Science.gov

Sample records for allowable stress design

  1. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  2. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  3. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  4. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  5. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  6. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  7. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  8. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  10. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  11. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-522). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  12. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  13. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  14. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  15. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  16. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  17. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  18. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  19. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  20. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  1. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  2. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  3. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  4. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  5. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  6. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  7. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  8. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  9. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  10. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  11. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  12. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  13. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  14. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  15. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  16. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  17. Test methods and design allowables for fibrous composites. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics discussed include extreme/hostile environment testing, establishing design allowables, and property/behavior specific testing. Papers are presented on environmental effects on the high strain rate properties of graphite/epoxy composite, the low-temperature performance of short-fiber reinforced thermoplastics, the abrasive wear behavior of unidirectional and woven graphite fiber/PEEK, test methods for determining design allowables for fiber reinforced composites, and statistical methods for calculating material allowables for MIL-HDBK-17. Attention is also given to a test method to measure the response of composite materials under reversed cyclic loads, a through-the-thickness strength specimen for composites, the use of torsion tubes to measure in-plane shear properties of filament-wound composites, the influlence of test fixture design on the Iosipescu shear test for fiber composite materials, and a method for monitoring in-plane shear modulus in fatigue testing of composites.

  18. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  19. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  20. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  1. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  2. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  3. Effects of yarn crimping on braided composite design allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Dan

    1995-01-01

    that a 30% increase in compressive strength is obtainable by eliminating axial yarn crimping. Further compression testing is underway to quantify the relationship between crimp severity and compressive strength. Additional testing is planned to investigate the effect of crimping on the open-hole compressive strength, often considered a more significant design allowable.

  4. Brazed Joints Design and Allowables: Discuss Margins of Safety in Critical Brazed Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    FLom, Yury

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation tutorial discusses margins of safety in critical brazed structures. It reviews: (1) the present situation (2) definition of strength (3) margins of safety (4) design allowables (5) mechanical testing (6) failure criteria (7) design flowchart (8) braze gap (9) residual stresses and (10) delayed failures. This presentation addresses the strength of the brazed joints, the methods of mechanical testing, and our ability to evaluate the margins of safety of the brazed joints as it applies to the design of critical and expensive brazed assemblies.

  5. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  6. Flexibility of branch connections and B31.3 allowable stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Wais, E.A.

    1996-12-01

    The guidance for flexibility factors for branch connections contained in ASME piping Codes, B31.1 and B31.3 are reviewed and suggestions for modification are provided. Examples are provided which demonstrate potential conservatism in the Code methodology. Other items are discussed including branch connection stress intensification factors, B31.1 allowable stresses including margins on stress. Recommendations are provided for consideration by B31 Code Committees.

  7. Calculations allow program to design pipelines for waxy crude--

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Fariss, T.F.; Desouky, S.E.M. )

    1990-01-08

    This article reports that calculations have been derived which will permit writing of a computer program for design of a pipeline handling Newtonian, pseudoplastic, or yield-pseudoplastic crudes. Statistical analysis was used to find out the variation of rheological behavior with operating temperatures and wax content in various Saudi oils. The evaluation was carried out at a statistical confidence level of 95%. Experimental data were correlated with respect to power-law and Herschel-Bulkey law. The pipeline design calculations were carried out through a computer program. The friction factor was determined from Torrance's correlation and Dodge and Metzner correlation for yield-pseudoplastic and pseudoplastic fluids, respectively. The frictional pressure drop was calculated from Darcy-Weisbach equation.

  8. Determination of design allowable strength properties of elevated-temperature alloys. Part 1: Coated columbium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favor, R. J.; Maykuth, D. J.; Bartlett, E. S.; Mindlin, H.

    1972-01-01

    A program to determine the characteristics of two coated columbium alloy systems for spacecraft structures is discussed. The alloy was evaluated as coated base material, coated butt-welded material, and material thermal/pressure cycled prior to testing up to 30 cycles. Evaluation was by means of tensile tests covering the temperature range to 2400 F. Design allowables were computed and are presented as tables of data. The summary includes a room temperature property table, effect of temperature curves, and typical stress-strain curves.

  9. Stress constraints in optimality criteria design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures described emphasize the processing of stress constraints within optimality criteria designs for low structural weight with stress and compliance constraints. Prescreening criteria are used to partition stress constraints into either potentially active primary sets or passive secondary sets that require minimal processing. Side constraint boundaries for passive constraints are derived by projections from design histories to modify conventional stress-ratio boundaries. Other procedures described apply partial structural modification reanalysis to design variable groups to correct stress constraint violations of unfeasible designs. Sample problem results show effective design convergence and, in particular, advantages for reanalysis in obtaining lower feasible design weights.

  10. Integral flange design program. [procedure for computing stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    An automated interactive flange design program utilizing an electronic desk top calculator is presented. The program calculates the operating and seating stresses for circular flanges of the integral or optional type subjected to internal pressure. The required input information is documented. The program provides an automated procedure for computing stresses in selected flange geometries for comparison to the allowable code values.

  11. Designing a Stress Management Curiculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael E.

    1982-01-01

    Educators must develop, for therapeutic recreation students, curriculum that teaches stress management techniques and theories. Guidelines for curriculum revision or enhancement in this area are presented. (CJ)

  12. Optimality criteria design and stress constraint processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for pre-screening stress constraints into either primary or side-constraint categories are reviewed; a projection method, which is developed from prior cycle stress resultant history, is introduced as an additional screening parameter. Stress resultant projections are also employed to modify the traditional stress-ratio, side-constraint boundary. A special application of structural modification reanalysis is applied to the critical stress constraints to provide feasible designs that are preferable to those obtained by conventional scaling. Sample problem executions show relatively short run times and fewer design cycle iterations to achieve low structural weights; those attained are comparable to the minimum values developed elsewhere.

  13. Variable-load stress analysis of threaded connections of high-strength materials with allowance for process-induced residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. F.; Konovalov, G. V.; Minin, B. V.; Kirpichev, V. A.

    Results of residual stress measurements and fatigue tests are presented for bolts of VT16 titanium alloy manufactured by various methods. A method is proposed for plotting the maximum-amplitude diagram of the stress cycle of a threaded joint with allowance for the residual stresses in the thread grooves. The calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. A stress index model for balloon design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    A NASA stress index model, SINDEX, is discussed which establishes the relative stress magnitudes along a balloon gore as a function of altitude. Application of the model to a data base of over 550 ballon flights demonstrates the effectiveness of the method. The results show a strong correlation between stress levels, failure rates, and the point of maximum stress coinciding with the observed failure locations. It is suggested that the model may be used during the balloon design process to lower the levels of stress in the balloon.

  15. Optimality of a Fully Stressed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    For a truss a fully stressed state is reached and when all its members are utilized to their full strength capacity. Historically, engineers considered such a design optimum. But recently this optimality has been questioned, especially since the weight of the structure is not explicitly used in fully stressed design calculations. This paper examines optimality of the full stressed design (FSD) with analytical and graphical illustrations. Solutions for a set of examples obtained by using the FSD method and optimization methods numerically confirm the optimality of the FSD. The FSD, which can be obtained with a small amount of calculation, can be extended to displacement constraints and to nontruss-type structures.

  16. Stressing Design in Electronics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    Advocates a strong emphasis on the teaching of the design of electronic circuits in undergraduate courses. An instructional paradigm involving the design and construction of a single-transistor amplifier is provided. (CP)

  17. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to establish design allowables data for the following room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber based adhesives: (1) General Electric's RTV-560; (2) Dow Corning's 93-046; and (3) Martin Marietta's SLA-561. These adhesives are being evaluated for attaching reusable surface insulation to space shuttle structure.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - Allowance for Facilities Planning and Design

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowance for Facilities Planning and Design B Appendix B to Subpart I of Part 35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works Pt. 35, Subpt. I, App. B Appendix B...

  19. The Alternative Role of Enterobactin as an Oxidative Stress Protector Allows Escherichia coli Colony Development

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Daiana R.; Pomares, María Fernanda; de Cristóbal, Ricardo E.; Vincent, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria have evolved different iron uptake systems with the ability to make use of their own and heterologous siderophores. However, there is growing evidence attributing alternative roles for siderophores that might explain the potential adaptive advantages of microorganisms having multiple siderophore systems. In this work, we show the requirement of the siderophore enterobactin for Escherichia coli colony development in minimal media. We observed that a strain impaired in enterobactin production (entE mutant) was unable to form colonies on M9 agar medium meanwhile its growth was normal on LB agar medium. Given that, neither iron nor citrate supplementation restored colony growth, the role of enterobactin as an iron uptake-facilitator would not explain its requirement for colony development. The absence of colony development was reverted either by addition of enterobactin, the reducing agent ascorbic acid or by incubating in anaerobic culture conditions with no additives. Then, we associated the enterobactin requirement for colony development with its ability to reduce oxidative stress, which we found to be higher in media where the colony development was impaired (M9) compared with media where the strain was able to form colonies (LB). Since oxyR and soxS mutants (two major stress response regulators) formed colonies in M9 agar medium, we hypothesize that enterobactin could be an important piece in the oxidative stress response repertoire, particularly required in the context of colony formation. In addition, we show that enterobactin has to be hydrolyzed after reaching the cell cytoplasm in order to enable colony development. By favoring iron release, hydrolysis of the enterobactin-iron complex, not only would assure covering iron needs, but would also provide the cell with a molecule with exposed hydroxyl groups (hydrolyzed enterobactin). This molecule would be able to scavenge radicals and therefore reduce oxidative stress. PMID:24392154

  20. Space Shuttle Orbiter - Leading edge structural design/analysis and material allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. W.; Curry, D. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC), a structural composite whose development was targeted for the high temperature reentry environments of reusable space vehicles, has successfully demonstrated that capability on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Unique mechanical properties, particularly at elevated temperatures up to 3000 F, make this material ideally suited for the 'hot' regions of multimission space vehicles. Design allowable characterization testing, full-scale development and qualification testing, and structural analysis techniques will be presented herein that briefly chart the history of the RCC material from infancy to eventual multimission certification for the Orbiter. Included are discussions pertaining to the development of the design allowable data base, manipulation of the test data into usable forms, and the analytical verification process.

  1. HIF1α represses cell stress pathways to allow proliferation of hypoxic fetal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Stowe, Jennifer; Aneas, Ivy; Sakabe, Noboru; Cattaneo, Paola; Henderson, Lindsay; Kilberg, Michael S.; Johnson, Randall S.; Chen, Ju; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Evans, Sylvia M.; Zambon, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional mediators of cell stress pathways, including HIF1α, ATF4, and p53, are key to normal development and play critical roles in disease, including ischemia and cancer. Despite their importance, mechanisms by which pathways mediated by these transcription factors interact with each other are not fully understood. In addressing the controversial role of HIF1α in cardiomyocytes (CMs) during heart development, we have discovered a mid-gestational requirement for HIF1α for proliferation of hypoxic CMs, involving metabolic switching and a complex interplay between HIF1α, ATF4 and p53. Loss of HIF1α resulted in activation of ATF4 and p53, the latter inhibiting CM proliferation. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected mechanisms by which HIF1α intersects with ATF4 and p53 pathways. Our results highlight previously undescribed roles of HIF1α and interactions between major cell stress pathways that could be targeted to enhance proliferation of CMs in ischemia, and may have relevance to other diseases, including cancer. PMID:26028220

  2. Thermoelastoplastic stress state of a cylindrical vessel in the vicinity of an annular weld with allowance for loading history

    SciTech Connect

    Piskun, V.V.

    1985-11-01

    The present study numerically investigates the axisymmetric thermoelastoplastic stress state of a discretely nonuniform cylindrical shell in the region of an annular weld with allowance for the history of mechanical and thermal loading. This is based on the assumption that there are no residual stresses and strains after welding and creep strain can be ignored. The authors assume that the shell is a component part of a closed cylindrical vessel which is under internal pressure. They examine a loading process, consiting of three stages. Two calculations are performed with the loading history described in the paper.

  3. Increasing the Oxidative Stress Response Allows Escherichia coli To Overcome Inhibitory Effects of Condensed Tannins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra H.; Imlay, James A.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2003-01-01

    Tannins are plant-derived polyphenols with antimicrobial effects. The mechanism of tannin toxicity towards Escherichia coli was determined by using an extract from Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle) as a source of condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins). E. coli growth was inhibited by tannins only when tannins were exposed to oxygen. Tannins auto-oxidize, and substantial hydrogen peroxide was generated when they were added to aerobic media. The addition of exogenous catalase permitted growth in tannin medium. E. coli mutants that lacked HPI, the major catalase, were especially sensitive to tannins, while oxyR mutants that constitutively overexpress antioxidant enzymes were resistant. A tannin-resistant mutant was isolated in which a promoter-region point mutation increased the level of HPI by 10-fold. Our results indicate that wattle condensed tannins are toxic to E. coli in aerobic medium primarily because they generate H2O2. The oxidative stress response helps E. coli strains to overcome their inhibitory effect. PMID:12788743

  4. Modulation of oxidative stress and subsequent induction of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress allows citral to decrease cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Arvinder; Felder, Mildred; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjot; Czarnecki, Austin; Rathi, Kavya; Zeng, San; Osowski, Kathryn Kalady; Howell, Colin; Xiong, May P; Whelan, Rebecca J; Patankar, Manish S

    2016-01-01

    The monoterpenoid, citral, when delivered through PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles inhibits in vivo growth of 4T1 breast tumors. Here, we show that citral inhibits proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines. In p53 expressing ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 but not in p53-deficient SKOV-3 cells, citral induces G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and increased cleaved caspase3 and Bax and decreased Bcl-2. In SKOV-3 cells, citral induces the ER stress markers CHOP, GADD45, EDEM, ATF4, Hsp90, ATG5, and phospho-eIF2α. The molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuates citral activity in SKOV-3 but not in ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 cells. In p53-expressing cells, citral increases phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53. Activation of p53 increases Bax, PUMA, and NOXA expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α, attenuates citral-mediated apoptosis. Citral increases intracellular oxygen radicals and this leads to activation of p53. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by L-buthionine sulfoxamine increases potency of citral. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine decreases phosphorylation of p53 in citral-treated ECC-1 and OVCAR-3. These results define a p53-dependent, and in the absence of p53, ER stress-dependent mode of action of citral. This study indicates that citral in PEG-b-PCL nanoparticle formulation should be considered for treatment of breast and other tumors. PMID:27270209

  5. Modulation of oxidative stress and subsequent induction of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress allows citral to decrease cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Arvinder; Felder, Mildred; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjot; Czarnecki, Austin; Rathi, Kavya; Zeng, San; Osowski, Kathryn Kalady; Howell, Colin; Xiong, May P.; Whelan, Rebecca J.; Patankar, Manish S.

    2016-01-01

    The monoterpenoid, citral, when delivered through PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles inhibits in vivo growth of 4T1 breast tumors. Here, we show that citral inhibits proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines. In p53 expressing ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 but not in p53-deficient SKOV-3 cells, citral induces G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and increased cleaved caspase3 and Bax and decreased Bcl-2. In SKOV-3 cells, citral induces the ER stress markers CHOP, GADD45, EDEM, ATF4, Hsp90, ATG5, and phospho-eIF2α. The molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuates citral activity in SKOV-3 but not in ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 cells. In p53-expressing cells, citral increases phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53. Activation of p53 increases Bax, PUMA, and NOXA expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α, attenuates citral-mediated apoptosis. Citral increases intracellular oxygen radicals and this leads to activation of p53. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by L-buthionine sulfoxamine increases potency of citral. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine decreases phosphorylation of p53 in citral-treated ECC-1 and OVCAR-3. These results define a p53-dependent, and in the absence of p53, ER stress-dependent mode of action of citral. This study indicates that citral in PEG-b-PCL nanoparticle formulation should be considered for treatment of breast and other tumors. PMID:27270209

  6. Role of Probabilistic Micromechanics Modeling in Establishing Design Allowables in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Brewer, David N.

    2005-01-01

    One of the major challenges in designing with any new material, and particularly with advanced composite materials, is the fidelity of material design allowables. In the case of composite materials, the concern arises from the inherent nature of these materials, i.e., their heterogeneous make-up and the various factors that affect their properties in a specific design environment. Composites have various scales - micro, macro, laminate and structural, as well as numerous other fabrication related parameters. Many advanced composites in aerospace applications involve complex two- and three-dimensional fiber architectures and requires high-temperature processing. Since there are uncertainties associated with each of these, the observed behavior of composite materials shows scatter. Evaluating the effect of each of these variables on the observed scatter in composite properties solely by teSting is cost and time prohibitive. One alternative is to evaluate these effects by computational simulation. The authors have developed probabilistic composite micromechanics techniques by combining woven composite micromechanics and Fast Probability Integration (FPI) techniques to address these issues. In this paper these techniques will be described and demonstrated through selected examples. Results in the form of cumulative distribution functions (CDF) of the composite properties of a MI (melt-infiltrated) SiC/SiC (silicon carbide fiber in a silicon carbide matrix) Composite will be presented. A CDF is a relationship defined by the value of the property (the response variable) with respect to the cumulative probability of occurrence. Furthermore, input variables causing scatter are identified and ranked based upon their sensitivity magnitude. Sensitivity information is very valuable in quality control. How these results can be utilized to develop design allowables so that these materials may be used by structural analysts/designers will also be discussed.

  7. Development of design allowable data for Celion 6000/LARC-160, graphite/polyimide composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.; Scanlan, P. R.; Rosen, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    A design allowables test program was conducted on Celion 6000/LARC-160 graphite polyimide composite to establish material performance over a 116 K (-250 F) to 589 K (600 F) temperature range. Tension, compression, in-plane shear and short beam shear properties were determined for uniaxial, quasi-isotropic and + or - 45 deg laminates. Effects of thermal aging and moisture saturation on mechanical properties were also evaluated. Celion 6000/LARC-160 graphite/polyimide can be considered an acceptable material system for structural applications to 589 K (600 F).

  8. Design analysis, robust methods, and stress classification

    SciTech Connect

    Bees, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This special edition publication volume is comprised of papers presented at the 1993 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, July 25--29, 1993 in Denver, Colorado. The papers were prepared for presentations in technical sessions developed under the auspices of the PVPD Committees on Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, Operations Applications and Components. The topics included are: Analysis of Pressure Vessels and Components; Expansion Joints; Robust Methods; Stress Classification; and Non-Linear Analysis. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  9. Design Criteria for Controlling Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    This document sets forth the criteria to be used in the selection of materials for space vehicles and associated equipment and facilities so that failure resulting from stress corrosion will be prevented. The requirements established herein apply to all metallic components proposed for use in space vehicles and other flight hardware, ground support equipment, and facilities for testing. These requirements are applicable not only to items designed and fabricated by MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) and its prime contractors, but also to items supplied to the prime contractor by subcontractors and vendors.

  10. A robust design mark-resight abundance estimator allowing heterogeneity in resighting probabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClintock, B.T.; White, Gary C.; Burnham, K.P.

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces the beta-binomial estimator (BBE), a closed-population abundance mark-resight model combining the favorable qualities of maximum likelihood theory and the allowance of individual heterogeneity in sighting probability (p). The model may be parameterized for a robust sampling design consisting of multiple primary sampling occasions where closure need not be met between primary occasions. We applied the model to brown bear data from three study areas in Alaska and compared its performance to the joint hypergeometric estimator (JHE) and Bowden's estimator (BOWE). BBE estimates suggest heterogeneity levels were non-negligible and discourage the use of JHE for these data. Compared to JHE and BOWE, confidence intervals were considerably shorter for the AICc model-averaged BBE. To evaluate the properties of BBE relative to JHE and BOWE when sample sizes are small, simulations were performed with data from three primary occasions generated under both individual heterogeneity and temporal variation in p. All models remained consistent regardless of levels of variation in p. In terms of precision, the AICc model-averaged BBE showed advantages over JHE and BOWE when heterogeneity was present and mean sighting probabilities were similar between primary occasions. Based on the conditions examined, BBE is a reliable alternative to JHE or BOWE and provides a framework for further advances in mark-resight abundance estimation. ?? 2006 American Statistical Association and the International Biometric Society.

  11. Development of design allowables data for adhesives for attaching reusables surface insulation, addendum 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. P.; Carroll, M. T.

    1973-01-01

    The task consisted of conducting mechanical and thermal tests to establish design allowables data on a new room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone adhesive, X3-6004. Low modulus, coupled with relatively low density and good low-temperature properties of this adhesive, places it in contention as a candidate for attaching reusable surface insulation on the space shuttle. Data obtained show that the modulus values of X3-6004 are significantly lower than those of RTV-560 and the other three adhesives characterized at test temperatures from 550 to -175 F. At -175, -200 and -270 F, the modulus of X3-6004 is approximately the same as GE RTV-560 and the other three silicone adhesives. The X3-6004 adhesive exhibits good processing properties. It has a 12 percent lower density than RTV-560. Although lower in overall strength properties as compared to the other adhesives in the program, X3-6004 has adequate adhesion to 2024T81 aluminum to compete as an adhesive for attaching reusable surface insulation. It does exhibit some tendency to revert and soften at temperatures above 350 F when in a confined area.

  12. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  13. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  14. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  15. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  16. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - Allowance for Facilities Planning and Design

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 33. 11. The State will determine the amount and conditions of any advance under § 35.2025(b... Design B Appendix B to Subpart I of Part 35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Design 1. This appendix provides the method EPA will use to determine both the estimated and the...

  18. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  19. Sleeping Beauty transposase structure allows rational design of hyperactive variants for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Franka; Wiedemann, Lisa; Zuliani, Cecilia; Querques, Irma; Sebe, Attila; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a prominent Tc1/mariner superfamily DNA transposon that provides a popular genome engineering tool in a broad range of organisms. It is mobilized by a transposase enzyme that catalyses DNA cleavage and integration at short specific sequences at the transposon ends. To facilitate SB's applications, here we determine the crystal structure of the transposase catalytic domain and use it to model the SB transposase/transposon end/target DNA complex. Together with biochemical and cell-based transposition assays, our structure reveals mechanistic insights into SB transposition and rationalizes previous hyperactive transposase mutations. Moreover, our data enables us to design two additional hyperactive transposase variants. Our work provides a useful resource and proof-of-concept for structure-based engineering of tailored SB transposases. PMID:27025571

  20. Sleeping Beauty transposase structure allows rational design of hyperactive variants for genetic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Franka; Wiedemann, Lisa; Zuliani, Cecilia; Querques, Irma; Sebe, Attila; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a prominent Tc1/mariner superfamily DNA transposon that provides a popular genome engineering tool in a broad range of organisms. It is mobilized by a transposase enzyme that catalyses DNA cleavage and integration at short specific sequences at the transposon ends. To facilitate SB's applications, here we determine the crystal structure of the transposase catalytic domain and use it to model the SB transposase/transposon end/target DNA complex. Together with biochemical and cell-based transposition assays, our structure reveals mechanistic insights into SB transposition and rationalizes previous hyperactive transposase mutations. Moreover, our data enables us to design two additional hyperactive transposase variants. Our work provides a useful resource and proof-of-concept for structure-based engineering of tailored SB transposases. PMID:27025571

  1. Specification of CuCrZr Alloy Properties after Various Thermo-Mechanical Treatments and Design Allowables including Neutron Irradiation Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Vladimir; Kalinin, G. M.; Fabritsiev, Sergei A.; Zinkle, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy is a promising heat sink and functional material for various applica- tions in ITER, for example the first wall, blanket electrical attachment, divertor, and heating systems. Three types of thermo-mechanical treatment were identified as most promising for the various applica- tions in ITER: solution annealing, cold working and ageing; solution annealing and ageing; solution annealing and ageing at non-optimal condition due to specific manufacturing processes for engineer- ing-scale components. The available data for these three types of treatments were assessed and mini- mum tensile properties were determined based on recommendation of Structural Design Criteria for the ITER In-vessel Components. The available data for these heat treatments were analyzed for assess- ment of neutron irradiation effect. Using the definitions of the ITER Structural Design Criteria the design allowable stress intensity values are proposed for CuCrZr alloy after various heat treatments.

