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Sample records for allowable stress limits

  1. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  2. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  3. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  4. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-522). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  5. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  6. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  7. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-ENG). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  8. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-ENG). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  9. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-ENG). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  10. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  11. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  12. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  13. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  14. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  15. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  16. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  17. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  18. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  19. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  20. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  1. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  2. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  3. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  4. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  5. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  6. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  7. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  8. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  9. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  10. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  11. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  12. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  13. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  14. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration....

  15. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  16. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  17. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  18. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.13 Maximum allowable limits. (a) Maximum allowable diversions. (1) A provisional water budget in the Newlands Project Water Budget table must be recalculated for each irrigation season to reflect anticipated water-righted acres to be irrigated. At the start of the irrigation...

  19. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... calculated annually to ensure an adequate water supply for all water right holders whose water use complies... subsequent decisions concerning transfers of Project water rights, using the methodology established in this... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.13 Maximum allowable limits. (a) Maximum allowable diversions. (1)...

  20. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... calculated annually to ensure an adequate water supply for all water right holders whose water use complies... subsequent decisions concerning transfers of Project water rights, using the methodology established in this... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.13 Maximum allowable limits. (a) Maximum allowable diversions. (1)...

  1. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN...

  2. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the ultimate tensile strength of its material. (b) Safety factor. When it is necessary to use the code of original..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and...

  3. Allowable exposure limits for carbon dioxide during extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seter, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent was to review the research pertaining to human exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to recommend allowable exposure limits for extravehicular activity (EVA). Respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal systems may be adversely affected by chronic low dose CO2 exposure. Ventilation was increased 15 percent with 1 percent CO2 and 50 percent with 2 percent CO2. Chronic exposure to less than 2 percent CO2 led to 20 day cycles of uncompensated and compensated respiratory acidosis. Acid-base changes were small. Histopathologic changes in guinea pig lungs have been noted with long term exposure to 1 percent CO2. No changes were seen with exposure to 0.5 percent CO2. Cycling of bone calcium stores with associated changes in blood and urinary calcium levels occurs with long term CO2 exposure. Histologic changes in bone have been noted in guinea pigs exposed to 1 percent CO2. Renal calcification has been noted in guinea pigs with exposure to as low as 0.5 percent CO2. An increase in gastric acidity was noted in subjects with long term exposure to 1 percent CO2. Cardiovascular and neurologic function were largely unaffected. A decrease in the incidence of respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal disease was noted in submariners coincident with a decrease in ambient CO2 from 1.2 percent to 0.8-0.9 percent. Oxygen (O2) and CO2 stimulate respiration independently and cumulatively. The addition of CO2 to high dose O2 led to the faster onset of seizure activity in mice. Experiments evaluating the physiologic responses to intermittent, repetitive exposures to low dose CO2 and 100 percent O2 mixtures should be performed. A reduction in the current NASA standard for CO2 exposure during EVA of 1 percent (7.6 mmHg) for nominal and 2 percent (15.2 mmHg) for heavy exertion to 0.5 percent (3.8 mmHg) for nominal and 1 percent (7.6 mmHg) for heavy exertion may be prudent. At a minimum, the current NASA standard should not be liberalized.

  4. Measuring stress: Uses and limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.W. II

    1994-12-31

    The topic of the uses and limitations of measuring stress in the oceans is addressed. The use of the term stress in this context is ambiguous. Rather than assuming that stress is an actual measurable property of oceans, one may assume that the term refers to the complex of harmful things that is going on in the oceans. that is, it is a cover term for a complex of processes and states, many of which are unknown or undefined. The appeal of the term stress used in that way is very tempting. Considerable complexity results from the fact that the ocean consists of numerous and diverse species and ecosystems each of which have various properties that have some claim to protection. Another source of complexity is the diversity of factors which constitute threats to the environment. In evaluating the concepts of ecological risk assessment, there are sources of hazardous agents, there are receptors that are affected, and there is a process by which these interact termed exposure. As a result of exposure there is some probability that the actions of the sources have caused or will cause some effect on the receptor, the risk. Assessments may be source driven; they may attempt to determine the risks associated with a waste outfall. Assessments may also be effects driven; they may attempt to determine the cause of a die-off of marine mammals or determine the likelihood of a particular rise in sea-level. Finally, they may be exposure driven. Each of these components of the causal chain might serve as measures of stress.

