tube, and an actuator. Pumping is achieved as the forward motion of the actuator first closes the upstream valve, and then compresses a section of the tube. The increased internal pressure opens a downstream burst valve to expel the fluid. Reduced pressure in the pump tube allows the downstream valve to close, and removal of actuator force allows the upstream valve and pump tube to open, refilling the pump. The motor actuated design offers a linear dependence of flow rate on voltage in the range of 1.75-3 V. Flow rate decreases from 780 μl/min with increasing back pressure up to the maximum back pressure of 48 kPa. At 3 V and minimum back pressure, the pump consumes 90 mW. The shape memory alloy actuated design offers a 5-fold size and 4-fold weight reduction over the motor design, higher maximum back pressure, and substantial insensitivity of flow rate to back pressure at the cost of lower power efficiency and flow rate. The manually actuated version is simpler and appropriate for applications unconstrained by actuation distance.

  18. A self-priming, roller-free, miniature, peristaltic pump operable with a single, reciprocating actuator

    PubMed Central

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Ramunas, John; Santiago, Juan G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a design for a miniature self-priming peristaltic pump actuated with a single linear actuator, and which can be manufactured using conventional materials and methods. The pump is tolerant of bubbles and particles and can pump liquids, foams, and gases. We explore designs actuated by a motor (in depth) and a shape memory alloy (briefly); and briefly present a manually actuated version. The pump consists of a Delrin acetal plastic body with two integrated valves, a flexible silicone tube, and an actuator. Pumping is achieved as the forward motion of the actuator first closes the upstream valve, and then compresses a section of the tube. The increased internal pressure opens a downstream burst valve to expel the fluid. Reduced pressure in the pump tube allows the downstream valve to close, and removal of actuator force allows the upstream valve and pump tube to open, refilling the pump. The motor actuated design offers a linear dependence of flow rate on voltage in the range of 1.75–3 V. Flow rate decreases from 780 μl/min with increasing back pressure up to the maximum back pressure of 48 kPa. At 3 V and minimum back pressure, the pump consumes 90 mW. The shape memory alloy actuated design offers a 5-fold size and 4-fold weight reduction over the motor design, higher maximum back pressure, and substantial insensitivity of flow rate to back pressure at the cost of lower power efficiency and flow rate. The manually actuated version is simpler and appropriate for applications unconstrained by actuation distance. PMID:24672145

  19. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  20. Representing pump-capacity relations in groundwater simulation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    The yield (or discharge) of constant-speed pumps varies with the total dynamic head (or lift) against which the pump is discharging. The variation in yield over the operating range of the pump may be substantial. In groundwater simulations that are used for management evaluations or other purposes, where predictive accuracy depends on the reliability of future discharge estimates, model reliability may be enhanced by including the effects of head-capacity (or pump-capacity) relations on the discharge from the well. A relatively simple algorithm has been incorporated into the widely used MODFLOW groundwater flow model that allows a model user to specify head-capacity curves. The algorithm causes the model to automatically adjust the pumping rate each time step to account for the effect of drawdown in the cell and changing lift, and will shut the pump off if lift exceeds a critical value. The algorithm is available as part of a new multinode well package (MNW2) for MODFLOW.

  1. Representing pump-capacity relations in groundwater simulati on models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    The yield (or discharge) of constant-speed pumps varies with the total dynamic head (or lift) against which the pump is discharging. The variation in yield over the operating range of the pump may be substantial. In groundwater simulations that are used for management evaluations or other purposes, where predictive accuracy depends on the reliability of future discharge estimates, model reliability may be enhanced by including the effects of head-capacity (or pump-capacity) relations on the discharge from the well. A relatively simple algorithm has been incorporated into the widely used MODFLOW groundwater flow model that allows a model user to specify head-capacity curves. The algorithm causes the model to automatically adjust the pumping rate each time step to account for the effect of drawdown in the cell and changing lift, and will shut the pump off if lift exceeds a critical value. The algorithm is available as part of a new multinode well package (MNW2) for MODFLOW. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  2. Representing pump-capacity relations in groundwater simulation models.

    PubMed

    Konikow, L F

    2010-01-01

    The yield (or discharge) of constant-speed pumps varies with the total dynamic head (or lift) against which the pump is discharging. The variation in yield over the operating range of the pump may be substantial. In groundwater simulations that are used for management evaluations or other purposes, where predictive accuracy depends on the reliability of future discharge estimates, model reliability may be enhanced by including the effects of head-capacity (or pump-capacity) relations on the discharge from the well. A relatively simple algorithm has been incorporated into the widely used MODFLOW groundwater flow model that allows a model user to specify head-capacity curves. The algorithm causes the model to automatically adjust the pumping rate each time step to account for the effect of drawdown in the cell and changing lift, and will shut the pump off if lift exceeds a critical value. The algorithm is available as part of a new multinode well package (MNW2) for MODFLOW.

  3. Tiny magnetic wireless pump: Fabrication of magnetic impeller and magnetic wireless manipulation for blood circulation in legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Yu, Chang Ho; Ishiyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a wireless pump that uses magnetic wireless manipulation to pump blood in the legs. A compact size and sufficient hydrodynamic performance were the most important requirements. Because the bonded magnet technique allows for a complex shape and various magnetization orientations, we fabricated a magnetic impeller from magnetic SmFeN powder. The impellers demonstrated a magnetic moment of 2772.64 emu and coercive force of 7.55 kOe. Using the impeller, we developed a tiny blood pump with a diameter of 22 mm and height of 6 mm. The pump allows for a maximum flow rate of 2.7 l/min and maximum pump head of approximately 170 mm Hg at a rotating speed of 6000 rpm. This level of hydrodynamic performance is sufficient to circulate blood in the legs. In this paper, we present the magnetic properties of the magnetic impeller and the hydrodynamic performance with wireless operation.

  4. Estimation of salt water upconing using a steady-state solution for partial completion of a pumped well.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    A new steady-state analytical solution to the two-dimensional radial-flow equation was developed for drawdown (head) conditions in an aquifer with constant transmissivity, no-flow conditions at the top and bottom, constant head conditions at a known radial distance, and a partially completed pumping well. The solution was evaluated for accuracy by comparison to numerical simulations using MODFLOW. The solution was then used to estimate the rise of the salt water-fresh water interface (upconing) that occurs under a pumping well, and to calculate the critical pumping rate at which the interface becomes unstable, allowing salt water to enter the pumping well. The analysis of salt water-fresh water interface rise assumed no significant effect on upconing by recharge; this assumption was tested and supported using results from a new steady-state analytical solution developed for recharge under two-dimensional radial-flow conditions. The upconing analysis results were evaluated for accuracy by comparison to those from numerical simulations using SEAWAT for salt water-fresh water interface positions under mild pumping conditions. The results from the equation were also compared with those of a published numerical sharp-interface model applied to a case on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This comparison indicates that estimating the interface rise and maximum allowable pumping rate using the analytical method will likely be less conservative than the maximum allowable pumping rate and maximum stable interface rise from a numerical sharp-interface model.

  5. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  6. Low volume variable RPM submersible well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lorett, J.A.; Vandevier, J.E.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a submersible pump assembly comprising in combination: a centrifugal pump having impeller means for producing at least two flow rates for a selected head when operated at constant speed, making the pump potentially unstable, and for requiring increasing torque to produce increasing flow rates. An electric motor connects directly to the pump for driving the pump. A sensing means senses the torque output of the motor; and variable a speed drive means for varies the speed of the motor in response to the torque sensed by the sensing means to maintain a constant torque output. The constant torque applied to the pump prevents the pump from delivering more than one flow rate for a given head to stabilize the operation.

  7. Analytical design curves to maximize pumping or minimize injection in coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Park, Namsik; Cui, Lei; Shi, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Explicit algebraic equations are derived to determine approximate maximum pumping rates or minimum injection rates to limit sea water intrusion to a prespecified distance from the coastline. The equations are based on Strack's (1976) single-potential solution. The maximum pumping rates and minimum injection rates applied at wells with uniform spacing to control the inland movement of the fresh water-salt water interface in a coastal aquifer could be calculated from Strack's (1976) solution without the need of a numerical optimization algorithm. When wells are distributed in a simple fashion, the maximum intrusion location can be identified precisely for pumping cases and approximately for injection cases. For pumping cases, critical points are the limit of allowable salt water intrusion, whereas no such limit exists for injection cases. Once an application site is identified, a series of design curves for pumping and injection rates can be developed for arbitrary intrusion limits. When a user is interested only in the largest pumping rates associated with critical points, one design curve can yield complete information.

  8. Usefulness of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation using double roller pumps in a low body weight newborn: A novel strategy for mechanical circulatory support in an infant.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Kato, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Shiori; Amano, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with a centrifugal pump requires a certain flow rate; therefore, its application for low body weight infants is frequently accompanied by oxygenator membrane malfunction and/or inadequate perfusion. To prevent low-flow associated complications, we report a case in which a novel system of dual roller pumps was used. A baby girl with a body mass index 0.25 m(2), who experienced difficulty weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass after a Norwood-like operation, required an ECMO. Concerns for the tube lifespan reduction due to roller pump friction led to the use of a double roller pump circulation. The termination of ECMO during tube exchange is not needed, because circulation is maintained by another roller pump. The novel strategy of ECMO with double roller pumps will allow low perfusion rate to provide adequate circulatory support for low body weight patients.

  9. Miniature Lightweight Ion Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.

    2010-01-01

    sputtered away. For stable pumping of inert gases, one side of the cathode is made of Ta. Impaction on Ta produces energetic, neutral atoms that pump the inert gases on the anode structure at the peripheral areas of the cathodes (between anode rings). For inert gases stability, a post design has been implemented. Here, posts of cathode material (Ti) are mounted on the cathode. These protrude into the initial part of the anode elements. Materials sputtered from the posts condense on the anode assembly and on the cathode plane at higher rates than in the normal diodes due to enhanced sputtering at glancing angles from geometrical considerations. This increases pumping by burial. This post design has enhanced pumping rates for both active and inert gases, compared with conventional designs.

  10. High-pressure open-channel on-chip electroosmotic pump for nanoflow high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Congying; Lynch, Kyle B; Lu, Joann J; Zhang, Zhengyu; Pu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Shaorong

    2014-02-18

    Here, we construct an open-channel on-chip electroosmotic pump capable of generating pressures up to ∼170 bar and flow rates up to ∼500 nL/min, adequate for high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separations. A great feature of this pump is that a number of its basic pump units can be connected in series to enhance its pumping power; the output pressure is directly proportional to the number of pump units connected. This additive nature is excellent and useful, and no other pumps can work in this fashion. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this pump to perform nanoflow HPLC separations; tryptic digests of bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin factor (TF), and human immunoglobulins (IgG) are utilized as exemplary samples. We also compare the performance of our electroosmotic (EO)-driven HPLC with Agilent 1200 HPLC; comparable efficiencies, resolutions, and peak capacities are obtained. Since the pump is based on electroosmosis, it has no moving parts. The common material and process also allow this pump to be integrated with other microfabricated functional components. Development of this high-pressure on-chip pump will have a profound impact on the advancement of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  11. Stochastic thermodynamics of hidden pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Parrondo, Juan M. R.

    2015-05-01

    We show that a reversible pumping mechanism operating between two states of a kinetic network can give rise to Poisson transitions between these two states. An external observer, for whom the pumping mechanism is not accessible, will observe a Markov chain satisfying local detailed balance with an emerging effective force induced by the hidden pump. Due to the reversibility of the pump, the actual entropy production turns out to be lower than the coarse-grained entropy production estimated from the flows and affinities of the resulting Markov chain. Moreover, in presence of a large time scale separation between the fast-pumping dynamics and the slow-network dynamics, a finite current with zero dissipation may be produced. We make use of these general results to build a synthetase-like kinetic scheme able to reversibly produce high free-energy molecules at a finite rate and a rotatory motor achieving 100% efficiency at finite speed.

  12. Stochastic thermodynamics of hidden pumps.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Parrondo, Juan M R

    2015-05-01

    We show that a reversible pumping mechanism operating between two states of a kinetic network can give rise to Poisson transitions between these two states. An external observer, for whom the pumping mechanism is not accessible, will observe a Markov chain satisfying local detailed balance with an emerging effective force induced by the hidden pump. Due to the reversibility of the pump, the actual entropy production turns out to be lower than the coarse-grained entropy production estimated from the flows and affinities of the resulting Markov chain. Moreover, in presence of a large time scale separation between the fast-pumping dynamics and the slow-network dynamics, a finite current with zero dissipation may be produced. We make use of these general results to build a synthetase-like kinetic scheme able to reversibly produce high free-energy molecules at a finite rate and a rotatory motor achieving 100% efficiency at finite speed.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a fritless microfabricated electroosmotic pump with reduced pH dependence.

    PubMed

    Razunguzwa, Trust T; Timperman, Aaron T

    2004-03-01

    A fritless electroosmotic pump with reduced pH dependence has been fabricated on a glass microchip and its performance characterized. The chip design consists of two 500-microm channels, one packed with anion exchange beads and the other packed with cation exchange beads, which produce convergent electroosmotic flow streams. The electroosmotically pumped solution flows away from the intersection of the two pumping channels through a field-free channel. This simple design allows for the production of a fritless electroosmotic pump and easy replacement of the ion exchange beads whose charged surfaces generate the flow. The pump was found to produce volumetric flow rates of up to 2 microL/min for an applied voltage of 3 kV at a pH of 6.8. Moreover, the electroosmotic pump can generate high flow rates over an extended pH range of at least 2-12, a significant advantage over previously fabricated electroosmotic pumps, which typically have a more limited range in which they can achieve high flow rates.

  14. Sucking pump activity in feeding behaviour regulation in carpenter ants.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Gontijo, Alberto de Figueiredo; Josens, Roxana

    2009-06-01

    Modulation of liquid feeding-rate would allow insects to ingest more food in the same time when this was required. Ants can vary nectar intake rate by increasing sucking pump frequency according to colony requirements. We analysed electrical signals generated by sucking pump activity of ants during drinking solutions of different sucrose concentrations and under different carbohydrate-deprivation levels. Our aim was to define parameters that characterize the recordings and analyse their relationship with feeding behaviour. Signals showed that the initial and final frequencies of sucking pump activity, as well as the difference between them were higher in sugar-deprived ants. However, these parameters were not influenced by sucrose solution concentration, which affected the number of pump contractions and the volume per contraction. Unexpectedly, we found two different responses in feeding behaviour of starved and non-starved ants depending on concentration. Starved ants drank dilute solutions for the same length of time as non-starved ants but ingested higher volumes. While drinking the concentrated solutions, starved ants drank the same volume, but did so in a shorter time than the non-starved ones. Despite these differences, for each analysed concentration the total number of pump contractions remained constant independently of sugar-deprivation level. These results are discussed in the frame of feeding regulation and decision making in ant foraging behaviour.

  15. Solar Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pique, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Proposed pump moves liquid by action of bubbles formed by heat of sun. Tube of liquid having boiling point of 100 to 200 degrees F placed at focal axis of cylindrical reflector. Concentrated sunlight boils liquid at focus, and bubbles of vapor rise in tube, carrying liquid along with them. Pressure difference in hot tube sufficient to produce flow in large loop. Used with conventional flat solar heating panel in completely solar-powered heat-storage system.

  16. Heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.

    1982-11-30

    A single working fluid heat pump system having a turbocompressor with a first fluid input for the turbine and a second fluid input for the compressor, and a single output volute or mixing chamber for combining the working fluid output flows of the turbine and the compressor. The system provides for higher efficiency than single fluid systems whose turbine and compressor are provided with separate output volutes.

  17. Design and test of a pump failure anticipator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frarey, J. L.; Wilson, D. S.; Burchill, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two different types of pumps in order to refine the concept and to finalize design details of a positive displacement internal gear pump and a shroudless centrifugal pump. A concept and a system that could be used with pumps to allow a rapid judgement to be made of the suitability of the pump for futher service is developed. Test results and detailed data analysis are included.

  18. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  19. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  20. Identification of pumping influences in long-term water level fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Harp, Dylan R; Vesselinov, Velimir V

    2011-01-01

    Identification of the pumping influences at monitoring wells caused by spatially and temporally variable water supply pumping can be a challenging, yet an important hydrogeological task. The information that can be obtained can be critical for conceptualization of the hydrogeological conditions and indications of the zone of influence of the individual pumping wells. However, the pumping influences are often intermittent and small in magnitude with variable production rates from multiple pumping wells. While these difficulties may support an inclination to abandon the existing dataset and conduct a dedicated cross-hole pumping test, that option can be challenging and expensive to coordinate and execute. This paper presents a method that utilizes a simple analytical modeling approach for analysis of a long-term water level record utilizing an inverse modeling approach. The methodology allows the identification of pumping wells influencing the water level fluctuations. Thus, the analysis provides an efficient and cost-effective alternative to designed and coordinated cross-hole pumping tests. We apply this method on a dataset from the Los Alamos National Laboratory site. Our analysis also provides (1) an evaluation of the information content of the transient water level data; (2) indications of potential structures of the aquifer heterogeneity inhibiting or promoting pressure propagation; and (3) guidance for the development of more complicated models requiring detailed specification of the aquifer heterogeneity.

  1. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  2. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  3. The microbial carbon pump concept: Potential biogeochemical significance in the globally changing ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, Louis; Rivkin, Richard B.; Weinbauer, Markus G.; Guidi, Lionel; Uitz, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Three vertical ocean carbon pumps have been known for almost three decades to sequester atmospheric carbon in the deep-water and sediment reservoirs, i.e. the solubility pump, the carbonate pump, and the soft-tissue (also known as organic, or biological) carbon pump (BCP). These three pumps maintain the vertical gradient in total dissolved inorganic carbon between the surface and deep waters. The more recently proposed microbial carbon pump (MCP) would maintain a gradient between short- and long-lived dissolved organic carbon (DOC; average lifetimes of <100 and >100 years, respectively). Long-lived DOC is an additional proposed reservoir of sequestered carbon in the ocean. This review: examines critically aspects of the vertical ocean carbon pumps and the MCP, in particular their physical dimensions and their potential roles in carbon sequestration; normalises the dimensions of the MCP to allow direct comparisons with the three vertical ocean carbon pumps; compares the MCP and vertical ocean carbon pumps; organises in a coherent framework the information available in the literature on refractory DOC; explores the potential effects of the globally changing ocean on the MCP; and identifies the assumptions that generally underlie the MCP studies, as bases for future research. The study: proposes definitions of terms, expressions and concepts related to the four ocean carbon pumps (i.e. three vertical pumps and MCP); defines the magnitude for the MCP as the rate of production of DOC with an average lifetime of >100 years and provides its first estimate for the World Ocean, i.e. 0.2 Pg C year-1; and introduces an operational "first-time-sequestration" criterion that prevents organic carbon fluxes from being assigned to both the BCP and the MCP. In our review of the potential effects of predicted climate-related changes in the ocean environment on the MCP, we found that three of the seven predicted changes could potentially enhance carbon sequestration by the MCP, and

  4. Paper pump for passive and programmable transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Hagen, Joshua A; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In microfluidic systems, a pump for fluid-driving is often necessary. To keep the size of microfluidic systems small, a pump that is small in size, light-weight and needs no external power source is advantageous. In this work, we present a passive, simple, ultra-low-cost, and easily controlled pumping method based on capillary action of paper that pumps fluid through conventional polymer-based microfluidic channels with steady flow rate. By using inexpensive cutting tools, paper can be shaped and placed at the outlet port of a conventional microfluidic channel, providing a wide range of pumping rates. A theoretical model was developed to describe the pumping mechanism and aid in the design of paper pumps. As we show, paper pumps can provide steady flow rates from 0.3 μl/s to 1.7 μl/s and can be cascaded to achieve programmable flow-rate tuning during the pumping process. We also successfully demonstrate transport of the most common biofluids (urine, serum, and blood). With these capabilities, the paper pump has the potential to become a powerful fluid-driving approach that will benefit the fielding of microfluidic systems for point-of-care applications.

  5. Paper pump for passive and programmable transport

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Hagen, Joshua A.; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In microfluidic systems, a pump for fluid-driving is often necessary. To keep the size of microfluidic systems small, a pump that is small in size, light-weight and needs no external power source is advantageous. In this work, we present a passive, simple, ultra-low-cost, and easily controlled pumping method based on capillary action of paper that pumps fluid through conventional polymer-based microfluidic channels with steady flow rate. By using inexpensive cutting tools, paper can be shaped and placed at the outlet port of a conventional microfluidic channel, providing a wide range of pumping rates. A theoretical model was developed to describe the pumping mechanism and aid in the design of paper pumps. As we show, paper pumps can provide steady flow rates from 0.3 μl/s to 1.7 μl/s and can be cascaded to achieve programmable flow-rate tuning during the pumping process. We also successfully demonstrate transport of the most common biofluids (urine, serum, and blood). With these capabilities, the paper pump has the potential to become a powerful fluid-driving approach that will benefit the fielding of microfluidic systems for point-of-care applications. PMID:24403999

  6. Well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J.S.

    1983-03-08

    Well fluid pumping apparatus comprises: (A) body structure defining an upright plunger bore, (B) a plunger reciprocable in that bore, (C) the body structure also defining a chamber sidewardly offset from an axis defined by the plunger bore and communicating with the bore, and (D) valving carried by the body structure to pass intake fluid via the chamber into the plunger bore in response to stroking of the plunger in one direction in the bore, and to pass discharge fluid from the plunger bore into and from the chamber in response to stroking of the plunger in the opposite direction in the bore.