  2. Design element alternatives for stress-management intervention websites.

    PubMed

    Williams, Reg A; Gatien, Gary; Hagerty, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Typical public and military-sponsored websites on stress and depression tend to be prescriptive. Some require users to complete lengthy questionnaires. Others reproduce printed flyers, papers, or educational materials not adapted for online use. Some websites require users to follow a prescribed path through the material. Stress Gym was developed as a first-level, evidence-based, website intervention to help U.S. military members learn how to manage mild to moderate stress and depressive symptoms using a self-help intervention with progress tracking and 24/7 availablility. It was designed using web-based, health-management intervention design elements that have been proven effective and users reported they prefer. These included interactivity, self-pacing, and pleasing aesthetics. Users learned how to manage stress by accessing modules they choose, and by practicing proven stress management strategies interactively immediately after login. Test results of Stress Gym with Navy members demonstrated that it was effective, with significant decreases in reported perceived stress levels from baseline to follow-up assessment. Stress Gym used design elements that may serve as a model for future websites to emulate and improve upon, and as a template against which to compare and contrast the design and functionality of future online, health-intervention websites. PMID:21684565

  3. Computational Design of the β-Sheet Surface of a Red Fluorescent Protein Allows Control of Protein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Wannier, Timothy M.; Moore, Matthew M.; Mou, Yun; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Computational design has been used with mixed success for the design of protein surfaces, with directed evolution heretofore providing better practical solutions than explicit design. Directed evolution, however, requires a tractable high-throughput screen because the random nature of mutation does not enrich for desired traits. Here we demonstrate the successful design of the β-sheet surface of a red fluorescent protein (RFP), enabling control over its oligomerization. To isolate the problem of surface design, we created a hybrid RFP from DsRed and mCherry with a stabilized protein core that allows for monomerization without loss of fluorescence. We designed an explicit library for which 93 of 96 (97%) of the protein variants are soluble, stably fluorescent, and monomeric. RFPs are heavily used in biology, but are natively tetrameric, and creating RFP monomers has proven extremely difficult. We show that surface design and core engineering are separate problems in RFP development and that the next generation of RFP markers will depend on improved methods for core design. PMID:26075618

  4. Study on the design method of the jack-up's x-type cantilever allowable load nephogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yazhou; Sun, Chengmeng; Qin, Hongde; Jiang, Bin; Fan, Yansong

    2014-09-01

    The extending of a cantilever and transverse moving of a drilling floor enable the jack-up to operate in several well positions after the Jack-up has pitched. The cantilever allowable load nephogram is the critical reference which can evaluate the jack-up's drilling ability, design the cantilever structure and instruct a jack-up manager to make the operations safe. The intent of this paper is to explore the interrelationships between the cantilever position, drilling floor and the loads including wind force, the stand set-back weight etc., through analyzing the structure and load characteristics of the x-type cantilever and the simplified mechanics model with the restriction of the maximum moment capacity of the cantilever single side beam. Referring to several typical position designs load values, the cantilever allowable load nephogram is obtained by using the suitable interpolation method. The paper gives a method for cantilever allowable load design, which is proved reliable and effective by the calculation example.

  5. Heat-stressed structural components in combustion-engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Otto

    1938-01-01

    Heated structural parts alter their shape. Anything which hinders free heat expansion will give rise to heat stresses. Design rules are thus obtained for the heated walls themselves as well as for the adjoining parts. An important guiding principle is that of designing the heat-conducting walls as thin as possible.

  6. Ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation can both induce photoprotective capacity allowing barley to overcome high radiation stress.

    PubMed

    Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Štroch, Michal; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír; Tříska, Jan; Jansen, Marcel A K; Robson, T Matthew; Urban, Otmar

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of acclimation to ultraviolet (UV) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on photoprotective mechanisms in barley leaves. Barley plants were acclimated for 7 days under three combinations of high or low UV and PAR treatments ([UV-PAR-], [UV-PAR+], [UV+PAR+]). Subsequently, plants were exposed to short-term high radiation stress (HRS; defined by high intensities of PAR - 1000 μmol m(-2) s(-1), UV-A - 10 W m(-2) and UV-B 2 W m(-2) for 4 h), to test their photoprotective capacity. The barley variety sensitive to photooxidative stress (Barke) had low constitutive flavonoid content compared to the resistant variety (Bonus) under low UV and PAR intensities. The accumulation of lutonarin and 3-feruloylquinic acid, but not of saponarin, was greatly enhanced by high PAR and further increased by UV exposure. Acclimation of plants to both high UV and PAR intensities also increased the total pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ). Subsequent exposure to HRS revealed that prior acclimation to UV and PAR was able to ameliorate the negative consequences of HRS on photosynthesis. Both total contents of epidermal flavonols and the total pool of VAZ were closely correlated with small reductions in light-saturated CO2 assimilation rate and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry caused by HRS. Based on these results, we conclude that growth under high PAR can substantially increase the photoprotective capacity of barley plants compared with plants grown under low PAR. However, additional UV radiation is necessary to fully induce photoprotective mechanisms in the variety Barke. This study demonstrates that UV-exposure can lead to enhanced photoprotective capacity and can contribute to the induction of tolerance to high radiation stress in barley. PMID:25583309

  7. Design Allowables Test Program, Celion 3000/PMR-15 and Celion 6000/PMR-15, Graphite/Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.; Mccleskey, S. F.

    1982-01-01

    A design allowables test program was conducted on Celion 3000/PRM-15 and Celion 6000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite to establish material performance over a 116 K (-250 F) to 589 K (600 F) temperature range. Effects of aging, thermal cycling and moisture were also evaluated. Tension, compression and in plane shear properties were determined for uniaxial, pseudoisotropic and +45 laminates. Test results show sufficient strength and stiffness to substantiate graphite/polyimide composites as an acceptable structural material for high temperature structural applications.

  8. Stress-vs-time signals allow the prediction of structurally catastrophic events during fracturing of immature cartilage and predetermine the biomechanical, biochemical, and structural impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Kurz, Bodo; Felka, Tino; Rothdiener, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Aurich, Matthias; Frank, Eliot; Bahrs, Christian; Badke, Andreas; Stöckle, Ulrich; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Trauma-associated cartilage fractures occur in children and adolescents with clinically significant incidence. Several studies investigated biomechanical injury by compressive forces but the injury-related stress has not been investigated extensively. In this study, we hypothesized that the biomechanical stress occurring during compressive injury predetermines the biomechanical, biochemical, and structural consequences. We specifically investigated whether the stress-vs-time signal correlated with the injurious damage and may allow prediction of cartilage matrix fracturing. Methods Superficial and deeper zones disks (SZDs, DZDs; immature bovine cartilage) were biomechanically characterized, injured (50% compression, 100%/sec strain-rate), and re-characterized. Correlations of the quantified functional, biochemical and histological damage with biomechanical parameters were zonally investigated. Results Injured SZDs exhibited decreased dynamic stiffness (by 93.04 ± 1.72%), unresolvable equilibrium moduli, structural damage (2.0 ± 0.5 on a 5-point-damage-scale), and 1.78-fold increased sGAG loss. DZDs remained intact. Measured stress-vs-time-curves during injury displayed 4 distinct shapes, which correlated with histological damage (p<0.001), loss of dynamic stiffness and sGAG (p<0.05). Damage prediction in a blinded experiment using stress-vs-time grades was 100%-correct and sensitive to differentiate single/complex matrix disruptions. Correlations of the dissipated energy and maximum stress rise with the extent of biomechanical and biochemical damage reached significance when SZDs and DZDs were analyzed as zonal composites but not separately. Conclusion The biomechanical stress that occurs during compressive injury predetermines the biomechanical, biochemical, and structural consequences and, thus, the structural and functional damage during cartilage fracturing. A novel biomechanical method based on the interpretation of compressive yielding allows the

  9. Slagging properties of coals and allowance for them in the analysis of the possibility of using out-of-design fuel

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Alekhnovich; N.V. Artem'eva; V.V. Bogomolov

    2006-05-15

    It is shown that out-of-design coal should be used only after computational analysis of slagging of the boiler. The use of ash fusibility as a criterion for the analysis should be avoided because this property does not reflect the slagging properties of coal to an acceptable degree. Parameters characterizing the properties more appropriately are presented. It is shown that slagging of an actual furnace depends on many factors and the condition that 'the thermal stresses should be lower than the limiting value' is insufficient. An algorithm for the analysis is suggested on the basis of the slagging conditions arising upon transition from one kind of fuel to another with allowance for the actual slagging situation.

  10. Design and analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbo, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of an analytic procedure which can be used to provide comprehensive stress and strength analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations is given. The methodology provides designer/analysts with a user-oriented procedure which, within acceptable engineering accuracy, accounts for the effects of a wide range of application design variables. The procedure permits the strength of arbitrary laminate constructions under general bearing/bypass load conditions to be predicted with only unnotched unidirectional strength and stiffness input data required. Included is a brief discussion of the relevancy of this analysis to the design of primary aircraft structure; an overview of the analytic procedure with theory/test correlations; and an example of the use and interaction of this strength analysis relative to the design of high-load transfer bolted composite joints.

  11. GASICA: generic automated stress induction and control application design of an application for controlling the stress state

    PubMed Central

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert J.; van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In a multitude of research and therapy paradigms it is relevant to know, and desirably to control, the stress state of a patient or participant. Examples include research paradigms in which the stress state is the dependent or independent variable, or therapy paradigms where this state indicates the boundaries of the therapy. To our knowledge, no application currently exists that focuses specifically on the automated control of the stress state while at the same time being generic enough to be used in various therapy and research purposes. Therefore, we introduce GASICA, an application aimed at the automated control of the stress state in a multitude of therapy and research paradigms. The application consists of three components: a digital stressor game, a set of measurement devices, and a feedback model. These three components form a closed loop (called a biocybernetic loop by Pope et al. (1995) and Fairclough (2009) that continuously presents an acute psychological stressor, measures several physiological responses to this stressor, and adjusts the stressor intensity based on these measurements by means of the feedback model, hereby aiming to control the stress state. In this manner GASICA presents multidimensional and ecological valid stressors, whilst continuously in control of the form and intensity of the presented stressors, aiming at the automated control of the stress state. Furthermore, the application is designed as a modular open-source application to easily implement different therapy and research tasks using a high-level programming interface and configuration file, and allows for the addition of (existing) measurement equipment, making it usable for various paradigms. PMID:25538554

  12. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan; Rahman, Anwar Abdul; Hamzah, Mohd Arif; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  13. New design deforming controlling system of the active stressed lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Li; Wang, Daxing

    2008-07-01

    A 450mm diameter active stressed lap has been developed in NIAOT by 2003. We design a new lap in 2007. This paper puts on emphases on introducing the new deforming control system of the lap. Aiming at the control characteristic of the lap, a new kind of digital deforming controller is designed. The controller consists of 3 parts: computer signal disposing, motor driving and force sensor signal disposing. Intelligent numeral PID method is applied in the controller instead of traditional PID. In the end, the result of new deformation are given.

  14. Piping stress handbook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Helguero, V.

    1986-01-01

    This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

  15. The Promiscuity of [beta]-Strand Pairing Allows for Rational Design of [beta]-Sheet Face Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2009-06-17

    Recent studies suggest the dominant role of main-chain H-bond formation in specifying {beta}-sheet topology. Its essentially sequence-independent nature implies a large degree of freedom in designing {beta}-sheet-based nanomaterials. Here we show rational design of {beta}-sheet face inversions by incremental deletions of {beta}-strands from the single-layer {beta}-sheet of Borrelia outer surface protein A. We show that a {beta}-sheet structure can be maintained when a large number of native contacts are removed and that one can design large-scale conformational transitions of a {beta}-sheet such as face inversion by exploiting the promiscuity of strand-strand interactions. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures confirmed the success of the design and supported the importance of main-chain H-bonds in determining {beta}-sheet topology. This work suggests a simple but effective strategy for designing and controlling nanomaterials based on {beta}-rich peptide self-assemblies.

  16. A tension stress loading unit designed for characterizing indentation response of single crystal silicon under tension stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei; Shi, Chengli; Hu, Xiaoli; Cui, Tao; Tian, Ye

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a tension stress loading unit is designed to provide tension stress for brittle materials by combining the piezo actuator and the flexible hinge. The structure of the tension stress loading unit is analyzed and discussed via the theoretical method and finite element simulations. Effects of holding time, the installed specimen and hysteresis of the piezo actuator on output performances of the tension stress loading unit are studied in detail. An experiment system is established by combing the indentation testing unit and the developed tension stress loading unit to characterize indentation response of single crystal silicon under tension stress. Experiment results indicate that tension stress leads to increasing of indentation displacement for the same inden-tation load of single crystal silicon. This paper provides a new tool for studying indentation response of brittle materials under tension stress.

  17. 'To preserve unity while almost allowing for chaos': Testing the aesthetic principle of unity-in-variety in product design.

    PubMed

    Post, R A G; Blijlevens, J; Hekkert, P

    2016-01-01

    Unity-in-variety is considered to be one of the oldest-known universal principles of beauty. However, little empirical research exists on how unity and variety together influence aesthetic appreciation. In three studies we investigated how unity and variety predict the aesthetic appreciation of a range of product designs, and further assessed whether perceived visual complexity and individual differences in regulatory focus influence this relationship. Our findings reveal that both unity and variety, while suppressing each other's effect, positively affect aesthetic appreciation. Hence, product designs that exhibit an optimum balance between unity and variety are aesthetically preferred. Furthermore, the research reveals that unity is the dominant factor in this relationship and facilitates the appreciation of variety. We discuss several theoretical and practical implications resulting from these studies. PMID:26687018

  18. Genome Wide Analysis of the Apple MYB Transcription Factor Family Allows the Identification of MdoMYB121 Gene Confering Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-Kai; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors (TFs) in plants. Although several MYB genes have been characterized to play roles in secondary metabolism, the MYB family has not yet been identified in apple. In this study, 229 apple MYB genes were identified through a genome-wide analysis and divided into 45 subgroups. A computational analysis was conducted using the apple genomic database to yield a complete overview of the MYB family, including the intron-exon organizations, the sequence features of the MYB DNA-binding domains, the carboxy-terminal motifs, and the chromosomal locations. Subsequently, the expression of 18 MYB genes, including 12 were chosen from stress-related subgroups, while another 6 ones from other subgroups, in response to various abiotic stresses was examined. It was found that several of these MYB genes, particularly MdoMYB121, were induced by multiple stresses. The MdoMYB121 was then further functionally characterized. Its predicted protein was found to be localized in the nucleus. A transgenic analysis indicated that the overexpression of the MdoMYB121 gene remarkably enhanced the tolerance to high salinity, drought, and cold stresses in transgenic tomato and apple plants. Our results indicate that the MYB genes are highly conserved in plant species and that MdoMYB121 can be used as a target gene in genetic engineering approaches to improve the tolerance of plants to multiple abiotic stresses. PMID:23950843

  19. Thermoelastic Femoral Stress Imaging for Experimental Evaluation of Hip Prosthesis Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Koji; Inomoto, Masayoshi; Ma, Wenxiao; Miyakawa, Syunpei; Tateishi, Tetsuya

    An experimental system using the thermoelastic stress analysis method and a synthetic femur was utilized to perform reliable and convenient mechanical biocompatibility evaluation of hip prosthesis design. Unlike the conventional technique, the unique advantage of the thermoelastic stress analysis method is its ability to image whole-surface stress (Δ(σ1+σ2)) distribution in specimens. The mechanical properties of synthetic femurs agreed well with those of cadaveric femurs with little variability between specimens. We applied this experimental system for stress distribution visualization of the intact femur, and the femurs implanted with an artificial joint. The surface stress distribution of the femurs sensitively reflected the prosthesis design and the contact condition between the stem and the bone. By analyzing the relationship between the stress distribution and the clinical results of the artificial joint, this technique can be used in mechanical biocompatibility evaluation and pre-clinical performance prediction of new artificial joint design.

  20. A phase-field approach to nonequilibrium phase transformations in elastic solids via an intermediate phase (melt) allowing for interface stresses.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I

    2016-04-28

    A phase-field approach for phase transformations (PTs) between three different phases at nonequilibrium temperatures is developed. It includes advanced mechanics, thermodynamically consistent interfacial stresses, and interface interactions. A thermodynamic Landau-Ginzburg potential developed in terms of polar order parameters satisfies the desired instability and equilibrium conditions for homogeneous phases. The interfacial stresses were introduced with some terms from large-strain formulation even though the small-strain assumption was utilized. The developed model is applied to study the PTs between two solid phases via a highly disordered intermediate phase (IP) or an intermediate melt (IM) hundreds of degrees below the melting temperature. In particular, the β ↔ δ PTs in HMX energetic crystals via IM are analyzed. The effects of various parameters (temperature, ratios of widths and energies of solid-solid (SS) to solid-melt (SM) interfaces, elastic energy, and interfacial stresses) on the formation, stability, and structure of the IM within a propagating SS interface are studied. Interfacial and elastic stresses within a SS interphase and their relaxation and redistribution with the appearance of a partial or complete IM are analyzed. The energy and structure of the critical nucleus (CN) of the IM are studied as well. In particular, the interfacial stresses increase the aspect-ratio of the CN. Although including elastic energy can drastically reduce the energy of the CN of the IM, the activation energy of the CN of the IM within the SS interface increases when interfacial tension is taken into account. The developed thermodynamic potential can also be modified to model other multiphase physical phenomena, such as multi-variant martensitic PTs, grain boundary and surface-induced pre-melting and PTs, as well as developing phase diagrams for IPs. PMID:27078783

  1. Artificial Warming of Arctic Meadow under Pollution Stress: Experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni, Christophe; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Fjelldal, Erling; Brenden, Marius; Kimball, Bruce; Rasse, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Boreal and arctic terrestrial ecosystems are central to the climate change debate, notably because future warming is expected to be disproportionate as compared to world averages. Likewise, greenhouse gas (GHG) release from terrestrial ecosystems exposed to climate warming is expected to be the largest in the arctic. Artic agriculture, in the form of cultivated grasslands, is a unique and economically relevant feature of Northern Norway (e.g. Finnmark Province). In Eastern Finnmark, these agro-ecosystems are under the additional stressor of heavy metal and sulfur pollution generated by metal smelters of NW Russia. Warming and its interaction with heavy metal dynamics will influence meadow productivity, species composition and GHG emissions, as mediated by responses of soil microbial communities. Adaptation and mitigation measurements will be needed. Biochar application, which immobilizes heavy metal, is a promising adaptation method to promote positive growth response in arctic meadows exposed to a warming climate. In the MeadoWarm project we conduct an ecosystem warming experiment combined to biochar adaptation treatments in the heavy-metal polluted meadows of Eastern Finnmark. In summary, the general objective of this study is twofold: 1) to determine the response of arctic agricultural ecosystems under environmental stress to increased temperatures, both in terms of plant growth, soil organisms and GHG emissions, and 2) to determine if biochar application can serve as a positive adaptation (plant growth) and mitigation (GHG emission) strategy for these ecosystems under warming conditions. Here, we present the experimental site and the designed open-field warming facility. The selected site is an arctic meadow located at the Svanhovd Research station less than 10km west from the Russian mining city of Nikel. A splitplot design with 5 replicates for each treatment is used to test the effect of biochar amendment and a 3oC warming on the Arctic meadow. Ten circular

  2. The assessment and measurement of adult life stress: Basic premises, operational principles, and design requirements.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Kate L; Monroe, Scott M

    2016-07-01

    Life stress is a central factor in the onset and course of a wide range of medical and psychiatric conditions. Determining the precise etiological and pathological consequences of stress, though, has been hindered by weaknesses in prevailing definitional and measurement practices. The purpose of the current paper is to evaluate the primary strategies for defining and measuring major and minor acute life events, chronic stressors, and daily hassles as informed by 3 basic scientific premises. The first premise concerns the manner in which stress is conceptualized and operationally defined, and specifically we assert that stress measures must not conflate the stress exposure with the stress response. The second premise concerns how stress exposures are measured, and we provide guidelines for optimizing standardized and sensitive indicators of life stress. The third premise addresses the consequences of variations in the procedures for life event measurement with regard to the validity of the research designs employed. We show that life stress measures are susceptible to several sources of bias, and if these potential sources of bias are not controlled in the design of the research, spurious findings may result. Our goal is to provide a useful guide for researchers who consider life stress to be an important factor in their theoretical models of disease, wish to incorporate measures of life stress in their research, and seek to avoid the common pitfalls of past measurement practices. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27254487

  3. Design and development of a miniature column-based interface (MCBI) stress gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, Denis D.

    1993-04-01

    Tests are routinely conducted to evaluate the survivability, under simulated battlefield conditions, of buried military structures subjected to high-explosive loadings. The survivability assessments require the measurement of dynamic normal stresses induced at soil/structure interfaces. Stresses in excess of 10,000 psi and accelerations greater than 100,000 g's may be applied at interface locations. Normal-incidence interface stress gages currently used in such tests are incapable of accurately measuring stresses above 5,000 psi, and are sensitive to lateral accelerations and structure-transmitted stresses which distort the measurement. This study explores the design, development, and testing of a miniature, column-based, interface (MCBI) stress gage. The MCBI gage is designed to measure normal stresses up to 35,000 psi. Laboratory tests indicate that the gage produces a linear output due to applied pressure and is virtually insensitive to lateral stresses. Explosive tests have shown the MCBI gage compares favorably to commonly-used interface stress gages at stresses up to 3,000 psi and is survivable at stresses up to 25,000 psi.

  4. Design and development of a new magnetic sensor for stress measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelopoulos, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the design and the development of a new magnetic sensor for stress measurements using the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the magnetic permeability techniques in ferromagnetic steels. Both techniques together, become an important nondestructive technique, due to its exceptional material and stress characterization capabilities. The correlation of the two methods was investigated. Conclusions were derived based on the experimental results.

  5. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  6. Design procedure for stress intensification factors of 90-Deg curved pipe having various tangent lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Nordham, D.J. . Carderock Division); Kaldor, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    A simple design procedure, based on 114 finite element analyses, was derived to predict the stress intensification factor for 90-deg curved pipe with end constraints composed of tangents of any length terminated by rigid flanges and no internal pressure loads. The results of this design procedure were then compared to stress intensification factors obtained from additional finite element analyses and experimental work. Stress intensification factors calculated using the design equations in the Power Piping Code (ANSI/ASME B31.1-1986) were also compared to all the finite element and experimental work. It was found that this design procedure more accurately predicts the stress intensification factors than the Power Piping Code.

  7. Photoelastic stress and fracture analysis of two neutron tube designs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, V.J.; Sanford, R.J.

    1980-10-15

    Photoelastic stress analysis and fracture stress analysis were carried out on two-dimensional models of the cross-sections of the M5N and M19N designs of a neutron tube under axial load. Of special interest was the metal-ceramic interface, where failure had been experienced. Both types of analysis showed the M5N to be superior to the M19N for the given loading in the area of failure. Tangential stresses along the free surfaces, and mixed-mode stress intensity factors for various crack lengths along the interface are reported.

  8. Improving sensitivity of piezoresistive microcantilever biosensors using stress concentration region designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. Z.; Cho, C.; Choi, W.; Lee, M.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    To improve the surface-stress sensitivity of piezoresistive microcantilever biosensors, this study presents cantilever designs with circular, square and triangular stress concentration regions (SCRs). The cantilever substrates are made of silicon and silicon dioxide and the piezoresistor is p-doped silicon. The cantilevers are characterized using FEM software for their surface-stress sensitivity and thermal vulnerability by applying surface stress, temperature and bias voltage loads. A relation for the surface-stress sensitivity of a silicon cantilever is also presented. Results show that use of SCRs in a silicon cantilever can improve its sensitivity by up to 55% and that a square SCR is the most suitable design to improve the overall sensitivity.

  9. Reliability approach to rotating-component design. [fatigue life and stress concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D. B.; Lalli, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    A probabilistic methodology for designing rotating mechanical components using reliability to relate stress to strength is explained. The experimental test machines and data obtained for steel to verify this methodology are described. A sample mechanical rotating component design problem is solved by comparing a deterministic design method with the new design-by reliability approach. The new method shows that a smaller size and weight can be obtained for specified rotating shaft life and reliability, and uses the statistical distortion-energy theory with statistical fatigue diagrams for optimum shaft design. Statistical methods are presented for (1) determining strength distributions for steel experimentally, (2) determining a failure theory for stress variations in a rotating shaft subjected to reversed bending and steady torque, and (3) relating strength to stress by reliability.