  5. 34 CFR 609.41 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 609.41 Section 609.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STRENGTHENING HISTORICALLY BLACK GRADUATE INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM...

  6. 34 CFR 607.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 607.30 Section 607.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STRENGTHENING INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM What Conditions Must a Grantee...

  7. 34 CFR 606.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 606.30 Section 606.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING...

  8. 34 CFR 606.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 606.30 Section 606.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING...

  9. 34 CFR 606.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 606.30 Section 606.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING...

  10. 34 CFR 606.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 606.30 Section 606.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING...

  11. 34 CFR 606.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 606.30 Section 606.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING...

  12. 41 CFR 302-17.3 - Types of moving expenses or allowances covered and general limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-RELOCATION INCOME TAX (RIT) ALLOWANCE § 302-17.3 Types of moving expenses or allowances covered and general limitations. The RIT allowance is limited by law as to the types of moving expenses that can be covered. The... furnished in kind or for which reimbursement or an allowance is provided to the transferred employee by...

  13. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  14. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  15. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  16. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  17. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  18. 75 FR 359 - Guidance on Simultaneous Transmission Import Limit Studies; Notice Allowing Post-Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Guidance on Simultaneous Transmission Import Limit Studies; Notice Allowing... provide guidance for performing Simultaneous Transmission Import Limit (SIL) studies. All...

  19. Weld stresses beyond elastic limit: Materials discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1989-01-01

    When welded structures depend on properties beyond the elastic limit to qualify their ultimate safety factor, and weld-parent materials abruptly change at the interface, then stress discontinuity is inevitable. The stress concentration is mildly sensitive to material relative strain hardening and acutely sensitive to applied stress fields. Peak stresses occur on the weld surface, at the interface, and dissipate within a 0.01-inch band. When the stress is intense, the weld will always fracture at the interface. The analysis incorporates a classical mechanics model to more sharply define stress spikes within the bandwidth, and suggests a relative material index and Poisson's ratio related to strain hardening. Implications are discussed which are applicable to industries of high performance structures.

  20. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  1. 34 CFR 608.40 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES PROGRAM What Conditions Must a Grantee Meet? § 608.40 What are allowable... paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a grantee may expend grant funds for activities that are related to.... Grant funds shall be used so that they supplement, and to the extent practical, increase the funds...

  2. Nitrogen and phosphorous limitations significantly reduce future allowable CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Ying-Ping; Matear, Richard; Pitman, Andy; Dai, Yongjiu

    2014-05-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) can be used to diagnose the emissions of CO2 allowed in order to follow the representative concentration pathways (RCPs) that are consistent with different climate scenarios. By mass balance, the allowable emission is calculated as the sum of the changes in atmospheric CO2, land and ocean carbon pools. Only two ESMs used in the fifth assessment (AR5) of International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) include nitrogen (N) limitation, and none include phosphorous (P) limitation. In this study we quantified the effects of N and P limitations on the allowable emissions using an ESM simulating land and ocean CO2 exchanges to the atmosphere in RCPs used for IPCC AR5. The model can run with carbon cycle alone (C only), carbon and nitrogen (CN) or carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (CNP) cycles as its land configurations. We used the simulated land and ocean carbon accumulation rates from 1850 to 2100 to diagnose the allowable emissions for each of three simulations (C only, CN or CNP). These were then compared with the emissions estimated by the Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) used to generate RCP2.6 and RCP8.5. N and P limitations on land in our ESM led to systematically lower land carbon uptake, and thus reduced allowable emissions by 69 Pg C (21%) for RCP2.6, and by 250 Pg C (13%) for RCP8.5 from 2006 to 2100. Our results demonstrated that including N and P limitations requires a greater reduction in human CO2 emissions than assumed in the IAMs used to generate the RCPs. Reference: Zhang, Q., Y. P. Wang, R. J. Matear, A. J. Pitman, and Y. J. Dai (2014), Nitrogen and phosphorous limitations significantly reduce future allowable CO2 emissions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, doi:10.1002/2013GL058352.