  7. Rotary recuperative magnetic heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirol, Lance D.; Dacus, Michael W.

    A bench scale rotary magnetic heat pump now being built is described. The unique design feature of this heat pump is the method for achieving recuperator fluid flow, which relies simply on parallel flow paths; the primary flow leg allows heat transfer between external load and sink and magnetic working material, while parallel flow accomplishes recuperation. The bench scale test is intended to demonstrate feasibility of the concept and to verify that all significant loss mechanisms are identified and treated properly in performance models, but is not a scaled down version of a practical heat pump. Working material is gadolinium foil 76 microns thick with 127-micron spaces for fluid flow. Magnetic fields are created by neodymium-iron-boron-permanent magnets with an air gap field of about 0.9 Tesla. Due to the low field (practical heat pumps will use superconducting magnets with field strength around 9 T); temperature lift is limited to 11 K.

  8. Performance of three large-volume infusion pumps with the monoplace hyperbaric chamber.

    PubMed

    Bell, James; Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Zyno Medical Z-800F, CME Body Guard 323 Color Vision, and Baxter Flo-Gard 6201 infusion pumps for monoplace chamber conditions. We adjusted pump occlusion pressure allowing infusion to 3 atmospheres absolute (atm abs). Baxter and Zyno pumps were connected to the chamber pass-through with rigid small-bore tubing. The CME infusion set was connected directly to the pass-through. We infused saline to a collection manifold inside a monoplace chamber at 1-100 mL/ hour under pressures ranging from 0.85-3.0 atm abs. We averaged results from three to five separate tests for each condition. At baseline, pumps performed within ±10% of expected (our measurement capability). However, clinical engineering verified performance within manufacturer specifications (±5% at atmospheric pressure). During a carbon monoxide hyperbaric protocol (3 atm abs/2 atm abs), measured flow with the Baxter, CME and Zyno pumps was ±5% of setting at 10 mL/hour (95%, 103%, 95%, respectively); at 1 mL/hour, average flow were 91%, 83%, 83%, respectively. During timed testing (volume recorded before decompression), pump accuracy was ±10% at 10 and 100 mL/hour. Tubing compliance compromised performance at lower flow rates, magnified by increased pressure. These pumps have potential for monoplace chamber use, although not supported by the manufacturers or FDA-cleared. At low flow rates, tubing compliance affects delivered volumes.

  9. A KrF laser electron-beam-pumped at a specific rate of 1.6 GW/l-atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchnev, V. M.; Klementov, A. D.; Sergeev, P. B.

    1981-06-01

    An electron-beam-pumped KrF laser has been investigated in the gas mixture-pressure range of 1-5 atm. At the optimal pressure of the mixture, Ar:Kr:F2 = 300:30:13.3 atm, in the active volume of 0.45 l, a laser energy of 8.8 J has been obtained (the lasing pulse duration being approximately 70 ns), and a laser efficiency of 4.5% has been recorded. Using the laser efficiency and output results, the intensity saturation for different pressures of the working medium has been computed, and it was shown that laser kinetics is substantially influenced by the heating of the medium during pulsed pumping. It was concluded that lasing with an efficiency of approximately 10% and a power output of approximately 40 to 50 J/l was possible; however, this requires the use of resonator optics with a damage threshold that is greater than 15 MW/sq cm.

  10. Hydraulic gas pump: A discussion of its power usage

    SciTech Connect

    Amani, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study that compares the theoretically calculated power consumption of a Hydraulic Gas Pump, rod pumps, and electric submersible pumps. The results indicate that, depending on the flowing bottomhole pressure of a well, a Hydraulic Gas Pump can have lower power costs than a rod pump or a submersible pump. The author presents a method for calculating the power cost of a Hydraulic Gas Pump and discusses the relationship of the power cost of this pump to the flowing bottomhole pressure. Several graphs compare the calculated power consumption of a rod pump, submersible pump, and Hydraulic Gas Pump for well depths ranging between 6,000 and 10,000 feet; flowing bottomhole pressure ranging between 500 and 2,000 psi; and production rates of 300 and 500 BLPD.

  11. Experiment on performance of adjustable jet pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. M.; Long, X. P.; Zhang, S. B.; Lu, X.

    2012-11-01

    When the water level of upper or lower reaches of hydraulic power station changes, the adjustable jet pump which is different from traditional fixed jet pump can maintain stable pressure and flow rate for the system of technical water supply of hydraulic power plant. The model test indicates that the efficiency of the adjustable jet pump is slightly lower than fixed jet pump near rating operation point. With the decrease of opening degree, both efficiencies are more and more close to each other. The fundamental performance of I-type adjustable jet pump is better than II-type and the cavitation performance of I-type adjustable jet pump is worse than II-type. Test data also indicate that the performance of adjustable jet pump is very different from fixed jet pump, so the theory of fixed jet pump is not able to be copied to adjustable jet pump. It is necessary to farther study on the performance of the adjustable jet pump. This paper has reference value for analogous design of system of circulation water supply to turbine units in hydraulic power station.

  12. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  13. Pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a gas-oil well production system for pumping formation fluid wherein a down hole pump is provided having a barrel including a barrel fluid inlet, a barrel fluid outlet, a barrel chamber, and a plunger mounted in the barrel chamber having a plunger chamber. The plunger is reciprocally driven between an upper terminal position at the end of the plunger upstroke and a lower terminal position at the end of the plunger downstroke. The method for removing developed gaseous fluids in the formation fluid from the barrel chamber comprises: drawing formation fluid into the barrel chamber during the plunger upstroke; providing gas port means in the barrel; expelling the developed gaseous fluids from the barrel chamber through the gas port means during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from the upper terminal position of the gas port means; and substantially blocking the gas port means and moving formation fluid into the plunger chamber during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from below the gas port means to the lower terminal position.

  14. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  15. LD-pumped erbium and neodymium lasers with high energy and output beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Vladimir V.; Bezyazychnaya, Tatiana V.; Bogdanovich, Maxim V.; Grigor'ev, Alexandr V.; Lebiadok, Yahor V.; Lepchenkov, Kirill V.; Ryabtsev, Andrew G.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.; Shchemelev, Maxim A.

    2013-05-01

    Physical and fabrication peculiarities which provide the high output energy and beam quality for the diode pumped erbium glass and Nd:YAG lasers are considered. Developed design approach allow to make passively Q-switched erbium glass eye-safe portable laser sources with output energy 8 - 12 mJ (output pulse duration is less than 25 ns, pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz) and beam quality M2 less than 1.3. To reach these values the erbium laser pump unit parameters were optimized also. Namely, for the powerful laser diode arrays the optimal near-field fill-factor, output mirror reflectivity and heterostructure properties were determined. Construction of advanced diode and solid-state lasers as well as the optical properties of the active element and the pump unit make possible the lasing within a rather wide temperature interval (e.g. from minus forty till plus sixty Celsius degree) without application of water-based chillers. The transversally pumped Nd:YAG laser output beam uniformity was investigated depending on the active element (AE) pump conditions. In particular, to enhance the pump uniformity within AE volume, a special layer which practically doesn't absorb the pump radiation but effectively scatters the pump and lasing beams, was used. Application of such layer results in amplified spontaneous emission suppression and improvement of the laser output beam uniformity. The carried out investigations allow us to fabricate the solid-state Nd:YAG lasers (1064 nm) with the output energy up to 420 mJ at the pulse repetition rate up to 30 Hz and the output energy up to 100 mJ at the pulse repetition rate of of 100 Hz. Also the laser sources with following characteristics: 35 mJ, 30 Hz (266 nm); 60 mJ, 30 Hz (355 nm); 100 mJ, 30 Hz (532 nm) were manufactured on the base of the developed Nd:YAG quantrons.

  16. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  17. Electrothermal pumping with interdigitated electrodes and resistive heaters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart J; Green, Nicolas G

    2015-08-01

    Interdigitated electrodes are used in electrokinetic lab-on-a-chip devices for dielectrophoretic trapping and characterization of suspended particles, as well as the production of field-induced fluid flow via AC electroosomosis and electrothermal mechanisms. However, the optimum design for dielectrophoresis, that if symmetrical electrodes, cannot induce bulk electrohydrodynamic pumping. In addition, the mechanism of intrinsic electrothermal pumping is affected by the properties of the fluid, with thermal fields being generated by Joule Heating. This work demonstrates the incorporation of an underlying thin film heater, electrically isolated from the interdigitated electrodes by an insulator layer, to enhance bulk electrothermal pumping. The use of integrated heaters allows the thermal field generation to be controlled independently of the electric field. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the importance of geometrical arrangement of the heater with respect to the interdigitated electrodes, as well as electrode size, spacing, and arrangement. The optimization of such a system is a careful balance between electrokinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. The heater location and electrode spacing influence the rate of electrothermal pumping significantly more than electrode width and insulator layer thickness. This demonstration will aid in the development of microfluidic electrokinetic systems that want to utilize the advantages associated with electrothermal pumping while simultaneously applying other lab-on-a-chip electrokinetics like dielectrophoresis.

  18. Measurement of pump-induced transient lensing in a cryogenically-cooled high average power Ti:sapphire amplifier.

    PubMed

    Planchon, Thomas A; Amir, Wafa; Childress, Colby; Squier, Jeff A; Durfee, Charles G

    2008-11-10

    The transient thermal lensing in a liquid-nitrogren cooled kilohertz multipass amplifier is quantitatively measured with spatially-resolved Fourier transform spectral interferometry. A pump-probe arrangement allows the observation of a polarization-dependent non-thermal component following the fluorescence timescale: additional cooling would not suppress this residual lensing. We also observe a time-dependent thermal component that has a timescale sufficiently fast to indicate that there is cooling between shots even at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. The value of pump-induced lensing would be underestimated when performing time-averaged measurements of pump-induced phase shifts.

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  20. Novel limiter pump topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure.

  1. Pumping tests in a low permeability rock: Results and interpretation of a four-year long monitoring of water production flow rates in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinsot, A.; Delay, J.; de La Vaissière, R.; Cruchaudet, M.

    Hydraulic conductivity of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock ranges between 10 -14 and 10 -12 m/s. In spite of these low values, long term ‘pumping tests’ covering a range of head differentials have been performed in several boreholes in the Andra Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Specifically designed experimental setups made it possible to monitor water production flow rates ranging from 0.5 to 50 mL/day, during more than 4 years. Long term pumping tests provided an alternative to the pressure test method for evaluating hydraulic conductivities at the -430 m and -505 m depth levels in the URL. The obtained values were close to 0.8 × 10 -13 m/s and 1.3 × 10 -13 m/s, respectively. The lowest flow rate measured under well-established hydraulic head boundary conditions was close to 2.5 mL/day. It corresponds to a calculated hydraulic gradient value less than 120 m/m. This result indicates that water can flow in the Callovo-Oxfordian with such a hydraulic gradient value.

  2. Pioneering Heat Pump Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aschliman, Dave; Lubbehusen, Mike

    2015-06-30

    This project was initiated at a time when ground coupled heat pump systems in this region were limited in size and quantity. There were economic pressures with costs for natural gas and electric utilities that had many organizations considering ground coupled heat pumps; The research has added to the understanding of how ground temperatures fluctuate seasonally and how this affects the performance and operation of the heat pumps. This was done by using a series of temperature sensors buried within the middle of one of the vertical bore fields with sensors located at various depths below grade. Trending of the data showed that there is a lag in ground temperature with respect to air temperatures in the shoulder months, however as full cooling and heating season arrives, the heat rejection and heat extraction from the ground has a significant effect on the ground temps; Additionally it is better understood that while a large community geothermal bore field serving multiple buildings does provide a convenient central plant to use, it introduces complexity of not being able to easily model and predict how each building will contribute to the loads in real time. Additional controllers and programming were added to provide more insight into this real time load profile and allow for intelligent shedding of load via a dry cooler during cool nights in lieu of rejecting to the ground loop. This serves as a means to ‘condition’ the ground loop and mitigate thermal creep of the field, as is typically observed; and It has been observed when compared to traditional heating and cooling equipment, there is still a cost premium to use ground source heat pumps that is driven mostly by the cost for vertical bore holes. Horizontal loop systems are less costly to install, but do not perform as well in this climate zone for heating mode

  3. A fermentation-powered thermopneumatic pump for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Manuel; Ziaie, Babak

    2012-10-21

    We present a microorganism-powered thermopneumatic pump that utilizes temperature-dependent slow-kinetics gas (carbon dioxide) generating fermentation of yeast as a pressure source. The pump consists of stacked layers of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a silicon substrate that form a drug reservoir, and a yeast-solution-filled working chamber. The pump operates by the displacement of a drug due to the generation of gas produced via yeast fermentation carried out at skin temperatures. The robustness of yeast allows for long shelf life under extreme environmental conditions (50 °C, >250 MPa, 5-8% humidity). The generation of carbon dioxide is a linear function of time for a given temperature, thus allowing for a controlled volume displacement. A polymeric prototype (dimensions 15 mm × 15 mm × 10 mm) with a slow flow rate of <0.23 μL min(-1) and maximum backpressure of 5.86 kPa capable of continuously pumping for over two hours is presented and characterized.

  4. MEMS ion-sorption high vacuum pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebyk, T.; Knapkiewicz, P.; Szyszka, P.; Gorecka-Drzazga, A.; Dziuban, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    In the article a miniature MEMS-type ion-sorption vacuum pump has been presented. The influence of electric and magnetic field, as well as horizontal and vertical dimensions of the micropump and type of material used for electrodes on the pump properties has been investigated. It has been found that the micropump works efficiently as long as the magnetic field is higher than 0.3 T, and pumping cell is larger than 1x1x1 mm3. The pump allows generating vacuum at the level of 10-7-10-9 hPa in 100 mm3 volume.

  5. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  6. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  7. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  8. User friendliness, efficiency & spray quality of stirrup pumps versus hand compression pumps for indoor residual spraying

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Kesari, Shreekant; Chowdhury, Rajib; Kumar, Sanjiv; Sinha, Gunjan; Hussain, Saddam; Huda, M. Mamun; Kroeger, Axel; Das, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Indoor residual spraying (IRS) is a proven tool to reduce visceral leishmaniasis vectors in endemic villages. In India IRS is being done with stirrup pumps, whereas Nepal, Bangladesh, and other countries use compression pumps. The present study was conducted with the objectives to compare the efficiency, cost and user friendliness of stirrup and compression pumps. Methods: The study was carried out in Gorigawan village of the Vaishali district in north Bihar and included a total population of 3259 inhabitants in 605 households. Spraying with 50 per cent DDT was done by two teams with 6 persons per team under the supervision of investigators over 5 days with each type of pump (10 days in total using 2 stirrup pumps and 3 compression pumps) by the same sprayers in an alternate way. The spraying technique was observed using an observation check list, the number of houses and room surfaces sprayed was recorded and an interview with sprayers on their satisfaction with the two types of pumps was conducted. Results: On average, 65 houses were covered per day with the compression pump and 56 houses were covered with the stirrup pump. The surface area sprayed per squad per day was higher for the compression pump (4636 m2) than for the stirrup pump (4102 m2). Observation showed that it was easy to maintain the spray swath with the compression pump but very difficult with the stirrup pump. The wastage of insecticide suspension was negligible for the compression pump but high for the stirrup pump. Interpretation & conclusions: The compression pump was found to be more user friendly due to its lower weight, easier to operate, lower operation cost, higher safety and better efficiency in terms of discharge rate and higher area coverage than the stirrup pump. PMID:24056601

  9. Numerical simulation of pump-intake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Pavel; Klas, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Pump pre-swirl or uneven flow distribution in front of the pump can induce pump-intake vortices. These phenomena result in blockage of the impeller suction space, deterioration of efficiency, drop of head curve and earlier onset of cavitation. Real problematic case, where head curve drop was documented, is simulated using commercial CFD software. Computational simulation was carried out for three flow rates, which correspond to three operating regimes of the vertical pump. The domain consists of the pump sump, pump itself excluding the impeller and the delivery pipe. One-phase approach is applied, because the vortex cores were not filled with air during observation of the real pump operation. Numerical simulation identified two surface vortices and one bottom vortex. Their position and strength depend on the pump flow rate. Paper presents detail analysis of the flow field on the pump intake, discusses influence of the vortices on pump operation and suggests possible actions that should be taken to suppress the intake vortices.

  10. The Lunar Thermal Ice Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonson, O.; Schorghofer, N.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical considerations and recent observations indicate the lunar polar regions harbor deposits of water ice in extremely cold regions. The geographic distribution of H-bearing regolith shows only a partial match to permanently shadowed areas, thus suggesting that ice is not simply trapped by low temperature but another mechanism plays a role in concentrating H2O. Under suitable conditions, water molecules can be pumped down into the regolith by day-night temperature cycles, leading to an enrichment of H2O in excess of the surface concentration. Ideal conditions for pumping are estimated to be mean surface temperatures below 105 K and peak surface temperatures higher than 130 K. These conditions complement those of the classical cold traps, roughly defined by peak temperatures <120 K. Temperatures were obtained by analyzing the LRO Diviner measurements and geographic regions of positive pumping differential are identified. These extend the ice distribution beyond traditional cold traps. At latitudes poleward of 85 degrees equator-facing slopes have a positive pumping differential because at this latitude their aspect allows larger temperature oscillations while remaining on average cold. At lower polar latitudes, down to about 70 degrees, pole-facing slopes have positive pumping differential, because here the slope aspect allows the surface to remain cooler than average.

  11. Results of a multi-site field treatability test for bioslurping: A comparison of LNAPL rates using vacuum-enhanced recovery (bioslurping), passive skimming, and pump drawdown recovery techniques. Field test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kittel, J.A.; Leeson, A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Miller, R.E.; Haas, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    Bioslurping is a new dynamic technology designed to efficiently recover free-floating petroleum hydrocarbons (free product) from the subsurface while simultaneously enhancing natural biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the vadose zone. Bioslurping is a vacuum-enhanced fluids pumping technology that simultaneously extracts groundwater, free product, and soil gas in the same process stream. The U.S. Air Force has initiated a multi-site program to evaluate the widespread application of bioslurping at free product-contaminated Air Force sites. The Air Force Bioslurper Initiative is designed to access the field application of the bioslurping technology at 36 Air Force sites. The field studies are designed to evaluate the efficacy of bioslurping for the recovery of free-floating fuel (free product) and to evaluate the potential for bioventing to enhance natural biodegradation of petroleum contaminants. The technical approach for conducting the bioslurper pilot tests includes assessing the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of each site, free-product baildown testing in site monitoring wells, soil gas analysis, and a bioslurper pump test. Bioslurping free-product recovery efficiency is compared to conventional skimming and dual-pump free-product recovery technologies, and bioventing potential is assessed via in situ respiration testing. The Air Force field program was initiated in July 1994. At the time of this writing, seven field tests have been completed. At each site bioslurping has yielded the highest LNAPL recovery rate. This paper presents a summary of LNAPL recovery data to date. Operational issues such as permitting and treatment of vapor and wastewater discharge will be discussed.

  12. Fuel injection pump of the distribution type

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, T.; Sumitani, S.; Tani, T.; Miyaki, M.; Masuda, A.

    1986-07-08

    A distribution type fuel injection pump is described for delivering fuel to each of the combustion chambers in an internal combustion engine consisting of: pump housing means including a pumping head in which a pumping chamber is defined; first fuel supply means for supplying fuel to the pumping chamber; fuel pressurizing means for applying pressure to the fuel in the pumping chamber; distributor means for distributing and delivering the fuel, which has been pressurized in the pumping chamber, to each of the combustion chambers in the engine; control plunger means actuated by the fuel pressure in the pumping chamber and including a control cylinder bore defined in the pumping head and a control plunger fitted into the control cylinder bore, the control cylinder bore being partitioned into a first chamber to which the fuel pressure in the pumping chamber is transmitted and which serves to apply this pressure to one end of the control plunger, and a second chamber defined by the other end of the control plunger; second fuel supply means for supplying an adjusted amount of fuel to the second chamber and including a control passage connected to the second chamber and an electromagnetic valve for opening and closing the control passage; and escaping means for allowing the fuel to escape from the second chamber when the fuel pressure in the second chamber becomes higher than a certain value.

  13. Improving the Energy Effciency of Pump Systems - PSAT

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    PSAT software uses data that are typically available or easily obtained in the field (e.g., pump head, flow rate, and motor power) to estimate potential energy and dollar savings in industrial pump systems.

  14. Hydrodynamic design of generic pump components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastland, A. H. J.; Dodson, H. C.

    1991-01-01

    Inducer and impellar base geometries were defined for a fuel pump for a generic generator cycle. Blade surface data and inlet flowfield definition are available in sufficient detail to allow computational fluid dynamic analysis of the two components.

  15. Performance Testing of a Prototypic Annular Linear Induction Pump for Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Schoenfeld, M. P.; Webster, K.; Houts, M. G.; Godfroy, T. J.; Bossard, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Results of performance testing of an annular linear induction pump are presented. The pump electromagnetically pumps liquid metal (NaK) through a circuit specially designed to allow for quantification of the performance. Testing was conducted over a range of conditions, including frequencies of 33, 36, 39, and 60 Hz, liquid metal temperatures from 25 to 525 C, and input voltages from 5 to 120 V. Pump performance spanned a range of flow rates from roughly 0.16 to 5.7 L/s (2.5 to 90 gpm), and pressure head <1 to 90 kPa (<0.145 to 13 psi). The maximum efficiency measured during testing was slightly greater than 6%. The efficiency was fairly insensitive to input frequency from 33 to 39 Hz, and was markedly lower at 60 Hz. In addition, the efficiency decreased as the NaK temperature was raised. While the pump was powered, the fluid responded immediately to changes in the input power level, but when power was removed altogether, there was a brief slow-down period before the fluid would come to rest. The performance of the pump operating on a variable frequency drive providing 60 Hz power compared favorably with the same pump operating on 60 Hz power drawn directly from the electrical grid.