  10. Long-term strength and allowable stresses of grade 10Kh9MFB and X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91/P91) chromium heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Danyushevskiy, I. A.; Schenkova, I. A.; Prudnikov, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, grade X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91, P91) and 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) chromium steels are widely applied in equipment manufacturing for thermal power plants in Russia and abroad. Compilation and comparison of tensile, impact, and long-term strength tests results accumulated for many years of investigations of foreign grade X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, P91, and domestic grade 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) steels is carried out. The property identity of metals investigated is established. High strength and plastic properties of steels, from which pipes and other products are made, for operation under creep conditions are confirmed. Design characteristics of long-term strength on the basis of tests with more than one million of hour-samples are determined ( and at temperatures of 500-650°C). The table of recommended allowable stresses for grade 10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-SH, X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, and P91 steels is developed. The long-time properties of pipe welded joints of grade 10Kh9MFB+10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-Sh+10Kh9MFB-Sh, X10CrMoVNb9-1+X10CrMoVNb9-1, P91+P91, T91+T91, 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh)+X10CrMoVNb9-1(T/P91) steels is researched. The welded joint reduction factor is experimentally determined.

  11. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  12. Modified Fully Utilized Design (MFUD) Method for Stress and Displacement Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya; Gendy, Atef; Berke, Laszlo; Hopkins, Dale

    1997-01-01

    The traditional fully stressed method performs satisfactorily for stress-limited structural design. When this method is extended to include displacement limitations in addition to stress constraints, it is known as the fully utilized design (FUD). Typically, the FUD produces an overdesign, which is the primary limitation of this otherwise elegant method. We have modified FUD in an attempt to alleviate the limitation. This new method, called the modified fully utilized design (MFUD) method, has been tested successfully on a number of designs that were subjected to multiple loads and had both stress and displacement constraints. The solutions obtained with MFUD compare favorably with the optimum results that can be generated by using nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The MFUD method appears to have alleviated the overdesign condition and offers the simplicity of a direct, fully stressed type of design method that is distinctly different from optimization and optimality criteria formulations. The MFUD method is being developed for practicing engineers who favor traditional design methods rather than methods based on advanced calculus and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The Integrated Force Method (IFM) was found to be the appropriate analysis tool in the development of the MFUD method. In this paper, the MFUD method and its optimality are presented along with a number of illustrative examples.

  13. Comparative finite element analysis of the stress-strain states in three different bonded solid oxide fuel cell seal designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, K. S.; Koeppel, B. J.

    One of the critical issues in designing and fabricating a high performance planar solid oxide fuel cell (pSOFC) stack is the development of the appropriate materials and techniques for hermetically sealing the metal and ceramic components. A second critical issue is ensuring that the brittle ceramic cell constituents, i.e. the electrodes and electrolyte, exhibit high mechanical reliability by mitigating potential sources of thermal-mechanically induced stresses that can lead to fracture during operation and/or shutdown. A foil-based sealing approach is currently being developed that appears to offer good hermeticity and mechanical integrity, while minimizing the generation of high stresses in either of the joint's substrate materials. Based on the concept's viability, demonstrated in prior experimental work, numerical analyses were conducted to evaluate the behavior and benefits of the seal in a configuration prototypic of current pSOFC stack designs. This paper presents recent results from finite element (FE) simulations of a planar cell using the foil-based seal, along with companion analyses of the more conventionally employed glass-ceramic and brazed joints. The stresses and deformations of the components were evaluated at isothermal operating and shutdown temperatures. The results indicate that the foil seal is able to accommodate a significant degree of thermal mismatch strain between the metallic support structure and the ceramic cell via elastic deformations of the foil and plasticity in the foil-to-cell braze layer. Consequently the cell stresses in this type of seal are predicted to be much lower than those in the glass-ceramic and brazed designs, which is expected to lead to improved stack reliability. This ability to accommodate large thermal strain mismatches allows the design requirement of thermal expansion matching between ceramic and metal stack components to be relaxed and expands the list of candidate materials that can be considered for the

  14. Application of fully stressed design procedures to redundant and non-isotropic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.; Tsach, U.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of fully stressed design procedures for sizing highly redundant structures including structures made of composite materials. The evaluation is carried out by sizing three structures: a simple box beam of either composite or metal construction; a low aspect ratio titanium wing; and a titanium arrow wing for a conceptual supersonic cruise aircraft. All three structures are sized by ordinary fully-stressed design (FSD) and thermal fully stressed design (TFSD) for combined mechanical and thermal loads. Where possible, designs are checked by applying rigorous mathematical programming techniques to the structures. It is found that FSD and TFSD produce optimum designs for the metal box beam, but produce highly non-optimum designs for the composite box beam. Results from the delta wing and arrow wing indicate that FSD and TFSD exhibits slow convergence for highly redundant metal structures. Further, TFSD exhibits slow oscillatory convergence behavior for the arrow wing for very high temperatures. In all cases where FSD and TFSD perform poorly either in obtaining nonoptimum designs or in converging slowly, the assumptions on which the algorithms are based are grossly violated. The use of scaling, however, is found to be very effective in obtaining fast convergence and efficiently produces safe designs even for those cases when FSD and TFSD alone are ineffective.

  15. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  16. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  17. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  18. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in Appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  19. Thermal stress analysis of planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks: Effects of sealing design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Huang, Ling-Hao; Chiang, Lieh-Kwang; Chyou, Yau-Pin

    A three-dimensional multi-cell model based on a prototypical, planar solid oxide fuel cell (pSOFC) stack design using compliant mica-based seal gaskets was constructed in this study to perform comprehensive thermal stress analyses by using a commercial finite element analysis (FEA) code. Effects of the applied assembly load on the thermal stress distribution in the given integrated pSOFC stack with such a compressive sealing design were characterized. A comparison was made with a previous study for a similar comprehensive multi-cell pSOFC stack model but using only a rigid type of glass-ceramic sealant instead. Simulation results indicate that stress distributions in the components such as positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) plate, PEN-supporting window frame, nickel mesh, and interconnect were mainly governed by the thermal expansion mismatch rather than by the applied compressive load. An applied compressive load of 0.6 MPa could eliminate the bending deformation in the PEN-frame assembly plate leading to a well joined structure. For a greater applied load, the critical stresses in the glass-ceramic and mica sealants were increased to a potential failure level. In this regard, a 0.6 MPa compressive load was considered an optimal assembly load. Changing the seal between the connecting metallic PEN-supporting frame and interconnect from a rigid type of glass-ceramic sealant to a compressive type of mica gasket would significantly influence the thermal stress distribution in the PEN plate. The critical stress in the PEN was favorably decreased at room temperature but considerably increased at operating temperature due to such a change in sealing design. Such differences in the stress distribution could be ascribed to the differences in the constrained conditions at the interfaces of adjacent components under various sealing designs.

  20. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  1. Design and Stress Analysis of Low-Noise Adjusted Bearing Contact Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Mullins, Baxter R.; Woods, Ron

    2002-01-01

    An integrated computerized approach for design and stress analysis of low-noise spiral bevel gear drives with adjusted bearing contact has been developed. The computation procedure is an iterative process, requiring four separate steps that provide: (a) a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to reduce the effect of errors of alignment, and (b) reduction of the shift of bearing contact caused by misalignment. Application of finite element analysis permits the contact and bending stresses to be determined and investigate the formation of the bearing contact. The design of finite element models and boundary conditions is automated and does not require an intermediate CAD computer program. A commercially available finite element analysis computer program with contact capability was used to conduct the stress analysis. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples.

  2. 78 FR 9633 - Policy Statement on the Scenario Design Framework for Stress Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... November 23, 2012, at 77 FR 70124 remains February 15, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tim Clark... Federal Register of November 23, 2012, (77 FR 70124) requesting public comment on a policy statement on... CFR Part 252 RIN 7100-AD-86 Policy Statement on the Scenario Design Framework for Stress...

  3. Contact stresses with an unresurfaced patella in total knee arthroplasty: the effect of femoral component design.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S; Ishinishi, T; Whiteside, L A

    2000-03-01

    Compressive contact stresses between the patella and the anterior femur were measured with a digital electronic sensor before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in 10 cadaver knee specimens. Contact stresses were measured first in normal knees, then after TKA with the Insall-Burstein Total Condylar, Miller Galante II, Ortholoc II, Porous Coated Anatomic, and Profix knee prostheses implanted without resurfacing the patella. The Insall-Burstein, Miller-Galante II, and Ortholoc II prostheses had significantly higher contact stresses than the normal knee throughout the flexion arc. The Porous Coated Anatomic, which has a smooth patellar groove, maintained contact area as in the normal knee and did not have significantly higher contact stresses at flexion angles <90 degrees. At flexion angles > or =105 degrees, patellofemoral contact occurred in two small areas as the patella encountered the intercondylar notch in all components except the Profix. The Profix maintained full contact and low compressive stresses throughout the full flexion arc because of its posteriorly extended patellar groove. Design features of the patellofemoral portion of TKA components are important factors that affect contact stresses in the patellofemoral joint. These features likely will affect the clinical results of TKA with an unresurfaced patella. PMID:10741365

  4. Design of a multi-axis implantable MEMS sensor for intraosseous bone stress monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Fernando; Weiss, Lee; Campbell, Phil; Miller, Mark; Fedder, Gary K.

    2009-08-01

    The capability to assess the biomechanical properties of living bone is important for basic research as well as the clinical management of skeletal trauma and disease. Even though radiodensitometric imaging is commonly used to infer bone quality, bone strength does not necessarily correlate well with these non-invasive measurements. This paper reports on the design, fabrication and initial testing of an implantable ultra-miniature multi-axis sensor for directly measuring bone stresses at a micro-scale. The device, which is fabricated with CMOS-MEMS processes, is intended to be permanently implanted within open fractures, or embedded in bone grafts, or placed on implants at the interfaces between bone and prosthetics. The stress sensor comprises an array of piezoresistive pixels to detect a stress tensor at the interfacial area between the MEMS chip and bone, with a resolution to 100 Pa, in 1 s averaging. The sensor system design and manufacture is also compatible with the integration of wireless RF telemetry, for power and data retrieval, all within a 3 mm × 3 mm × 0.3 mm footprint. The piezoresistive elements are integrated within a textured surface to enhance sensor integration with bone. Finite element analysis led to a sensor design for normal and shear stress detection. A wired sensor was fabricated in the Jazz 0.35 µm BiCMOS process and then embedded in mock bone material to characterize its response to tensile and bending loads up to 250 kPa.

  5. Design and construction of pre-stressed piezoelectric unimorph for trailing edge flap actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lae-Hyong; Lee, Jong-Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a trailing edge flap actuation mechanism using a novel pre-stressed piezoelectric unimorph, PUMPS (Piezoelectric Unimorph with Mechanically Pre-stressed Substrate). Experimental evaluation of actuation performance such as force-displacement characteristics of PUMPS actuators showed that the performance of PUMPS satisfied the requirements for trailing edge flap actuation. Subsequently, flap actuation mechanisms were designed and constructed with several slot types in the flaps, and stacked PUMPS actuators were applied to the flap actuation mechanisms. Experimental study of the test wing models with four flaps was accomplished, and the flap angle was achieved up to +/-5.5° within 15Hz under maximum applicable voltage.

  6. Three dimensional finite element stress analysis of different designs of superconducting toroidal field coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Borovkov, A.I.; Ilyin, P.; L'vov, V. ); Krivchenkov, Y.; Korol'kov, M.; Spirchenko, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that during conceptual design phase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor a series of finite element stress analyses of different variants of the toroidal field coils (TFC) have been performed. The three dimensional stress state requires the three dimensional stress analysis, the complex microheterogenous structure of the TFC required a special algorithm for analysis. On the basis of study of four variants of the TFC the latest one was designed and analyzed.

  7. Bi-Metallic Composite Structures With Designed Internal Residual Stress Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) have a unique ability to recover small amounts of plastic strain through a temperature induced phase change. For these materials, mechanical displacement can be accomplished by heating the structure to induce a phase change, through which some of the plastic strain previously introduced to the structure can be reversed. This paper introduces a concept whereby an SMA phase is incorporated into a conventional alloy matrix in a co-continuous reticulated arrangement forming a bi-metallic composite structure. Through memory activation of the mechanically constrained SMA phase, a controlled residual stress field is developed in the interior of the structure. The presented experimental data show that the memory activation of the SMA composite component significantly changes the residual stress distribution in the overall structure. Designing the structural arrangement of the two phases to produce a controlled residual stress field could be used to create structures that have much improved durability and damage tolerance properties.

  8. Non-linear analysis and the design of Pumpkin Balloons: stress, stability and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.; Wakefield, D. S.

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite these activities have broadened to encompass lighter than air structures such as aerostats hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons Winzen Engineering couple many years of practical balloon design and fabrication experience with both academic and practical knowledge of the characterisation of the non-linear viscoelastic response of the polymeric films typically used for high-altitude scientific balloons Both companies have provided consulting services to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon ULDB Program Early implementations of pumpkin balloons have shown problems of geometric instability characterised by improper deployment and these difficulties have been reproduced numerically using inTENS The solution lies in both the shapes of the membrane lobes and also the need to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness Balloons undergo significant temperature and pressure variations in flight The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film can lead to significant meridional stress Fabrication tolerances can lead to significant local hoop stress concentrations particularly adjacent to the base and apex end fittings The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate stress concentrations However creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations that may

  9. Design and construction of a storm window with increased thermal efficiency which opens to allow ventilation as needed. Final technical report, proposal number F375

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The project as originally conceived and funded envisioned a conventional full - window - length storm sash mounted in the cement block window opening. Appropriate linkage would open the storm sash. This design proved to be a safety hazard and physically undesirable. The design of the storm window sash was revised. Individual storm frames were to be mounted on each awning sash. Mechanical interferences with the storm sash occurred when a two inch air space was used. This was solved by reducing the air space to the optimum dimension of 3/4 inches. The sizes and configuration of the awning type windows were studied to aid in cost effective and efficient design of the storm frame. It was discovered that in all but the later (aluminum conserving) models, the window pane was recessed 3/4 inches. This serendipidous fact resulted in the design of a triple glazed window utilizing only one storm sash glazed on both sides. The resultant combination window and storm sash is estimated to give approximately R 3.9 to R 5.2 insulation value.

  10. Stress analysis and design considerations for Shuttle pointed autonomous research tool for astronomy /SPARTAN/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Shuttle Pointed Autonomous Research Tool for Astronomy (SPARTAN) family of spacecraft are intended to operate with minimum interfaces with the U.S. Space Shuttle in order to increase flight opportunities. The SPARTAN I Spacecraft was designed to enhance structural capabilities and increase reliability. The approach followed results from work experience which evolved from sounding rocket projects. Structural models were developed to do the analyses necessary to satisfy safety requirements for Shuttle hardware. A loads analysis must also be performed. Stress analysis calculations will be performed on the main structural elements and subcomponents. Attention is given to design considerations and program definition, the schematic representation of a finite element model used for SPARTAN I spacecraft, details of loads analysis, the stress analysis, and fracture mechanics plan implications.

  11. Design and Stress Analysis of Low-Noise Adjusted Bearing Contact Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, A.; Litvin, F. L.; Mullins, B. R.; Woods, R.; Handschuh, R. F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2002-01-01

    An integrated computerized approach for design and stress analysis of low-noise spiral bevel gear drives with adjusted bearing contact is proposed. The procedure of computations is an iterative process that requires four separate procedures and provide: (a) a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to reduce the effect of errors of alignment on noise and vibration, and (b) reduction of the shift of bearing contact caused by misalignment. Application of finite element analysis enables us to determine the contact and bending stresses and investigate the formation of the bearing contact. The design of finite element models and boundary conditions is automated and does not require intermediate CAD computer programs for application of general purpose computer program for finite element analysis.

  12. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  13. Minimum weight design of rotorcraft blades with multiple frequency and stress constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1988-01-01

    Minimum weight designs of helicopter rotor blades with constraints on multiple coupled flap-lag natural frequencies are studied. Constraints are imposed on the minimum value of the blade autorotational inertia to ensure sufficient rotary inertia to autorotate in case of engine failure and on stresses to guard against structural failure due to blade centrifugal forces. Design variables include blade taper ratio, dimensions of the box beam located inside the airfoil and magnitudes of nonstructural weights. The program CAMRAD is used for the blade modal analysis; the program CONMIN is used for the optimization. A linear approximation involving Taylor series expansion is used to reduce the analysis effort. The procedure contains a sensitivity analysis consisting of analytical derivatives for objective function and constraints on autorotational inertia and stresses. Central finite difference derivatives are used for frequency constraints. Optimal designs are obtained for both rectangular and tapered blades. Using this method, it is possible to design a rotor blade with reduced weight, when compared to a baseline blade, while satisfying all the imposed design requirements.

  14. Computer-aided design of high-contact-ratio gears for minimum dynamic load and stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Lee, Chinwai; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A computer aided design procedure is presented for minimizing dynamic effects on high contact ratio gears by modification of the tooth profile. Both linear and parabolic tooth profile modifications of high contact ratio gears under various loading conditions are examined and compared. The effects of the total amount of modification and the length of the modification zone were systematically studied at various loads and speeds to find the optimum profile design for minimizing the dynamic load and the tooth bending stress. Parabolic profile modification is preferred over linear profile modification for high contact ratio gears because of its lower sensitivity to manufacturing errors. For parabolic modification, a greater amount of modification at the tooth tip and a longer modification zone are required. Design charts are presented for high contact ratio gears with various profile modifications operating under a range of loads. A procedure is illustrated for using the charts to find the optimum profile design.

  15. Effects of design variables on the critical stresses of eye bars under load: an evaluation by photoelastic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.G.; Stone, J.C.

    1982-01-08

    Textbooks on machine design and other relevant handbooks have not approached in depth the problem of estimating the effects of major design variables on the critical stresses in eye-bar lugs used for heavy lifting. The critical stresses determined experimentally by the photoelastic modeling of design variations of geometry and pin clearance with and without a bushing between the pin and the lug are discussed. Experimental data are compared to values developed from theoretical analysis.

  16. Analysis of elastic-plastic resistance material response for stress gage design

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.

    1986-04-01

    A deformation dependent model is developed for the resistivity changes of materials. The resistance response is represented as a functional that depends on measures of relative deformation between atoms and on dislocation density. Deformation dependent mechanisms of intrinsic resistivity are changes in the electronic band configurations, changes in the electron-phonon interaction cross-sections, and changes in the density of defect structures. The deformation dependent model for electronic band configurations is to represent changes in the number density of mobile electrons. The deformation dependent model for electron-phonon interaction and the density of defect structures is to represent changes in the scattering mechanisms that impede electron transport through a material. It is only after intrinsic resistivity is formulated in terms of recoverable and nonrecoverable deformation measures that a portion of a materials' resistance change can be isolated and explicitly identified as stress tensor dependent. This stress dependent part of the intrinsic resistivity response is referred to as the ''idealized'' piezoresistivity of a material. This idealized piezoresistivity is the change that depends on recoverable strains, which in the idealized case are elastic. In order to analyze and design reliable stress gages it is necessary to understand this idealized piezoresistance response, as well as other recoverable and nonrecoverable deformation dependent contributions to resistivity. Finally, an analysis is presented to demonstrate that a resistivity measurement for a single piezoresistance foil gage is not uniquely related to only one stress tensor applied to the gage. This analysis sugggests a new design for a triple material piezoresistance gage package to provide three independent and simultaneous resistivity measurements that are uniquely related to the three normal components of the stress tensor.

  17. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a 3rd Generation Addressable CMOS Piezoresistive Stress Sensing Test Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.

    1999-04-13

    Piezoresistive stress sensing chips have been used extensively for measurement of assembly related die surface stresses. Although many experiments can be performed with resistive structures which are directly bonded, for extensive stress mapping it is necessary to have a large number of sensor cells which can be addressed using CMOS logic circuitry. Our previous test chip, the ATC04, has 100 cells, each approximately 0.012 in. on a side, on a chip with a side dimension of 0.45 in. When a cell resistor is addressed, it is connected to a four terminal measurement bus through CMOS transmission gates. In theory, the gate resistances do not affect the measurement. In practice, there may be subtle effects which appear when very high accuracy is required. At high temperatures, gate leakage can increase to a point at which the resistor measurement becomes inaccurate. For ATC04 this occurred at or above 50 C. Here, we report on the first measurements obtained with a new prototype test chip, the ATC06. This prototype was fabricated in a 0.5 micron feature size silicided CMOS process using the MOSIS prototyping facility. The cell size was approximately 0.004 in. on a side. In order to achieve piezoresistive behavior for the implanted resistors it was necessary to employ a non-standard silicide ''blocking'' process. The stress sensitivity of both implanted and polysilicon blocked resistors is discussed. Using a new design strategy for the CMOS logic, it was possible to achieve a design in which only 5 signals had to be routed to a cell for addressing vs. 9 for ATC04. With our new design, the resistor under test is more effectively electrically isolated from other resistors on the chip, thereby improving high temperature performance. We present data showing operation up to 140 C.

  18. Design of a squeeze film magnetorheological brake considering compression enhanced shear yield stress of magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, C.; Hirani, H.

    2013-02-01

    A magnetorheological brake, consisting of rotating disks immersed in a MR fluid and enclosed in an electromagnet, is proposed to replace the conventional heavy weight low response hydraulic disk brake. The frictional characteristics of the proposed brake can be controlled by regulating the yield stress of the MR fluid as function of magnetic field and normal compressive force. The controllable yield stress retards the surfaces of rotating disks, thus MR fluid can be used as a brake lining material. The present research work attempts designing a squeeze film MR brake by accounting compression enhanced shear yield stress of magnetorheological fluid. Theoretical calculations indicate that the estimated braking torque of the six plate squeeze film MR brake, under compression, is in the order of 600Nm. To validate the theoretical design and its findings, a prototype of single-plate squeeze film MR disk brake has been developed. Experimental test setup helps to illustrate braking torque under different control currents (0.0 to 1.25 A).

  19. Stress analysis and testing of the outer capsule design for the Strontium Heat Source Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, F.A.; Shippell, R.J. Jr.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Strontium Heat Source Development Program is to obtain the data needed to license /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat sources - specifically the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsules produced in the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) at Hanford. Toward this end, a high integrity outer capsule has been designed to replace the present outer capsule of the WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsule. The proposed design of a Hastelloy S outer capsule which features a mechanical interlock type of end closure is described. Qualification testing requirements are outlined, and stress analyses and developmental tests are described. These tests were performed on AISI-1018 steel stand-in capsules, and included both external pressure and impact tests. The external pressure tests showed that stress calculations seriously overestimated the pressure capability of the outer capsule. Possible reasons for the lack of agreement between the tests and the analyses are evaluated. The stress analyses and tests results indicate that the proposed outer capsule will meet the heat source qualification requirements. Future tests will be conducted to experimentally verify that the Hastelloy S outer capsule in an aged condition meets the structural integrity requirements.

  20. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications.

  1. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  2. Stress Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel in the Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    High fuel temperatures and resulting fuel particle coating stresses can be expected in a Pu and minor actinide fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design as compared to the ’standard’ UO2 fueled core. The high discharge burnup aimed for in this Deep-Burn design results in increased power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed near the inner and outer reflector. Furthermore, the pebble power in a multi-pass in-core pebble recycling scheme is relatively high for pebbles that make their first core pass. This might result in an increase of the mechanical failure of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the PBMR design. To investigate the integrity of the particle fuel coatings as a function of the irradiation time (i.e. burnup), core position and during a Loss Of Forced Cooling (LOFC) incident the PArticle STress Analysis code (PASTA) has been coupled to the PEBBED code for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion analysis of the core. Two deep burn fuel types (Pu with or without initial MA fuel content) have been investigated with the new code system for normal and transient conditions including the effect of the statistical variation of thickness of the coating layers.