  3. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  4. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  5. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  6. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  7. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  8. US Supreme Court allows limits on AIDS-related insurance benefits.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R

    2000-01-01

    In a ruling issued on 10 January 2000 with respect to Doe v Mutual of Omaha Insurance, the US Supreme Court refused to review a lower-court decision allowing an insurance company to limit health-care benefits for AIDS-related claims to less than one-tenth of what it pays under the same policies for expenses related to other illnesses. The lower court had ruled that anti-discrimination legislation does not apply to insurance policies.

  9. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... round, rectangular, or gusset braces shall be 9,000 psi. Strength of Materials ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS... maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  10. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... round, rectangular, or gusset braces shall be 9,000 psi. Strength of Materials ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS... maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  11. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... round, rectangular, or gusset braces shall be 9,000 psi. Strength of Materials ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS... maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  12. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... round, rectangular, or gusset braces shall be 9,000 psi. Strength of Materials ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS... maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  13. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... round, rectangular, or gusset braces shall be 9,000 psi. Strength of Materials ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS... maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  14. Investigation on the presence of sulphites in fresh meat preparations: estimation of an allowable maximum limit.

    PubMed

    Iammarino, Marco; Di Taranto, Aurelia; Muscarella, Marilena

    2012-02-01

    Sulphiting agents are commonly used food additives. They are not allowed in fresh meat preparations. In this work, 2250 fresh meat samples were analysed to establish the maximum concentration of sulphites that can be considered as "natural" and therefore be admitted in fresh meat preparations. The analyses were carried out by an optimised Monier-Williams Method and the positive samples confirmed by ion chromatography. Sulphite concentrations higher than the screening method LOQ (10.0 mg · kg(-1)) were found in 100 samples. Concentrations higher than 76.6 mg · kg(-1), attributable to sulphiting agent addition, were registered in 40 samples. Concentrations lower than 41.3 mg · kg(-1) were registered in 60 samples. Taking into account the distribution of sulphite concentrations obtained, it is plausible to estimate a maximum allowable limit of 40.0 mg · kg(-1) (expressed as SO(2)). Below this value the samples can be considered as "compliant".

  15. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  16. 41 CFR 302-17.3 - Types of moving expenses or allowances covered and general limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... actually paid or incurred, and are not allowable as a moving expense deduction for tax purposes. The types....) (e) Househunting trip. Travel (including per diem) and transportation expenses of the employee and spouse for one round trip to the new official station to seek permanent residence quarters. (See part...

  17. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... to drought, (v) The net operating loss deduction allowed by section 172, or the corresponding... and expenses must be directly attributable to drought conditions and not to other causes such...

  18. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... to drought, (v) The net operating loss deduction allowed by section 172, or the corresponding... and expenses must be directly attributable to drought conditions and not to other causes such...

  19. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... to drought, (v) The net operating loss deduction allowed by section 172, or the corresponding... and expenses must be directly attributable to drought conditions and not to other causes such...

  20. Limiting metabolic rate (thermal work limit) as an index of thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Brake, Derrick J; Bates, Graham P

    2002-03-01

    The development of a rational heat stress index called thermal work limit (TWL) is presented. TWL is defined as the limiting (or maximum) sustainable metabolic rate that euhydrated, acclimatized individuals can maintain in a specific thermal environment, within a safe deep body core temperature (< 38.20 degrees C) and sweat rate (< 1.2 kg/hr(-1)). The index has been developed using published experimental studies of human heat transfer, and established heat and moisture transfer equations through clothing. Clothing parameters can be varied and the protocol can be extended to unacclimatized workers. The index is designed specifically for self-paced workers and does not rely on estimation of actual metabolic rates, a process that is difficult and subject to considerable error. The index has been introduced into several large industrial operations located well inside the tropics, resulting in a substantial and sustained fall in the incidence of heat illness. Guidelines for TWL are proposed along with recommended interventions. TWL has application to professionals from both the human and engineering sciences, as it allows not only thermal strain to be evaluated,. but also the productivity decrement due to heat (seen as a reduced sustainable metabolic rate) and the impact of various strategies such as improved local ventilation or refrigeration to be quantitatively assessed.