  16. Hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, P.R.; Jantzen, D.E.

    1984-05-15

    This invention relates to an improved pump jack characterized by a hollow piston rod which telescopes down over the sucker rod to which it is clamped for reciprocating motion. The cylinder, in turn, is fastened in fixed position directly to the upper exposed end of the well casing. As fluid is introduced into the lower end of the cylinder it raises the piston into engagement with a pushrod housed in the upper cylinder head that lifts switch-actuating means associated therewith into a position operative to actuate a switch located adjacent thereto thereby causing the latter to change state and actuate a multi-function solenoid valve so as to cut off fluid flow to the cylinder. As gravity lowers the sucker rod and piston exhausting the hydraulic fluid therebeneath, an adjustable stop engages the pushrod from above so as to return it together with the switch-actuating means associated therewith to their original positions thereby resetting the switch to complete the operating cycle.

  17. [Centrifugal blood pumps (new possibilities of design improvement)].

    PubMed

    Leshchinskiĭ, B M; Itkin, G P; Zimin, N K

    1992-01-01

    Based on an analysis of 300 world information sources, 19 types of centrifugal blood pumps were ascertained. Five new designs suggested have an idea in common: combination of the inlet of the disk pump and of the outlet of the impeller pump. This allows uniting the merits of the above pumps and excluding their shortcomings. The designs suggested make it possible to solve the two basic problems: hemolysis and thrombogenesis inside the pumps. The use of the pumps designed on such a basis will afford a simple and reliable approach to heart function replacement.

  18. Implementation of Time-Resolved Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy Using a kHz Repetition Rate Pump Laser

    PubMed Central

    MAGANA, DONNY; PARUL, DZMITRY; DYER, R. BRIAN; SHREVE, ANDREW P.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be invaluable for studying excited-state structures and dynamics in both biological and inorganic systems. Despite the established utility of this method, technical challenges continue to limit the data quality and more wide ranging applications. A critical problem has been the low laser repetition rate and interferometer stepping rate (both are typically 10 Hz) used for data acquisition. Here we demonstrate significant improvement in the quality of time-resolved spectra through the use of a kHz repetition rate laser to achieve kHz excitation and data collection rates while stepping the spectrometer at 200 Hz. We have studied the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state of Ru(bipyridine)3Cl2 in deuterated acetonitrile to test and optimize high repetition rate data collection. Comparison of different interferometer stepping rates reveals an optimum rate of 200 Hz due to minimization of long-term baseline drift. With the improved collection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio, better assignments of the MLCT excited-state bands can be made. Using optimized parameters, carbonmonoxy myoglobin in deuterated buffer is also studied by observing the infrared signatures of carbon monoxide photolysis upon excitation of the heme. We conclude from these studies that a substantial increase in performance of ss-FT-IR instrumentation is achieved by coupling commercial infrared benches with kHz repetition rate lasers. PMID:21513597

  19. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott, Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  20. Types of Breast Pumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Powered and Electric Pumps A powered breast pump uses batteries or a cord plugged into an electrical outlet ... pumps rely on a power source, women who use powered breast pumps should be prepared for emergency situations when electricity or extra batteries may not be available. If breastfeeding is not ...

  1. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  2. Switching model photovoltaic pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Wagdy R.; Abdul-Sadek Nour, M.

    Photovoltaic (PV) pumping systems are widely used due to their simplicity, high reliability and low cost. A directly-coupled PV pumping system is the most reliable and least-cost PV system. The d.c. motor-pump group is not, however, working at its optimum operating point. A battery buffered PV pumping system introduces a battery between the PV array and the d.c. motor-pump group to ensure that the motor-pump group is operating at its optimum point. The size of the battery storage depends on system economics. If the battery is fully charged while solar radiation is available, the battery will discharge through the load while the PV array is disconnected. Hence, a power loss takes place. To overcome the above mentioned difficulty, a switched mode PV pumping is proposed. When solar radiation is available and the battery is fully charged, the battery is disconnected and the d.c. motor-pump group is directly coupled to the PV array. To avoid excessive operating voltage for the motor, a part of the PV array is switched off to reduce the voltage. As a result, the energy loss is significantly eliminated. Detailed analysis of the proposed system shows that the discharged water increases by about 10% when compared with a conventional battery-buffered system. The system transient performance just after the switching moment shows that the system returns to a steady state in short period. The variations in the system parameters lie within 1% of the rated values.

  3. Development of a novel centrifugal pump: magnetic rotary pump.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, S; Yambe, T; Sonobe, T; Kobayashi, S; Nitta, S

    1997-07-01

    The rotational axis of the centrifugal pump has some associated problems such as blood destruction and sealing between the axis and pump housing. To improve upon these deficits we have developed a new type of blood pump, the magnetic rotary pump (MRP). The MRP has an original design with no rotational axis and no impellers. We made a prototype MRP and examined its hemodynamics in mock circulation. The prototype MRP flow rate is only 1.0 L/min with an afterload of 30 mm Hg, and we have made some modifications in the size and drive mechanisms from these results. The modified MRP can achieve high flow rates and rotational speeds (6.0 L/min with an afterload of 100 mm Hg, 2,000 rpm) in a mock circuit, and the modified MRP was used for left heart assistance in an acute animal experiment. The MRP could maintain the hemodynamics of an anesthetized adult goat. These results suggest that the MRP needs to be improved in several areas, but the MRP may be useful as a blood pump.

  4. Patient-controlled analgesic infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    1988-05-01

    We evaluated 7 PCA infusion pumps from 7 manufacturers. The condition for acceptable use of 6 of the units is that they not be used at low volumes that could result in overinfusion from the stored volume when an occlusion is cleared. Our ratings and ranking are based primarily on safety, security, and overall ease of use. All pumps meet most accuracy, electrical safety, and performance criteria. Two of the pumps are suitable for ambulatory use but are not recommended for general hospital or home care bedside use. One of the pumps is totally disposable and nonelectronic. Purchasing decisions should also take into consideration the cost of disposables, application, and medication security.

  5. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  6. PIV Measurements in Pumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Pump Impeller Fig. 37 shows the top view of pump test rig for radial impeller pumps . The goal of this experiment is cavitation observation and their...PIV Measurements in Pumps 5 - 28 RTO-EN-AVT-143 Figure 37: Test Rig for Combined PIV Measurements and Cavitation Observation. Figure 38...RTO-EN-AVT-143 5 - 1 PIV Measurements in Pumps Dr. Detlev L. Wulff TU Braunschweig Institut für Strömungsmaschinen Langer Kamp 6 D-38106

  7. Absorption heat pump for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan; Simon, William E.; Warrier, Gopinath R.; Woramontri, Woranun

    1993-01-01

    In the first part, the performance of the Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) with water-sulfuric acid and water-magnesium chloride as two new refrigerant-absorbent fluid pairs was investigated. A model was proposed for the analysis of the new working pairs in a heat pump system, subject to different temperature lifts. Computer codes were developed to calculate the Coefficient of Performance (COP) of the system with the thermodynamic properties of the working fluids obtained from the literature. The study shows the potential of water-sulfuric acid as a satisfactory replacement for water-lithium bromide in the targeted temperature range. The performance of the AHP using water-magnesium chloride as refrigerant-absorbent pair does not compare well with those obtained using water-lithium bromide. The second part concentrated on the design and testing of a simple ElectroHydrodynamic (EHD) Pump. A theoretical design model based on continuum electromechanics was analyzed to predict the performance characteristics of the EHD pump to circulate the fluid in the absorption heat pump. A numerical method of solving the governing equations was established to predict the velocity profile, pressure - flow rate relationship and efficiency of the pump. The predicted operational characteristics of the EHD pump is comparable to that of turbomachinery hardware; however, the overall efficiency of the electromagnetic pump is much lower. An experimental investigation to verify the numerical results was conducted. The pressure - flow rate performance characteristics and overall efficiency of the pump obtained experimentally agree well with the theoretical model.

  8. Progress in High-Field Optical Pumping of Alkali Metal Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2006-05-01

    We present preliminary results of an attempt to polarize alkali metal nuclei via optical pumping in a large (9.4-tesla) magnetic field. NMR measurements of ^87Rb and ^133Cs films in optical cells will be reported. Depopulation pumping of alkalis can easily produce electron polarizations of order unity, as measured during spin-exchange optical pumping of noble gases [1]. At low magnetic fields (< ˜1 kG), the strong hyperfine coupling between the alkali electron and nucleus allows angular momentum exchange from one to the other, resulting in nuclear polarization enhancement through optical pumping. In the high magnetic fields required for NMR, however, this interaction is largely decoupled and electron-nuclear spin exchange must rely upon the δA I .S interaction induced by buffer gas collisions (also called the ``Carver rate''). High-field optical pumping experiments may allow for a more precise measurement of this rate, as well as yielding insight into the transfer of angular momentum from the polarized alkali vapor to the bulk alkali metal on the cell walls. The technical challenges of high-resolution NMR of alkali metals at 9.4 tesla will be discussed. 1. E. Babcock, I. Nelson, S. Kadlecek, et al., Physical Review Letters 91, 123003 (2003).

  9. Electron pumping at gigahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, David

    2010-03-01

    Recently, we have overcome the upper frequency limit measured for earlier pumps, by removing the reliance on quantum mechanical tunnelling through barriers on either side of a quantum dot [1]. The ease of operation, high frequency and simplicity of the waveform driving the pump were unexpected findings, contrary to previous predictions. The high speed (GHz), accurate pumping of electrons at the nano-Amp current level allows for easy integration in a wide range of applications from the development of the current standard in the field of metrology to single photon production and quantum based computing, making these new findings of value to many scientific disciplines. The inclusion of a perpendicular magnetic field [2] has shown a marked improvement in the accuracy of the pumped current and allows the study of the interactions of controlled dynamic electrons with a magnet field. Recent work combining two electron pumps in parallel [3] has demonstrated an increase in current output without the increase in error associated with a higher output current from a single pump. With the control and manipulation of a selected number of electrons there is the possibility of the creation of a two-particle entangled state. An interference-type experiment with the inclusion of a beam splitter could be used to probe this state. [4pt] [1] M. D. Blumenthal, B. Kaestner, L. Li, S. Giblin, T. J. B. M. Janssen, M. Pepper, D. Anderson, G. Jones, and D. A. Ritchie, Nature Physics 3, 343 (2007). [0pt] [2] S. J. Wright, M. D. Blumenthal, Godfrey Gumbs, A. L. Thorn, M. Pepper, T. J. B. M. Janssen, S. N. Holmes, D. Anderson, G. A. C. Jones, C. A. Nicoll, and D. A. Ritchie, Phys Rev B. 78, 233311 (2008). [0pt] [3] S. J. Wright, M. D. Blumenthal, M. Pepper, D. Anderson, G. A. C. Jones, C. A. Nicoll, and D. A. Ritchie, Phys Rev B. 80, 113303 (2009).

  10. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  11. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  12. Simulation of a valveless pump with an elastic tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Soo Jai; Chang, Cheong Bong; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2012-11-01

    A valveless pump consisting of a pumping chamber with an elastic tube was simulated using an immersed boundary method. The interaction between the motion of the elastic tube and the pumping chamber generated a net flow toward the outlet throughout a full cycle of the pump. The net flow rate of the valveless pump was examined by varying the stretching coefficient, bending coefficient, the aspect ratio of the elastic tube, and the frequency of the pumping chamber. As the stretching and bending coefficients of the elastic tube increased, the net flow through the valveless pump decreased. Elastic tubes with aspect ratios in the range of 2 rate than that generated for tubes with aspect rations of l/d=1 or 4. As the frequency of the pumping chamber increased, the net flow rate of the pump for l/d=2 increased. However, the net flow rate for l/d=3 was nonlinearly related to the pumping frequency due to the complexity of the wave motions. Snapshots of the fluid velocity vectors and the wave motions of the elastic tube were examined over one cycle of the pump. The relationship between the average gap in the elastic tube and the average flow rate of the pump was analyzed.

  13. Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

    2007-05-03

    Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

  14. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cryopumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels that alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independant pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  15. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cyropumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels the alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independent pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  16. Alternative backing up pump for turbomolecular pumps

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2003-04-22

    As an alternative to the use of a mechanical backing pump in the application of wide range turbomolecular pumps in ultra-high and extra high vacuum applications, palladium oxide is used to convert hydrogen present in the evacuation stream and related volumes to water with the water then being cryo-pumped to a low pressure of below about 1.e.sup.-3 Torr at 150.degree. K. Cryo-pumping is achieved using a low cost Kleemenco cycle cryocooler, a somewhat more expensive thermoelectric cooler, a Venturi cooler or a similar device to achieve the required minimization of hydrogen partial pressure.

  17. Trim or Replace Impellers on Oversized Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    One in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial pumping systems. As a result of conservative engineering practices, pumps are often substantially larger than they need to be for an industrial plant's process requirements. Centrifugal pumps can often be oversized because of ''rounding up'', trying to accommodate gradual increases in pipe surface roughness and flow resistance over time, or anticipating future plant capacity expansions. In addition, the plant's pumping requirements might not have been clearly defined during the design phase. Because of this conservative approach, pumps can have operating points completely different from their design points. The pump head is often less than expected, while the flow rate is greater. This can cause cavitation and waste energy as the flow rate typically must be regulated with bypass or throttle control. Oversized and throttled pumps that produce excess pressure are excellent candidates for impeller replacement or ''trimming'', to save energy and reduce costs. Trimming involves machining the impeller to reduce its diameter. Trimming should be limited to about 75% of a pump's maximum impeller diameter, because excessive trimming can result in a mismatched impeller and casing. As the impeller diameter decreases, added clearance between the impeller and the fixed pump casing increases internal flow recirculation, causes head loss, and lowers pumping efficiency. For manufacturing standardization purposes, pump casings and shafts are designed to accommodate impellers in a range of sizes. Many pump manufacturers provide pump performance curves that indicate how various models will perform with different impeller diameters or trims. The impeller should not be trimmed any smaller than the minimum diameter shown on the curve. Net positive suction head requirements (NPSHR) usually decrease at lower flow rates and can increase at the higher end of the pump head curve. The NPSHR at a given flow rate will

  18. High energy cw-diode pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier with efficient second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Lührmann, Markus; Theobald, Christian; Wallenstein, Richard; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2009-12-07

    We report on a 888 nm diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier with up to 33.7 W output power with a repetition-rate of 20 kHz and an adjustable pulse duration between 217 ps and 1 ns. This setup allowed for efficient second harmonic generation with an efficiency of up to 79%.

  19. Scroll Compressor Oil Pump Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, S.

    2015-08-01

    Scroll compressors utilize three journal bearings to absorb gas, friction and inertial loads exerted on the crankshaft. To function properly, these bearings must be lubricated with a certain amount of oil. The focus of this paper will be to discuss how computational fluid dynamics can be used to predict oil flow out of a single-stage oil pump. The effects of speed and lubricant viscosity on pump output will also be presented. The comparisons will look at mass flow rates, differences in pressure, and torque at various speeds and dynamic viscosities. The computational fluid dynamic analysis results will be compared with actual lab testing where a crankshaft bench tester was built.

  20. Dynamic modeling of optically pumped electrically driven terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadou, A.; Thobel, J.-L.; Lamari, S.

    2017-03-01

    Based on our four-level rate equations model, we analyze through numerical simulations the dynamics of the electron density, population inversion and terahertz intensity present within the cavity of a mid-infrared optically pumped electrically driven THz quantum cascade laser. We find in particular that the mid-infrared pump intensity influences significantly the dynamical behavior of the present device. Moreover, compared to its homologue, the conventional electrically injected THz quantum cascade laser, this system presents much faster dynamics. In addition, within the premises of our model, we derive in the most general case the equation that allows for the determination of the turn-on delay time tth.

  1. H{sub 2}(v = 0,1) + C{sup +}({sup 2} P) {yields} H+CH{sup +} STATE-TO-STATE RATE CONSTANTS FOR CHEMICAL PUMPING MODELS IN ASTROPHYSICAL MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Bulut, Niyazi; Roncero, Octavio; Godard, B.; Cernicharo, Jose; Halvick, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    State-to-state rate constants for the title reaction are calculated using the electronic ground state potential energy surface and an accurate quantum wave-packet method. The calculations are performed for H{sub 2} in different rovibrational states, v = 0, 1 and J = 0 and 1. The simulated reaction cross section for v = 0 shows a rather good agreement with the experimental results of Gerlich et al., both with a threshold of 0.36 eV and within the experimental error of 20%. The total reaction rate coefficients simulated for v = 1 are two times smaller than those estimated by Hierl et al. from cross sections measured at different temperatures and neglecting the contribution from v > 1 with an uncertainty factor of two. Thus, part of the disagreement is attributed to the contributions of v > 1. The computed state-to-state rate coefficients are used in our radiative transfer model code applied to the conditions of the Orion Bar photodissociation region, and leads to an increase of the line fluxes of high-J lines of CH{sup +}. This result partially explains the discrepancies previously found with measurements and demonstrates that CH{sup +} excitation is mostly driven by chemical pumping.

  2. Generation of a coherent x ray in the water window region at 1 kHz repetition rate using a mid-infrared pump source.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui; Xu, Han; Fu, Yuxi; Yao, Jinping; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Takahashi, Eiji J; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Liu, X; Chen, J

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrate the generation of a coherent x ray in the water window region in a gas cell filled with neon gas using a wavelength-tunable mid-IR femtosecond laser operating at 1 kHz repetition rate. The cutoff energy and conversion efficiency of the water window x ray can be optimized by tuning gas pressure as well as the focal position.

  3. General-purpose infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    General-purpose infusion pumps deliver liquid medications to patients through intravenous or epidural routes at specified flows. They are most often used in hospitals and alternative care settings (e.g., physician' offices, patients' homes) when liquid medications need to be administered with greater accuracy or at higher flows than can be provided through a manually adjusted gravity administration set. In this Update of our February 1997 Evaluation of infusion pumps (Health Devices 26[2]), we tested 3 additional pumps from 3 suppliers. We also rated and ranked them in comparison with the 16 units from the February 1997 study that are still being produced. With a few exceptions, we tested the new pumps against the same criteria and using the same test methods as those in the previous Evaluation. However, for this Update, the focus of our findings has broadened: although we continue to place strong emphasis on the pumps' protection against gravity free-flow, we also give significant weight to their overall safety, performance, and human factors design. As a result, our ratings and rankings scheme has changed, affecting the rankings of some of the previously evaluated units. Of the 19 currently available units that have been evaluated to date, we rated 13 units Acceptable, with 5 of those units ranked above the other 8. A further 5 units were rated Conditionally Acceptable; we consider them Acceptable if they are used with the available free-flow protection. And 1 unit had performance problems that caused us to rate it Unacceptable (this unit has been recalled by its supplier; see the inset on page 162). As always, we caution readers not to base selection and purchasing decisions on our conclusions alone, but on a thorough understanding of the issues behind those conclusions, which can be gained by reading this Evaluation in its entirety and carefully reviewing the February 1997 issue.

  4. Optimal quantum pumps.

    PubMed

    Avron, J E; Elgart, A; Graf, G M; Sadun, L

    2001-12-03

    We study adiabatic quantum pumps on time scales that are short relative to the cycle of the pump. In this regime the pump is characterized by the matrix of energy shift which we introduce as the dual to Wigner's time delay. The energy shift determines the charge transport, the dissipation, the noise, and the entropy production. We prove a general lower bound on dissipation in a quantum channel and define optimal pumps as those that saturate the bound. We give a geometric characterization of optimal pumps and show that they are noiseless and transport integral charge in a cycle. Finally we discuss an example of an optimal pump related to the Hall effect.

  5. Haemolysis during cardiopulmonary bypass: an in vivo comparison of standard roller pumps, nonocclusive roller pumps and centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Hansbro, S D; Sharpe, D A; Catchpole, R; Welsh, K R; Munsch, C M; McGoldrick, J P; Kay, P H

    1999-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) involves the use of either an occlusive roller pump or centrifugal pump. Damage to blood elements, including haemolysis, may arise from occlusion when using a roller pump; the appropriate degree of occlusion has not yet been determined scientifically. Centrifugal and nonocclusive roller pumps are reputed to reduce haemolysis. The objective of this study was to compare haemolysis caused by a standard roller pump with a dynamically set nonocclusive roller pump and with a centrifugal pump. We prospectively randomized 60 patients undergoing routine coronary artery surgery into three groups: standard roller pump (STD, n = 20), dynamically set roller pump (DYN, n = 20), or centrifugal pump (CEN, n = 20). The level of plasma free haemoglobin (FHb) was measured preoperatively, and the rate of formation of FHb (in mg/dl/min) was determined at the end of the ischaemic phase and at the end of CPB. Cardiotomy suction blood was isolated for the ischaemic phase and returned before the end of CPB. It was found that there were no differences between the groups in demographic or operative variables. The rate of formation of FHb at the end of the ischaemic phase was similar for all groups (STD 0.108 +/- 0.10, DYN 0.117 +/- 0.08, CEN 0.129 +/- 0.07). At the end of CPB, after return of the cardiotomy suction blood, there was a significant (< 0.001) increase in the rate of formation of FHb in all groups. The increase was similar for each of the groups (STD 0.424 +/- 0.17, DYN 0.481 +/- 0.20, CEN 0.471 +/- 0.18). We conclude that the rates of haemolysis are similar for each of the pump types, and no benefit is conferred by the use of either a dynamically set roller pump or a centrifugal pump compared with the standard roller pump. The return of the cardiotomy suction blood to the circulation is the principal source of plasma free haemoglobin.

  6. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  7. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition.

  8. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  9. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  10. Development of Advanced Centrifugal Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.

    2009-09-30

    A CRADA project was performed between BNL and Flowserve, California, under the auspices of Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) with the DOE support. The purpose was to jointly support a team of Russian institutes led by Kurchatov Institute to develop technology to increase operating life of centrifugal pumps. The work was performed from March 1, 2002 to September 30, 2009. The project resulted in development and validation the total cost of the sub-contract with Kurchatov Institute was $700,000, with matching fund from the industrial partner, Flowserve. The technical objective of this project is to develop advanced centrifugal pumps for the power, petroleum, chemical and water services industries by increasing the reliability of pumping equipment without a corresponding increase in life cycle cost. This major market need can be served by developing centrifugal pumps that generate only modest forces on the mechanical system even when operating under significant off-design conditions. This project is focused towards understanding the origin of hydraulic forces (both radial and axial, steady and time-dependent) and to develop design options, which reduce these forces over a broad flow range. This focus will include the force generation due to cavitation inside the pump as the operating conditions extend to low suction pressures. The results of research will reduce the inception of cavitation that leads to surface erosion and to find passive method of reducing peaks in axial thrust during whole range of flow rates.