  3. Modeling and design of a normal stress electromagnetic actuator with linear characteristics for fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yongjun; Wei, Xiaohui; Wang, Chunlei; Dai, Xin; Wang, Shigang

    2014-05-01

    A new rotary normal stress electromagnetic actuator for fast steering mirror (FSM) is presented. The study includes concept design, actuating torque modeling, actuator design, and validation with numerical simulation. To achieve an FSM with compact structure and high bandwidth, the actuator is designed with a cross armature magnetic topology. By introducing bias flux generated by four permanent magnets (PMs), the actuator has high-force density similar to a solenoid but also has essentially linear characteristics similar to a voice coil actuator, leading to a simply control algorithm. The actuating torque output is a linear function of both driving current and rotation angle and is formulated with equivalent magnetic circuit method. To improve modeling accuracy, both the PM flux and coil flux leakages are taken into consideration through finite element simulation. Based on the established actuator model, optimal design of the actuator is presented to meet the requirement of our FSM. Numerical simulation is then presented to validate the concept design, established actuator model, and designed actuator. It is shown that the calculated results are in a good agreement with the simulation results.

  4. Reynolds shear stress for textile prosthetic heart valves in relation to fabric design.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Yousefi, Atieh; Forleo, Marcio; Vaesken, Antoine; Heim, Frederic; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-07-01

    The most widely implanted prosthetic heart valves are either mechanical or bioprosthetic. While the former suffers from thrombotic risks, the latter suffers from a lack of durability. Textile valves, alternatively, can be designed with durability and to exhibit hemodynamics similar to the native valve, lowering the risk for thrombosis. Deviations from native valve hemodynamics can result in an increased Reynolds Shear Stress (RSS), which has the potential to instigate hemolysis or shear-induced thrombosis. This study is aimed at characterizing flow in multiple textile valve designs with an aim of developing a low profile valve. Valves were created using a shaping process based on heating a textile membrane and placed within a left heart simulator. Turbulence and bulk hemodynamics were assessed through particle imaging velocimetry, along with flow and pressure measurements. Overall, RSS was reduced for low profile valves relative to high profile valves, but was otherwise similar among low profile valves involving different fabric designs. However, leakage was found in 3 of the 4 low profile valve designs driving the fabric design for low profile valves. Through textile design, low profile valves can be created with favorable hemodynamics. PMID:26919564

  5. ZERODUR glass ceramics: strength data for the design of structures with high mechanical stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Nattermann, Kurt; Döhring, Thorsten; Kuhr, Markus; Thomas, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Gath, Peter; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2008-07-01

    With an increasing number of applications mirrors and support structures made of the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR® has to endure high mechanical loads, e.g. rocket launches or controlled deformations for optical image correction. Like for other glassy materials, the strength of glass ceramics is dominated by its surface condition. Test specimens have been ground with fine grain tools (e.g. D64 diamond grains) and / or subsequently etched. The strength data basis for the design of highly stressed structures has been extended and new information has been derived for the extrapolation to low failure probabilities.

  6. The correct lens mount lightweighting design and thermal stress OPD analysis in Cassegrain telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chan, Chia-Yen; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-09-01

    This study is trying to evaluate different lens barrel material, caused lens stress OPD (Optical Path Different) in different temperature condition. The Cassegrain telescope's correct lens assembly are including as correct lens, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The lens barrel initial design is made by invar, but system mass limit is need to lightweighting to meet requirement. Therefore, the lens barrel material is tried to replace to lower density material, such as aluminum and titanium alloy. Meanwhile, the aluminum or titanium alloy material properties CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) are larger then invar. Thus, the high CTE material will introduce larger thermal stress into the optical system in different temperature condition. This article is analysis the correct lens assembly thermal stress and optical performance in different lens mount material. From above conditions, using FEM (Finite Element Method) and optical software, simulation and optimization the lens mount to achieve system mass requirement.

  7. Geomechanical Modeling to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S. P.; Sobolik, S. R.; Matteo, E. N.; Dewers, T. A.; Taha, M. R.; Stormont, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. For the DOE-NETL project 'Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials,' we are especially interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Building on existing thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) finite element modeling of wellbore casings subject to significant tensile and shear loads, we advance a conceptual and numerical methodology to assess responses of annulus cement and casing. Bench-scale models complement bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. Field scale models use the stratigraphy from a pilot CO2 injection operation to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. We report on approaches used for adapting existing wellbore models and share preliminary results of field scale models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: 2013-6241A.

  8. The effect of thread design on stress distribution in a solid screw implant: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Oğuz; Inan, Ozgür

    2010-08-01

    The biomechanical behavior of implant thread plays an important role on stresses at implant-bone interface. Information about the effect of different thread profiles upon the bone stresses is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different implant thread designs on stress distribution characteristics at supporting structures. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) stress-analysis method was used. Four types of 3D mathematical models simulating four different thread-form configurations for a solid screw implant was prepared with supporting bone structure. V-thread (1), buttress (2), reverse buttress (3), and square thread designs were simulated. A 100-N static axial occlusal load was applied to occlusal surface of abutment to calculate the stress distributions. Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FE modeling/analysis. The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at loading areas of implant abutments and cervical cortical bone regions for all models. Stress concentration at cortical bone (18.3 MPa) was higher than spongious bone (13.3 MPa), and concentration of first thread (18 MPa) was higher than other threads (13.3 MPa). It was seen that, while the von Mises stress distribution patterns at different implant thread models were similar, the concentration of compressive stresses were different. The present study showed that the use of different thread form designs did not affect the von Mises concentration at supporting bone structure. However, the compressive stress concentrations differ by various thread profiles. PMID:19543925

  9. Design and fabrication of a large area freestanding compressive stress SiO2 optical window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Toan, Nguyen; Sangu, Suguru; Ono, Takahito

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the design and fabrication of a 7.2 mm  ×  9.6 mm freestanding compressive stress SiO2 optical window without buckling. An application of the SiO2 optical window with and without liquid penetration has been demonstrated for an optical modulator and its optical characteristic is evaluated by using an image sensor. Two methods for SiO2 optical window fabrication have been presented. The first method is a combination of silicon etching and a thermal oxidation process. Silicon capillaries fabricated by deep reactive ion etching (deep RIE) are completely oxidized to form the SiO2 capillaries. The large compressive stress of the oxide causes buckling of the optical window, which is reduced by optimizing the design of the device structure. A magnetron-type RIE, which is investigated for deep SiO2 etching, is the second method. This method achieves deep SiO2 etching together with smooth surfaces, vertical shapes and a high aspect ratio. Additionally, in order to avoid a wrinkling optical window, the idea of a Peano curve structure has been proposed to achieve a freestanding compressive stress SiO2 optical window. A 7.2 mm  ×  9.6 mm optical window area without buckling integrated with an image sensor for an optical modulator has been successfully fabricated. The qualitative and quantitative evaluations have been performed in cases with and without liquid penetration.

  10. Computational simulations of stress shielding and bone resorption around existing and computer-designed orthopaedic screws.

    PubMed

    Gefen, A

    2002-05-01

    Failure of an orthopaedic fixation due to stress shielding and consequent screw loosening is a major concern among surgeons: the loosened screws could not only interfere with the healing process but also endanger adjacent anatomical structures. In this study, the effect of the screw's engineering design (dimensions, profile shape and material properties) on the load sharing with adjacent bone and consequent bone resorption was tested, using a set of two-dimensional computational (finite element) models. An algorithm simulating local bone adaptation to strain energy density (SED) mechanical stimuli was developed and used to evaluate the biomechanical performances of different commercial screws. Two new designs, a 'graded-stiffness' composite screw, with a reduced-stiffness titanium core and outer polymeric threads, and an active-compression hollow screw that generates compressive stresses on the surrounding bone, were also evaluated. A dimensionless set of stress transfer parameters (STPs) were utilised for ranking the performances of the different screws according to the expected screw-bone load sharing and its evolution with adaptation of the surrounding tissue. The results indicated that commercial wide (6 mm thread diameter) trapezoidal and rectangular screw profiles have superior biomechanical compatibility with bone (i.e. predicted to be stable after 2 years). The graded-stiffness and active-compression screws provided the best biomechanical performances: bone loading around them was predicted to decrease by no more than 15% after 3 years, compared with a decrease of 55-70% in bone loading around commercially available screws. Computer simulations of bone adaptation around orthopaedic screws are demonstrated to be effective means for objective and quantitative evaluation of the biomechanical aspects of implant-tissue compatibility. PMID:12195978

  11. Mesh Deformation Based on Fully Stressed Design: The Method and Two-Dimensional Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Mesh deformation in response to redefined boundary geometry is a frequently encountered task in shape optimization and analysis of fluid-structure interaction. We propose a simple and concise method for deforming meshes defined with three-node triangular or four-node tetrahedral elements. The mesh deformation method is suitable for large boundary movement. The approach requires two consecutive linear elastic finite-element analyses of an isotropic continuum using a prescribed displacement at the mesh boundaries. The first analysis is performed with homogeneous elastic property and the second with inhomogeneous elastic property. The fully stressed design is employed with a vanishing Poisson s ratio and a proposed form of equivalent strain (modified Tresca equivalent strain) to calculate, from the strain result of the first analysis, the element-specific Young s modulus for the second analysis. The theoretical aspect of the proposed method, its convenient numerical implementation using a typical linear elastic finite-element code in conjunction with very minor extra coding for data processing, and results for examples of large deformation of two-dimensional meshes are presented in this paper. KEY WORDS: Mesh deformation, shape optimization, fluid-structure interaction, fully stressed design, finite-element analysis, linear elasticity, strain failure, equivalent strain, Tresca failure criterion

  12. DESAP 2: A structural design program with stress and buckling constraints. Volume 1: Theoretical and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiusalaas, J.; Reddy, G. B.

    1977-01-01

    DESAP 2 is described as a finite element program for computer-automated, minimum weight design of elastic structures with constraints on stresses (including local instability criteria) and buckling loads. No limits are placed on the number of load conditions for stress-constrained design, but only one of these load conditions can be chosen as the potential buckling load. A substantial portion of DESAP 2, particularly the analysis of the prebuckling state, is derived from the SOLID SAP finite element program. The stress-constrained design is based on the classical stress ratio method, which drives the design towards a fully stressed state. The constraints on the buckling load are handled by solving the appropriate optimality criterion by successive iterations. During each iteration, the element sizes determined by the stress ratio method are used as the minimum size constraints. The element subroutines are organized in a manner that permits the user to make additions and changes with a minimal programming effort. Consequently, DESAP 2 can readily be changed into a special-purpose program to handle the user's specific design requirements and failure criteria.

  13. Stress.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself. PMID:18846841

  14. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs

    PubMed Central

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Heidari, Fatemeh; Kashani, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs) and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated). Materials and Methods: A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated); 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software. Results: In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate. Conclusion: We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis. PMID:26884772

  15. A Patient Specific Biomechanical Analysis of Custom Root Analogue Implant Designs on Alveolar Bone Stress: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyse by means of FEA the influence of 5 custom RAI designs on stress distribution of peri-implant bone and to evaluate the impact on microdisplacement for a specific patient case. Materials and Methods. A 3D surface model of a RAI for the upper right canine was constructed from the cone beam computed tomography data of one patient. Subsequently, five (targeted) press-fit design modification FE models with five congruent bone models were designed: “Standard,” “Prism,” “Fins,” “Plug,” and “Bulbs,” respectively. Preprocessor software was applied to mesh the models. Two loads were applied: an oblique force (300 N) and a vertical force (150 N). Analysis was performed to evaluate stress distributions and deformed contact separation at the peri-implant region. Results. The lowest von Mises stress levels were numerically observed for the Plug design. The lowest levels of contact separation were measured in the Fins model followed by the Bulbs design. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the applied methodology, adding targeted press-fit geometry to the RAI standard design will have a positive effect on stress distribution, lower concentration of bone stress, and will provide a better primary stability for this patient specific case. PMID:27274727

  16. 77 FR 70124 - Policy Statement on the Scenario Design Framework for Stress Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ...\\ 77 FR 62398 (October 12, 2012); 12 CFR part 252, subparts F- H. The Board's stress test rules provide... both supervisory and company-run stress tests.\\20\\ \\18\\ 12 U.S.C. 5365(i)(1); 77 FR 62378 (October 12... stress.\\24\\ \\24\\ See Capital plans, 76 FR 74631 (Dec. 1, 2011) (codified at 12 CFR 225.8). Stress...

  17. Modified Involute Helical Gears: Computerized Design, Simulation of Meshing and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The computerized design, methods for generation, simulation of meshing, and enhanced stress analysis of modified involute helical gears is presented. The approaches proposed for modification of conventional involute helical gears are based on conjugation of double-crowned pinion with a conventional helical involute gear. Double-crowning of the pinion means deviation of cross-profile from an involute one and deviation in longitudinal direction from a helicoid surface. Using the method developed, the pinion-gear tooth surfaces are in point-contact, the bearing contact is localized and oriented longitudinally, and edge contact is avoided. Also, the influence of errors of alignment on the shift of bearing contact, vibration, and noise are reduced substantially. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples that confirm the advantages of the gear drives of the modified geometry in comparison with conventional helical involute gears.

  18. Modified Involute Helical Gears: Computerized Design, Simulation of Meshing, and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert (Technical Monitor); Litvin, Faydor L.; Gonzalez-Perez, Ignacio; Carnevali, Luca; Kawasaki, Kazumasa; Fuentes-Aznar, Alfonso

    2003-01-01

    The computerized design, methods for generation, simulation of meshing, and enhanced stress analysis of modified involute helical gears is presented. The approaches proposed for modification of conventional involute helical gears are based on conjugation of double-crowned pinion with a conventional helical involute gear. Double-crowning of the pinion means deviation of cross-profile from an involute one and deviation in longitudinal direction from a helicoid surface. Using the method developed, the pinion-gear tooth surfaces are in point-contact, the bearing contact is localized and oriented longitudinally, and edge contact is avoided. Also, the influence of errors of aligment on the shift of bearing contact, vibration, and noise are reduced substantially. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples that confirm the advantages of the gear drives of the modified geometry in comparison with conventional helical involute gears.

  19. The Effects of Different Miniscrew Thread Designs and Force Directions on Stress Distribution by 3-dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Hamidreza; Ajami, Shabnam; Nabavizadeh Rafsanjani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The use of miniscrew as an absolute anchorage device in clinical orthodontics is growing increasingly. Many attempts have been made to reduce the size, to improve the design, and to increase the stability of miniscrew. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different thread shapes and force directions of orthodontic miniscrew on stress distribution in the supporting bone structure. Materials and Method A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used. A 200-cN force in three angles (0°, 45°, and 90°) was applied on the head of the miniscrew. The stress distribution between twelve thread shapes was investigated as categorized in four main groups; buttress, reverse buttress, square, and V-shape. Results Stress distribution was not significantly different among different thread shapes. The maximum amount of bone stress at force angles 0°, 45°, and 90° were 38.90, 30.57 and 6.62 MPa, respectively. Analyzing the von Mises stress values showed that in all models, the maximum stress was concentrated on the lowest diameter of the shank, especially the part that was in the soft tissue and cervical cortical bone regions. Conclusion There was no relation between thread shapes and von Mises stress distribution in the bone; however, different force angles could affect the von Mises stress in the bone and miniscrew. PMID:26636123

  20. Design, analysis, and characterization of stress-engineered 3D microstructures comprised of PECVD silicon oxide and nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Chia-Hsing; Turner, Kevin T.

    2016-06-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are typically 2D or quasi-3D structures fabricated using surface and bulk micromachining processes. In this work, an approach for 3D structure fabrication based on stress engineering is demonstrated. Specifically, sub-mm 3D spherical cage-like structures are realized through the deformation of bilayers of residually-stressed silicon oxide and silicon nitride with micrometer-scale thicknesses. Analytical and finite models to predict the shape of stress-engineered structures based on geometry and residual stress are described and used for structure design. A systematic experimental study was performed to quantify residual stresses in silicon nitride films made by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The measurements show that the residual stress of PECVD silicon nitride can be tuned over a wide range of tensile stresses through the control of deposition parameters, such as flow rate and power. Stress engineered 3D cage-like structures comprised of PECVD silicon nitride and oxide films were fabricated. 3D structures with a range of curvatures were demonstrated. The measured geometry of the fabricated structures are in good agreement with predictions from analytical and finite element models.

  1. A 201 MHz RF cavity design with non-stressed pre-curved Be windows for muon cooling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Ladran, A.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Lau, W.; Yang, S .; Rimmer, R.A.

    2003-05-01

    We present a 201-MHz RF cavity design for muon cooling channels with non-stressed and pre-curved Be foils to terminate the beam apertures. The Be foils are necessary to improve the cavity shunt impedance with large beam apertures needed for accommodating large transverse size muon beams. Be is a low-Z material with good electrical and thermal properties. It presents an almost transparent window to muon beams, but terminates the RF cavity electro-magnetically. Previous designs use pre-stressed flat Be foils in order to keep cavity from detuning resulted from RF heating on the window surface. Be foils are expensive, and it is difficult to make them under desired tension. An alternative design is to use precurved and non-stressed Be foils where the buckling direction is known, and frequency shifts can be properly predicted. We will present mechanical simulations on the Be foils in this paper.

  2. Determination of design gasket assembly stress with the new constants -- Exact Method

    SciTech Connect

    Guizzo, A.C.

    1996-12-01

    The PVRC task force, working to determine the new design procedure for bolted flange connections, has done a great job in developing a theory based on extensive experimental work, but they are still striving to determine an adequate way to establish a calculation procedure, using the concepts behind the new gasket constants. The current draft of the new code describes the Convenient Method for doing a calculation. The results obtained by using this procedure are different from the ones obtained with the Flexible Method, an alternative calculation procedure that requires iteration to find what would be the lowest and therefore the optimum bolt load. As in some situations this iterative procedure shows no convergence, attempts are being made to modify the Convenient Method so that it would result in design bolt load figures closer to the optimum. This paper proposes and describes a direct approach for calculating the assembly stress to be applied on the gasket using the new constants concept. It proposes also the introduction of ``d`` the Tp exponent as a fourth constant and the utilization of the actual gasket diameter in the Tp calculation. Comparisons are made between these proposals and the current calculation procedure.

  3. Design of Stress-Strain Measuring System for Bulldozing Plate Based on Virtual Instrument Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. C.; Li, J. Q.; Zhang, R.

    2006-10-01

    Soil is a kind of discrete, multiphase compound that is composed of soil particles, liquid and air. When soil is disturbed by bulldozing plate, the mechanical behavior of the soil will become very complex. Based on the law of action and reaction, the dynamic mechanical behavior of disturbed soil was indirectly analyzed by measuring and studying the forces on the bulldozing plate by soil currently, so a stress-strain virtual measuring system for bulldozing plate, which was designed by the graphical programming language DASYLab, was used to measure the horizontal force Fz acting on the bulldozing plate. In addition, during the course of design, the experimental complexities and the interferential factors influencing on signal logging were analyzed when bulldozing plate worked, so the anti-jamming methods of hardware and software technology were adopted correlatively. In the end, the horizontal force Fz was analyzed with Error Theory, the result shown that the quantificational analysis of Fz were identical to the qualitative results of soil well, and the error of the whole test system is under 5 percent, so the tress-strain virtual measuring system was stable and credible.

  4. Techno-stress: a prospective psychophysiological study of the impact of a controlled stress-reduction program in advanced telecommunication systems design work.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, B B

    1996-01-01

    There is a void of studies concerning occupational health aspects from working with the most advanced forms of information technologies techniques such as are found in some of the world-renowned telecommunication systems development laboratories. However, many of these techniques will later be applied in the regular office environment. We wanted to identify some of the major stressors perceived by advanced telecommunication systems design employees and develop a valid and reliable instrument by which to monitor such stressors. We were also interested in assessing the impact of a controlled prospective stress-reduction program on perceived mental stress and specific psychophysiological parameters. A total of 116 employees were recruited. Sixty-one were offered to participate in one of three stress-reduction training programs (intervention group). The additional 50 functioned as a reference group. After a detailed baseline assessment, including a comprehensive questionnaire and psychophysiological measurements, new assessments were made at the end of the formal training program (+ 3 months) and after an additional 5-month period. Results reveal a significant improvement in the intervention group with regard to circulating levels of the stress-sensitive hormone prolactin as well as an attenuation in mental strain. Cardiovascular risk indicators were also improved. Circulating thrombocytes decreased in the intervention group. Type of stress-reduction programs chosen and intensity of participation did not significantly impact results. Coping style was not affected and no beneficial effects were observed with regard to the psychological characteristics of the work, eg intellectual discretion and control over work processes. The survey instrument is now being used in the continuous improvement of work processes and strategic leadership of occupational health issues. The results suggest that prior psychophysiological stress research, based on low- and medium-skill, rather

  5. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the

  6. Computer Simulation of Stress-Strain State of Oil Gathering Pipeline Designed for Ugut Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, P. V.; Burkova, S. P.; Samigullin, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the stress and strain state modeling of infield pipeline in Ugut oil field. The finite element models of the stress field distribution in the pipeline wall are presented in this paper. The attention is paid to the pipeline reliability under stress conditions induced by the internal pressure and external compressive or tensile loads.