  1. Plate and butt-weld stresses beyond elastic limit, material and structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1991-01-01

    Ultimate safety factors of high performance structures depend on stress behavior beyond the elastic limit, a region not too well understood. An analytical modeling approach was developed to gain fundamental insights into inelastic responses of simple structural elements. Nonlinear material properties were expressed in engineering stresses and strains variables and combined with strength of material stress and strain equations similar to numerical piece-wise linear method. Integrations are continuous which allows for more detailed solutions. Included with interesting results are the classical combined axial tension and bending load model and the strain gauge conversion to stress beyond the elastic limit. Material discontinuity stress factors in butt-welds were derived. This is a working-type document with analytical methods and results applicable to all industries of high reliability structures.

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part...

  3. The stress field in Europe: optimal orientations with confidence limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carafa, M. M. C.; Barba, S.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we modify and extend a data analysis technique to determine the stress orientations between data clusters by adding an additional constraint governing the probability algorithm. We apply this technique to produce a map of the maximum horizontal compressive stress (SHmax) orientations in the greater European region (including Europe, Turkey and Mediterranean Africa). Using the World Stress Map data set release 2008, we obtain analytical probability distributions of the directional differences as a function of the angular distance, θ. We then multiply the probability distributions that are based on pre-averaged data within θ < 3° of the interpolation point and determine the maximum likelihood estimate of the SHmax orientation. At a given distance, the probability of obtaining a particular discrepancy decreases exponentially with discrepancy. By exploiting this feature observed in the World Stress Map release 2008 data set, we increase the robustness of our SHmax determinations. For a reliable determination of the most likely SHmax orientation, we require that 90 per cent confidence limits be less than ±60° and a minimum of three clusters, which is achieved for 57 per cent of the study area, with uncertainties of less than ±30° for 19 per cent of the area. When the data density exceeds 0.8 × 10-3 data km-2, our method provides a means of reproducing significant local patterns in the stress field. Several mountain ranges in the Mediterranean display 90° changes in the SHmax orientation from their crests (which often experience normal faulting) and their foothills (which often experience thrust faulting). This pattern constrains the tectonic stresses to a magnitude similar to that of the topographic stresses.

  4. Using the written description requirement to limit broad patent scope, allow competition, and encourage innovation in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Mull, William C

    2004-01-01

    The biotechnology research and development process is extremely expensive and companies must attract investors to this high-risk industry to pay for these costs. Biotechnology companies rely on their ability to exclude others from exploiting the benefits of their research through patent protection to attract these investors. Consequently, they seek strong patent protection for their inventions by claiming a broad scope of patent protection for their inventions. Biotechnology is an industry where the scope of protection should be limited. Science-based technologies exploit the perceived technological opportunities from recent scientific developments, concentrating the attention of many inventors on the same areas. This poses several unique problems. First, only the first of several inventors will receive a patent to the invention. Second, due to publicly available, basic techniques, the actual contribution made by the inventor may be relatively small. Finally, there is a significant risk that permitting an overbroad patent scope may permit original patentees to control a variety of improvements and a number of applications. Additionally, a broad scope of protection for an invention tends to cause underutilization of many potential inventions or improvements. By limiting the scope of protection, one allows competitors to utilize these potential inventions or improvements and encourages the advancement of the technology. Traditionally, courts have used the scope of the disclosure to limit a patent with an overly broad scope of protection. The Federal Circuit is correctly applying the written description requirement as part of the disclosure to limit broad claim scope in biotechnology patents. The written description requirement is separate from the enablement requirement and applies to all claims. By requiring a written description to allow a PHOSITA to determine the structural characteristics of the claimed invention, the Federal Circuit is able limit biotechnology

  5. Modulation of oxidative stress and subsequent induction of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress allows citral to decrease cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Arvinder; Felder, Mildred; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjot; Czarnecki, Austin; Rathi, Kavya; Zeng, San; Osowski, Kathryn Kalady; Howell, Colin; Xiong, May P.; Whelan, Rebecca J.; Patankar, Manish S.