  11. Earth-coupled heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    The object of the research work was to demonstrate that a water source heat pump could be used with an earth-coupled heat exchanger which was buried in an absorption field of a domestic sewage disposal system to provide the heating and cooling requirements for residential use in an energy efficient fashion. The system consists of a 3 ton heat pump (nominal rating of 34,000 Btu/hr), a closed-loop heat exchanger which was fabricated from 200 feet of 2 inch diameter cast iron soil pipe, and a calorimeter house which had heat transmission characteristics similar to a 100 sq ft house. The earth-coupled heat exchanger was connected to the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. Water was circulated through the heat exchanger coil in the earth and through the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. The earth served as the energy source (for heating) or sink (for cooling) for the heat pump.

  12. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  13. Hemodialysis using a valveless pulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungsoo; Mun, Cho Hae; Lee, Sa Ram; Min, Byoung Goo; Yoo, Kyu Jae; Park, Yong Woo; Won, Yong Soon

    2008-01-01

    Research on pulsatile blood pumps for extracorporeal life support has been widely performed because of the proven advantageous effects of blood pulsation. However, studies on the use of pulsatile blood pumps for hemodialysis are limited, although available evidence demonstrates that pulsatile blood flow has a positive influence on dialysis outcome. Therefore, the authors designed a new pulsatile pump, which is characterized by minimal-occlusion of blood-containing tubing, no requirement for valves, and no blood flow regurgitation. In-vitro hemolysis tests were conducted using fresh bovine blood, and the normalized index of hemolysis was adopted to compare blood traumas induced by the devised pulsatile pump and a conventional roller pump. In addition, experimental hemodialyses with a canine renal failure model were performed using the devised pump. Normalized index of hemolysis levels obtained was much smaller for the devised pulse pump (45 +/- 21 mg/100 L) than for the roller pump (103 +/- 10 mg/100 L), and no technical problems were encountered during dialysis sessions. Blood and dialysate flow rates were maintained at predetermined values and molecular removal was satisfactory. Postdialysis urea and creatinine reduction ratios were 61.8% +/- 10.6% and 57.4% +/- 9.0%, respectively. Pulsatile flow has usually been generated using pulsatile devices containing valves, but the valves cause concern in terms of the clinical applications of these devices. However, the described pulsatile pump does not require valves, and yet no blood flow regurgitation was observed.

  14. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOEpatents

    Osher, J.L.

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  15. Experience with Dry Running Vacuum Pumps in Helium Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arztmann, R.

    2008-03-01

    A process vacuum system for helium using dry running vacuum pumps only was shop tested and installed in a refrigeration plant to serve cavities operating at 2K for a cryogenic storage ring. The paper explains the joint development steps of Busch AG and Linde Kryotechnik AG to use dry running vacuum pumps for helium service at ambient temperature. A roots type booster pump followed by a non lube rotary screw pump provides very good performance in a helium vacuum pump system. Variable frequency drives on both pumps allow to adjust the pump characteristics to a wide range of operating parameters. Operation without friction of sealing elements in the compression space also of the screw pump promises extended maintenance intervals and virtually no wear on the rotors. The current plant operation at Max Plank Institute in Heidelberg, Germany Laboratory will provide additional experience for further applications.

  16. Casing pumps can curb costs, increase output in certain wells

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrel, R.; Cornett, T.

    1987-04-13

    Casing pumps can increase production while cutting costs in wells producing up to 40-b/d fluid and 350-Mcfd gas. Picking the oil and gas well suitable for this application is the key to obtaining such benefits. This article describes the method for making that decision. Casing pumps eliminate gas-locking. The costs of maintaining and operating a casing pump are less than that for the conventional sucker rod pumping system. Like plunger lifts, casing pumps are self-contained pumps that use the well's pressurized gas as the energy source, in turn allowing all of this energy to be sold. Yet, while plunger lifts normally require several hundred pounds of shut-in pressure, casing pumps typically require only 100 lb of shut-in pressure to operate. Casing pumps require no tubing, sucker rods, timers, or outside sources of energy.

  17. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  18. Sizing pumps for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, S.Z.

    1996-11-01

    Slurry characteristics have a significant impact on centrifugal pump performance. For instance, as particle size increases or the percent solids concentration increases, pump head and efficiency decrease. Therefore, before a slurry pump is selected, it is important to define the slurry characteristics as accurately as possible. The effect of the slurry characteristics on the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump will be emphasized (the effect on flowrate is less significant). The effect of slurry characteristics is more predominant in smaller pumps (with smaller diameter impellers) than in larger pumps. The data and relationship between the various slurry parameters have been developed from correlations and nomographs published by pump vendors from their field data and test results. The information helps to avoid specifying an undersized pump/motor assembly for slurry service.

  19. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  20. Numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation for use in calculating pumping rates in a CO sub 2 discharge laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, D.A.

    1989-12-01

    The collisional Boltzmann equation was solved numerically to obtain excitation rates for use in a CO{sub 2} laser design program. The program was written in Microsoft QuickBasic for use on the IBM Personal Computer or equivalent. Program validation involved comparisons of computed transport coefficients with experimental data and previous theoretical work. Four different numerical algorithms were evaluated in terms of accuracy and efficiency. L-U decomposition was identified as the preferred approach. The calculated transport coefficients were found to agree with empirical data within one to five percent. The program was integrated into a CO{sub 2} laser design program. Studies were then performed to evaluate the effects on predicted laser output power and energy density as parameters affecting electron kinetics were changed. Plotting routines were written for both programs.

  1. Performance of an Annular Linear Induction Pump with Applications to Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Schoenfeld, Michael; Pearson, J. Boise; Webster, Kenneth; Godfroy, Thomas; Adkins, Harold E., Jr.; Werner, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Results of performance testing of an annular linear induction pump are presented. The pump electromagnetically pumps liquid metal through a circuit specially designed to allow for quantification of the performance. Testing was conducted over a range of conditions, including frequencies of 33, 36, 39, and 60 Hz, liquid metal temperatures from 125 to 525 C, and input voltages from 5 to 120 V. Pump performance spanned a range of flow rates from roughly 0.16 to 5.7 L/s (2.5 to 90 gpm), and pressure head less than 1 to 90 kPa (less than 0.145 to 13 psi). The maximum efficiency measured during testing was slightly greater than 6%. The efficiency was fairly insensitive to input frequency from 33 to 39 Hz, and was markedly lower at 60 Hz. In addition, the efficiency decreased as the NaK temperature was raised. The performance of the pump operating on a variable frequency drive providing 60 Hz power compared favorably with the same pump operating on 60 Hz power drawn directly from the electrical grid.

  2. A review of thermal response test analysis using pumping test concepts.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Jasmin; Therrien, René; Gosselin, Louis; Lefebvre, René

    2011-01-01

    The design of ground-coupled heat pump systems requires knowledge of the thermal properties of the subsurface and boreholes. These properties can be measured with in situ thermal response tests (TRT), where a heat transfer fluid flowing in a ground heat exchanger is heated with an electric element and the resulting temperature perturbation is monitored. These tests are analogous to standard pumping tests conducted in hydrogeology, because a system that is initially assumed at equilibrium is perturbed and the response is monitored in time, to assess the system's properties with inverse modeling. Although pumping test analysis is a mature topic in hydrogeology, the current analysis of temperature measurements in the context of TRTs is comparatively a new topic and it could benefit from the application of concepts related to pumping tests. The purpose of this work is to review the methodology of TRTs and improve their analysis using pumping test concepts, such as the well function, the superposition principle, and the radius of influence. The improvements are demonstrated with three TRTs. The first test was conducted in unsaturated waste rock at an active mine and the other two tests aimed at evaluating the performance of thermally enhanced pipe installed in a fully saturated sedimentary rock formation. The concepts borrowed from pumping tests allowed the planning of the duration of the TRTs and the analysis of variable heat injection rate tests accounting for external heat transfer and temperature recovery, which reduces the uncertainty in the estimation of thermal properties.

  3. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility planning in accordance with appendix B of this subpart. (b) Advance of allowance to potential grant... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  4. Photovoltaic pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klockgether, J.; Kiessling, K. P.

    1983-09-01

    Solar pump systems for the irrigation of fields and for water supply in regions with much sunshine are discussed. For surface water and sources with a hoisting depth of 12 m, a system with immersion pumps is used. For deep sources with larger hoisting depths, an underwater motor pump was developed. Both types of pump system meet the requirements of simple installation and manipulation, safe operation, maintenance free, and high efficiency reducing the number of solar cells needed.

  5. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Stock, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from September 1, 1988 to February 28, 1989 under NASA grant NAG-1-441 entitled, Direct Solar-Pumped Iodine Laser Amplifier. During this period, the research effort was concentrated on the solar pumped master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system using n-C3F7I. In the experimental work, the amplification measurement was conducted to identify the optimum conditions for amplification of the center's Vortek solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. A modeling effort was also pursued to explain the experimental results in the theoretical work. The amplification measurement of the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier is the first amplification experiment on the continuously pumped amplifier. The small signal amplification of 5 was achieved for the triple pass geometry of the 15 cm long solar simulator pumped amplifier at the n-C3F7I pressure of 20 torr, at the flow velocity of 6 m/sec and at the pumping intensity of 1500 solar constants. The XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator, which was developed in the previous research, was employed as the master oscillator for the amplification measurement. In the theoretical work, the rate equations of the amplifier was established and the small signal amplification was calculated for the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. The amplification calculated from the kinetic equations with the previously measured rate coefficients reveals very large disagreement with experimental measurement. Moreover, the optimum condition predicted by the kinetic equation is quite discrepant with that measured by experiment. This fact indicates the necessity of study in the measurement of rate coefficients of the continuously pumped iodine laser system.

  6. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  7. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  8. Centrifugal main fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.F.

    1986-08-26

    For a gas turbine power plant having a fuel supply and a fuel metering valve and variable geometry for the power plant including servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and variable geometry, a fuel pumping system, is described to supply pressurized fuel for the servo actuating mechanisms and for the engine working fluid medium. The pumping system includes a centrifugal pump solely supplying the fuel to the fuel metering valve to be delivered to the power plant for its working fluid medium, a positive displacement pump in parallel with the centrifugal pump and solely to supply pressurized fuel to the servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and for the variable geometry, and a boost pump means disposed in serial relationship with the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump for augmenting the pressure supplied by the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump during predetermined operating conditions of the power plant. The combined boost pump and centrifugal pump capability is sufficient to satisfy the vapor to liquid ratio requirements of the power during its entire operating envelope.

  9. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  10. Do perceptions of insulin pump usability impact attitudes toward insulin pump therapy? A pilot study of individuals with type 1 and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, James J; Gilgen, Emily

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the impact of perceived insulin pump usability on attitudes toward insulin pump therapy in diabetic individuals currently treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI). This comparative, single-arm study recruited 28 adults with type 1 (n = 16) and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (n = 12) to evaluate 2 current insulin pumps: Medtronic Revel 723 (Pump 1), Asante Snap Insulin Pump (Pump 2). Participants were randomized 1:1 to 1 of 2 assessment sequences: Pump 1 followed by Pump 2; and Pump 2 followed by Pump 1. Structured observational protocols were utilized to assess participants' ability and time required to learn/perform common tasks associated with pump setup/use. Participants used a modified version of the System Usability Scale (SUS) and investigator-developed questionnaires to rate pump usability and task difficulty; pre-post questionnaires assessed changes in attitudes toward insulin pump therapy. All participants completed the study. SUS scores showed Pump 2 to be more usable than Pump 1 on all usability attributes. Participants rated Pump 2 more positively than Pump 1, overall mean SUS scores of 5.7 versus 4.1 respectively, F(1, 52) = 32.7, P < .001, and SUS scores were higher if participants used the Pump 2 last, 5.3 versus 4.4 for Pump 1 last, F(1, 52) = 10.8, P < .01. Pump 2 was preferred for all tasks: manual bolus (86%), bolus calculation (71%), managing basal rates (93%), interpreting alarms (96%), transferring settings (100%), changing insulin and infusion sets (93%), all P < .05. Perceptions of pump usability can directly impact acceptance and use of features that may benefit those who wear them. Simpler pump devices that decrease perceptions of complexity may encourage broader use of this technology.

  11. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  12. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  13. How to select and apply positive-displacement rotary pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Neerken, R.F.

    1980-04-07

    The advantages of rotary pumps for process applications are promoted by these practical guidelines concerning the types available, facts about their operation and performance, and the fluid systems in which they can be used. Basic types of rotary pumps discussed include internal gear, sliding vane, single-screw (progressing cavity), cam and piston, flexible tube, flexible liner, external gear, circumferential piston, twin screw, triple screw, single lobe, and 3 lobe. Factors which are examined to make pump selection include suction requirements, viscosity of fluids, temperature at which process fluid is handled, working and allowable pressures, pump capacity, pump horsepower, materials of construction, and intended applications.

  14. Improving Infusion Pump Safety Through Usability Testing.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen E; Arnold, Ryan; Capan, Muge; Campbell, Michele; Zern, Susan Coffey; Dressler, Robert; Duru, Ozioma O; Ebbert, Gwen; Jackson, Eric; Learish, John; Strauss, Danielle; Wu, Pan; Bennett, Dean A

    With the recognition that the introduction of new technology causes changes in workflow and may introduce new errors to the system, usability testing was performed to provide data on nursing practice and interaction with infusion pump technology. Usability testing provides the opportunity to detect and analyze potentially dangerous problems with the design of infusion pumps that could cause or allow avoidable errors. This work will reduce preventable harm through the optimization of health care delivery.

  15. Custom Unit Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Little, Frank; Oinuma, Ryoji; Larsen, Ben; Goldman, Jeff; Reinis, Filip; Trevino, Luis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, seal-less, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion, and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated at 40 to 240 lbm/hr flow rate, 35 to 100 oF pump temperature, and 5 to 10 psid pressure rise. Power consumption of the pump controller at the nominal operating point in both ambient and vacuum conditions was 9.5 W, which was less than the 12 W predicted. Gas ingestion capabilities were tested by injecting 100 cc of air into the fluid line; the pump operated normally throughout this test.

  16. Investigation of the pump wavelength influence on pulsed laser pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, H.; Withford, M. J.; Mildren, R. P.; Piper, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Recent theoretical modelling and experimental results have shown that excess lattice phonon energy created dur ing the non-radiative energy transfer from the 4T2 pump manifold to the 2E storage level in Alexandrite when pumped with wavelengths shorter than ˜645 nm causes chaotic lasing output. Shorter pump wavelengths have also been associated with increased non-radiative energy decay and reduced laser efficiency. We report studies of fluorescence emission spectra of Alexandrite illuminated at a range of wavelengths from green to red, which demonstrate reduced fluorescence yield for shorter pump wavelengths at elevated crystal temperatures. Investigations of pulsed laser pumping of Alexandrite over the same spectral range demonstrated reduced pump threshold energy for longer pump wavelengths. High repetition rate pulsed pumping of Alexandrite at 532, 578 and 671 nm showed stable and efficient laser performance was only achieved for red pumping at 671 nm. These results support the theoretical model and demonstrate the potential for scalable, red laser pumped, all-solid-state Alexandrite lasers.

  17. F-AREA PUMP TANK 1 MIXING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Richard Dimenna, R; Si Lee, S

    2008-11-05

    The F-area pump tanks are used to transfer supernate, sludge, and other materials. In any transfer, the solution must stay well mixed without allowing particulate matter to settle out of the liquid and, thus, accumulate in the bottom of the pump tank. Recently, the pulse jet mixing in F-area Pump Tank 1 (FPT1) has been decommissioned. An analysis of the liquid transfer through FPT1 has been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to assess whether or not the velocities throughout the tank will remain high enough to keep all particulate suspended using only transfer and recirculation pumps. The following paragraph is an abbreviated synopsis of the transfer procedure for FPT1 [1, 2]. Prior to a transfer, FPT1 begins to be filled with inhibited water through the inlet transfer line (TI). When the tank liquid level reaches 52.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom, the recirculation pump (RI and RO) is activated. At a tank liquid level of 72.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom, the outlet transfer line (TO) is activated to reduce the liquid level in FPT1 and transfer inhibited water to H-area Pump Tank 7 (HPT7). The liquid level is reduced down to 39.5 inches, with an allowable range from 37.5 to 41.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom. HPT7 goes through a similar procedure as FPT1 until both have tank liquid levels of approximately 39.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom. The transfer of inhibited water continues until a steady-state has been reached in both pump tanks. At this point, the supernate/sludge transfer begins with a minimum flow rate of 70 gpm and an average flow rate of 150 gpm. After the transfer is complete, the pump tanks (both FPT1 and HPT7) are pumped down to between 20.5 and 22.5 inches (above absolute bottom) and then flushed with 25,000 gallons of inhibited water to remove any possible sludge heal. After the flushing, the pump tanks are emptied. Note that the tank liquid level is measured using diptubes. Figure 2

  18. Ultra-high speed vacuum pump system with first stage turbofan and second stage turbomolecular pump

    SciTech Connect

    Jostlein, Hans

    2006-04-04

    An ultra-high speed vacuum pump evacuation system includes a first stage ultra-high speed turbofan and a second stage conventional turbomolecular pump. The turbofan is either connected in series to a chamber to be evacuated, or is optionally disposed entirely within the chamber. The turbofan employs large diameter rotor blades operating at high linear blade velocity to impart an ultra-high pumping speed to a fluid. The second stage turbomolecular pump is fluidly connected downstream from the first stage turbofan. In operation, the first stage turbofan operates in a pre-existing vacuum, with the fluid asserting only small axial forces upon the rotor blades. The turbofan imparts a velocity to fluid particles towards an outlet at a high volume rate, but moderate compression ratio. The second stage conventional turbomolecular pump then compresses the fluid to pressures for evacuation by a roughing pump.

  19. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  20. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  1. Pump packages for Colombian crude oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Caterpillar Large Engine Center recently packaged ten engine-driven centrifugal pump packages for British Petroleum Exploration`s crude oil pipeline in South America. The ten sets, which use Ingersoll-Dresser centrifugal pumps, are designed to increase significantly the output of BP`s Central LLanos pipeline located in a remote region near Bogota, Colombia. BP anticipates that the addition of the new pump packages will increase daily volume from the current 100000 barrels to approximately 210000 barrels when the upgrade of the pipeline is completed in September. The ten sets are installed at three separate pumping stations. The stations are designed to operate continuously while unmanned, with only periodic maintenance required. The pump packages are powered by Caterpillar 3612 engines rated 3040 kW at 1000 r/min. The 12-cylinder engines are turbocharged and charge-air cooled and use the pipeline oil as both fuel and a cooling medium for the fuel injectors.

  2. Pulsed pumping process optimization using a potential flow model.

    PubMed

    Tenney, C M; Lastoskie, C M

    2007-08-15

    A computational model is applied to the optimization of pulsed pumping systems for efficient in situ remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the pulsed pumping mode of operation, periodic rather than continuous pumping is used. During the pump-off or trapping phase, natural gradient flow transports contaminated groundwater into a treatment zone surrounding a line of injection and extraction wells that transect the contaminant plume. Prior to breakthrough of the contaminated water from the treatment zone, the wells are activated and the pump-on or treatment phase ensues, wherein extracted water is augmented to stimulate pollutant degradation and recirculated for a sufficient period of time to achieve mandated levels of contaminant removal. An important design consideration in pulsed pumping groundwater remediation systems is the pumping schedule adopted to best minimize operational costs for the well grid while still satisfying treatment requirements. Using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model, optimal pumping frequencies and pumping event durations have been investigated for a set of model aquifer-well systems with different well spacings and well-line lengths, and varying aquifer physical properties. The results for homogeneous systems with greater than five wells and moderate to high pumping rates are reduced to a single, dimensionless correlation. Results for heterogeneous systems are presented graphically in terms of dimensionless parameters to serve as an efficient tool for initial design and selection of the pumping regimen best suited for pulsed pumping operation for a particular well configuration and extraction rate. In the absence of significant retardation or degradation during the pump-off phase, average pumping rates for pulsed operation were found to be greater than the continuous pumping rate required to prevent contaminant breakthrough.

  3. Ammoniated salt heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W. R.; Jaeger, F. J.; Giordano, T. J.

    A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat. Several liquid ammoniates are identified and the critical properties of three of the most promising are presented. Results of small scale (5000 Btu) system tests are discussed and a design concept for a prototype system is given. This system represents a significant improvement over the system using solid ammoniates investigated previously because of the increase in heat transfer rates (5 to 60 Btu/hr sq ft F) and the resulting reduction in heat exchanger size. As a result the concept shows promise of being cost competitive with conventional systems.

  4. Mud pump failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.C. II

    1981-10-01

    Extrusion, the primary cause of piston failure, is the degradation of a seal caused by the seal material moving into the interface between the two parts being sealed. It is shown that operational dynamics of the mud piston lead to an aggravated extrusion condition. As both the liner wall and the piston OD lose material, the clearance gap between liner and piston increases. This gap provides the piston seal a space to move into when pressurized. This movement, called extrusion, is undesirable because the piston rubber is then subjected to abnormal stresses which it cannot tolerate. As the piston moves forward, this extruded material is gradually nibbled away. Extrusion and nibble action continue on each stroke of the pump as additional rubber moves away from the high-pressure side of the piston toward the low-pressure side. A discussion is presented of extrusion rates and seal leakage.