  7. Wall shear stress as measured in vivo: consequences for the design of the arterial system

    PubMed Central

    Hoeks, Arnold P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Based upon theory, wall shear stress (WSS), an important determinant of endothelial function and gene expression, has been assumed to be constant along the arterial tree and the same in a particular artery across species. In vivo measurements of WSS, however, have shown that these assumptions are far from valid. In this survey we will discuss the assessment of WSS in the arterial system in vivo and present the results obtained in large arteries and arterioles. In vivo WSS can be estimated from wall shear rate, as derived from non-invasively recorded velocity profiles, and whole blood viscosity in large arteries and plasma viscosity in arterioles, avoiding theoretical assumptions. In large arteries velocity profiles can be recorded by means of a specially designed ultrasound system and in arterioles via optical techniques using fluorescent flow velocity tracers. It is shown that in humans mean WSS is substantially higher in the carotid artery (1.1–1.3 Pa) than in the brachial (0.4–0.5 Pa) and femoral (0.3–0.5 Pa) arteries. Also in animals mean WSS varies substantially along the arterial tree. Mean WSS in arterioles varies between about 1.0 and 5.0 Pa in the various studies and is dependent on the site of measurement in these vessels. Across species mean WSS in a particular artery decreases linearly with body mass, e.g., in the infra-renal aorta from 8.8 Pa in mice to 0.5 Pa in humans. The observation that mean WSS is far from constant along the arterial tree implies that Murray’s cube law on flow-diameter relations cannot be applied to the whole arterial system. Because blood flow velocity is not constant along the arterial tree either, a square law also does not hold. The exponent in the power law likely varies along the arterial system, probably from 2 in large arteries near the heart to 3 in arterioles. The in vivo findings also imply that in in vitro studies no average shear stress value can be taken to study effects on endothelial cells derived

  8. Design and Validation of a Novel Bioreactor to Subject Aortic Valve Leaflets to Side-Specific Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Sucosky, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic stresses are presumed to play an important role in the development of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The elucidation of the shear stress mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CAVD has been hampered by the complexity of the native unsteady and side-specific valvular flow environment. To address this gap, this article describes the design and validation of a novel device to expose leaflet samples to time-dependent side-specific shear stress. The device built on a double cone-and-plate geometry was dimensioned based on our previous single-sided shear stress device that minimizes secondary flow effects inherent to this geometry. A fluid–structure interaction (FSI) model was designed to predict the actual shear stress produced on a tissue sample mounted in the new device. Staining was performed on porcine leaflets conditioned in the new bioreactor to assess endothelial integrity and cellular apoptosis. The FSI results demonstrated good agreement between the target (native) and the actual side-specific shear stress produced on a tissue sample. No significant difference in endothelial integrity and cellular apoptosis was detected between samples conditioned for 96 h and fresh controls. This new device will enable the investigation of valvular response to normal and pathologic hemodynamics and the potential mechano-etiology of CAVD. PMID:21455792

  9. Nonlinear control design for stressed power systems using normal forms of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Gilsoo

    Large stressed interconnected power systems exhibit complicated dynamic behavior when subjected to disturbances. This nonlinear complex behavior is not well analyzed with present tools, and a complete theoretical analysis of this is not feasible in large systems. In stressed power systems, due to the presence of increased nonlinearity and the existence of nonlinear modal interactions, there exist some limitation to the use of conventional linear control design techniques. Therefore there is a need to understand the nature of nonlinear modal interactions and their influences on control performance for optimal controller setting. This work deals with control design in power systems using the method of normal forms. The objective of this work is to understand the effect of the nonlinear modal interaction on control performance and to develop a procedure to design controls incorporating the nonlinear information. For power systems equipped with fast exciters, the exciter gains have crucial influence on the system dynamic behavior. In order to be able to tune the exciter gains for optimal system performance, one has to understand, how the system response changes with different gain settings. In linear analysis, this consists of determining the eigenvalues for various gains, and computing the sensitivity of the eigenvalues under gain variations. If one takes into account the influence of the second order normal forms on the system response, then the corresponding interaction coefficients and their sensitivity with respect to gain variations has to be studied as well. This is the topic of the study presented here. The concept of nonlinear participation factors, and sensitivity of the normal forms coefficient, together with linear participation factors and eigenvalue sensitivity are used to vary control settings. The control settings are varied to obtain improved stability and to reduce the nonlinearity in the system. The proposed procedure was applied to the 50-generator

  10. Community health workers assisting Latinos manage stress and diabetes (CALMS-D): rationale, intervention design, implementation, and process outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Bermudez-Millan, Angela; Damio, Grace; Segura-Perez, Sofia; Chhabra, Jyoti; Vergara, Cunegundo; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Latinos have high rates of diabetes and mental distress, but lack appropriate services. A study was designed to compare enhanced standard diabetes care with enhanced standard care plus community health worker (CHW) delivered stress management for Latinos with type 2 diabetes. This paper reports intervention design and process outcomes. A formative process was used to develop and implement an eight-session, group stress management intervention. One hundred twenty-one participants completed baseline assessments; n = 107 attended diabetes education and were then randomized. Recruits reported high credibility and treatment expectancies. Treatment fidelity was high. Participants reported high treatment satisfaction and therapeutic alliance and their diabetes knowledge and affect improved over the short term. Retention and attendance at group sessions was challenging but successful relative to similar trials. This comprehensive and culturally sensitive stress management intervention, delivered by a well-trained CHW, was successfully implemented. PMID:26622914

  11. Influence of acetabular cup rim design on the contact stress during edge loading in ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mak, Mathew; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stewart, Todd D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the contact stresses in 3 different acetabular cup rim designs (new, worn, chamfer) during edge loading, after microseparation of ceramic on ceramic hip prostheses. A 3-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted for a 28-mm diameter alumina ceramic bearing with a radial clearance of 40 μm using a normal load of 2500 N under edge loading. At a separation distance of 250 μm, the maximum tensile stress in the "new" design was of similar magnitude to the flexural strength of the alumina material that supports the localized breakdown (stripe wear) of the acetabular cup surface observed clinically. Introducing a 2.5-mm radius chamfer should reduce the maximum tensile stress in the region of 60%. PMID:20149581

  12. Maydays and Murphies: A Study of the Effect of Organizational Design, Task, and Stress on Organizational Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zhiang; Carley, Kathleen

    How should organizations of intelligent agents be designed so that they exhibit high performance even during periods of stress? A formal model of organizational performance given a distributed decision-making environment in which agents encounter a radar detection task is presented. Using this model the performance of organizations with various…

  13. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J. Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs. PMID:26539566

  14. Anthropological and Psychological Merge: Design of a Stress Measure for Mexican Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Beti; O'Connor, Kathleen; Godina, Ruby; Ibarra, Genoveva

    2010-01-01

    This study implements qualitative and quantitative methodologies in the development of a culturally appropriate instrument of stress for Mexican immigrant farmworkers. Focus groups were used to uncover culturally based perspectives on life stressors, definitions of stress, and stress mediators. Qualitative data were analyzed using QSR NVivo and then used to develop a 23-item stress scale. The scale was tested for reliability and validity in an independent sample and demonstrates excellent reliability (α = 0.9123). Test-retest coefficients of the stress scale are also strong (r = 0.8344, p = 0.0000). Qualitative analyses indicated three major sources of stress: work, family, and community. Emotional aspects of stress also emerged, demonstrating a cultural perspective of stress closely related to feelings of despair and not being able to find a way out of despairing situations. This paper reveals themes gathered from the qualitative data and identifies reliability and validity constructs associated with the scale. The stress scale developed as part of this investigation is a reliable and culturally appropriate instrument for assessing stress among Mexican immigrant farmworkers. PMID:17955350

  15. 78 FR 71435 - Policy Statement on the Scenario Design Framework for Stress Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ...\\ 77 FR 62398 (October 12, 2012); 12 CFR part 252, subparts F- H. The Board's stress test rules provide... Board and specified in the Capital Assessments and Stress Testing report (FR Y-14) (trading companies... Requirements for Covered Companies, (January 5, 2012) (77 FR 594). \\18\\ See Supervisory Guidance on...

  16. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR part 29-70... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 633.303 Section 633.303... FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.303 Allowable costs. (a) General....

  17. Biomechanical analysis of alveolar bone stress around implants with different thread designs and pitches in the mandibular molar area.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ting-Hsun; Du, Je-Kang; Pan, Chin-Yun; Lee, Huey-Er; Chung, Wei-Hao

    2012-04-01

    Threaded implants have been shown to play an important role in increasing mechanical osseointegration. The aim of this study was to determine bone stress distribution when using different types of implant thread pitches and designs. Five 3D finite element models were constructed to simulate bone stresses induced in implant bodies with two types of thread form: triangular ("Tri" prefix) and trapezoidal ("Trap" prefix). The former had thread pitches of 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mm, while the latter had thread pitches of 1.2 and 1.6 mm. A biting load of 143 N was applied vertically and obliquely to the occlusal central fossa of the crown. The main effects of each level of the three factors investigated (loading type, pitch, and thread form) in terms of the stress value were computed for all models. Results indicated that the loading type was the main factor of influence on the peak compressive stress of the alveolar bone. Optimal thread pitch was 1.2 mm for a triangular-thread implant, and a trapezoidal-threaded implant with thread pitch of 1.6 mm had the lowest stress value among trapezoidal-threaded implants. This study concluded that each thread form has its unique optimal thread pitch with regard to lower concentration of bone stress. Clinically, this study suggests that in biomechanical consideration, thread pitch exceeding 0.8 mm is more appropriate for a screwed implant. For clinical cases that require greater bone-implant interface, trapezoidal-threaded implants with thread pitch of 1.6 mm provide greater primary stability and lower concentration of bone stress under different loading directions. PMID:21301903

  18. Development of a fiber Bragg grating sensor for in-shoe shear stress measurement: design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulaxouzidis, Andreas V.; Roberts, V. C.; Holmes, Melanie J.; Handerek, Vincent A.

    2000-08-01

    In-shoe shear stress sensors are a required tool for the investigation of plantar ulcer development after the onset of diabetes. Recently, several transducers have been developed for measuring in-shoe shear stress using magneto- resistive technology, light intensity modulation, and copolymer piezoelectric materials. Common drawbacks in the previous methods are the relatively large size of the sensors and the difficulty in interrogating many sensors simultaneously in order to achieve distributed sensing. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time a shear stress sensor using Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The small size and the multiplexing capability of FBGs enables quasi- distributed sensing of shear stress on the plantar surface by interrogating a large number of identical sensors. The sensor design is based on the theory of elastic bending of columns. The sensor consists of two FBGs fitted inside a metallic structure which is able to deform elastically under shear stress. This elastic deformation produces strain on the FBGs, which can be detected by measuring the Bragg wavelength shift of the reflected light of each FBG using a CCD spectrometer. Preliminary results on an enlarged version of the sensor have shown the applicability of FBGs for the implementation of the in-shoe sensor.

  19. Smart Elasto-Magneto-Electric (EME) Sensors for Stress Monitoring of Steel Cables: Design Theory and Experimental Validation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru; Duan, Yuanfeng; Or, Siu Wing; Zhao, Yang

    2014-01-01

    An elasto-magnetic (EM) and magneto-electric (ME) effect based elasto-magneto-electric (EME) sensor has been proposed recently by the authors for stress monitoring of steel cables with obvious superiorities over traditional elasto-magnetic sensors. For design optimization and engineering application of the EME sensor, the design theory is interpreted with a developed model taking into account the EM coupling effect and ME coupling effect. This model is able to approximate the magnetization changes that a steel structural component undergoes when subjected to excitation magnetic field and external stress, and to simulate the induced ME voltages of the ME sensing unit located in the magnetization area. A full-scale experiment is then carried out to verify the model and to calibrate the EME sensor as a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tool to monitor the cable stress. The experimental results agree well with the simulation results using the developed model. The proposed EME sensor proves to be feasible for stress monitoring of steel cables with high sensitivity, fast response, and ease of installation. PMID:25072348

  20. Smart elasto-magneto-electric (EME) sensors for stress monitoring of steel cables: design theory and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Duan, Yuanfeng; Or, Siu Wing; Zhao, Yang

    2014-01-01

    An elasto-magnetic (EM) and magneto-electric (ME) effect based elasto-magneto-electric (EME) sensor has been proposed recently by the authors for stress monitoring of steel cables with obvious superiorities over traditional elasto-magnetic sensors. For design optimization and engineering application of the EME sensor, the design theory is interpreted with a developed model taking into account the EM coupling effect and ME coupling effect. This model is able to approximate the magnetization changes that a steel structural component undergoes when subjected to excitation magnetic field and external stress, and to simulate the induced ME voltages of the ME sensing unit located in the magnetization area. A full-scale experiment is then carried out to verify the model and to calibrate the EME sensor as a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tool to monitor the cable stress. The experimental results agree well with the simulation results using the developed model. The proposed EME sensor proves to be feasible for stress monitoring of steel cables with high sensitivity, fast response, and ease of installation. PMID:25072348

  1. 3-D TECATE/BREW: Thermal, stress, and birefringent ray-tracing codes for solid-state laser design

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, R.J.; Doss, S.K.; Nelson, R.G.

    1994-07-20

    This report describes the physics, code formulations, and numerics that are used in the TECATE (totally Eulerian code for anisotropic thermo-elasticity) and BREW (birefringent ray-tracing of electromagnetic waves) codes for laser design. These codes resolve thermal, stress, and birefringent optical effects in 3-D stationary solid-state systems. This suite of three constituent codes is a package referred to as LASRPAK.

  2. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  3. Separation by nanoparticles plasmonic resonance with low stress in microfluidics channel (analytical and design).

    PubMed

    SalmanOgli, Ahmad; Farhadnia, Farshad; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-08-01

    In this study, nanoparticles near-field plasmonic resonance is used to improve the traditional cell separation main outputs such as viability and efficiency. The live cells viability is severely depend on stresses, which are applied on cells in the microfluidics channel. Hence, for improving the cell viability, the enforced stresses inside of the structure should be declined. The major factors of the enforced stresses are related to the electric field non-uniformity, which are attributed to the hurdles and applied voltage magnitude. Therefore, in this study, a new structure is presented and thereby, the magnitude of the applied stresses on live cells is minimised which is contributed to the decreasing the non-uniformity strength of channel. It should be noted that in the new structure two arrays of nanoparticles were used to produce a short range and localised non-uniform electrical field because of their near-field plasmonic resonance. Hence, the enforced stress on the live cell severely decreased at the far-field and confined at the small section of the channel. It is due to, the near-field plasmonic amplitude is dramatically disappeared by increasing distance, hence, the cells far from the nanoparticles will be endured the low level but effective amount of the optical force. PMID:27463794

  4. A finite element study on stress distribution of two different attachment designs under implant supported overdenture

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Yousief, Salah A.; Soliman, Tarek A.; Saleh, Mahmoud M.; Omar, Wael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate stress patterns generated within implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained by two different attachment types: ball and socket and locator attachments. Materials and methods Commercial CAD/CAM and finite element analysis software packages were utilized to construct two 3D finite element models for the two attachment types. Unilateral masticatory compressive loads of 50, 100, and 150 N were applied vertically to the overdentures, parallel to the longitudinal axes of the implants. Loads were directed toward the central fossa in the molar region of each overdenture, that linear static analysis was carried out to find the generated stresses and deformation on each part of the studied model. Results According to FEA results the ball attachment neck is highly stressed in comparison to the locator one. On the other hand mucosa and cortical bone received less stresses under ball and socket attachment. Conclusions Locator and ball and socket attachments induce equivalent stresses on bone surrounding implants. Locator attachment performance was superior to that of the ball and socket attachment in the implants, nylon caps, and overdenture. Locator attachments are highly recommended and can increase the interval between successive maintenance sessions. PMID:26644755

  5. The optimal design of an implant to improve bone quality of implant surroundings based on stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyama, Yoshihiro; Nagayama, Noriyuki; Kuramoto, Koichi; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2009-05-01

    Research on how implant surface shape contributes to long-term stability after implantation is important in the field of orthopaedics. In particular, technology that controls various bone quality parameters and voluntary bone inducement in implant surroundings should be developed for the next generation of implants and this will improve the patient's quality of life (QOL). For this research, we focused on the inducement of the appropriate alignment for biological apatite (BAp) crystallites and related collagen (Col.) fibres as a bone quality parameter. In this study, we predicted that when stress is applied to bone, the BAp/Col. preferential alignment can be formed if osteocytes are in an environment that is aligned with the principle stress vector. We tested this idea by introducing grooves in the principal stress direction on the surface of an implant. This work thus analyzes the effect of stress transmission by a load at the proximal femur on the bone inside and near the grooves by using mechanical simulation in which groove angles can be changed on the implant surface. Coordinate data from the mechanical simulation of the combined bone/implant environment was verified against the coordinate data obtained by CT scans of actual canine bone. Results suggest that the tendency of stress transmission differs depending on the position and angle of the grooves and based on a vector diagram of the maximum and minimum principal stresses. The simulation was able to predict bone dynamics in vivo and enabled a best design of an implant to control the BAp/Col. alignment as an index of bone quality.

  6. Mobile Mental Wellness Training for Stress Management: Feasibility and Design Implications Based on a One-Month Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahtinen, Aino; Välkkynen, Pasi; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Vanhala, Toni; Ermes, Miikka; Sairanen, Essi; Myllymäki, Tero; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevention and management of work-related stress and related mental problems is a great challenge. Mobile applications are a promising way to integrate prevention strategies into the everyday lives of citizens. Objective The objectives of this study was to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of a mobile mental wellness training application among working-age individuals, and to derive preliminary design implications for mobile apps for stress management. Methods Oiva, a mobile app based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), was designed to support active learning of skills related to mental wellness through brief ACT-based exercises in the daily life. A one-month field study with 15 working-age participants was organized to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of Oiva. The usage of Oiva was studied based on the usage log files of the application. Changes in wellness were measured by three validated questionnaires on stress, satisfaction with life (SWLS), and psychological flexibility (AAQ-II) at the beginning and at end of the study and by user experience questionnaires after one week’s and one month’s use. In-depth user experience interviews were conducted after one month’s use to study the acceptance and user experiences of Oiva. Results Oiva was used actively throughout the study. The average number of usage sessions was 16.8 (SD 2.4) and the total usage time per participant was 3 hours 12 minutes (SD 99 minutes). Significant pre-post improvements were obtained in stress ratings (mean 3.1 SD 0.2 vs mean 2.5 SD 0.1, P=.003) and satisfaction with life scores (mean 23.1 SD 1.3 vs mean 25.9 SD 0.8, P=.02), but not in psychological flexibility. Oiva was perceived easy to use, acceptable, and useful by the participants. A randomized controlled trial is ongoing to evaluate the effectiveness of Oiva on working-age individuals with stress problems. Conclusions A feasibility study of Oiva mobile mental wellness training app showed good

  7. Pipeline design and thermal stress analysis of a 10kW@20K helium refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Gong, L. H.; Xu, P.; Liu, H. M.; Li, L. F.; Xu, X. D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on the devices and pipeline in the horizontal cryogenic cold-box of a 10kW@20K helium refrigerator developed by Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Four devices, six valves, supporting components and pipe lines are positioned in the cold-box. At operating state, the temperature of these devices and pipeline is far below the room temperature, and the lowest temperature is 14K. Due to different material and temperature, the shrinkage of devices and pipes is different. Finite element analysis software SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION was used to numerically simulate the thermal stress and deformation. The results show that the thermal stress of pipe A is a little large. So we should change the pipe route or use a bellows expansion joint. Bellows expansion joints should also be used in the pipes connected to three of the six valves to protect them by decreasing the deformation. At last, the effect of diameter, thickness and bend radius on the thermal stress was analyzed. The results show that the thermal stress of the pipes increases with the increase of the diameter and the decrease of the bend radius.

  8. An improved design for joints between CC composites and glidcop copper using three dimensional stress analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Kundu, T.; Guba, S.

    1994-12-31

    When copper block and carbon-carbon composite block are joined at a high temperature (850{degrees}C) and gradually cooled down to room temperature, the joint fails due to the generation of high stresses near the interface because of the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the two materials. In this research, several attempts have been made to reduce this high stress field near the interface. For this purpose, the angle between the interface and the free edge has been altered, grooves cut in both copper and carbon side of the interface, different braze layer thickness examined, and single and double interlayers (copper and molybdenum) introduced at the interface. A three dimensional stress analysis for all these different alterations have been carried out using ABAQUS finite element program. In these analysis, the metals have been modeled as elastoplastic materials that follow von Mises yield criterion whereas the carbon composite has been modeled as a material that follows the Drucker-Prager failure criterion. Some modifications have been found to be very effective for reducing the stress field while others have not been so effective.

  9. The Power of Role Design: Balancing the Principals Financial Responsibility with the Implications of Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The Anglo-Saxon countries have implemented Management by Objectives (MBO) complemented with school-based management (SBM) fairly rapidly. Although these countries are considered something of a benchmark of stability, research on principals reveals that they experience high levels of stress and that this is associated with poorer job performance.…

  10. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  11. The design of a stress-management programme for nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Lees, S; Ellis, N

    1990-08-01

    This study identifies the stressors and coping strategies of nursing staff (students, trained staff and those who had left the profession before qualification) in a variety of ward specialisms. The research instruments included an open-ended interview concerning pre-nursing experience, perceived stressors and satisfactions, and ways of coping, and psychometric tests of self-esteem, assertion, ways of coping and personality. The five most frequently cited stressors were understaffing, conflict with nurses, dealing with death and dying, overwork and conflict with doctors. Experience of stressors was related to role and seniority of respondents, with different aspects of the same stressor differentially affecting nurses at different levels of experience. Coping strategies also depended on experience. Trained staff showed more use of problem-focused ways of coping, whilst students and leavers relied more on emotion-focused strategies to deal with stressful situations. These differences were related to personality characteristics of respondents and to self-esteem as well as to situational characteristics of the stressful episode. Social support was important in times of work-related stress, with students in particular making good use of peer group support. Respondents were generally lacking in assertiveness and high in anxiety. Although self-esteem was generally high, leavers scored markedly less than other subject groups in the areas of personal and social self-esteem. Leavers had little prior knowledge or experience of nursing before entering training and knew few nurses or doctors: consequently, nursing failed to meet their expectations. Stress was identified as the major cause of attrition and the sources of stress are identified. This study informed a major programme of stress-management training for student nurses which began in 1988 at the North Wales School of Nursing and which is currently under evaluation. It includes relaxation therapy, assertiveness training

  12. Design and field experience with the WES 10 percent bar airblast and soil stress gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, C. E.; Welch, C. R.

    1985-06-01

    A family of shock transducers based on the classical load-cell geometry, i.e., the elastic compression of a column, is currently under development at the waterways Experiment Station. The transducers include an airblast gage, a soil stress gage, and a soil-structure interface stress gage. These gages operate at considerable higher pressure ranges than previous elastic shock transducers. The airblast gage has provided long term (over 10 msec) measurements in blast environments of over 600 MPa (6 kbar). The theoretical operating pressure range of the gages is approximately 1000 MPa (10 kbar) limited by the elastic limit of the gage body steel. The actual pressure range to date has been limited by acceleration induced failures of the strain gages and internal wiring. The transducer development, is described and some dynamic measurements produced from these gages are given.

  13. Evaluation of Design Strength and Residual Stress in Ceramic/Metal Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Sun Chul; Park, Won Jo; Park, Sung Ho

    Since the ceramic has excellent qualities in light weight, abrasion resistance and heat resistance etc, compared with the metal, it has been actively examined in order to apply for the structures such as gas turbine and turbo charger etc, which require high strength and heat resistance. But it is not desirable to be used for the structural material since the ceramic is fragile, so the join with the metal with abundant toughnees has been studied. However, during the cooling process, the joint residual stress develops on the ceramic/metal joint by the difference in thermal expansion coefficient between two materials and it affects the bending strength significantly. Also, in order to use the joint material as the structural material, the study about the fatigue of thermal cycle of actual use statement is necessary. Therefore, to ensure security and improvement of the bending strength of joint material, the state of residual stress distribution to the high temperature-thermal cycle, and studied the effects of thermal cycle and state of residual stress distribution on the strength of joint material as well.

  14. BioCycle study: design of the longitudinal study of the oxidative stress and hormone variation during the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Howards, Penelope P.; Browne, Richard W.; Hediger, Mary; Liu, Aiyi; Trevisan, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Summary Studies in both human and animal species have suggested that oxidative stress may be associated with health outcomes, including the risk of infertility in both males and females. Sex hormones have been shown to have antioxidant properties. The difficulty in studying the role of oxidative stress in females is partly due to fluctuation in these endogenous sex hormones across the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to determine the association of oxidative stress levels with endogenous reproductive hormone levels and antioxidants, including vitamin levels, across the menstrual cycle in a prospective cohort of premenopausal women. The goal was to enrol 250 healthy, regularly menstruating premenopausal women for two menstrual cycles. Participants visited the clinic up to 8 times per cycle, at which time blood and urine were collected. The visits occurred at key hormonally defined phases of the menstrual cycle, with the help of an algorithm based on cycle length and data from a fertility monitor. In addition, participants were administered standardised questionnaires, had various physical measures taken, and had other pertinent data collected. A total of 259 women were enrolled in this study, with 250 completing two cycles, despite a demanding study protocol which participants were required to follow. This report describes the study design, baseline characteristics and visit completion rate for the BioCycle study. PMID:19159403

  15. Programming for Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Structures under stress are designed much more rapidly -- allowing for remarkable increases in productivity -- since NASTRAN (for NASA Structural Analysis) has become available. The versatile computer program, written originally to help design more efficient space vehicles, finds additional applications each year.

  16. Engineering design, stress and thermal analysis, and documentation for SATS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An in-depth analysis and mechanical design of the solar array stowage and deployment arrangements for use in Small Applications Technology Satellite spacecraft is presented. Alternate approaches for the major elements of work are developed and evaluated. Elements include array stowage and deployment arrangements, the spacecraft and array behavior in the spacecraft despin mode, and the design of the main hinge and segment hinge assemblies. Feasibility calculations are performed and the preferred approach is identified.

  17. Designing Microfluidic Devices for Studying Cellular Responses Under Single or Coexisting Chemical/Electrical/Shear Stress Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tzu-Yuan; Sun, Yung-Shin; Hou, Hsien-San; Wu, Shang-Ying; Zhu, Yun; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are capable of creating a precise and controllable cellular micro-environment of pH, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. They have been commonly used for in vitro cell studies by providing in vivo like surroundings. Especially, how cells response to chemical gradients, electrical fields, and shear stresses has drawn many interests since these phenomena are important in understanding cellular properties and functions. These microfluidic chips can be made of glass substrates, silicon wafers, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates, or polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates. Out of these materials, PMMA substrates are cheap and can be easily processed using laser ablation and writing. Although a few microfluidic devices have been designed and fabricated for generating multiple, coexisting chemical and electrical stimuli, none of them was considered efficient enough in reducing experimental repeats, particular for screening purposes. In this report, we describe our design and fabrication of two PMMA-based microfluidic chips for investigating cellular responses, in the production of reactive oxygen species and the migration, under single or coexisting chemical/electrical/shear stress stimuli. The first chip generates five relative concentrations of 0, 1/8, 1/2, 7/8, and 1 in the culture regions, together with a shear stress gradient produced inside each of these areas. The second chip generates the same relative concentrations, but with five different electric field strengths created within each culture area. These devices not only provide cells with a precise, controllable micro-environment but also greatly increase the experimental throughput. PMID:27584698

  18. Non-linear visco-elastic analysis and the design of super-pressure balloons : stress, strain and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, David

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures. Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite, these activities have broadened to encompass ‘lighter than air' structures such as aerostats, hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons. Since 2004 Tensys have acted as consultants to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Program. Early implementations of the super-pressure balloon design chosen for ULDB have shown problems of geometric instability, characterised by improper deployment and the potential for overall geometric instability once deployed. The latter has been reproduced numerically using inTENS, and the former are better understood following a series of large-scale hangar tests simulating launch and ascent. In both cases the solution lies in minimising the film lobing between the tendons. These tendons, which span between base and apex end fittings, cause the characteristic pumpkin shape of the balloons and also provide valuable constraint against excessive film deformation. There is also the requirement to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness. A consequence of reduced lobing between tendons is the development of higher stresses in the balloon film under pressure. The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film lead to further significant meridional stress under low temperature flight conditions. The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate excessive stress and local concentrations. However, creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations sufficient to compromise the geometric stability of the balloon. The design of a balloon requires an analysis approach that addresses the questions of stress and stability over the duration of a flight by time stepping analyses using an appropriate material model. This paper summarises the Dynamic Relaxation

  19. Computers, Children & Repetitive Stress Injuries: The Effects of Computer Workstation Design on Children's Posture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lorraine E.; Laeser, Kathryn L.