    2016-01-01

    The monoterpenoid, citral, when delivered through PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles inhibits in vivo growth of 4T1 breast tumors. Here, we show that citral inhibits proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines. In p53 expressing ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 but not in p53-deficient SKOV-3 cells, citral induces G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and increased cleaved caspase3 and Bax and decreased Bcl-2. In SKOV-3 cells, citral induces the ER stress markers CHOP, GADD45, EDEM, ATF4, Hsp90, ATG5, and phospho-eIF2α. The molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuates citral activity in SKOV-3 but not in ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 cells. In p53-expressing cells, citral increases phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53. Activation of p53 increases Bax, PUMA, and NOXA expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α, attenuates citral-mediated apoptosis. Citral increases intracellular oxygen radicals and this leads to activation of p53. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by L-buthionine sulfoxamine increases potency of citral. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine decreases phosphorylation of p53 in citral-treated ECC-1 and OVCAR-3. These results define a p53-dependent, and in the absence of p53, ER stress-dependent mode of action of citral. This study indicates that citral in PEG-b-PCL nanoparticle formulation should be considered for treatment of breast and other tumors. PMID:27270209

  6. Modulation of oxidative stress and subsequent induction of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress allows citral to decrease cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Arvinder; Felder, Mildred; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjot; Czarnecki, Austin; Rathi, Kavya; Zeng, San; Osowski, Kathryn Kalady; Howell, Colin; Xiong, May P; Whelan, Rebecca J; Patankar, Manish S

    2016-01-01

    The monoterpenoid, citral, when delivered through PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles inhibits in vivo growth of 4T1 breast tumors. Here, we show that citral inhibits proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines. In p53 expressing ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 but not in p53-deficient SKOV-3 cells, citral induces G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and increased cleaved caspase3 and Bax and decreased Bcl-2. In SKOV-3 cells, citral induces the ER stress markers CHOP, GADD45, EDEM, ATF4, Hsp90, ATG5, and phospho-eIF2α. The molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuates citral activity in SKOV-3 but not in ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 cells. In p53-expressing cells, citral increases phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53. Activation of p53 increases Bax, PUMA, and NOXA expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α, attenuates citral-mediated apoptosis. Citral increases intracellular oxygen radicals and this leads to activation of p53. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by L-buthionine sulfoxamine increases potency of citral. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine decreases phosphorylation of p53 in citral-treated ECC-1 and OVCAR-3. These results define a p53-dependent, and in the absence of p53, ER stress-dependent mode of action of citral. This study indicates that citral in PEG-b-PCL nanoparticle formulation should be considered for treatment of breast and other tumors. PMID:27270209

  7. Strain limit dependence on stress triaxiality for pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.-C.; Chen, G.; Yang, X.-F.; Xu, T.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the failure characteristics of pressure vessel materials were investigated, and measurement and analysis approaches for ductile fracture strains were studied. Based on uniaxial tensile tests of notched round bar specimens, combined with finite element analyses and microscopic observations of fracture surface, the relationships between the stress triaxiality factor and the ductile fracture strain are proposed for three typical Chinese pressure vessel steels, 16MnR, Q235 and 0Cr18Ni9. The comparison of experimental fracture strains with the multiaxial strain limit specified in ASME VIII-2 2007 shows that the strain limit criterion of ASME is suitable for carbon steels but not suitable for austenitic stainless steels for Chinese pressure vessel steels. To improve the calculation accuracy for fracture strain of materials and to develop the strain limit criterion for Chinese pressure vessel materials, more experimental studies and numerical analyses on fracture strain are necessary.

  8. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  9. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  10. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  11. Modifications to the Paterson triaxial rock deformation apparatus to allow combined stress testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, S.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Xiao, W. F.; Covey-Crump, S. J.; Rutter, E. H.

    2010-12-01

    Almost all rock deformation experiments are performed in pure shear (axial compression or extension) or simple shear (torsion). However, in general, natural deformation can be expected to occur under some combination of these end member loading geometries. One of the most widely used apparatus for deforming geological samples at elevated temperatures and confining pressures is the Paterson triaxial rock deformation apparatus which is now installed in several experimental rock deformation facilities worldwide. In basic design this apparatus has the capacity for deforming samples under simultaneously applied axial loads and torques but modifications are required to the way in which axial load and torque are measured during such experiments if the mechanical data acquired are to be meaningful. Two design complications in particular arise. Firstly, at present axial load and torque are measured by a single slotted elastic element which undergoes measurable (and hence able to be calibrated) elastic distortions in response to applied axial loads and torques. The use of a single element presents no difficulties if either axial loads or torques are applied but when they are applied together the torque leads to an apparent but not real axial load and vice versa. Secondly, in a torsion test it is important to be able to detect the point during twisting at which all the slack within the rig - needed to allow test assembly - has been taken up and initial torque is applied to the sample. In a pure torsion test this is achieved by having a gap between the axial ram (containing the load cell) and the sample assembly but when there is a simultaneously applied axial load this gap is closed and the resulting friction at this surface means that torque is transferred to the load cell from the onset of twisting. In this contribution we show how a low-friction thrust bearing assembly located between the axial ram and sample assembly can be used to provide a relatively easy and

  12. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven C; Huber, Matthew

    2010-05-25

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature T(W), is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. T(W) never exceeds 31 degrees C. Any exceedence of 35 degrees C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 degrees C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11-12 degrees C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 degrees C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record.