  5. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, S.M.; Ward, R.L.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a pump for pumping a preselected quantity of fluid with each pump driving stroke from a fluid inlet port to a fluid outlet port, an inlet valve for selectively controlling fluid flow through the fluid inlet port, a pump body defining a pump bore therein, a piston slidably movable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, an operator unit for reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a manifold interconnect with the pump body. It comprises a flow path therein extending from a manifold inlet port to a manifold outlet port, flow path being in communication with the fluid outlet port in the pump body, a purge passageway extending from the flow path to the outlet passageway, a purge valve for regulating fluid flow through the purge passageway, and a filter positioned within the manifold and extending across a portion of the flow path, the filter defining a filtered zone within the flow path adjoining the inlet port in the pump body, and an unfiltered zone within the flow path extending from the manifold inlet to the manifold outlet, such that filtered fluid enters the pump bore while unfiltered fluid bypasses the filter and passes out the manifold outlet port.

  6. Optical pumping system design for large production of hyperpolarized.

    PubMed

    Ruset, I C; Ketel, S; Hersman, F W

    2006-02-10

    We present a design for a spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of highly polarized 129Xe. Low xenon concentrations in the flowing gas mixture allow the laser to maintain high Rb polarization. The large spin-exchange rate between Rb and 129Xe through the long-lived van der Waals molecules at low pressure, combined with a high flow rate, results in large production rates of hyperpolarized xenon. We report a maximum polarization of 64% achieved for a 0.3 l/h Xe flow rate, and maximum magnetization output of 6 l/h at 22% polarization. Our findings regarding the polarization dependence on temperature, nitrogen partial pressure, and gas mixture flow velocity are also reported.

  7. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Charles D.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Toole, Jr., William R.

    1996-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump for in-ground filtering and monitoring of ws or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  8. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  9. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1996-10-29

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of waters or other fluid sources, includes a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis. 5 figs.

  10. Intervalley energy of GaN conduction band measured by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkevičius, Saulius; Uždavinys, Tomas K.; Foronda, Humberto M.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Weisbuch, Claude; Speck, James S.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved transmission and reflection measurements were performed for bulk GaN at room temperature to evaluate the energy of the first conduction band satellite valley. The measurements showed clear threshold-like spectra for transmission decay and reflection rise times. The thresholds were associated with the onset of the intervalley electron scattering. Transmission measurements with pump and probe pulses in the near infrared produced an intervalley energy of 0.97 ±0.02 eV. Ultraviolet pump and infrared probe reflection provided a similar value. Comparison of the threshold energies obtained in these experiments allowed estimating the hole effective mass in the upper valence band to be 1.4 m0 . Modeling of the reflection transients with rate equations has allowed estimating electron-LO (longitudinal optical) phonon scattering rates and the satellite valley effective mass.

  11. Fuel system for rotary distributor fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Klopfer, K.H.; Kelly, W.W.

    1993-06-01

    In a fuel injection pump having a drive shaft, a pump rotor driven by the drive shaft, reciprocating pumping means with periodic intake and pumping strokes to periodically receive an intake charge of fuel and deliver fuel at high pressure for fuel injection is described; a distributor head with a plurality of angularly spaced distributor outlets, the pump rotor providing a distributor rotor with a distributor port connected to the pumping means, the distributor rotor being rotatably mounted in the distributor head for sequential registration of the distributor port with the distributor outlets for distributing said high pressure delivery of fuel thereto; a fuel system for supplying fuel to the pumping means, having an end chamber at one end of the pump rotor and a fuel supply pump driven by the drive shaft and having an inlet and outlet, the supply pump outlet being connected to the end chamber for supplying fuel thereto, and a pressure regulator for regulating the fuel pressure in the end chamber; and a control valve connected between the pumping means and the end chamber and selectively opened during the intake strokes to supply fuel to the pumping means from the end chamber and during the pumping strokes to spill fuel from the pumping means into the end chamber to terminate said high pressure delivery of fuel; the improvement wherein the fuel system comprises a fuel return passage connected in series with the end chamber downstream thereof, wherein the pressure regulator is mounted in the return passage for regulating the upstream fuel pressure, including the upstream fuel pressure within the end chamber, and is connected for conducting excess fuel for return to the supply pump inlet, and wherein the supply pump is driven by the drive shaft to supply fuel at a rate exceeding the rate of said high pressure delivery of fuel for fuel injection and to provide excess fuel flow continuously through the end chamber and return passage to the pressure regulator.

  12. Laser radiation frequency conversion in carbon- and cluster-containing plasma plumes under conditions of single and two-color pumping by pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    This work reviews a series of investigations of different plasma plumes using single- and two-color laser systems that emit femtosecond pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate. Results of investigation of the resonant enhancement of harmonics in tin plasma with the use of two types of pumps are analyzed, and it is shown that the tuning of the wavelengths of harmonics to ion-resonance levels plays an important role in increasing the conversion efficiency to high-order harmonics of the radiation to be converted. Investigations of different carbon-containing plasma media (carbon nanotubes, graphite, carbon aerogel, etc.) exhibit attractive properties of the nonlinear medium of this type for efficient generation of high-order harmonics. The results of the first experiments on the use of nanoparticles produced directly in the course of laser ablation of metals for increasing the efficiency of harmonics generated in this cluster-containing medium are analyzed. It is shown that new approaches realized in these investigations give hope that the nonlinear optical response of plasma media in the far-ultraviolet range can be further increased.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Characterization of the Pediatric Pump-Lung.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongjun J; Gellman, Barry; Zhang, Tao; Taskin, M Ertan; Dasse, Kurt A; Griffith, Bartley P

    2011-12-01

    The pediatric pump-lung (PediPL) is a miniaturized integrated pediatric pump-oxygenator specifically designed for cardiac or cardiopulmonary support for patients weighing 5-20 kg to allow mobility and extended use for 30 days. The PediPL incorporates a magnetically levitated impeller with uniquely configured hollow fiber membranes into a single unit capable of performing both pumping and gas exchange. A combined computational and experimental study was conducted to characterize the functional and hemocompatibility performances of this newly developed device. The three-dimensional flow features of the PediPL and its hemolytic characteristics were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics based modeling. The oxygen exchange was modeled based on a convection-diffusion-reaction process. The hollow fiber membranes were modeled as a porous medium which incorporates the flow resistance in the bundle by an added momentum sink term. The pumping function was evaluated for the required range of operating conditions (0.5-2.5 L/min and 1000-3000 rpm). The blood damage potentials were further analyzed in terms of flow and shear stress fields, and the calculations of hemolysis index. In parallel, the hydraulic pump performance, oxygen transfer and hemolysis level were quantified experimentally. Based on the computational and experimental results, the PediPL device is found to be functional to provide necessary oxygen transfer and blood pumping requirements for the pediatric patients. Smooth blood flow characteristics and low blood damage potential were observed in the entire device. The in-vitro tests further confirmed that the PediPL can provide adequate blood pumping and oxygen transfer over the range of intended operating conditions with acceptable hemolytic performance. The rated flow rate for oxygenation is 2.5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis is 0.065 g/100L at 1.0 L/min and 3000 rpm.

  14. Two-stage aquifer pumping subject to slow desorption and persistent sources.

    PubMed

    Saez, Jose A; Harmon, Thomas C

    2006-01-01

    This work focuses on improving pump-and-treat remediation by optimizing a two-stage operational scheme to reduce volumes extracted when confronted with nonequilibrium desorption, low-permeability units, and continuous contaminant sources such as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Q1 and Q2 are the initial short-term high pumping rate and later long-term low pumping rate, respectively. A two-dimensional ground water flow and transport management model was used to test the proposed strategy for plumes developed from finite (NAPL-free) and continuous (NAPL-driven) contaminant sources in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous (zoned) aquifers. Remediation scenarios were simulated over durations of 2000, 6000, and 15,000 d to determine (1) the optimal time to switch from a preset Q1 to Q2 and (2) the value of Q2. The problem was constrained by mass removal requirements, maximum allowable downgradient concentrations, and practical bounds on Q2. Q1 was fixed at preset values 50% to 200% higher than the single-stage pumping rates (i.e., steady pumping rates during entire remediation period) necessary to achieve a desired cleanup level and capture the plume. Results for the NAPL-free homogeneous case under nonequilibrium desorption conditions achieved the same level of cleanup as single-stage pumping, while reducing extracted volumes by up to 36%. Comparable savings were obtained with NAPL-driven sources only when the source concentration was reduced by at least 2 orders of magnitude. For the zoned aquifer, the proposed strategy provided volume savings of up to 24% under NAPL-free and reduced source conditions.

  15. 46 CFR 28.255 - Bilge pumps, bilge piping, and dewatering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... same rate as water is introduced. Pumps used as part of the processing of fish do not count for meeting this requirement. The dewatering system must be interlocked with the pump(s) supplying water to the... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bilge pumps, bilge piping, and dewatering systems....

  16. Characterization of a centrifugal pump in He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of an effort to determine the feasibility of helium transfer in space, a centrifugal pump was tested in He II at a variety of flow rates, pump speeds, and fluid temperatures. The pump, which has a straight bladed impeller 6.86 cm in diameter, generated a maximum pressure rise of 15 kPa and a maximum flow rate of 22 g/s for the conditions of the test. Pump performance seems to be independent of fluid temperature and is in good agreement with the values predicted by the manufacturer. Over the range of flow coefficients, the measured maximum efficiency is around 50 percent. Cavitation is observed in the pump and is thought to be highly dependent on the local heating of the helium in the pump. Preliminary measurements of the noise spectra of the pump suggest a possible mechanism to predict the onset of cavitation.

  17. Pitot heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, R.D.

    1981-12-08

    A pitot heat pump is described wherein a multi-stage pitot pump is employed as the compression means in a heat pump thermodynamic cycle. The heat pump is comprised of a multi-stage vapor pitot pump, liquid pitot pump, turbine, vaporizer, evaporator, condenser and expansion valve. The turbine is used to rotate a shaft to which the impellers of the pitot pump are attached. Refrigerant gas from the evaporator enters the first stage of the pitot pump and the impeller therein forces the refrigerant gas outwardly where it enters the narrow end of a pitot tube provided therein. The discharge end of the pitot tube is in communication with the next stage of the pitot pump. In passing through the pitot tube, the refrigerant gas expands and the centrifugal force and the kinetic energy of the gas provide the energy whereby the refrigerant gas is compressed. After the last stage, the compressed gas is transmitted to the condenser of the heat pump.

  18. Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) Plan for Double Shell Tank (DST) Annulus Emergency Pumping System

    SciTech Connect

    SHIPLER, C.E.

    2001-07-03

    This documents is to facilitate the transfer of the DST annulus emergency pumping system. This document describes the project deliverables that will allow tank farms operations to deploy a pump and transfer system for timely removal of leaked waste etc..

  19. Performance testing of feedwater pump turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Finck, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    Utilities acknowledge that steam turbine drives for feedwater pumps outperform motor drives in improving station heat rate. Rising fuel prices frequently make steam costs the determining factor in evaluating feedwater pump drive turbines. Decisions made on efficiency differences as small as 0.2 percent often necessitate accurate performance testing to verify quoted efficiencies, making it imperative that accurate tests of turbine throttle flow, shaft speed and torque, and other parameters be run to ensure meaningful results. A highly specialized feed pump turbine manufacturers test facility is the most accurate testing method as well as the most convenient and potentially the most economical. 4 figures.

  20. The stress analysis of a heavy liquid metal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. D.; Li, X. L.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Li, C. J.; Gao, S.

    2016-05-01

    Lead-based coolant reactor is a promising Generation-IV reactor. In the lead-based coolant reactor, the coolant is liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. The main pump in the reactor is a very important device. It supplies force for the coolant circulation. The liquid metal has a very large density which is about ten times of the water. Also, the viscosity of the coolant is small which is about one sixth of the water. When the pump transports heavy liquid, the blade loading is heavy. The large force can cause the failure of the blade when the fatigue stress exceeds the allowable stress. The impeller fraction is a very serious accident which is strictly prohibited in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, the numerical method is used to simulate the flow field of a heavy liquid metal pump. The SST k-w turbulent model is used in the calculation to get a more precise flow structure. The hydraulic force is obtained with the one way fluid solid coupling. The maximum stress in the impeller is analyzed. The stress in the liquid metal pump is compared with that in the water pump. The calculation results show that the maximum stress of the impeller blade increases with increase of flow rate. In the design of the impeller blade thickness, the impeller strength in large operating condition should be considered. The maximum stress of the impeller blade located in the middle and near the hub of the leading edge. In this position, the blade is easy to fracture. The maximum deformation of the impeller firstly increase with increase of flow rate and then decrease with increase of flow rate. The maximum deformation exists in the middle of the leading edge when in small flow rate and in the out radius of the impeller when in large flow rate. Comparing the stress of the impeller when transporting water and LBE, the maximum stress is almost one-tenth of that in the LBE impeller which is the same ratio of the density. The static stress in different medium is proportional to the pressure

  1. How revascularization on the beating heart with cardiopulmonary bypass compares to off-pump? A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Sepehripour, Amir H; Chaudhry, Umar A; Suliman, Amna; Kidher, Emaddin; Sayani, Nusrat; Ashrafian, Hutan; Harling, Leanne; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-01-01

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery has been a controversial area of debate and the outcome profile of the technique has been thoroughly investigated. Scepticism regarding the reported outcomes and the conduct of the randomized trials comparing this technique with conventional on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery has been widely voiced, and the technique of off-pump surgery remains as an infrequently adopted approach to myocardial revascularization worldwide. Criticisms of the technique are related to lower rates of complete revascularization and its unknown long-term consequences, the significant detrimental effects on mortality and major adverse events when emergency conversion is required, and the significant lack of long-term survival and morbidity data. The hybrid technique of myocardial revascularization on the beating heart with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass may theoretically provide the beneficial effects of off-pump surgery in terms of myocardial protection and organ protection, while providing the safety and stability of on-pump surgery to allow complete revascularization. Large randomized comparison to support evidence-based choices is currently lacking. In this article, we have meta-analysed the outcomes of on-pump beating heart surgery in comparison with off-pump surgery focusing on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular adverse events (MACCE) including mortality, stroke and myocardial infarction and the degree of revascularization and number of bypass grafts performed. It was demonstrated that the beating heart on-pump technique allows a significantly higher number of bypass grafts to be performed, resulting in significantly higher degree of revascularization. We have also demonstrated a slightly higher rate of 30-day mortality and MACCE with the technique although not at a statistically significant level. These results should be considered alongside the population risk profile, where a significantly higher risk cohort had

  2. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  3. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  4. The sodium pump keeps us going.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben

    2003-04-01

    This invited lecture reviews recent evidence that, in skeletal muscle, excitability and contractility depend on the transmembrane distribution of Na(+) and K(+) and the membrane potential, which in turn are determined by the operation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump. Action potentials are elicited by passive fluxes of Na(+) and K(+). Because of their size and sudden onset, these transport events constitute the major challenge for the Na(+)-K(+) pumps. When the Na(+)-K(+) pumps cannot readily restore the Na(+)-K(+) gradients, working muscle cells often undergo net loss of K(+) and gain of Na(+). This leads to loss of excitability and force, in particular, in muscles where excitation-induced passive Na(+)-K(+) fluxes are large. Thus, excitability depends on the leak/pump ratio for Na(+) and K(+). When this ratio is increased by inhibition or downregulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pumps, the force decline seen during continued stimulation is accelerated. This effect is highly significant already within the first seconds of electrical stimulation. Fortunately, electrical stimulation also increases Na(+)-K(+) pumping rate within seconds. Thus, maximum increase (20-fold above the resting level) may be reached in 10 seconds, with utilization of all available Na(+)-K(+) pumps. In muscles, where excitability was inhibited by exposure to high [K(+)](o) (10-12.5 mM), activation of the Na(+)-K(+) pumps by hormones or electrical stimulation restored excitability and contractile force. In working muscles, the Na(+)-K(+) pumps, because of rapid activation of their large transport capacity, play a dynamic regulatory role in the second-to-second ongoing restoration and maintenance of excitability and force. The Na(+)-K(+) pumps become a limiting factor for contractile endurance, in particular, if their capacity is reduced by inactivity or disease.

  5. Fakir fuel pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    In designing the Fakir fuel pump, the fundamental idea was to obtain a simple and reliable method of conveying the fuel from a low tank to the carburetor, with the avoidance of the faults of all former methods and the simultaneous warming of the fuel by means of the heat of compression generated. The principle of the Fakir fuel pump rests on the well-known principle of the diaphragm pump, which must be suitably adapted to the present purpose.

  6. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W.

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  7. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (∼ 1024 Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  8. Development of a low-voltage piezohydraulic pump for compact hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdovinos, John; Carman, Gregory P.

    2015-12-01

    Frequency-leveraged electrohydraulic and piezohydraulic pumps represent an alternative technology to traditional electromagnetic motors. The development of a 45 cm3 piezohydraulic pump utilizing a 2 g low-voltage piezoelectric stack is presented. The piezohydraulic pump flow rate and performance were measured and compared to existing pumps in the literature. The flow rate produced by piezohydraulic pump was a nonlinear function of pump operational frequency showing multiple peaks. These flow rate peaks were a function of accumulator size and hydraulic line resonance. The piezohydraulic pump was capable of producing a 125 kPa stall pressure, 186 mL min-1 no-load flow rate, and 0.14 W of power. This pump constitutes one of the two miniature piezohydraulic pumps capable of outputting useful mechanical work. In addition, these results demonstrate that the external hydraulic lines and hydraulic accumulators have a significant effect on the flow and power output of this technology.

  9. Champagne Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  10. Submersible sodium pump

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Lopez, J.T.; Olich, E.E.; West, C.W.

    1989-11-21

    An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates. 14 figs.

  11. Submersible sodium pump

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Lopez, John T.; Olich, Eugene E.; West, Calvin W.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates.

  12. Remotely operable peristaltic pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A peristaltic pump is disclosed which includes a roller assembly on which is mounted a series of pump rollers. As the roller assembly is rotated by a drive gear the pump rollers are driven in reverse rotation by means of a stationary ring gear and pump roller gears. An upper pressure shoe plate and a lower pressure shoe plate are positioned above sets of flexible tubing. The tubing is sandwiched between the pressure shoe plates and the pump rollers. A highly compact pump is provided having twice as many fluid channel lines as is conventional. The peristaltic pump device may be remotely operated by means of a rotary actuator which rotates a driving hub to move the shoe plates by means of eccentrically mounted links. The pressure shoe plates may be moved by the rotary actuator to a loaded position in which the fluid lines are pinched by the pump rollers and fluid is pumped to an unloaded position in which the fluid lines are maintained in an undeformed, uncrimped configuration so that no creases or crimps are set into the fluid lines during periods of prolonged nonuse.

  13. Thermomechanical piston pump development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelman, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    A thermally powered reciprocating pump has been devised to replace or augment an electric pump for the transport of temperature-control fluid on the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS). The thermally powered pump operates cyclically by extracting heat energy from the fluid by means of a vapor-pressure expansion system and by using the heat to perform the mechanical work of pumping. A feasibility test unit has been constructed to provide an output of 7 cu in during a 10- to 100-second cycle. It operates with a fluid input temperature of 200 to 300 F and a heat sink temperature of 0 to 30 F.

  14. Transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2015-09-30

    We have studied theoretically the operation of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser. For the case of high-intensity laser radiation, we have obtained an analytical solution to a complex system of differential equations describing the laser. This solution allows one to exhaustively determine all the energy characteristics of the laser and to find optimal parameters of the working medium and pump radiation (temperature, buffer gas pressure, and intensity and width of the pump spectrum). (lasers)

  15. Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Glawdel, Tomasz; Elbuken, Caglar; Lee, Lucy E J; Ren, Carolyn L

    2009-11-21

    This study presents a microfluidic system that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill) to perform toxicity testing on fish cells seeded in the system. The system consists of three mechanical components: (1) a toxicity testing chip containing a microfluidic gradient generator which creates a linear concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip that controls the flow rate and operation of the toxicity chip, and (3) indirect reservoirs that connect the two chips allowing for the toxicant solution to be pumped separately from the electroosmotic pump solution. The flow rate and stability of the EO pumps was measured and tested by monitoring the gradient generator using fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a lethality test was performed with this system setup using a rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) as the test cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a model toxicant. A gradient of sodium dodecyl sulfate, from 0 to 50 microg mL(-1), was applied for 1 hr to the attached cells, and the results were quantified using a Live/Dead cell assay. This work is a preliminary study on the application of EO pumps in a living cell assay, with the potential to use the pumps in portable water quality testing devices with RTgill-W1 cells as the biosensors.

  16. The impact of pump settings on the quality of pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Rider, Alan R; Ressler, Noel M; Karkhanis, Tushar R; Kunselman, Allen R; Wang, Shigang; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the Jostra HL-20 roller pump under different baseflow and pump head settings with quantified energy values from pressure and flow waveforms, in a simulated pediatric bypass circuit. Pump flow rate was set at 800 mL/min for both pulsatile and nonpulsatile perfusion modes and the mean arterial pressure (MAP) of the pseudopatient was maintained at 40 mm Hg for each experiment. Pulsatile baseflow settings and pump head start points varied with each experiment. Pressure and flow waveforms were recorded at preoxygenator, precannula, and postcannula sites under each pump setting. A total of 91 experiments were performed (n=7, nonpulsatile; n=84, pulsatile). Increasing baseflow caused decreases in the mean circuit pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) levels for all pump head start times. When increasing pump head start time within each baseflow, values for MAP and SHE increased significantly. Regardless of baseflow or pump head start time, values for mean circuit pressure and SHE were lower for nonpulsatile flow than for pulsatile flow. Total hemodynamic energy values were also significantly higher under pulsatile perfusion and increased pump start times while decreasing with increased baseflows in the circuit. This study concludes that decreased baseflows with increased pump head settings on the Jostra HL-20 roller pump could significantly increase quality of generated pulsatile energy. Further research is necessary to evaluate these various pump settings under microembolic loads and with different circuit components.