    2007-01-01

    As adult office workers' use of computers has increased, the incidence of computer-related musculoskeletal complaints and injuries has also increased. Although the use of computers in the classroom is increasing, little attention has been paid by educators, furniture manufacturers, or researchers to the ergonomic design issues of educational…

  20. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  1. In vitro, time-resolved PIV comparison of the effect of stent design on wall shear stress.

    PubMed

    Charonko, John; Karri, Satyaprakash; Schmieg, Jaime; Prabhu, Santosh; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2009-07-01

    The effect of stent design on wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) was studied in vitro using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). Four drug-eluting stents [XIENCE V (Abbott Vascular), TAXUS Liberté (Boston Scientific), Endeavor (Medtronic), and Cypher (J&J Cordis)] and a bare-metal stent [VISION (Abbott Vascular)] were implanted into compliant vessel models, and the flow was measured in physiologically accurate coronary conditions featuring reversal and realistic offsets between pressure and flowrate. DPIV measurements were made at three locations under two different flow rates (resting: Re = 160, f = 70 bpm and exercise: Re = 300, f = 120 bpm). It was observed that design substantially affected the WSS experienced at the vessel walls. Averaged values between struts ranged from 2.05 dynes/cm(2) (Cypher) to 8.52 dynes/cm(2) (XIENCE V) in resting conditions, and from 3.72 dynes/cm(2) (Cypher) to 14.66 dynes/cm(2) (VISION) for the exercise state. Within the stent, the WSS dropped and the OSI increased immediately distal to each strut. In addition, an inverse correlation between average WSS and OSI existed. Comparisons with recently published results from animal studies show strong correlation between the measured WSS and observed endothelial cell coverage. These results suggest the importance of stent design on the WSS experienced by endothelial cells in coronary arteries. PMID:19381810

  2. Effect of the 2010 Chilean Earthquake on Posttraumatic Stress Reducing Sensitivity to Unmeasured Bias Through Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Zubizarreta, José R.; Cerdá, Magdalena; Rosenbaum, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, a magnitude 8.8 earthquake hit Chile, devastating parts of the country. Having just completed its national socioeconomic survey, the Chilean government reinterviewed a subsample of respondents, creating unusual longitudinal data about the same persons before and after a major disaster. The follow-up evaluated posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) using Davidson’s Trauma Scale. We use these data with two goals in mind. Most studies of PTSS after disasters rely on recall to characterize the state of affairs before the disaster. We are able to use prospective data on preexposure conditions, free of recall bias, to study the effects of the earthquake. Second, we illustrate recent developments in statistical methodology for the design and analysis of observational studies. In particular, we use new and recent methods for multivariate matching to control 46 covariates that describe demographic variables, housing quality, wealth, health, and health insurance before the earthquake. We use the statistical theory of design sensitivity to select a study design with findings expected to be insensitive to small or moderate biases from failure to control some unmeasured covariate. PTSS were dramatically but unevenly elevated among residents of strongly shaken areas of Chile when compared with similar persons in largely untouched parts of the country. In 96% of exposed-control pairs exhibiting substantial PTSS, it was the exposed person who experienced stronger symptoms (95% confidence interval = 0.91–1.00). PMID:23222557

  3. Effect of the 2010 Chilean earthquake on posttraumatic stress: reducing sensitivity to unmeasured bias through study design.

    PubMed

    Zubizarreta, José R; Cerdá, Magdalena; Rosenbaum, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, a magnitude 8.8 earthquake hit Chile, devastating parts of the country. Having just completed its national socioeconomic survey, the Chilean government reinterviewed a subsample of respondents, creating unusual longitudinal data about the same persons before and after a major disaster. The follow-up evaluated posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) using Davidson's Trauma Scale. We use these data with two goals in mind. Most studies of PTSS after disasters rely on recall to characterize the state of affairs before the disaster. We are able to use prospective data on preexposure conditions, free of recall bias, to study the effects of the earthquake. Second, we illustrate recent developments in statistical methodology for the design and analysis of observational studies. In particular, we use new and recent methods for multivariate matching to control 46 covariates that describe demographic variables, housing quality, wealth, health, and health insurance before the earthquake. We use the statistical theory of design sensitivity to select a study design with findings expected to be insensitive to small or moderate biases from failure to control some unmeasured covariate. PTSS were dramatically but unevenly elevated among residents of strongly shaken areas of Chile when compared with similar persons in largely untouched parts of the country. In 96% of exposed-control pairs exhibiting substantial PTSS, it was the exposed person who experienced stronger symptoms (95% confidence interval = 0.91-1.00). PMID:23222557

  4. Effect of Preparation Taper, Height and Marginal Design Under Varying Occlusal Loading Conditions on Cement Lute Stress: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Siddhi; Amarnath, Gowdagere Shamanna; Muddugangadhar, Byrasandra Channapa; Sharma, Ashish; Choudhary, Suchismita

    2014-12-01

    To assess the effect of preparation taper, height and margin design under different loading conditions on cement lute stress. A 3-D FE model of an upper second premolar and molar was developed from CT scan of human skull using software programmes (MIMICS, Hypermesh and ANSYS). 10° and 30° taper, 3 and 5 mm preparation height and shoulder and chamfer finish lines were used. Type 1 Glass ionomer cement with 24 μm lute width was taken and the model was loaded under 100 N horizontal point load, vertical point load distributed axial load. The maximum shear stress and Von Mises stress within the cement lute were recorded. The maximum shear stresses ranged from 1.70 to 3.93 MPa (horizontal point loading), 0.66 to 3.04 MPa (vertical point loading), 0.38 to 0.87 MPa (distributed loading). The maximum Von Mises stresses ranged from 3.39 to 10.62 MPa (horizontal point loading), 1.93 to 8.58 MPa (vertical point loading) and 1.49 to 3.57 MPa (distributed loading). The combination of 10° taper and 5 mm height had the lowest stress field while the combination of 30° taper and 5 mm height had the highest stress field. Distributed axial loading shows least stress, better stress homogenization and gives a favorable prognosis for the fixed prostheses. Smaller preparation taper of 10° is biomechanically more acceptable than a 30° taper. It is desirable to decrease taper as height increases. The chamfer margin design is associated with greater local cement stresses toward the margins that could place the cement at greater risk for microfracture and failure. PMID:26199500

  5. Biomechanical stresses in computer-aided design and in data entry.

    PubMed

    Cail, François; Aptel, Michel

    2003-01-01

    A study of the risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the upper limbs was carried out on 2 populations, 1 performing a computer-aided design (CAD) task and the other performing a data entry task. A questionnaire on MSD complaints and working life was completed by a sample of each population. Biomechanical measurements of the forces, the angles, and the repetitiveness of movements of the upper limbs were carried out on some operators in each sample. It emerged that complaints of the upper limbs seem to be linked to the use of input devices. The grip forces exerted when using the keyboard and mouse were higher in CAD than in data entry. PMID:14577943

  6. Designing climate-resilient rice with ideal grain quality suited for high-temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Nese; Butardo, Vito M; Misra, Gopal; Cuevas, Rosa Paula; Anacleto, Roslen; Kavi Kishor, Polavarpu B

    2015-04-01

    To ensure rice food security, the target outputs of future rice breeding programmes should focus on developing climate-resilient rice varieties with emphasis on increased head rice yield coupled with superior grain quality. This challenge is made greater by a world that is increasingly becoming warmer. Such environmental changes dramatically impact head rice and milling yield as well as increasing chalkiness because of impairment in starch accumulation and other storage biosynthetic pathways in the grain. This review highlights the knowledge gained through gene discovery via quantitative trait locus (QTL) cloning and structural-functional genomic strategies to reduce chalk, increase head rice yield, and develop stable lines with optimum grain quality in challenging environments. The newly discovered genes and the knowledge gained on the influence of specific alleles related to stability of grain quality attributes provide a robust platform for marker-assisted selection in breeding to design heat-tolerant rice varieties with superior grain quality. Using the chalkiness trait in rice as a case study, we demonstrate here that the emerging field of systems genetics can help fast-track the identification of novel alleles and gene targets that can be pyramided for the development of environmentally robust rice varieties that possess improved grain quality. PMID:25662847

  7. Designing climate-resilient rice with ideal grain quality suited for high-temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasulu, Nese; Butardo, Vito M.; Misra, Gopal; Cuevas, Rosa Paula; Anacleto, Roslen; Kavi Kishor, Polavarpu B.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure rice food security, the target outputs of future rice breeding programmes should focus on developing climate-resilient rice varieties with emphasis on increased head rice yield coupled with superior grain quality. This challenge is made greater by a world that is increasingly becoming warmer. Such environmental changes dramatically impact head rice and milling yield as well as increasing chalkiness because of impairment in starch accumulation and other storage biosynthetic pathways in the grain. This review highlights the knowledge gained through gene discovery via quantitative trait locus (QTL) cloning and structural–functional genomic strategies to reduce chalk, increase head rice yield, and develop stable lines with optimum grain quality in challenging environments. The newly discovered genes and the knowledge gained on the influence of specific alleles related to stability of grain quality attributes provide a robust platform for marker-assisted selection in breeding to design heat-tolerant rice varieties with superior grain quality. Using the chalkiness trait in rice as a case study, we demonstrate here that the emerging field of systems genetics can help fast-track the identification of novel alleles and gene targets that can be pyramided for the development of environmentally robust rice varieties that possess improved grain quality. PMID:25662847

  8. A novel stress isolation guard-ring design for the improvement of a three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Shen; Chang, Heng-Chung; Hu, Chih-Fan; Cheng, Chao-Lin; Fang, Weileun

    2011-10-01

    This study designs and implements a stress isolation guard-ring structure to improve the performances of the existing single proof-mass three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer. Thus, the environment disturbances, such as temperature variation and force/deflection transmittance, for a packaged three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer are significantly reduced. In application, the three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer has been fabricated using the bulk micromachining process on the SOI wafer. Experimental results show that the out-of-plane deformation of the suspended spring mass on the packaged accelerometer is reduced from 0.72 to 0.10 µm at a 150 °C temperature elevation. The temperature coefficient of zero-g offset for the presented sensor is reduced, and the temperature-induced sensitivity variation is minimized as well. Measurements also demonstrate that the guard-ring design successfully reduces the false signals induced by the force and displacement transmittance disturbances for one order of magnitude. Moreover, the three-axis acceleration sensing for the presented accelerometer with guard ring has also been demonstrated with sensitivities of 0.12-0.17 mV V-1 g-1 and nonlinearity < 1.02%.

  9. Vietnam recommended dietary allowances 2007.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nguyen Cong; Hoan, Pham Van

    2008-01-01

    It has been well acknowledged that Vietnam is undergoing a nutrition transition. With a rapid change in the country's reform and economic growth, food supply at the macronutrient level has improved. Changes of the Vietnamese diet include significantly more foods of animal origin, and an increase of fat/oils, and ripe fruits. Consequently, nutritional problems in Vietnam now include not only malnutrition but also overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and other chronic diseases related to nutrition and lifestyles. The recognition of these shifts, which is also associated with morbidity and mortality, was a major factor in the need to review and update the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for the Vietnamese population. This revised RDA established an important science-based tool for evaluation of nutrition adequacy, for teaching, and for scientific communications within Vietnam. It is expected that the 2007 Vietnam RDA and its conversion to food-based dietary guidelines will facilitate education to the public, as well as the policy implementation of programs for prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and addressing the double burden of both under and over nutrition. PMID:18460440

  10. Design and thermal stress analysis of high power x-ray monochromators cooled with liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. S.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-07-01

    Cryogenically cooled, single-crystal silicon, x-ray monochromators offer much better thermal performance than room-temperature silicon monochromators. The improved performance can be quantified by a figure-of-merit equal to the ratio of the thermal conductivity to the coefficient of thermal expansion. This ratio increases by about a factor of 50 as the temperature is decreased from 300 K to 100 K. An extensive thermal and structural finite element analysis is presented for an inclined, liquid nitrogen cooled, Si monochromator crystal diffracting 4.2 keV photons from the (111) planes using Undulator A at the Advanced Photon Source. The angular size of the beam accepted on the crystal was chosen to be 50 (mu)rad vertically and 120 (mu)rad horizontally. The deflection parameter, K, was 2.17 for all cases. The peak power density at normal incidence to the beam was calculated to be 139 W/mm(exp 2), and the total power was 750 W at a distance of 30 m from the source for a positron current of 100 mA. The crystal was oriented in the inclined geometry with an inclination angle of 85 degrees for all cases. The performance of the crystal was investigated for beam currents of 100, 200, and 300 mA. The calculated peak slopes of the diffraction plane over the extent of the beam footprint were -1.17, -2.35, and 0.33 (mu)rad, and the peak temperatures were 88.2, 102.6, and 121.4 K, respectively. The variation in the Bragg angle due to change in d-spacing across the beam footprint was less than 1 (mu)rad for all cases. These results indicate that a properly designed, cryogenically cooled, inclined silicon monochromator can deliver the full brilliance of Undulator A at even the highest machine currents.

  11. Internet-based prevention of posttraumatic stress symptoms in injured trauma patients: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mouthaan, Joanne; Sijbrandij, Marit; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Gersons, Berthold P.R.; Olff, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Background Injured trauma victims are at risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other post-trauma psychopathology. So far, interventions using cognitive behavioral techniques (CBT) have proven most efficacious in treating early PTSD in highly symptomatic individuals. No early intervention for the prevention of PTSD for all victims has yet proven effective. In the acute psychosocial care for trauma victims, there is a clear need for easily applicable, accessible, cost-efficient early interventions. Objective To describe the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of a brief Internet-based early intervention that incorporates CBT techniques with the aim of reducing acute psychological distress and preventing long-term PTSD symptoms in injured trauma victims. Method In a two armed RCT, 300 injured trauma victims from two Level-1 trauma centers in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, will be assigned to an intervention or a control group. Inclusion criteria are: being 18 years of age or older, having experienced a traumatic event according to the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-IV and understanding the Dutch language. The intervention group will be given access to the intervention's website (www.traumatips.nl), and are specifically requested to login within the first month postinjury. The primary clinical study outcome is PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes include symptoms of depression and anxiety, quality of life, and social support. In addition, a cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention will be performed. Data are collected at one week post-injury, prior to first login (baseline), and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analyses will be on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion The results will provide more insight into the effects of preventive interventions in general, and Internet-based early interventions specifically, on acute stress reactions and PTSD, in an injured population, during the acute phase after

  12. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  13. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  14. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  15. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  16. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  17. Nitrosative Stress in the Nervous System: Guidelines for Designing Experimental Strategies to Study Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A

    2016-03-01

    Reactive nitrogen species, such as nitric oxide (NO), exert their biological activity in large part through post-translational modification of cysteine residues, forming S-nitrosothiols. This chemical reaction proceeds via a process that we and our colleagues have termed protein S-nitrosylation. Under conditions of normal NO production, S-nitrosylation regulates the activity of many normal proteins. However, in degenerative conditions characterized by nitrosative stress, increased levels of NO lead to aberrant S-nitrosylation that contributes to the pathology of the disease. Thus, S-nitrosylation has been implicated in a wide range of cellular mechanisms, including mitochondrial function, proteostasis, transcriptional regulation, synaptic activity, and cell survival. In recent years, the research area of protein S-nitrosylation has become prominent due to improvements in the detection systems as well as the demonstration that protein S-nitrosylation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other neurological disorders. To further promote our understanding of how protein S-nitrosylation affects cellular systems, guidelines for the design and conduct of research on S-nitrosylated (or SNO-)proteins would be highly desirable, especially for those newly entering the field. In this review article, we provide a strategic overview of designing experimental approaches to study protein S-nitrosylation. We specifically focus on methods that can provide critical data to demonstrate that an S-nitrosylated protein plays a (patho-)physiologically-relevant role in a biological process. Hence, the implementation of the approaches described herein will contribute to further advancement of the study of S-nitrosylated proteins, not only in neuroscience but also in other research fields. PMID:26118537

  18. Design of high-performance anti-adhesion agent using injectable gel with an anti-oxidative stress function.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Yoko; Matsumoto, Yu; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-01

    Postsurgical tissue adhesion formation caused by inflammation and oxidative stress is one of the serious issues because it induces severe clinical disorders. In this study, we designed redox injectable gel (RIG) which covalently possesses nitroxide radicals as a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger for high performance anti-adhesion agent. The redox flower micelles exhibiting gelation under physiological conditions were prepared by a polyion complex (PIC) between polyamine-PEG-polyamine triblock copolymer possessing nitroxide radicals as a side chain of polyamine segments and poly(acrylic acid). RIG showed prolonged local retention in the abdominal cavity of the mice, which was monitored by in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Compared with a commercial anti-adhesion agent (Seprafilm(®), Genzyme, Cambridge, MA), RIG dramatically inhibited the formation of tissue adhesions via a combination of physical separation and biological elimination of generated ROS in talc-induced adhesion model mice. Treatment with RIG suppressed inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil invasion, suppressing the increase in peritoneal membrane thickness. It is also emphasized that RIG suppressed the increase of white blood cells level, indicating that the present RIG treatment effectively prevents diffusion of local inflammation to entire body. These findings indicate that RIG has a great potential as a high performance anti-adhesion agent. PMID:26288251

  19. Current experience in testing mitochondrial nutrients in disorders featuring oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction: rational design of chemoprevention trials.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni; Aiello Talamanca, Annarita; Castello, Giuseppe; Cordero, Mario D; d'Ischia, Marco; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Pallardó, Federico V; Petrović, Sandra; Tiano, Luca; Zatterale, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    An extensive number of pathologies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) and oxidative stress (OS). Thus, mitochondrial cofactors termed "mitochondrial nutrients" (MN), such as α-lipoic acid (ALA), Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and l-carnitine (CARN) (or its derivatives) have been tested in a number of clinical trials, and this review is focused on the use of MN-based clinical trials. The papers reporting on MN-based clinical trials were retrieved in MedLine up to July 2014, and evaluated for the following endpoints: (a) treated diseases; (b) dosages, number of enrolled patients and duration of treatment; (c) trial success for each MN or MN combinations as reported by authors. The reports satisfying the above endpoints included total numbers of trials and frequencies of randomized, controlled studies, i.e., 81 trials testing ALA, 107 reports testing CoQ10, and 74 reports testing CARN, while only 7 reports were retrieved testing double MN associations, while no report was found testing a triple MN combination. A total of 28 reports tested MN associations with "classical" antioxidants, such as antioxidant nutrients or drugs. Combinations of MN showed better outcomes than individual MN, suggesting forthcoming clinical studies. The criteria in study design and monitoring MN-based clinical trials are discussed. PMID:25380523

  20. Current Experience in Testing Mitochondrial Nutrients in Disorders Featuring Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Rational Design of Chemoprevention Trials

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Giovanni; Aiello Talamanca, Annarita; Castello, Giuseppe; Cordero, Mario D.; d’Ischia, Marco; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Pallardó, Federico V.; Petrović, Sandra; Tiano, Luca; Zatterale, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    An extensive number of pathologies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) and oxidative stress (OS). Thus, mitochondrial cofactors termed “mitochondrial nutrients” (MN), such as α-lipoic acid (ALA), Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and l-carnitine (CARN) (or its derivatives) have been tested in a number of clinical trials, and this review is focused on the use of MN-based clinical trials. The papers reporting on MN-based clinical trials were retrieved in MedLine up to July 2014, and evaluated for the following endpoints: (a) treated diseases; (b) dosages, number of enrolled patients and duration of treatment; (c) trial success for each MN or MN combinations as reported by authors. The reports satisfying the above endpoints included total numbers of trials and frequencies of randomized, controlled studies, i.e., 81 trials testing ALA, 107 reports testing CoQ10, and 74 reports testing CARN, while only 7 reports were retrieved testing double MN associations, while no report was found testing a triple MN combination. A total of 28 reports tested MN associations with “classical” antioxidants, such as antioxidant nutrients or drugs. Combinations of MN showed better outcomes than individual MN, suggesting forthcoming clinical studies. The criteria in study design and monitoring MN-based clinical trials are discussed. PMID:25380523

  1. Stress echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    Echocardiography stress test; Stress test - echocardiography; CAD - stress echocardiography; Coronary artery disease - stress Echocardiography; Chest pain - stress echocardiography; Angina - stress echocardiography; ...

  2. Effect of the crown design and interface lute parameters on the stress-state of a machined crown-tooth system: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Shahrbaf, Shirin; vanNoort, Richard; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Martin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The effect of preparation design and the physical properties of the interface lute on the restored machined ceramic crown-tooth complex are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to determine, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) the effect of the tooth preparation design and the elastic modulus of the cement on the stress state of the cemented machined ceramic crown-tooth complex. The three-dimensional structure of human premolar teeth, restored with adhesively cemented machined ceramic crowns, was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of a restored tooth was created. Two preparation designs, with different occlusal morphologies, were modeled with cements of 3 different elastic moduli. Interactive medical image processing software (mimics and professional CAD modeling software) was used to create sophisticated digital models that included the supporting structures; periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The generated models were imported into an FEA software program (hypermesh version 10.0, Altair Engineering Inc.) with all degrees of freedom constrained at the outer surface of the supporting cortical bone of the crown-tooth complex. Five different elastic moduli values were given to the adhesive cement interface 1.8GPa, 4GPa, 8GPa, 18.3GPa and 40GPa; the four lower values are representative of currently used cementing lutes and 40GPa is set as an extreme high value. The stress distribution under simulated applied loads was determined. The preparation design demonstrated an effect on the stress state of the restored tooth system. The cement elastic modulus affected the stress state in the cement and dentin structures but not in the crown, the pulp, the periodontal ligament or the cancellous and cortical bone. The results of this study suggest that both the choice of the preparation design and the cement elastic modulus can affect the stress state within the restored crown

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 252 - Policy Statement on the Scenario Design Framework for Stress Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act or Act) and through its capital plan rule (12 CFR 225.8). Under the stress... supervisory and company-run stress tests (macroeconomic scenarios).23 21 12 U.S.C. 5365(i)(1); 12 CFR part 252, subpart F. 22 12 U.S.C. 5365(i)(2); 12 CFR part 252, subparts G and H. 23 The stress test rules...

  4. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  5. Stress Evolution in Roadway Rock Bolts During Mining in a Fully Mechanized Longwall Face, and an Evaluation of Rock Bolt Support Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Guimin; Hou, Rongbin; Wu, Yu; Zhou, Hongqi

    2015-01-01

    Rock bolts are widely used in coal mines throughout China. Approximately 8,000 km of roadways are excavated in coal mines every year in China, 80 % of which are supported by rock bolts. At present, the design of rock bolt support schemes is mainly based on analogies and experience from previous projects. In the present study, in order to evaluate the design of rock bolt support in roadways, several cross sections of a roadway were monitored for rock bolt stress during the roadway excavation and mining. The study results show that the stress in the rock bolts varied in the areas 20 m behind the excavating face and 30 m ahead of the mining face. For the rock bolts observed in this study, the max axial force was within the design limit of the bolts, thus the support design was shown to be acceptable. Then, numerical simulation was performed using FLAC3D to investigate the stress evolution in the rock bolts during the mining of the fully mechanized longwall face. The simulation results show an overall agreement with the in situ measurements. Finally, parametric study pertaining to length, anchorage length, and rock bolt spacing was carried out with the numerical model, and several suggestions for the support design were proposed.