  13. Monolayer stress microscopy: limitations, artifacts, and accuracy of recovered intercellular stresses.

    PubMed

    Tambe, Dhananjay T; Croutelle, Ugo; Trepat, Xavier; Park, Chan Young; Kim, Jae Hun; Millet, Emil; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    In wound healing, tissue growth, and certain cancers, the epithelial or the endothelial monolayer sheet expands. Within the expanding monolayer sheet, migration of the individual cell is strongly guided by physical forces imposed by adjacent cells. This process is called plithotaxis and was discovered using Monolayer Stress Microscopy (MSM). MSM rests upon certain simplifying assumptions, however, concerning boundary conditions, cell material properties and system dimensionality. To assess the validity of these assumptions and to quantify associated errors, here we report new analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations. For several commonly used experimental monolayer systems, the simplifying assumptions used previously lead to errors that are shown to be quite small. Out-of-plane components of displacement and traction fields can be safely neglected, and characteristic features of intercellular stresses that underlie plithotaxis remain largely unaffected. Taken together, these findings validate Monolayer Stress Microscopy within broad but well-defined limits of applicability.

  14. Setting heat stress limits for acclimatised soldiers exercising in heat.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C

    1997-02-01

    Heat illness is a recognised risk of military training. The Combat Fitness Test (CFT) has been identified as an activity that has been associated with heat casualties. The aim of this study was to establish whether a heat stress limit could be set for acclimatised soldiers performing the CFT by measuring the group mean rises in core temperature whilst performing the CFT at various environmental temperatures. The study showed that CFTs should not be undertaken when the start or expected end Wet Bulb Globe Test (WBGT) is greater than 25 degrees C if the group mean rise in core temperature is not to exceed 0.6 degree C (95% CI 0.2 degree C to 1 degree C).

  15. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  16. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression.

    PubMed

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-05-03

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients.

  17. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  18. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather...), you must meet the appropriate emission limits in the following table: Type of Leather Product...

  19. Torsional stress in DNA limits collaboration among reverse gyrase molecules.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taisaku; Sutoh, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Reverse gyrase is an enzyme that can overwind (introduce positive supercoils into) DNA using the energy obtained from ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme is found in hyperthermophiles, and the overwinding reaction generally requires a temperature above 70 °C. In a previous study using microscopy, we have shown that 30 consecutive mismatched base pairs (a bubble) in DNA serve as a well-defined substrate site for reverse gyrase, warranting the processive overwinding activity down to 50 °C. Here, we inquire how multiple reverse gyrase molecules may collaborate with each other in overwinding one DNA molecule. We introduced one, two, or four bubbles in a linear DNA that tethered a magnetic bead to a coverslip surface. At 40-71 °C in the presence of reverse gyrase, the bead rotated clockwise as viewed from above, to relax the DNA twisted by reverse gyrase. Dependence on the enzyme concentration indicated that each bubble binds reverse gyrase tightly (dissociation constant < 0.1 nm) and that bound enzyme continuously overwinds DNA for > 5 min. Rotation with two bubbles was significantly faster compared with one bubble, indicating that overwinding actions are basically additive, but four bubbles did not show further acceleration except at 40 °C where the activity was very low. The apparent saturation is due to the hydrodynamic friction against the rotating bead, as confirmed by increasing the medium viscosity. When torsional stress in the DNA, determined by the friction, approaches ~ 7 pN·nm (at 71 °C), the overwinding activity of reverse gyrase drops sharply. Multiple molecules of reverse gyrase collaborate additively within this limit.