  17. Pump hump characteristic research based on mass transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. M.; Zhao, Y. Z.; Liu, X. B.; Ma, Y.; Wang, W. F.

    2015-01-01

    The current development of modern pumped storage plants aims towards a higher flexibility in operation, an extended operation range of the hydraulic machine (especially in the pumping mode), and a higher reliability. The pumping requirements are the crucial design drivers, since, even if the turbine mode performance is very sound, the success of a project depends also on the pump turbine delivering the required maximum pump head and starting reliably in pump mode. Pump hump (pump instability working points at highest head) which is an instability source to the pump-turbine vibration is a serious damage to the pump operation on high head. So the pump hump and cavitation number based on the numerical simulation and experiment results are shown in this paper. The pump hump is sensitive affected by the cavitation number. With the cavitation number decreasing, the hump on flow characteristic curve (e.g. head-flow rate curve, H-Q curve) is gradually decreasing until vanished. Predicting cavitating flows with multi-phase CFD computations is still a very challenging task. Some results of ongoing work in this field are presented. The hump on H-Q curve with cavitation number is discussed in this paper.

  18. Resonance wave pumping: wave mass transport pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Violeau, Damien; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies a valveless pump (or Liebau pump) results in a strong pulsating flow. A free-surface version of the Liebau pump is presented. The experiment consists of a closed tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free-surface and a recirculation section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle is placed at an off-centre position at the free-surface and controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Near certain frequencies identified as resonance frequencies through a linear potential theory analysis, the system behaves like a pump. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is performed in the near free surface region and compared with simulations using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The mean eulerian mass flux field (ρ) is extracted. It is observed that the flow is located in the vicinity of the surface layer suggesting Stokes Drift (or Wave Mass Transport) is the source of the pumping. A model is developped to extend the linear potential theory to the second order to take into account these observations. The authors would like to acknowledge the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for their generous support.

  19. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  20. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  1. Liquid pump for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo portable life support system water-recirculation pump used for astronaut cooling is described. The problems associated with an early centrifugal pump and how these problems were overcome by the use of a new diaphragm pump are discussed. Performance comparisons of the two pump designs are given. Developmental problems and flight results with the diaphragm pump are discussed.

  2. Design and development of a split-evaporator heat-pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, M.H.; Penoncello, S.G.

    1981-12-01

    The designs and experimental results of three types of multiple source heat pumps are presented. The three designs are the parallel evaporator, the series evaporator, and the parallel evaporator with active subcooling, with the parallel evaporator with the active subcooling showing the most promise for solving the problem of defrosting of air evaporators. Three design procedures for multiple source heat pumps were developed. One of these is a hand calculational procedure, the others are computer based. The models are based upon the refrigerant flow rate, rather than the refrigeration effect of the evaporator. The technical results of a detailed analytical and experimental model of the heat transfer rates on a flat plate ice maker are presented. It is shown, both analytically and experimentally, that the temperature of the air surrounding the flat plate ice maker can play a dominant role in the rate of ice formation. A detailed weather analysis for forty cities located throughout the nation was completed. These data were processed to allow easy computation of thermal storage requirements for full, partial, or minimum ACES systems, or upon other design requirements, such as off-peak air conditioning. The results of an innovative ice storage system that is thermally coupled to the earth are described. This system has the potential for meeting both the off-peak air conditioning needs and the thermal storage requirements for the heating cycle. An economic and energy comparison of multiple source heat pumps with ACES, and air-to-air heat pump systems is presented.

  3. Pipe flow of pumping wet shotcrete based on lubrication layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianjun; Liu, Guoming; Cheng, Weimin; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wet shotcrete can reduce dust and improve supporting strength, however, safe and efficient pipage is a key technical part of wet shotcrete process. The paper studied the pipe flow law of wet shotcrete based on lubrication layer by build the experimental pumping circuit of wet shotcrete that can carry out a number of full-scale pumping tests. The experimental results show there was a linear relationship between pressure loss and flow rate. Combined with the Buckingham rheological equation, the computing equations of the yield shear stress and plastic viscosity were deduced through linear regression. A simple analytical method allowing for a rough estimation of the pumping pressure was proposed and used when considering the lubrication layer of wet shotcrete in pipes. In addition, two kinds of particulate distributive models were established along the time axial to analyze the formation of lubrication layer which is related with particles migration. By computational fluid dynamics simulation, the lubrication layer thickness of different mix proportions was estimated. A new method for measuring the thickness of lubrication layer was proposed to verify it by binarization processing. Finally, according to the comparative analysis of experiments, simulation and computed value, it can be seen that the lubrication layer plays a key role in the process of wet shotcrete flow and with the increase of lubrication layer thickness pipe pressure declines gradually.

  4. Looking south at boiler feedwater pumps (steam turbine pump on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking south at boiler feedwater pumps (steam turbine pump on left, electric motor pump on right). - Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, Allenport Works, Boiler House, Route 88 on West bank of Monongahela River, Allenport, Washington County, PA

  5. 98. VIEW OF PUMPS FROM NORTH. MILL SOLUTION PUMP No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. VIEW OF PUMPS FROM NORTH. MILL SOLUTION PUMP No. 2 IN FOREGROUND, ABANDONED BARREN SOLUTION PUMP BEYOND. AGITATOR No. 1 IN BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  6. 33. PLAN OF DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION SHOWING EXISTING PUMPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. PLAN OF DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION SHOWING EXISTING PUMPING PLAN AND LOCATION OF PROPOSED ADDITIONS, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS, JULY 1908. Aperture card 6417. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  8. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  9. How improper pump selection influences ESP cable failure

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.

    1984-10-01

    ESP cable failures can sometimes seem to result from high-temperature damage even though the well temperature is far below the temperature rating of the cable. Recent studies show that the problem is one of low well productivity, either from a pumped-off or a gas-locked condition, and that the excessive heat is generated in the pump. In both cases, the problem is caused by misapplied equipment. In the pumped-off condition the pump is oversized. In the gas-locked condition, a proper gas separator should be used. The importance of proper pump selection is emphasized. Both conditions cause excessive heat buildup in the pump. When flow decreases as in either of these conditions, energy continues to be added to the fluid, but pump efficiency decreases and flow decreases. The losses or inefficiencies of the system are transferred to a lesser weight of fluid, so the fluid temperature rises even more.

  10. METHOD FOR PUMPING GASES AT LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-01

    A method is given for pumping overpressure "pulses" or "bursts" of gases without a significant rise in base pressure within a "gettering-type" vacuum pump having surfaces within the pumping cavity coated with or comprising clean gettering metal, e.g., Mo or Ta. The cavity is first pumped down by any convenient means to an equilibrium base pressure in the range desired, generally below 10/sup -6/ mm Hg. At this pressure, the metal immediately adsorbs overpressures or "bursts" of gases striking same with thermal motion without raising the base pressure significantiy. Desorption takes place at an equilibrium rate which, of course, is dependent upon the equilibrium pressure, and such desorbed gases are continuously removed by diffuaion pump or other pumping, whereby said overpressures or "bursts" of gases are removed without a rise in the equilibrium pressure and/or back diffusion of the gaseous pulse from the pumping cavity. (AEC)

  11. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  12. A Shocking New Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  13. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1994-12-31

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  14. Micromachined peristaltic pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Micromachined pumps including a channel formed between a first membrane and a substrate or between first and second flexible membranes. A series of electrically conductive strips is applied to a surface of the substrate or one of the membranes. Application of a sequential voltage to the series of strips causes a region of closure to progress down the channel to achieve a pumping action.

  15. Solar heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanson, R.

    Brief discussions of the major components of a solar powered, chemical ground source heat pump are presented. The components discussed are the solar collectors and the chemical heat storage battery. Sodium sulfide is the medium used for heat storage. Catalog information which provides a description of all of the heat pump systems is included.

  16. Estimating Pump Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W.; Meng, S. Y.; Meng, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Blockage predicted for all components including inducers, impellers and diffusers. Pump performance predicted by semiempirical method shows excellent agreement with test results in Space Shuttle main-engine highpressure fuel turbopump. Comparisons of pump efficiency show equally good agreement of calculated values with experimental ones. Method improves current estimation methods based solely on subjective engineering judgment.

  17. Water Treatment Technology - Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on pumps provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: types of pumps in plant and distribution systems, pump…

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Cobb, W.G.

    1959-06-01

    A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

  19. Advances in pump technology: insulin patch pumps, combined pumps and glucose sensors, and implanted pumps.

    PubMed

    Schaepelynck, P; Darmon, P; Molines, L; Jannot-Lamotte, M F; Treglia, C; Raccah, D

    2011-12-01

    This review discusses the most recent developments in insulin pump technology. The benefits of the insulin pump to patients with type 1 diabetes are recognized both for its metabolic effectiveness and its positive effects on quality of life. The current pumps are reliable, small and light, and are becoming more and more sophisticated. Nevertheless, there remain practical and psychological constraints for the patient. However, recent patch-pump advances should simplify the technical aspects of pump treatment and enhance patient comfort. Another advance combines the insulin pump with a glucose sensor. Such a combination is logical for optimizing pump use and, to that end, developing an automated or 'closed-loop'system that permits the delivery of subcutaneous insulin adjusted according to measured levels of subcutaneous glucose. Finally, implanted insulin pumps have proven their worth not only because of their simple use, but also for their contribution in the artificial pancreas project. Indeed, the prompt response with intraperitoneal administration of insulin makes it of interest for use in a closed-loop system.

  20. Multireflection pumping concept for miniaturized diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Meister, Jörg; Franzen, Rene; Apel, Christian; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2004-11-01

    An innovative pump concept for diode-pumped, solid-state lasers is introduced as an example for an Er:YSGG laser, permitting its miniaturization. Embedded in a multireflective pump cavity, the laser crystal is simultaneously side and end pumped. Specially calculated and shaped deflecting optics distribute the coaxially input pumping light homogeneously over the lateral surface of the crystal, therefore reducing the size of the laser head, including the optical resonator, to a length of 27.5 mm and an outside diameter of 12.5 mm. The differential efficiency achieved is between 8.7% and 24%. The laser emits energy of 15.7 mJ at an absolute efficiency of 9.1% and a repetition rate of 4 Hz.

  1. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, J. Warren; Kaplan, Selig N.; Pyle, Robert V.; Anderson, L. Wilmer; Ruby, Lawrence; Schlachter, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

  2. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  3. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  4. Normetex Pump Alternatives Study

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2013-04-25

    A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying

  5. Deep well solar pump

    SciTech Connect

    Vanek, J.

    1990-02-06

    This patent describes, in a pump having a source of gas under pressure, and a gas operated pump, a mechanism periodically injecting gas from the source of gas into the gas operated pump. It comprises: a long period pendulum turning towards a first position by gravity, an injection valve connected between the source of gas under pressure and the gas operated pump, a linkage between the pendulum and the injection valve. The linkage opening the injection valve when the pendulum is in the first position, an impulse tube connected between the injection valve and the gas operated pump, a member having a surface adjacent to the first position of the pendulum, and an elastic impulse bladder connected to the impulse tube adjacent to the surface so that inflation of the impulse bladder on the opening of the injection valve forces the impulse bladder against the pendulum urging the pendulum against the force of gravity toward a second position.

  6. Centrifugal pump fuel system

    SciTech Connect

    McGlone, M.E.; Larkins, L.J.; Johnson, R.O.; Moeller, K.A.

    1993-06-22

    A centrifugal pump fuel system for an engine driven fuel pump for an aircraft gas turbine engine is described comprising: a centrifugal pump having at constant speed rising head/flow characteristic at low flows; a plumbing system receiving flow from the pump, and having at least one control valve located down stream of and defining a discrete volume of the plumbing system; a plumbing resonant frequency defined by the discrete volume, the geometry of the plumbing system, and the bulk modulus of the fuel; a pressure difference regulating valve located adjacent to the discharge of the pump, up stream of the vast majority of the discrete volume; and the frequency response of the regulating valve being significantly less than the frequency response of the plumbing system such that the response of the regulating valve is attenuated at the resonant frequency of the plumbing system.

  7. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  8. A Valveless Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringley, Thomas; Childress, Stephen; Vandenberghe, Nicolas

    2004-11-01

    We study experimentally a simple valveless mechanical pump. The pumping mechanism could help to explain the successful circulation of blood in the cardiovascular systems of the human fetus, certain organisms whose hearts have no valves, and a person undergoing CPR. Because of its simplicity, the pump may also have applications in microfluidics. The experimental setup consists of two connected sections of tube, one rigid and one elastic, filled with water. To pump, a segment of the elastic section is pressed closed periodically. We examine the effects of varying the location of the forced segment and the forcing frequency. Both the magnitude and the direction of the pumping are observed to depend on both parameters. Moreover, certain frequencies result in destructive interference or resonance. We present some simple numerical models to try to explain these observations.

  9. High pressure liquid gas pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Design and development of two types of pumps for handling liquefied gases are discussed. One pump uses mechanical valve shift and other uses pneumatic valve shift. Illustrations of pumps are provided and detailed description of operation is included.

  10. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of lymphatic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Christian; Padera, Tim P.; Munn, Lance L.

    2012-02-01

    Lymphatic flow plays an important role in the progress of many diseases, including lymphedema and metastasis. However lymphatic pumping and flow is poorly understood. Here, we present a computer model that is based on biological observations of lymphatic pumping. Fluid flow is simulated by a D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model. The boundary of the vessels moves according to shear-induced nitric oxide production, and wall motion transfers momentum to the fluid to induce flow. Because the model only includes local properties, it can be highly parallelized. In our case we utilize graphic processors (GPU) to achieve high performance computation. We show that the model provides stable pumping over a wide range of parameter values, with optimum flow achieved in the biological ranges. Furthermore, we investigate the efficiency by analyzing the flow rate and pumping frequency in order to compare the behavior of the model with existing in vivo data.

  12. Solenoid pumps for flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D A; Johnson, K S

    1996-08-01

    Methods employing flow injection analysis (FIA), particularly for in situ seawater techniques, would benefit from reduction in pump size and power requirement, longer maintenance intervals, and the ability to incorporate microprocessor control of each reagent and sample flow stream. In this work, the peristaltic pump of a conventional FIA system was replaced by three solenoid-driven diaphragm pumps with integral Viton check valves, and the system was tested by performing the simple nitrite analysis, which has well-defined FIA performance characteristics. Sixty injections per hour were possible with flow rates of 0.5 mL/min for reagents and sample. The coefficient of variation was 1% for 10 μM NO(2)(-) concentrations, and the detection limit was less than 0.1 μM NO(2)(-). These values match the reported performance for this method using peristaltic pumps.

  13. The Newmarket pump: a new suction pump for external negative pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kinnear, W J; Shneerson, J M

    1985-09-01

    A new electronically controlled pump has been developed for use with a cuirass in providing external negative pressure ventilation. It is smaller, lighter, and more versatile than currently available pumps and operates on a servo principle. A rotary valve between the pump and the cuirass varies the rate of extraction of air from the cuirass. The pressure within the cuirass is sensed by a pressure transducer, and the output of this is used to control the position of the rotary valve by means of a motor so that the pressure within the cuirass follows a predetermined half sine wave pattern. The respiratory rate varies from 10 to 30 per minute and the inspiratory to expiratory time (I/E) ratio from 3:2 to 2:3. Inspiratory pressure varies from 0 to -50 cm H2O and an expiratory pressure of 0 to +50 cm H2O can be imposed. The performance of the new pump was assessed in 21 patients with nocturnal hypoxaemia who were accustomed to external negative pressure ventilation. The mean tidal volume achieved increased with increase in cuirass suction pressure, and changing the I/E ratio from 1:1 to 3:2 produced a small increase at a cuirass negative pressure at 20 cm water. Comparison of the Newmarket pump with the Cape pump in 14 patients showed that similar tidal volumes were achieved. Overnight monitoring of cuirass pressure in one patient showed more even control of peak negative pressure with the Newmarket pump than with the Cape pump. Ten pumps are in use in patients' homes; five have been in service for more than six months and no important problems have been encountered. The new pump seems to offer advantages that make external negative pressure ventilation more acceptable.

  14. The Newmarket pump: a new suction pump for external negative pressure ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, W J; Shneerson, J M

    1985-01-01

    A new electronically controlled pump has been developed for use with a cuirass in providing external negative pressure ventilation. It is smaller, lighter, and more versatile than currently available pumps and operates on a servo principle. A rotary valve between the pump and the cuirass varies the rate of extraction of air from the cuirass. The pressure within the cuirass is sensed by a pressure transducer, and the output of this is used to control the position of the rotary valve by means of a motor so that the pressure within the cuirass follows a predetermined half sine wave pattern. The respiratory rate varies from 10 to 30 per minute and the inspiratory to expiratory time (I/E) ratio from 3:2 to 2:3. Inspiratory pressure varies from 0 to -50 cm H2O and an expiratory pressure of 0 to +50 cm H2O can be imposed. The performance of the new pump was assessed in 21 patients with nocturnal hypoxaemia who were accustomed to external negative pressure ventilation. The mean tidal volume achieved increased with increase in cuirass suction pressure, and changing the I/E ratio from 1:1 to 3:2 produced a small increase at a cuirass negative pressure at 20 cm water. Comparison of the Newmarket pump with the Cape pump in 14 patients showed that similar tidal volumes were achieved. Overnight monitoring of cuirass pressure in one patient showed more even control of peak negative pressure with the Newmarket pump than with the Cape pump. Ten pumps are in use in patients' homes; five have been in service for more than six months and no important problems have been encountered. The new pump seems to offer advantages that make external negative pressure ventilation more acceptable. Images PMID:3864285

  15. Non-adiabatic quantized charge pumping with tunable-barrier quantum dots: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Bernd; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2015-10-01

    Precise manipulation of individual charge carriers in nanoelectronic circuits underpins practical applications of their most basic quantum property—the universality and invariance of the elementary charge. A charge pump generates a net current from periodic external modulation of parameters controlling a nanostructure connected to source and drain leads; in the regime of quantized pumping the current varies in steps of {{q}\\text{e}} f as function of control parameters, where {{q}\\text{e}} is the electron charge and f is the frequency of modulation. In recent years, robust and accurate quantized charge pumps have been developed based on semiconductor quantum dots with tunable tunnel barriers. These devices allow modulation of charge exchange rates between the dot and the leads over many orders of magnitude and enable trapping of a precise number of electrons far away from equilibrium with the leads. The corresponding non-adiabatic pumping protocols focus on understanding of separate parts of the pumping cycle associated with charge loading, capture and release. In this report we review realizations, models and metrology applications of quantized charge pumps based on tunable-barrier quantum dots.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Tubular Pumping Systems with Different Regulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Honggeng; Zhang, Rentian; Deng, Dongsheng; Feng, Xusong; Yao, Linbi

    2010-06-01

    Since the flow in tubular pumping systems is basically along axial direction and passes symmetrically through the impeller, most satisfying the basic hypotheses in the design of impeller and having higher pumping system efficiency in comparison with vertical pumping system, they are being widely applied to low-head pumping engineering. In a pumping station, the fluctuation of water levels in the sump and discharge pool is most common and at most time the pumping system runs under off-design conditions. Hence, the operation of pump has to be flexibly regulated to meet the needs of flow rates, and the selection of regulation method is as important as that of pump to reduce operation cost and achieve economic operation. In this paper, the three dimensional time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are closed by RNG κ-ɛ turbulent model, and two tubular pumping systems with different regulation methods, equipped with the same pump model but with different designed system structures, are numerically simulated respectively to predict the pumping system performances and analyze the influence of regulation device and help designers make final decision in the selection of design schemes. The computed results indicate that the pumping system with blade-adjusting device needs longer suction box, and the increased hydraulic loss will lower the pumping system efficiency in the order of 1.5%. The pumping system with permanent magnet motor, by means of variable speed regulation, obtains higher system efficiency partly for shorter suction box and partly for different structure design. Nowadays, the varied speed regulation is realized by varied frequency device, the energy consumption of which is about 3˜4% of output power of the motor. Hence, when the efficiency of variable frequency device is considered, the total pumping system efficiency will probably be lower.

  17. Apparatus for Pumping a Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeyen, Robert Van; Reeh, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A fluid pump has been developed for mechanically pumped fluid loops for spacecraft thermal control. Lynntech's technology utilizes a proprietary electrochemically driven pumping mechanism. Conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps typically do not meet the stringent power and operational reliability requirements of space applications. Lynntech's developmental pump is a highly efficient solid-state pump with essentially no rotating or moving components (apart from metal bellows).

  18. An experimental study on the airlift pump with air jet nozzle and booster pump.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju; Lee, Chae-Moon; Park, Jung-Won

    2009-01-01

    The experiments for high head airlifting performance with vertical tube were examined for wastewater treatment. Comparing with the centrifugal pump and other pumps, the airlift pump has some problems and limited applications. However, an advantage of an airlift pump is in its geometrical simplicity, not having any moving parts, so it is suitable in lifting fluids including tiny pieces of metal or grit. In this study, for the purpose of high lifting head, an air jet nozzle was used. We have performed experimentally according to various characteristics of the airlift pump system such as the change of submerged depth, lifting head of liquid-air mixture (total head) and air flow rate. This work has verified through experiments that airlift pump shows lifting ability for 3 m (Sr = 0.3) in comparison with conventional height, 2 m (Sr = 0.4). Also, we suggested that the new airlift pump system with the air booster pump be used to improve the higher lifting head performance.

  19. Terahertz dielectric response of photoexcited carriers in Si revealed via single-shot optical-pump and terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Yasuo; Horiuchi, Kohei; Masuda, Kaisei; Takeda, Jun; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2015-10-26

    We have demonstrated accurate observations of terahertz (THz) dielectric response due to photoexcited carriers in a Si plate via single-shot optical-pump and THz-probe spectroscopy. In contrast to conventional THz time-domain spectroscopy, this spectroscopic technique allows single-shot detection of the THz response of materials at a given delay time between the pump and THz pulses, thereby sufficiently extending the time interval between the pump pulses. As a result, we can accurately measure the dielectric properties of materials, while avoiding artifacts in the response caused by the accumulation of long-lived photoexcited carriers. Using our single-shot scheme, the transmittance of a Si plate was measured in the range of 0.5–2.5 THz with different pump fluences. Based on a Drude model analysis, the optically induced complex dielectric constant, plasma frequency, and damping rate in the THz region were quantitatively evaluated.