  6. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a web-based and mobile stress-management intervention for employees: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Work-related stress is associated with a variety of mental and emotional problems and can lead to substantial economic costs due to lost productivity, absenteeism or the inability to work. There is a considerable amount of evidence on the effectiveness of traditional face-to-face stress-management interventions for employees; however, they are often costly, time-consuming, and characterized by a high access threshold. Web-based interventions may overcome some of these problems yet the evidence in this field is scarce. This paper describes the protocol for a study that will examine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a web-based guided stress-management training which is based on problem solving and emotion regulation and aimed at reducing stress in adult employees. Methods The study will target stressed employees aged 18 and older. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) design will be applied. Based on a power calculation of d=.35 (1-β of 80%, α = .05), 264 participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to either the intervention group or a six-month waitlist control group. Inclusion criteria include an elevated stress level (Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale-10 ≥ 22) and current employment. Exclusion criteria include risk of suicide or previously diagnosed psychosis or dissociative symptoms. The primary outcome will be perceived stress, and secondary outcomes include depression and anxiety. Data will be collected at baseline and seven weeks and six months after randomization. An extended follow up at 12 months is planned for the intervention group. Moreover, a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective and will include both direct and indirect health care costs. Data will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis and per protocol. Discussion The substantial negative consequences of work-related stress emphasize the necessity for effective stress-management trainings. If the proposed internet intervention proves

  7. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowance rates. 591.305 Section 591.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may not exceed $10 a day....

  8. Teaching Stress Physiology Using Zebrafish ("Danio Rerio")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael; Dhawale, Shree; Mustafa, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    A straightforward and inexpensive laboratory experiment is presented that investigates the physiological stress response of zebrafish after a 5 degree C increase in water temperature. This experiment is designed for an undergraduate physiology lab and allows students to learn the scientific method and relevant laboratory techniques without causing…

  9. Contact stress analysis of the anterior tibial post in bi-cruciate stabilized and mobile-bearing posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty designs.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, Umito; Hamai, Satoshi; Okazaki, Ken; Ikebe, Satoru; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Akasaki, Yukio; Murakami, Koji; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-07-01

    In posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA), unexpected wear and fracture of the tibial post due to anterior post impingement have been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the contact stress on the anterior aspect of the tibial post in four contemporary TKA designs. We evaluated one bi-cruciate stabilized design (Journey II) and three mobile-bearing PS designs (Vanguard RP, PFC Sigma RP, and NexGen LPS Mobile). The contact conditions at the anterior aspect of the tibial post were determined upon application of a posterior force of 100N to individual implants. Each measurement was sequentially performed five times, and the data were compared within and across designs using analysis of variance and a post-hoc test. The contact stress of the Journey II and Vanguard RP was less than the compressive yield stress for polyethylene (10MPa) at all tested flexion angles and degrees of rotation. The PFC Sigma RP did not show anterior tibial post impingement under any experimental conditions. The NexGen LPS Mobile demonstrated bilateral edge loading at the anterior tibial post and exceeded 10MPa of contact stress in some test conditions. Thus, the differences among implants in terms of the dimensions of the femoral anterior cam or intercondylar notch and the anterior aspect of the tibial post in the axial and sagittal planes led to significant differences in contact conditions. The present study helps the surgeon to be more aware that various contact conditions of the anterior aspect of the tibial post can occur in individual TKA designs. PMID:26999701

  10. Liquid micrurgy chamber and microsyringe designs allow more efficient micromanipulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, E. W.

    1967-01-01

    More efficient micromanipulations on large amoebae achieved by liquid micrurgy chamber and microsyringe. These innovations move the system closer to the specimen, and flatten the specimen for a clear view of the nuclei, also eliminating spherical abberation and evaporation.

  11. Technology Allows Engineers to Make Solid Objects from Computer Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Computer operators using the technique of three-dimensional printing or rapid prototyping may soon be able to sculpt an object on the screen and within minutes, have a paper, plastic, or ceramic version of the object in hand. The process uses the principle that physical objects can be created in layers. (MSE)

  12. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  13. The influence of the root cross-section on the stress distribution in teeth restored with a positive-locking post and core design: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Kai-Uwe; Rottner, Kurt; Boldt, Julian; Proff, Peter; Gredes, Tomasz; Richter, Ernst-Jürgen; Reicheneder, Claudia

    2008-10-01

    Human teeth with substantial coronal defects are subject to reconstruction by means of post and core restorations. Typically, such a restoration comprises a slightly cylindrical post onto which an abutment of varying shape, depending on the designated restoration, is attached. As clinical results are not satisfactory to date, we proposed a new proprietary post and core design which makes use of positive locking. As this prefabricated system is not customised to an individual root's cross-sectional geometry (usually oval), a varying amount of radicular dentin is left in periphery of the core's outer edge. The aim of this study was to assess the implications of this fact, i.e., whether the root has to endure higher overall stress levels which ultimately may lead to failure of one of the components involved. A series of finite element simulations were performed to evaluate stress and strain on the system, in which the proposed post and core was embedded into a virtual dentin cylinder of different diameters, ranging from flush mounting of the restoration to a dentin excess of 4 mm, and subsequently loaded with forces with two angles of attack (90 degrees and 130 degrees ). The results show that flush mounting yields an agreeable stress and strain distribution within the radicular dentin, but overall stress levels drop significantly with an excess of 0.5 mm of surrounding dentin. More than 1 mm excess was not found to have profound positive effects. PMID:18803526

  14. Structure design and film process optimization for metal-gate stress in 20 nm nMOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuozhen, Fu; Huaxiang, Yin; Xiaolong, Ma; Shumin, Chai; Jianfeng, Gao; Dapeng, Chen

    2013-06-01

    The optimizations to metal gate structure and film process were extensively investigated for great metal-gate stress (MGS) in 20 nm high-k/metal-gate-last (HK/MG-last) nMOS devices. The characteristics of advanced MGS technologies on device performances were studied through a process and device simulation by TCAD tools. The metal gate electrode with different stress values (0 to -6 GPa) was implemented in the device simulation along with other traditional process-induced-strain (PIS) technologies like e-SiC and nitride capping layer. The MGS demonstrated a great enhancing effect on channel carriers transporting in the device as device pitch scaling down. In addition, the novel structure for a tilted gate electrode was proposed and relationships between the tilt angle and channel stress were investigated. Also with a new method of fully stressed replacement metal gate (FSRMG) and using plane-shape-HfO to substitute U-shape-HfO, the effect of MGS was improved. For greater film stress in the metal gate, the process conditions for physical vapor deposition (PVD) TiNx were optimized. The maximum compressive stress of -6.5 GPa TiNx was achieved with thinner film and greater RF power as well as about 6 sccm N ratio.

  15. Seal allows blind assembly and thermal expansion of components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The design of a seal consisting of two concentric cylinders with outer and inner threaded elements attached to each side of the system interface withstands large temperature changes and allows for blind assembly.

  16. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  17. Investigation of the design and static behavior of cylindrical tubular composite adhesive joints utilizing the finite element method and stress-based failure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Michael D.

    2011-12-01

    The stress and strength behavior of cylindrical tubular adhesive joints composed of dissimilar materials was explored. This was accomplished with the finite element method (FEM) and stress-based failure theories. Also, it was shown how a design of experiments (DOE) based method can be used to objectively organize the process of optimizing joint strength by using stress-based failure criteria. The finite element program used in this work was written in-house from scratch to implement the FEM for the purpose of solving both axisymmetric and three-dimensional linear elastic governing equations of static equilibrium. The formulation of the three-dimensional model is presented, and the required operations to arrive to the axisymmetric model are also presented. The axisymmetric model is two dimensional, capable of using four and eight node quadrilateral elements. However, only four node elements are used because a mesh of eight node elements requires more memory and increased mesh refinement. The three-dimensional model is capable of using eight and twenty node brick elements, but only eight node brick elements are used for the same reason. Both of the axisymmetric and three-dimensional models calculate the nodal displacements, strains, stress values for each material, and strength values for each material. The external static loads can be individually applied, or coupled together. The outputs seem to be most useful for interpretation when plotted through-the-thickness (TTT) and along-the-length (ATL) of the joint or tube. Outputs are valid only for materials that behave linearly elastic up to (or near) failure, and the stress-based failure criteria are used to define that limit. A small laboratory-sized joint was modeled to look at the theoretical stress and strength distributions plotted along-the-length of the joint at different radial locations. These stress and strength distributions can be correlated to the type of load being applied because of unique or prominent

  18. Design of low surface roughness-low residual stress-high optoelectronic merit a-IZO thin films for flexible OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naveen; Wilkinson, Taylor M.; Packard, Corinne E.; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-06-01

    The development of efficient and reliable large-area flexible optoelectronic devices demands low surface roughness-low residual stress-high optoelectronic merit transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films. Here, we correlate surface roughness-residual stress-optoelectronic properties of sputtered amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin films using a statistical design of experiment (DOE) approach and find a common growth space to achieve a smooth surface in a stress-free and high optoelectronic merit a-IZO thin film. The sputtering power, growth pressure, oxygen partial pressure, and RF/(RF+DC) are varied in a two-level system with a full factorial design, and results are used to deconvolve the complex growth space, identifying significant control growth parameters and their possible interactions. The surface roughness of a-IZO thin film varies over 0.19 nm to 3.97 nm, which is not in line with the general assumption of low surface roughness in a-IZO thin films. The initial regression model and analysis of variance reveal no single optimum growth sub-space to achieve low surface roughness (≤0.5 nm), low residual stress (-1 to 0 GPa), and industrially acceptable electrical conductivity (>1000 S/cm) for a-IZO thin films. The extrapolation of growth parameters in light of the current results and previous knowledge leads to a new sub-space, resulting in a low residual stress of -0.52±0.04 GPa, a low surface roughness of 0.55±0.03 nm, and moderate electrical conductivity of 1962±3.84 S/cm in a-IZO thin films. These results demonstrate the utility of the DOE approach to multi-parameter optimization, which provides an important tool for the development of flexible TCOs for the next-generation flexible organic light emitting diodes applications.

  19. The effect of academic stress and attachment stress on stress-eaters and stress-undereaters.

    PubMed

    Emond, Michael; Ten Eycke, Kayla; Kosmerly, Stacey; Robinson, Adele Lafrance; Stillar, Amanda; Van Blyderveen, Sherry

    2016-05-01

    It is well established that stress is related to changes in eating patterns. Some individuals are more likely to increase their overall food intake under conditions of stress, whereas others are more likely to consume less food when stressed. Attachment style has been linked to disordered eating and eating disorders; however, comparisons of eating behaviors under attachment versus other types of stress have yet to be explored. The present laboratory study examined the eating patterns in self-identified stress-undereaters and stress-eaters under various types of stress. More specifically, the study examined the effects of academic and attachment stress on calorie, carbohydrate and sugar consumption within these two groups. Under the guise of critiquing student films, university students viewed either one of two stress-inducing videos (academic stress or attachment stress, both designed to be emotionally arousing) or a control video (designed to be emotionally neutral), and their food intake was recorded. Results demonstrated that the video manipulations were effective in inducing stress. Differential patterns of eating were noted based on group and stress condition. Specifically, stress-undereaters ate fewer calories, carbohydrates and sugars than stress-eaters in the academic stress condition, but not in the attachment stress or control condition. Findings suggest that specific types of stressors may influence eating behaviors differently. PMID:26850311

  20. Assessment of allowance mechanism China's carbon trading pilots

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Ling; Shen, Bo; Qi, Shaozhou; Price, Lynn

    2015-08-28

    The allowance mechanism is one of the core and sensitive aspects in design of a carbon trading scheme and affects the compliance cost for each company covered under the scheme. By examining China's allowance mechanism from two aspects including allowance allocation and allowance distribution, this paper compares China's carbon trading pilots with the EU Emissions Trading System and California Cap-and-Trade Program, and through the comparison identify issues that affect the efficiency of the pilots. The paper also recommends course of actions to strengthen China's existing pilots and build valuable experiences for the establishment of the national cap-and-trade system in China.

  1. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  2. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  3. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  4. Thermal Stress Simulation and Optimum Design of CoSb3/Bi2Te3 Thermoelectric Unicouples with Graded Interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Yang, X. Q.; Zhai, P. C.; Zhang, Q. J.

    2008-02-01

    The thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric generator devices not only depends on the figure of merit of the materials, but also on the temperature distribution in the device. However, each single thermoelectric material is only suitable for a narrow range of temperature and no single thermoelectric material is suitable for use over a very wide range of temperatures (˜300-800 K). Recently, the concept of integrating new thermoelectric materials into a segmented thermoelectric unicouple has been introduced. In the present paper, the thermal stresses of CoSb3/Bi2Te3 thermoelectric unicouple subjected to thermal cyclic loading are simulated by finite element method. The results show that the maximum thermal tensile stress would reach about 180 MPa or even higher because of the mismatch of the theromechanical properties of the CoSb3 and Bi2Te3. This means that the device cannot work as the tensile strength of CoSb3 is about 100 MPa. In order to improve the performance, the graded interlayers are inserted to reduce the thermal stresses. It is shown that the thermal stresses in the thermoelectric device with graded interlayers would reduce to about 100 MPa.

  5. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  6. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those...

  7. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  8. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1180.56 Section 1180.56 Public... by a Grantee General Administrative Responsibilities § 1180.56 Allowable costs. (a) Determination of costs allowable under a grant is made in accordance with government-wide cost principles in...

  9. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  10. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  11. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... Financial and Program Management § 34.17 Allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined...

  12. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  13. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... Financial and Program Management § 34.17 Allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined...

  14. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  15. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  16. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  17. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  18. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  19. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable activities. Allowable activities are...

  20. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  1. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  2. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that...

  3. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  4. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  5. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  6. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  7. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  8. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  9. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  10. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  11. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  12. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  13. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  14. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs....

  15. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  16. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  17. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  18. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  19. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  20. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  1. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  2. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  3. Friction Stir Weld Restart+Reweld Repair Allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A friction stir weld (FSW) repair method has been developed and successfully implemented on Al 2195 plate material for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank (ET). The method includes restarting the friction stir weld in the termination hole of the original weld followed by two reweld passes. Room temperature and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties exceeded minimum FSW design strength and compared well with the development data. Simulated service test results also compared closely to historical data for initial FSW, confirming no change to the critical flaw size or inspection requirements for the repaired weld. Testing of VPPA fusion/FSW intersection weld specimens exhibited acceptable strength and exceeded the minimum design value. Porosity, when present at the intersection was on the root side toe of the fusion weld, the "worst case" being 0.7 inch long. While such porosity may be removed by sanding, this "worst case" porosity condition was tested "as is" and demonstrated that porosity did not negatively affect the strength of the intersection weld. Large, 15-inch "wide panels" FSW repair welds were tested to demonstrate strength and evaluate residual stresses using photo stress analysis. All results exceeded design minimums, and photo stress analysis showed no significant stress gradients due to the presence of the restart and multi-pass FSW repair weld.

  4. Distribution of normal human left ventricular myofiber stress at end diastole and end systole: a target for in silico design of heart failure treatments

    PubMed Central

    Genet, Martin; Lee, Lik Chuan; Nguyen, Rebecca; Haraldsson, Henrik; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Zhang, Zhihong; Ge, Liang; Ordovas, Karen; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular wall stress is believed to be responsible for many physical mechanisms taking place in the human heart, including ventricular remodeling, which is frequently associated with heart failure. Therefore, normalization of ventricular wall stress is the cornerstone of many existing and new treatments for heart failure. In this paper, we sought to construct reference maps of normal ventricular wall stress in humans that could be used as a target for in silico optimization studies of existing and potential new treatments for heart failure. To do so, we constructed personalized computational models of the left ventricles of five normal human subjects using magnetic resonance images and the finite-element method. These models were calibrated using left ventricular volume data extracted from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated through comparison with strain measurements from tagged MRI (950 ± 170 strain comparisons/subject). The calibrated passive material parameter values were C0 = 0.115 ± 0.008 kPa and B0 = 14.4 ± 3.18; the active material parameter value was Tmax = 143 ± 11.1 kPa. These values could serve as a reference for future construction of normal human left ventricular computational models. The differences between the predicted and the measured circumferential and longitudinal strains in each subject were 3.4 ± 6.3 and 0.5 ± 5.9%, respectively. The predicted end-diastolic and end-systolic myofiber stress fields for the five subjects were 2.21 ± 0.58 and 16.54 ± 4.73 kPa, respectively. Thus these stresses could serve as targets for in silico design of heart failure treatments. PMID:24876359

  5. Stress on the College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    A Stress Test designed to help college students increase awareness of stress and ways they deal with it is presented, along with suggestions to reduce stress. The stress test was presented at a workshop by George Washington University graduate students. The test's four scales measure ways that students cope with stress and the student's…

  6. Clinically-Relevant Design Features of a Three-Dimensional Correct Molar Crown and Related Maximum Principal Stress. A Finite Element Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Brian T.; Janal, Malvin N.; Zavanelli, Ricardo A.; Silva, Nelson R. F. A.; Rekow, E. Dianne; Thompson, Van P.; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of clinically relevant variables on the maximum principal stress (MPS) in the veneer layer of an anatomically correct veneer-core-cement-tooth model. Methods The average dimensions of a mandibular first molar crown were imported into CAD software; a tooth preparation was modeled by reducing the proximal walls by 1.5 mm and the occlusal surface by 2.0 mm. ‘Crown systems’ were composed by varying characteristics of a cement layer, structural core, and veneer solid, all designed to fit the tooth preparation. The main and interacting effects of proximal wall height reduction, core material, core thickness, cement modulus, cement thickness, and load position on the maximum stress distribution were derived from a series of nite element models and analyzed in a factorial analysis of variance. Results The average MPS in the veneer layer over the 64 models was 488 MPa (range= 248 to 840 MPa). MPS increased significantly with the addition of horizontal load components and with increasing cement thickness. In addition, MPS levels varied as a function of interactions between: proximal wall height reduction and load position; load position and cement thickness; core thickness and cement thickness; cement thickness and proximal wall height reduction; and core thickness, cement thickness and proximal wall height reduction. Conclusion Rational design of veneered structural ceramics must consider the complex geometry of the crown-tooth system and integrate the in uence of both the main effects and interactions among design parameters. PMID:19857888

  7. Design criteria for prestressed concrete reactor vessels for high-temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Elter, C.; Becker, G.

    1982-11-01

    For the design and construction of prestressed concrete reactor vessels, data on loading, construction materials, and safety factors are required. A description is given of the design conditions according to the current state of technology in the Federal Republic of Germany. Special consideration is given to the allowable stresses and an appropriate proposal for such stresses is suggested.

  8. Nanotopography and Surface Stress Analysis of Ti6Al4V Bioimplant: An Alternative Design for Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sweetu; Solitro, Giovanni Francesco; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T.; Amirouche, Farid; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical stability of biomedical Ti6Al4V rods with vertically aligned nanotubes structure formed on their surface has yet to be fully tested during insertion into the bone. The surface of rods impacted during insertion into a bone makes shear contact with bone, generating an interfacial stress. This stress plays an important role in osseointegration and may contribute to loosening between the bone and the implant during surgery. In the current study, the mechanical stability of various Ti6Al4V surfaces, including machined (M), rough (R), machined-anodized (MA), and rough-anodized (RA) surfaces, were tested and fully analyzed during insertion and pullout test into a simulant bone with densities 15 and 20 pounds per cubic foot (pcf). Our initial results from the field emission scanning electron microscopy images taken before and after insertion reveal that titania nanotubes remained stable and maintained their structural integrity during the insertion and pullout Instron test. Furthermore, from the interfacial stress calculation during the insertion, it was observed that compared with nonanodized rods, a higher force was required to insert the anodized rods. The interfacial stress generated during the insertion of anodized rods was 1.03 ± 0.11 MPa for MA and 1.10 ± 0.36 MPa for RA, which is significantly higher ( p < 0.05) than nonanodized rods with 0.36 ± 0.07 MPa for M and 0.36 ± 0.08 MPa for R in simulant bone with density of 15 pcf. Similar behavior was also observed in 20 pcf simulant bone. Energy dissipated during anodized rod insertion (i.e., MA = 1.3 ± 0.04 Nm and RA = 1.23 ± 0.24 Nm) was not significantly different than nonanodized rod insertion (i.e., M = 0.9 ± 0.05 Nm and R = 1.04 ± 0.04 Nm) into 15 pcf simulant bone. The high stress during insertion of anodized rods suggests that the nanotubes on the surface can cause gripping and high friction on the radial side, resisting the counter motion of the bone. The latter may play a beneficial

  9. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  10. Generic composite flywheel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber reinforced composites belong to a new class of materials and allow great flexibility in flywheel design. The most efficient flywheel may no longer have the classic Stodola taper and indeed, may not even be round. Some of the flywheel designs that have been developed in the past are discussed. Although choice of material, mounts and service requirements often dictate the final design choice for a particular application, the composite flywheels in this paper are classified within a geometric framework, a simple stress analysis of a circular disk is carried out.

  11. Organizational Stress among Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triesen, David; Williams, Mary-Jo

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to determine Canadian teachers' perceptions of work related stress and to assess the degree to which these stressors accounted for overall job stress. Results indicated the factors which most contributed to overall job stress were role overload, relationships with students, work load, and relationships with colleagues.…

  12. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  13. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  14. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  15. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  16. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  17. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  18. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  19. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  20. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  1. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1470.22 Section 1470.22 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  2. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  3. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 230, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A-122).” The allowability of... CFR part 220, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21).” The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of appendix E of 45 CFR...

  4. 45 CFR 2541.220 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2541.220 Section 2541.220 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.220 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may...

  5. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  6. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  7. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802...

  8. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802...

  9. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable...

  10. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable...

  11. 19 CFR 191.141 - Drawback allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drawback allowance. 191.141 Section 191.141 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.141 Drawback allowance. Section 313(h) of the...

  12. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  13. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  14. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  15. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  16. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  17. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  18. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  19. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  20. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  1. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clothing allowance. 3.810 Section 3.810 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.810 Clothing allowance. (a) Except as provided in paragraph...

  2. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section...

  3. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  4. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  5. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  6. Moral Appraisals Affect Doing/Allowing Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Fiery; Knobe, Joshua; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An extensive body of research suggests that the distinction between doing and allowing plays a critical role in shaping moral appraisals. Here, we report evidence from a pair of experiments suggesting that the converse is also true: moral appraisals affect doing/allowing judgments. Specifically, morally bad behavior is more likely to be construed…

  7. 4 CFR 5.6 - Allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowances. 5.6 Section 5.6 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM COMPENSATION § 5.6 Allowances. The provisions of chapter 59 of title 5, U.S. Code and the implementing regulations for the Executive Branch apply to Government...

  8. 28 CFR 100.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 100.11 Section 100.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) COST RECOVERY REGULATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 § 100.11 Allowable costs. (a) Costs that are eligible...

  9. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22... Administration § 66.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  10. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  11. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  12. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  13. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  14. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  15. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  16. 32 CFR 33.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 33.22 Section 33.22 National... Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 33.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use...

  17. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  18. 40 CFR 31.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 31.22 Section 31.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 31.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  19. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  20. 30 CFR 735.24 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 735.24 Section 735.24 Mineral... AND ENFORCEMENT § 735.24 Allowable costs. The Director or his authorized designee shall determine costs which may be reimbursed according to Office of Management and Budget Circular No. A-87....

  1. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  2. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  3. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs specified... and other Part B supplier services furnished under arrangements is an allowable cost to the extent it... reasonable if they— (A) Do not exceed those that a prudent and cost-conscious buyer would incur to...

  4. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food... EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24 Inventory... registered manufacturer shall be allowed as a part of the quota an amount sufficient to maintain an...

  5. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1303.24 Section 1303.24 Food... Quotas § 1303.24 Inventory allowance. (a) For the purpose of determining individual manufacturing quotas... sufficient to maintain an inventory equal to, (1) For current manufacturers, 50 percent of his...