  20. Aneuploidy-induced cellular stresses limit autophagic degradation

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vasile, Eliza; White, Eileen; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    An unbalanced karyotype, a condition known as aneuploidy, has a profound impact on cellular physiology and is a hallmark of cancer. Aneuploid cells experience a number of stresses that are caused by aneuploidy-induced proteomic changes. How the aneuploidy-associated stresses affect cells and whether cells respond to them are only beginning to be understood. Here we show that autophagosomal cargo such as protein aggregates accumulate within lysosomes in aneuploid cells. This causes a lysosomal stress response. Aneuploid cells activate the transcription factor TFEB, a master regulator of autophagic and lysosomal gene expression, thereby increasing the expression of genes needed for autophagy-mediated protein degradation. Accumulation of autophagic cargo within the lysosome and activation of TFEB-responsive genes are also observed in cells in which proteasome function is inhibited, suggesting that proteotoxic stress causes TFEB activation. Our results reveal a TFEB-mediated lysosomal stress response as a universal feature of the aneuploid state. PMID:26404941

  1. Drought-induced trans-generational tradeoff between stress tolerance and defence: consequences for range limits?

    PubMed Central

    Alsdurf, Jacob D.; Ripley, Tayler J.; Matzner, Steven L.; Siemens, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Areas just across species range boundaries are often stressful, but even with ample genetic variation within and among range-margin populations, adaptation towards stress tolerance across range boundaries often does not occur. Adaptive trans-generational plasticity should allow organisms to circumvent these problems for temporary range expansion; however, range boundaries often persist. To investigate this dilemma, we drought stressed a parent generation of Boechera stricta (A.Gray) A. Löve & D. Löve, a perennial wild relative of Arabidopsis, representing genetic variation within and among several low-elevation range margin populations. Boechera stricta is restricted to higher, moister elevations in temperate regions where generalist herbivores are often less common. Previous reports indicate a negative genetic correlation (genetic tradeoff) between chemical defence allocation and abiotic stress tolerance that may prevent the simultaneous evolution of defence and drought tolerance that would be needed for range expansion. In growth chamber experiments, the genetic tradeoff became undetectable among offspring sib-families whose parents had been drought treated, suggesting that the stress-induced trans-generational plasticity may circumvent the genetic tradeoff and thus enable range expansion. However, the trans-generational effects also included a conflict between plastic responses (environmental tradeoff); offspring whose parents were drought treated were more drought tolerant, but had lower levels of glucosinolate toxins that function in defence against generalist herbivores. We suggest that either the genetic or environmental tradeoff between defence allocation and stress tolerance has the potential to contribute to range limit development in upland mustards. PMID:24307931

  2. Photosynthetic limitations of a halophyte sea aster (Aster tripolium L) under water stress and NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akihiro; Kanechi, Michio; Uno, Yuichi; Inagaki, Noboru

    2003-02-01

    To understand the mechanisms of salt tolerance in a halophyte, sea aster ( Aster tripolium L.), we studied the changes of water relation and the factors of photosynthetic limitation under water stress and 300 mM NaCl stress. The contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) were highest in NaCl-stressed leaves. Leaf osmotic potentials ( Psi(s)) were decreased by both stress treatments, whereas leaf turgor pressure ( Psi(t)) was maintained under NaCl stress. Decrease in Psi(s) without any loss of Psi(t) accounted for osmotic adjustment using Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulated under NaCl stress. Stress treatments affected photosynthesis, and stomatal limitation was higher under water stress than under NaCl stress. Additionally, maximum CO(2) fixation rate and O(2) evolution rate decreased only under water stress, indicating irreversible damage to photosynthetic systems, mainly by dehydration. Water stress severely affected the water relation and photosynthetic capacity. On the other hand, turgid leaves under NaCl stress have dehydration tolerance due to maintenance of Psi(t) and photosynthetic activity. These results show that sea aster might not suffer from tissue dehydration in highly salinized environments. We conclude that the adaptation of sea aster to salinity may be accomplished by osmotic adjustment using accumulated Na(+) and Cl(-), and that this plant has typical halophyte characteristics, but not drought tolerance.

  3. [STRESS AND INFARCT LIMITING EFFECTS OF EARLY HYPOXIC PRECONDITIONING].

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, Yu B; Maslov, L N; Sementsov, A S; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tsibulnikov, S Yu

    2015-09-01

    It was established that early hypoxic preconditioning is an adaptive state different from eustress and distress. Hypoxic preconditioning has the cross effects, increasing the tolerance of the heart to ischemia-reperfusion and providing antiulcerogenic effect during immobilization stress.