  20. Enhanced electrothermal pumping with thin film resistive heaters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart J

    2013-05-01

    This work demonstrates the use of thin film heaters to enhance electrothermal pumping in microfluidic systems. Thin film heating electrothermal pumping is more efficient than Joule heating alone. Numerical simulations of an asymmetric electrode array are performed to demonstrate the advantages of incorporating thin film heaters. This specific simulation shows that thin film heater electrothermal pumping provides approximately two and one-half times more volumetric flow than Joule heating alone for the same input power to both systems. In addition, external heating allows for electrothermal pumping to be applicable to low conductivity media.

  1. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  2. Numerical Study of a Fuel Centrifugal Pump with Variable Impeller Width for Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Guan, Huasheng; Ye, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    As typical pump with large flow rate and high reliability, centrifugal pumps in fuel system of aero-engines mostly regulate flow rate by flow bypass, which leads to low efficiency and large fuel temperature rise especially at low flow rate. An innovative fuel centrifugal pump with variable impeller width is a more effective way to regulate flow rate than flow bypass. To find external characteristics of the centrifugal pump with variable impeller width proposed in this paper, flow domain within the pump is simulated numerically and some primary performance parameters and their correlation are analyzed. Results show that flow rate of the pump can be regulated by variable impeller width and that efficiency for this scheme is higher than that for flow bypass. The higher outlet static pressure the pump runs at, the wider range of flow rates can be obtained with stronger nonlinear relationship between flow rate and impeller width.

  3. Pressure charged airlift pump

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Gene K.

    1983-01-01

    A pumping system is described for pumping fluids, such as water with entrained mud and small rocks, out of underground cavities such as drilled wells, which can effectively remove fluids down to a level very close to the bottom of the cavity and which can operate solely by compressed air pumped down through the cavity. The system utilizes a subassembly having a pair of parallel conduit sections (44, 46) adapted to be connected onto the bottom of a drill string utilized for drilling the cavity, the drill string also having a pair of coaxially extending conduits. The subassembly includes an upper portion which has means for connection onto the drill string and terminates the first conduit of the drill string in a plenum (55). A compressed air-driven pump (62) is suspended from the upper portion. The pump sucks fluids from the bottom of the cavity and discharges them into the second conduit. Compressed air pumped down through the first conduit (46) to the plenum powers the compressed air-driven pump and aerates the fluid in the second conduit to lift it to the earth's surface.

  4. Deep well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Downen, J.L.; Sutliff, W.N.

    1981-06-16

    A pump barrel open at its lower end is coupled at its upper end by a tubular adapter assembly to the lower end of a pump tubing string. This assembly presents an internal bevelled sealing latching annulus, an axially bored pump head being radially expansively spring latched in a fixed axial sealed relation with the annulus to seal the upper end of the pump barrel from the adapter assembly to form a pump compression chamber surrounding a hollow polish rod extending upwardly from a plunger mounted on the lower end of the polish rod for reciprocation in the pump barrel. The plunger carries tandem travelling valves close beneath its connection with the polish rod. The lower valve opening to receive oil through the barrel and plunger on the down stroke and concurrently delivering such oil into the compression chamber. The upper valve closes on the down stroke and opening on the up stroke during which the lower valve closes to expel oil trapped in the compression chamber upward through the upper valve into the lower end of the hollow polish rod which oil is discharged at the upper end thereof into the pump tubing string through the fitting adapting the polish rod to the lower end of the sucker rod.

  5. Variable displacement vane pump

    SciTech Connect

    Tschantz, J.S.; Bisson, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    What has been developed under this program is a pumping system which can vary the amount of fuel delivered according to engine needs, thereby reducing the temperature rise of the fuel to very low levels. This permits the elimination of the air/oil coolers and conserves the vital airflow through the fan. The variable displacement vane pump (VDVP) also permits a substantial simplification of the control system with the elimination of complex metering valves, offering a significant reduction in fuel system cost. This program was initiated to develop a technology that embodied the ruggedness of the gear pump with the efficiency and metering versatility of the variable displacement vane pump. Thick metal vanes emulate the teeth on pumping gears while the simple, elegant swing cam feature provides the variable displacement capability without the unwieldy multiple cam segments found in other concepts. The result is a pumping architecture which is rugged, light in weight and extremely versatile, having demonstrated superb heat management and controllability in extensive bench and engine testing. This paper will report the results that the pumps have achieved to date both in terms of durability and efficiency.

  6. Spatially-selective optical pumping cooling and Two-Isotope Collision-Assisted Zeeman cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rebekah Ferrier

    In this thesis I describe two non-evaporative cooling schemes for cooling Rb atoms. The first is a Sisyphus-like ultracold gas cooling scheme called Spatially-selecTive Optical Pumping (STOP) cooling. In principle, STOP cooling has wide applicability to both atoms and molecules. STOP cooling works by exploiting the fact that atoms or molecules in a confining potential can be optically pumped out of an otherwise dark state in a spatially-selective way. Selecting atoms or molecules for optical pumping out of a dark state in a region of high potential energy and then waiting a fixed time after the optical pumping allows for the creation of a group of high kinetic energy atoms or molecules moving in a known direction. These can then be slowed using external fields (such as the scattering force from a resonant laser beam) and optically pumped back into the dark state, cooling the gas and closing the cooling cycle. I present theoretical modeling of the STOP cooling technique, including predictions of achievable cooling rates. I have conducted an experimental study of the cooling technique for a single cooling cycle, observing one dimensional cooling rates in excess of 100 micro-K per second in an ultracold gas of 87 Rb atoms. I will also comment on the prospects for improving the cooling performance beyond that presented in this work. The second cooling scheme I investigated is called Two-Isotope Collision Assisted Zeeman (2-CAZ) cooling. Through a combination of spin-exchange collisions in a magnetic field and optical pumping, it is possible to cool a gas of atoms without requiring the loss of atoms from the gas. I investigated 2-CAZ cooling using 85Rb and 87Rb. I was able to experimentally confirm that the measured 2-CAZ cooling rate agreed with a cooling rate predicted though a simple analytic model. As part of the measured cooling rate, I quantitatively characterized the heating rates associated with our actual implementation of this cooling technique and found

  7. East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

    1984-11-28

    Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

  8. East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

    1984-11-28

    The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

  9. A Fully Magnetically Levitated Circulatory Pump for Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir; Goldstein, Daniel J; Cleveland, Joseph C; Colombo, Paolo C; Walsh, Mary N; Milano, Carmelo A; Patel, Chetan B; Jorde, Ulrich P; Pagani, Francis D; Aaronson, Keith D; Dean, David A; McCants, Kelly; Itoh, Akinobu; Ewald, Gregory A; Horstmanshof, Douglas; Long, James W; Salerno, Christopher

    2017-02-02

    Background Continuous-flow left ventricular assist systems increase the rate of survival among patients with advanced heart failure but are associated with the development of pump thrombosis. We investigated the effects of a new magnetically levitated centrifugal continuous-flow pump that was engineered to avert thrombosis. Methods We randomly assigned patients with advanced heart failure to receive either the new centrifugal continuous-flow pump or a commercially available axial continuous-flow pump. Patients could be enrolled irrespective of the intended goal of pump support (bridge to transplantation or destination therapy). The primary end point was a composite of survival free of disabling stroke (with disabling stroke indicated by a modified Rankin score >3; scores range from 0 to 6, with higher scores indicating more severe disability) or survival free of reoperation to replace or remove the device at 6 months after implantation. The trial was powered for noninferiority testing of the primary end point (noninferiority margin, -10 percentage points). Results Of 294 patients, 152 were assigned to the centrifugal-flow pump group and 142 to the axial-flow pump group. In the intention-to-treat population, the primary end point occurred in 131 patients (86.2%) in the centrifugal-flow pump group and in 109 (76.8%) in the axial-flow pump group (absolute difference, 9.4 percentage points; 95% lower confidence boundary, -2.1 [P<0.001 for noninferiority]; hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32 to 0.95 [two-tailed P=0.04 for superiority]). There were no significant between-group differences in the rates of death or disabling stroke, but reoperation for pump malfunction was less frequent in the centrifugal-flow pump group than in the axial-flow pump group (1 [0.7%] vs. 11 [7.7%]; hazard ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.60; P=0.002). Suspected or confirmed pump thrombosis occurred in no patients in the centrifugal-flow pump group and in 14 patients (10

  10. [Insulin pump therapy in children, adolescents and adults].

    PubMed

    Stadler, Marietta; Zlamal-Fortunat, Sandra; Schütz-Fuhrmann, Ingrid; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Hofer, Sabine; Mader, Julia; Resl, Michael; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Weitgasser, Raimund; Prager, Rudolf; Bischof, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This position statement is based on the current evidence available on the safety and benefits of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump therapy (CSII) in diabetes with an emphasis on the effects of CSII on glycemic control, hypoglycaemia rates, occurrence of ketoacidosis, quality of life and the use of insulin pump therapy in pregnancy. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the clinical praxis of insulin pump treatment in children, adolescents and adults.

  11. Thulium:ZBLAN blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmon, Genji; Sato, Hisanao; Ohya, Jun; Uno, Tomoaki

    1997-05-01

    We demonstrate and analyze an upconversion blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths. Lasing at 0.48 m with very low pump threshold power is obtained from a Tm-doped fluorozirconate fiber that is counterpropagating pumped by 1.21- and 0.649- m light. We employed a rate-equation analysis using parameters obtained by fitting to the experimental data to predict the 0.48- m output characteristics as a function of fiber length and output reflectivity.

  12. Thulium:ZBLAN blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Tohmon, G; Sato, H; Ohya, J; Uno, T

    1997-05-20

    We demonstrate and analyze an upconversion blue fiber laser pumped by two wavelengths. Lasing at 0.48 mum with very low pump threshold power is obtained from a Tm-doped fluorozirconate fiber that is counterpropagating pumped by 1.21- and 0.649-mum light. We employed a rate-equation analysis using parameters obtained by fitting to the experimental data to predict the 0.48-mum output characteristics as a function of fiber length and output reflectivity.

  13. Insulin Pumps and Remote Software Updates: A New Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Noel E; Parks, Linda J; Verhoef, Erik T; Morgan, Corey A; Stal, Mikhail

    2015-09-18

    This article discusses the future direction of insulin pump technology and its relationship to the software update process. A user needs analysis revealed that respondents wanted an insulin pump software update process to function much in the same way as smartphone updates. Users of insulin pumps have the same expectations as with other ubiquitous technology such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops. The development of a software update system within a regulated environment that meets the needs of insulin pump users by allowing optional software updates that provide access to pump improvements, feature additions, or access to algorithms that provide therapy-changing technologies is a new way forward for the management of a complicated disease that affects more than 450,000 people using insulin pumps in the United States.

  14. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  15. Compact, electromagnetic multiple-stream multiple-stream pump for liquid metals - Design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Pump provides independent liquid-metal streams at a uniform flow rate. The toroidal magnet structure can accomodate any reasonable number of pump circuits. The power requirement is suited to the output voltage of the basic thermionic diode output.

  16. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  17. Approaching the full octave: noncollinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplification with two-color pumping.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, D; Homann, C; Tautz, R; Scharrer, M; Russell, P St J; Krausz, F; Veisz, L; Riedle, E

    2010-08-30

    We present a new method to broaden the amplification range in optical parametric amplification toward the bandwidth needed for single cycle femtosecond pulses. Two-color pumping of independent stages is used to sequentially amplify the long and short wavelength parts of the ultrabroadband seed pulses. The concept is tested in two related experiments. With multi-mJ pumping pulses with a nearly octave spanning spectrum and an uncompressed energy of 3 mJ are generated at low repetition rate. The spectral phase varies slowly and continuously in the overlap region as shown with 100 kHz repetition rate. This should allow the compression to the Fourier limit of below 5 fs in the high energy system.

  18. Feasibility of a TinyPump system for pediatric CPB, ECMO, and circulatory assistance: hydrodynamic performances of the modified pump housing for implantable TinyPump.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Masaaki; Hoshi, Hideo; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2007-01-01

    The TinyPump is a miniature centrifugal blood pump with an extremely small priming volume of 5 ml, allowing blood transfusion free cardiopulmonary bypass as well as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in pediatric patients. In this study, a new pump housing with the angled inlet port (25 degrees toward impeller center with respect to the flow axis) was designed to optimize the pump displaced volume and to extend the application of the TinyPump to implantable support The fluid dynamic performance analysis revealed that the head pressure losses increased from 3 to 17 mm Hg in comparison with straight port design as the pump rotational speed increased from 2,000 to 4,000 rpm. This was probably caused by perturbed flow patterns at the site of the inlet bent port area and streamline hitting the off-center of the impeller. No significant effect on pumping efficiency was observed because of modification in inlet port design. Modification in the inflow and outflow port designs together with the drive mechanism reduces the height of the pump system, including the motor, to 27 mm yielding the displaced volume of 68 ml in comparison with 40 mm of the paracorporeal system with the displaced volume of 105 ml. Further analysis in terms of hemolytic as well as antithrombogenic performance will be carried out to finalize the housing design for the implantable version of the TinyPump.

  19. Vietnam recommended dietary allowances 2007.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nguyen Cong; Hoan, Pham Van

    2008-01-01

    It has been well acknowledged that Vietnam is undergoing a nutrition transition. With a rapid change in the country's reform and economic growth, food supply at the macronutrient level has improved. Changes of the Vietnamese diet include significantly more foods of animal origin, and an increase of fat/oils, and ripe fruits. Consequently, nutritional problems in Vietnam now include not only malnutrition but also overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and other chronic diseases related to nutrition and lifestyles. The recognition of these shifts, which is also associated with morbidity and mortality, was a major factor in the need to review and update the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for the Vietnamese population. This revised RDA established an important science-based tool for evaluation of nutrition adequacy, for teaching, and for scientific communications within Vietnam. It is expected that the 2007 Vietnam RDA and its conversion to food-based dietary guidelines will facilitate education to the public, as well as the policy implementation of programs for prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and addressing the double burden of both under and over nutrition.

  20. A 10 Hz Grazing Incidence pumped Ni-like Mo laser at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ pump energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-09-30

    The first demonstration of the grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) scheme for laser-driven x-ray lasers (XRLs) is described utilizing 2-pulse pumping. A long pulse is incident normal to the target to produce a plasma with a particular density profile. Then a short pulse is incident at a grazing angle, chosen to optimally couple the short pulse laser energy into the specific density region where the inversion process will occur. The short pulse is simultaneously absorbed and refracted at a maximum electron density specified by the chosen pump angle then turns back into the gain region. The increased path length gives improved absorption allowing a reduction in the drive energy required for lasing. A Ni-like Mo XRL at 18.9 nm has been demonstrated with only 150 mJ total pump energy and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We report high gains of 60 cm{sup -1} and the achievement of gain saturation for targets of 4 mm length.

  1. 26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10 Section 48.6427-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview. This section provides rules under... allowed by section 6427(l)(5)(B)(i). These claims relate to kerosene sold from a blocked pump....

  2. 26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10 Section 48.6427-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview. This section provides rules under... allowed by section 6427(l)(5)(B)(i). These claims relate to kerosene sold from a blocked pump....

  3. 26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10 Section 48.6427-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview. This section provides rules under... allowed by section 6427(l)(5)(B)(i). These claims relate to kerosene sold from a blocked pump....

  4. Numerical experiment optimization to obtain the characteristics of the centrifugal pump steps package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, S. V.; Boldyrev, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The numerical simulation method of turbulent flow in a running space of the working-stage in a centrifugal pump using the periodicity conditions has been formulated. The proposed method allows calculating the characteristic indices of one pump step at a lower computing resources cost. The comparison of the pump characteristics' calculation results with pilot data has been conducted.

  5. 26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10 Section 48.6427-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview. This section provides rules under... allowed by section 6427(l)(5)(B)(i). These claims relate to kerosene sold from a blocked pump....

  6. Jostra Rota Flow RF-30 pump system: a new centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Orime, Y; Shiono, M; Yagi, S; Yamamoto, T; Okumura, H; Nakata, K; Kimura, S; Hata, M; Sezai, A; Kashiwazaki, S; Choh, S; Negishi, N; Sezai, Y; Matsui, T; Suzuki, M

    2000-06-01

    The Rota Flow pump is a fully integrated centrifugal pump system in the Jostra heart-lung machine HL-20 with features such as a less friction mono-pivot bearing system, sealless pump housing, and spiral housing. To evaluate its biocompatibility, antithrombogenesity, and hemolysis, we used it as a main pump of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) cases and compared it with the BioMedicus pump. From February 1999 to May 1999, 30 consecutive patients underwent CABG under conventional CPB. Fifteen cases were supported by the Rota Flow RF-32 (Group R), and the remaining 15 were pumped by the BioMedicus BP-80 (Group B). In both groups, the flow rate was controlled in an equivalent value. Blood sampling was as follows: preoperative, 60 min after, postoperative Days (POD) 0, 1, and 2. We evaluated the plasma free hemoglobin (fHb) as the hemolysis parameter, beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) and platelet factor IV (PF-4) as the platelet deterioration index, C3, C4, and CH50 as complement activation, coagulation function, fibrinolytic factor and thrombomodulin, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelin as endothelial deterioration. This system was very easily and simply controlled and had excellent response. Perioperative laboratory data were not markedly changed in either group. The Rota Flow demonstrated equivalent value of biocompatibility and hemolysis as compared with the BioMedicus BP-80, which is a standard centrifugal pump. After pumping, no thrombus formation or pivot wear was observed inside the pump. This atraumatic, small centrifugal pump is suitable not only for CPB but also for long-term circulatory support.

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  8. Intelligent pumping system developed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The oil field's first intelligent rod pumping system designed specifically to reduce the cost of pumping oil wells now is a reality. As a plus benefit, the system (called Liftronic) is compact and quiet. The new system combines an efficient mechanical design with a computer control system to reduce pumping costs. The unit stands less than 8 ft high, or approx. one-fourth the height of a comparable beam unit. It also mounts directly on the wellhead. The entire system can be concealed behind a fence or enclosed within a small building to make it a more attractive neighbor in residential, commercial, or recreational areas. It is useful also for agricultural areas where overhead irrigation systems restrict the use of many oil field pumping systems.

  9. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  10. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  11. Selecting multiphase pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Prang, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    Multiphase pumps in petroleum applications today must handle liquid products containing large amounts of gas, and often including water and sand as well. In the past, gas was commonly separated and flared off at the well head, and only liquid product was piped along for further processing. Using this setup, processing the gas as well as the liquid requires separators, compressors and dual pipelines. Rotary two-screw units are ideal for multiphase use, as they can pump any product that can be introduced into the suction passages of their screws. These devices also effectively handle heat generation from compressed gases. To select units for multiphase applications, an engineer should be familiar with these pumps and how they work. This article discusses rotary-screw pumps and how to effectively select a unit for multiphase service.

  12. Pumping and Breastmilk Storage

    MedlinePlus

    ... by washing your pumping equipment with soap and water and letting the equipment air dry. Storage of breastmilk Store your breastmilk in clean glass or hard BPA-free plastic bottles with tight-fitting lids. You can also use ...

  13. GAS METERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    George, C.M.

    1957-12-31

    A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

  14. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  15. Sliding valve pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, C.L.

    1980-09-09

    A sliding valve pump for oil wells which includes a working barrel having a plurality of apertures located in spaced relationship in the wall thereof and a pair of travelling valves fitted within the working barrel and carried by a plunger rod, the valves also having a plurality of apertures or ports for periodic registration with the ports in the working barrel wall to facilitate pumping of fluid from an oil reservoir or pool to the surface. The pump is designed to pull the oil-gas mixture from the reservoir pool into the lower section of the working barrel on the downward stroke, and to subsequently pump the collected oil through the barrel and tubing upwardly toward the surface on the upward stroke.

  16. Fuel injection pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, P.

    1985-04-02

    A fuel injection pump of the rotary distributor type includes a cam actuated plunger housing in a bore and an adjustable fuel control member which varies the amount of fuel supplied to the bore. The pump also includes a timing piston connected to the cam, the piston being biased by a spring against the action of fuel under pressure. In order to vary the timing under certain conditions a control piston serves as an abutment for the spring and the application of pressure to the control piston is controlled by a valve which has a valve element coupled to a throttle member of the pump the valve having a housing which is secured on the exterior of the pump.

  17. High efficiency centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nasvytis, P.J.; Jahrstorfer, G.W.

    1983-10-11

    A high speed fuel pump for a gas turnbine engine has a positively-driven shroud positioned between a main impeller and the wall of a pumping cavity to reduce impeller drag. The shroud is formed by a first disc having a boost impeller connected to its central hub portion and a second disc having a gear carried by its central hub portion. The main drive shaft assembly to which the main impeller is connected, carries a gear which meshes with gear mounted upon a shaft. The shaft also carries a gear which meshes with the gear. The gears are sized so that the shroud is driven at one-half the speed of the main impeller in order to maximize impeller drag reduction and enhance pumping capability when severe inlet conditions are present at the pump inlet.

  18. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  19. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  20. Using a Breast Pump

    MedlinePlus

    ... 15 seconds, then rinse with plenty of warm water. After washing, dry your hands thoroughly with a clean paper towel. You do not need to wash your breasts before you pump unless you have been using a cream, ointment, ...

  1. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. D.; Doherty, T. J.; Kannberg, L. D.

    1984-07-01

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-velocity requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more.