  6. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) OMB Circular A-122 does not cover the treatment of bid and proposal...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a.... Allowability of costs must be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable to the...

  7. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  8. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  9. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) OMB Circular A-122 does not cover the treatment of bid and proposal...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a.... Allowability of costs must be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable to the...

  10. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  11. 50 CFR 80.15 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., see 5 CFR 1310.3.). (b) What is required to determine the allowability of costs? Source documents or...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.15 Allowable costs. (a) What...

  12. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31 in the Federal Acquisition Regulation, except that patent prosecution costs are not allowable unless... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  13. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31 in the Federal Acquisition Regulation, except that patent prosecution costs are not allowable unless... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  14. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31 in the Federal Acquisition Regulation, except that patent prosecution costs are not allowable unless... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  15. Family Allowances and Fertility: Socioeconomic Differences

    PubMed Central

    SCHELLEKENS, JONA

    2009-01-01

    This article explores socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances on fertility. Although several studies have examined the relationship between cash benefits and fertility, few studies have addressed the possible differential effects of cash benefits on families of different income or education levels. I reconstructed the birth histories of women in the past two Israeli censuses of 1983 and 1995 to study socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances up to the seventh parity. The results indicate that family allowances have a significant effect at every parity. Using female education as an indicator of socioeconomic status, I find that socioeconomic status is a significant modifier of the effect of family allowances. Family allowances seem to have a relatively large impact on more-educated women. PMID:19771939

  16. Stress and stress counselling.

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report by the 1989 National Association of Clinical Tutors Wyeth Travelling Fellow to the United States of America. The stresses of postgraduate training and attempts to modify these are described, including stress counselling. The significance of stress and the relevance of the findings for postgraduate training in the United Kingdom are considered. PMID:2235808

  17. Fabrication of 'TAMU3', a 'Wind/React' stress-managed 14T Nb3Sn block coil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Jaisle, A.; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

    2008-02-01

    The third phase of a high field dipole technology development, a full set (2+) of Stress-Managed winding modules is being fabricated. The dipole fabrication uses tooling, fixtures, procedures and technology modified and updated based on the second phase work and results reported plus new material developments and higher performance strand. The strand was furnished by the DOE HEP Nb3Sn conductor development program. The modules' cables were processed and cabled by the LBNL facility using the latest procedures developed. There were several new materials and processes introduced in this third phase to improve performance or simplify the fabrication which will be discussed. If all the performance inherent in the strand were to be achieved then the peak field should be higher than 14 T. The containment and flux return structure are the same as used in phase 2. This phase of the development will constitute the outer winding modules of a 'Collider' prototype Block dipole with Stress-Management. The lessons learned and the results obtained will be discussed.

  18. Stress Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Stress Management Banner 1 - To Stress or Not to Stress - ... Decide But We Can Help What Is Stress Management? Banner 2 - Stress Continuum Graphic Banner Live life ...

  19. 2D design rule and layout analysis using novel large-area first-principles-based simulation flow incorporating lithographic and stress effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, Steven L.; Blatchford, James; Olubuyide, Oluwamuyiwa; Riley, Deborah; Chang, Simon; Hong, Qi-Zhong; Kim, T. S.; Borges, Ricardo; Lin, Li

    2009-03-01

    As design rules and corresponding logic standard cell layouts continue to shrink node-on-node in accordance with Moore's law, complex 2D interactions, both intra-cell and between cells, become much more prominent. For example, in lithography, lack of scaling of λ/NA implies aggressive use of resolution enhancement techniques to meet logic scaling requirements-resulting in adverse effects such as 'forbidden pitches'-and also implies an increasing range of optical influence relative to cell size. These adverse effects are therefore expected to extend well beyond the cell boundary, leading to lithographic marginalities that occur only when a given cell is placed "in context" with other neighboring cells in a variable design environment [1]. This context dependence is greatly exacerbated by increased use of strain engineering techniques such as SiGe and dual-stress liners (DSL) to enhance transistor performance, both of which also have interaction lengths on the order of microns. The use of these techniques also breaks the formerly straightforward connection between lithographic 'shapes' and end-of-line electrical performance, thus making the formulation of design rules that are robust to process variations and complex 2D interactions more difficult. To address these issues, we have developed a first-principles-based simulation flow to study contextdependent electrical effects in layout, arising not only from lithography, but also from stress and interconnect parasitic effects. This flow is novel in that it can be applied to relatively large layout clips- required for context-dependent analysis-without relying on semi-empirical or 'black-box' models for the fundamental electrical effects. The first-principles-based approach is ideal for understanding contextdependent effects early in the design phase, so that they can be mitigated through restrictive design rules. The lithographic simulations have been discussed elsewhere [1] and will not be presented in detail. The

  20. Probabilistic Approaches: Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Probabilistic composite design is described in terms of a computational simulation. This simulation tracks probabilistically the composite design evolution from constituent materials, fabrication process through composite mechanics, and structural component. Comparisons with experimental data are provided to illustrate selection of probabilistic design allowables, test methods/specimen guidelines, and identification of in situ versus pristine strength. For example, results show that: in situ fiber tensile strength is 90 percent of its pristine strength; flat-wise long-tapered specimens are most suitable for setting ply tensile strength allowables; a composite radome can be designed with a reliability of 0.999999; and laminate fatigue exhibits wide spread scatter at 90 percent cyclic-stress to static-strength ratios.

  1. Probabilistic Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Probabilistic composite design is described in terms of a computational simulation. This simulation tracks probabilistically the composite design evolution from constituent materials, fabrication process, through composite mechanics and structural components. Comparisons with experimental data are provided to illustrate selection of probabilistic design allowables, test methods/specimen guidelines, and identification of in situ versus pristine strength, For example, results show that: in situ fiber tensile strength is 90% of its pristine strength; flat-wise long-tapered specimens are most suitable for setting ply tensile strength allowables: a composite radome can be designed with a reliability of 0.999999; and laminate fatigue exhibits wide-spread scatter at 90% cyclic-stress to static-strength ratios.

  2. Stress-resultant models for ultimate load design of reinforced concrete frames and multi-scale parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, B. H.; Brancherie, D.; Davenne, L.; Ibrahimbegovic, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we present a new finite element for (geometrically linear) Timoshenko beam model for ultimate load computation of reinforced concrete frames. The proposed model combines the descriptions of the diffuse plastic failure in the beam-column followed by the creation of plastic hinges due to the failure or collapse of the concrete and of the re-bars. A modified multi-scale analysis is performed in order to identify the parameters for stress-resultant-based macro model, which is used to described the behavior of the Timoshenko beam element. For clarity, we focus upon the micro-scale models using the multi-fiber elements with embedded displacement discontinuities in mode I, which would typically be triggered by bending failure mode. More general case of micro-scale model capable of describing shear failure is described by Ibrahimbegovic et al. (Int J Numer Methods Eng 83(4):452-481, 2010).

  3. Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  4. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OIL AND GAS LEASES § 1220.012 Overhead allowance. (a) During the capital recovery period the overhead... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  5. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  6. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  7. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  8. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  9. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  10. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  11. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  12. Simulation of the stress computation in shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Utku, S.

    1978-01-01

    A self-teaching computer program is described, whereby the stresses in thin shells can be computed with good accuracy using the best fit approach. The program is designed for use in interactive game mode to allow the structural engineer to learn about (1) the major sources of difficulties and associated errors in the computation of stresses in thin shells, (2) possible ways to reduce the errors, and (3) trade-off between computational cost and accuracy. Included are derivation of the computational approach, program description, and several examples illustrating the program usage.

  13. Balloon Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger

    2007-01-01

    PlanetaryBalloon Version 5.0 is a software package for the design of meridionally lobed planetary balloons. It operates in a Windows environment, and programming was done in Visual Basic 6. By including the effects of circular lobes with load tapes, skin mass, hoop and meridional stress, and elasticity in the structural elements, a more accurate balloon shape of practical construction can be determined as well as the room-temperature cut pattern for the gore shapes. The computer algorithm is formulated for sizing meridionally lobed balloons for any generalized atmosphere or planet. This also covers zero-pressure, over-pressure, and super-pressure balloons. Low circumferential loads with meridionally reinforced load tapes will produce shapes close to what are known as the "natural shape." The software allows for the design of constant angle, constant radius, or constant hoop stress balloons. It uses the desired payload capacity for given atmospheric conditions and determines the required volume, allowing users to design exactly to their requirements. The formulations are generalized to use any lift gas (or mixture of gases), any atmosphere, or any planet as described by the local acceleration of gravity. PlanetaryBalloon software has a comprehensive user manual that covers features ranging from, but not limited to, buoyancy and super-pressure, convenient design equations, shape formulation, and orthotropic stress/strain.

  14. Stress and stress reduction.

    PubMed

    Straub, Heather; Qadir, Sameen; Miller, Greg; Borders, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Chronic stress contributes to preterm birth (PTB), through direct physiological mechanisms or behavioral pathways. This review identified interventions to prevent PTB through decreased maternal stress. Studies were grouped according to intervention: group prenatal care (11 studies), care coordination (8 studies), health insurance expansion (4 studies), expanded prenatal education/support in the clinic (8 studies), home visitation (9 studies), telephone contact (2 studies), or stress-reduction strategies (5 studies). Group prenatal care had the most evidence for PTB prevention. Comparative studies of PTB prevention through different models of prenatal care and maternal support, education, empowerment, stress-reduction, and coping strategies are needed. PMID:24979355

  15. Engineering design of ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.; Cheng, E.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient organic cooled low activation ferritic steel first wall and shield has been designed for the D-{sup 3}He power reactor ARIES-III. The design allows removal of the large surface heat load without exceeding temperature and stress design limits. The structure is expected to last for the whole reactor life. The major concerns regarding using the organic coolant in fusion reactors have been greatly alleviated.

  16. 44 CFR 11.73 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable claims. 11.73 Section 11.73 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... request of, or with the knowledge and consent of, superior authority or by reason of necessity. (8)...

  17. 44 CFR 11.73 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable claims. 11.73 Section 11.73 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... request of, or with the knowledge and consent of, superior authority or by reason of necessity. (8)...

  18. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85.22 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  19. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85.22 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  20. 30 CFR 220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 220.012 Section 220.012 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING NET PROFIT SHARE PAYMENT FOR OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS...

  1. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING NET PROFIT SHARE PAYMENT FOR OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL...

  2. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service with the Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent... the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident... authorized places. Claims may be allowable for damage to, or loss of, property arising from fire,...

  3. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2543.27 Section 2543.27...

  4. 43 CFR 12.62 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 12.62 Section 12.62... COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and...

  5. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section...

  6. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the claimant to save human life or government property. (4) Property used for the benefit of the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable claims. 34.4 Section 34.4 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS FILED UNDER THE MILITARY PERSONNEL...

  7. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the claimant to save human life or government property. (4) Property used for the benefit of the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable claims. 34.4 Section 34.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS FILED UNDER THE MILITARY PERSONNEL...

  8. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the claimant to save human life or government property. (4) Property used for the benefit of the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable claims. 34.4 Section 34.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS FILED UNDER THE MILITARY PERSONNEL...

  9. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the claimant to save human life or government property. (4) Property used for the benefit of the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable claims. 34.4 Section 34.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS FILED UNDER THE MILITARY PERSONNEL...

  10. 22 CFR 135.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 135.22 Section 135.22 Foreign... AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 135.22...

  11. 22 CFR 135.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 135.22 Section 135.22 Foreign... AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 135.22...

  12. 22 CFR 135.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 135.22 Section 135.22 Foreign... AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 135.22...

  13. 22 CFR 135.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 135.22 Section 135.22 Foreign... AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 135.22...

  14. 22 CFR 135.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 135.22 Section 135.22 Foreign... AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 135.22...

  15. 42 CFR 405.2468 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 405.2468 Section 405.2468 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services Payment for Rural...

  16. 78 FR 32629 - Post Allowance and Refiling

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Post Allowance and Refiling ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), as part of its continuing... States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA 22313-1450. Federal Rulemaking...

  17. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of the SO[sub 2] allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO[sub 2] emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO[sub 2] for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO[sub x] emission averaging, the utility would average NO[sub x] emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  18. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-12-31

    The use of the SO{sub 2} allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO{sub 2} emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO{sub 2} for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO{sub x} emission averaging, the utility would average NO{sub x} emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  19. 15 CFR 921.81 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 921.81 Section 921.81 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE...

  20. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  1. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind...

  2. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  3. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  4. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22 Section 13.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  5. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Consistent with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars A-21, A-87, A-102 and A-110 (2 CFR part 215... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  6. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  7. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  8. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Educational institution OMB Circular A-21. Hospital Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74. Commercial for-profit organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of...

  9. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section 79.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of...

  10. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  11. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  12. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section 79.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of...

  13. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22 Section 13.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  14. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Consistent with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars A-21, A-87, A-102 and A-110 (2 CFR part 215... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  15. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  16. 22 CFR 518.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Financial and Program Management § 518.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set...

  17. 22 CFR 518.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Financial and Program Management § 518.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set...

  18. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind...

  19. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  20. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. In addition... costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable...

  1. 49 CFR 19.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 19.27 Section...

  2. 49 CFR 18.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... transportation services provided leasing is more cost effective than acquisition or construction. ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 18.22 Section...

  3. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable claims. 180.104 Section 180.104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY... are payable: (i) Where personal funds were accepted by responsible Government personnel with...

  4. 19 CFR 191.101 - Drawback allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Preparations (Including Perfumery) Manufactured From Domestic Tax-Paid Alcohol § 191.101 Drawback allowance. (a... perfumery) manufactured or produced in the United States in part from the domestic tax-paid alcohol. (b... tax on flavoring extracts or medicinal or toilet preparations (including perfumery) manufactured...

  5. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Consistent with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars A-21, A-87, A-102 and A-110 (2 CFR part 215... Agreements § 208.33 Allowable costs. (a) Cost neutrality. DHS policy is that an Alert or Activation should be as cost neutral as possible to Sponsoring Agencies and Participating Agencies. To make an Alert...

  6. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Consistent with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars A-21, A-87, A-102 and A-110 (2 CFR part 215... Agreements § 208.33 Allowable costs. (a) Cost neutrality. DHS policy is that an Alert or Activation should be as cost neutral as possible to Sponsoring Agencies and Participating Agencies. To make an Alert...

  7. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Consistent with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars A-21, A-87, A-102 and A-110 (2 CFR part 215... Agreements § 208.33 Allowable costs. (a) Cost neutrality. DHS policy is that an Alert or Activation should be as cost neutral as possible to Sponsoring Agencies and Participating Agencies. To make an Alert...

  8. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... current period. However, if the recipient's established practice is to treat these costs by some other... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) OMB Circular A-122 does not cover the treatment of bid and...

  9. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... current period. However, if the recipient's established practice is to treat these costs by some other... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) OMB Circular A-122 does not cover the treatment of bid and...

  10. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS...

  11. 27 CFR 40.472 - Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... allowance of the tax where the cigarette papers and tubes, after removal from the factory upon determination... perjury and shall show the date the cigarette papers and tubes were removed from the factory. A claim... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES,...

  12. 27 CFR 40.472 - Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... allowance of the tax where the cigarette papers and tubes, after removal from the factory upon determination... perjury and shall show the date the cigarette papers and tubes were removed from the factory. A claim... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES,...

  13. 27 CFR 40.472 - Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... allowance of the tax where the cigarette papers and tubes, after removal from the factory upon determination... perjury and shall show the date the cigarette papers and tubes were removed from the factory. A claim... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES,...

  14. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  15. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  16. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  17. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  18. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR part 29-70... be allowable, a cost must be necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient administration of the... billed as a single unit charge do not have to be allocated or prorated among the several cost...

  19. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent or wrongful act or... subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident to service with the Department... excluded: (1) Property or damage in quarters or other authorized places. Claims may be allowable for...

  20. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR 29-70 and 41 CFR 1-15.7. (c) Costs associated with repairs, maintenance, and capital improvements of existing... charged to the program shall be consistent with those normally allowed in like circumstances and,...

  1. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR 29-70 and 41 CFR 1-15.7. (c) Costs associated with repairs, maintenance, and capital improvements of existing... charged to the program shall be consistent with those normally allowed in like circumstances and,...

  2. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR 29-70 and 41 CFR 1-15.7. (c) Costs associated with repairs, maintenance, and capital improvements of existing... charged to the program shall be consistent with those normally allowed in like circumstances and,...

  3. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205 Section 136.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  4. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211 Section 136.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  5. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223 Section 136.223 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  6. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217 Section 136.217 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  7. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229 Section 136.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  8. 43 CFR 12.62 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 12.62 Section 12.62 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND...

  9. Manpower Training Allowances: Financial Assistance or Investment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, Georges

    1975-01-01

    The author compares the differing approaches of Germany, Sweden, France, and Australia for providing financial support to adults enrolled in vocational training programs, focusing on training allowances for recurrent education. He concludes that without some governmental maintenance program, it is unlikely that adults can utilize even tuition-free…

  10. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment...

  11. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  12. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  13. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  14. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  15. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  16. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  17. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind...

  18. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22 Section 13.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  19. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  20. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 13.22 Section 13.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section 79.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of...

  2. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  3. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  4. 22 CFR 518.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Financial and Program Management § 518.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set...

  5. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  6. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  7. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  8. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... cost principles applicable to the entity incurring the costs. Thus, allowability of costs incurred...

  9. 22 CFR 518.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Financial and Program Management § 518.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set...

  10. 22 CFR 518.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Financial and Program Management § 518.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set...

  11. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 79.8 Section 79.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of...

  12. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... cost principles applicable to the entity incurring the costs. Thus, allowability of costs incurred...

  13. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  14. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  15. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind...

  16. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  17. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  18. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  19. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22 Section 13.22 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  20. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.27 Allowable costs. For each...

  1. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind...

  2. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  3. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  4. 44 CFR 11.73 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable claims. 11.73 Section 11.73 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... request of, or with the knowledge and consent of, superior authority or by reason of necessity. (8)...

  5. 27 CFR 40.472 - Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowance. 40.472 Section 40.472 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Manufacture of Cigarette...

  6. 27 CFR 40.472 - Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowance. 40.472 Section 40.472 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Manufacture of Cigarette...

  7. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS FILED UNDER THE MILITARY PERSONNEL AND... the claimant to save human life or government property. (4) Property used for the benefit of the government. Claims may be allowed for damage to, or loss of, property used for the benefit of the...

  8. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-award...

  9. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-award...

  10. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-award...

  11. Stress distribution and dimensional changes in chromatographic columns

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Feng; Drumm, Eric; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    High pressures, in the kilobar range, are now used in liquid chromatography. Basic equations from mechanics are applied to investigate the stress state in several idealized chromatography tubes, and these stresses are evaluated with respect to the maximum allowable stresses predicted by several methods used in pressure vessel design. An analytical solution is developed for the dimensional changes of idealized tubes subjected to internal pressure, and the analytical solutions used to verify the results from a numerical approximation. Numerical approximations are then used to explore the effects of the end restraint provided by the end frits. Conclusions are derived regarding the requirements for a safe operation of these high pressure chromatography tubes.

  12. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and.... Preliminary costs may include such items as feasibility surveys, engineering design, biological...

  13. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and.... Preliminary costs may include such items as feasibility surveys, engineering design, biological...

  14. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and.... Preliminary costs may include such items as feasibility surveys, engineering design, biological...

  15. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and.... Preliminary costs may include such items as feasibility surveys, engineering design, biological...

  16. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met... collection of a museum, except library, literary, or archival material specifically required for a designated activity under a grant under the Act....

  17. Geomechanical Modeling of CO2 Injection Site to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolik, S. R.; Gomez, S. P.; Matteo, E. N.; Stormont, J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper will present the results of large-scale three-dimensional calculations simulating the hydrological-mechanical behavior of a CO2injection reservoir and the resulting effects on wellbore casings and sealant repair materials. A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. The DOE-NETL project "Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials," is interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Two distinct computational models comprise the current modeling effort. The first is a field scale model that uses the stratigraphy, material properties, and injection history from a pilot CO2injection operation in Cranfield, MS to develop a stress-strain history for wellbore locations from 100 to 400 meters from an injection well. The results from the field scale model are used as input to a more detailed model of a wellbore casing. The 3D wellbore model examines the impacts of various loading scenarios on a casing structure. This model has been developed in conjunction with bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. The results from these models will be used to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. This material is based upon work supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant Number DE-FE0009562. This project is managed and administered by the Storage Division of the NETL and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science

  18. Geomechanical Modeling of CO2 Injection Site to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolik, S. R.; Gomez, S. P.; Matteo, E. N.; Stormont, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper will present the results of large-scale three-dimensional calculations simulating the hydrological-mechanical behavior of a CO2injection reservoir and the resulting effects on wellbore casings and sealant repair materials. A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. The DOE-NETL project "Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials," is interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Two distinct computational models comprise the current modeling effort. The first is a field scale model that uses the stratigraphy, material properties, and injection history from a pilot CO2injection operation in Cranfield, MS to develop a stress-strain history for wellbore locations from 100 to 400 meters from an injection well. The results from the field scale model are used as input to a more detailed model of a wellbore casing. The 3D wellbore model examines the impacts of various loading scenarios on a casing structure. This model has been developed in conjunction with bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. The results from these models will be used to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. This material is based upon work supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant Number DE-FE0009562. This project is managed and administered by the Storage Division of the NETL and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science

  19. Geomechanical Modeling of CO2 Injection Site to Predict Wellbore Stresses and Strains for the Design of Wellbore Seal Repair Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolik, S. R.; Matteo, E. N.; Dewers, T. A.; Newell, P.; Gomez, S. P.; Stormont, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper will present the results of large-scale three-dimensional calculations simulating the hydrological-mechanical behavior of a CO2 injection reservoir and the resulting effects on wellbore casings and sealant repair materials. A critical aspect of designing effective wellbore seal repair materials is predicting thermo-mechanical perturbations in local stress that can compromise seal integrity. The DOE-NETL project "Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials," is interested in the stress-strain history of abandoned wells, as well as changes in local pressure, stress, and temperature conditions that accompany carbon dioxide injection or brine extraction. Two distinct computational models comprise the current modeling effort. The first is a field scale model that uses the stratigraphy, material properties, and injection history from a pilot CO2 injection operation in Cranfield, MS to develop a stress-strain history for wellbore locations from 100 to 400 meters from an injection well. The results from the field scale model are used as input to a more detailed model of a wellbore casing. The 3D wellbore model examines the impacts of various loading scenarios on a casing structure. This model has been developed in conjunction with bench-top experiments of an integrated seal system in an idealized scaled wellbore mock-up being used to test candidate seal repair materials. The results from these models will be used to estimate the necessary mechanical properties needed for a successful repair material. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant Number DE-FE0009562. This project is managed and administered by the University of New Mexico and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of

  20. Elbow stress indices using finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lixin

    Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code) specifies rules for the design of nuclear power plant components. NB-3600 of the Code presents a simplified design method using stress indices---Scalar Coefficients used the modify straight pipe stress equations so that they can be applied to elbows, tees and other piping components. The stress indices of piping components are allowed to be determined both analytically and experimentally. This study concentrates on the determination of B2 stress indices for elbow components using finite element analysis (FEA). First, the previous theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations on elbow behavior were comprehensively reviewed, as was the philosophy behind the use of stress indices. The areas of further research was defined. Then, a comprehensive investigation was carried out to determine how the finite element method should be used to correctly simulate an elbow's structural behavior. This investigation included choice of element type, convergence of mesh density, use of boundary restraint and a reconciliation study between FEA and laboratory experiments or other theoretical formulations in both elastic and elasto-plastic domain. Results from different computer programs were also compared. Reasonably good reconciliation was obtained. Appendix II of the Code describes the experimental method to determine B2 stress indices based on load-deflection curves. This procedure was used to compute the B2 stress indices for various loading modes on one particular elbow configuration. The B2 stress indices thus determined were found to be about half of the value calculated from the Code equation. Then the effect on B2 stress indices of those factors such as internal pressure and flange attachments were studied. Finally, the investigation was extended to other configurations of elbow components. A parametric study was conducted on different elbow sizes and schedules. Regression analysis was then used to