  2. Pneumatically Actuated Miniature Peristaltic Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Feldman, Jason; Svehla, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    Pneumatically actuated miniature peristaltic vacuum pumps have been proposed for incorporation into advanced miniature versions of scientific instruments that depend on vacuum for proper operation. These pumps are expected to be capable of reaching vacuum-side pressures in the torr to millitorr range (from .133 down to .0.13 Pa). Vacuum pumps that operate in this range are often denoted roughing pumps. In comparison with previously available roughing pumps, these pumps are expected to be an order of magnitude less massive and less power-hungry. In addition, they would be extremely robust, and would operate with little or no maintenance and without need for oil or other lubricants. Portable mass spectrometers are typical examples of instruments that could incorporate the proposed pumps. In addition, the proposed pumps could be used as roughing pumps in general laboratory applications in which low pumping rates could be tolerated. The proposed pumps could be designed and fabricated in conventionally machined and micromachined versions. A typical micromachined version (see figure) would include a rigid glass, metal, or plastic substrate and two layers of silicone rubber. The bottom silicone layer would contain shallow pump channels covered by silicone arches that could be pushed down pneumatically to block the channels. The bottom silicone layer would be covered with a thin layer of material with very low gas permeability, and would be bonded to the substrate everywhere except in the channel areas. The top silicone layer would be attached to the bottom silicone layer and would contain pneumatic- actuation channels that would lie crosswise to the pump channels. This version is said to be micromachined because the two silicone layers containing the channels would be fabricated by casting silicone rubber on micromachined silicon molds. The pneumatic-actuation channels would be alternately connected to a compressed gas and (depending on pump design) either to atmospheric

  3. Optimized Biasing of Pump Laser Diodes in a Highly Reliable Metrology Source for Long-Duration Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Chang, Daniel; Erlig, Hernan

    2011-01-01

    Non Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO) lasers are highly attractive for metrology applications. NPRO reliability for prolonged space missions is limited by reliability of 808 nm pump diodes. Combined laser farm aging parameter allows comparing different bias approaches. Monte-Carlo software developed to calculate the reliability of laser pump architecture, perform parameter sensitivity studies To meet stringent Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Lite lifetime reliability / output power requirements, we developed a single-mode Laser Pump Module architecture that: (1) provides 2 W of power at 808 nm with >99.7% reliability for 5.5 years (2) consists of 37 de-rated diode lasers operating at -5C, with outputs combined in a very low loss 37x1 all-fiber coupler

  4. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  5. Geothermal irrigation pump

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, H.B.

    1982-04-20

    A deep well pumping apparatus utilizing a geothermal source of energy is disposed within or above a stratum having a cool irrigating fluid, and an associated heat exchange unit is disposed within a stratum having the geothermal source. An organic working fluid is conveyed under pressure through the heat exchange unit and applied as a gas to a turbine assembly operatively coupled to the pump. The spent working fluid and cool irrigation fluid are then conveyed to the surface.

  6. PUMP FOR GASEOUS WORKING FLUIDS

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.

    1948-12-14

    A gas pump having a substantially constant rate of flow and a relatively efficient punnping action is described. A number of flexible plates disposed longitudinally in and in contact with a duct are caused to oscillate transversly so as to produce wave-llke deformations of the plates. These deformations are mechanically produced by pushrods and an eccentric gearing arrangement, and are so synchronized that the waves travel from the inlet to the outlet of the duct, and, in so doing, move the gas by positive displacement.

  7. Axial pumps for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M. C.; Rothe, K.

    1974-01-01

    The development of axial flow hydrogen pumps is examined. The design features and the performance data obtained during the course of the development programs are discussed. The problems created by the pump characteristics are analyzed. Graphs of four stage pump performance for various turbine blade configurations are developed. The characteristics and performance of a variety of pumps are included.

  8. The Evolution of Ion Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Peter C.; Wilson, T. Hastings

    1985-01-01

    Constructs an evolutionary sequence to account for the diversity of ion pumps found today. Explanations include primary ion pumps in bacteria, features and distribution of ATP-driven pumps, preference for cation transport, and proton pump reversal. The integrated evolutionary hypothesis should encourage new experimental approaches. (DH)

  9. Intracavity interferometry using synchronously pumped OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadilová, Alena; Vyhlídal, David; Kubeček, Václav; Šulc, Jan; Navrátil, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The concept of system for intracavity interferometry based on the beat note detection in subharmonic synchronously intracavity pumped optical parametrical oscillator (OPO) is presented. The system consisted of SESAM-modelocked, picosecond, diode pumped Nd:YVO4 laser, operating at wavelength 1.06 μm and tunable linear intracavity pumped OPO based on MgO:PPLN crystal, widely tunable in 1.5 μm able to deliver two independent trains of picosecond pulses. The optical length of the OPO cavity was set to be exactly twice the pumping cavity length. In this configuration the OPO produces signal pulses with the same repetition frequency as the pump laser but the signal consists of two completely independent pulse trains. For purpose of pump probe measurements the setup signal with half repetition rate and scalable amplitude was derived from the OPO signal using RF signal divider, electropotical modulator and fiber amplifier. The impact of one pump beam on the sample is detected by one probing OPO train, the other OPO train is used as a reference. The beat note measured using the intracavity interferometer is proportional to phase modulation caused by the pump beam. The bandwidth of observed beat-note was less than 1 Hz (FWHM), it corresponds to a phase shift measurement error of less than 1.5 × 10-7 rad without any active stabilization. Such compact low-cost system could be used for ultra-sensitive phase-difference measurements (e.g. nonlinear refractive index measurement) for wide range of material especially in spectral range important for telecom applications.

  10. Pumping a playground swing.

    PubMed

    Post, Auke A; de Groot, Gert; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Beek, Peter J

    2007-04-01

    In mechanical studies of pumping a playground swing, two methods of energy insertion have been identified: parametric pumping and driven oscillation. While parametric pumping involves the systematic raising and lowering of the swinger's center of mass (CM) along the swing's radial axis (rope), driven oscillation may be conceived as rotation of the CM around a pivot point at a fixed distance to the point of suspension. We examined the relative contributions of those two methods of energy insertion by inviting 18 participants to pump a swing from standstill and by measuring and analyzing the swing-swinger system (defined by eight markers) in the sagittal plane. Overall, driven oscillation was found to play a major role and parametric pumping a subordinate role, although the relative contribution of driven oscillation decreased as swinging amplitude increased, whereas that of parametric pumping increased slightly. Principal component analysis revealed that the coordination pattern of the swing-swinger system was largely determined (up to 95%) by the swing's motion, while correlation analysis revealed that (within the remaining 5% of variance) trunk and leg rotations were strongly coupled.

  11. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  12. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  13. Pumping system for oil production

    SciTech Connect

    Yamato, I.; Yamata, T.

    1984-05-29

    A pumping system for oil production comprises a hydraulic unit set on the ground and adapted to send out a pressure oil, and a pump unit set in an oil well and adapted to draw up crude oil therefrom. The pump unit comprises a pump cylinder, and a plunger reciprocatingly moved in the pump cylinder. The plunger is provided with a clearance formed between the outer circumferential surface of a lower end portion thereof and the inner circumferential surface of the pump cylinder. The pressure oil supplied from the hydraulic unit is ejected from the clearance along the inner surface of the pump cylinder into a cylinder chamber.

  14. Mathematical model development and simulation of heat pump fruit dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Achariyaviriya, S.; Soponronnarit, S.; Terdyothin, A.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of a heat pump fruit dryer was developed to study the performance of heat pump dryers. Using the moisture content of papaya glace drying, the refrigerant temperature at the evaporator and condenser and the performance, was verified. It was found that the simulated results using closed loop heat pump dryer were close to the experimental results. The criteria for evaluating the performance were specific moisture extraction rate and drying rate. The results showed that ambient conditions affected significantly on the performance of the open loop dryer and the partially closed loop dryer. Also, the fraction of evaporator bypass air affected markedly the performance of all heat pump dryers. In addition, it was found that specific air flow rate and drying air temperature affected significantly the performance of all heat pump dryers.

  15. Apparatus for pumping subterranean fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, E. H.

    1985-11-19

    An apparatus and method for pumping oil or other fluids from the earth is disclosed as using a submersible pump which is suspended in a hole drilled into the earth by means of a flexible cable. Encased in a flexible sheath with the cable are a power cable for the pump and a flexible hose to carry the oil from the pump to the surface of the earth. Control and signal wires may also be encased in the sheath for connection to transducers mounted on the pump. The pump may be easily inserted into or removed from the hole by using a reeling mechanism on the surface of the earth. The pump itself may comprise a submersible motor connected to a rotary to linear motion transducer that causes a pump barrel to reciprocate. The pump barrel moves over a stationary pump plunger, and there are ball check valves in both the barrel and plunger to control the entrance and exit of oil.

  16. Automatic pump for deep wells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1981-11-24

    An automatic pump for deep wells comprises a long stroke reciprocating pump having its piston normally in its bottom position and an automatic control dependent upon the collection of a predetermined amount of liquid in the pump cylinder above the piston for actuating the piston to pump the liquid into a production line. The automatic control includes an electric motor driven hydraulic pump and a reservoir of hydraulic fluid which is actuated upon filling of the reciprocating pump chamber to supply hydraulic fluid to a closed chamber below the piston and force the piston upwardly to discharge liquid from the pump cylinder. Gas collected in the top of the pump cylinder results in low starting current and a saving of energy. The hydraulic pump is reversed automatically upon completion of the pumping stroke of the piston.

  17. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...-study allowance. An eligible individual pursuing a program of education under 38 U.S.C. chapter 33 at a rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  18. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...-study allowance. An eligible individual pursuing a program of education under 38 U.S.C. chapter 33 at a rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  19. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...-study allowance. An eligible individual pursuing a program of education under 38 U.S.C. chapter 33 at a rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  20. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...-study allowance. An eligible individual pursuing a program of education under 38 U.S.C. chapter 33 at a rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  1. 41 CFR 101-27.503 - Allowable credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Allowable credit. 101-27...-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.503 Allowable credit. Allowable credit for activities returning... condition of the material received. (a) Credit will be granted at the rate of 80 percent of the current...

  2. 41 CFR 101-27.503 - Allowable credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Allowable credit. 101-27...-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.503 Allowable credit. Allowable credit for activities returning... condition of the material received. (a) Credit will be granted at the rate of 80 percent of the current...

  3. 41 CFR 101-27.503 - Allowable credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Allowable credit. 101-27...-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.503 Allowable credit. Allowable credit for activities returning... condition of the material received. (a) Credit will be granted at the rate of 80 percent of the current...

  4. 41 CFR 101-27.503 - Allowable credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable credit. 101-27...-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.503 Allowable credit. Allowable credit for activities returning... condition of the material received. (a) Credit will be granted at the rate of 80 percent of the current...

  5. Heat pumps and manufactured homes: Making the marriage work

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, F.; Neal, C.L.

    1996-11-01

    Manufactured homes make up over 7% of the US housing stock, including over 15% of the homes in North Carolina. As more of these homes are being equipped with heat pumps, it becomes important to figure out how to make these systems efficient. This article describes a number of ways of increasing the efficiency. The following topics are included: heat pump actual and rated capacity; heat pump sizing; air flow to the coil; indoor thermostat placement; outdoor thermostat; condensate; leaky ducts; pressure boundary breaches; pressure problems; what you should look for in heat pumps; manufactured housing - an evolutionary home.

  6. Wave optics simulation of diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for a diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) was developed. The code employs the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral for both laser mode and pump light propagations. A three-dimensional rate equation set was developed to determine the local gain. The spectral divergence of the pump beam was represented by a series of monochromatic beams with different wavelengths. The calculated results showed an excellent agreements with relevant experimental results. It was found that the main channel of the pump power drain is the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the lasing transition.

  7. 20 CFR 638.524 - Allowances and allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... allotments. (a) The Secretary shall periodically establish rates of allowances and allotments to be paid... these rates as a notice in the Federal Register. (b) The Job Corps Director shall ensure that each... death, any amount due, including the amount of any unpaid readjustment allowance, shall be paid...

  8. Pumping Optimization Model for Pump and Treat Systems - 15091

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Karanovic, M.; Miller, Charles W.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-15

    Pump and Treat systems are being utilized to remediate contaminated groundwater in the Hanford 100 Areas adjacent to the Columbia River in Eastern Washington. Design of the systems was supported by a three-dimensional (3D) fate and transport model. This model provided sophisticated simulation capabilities but requires many hours to calculate results for each simulation considered. Many simulations are required to optimize system performance, so a two-dimensional (2D) model was created to reduce run time. The 2D model was developed as a equivalent-property version of the 3D model that derives boundary conditions and aquifer properties from the 3D model. It produces predictions that are very close to the 3D model predictions, allowing it to be used for comparative remedy analyses. Any potential system modifications identified by using the 2D version are verified for use by running the 3D model to confirm performance. The 2D model was incorporated into a comprehensive analysis system (the Pumping Optimization Model, POM) to simplify analysis of multiple simulations. It allows rapid turnaround by utilizing a graphical user interface that: 1 allows operators to create hypothetical scenarios for system operation, 2 feeds the input to the 2D fate and transport model, and 3 displays the scenario results to evaluate performance improvement. All of the above is accomplished within the user interface. Complex analyses can be completed within a few hours and multiple simulations can be compared side-by-side. The POM utilizes standard office computing equipment and established groundwater modeling software.

  9. Calculation and optimization of parameters in low-flow pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeva, E. M.; Masich, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    The materials on balance tests of high-speed centrifugal pumps with low flow rate are presented. On the bases of analysis and research synthesis, we demonstrate the rational use of impellers of semi-open and open types providing high values for energy parameters of feed system of low-flow pumps.

  10. Indian Creek Pumping Station Hydraulic Prototype Tests, Mankato, Minnesota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    RESULTS AND ANALYSIS Discharge Measurements 19. Pump discharge was determined using rating curves provided by the manufacturer based on total dynamic ...head ( TDH ). This curve is shown by Plate 4. Pump column pressure measurements (refer to paragraph 12) were recorded and converted to TDH in order to

  11. Performance of a newly developed implantable centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Tatsumi, E; Takano, H

    2001-01-01

    The performance of the newly developed implantable centrifugal blood pump was investigated in vitro. The pump was developed with the end goal of building a versatile system that includes a left ventricular assist system with an internal secondary battery or an implantable biventricular assist system with two implantable blood pumps. The hydrodynamic characteristics and efficiency of the blood pump were evaluated, and the mechanical damage to the blood caused by the blood pump was assessed through a hemolysis test using fresh goat blood. The pump could generate 120 mm Hg at a flow rate of 5 L/min and a motor speed of 2,500 rpm. The electric input power to the pump was approximately 5 watts under these working conditions. The hemolysis caused by the pump was a bit higher than that by the former model, but stayed within an acceptable range. Performance of the pump in vitro was considered sufficient for a left ventricular assist device, although further design improvement is necessary in terms of hemolysis and system efficiency to improve biocompatibility of the pump.

  12. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  13. New slurry pumps in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Wang, W.; Shi, Z.

    1998-07-01

    Wet parts of centrifugal slurry pumps are naturally subjected to wear, but local wear in pumps could be avoided, at least partly. Through studying the wear phenomenon of slurry pumps in industrial applications, a series of much more advanced slurry pumps was developed in China. Laboratory tests and industrial applications show that the new pumps are high in efficiency when transporting slurries, and uniform wear can be expected from them.

  14. New slurry pumps in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengwang Li; Wenlie Wang; Zhongyin Shi

    1998-04-01

    Wet parts of centrifugal slurry pumps are naturally subjected to wear, but local wear in pumps could be avoided, at least partly. Through studying the wear phenomenon of slurry pumps in industrial applications, a series of much more advanced slurry pumps was developed in China. Laboratory tests and industrial applications show that the new pumps are high in efficiency when transporting slurries, and uniform wear can be expected from them.

  15. Natural Thermoelectric Heat Pump in Social Wasps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishay, Jacob S.; Pertsis, Vitaly; Rave, Eran; Goren, Alon; Bergman, David J.

    2003-05-01

    Photographs of wasps or hornets, taken with different temperature sensitive infrared cameras, reveal body temperatures that are sometimes significantly lower than the ambient temperature. This suggests that the hornets possess an intrinsic biological heat pump mechanism which can be used to achieve such cooling. Evidence is presented to substantiate this novel suggestion and to argue that the heat pump is most likely implemented by exploiting a thermoelectric effect in the hornet cuticle. Such a natural heat pump can conceivably also serve to cool the active hornet, engaged in daytime activities outside the nest at ambient temperatures exceeding 40 °C, to a body temperature that is low enough to allow its survival in extreme thermal conditions. It might also function as a means of raising the body temperature up to a level that enables the hornet to remain active even when the ambient temperature is as low as 10 °C.

  16. Valveless pumping using traversing vapor bubbles in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Thomas K.; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    1998-06-01

    Pumping of fluids in microchannels using the movement of a single or multiple vapor bubble(s) is proposed, analyzed, and demonstrated. The pumping mechanism requires no micromechanical moving parts for actuation by utilizing asymmetric heating which creates a variation in vapor pressure and surface tension due to the heater-induced temperature gradient along the channel. A heat and mass transfer analysis was performed to understand the pumping mechanism and estimate the pumping capability of the micropumping device. To verify the concept and our analysis, a pumping device with a transparent microchannel with a hydraulic diameter of 3.4 μm was fabricated on a silicon wafer using surface micromachining. Experimental results with the first generation device have shown pumping of isopropanol at velocities as high as 160 μm/s (0.5 nl/min flow rate) with a pressure head of approximately 800 Pa.

  17. Motionless heat pump - A new application of thermal transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugimoto, K.; Hirota, Y.; Kizaki, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A motionless heat pump system using a combination of thermal transpiration flow of a rarefied gas and a phase change of water has been proposed. This system consists primarily of a thermal transpiration pump, referred to as a Knudsen pump, and two chambers filled with water and water vapor, respectively. The Knudsen pump moves water vapor from one chamber to the other. The pressure drop in the outflow chamber promotes the evaporation of water and heat absorption, whereas the pressure increase in the inflow chamber promotes vapor condensation and heat generation. The maximum pressure difference and mass flow rate obtained by a Knudsen pump composed of a glass fiber filter were 57.6 Pa and 0.0484 mg/s/cm2, respectively, at a temperature difference across the filter of 120 K between the two chambers. The vapor delivery capacity of this pump was also measured experimentally.

  18. Electrochemically actuated mercury pump for fluid flow and delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, J.; Zhong, C. J.; Coldiron, S. J.; Porter, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype pumping system with the potential for incorporation into miniaturized, fluid-based analytical instruments. The approach exploits the well-established electrocapillarity phenomena at a mercury/electrolyte interface as the mechanism for pump actuation. That is, electrochemically induced changes in the surface tension of mercury result in the pistonlike movement of a mercury column confined within a capillary. We present herein theoretical and experimental assessments of pump performance. The design and construction of the pump are detailed, and the potential attributes of this design, including the generated pumping pressure, flow rate, and power consumption, are discussed. The possible miniaturization of the pump for use as a field-deployable, fluid-delivery device is also briefly examined.

  19. 885-nm Pumped Ceramic Nd:YAG Master Oscillator Power Amplifier Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a traditional diode pumped solid-state laser that is typically pumped with 808-nm laser diode array (LDA) and crystalline Nd:YAG was improved by using 885-nm LDAs and ceramic Nd:YAG. The advantage is lower quantum defect, which will improve the thermal loading on laser gain medium, resulting in a higher-performance laser. The use of ceramic Nd:YAG allows a higher Nd dopant level that will make up the lower absorption at the 885-nm wavelength on Nd:YAG. When compared to traditional 808-nm pump, 885-nm diodes will have 30% less thermal load (or wasted heat) and will thus see a similar percentage improvement in the overall laser efficiency. In order to provide a more efficient laser system for future flight missions that require the use of low-repetition- rate (pumping the Nd:YAG laser crystal. This pumping scheme has many potential advantages for improved reliability, efficiency, thermal management, contamination control, and mechanical flexibility. The advantages of using 885-nm pump diodes in Nd:YAG laser systems are numerous. The epitaxial structures of these 885-nm diodes are aluminum-free. There is a significant reduction in the thermal load generated from the Stokes shift or quantum defects. A Stokes shift is the energetic difference between the pump and laser photons. Pumping at a wavelength band closer to the lasing wavelength can reduce the thermal load by .30% compared to traditional pumping at 808 nm, and increase the optical- to-optical efficiency by the same factor. The slope efficiency is expected to increase with a reduction in the thermal load. The typical crystalline Nd:YAG can be difficult to produce with doping level >1% Nd. To make certain that the absorption at 885 nm is on the same par as the 808-nm diode, the Nd:YAG material needs to be doped with higher concentration of Nd. Ceramic Nd:YAG is the only material that can be tailored

  20. A review of leakage flow in centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng-Kong; Wong, Yew-Wah

    2006-05-01

    This article presents a new approach in determining the functional relationship between the leakage flow in a centrifugal blood pump and various parameters that affect it. While high leakage flow in a blood pump is essential for good washout and can help prevent thrombus formation, excessive leakage flow will result in higher fluid shear stress that may lead to hemolysis. Dimensional analysis is employed to provide a functional relationship between leakage flow rate and other important parameters governing the operation of a centrifugal blood pump. Results showed that pump performance with a smaller gap clearance is clearly superior compared to those of two other similar pumps with larger gap clearances. It was also observed that the nondimensional leakage flow rate varies almost linearly with dimensionless pump head. It also decreases with increasing volume flow rate. A smaller gap clearance will also increase the flow resistance and hence, decrease the nondimensional leakage flow rate. Increasing surface roughness, length of the gap clearance passage, or loss coefficient of the gap geometry will increase losses and hence, decrease the leakage flow rate. It is also interesting to note that for a given pump and gap clearance geometry, the nondimensional leakage flow rate is almost independent of the Reynolds number when specific speed is constant.