  4. Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment. A correct simulation of crop responses to water stress is essential for a system model. In this study, we investigated three methods of quantifying water deficit stresses based on soil water meas...

  5. [STRESS AND INFARCT LIMITING EFFECTS OF EARLY HYPOXIC PRECONDITIONING].

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, Yu B; Maslov, L N; Sementsov, A S; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tsibulnikov, S Yu

    2015-09-01

    It was established that early hypoxic preconditioning is an adaptive state different from eustress and distress. Hypoxic preconditioning has the cross effects, increasing the tolerance of the heart to ischemia-reperfusion and providing antiulcerogenic effect during immobilization stress. PMID:26672158

  6. 50 CFR Table 1 (north) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10′ N....

  7. 50 CFR Table 1 (south) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10′ N....

  8. 41 CFR 302-7.17 - Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Is the maximum weight... Government OCONUS or upon return to CONUS? 302-7.17 Section 302-7.17 Public Contracts and Property Management...) General Rules § 302-7.17 Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited...

  9. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or local housing credit agency (temporary). 1.42-1T Section 1.42-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME...

  10. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed... to $1.25 multiplied by the State's population. A State's population for any calendar year is... the Bureau of the Census publication, “Current Population Reports, Series P-25: Population...

  11. Reversible stress and strain limits of the critical current of practical REBCO and BSCCO wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, K.; Machiya, S.; Nishijima, G.

    2016-09-01

    Practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 tape-shaped wires are now manufactured on an industrial scale. They are a typical composite material consisting of superconducting layer/filaments together with functional components. These functional components affect directly the stress and strain dependences of the critical current. When applying an external stress R, the critical current I c was measured. Then the external stress was reduced to R = 0 and the recovered critical current I cr was again measured. The tensile stress and strain dependences of both normalized critical currents divided by the original value, I c/I c0 and I cr/I c0 were investigated. In general I cr/I c0 recovered close to unity when the applied stress was low, but its recovering level decreased gradually with increasing applied stress. The definition of the reversible stress and strain limits was investigated and its validity was proved using the cyclic loading test. The original definition of reversible stress and strain limits of critical current relates to: (1) when releasing the applied stress and strain, the I c shall recover to the original value, and (2) when applying the cyclic stresses, the I c shall keep the original value. Here, as a practical definition for the reversible stress and strain limits, the tensile stress and strain at 99% recovery of I c have been proposed. On the other hand, it was made clear that the stress and strain at I c 95% retention are not valid for use commonly as a criterion of reversible stress and strain limits for both practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 wires.

  12. Leveraging oxidative stress questions in vivo: Implications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Arteel, Gavin E

    2016-04-01

    The elegance of Helmut Sies' original definition of oxidative stress belies the complexity of the reactions that are potentially involved. This is by no means a criticism of the author, but rather how the words have been used to oversimplify the concept by some. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can be products of a myriad of events within the living body. Indeed, it is now understood that ROS/RNS are critical for normal cellular metabolism and have beneficial effects (e.g., cytotoxicity against invading bacteria). A general problem of studying prooxidants in vivo is that, due to their inherent reactivity, they generally cannot be measured directly. This indirect detection of 'footprints' leaves a very large black box that we are to this day only beginning to understand. This manuscript will summarize some considerations that are of utmost importance when translating oxidative stress into in vivo research. Helmut has been a key thought leader, researcher and mentor whose contributions to this field are immeasurable. PMID:27095213

  13. Leveraging oxidative stress questions in vivo: Implications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Arteel, Gavin E.

    2016-01-01

    The elegance of Helmut Sies’ original definition of oxidative stress belies the complexity of the reactions that are potentially involved. This is by no means a criticism of the author, but rather how the words have been used to oversimplify the concept by some. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can be products of a myriad of events within the living body. Indeed, it is now understood that ROS/RNS are critical for normal cellular metabolism and have beneficial effects (e.g., cytotoxicity against invading bacteria). A general problem of studying prooxidants in vivo is that, due to their inherent reactivity, they generally cannot be measured directly. This indirect detection of ‘footprints’ leaves a very large black box that we are to this day only beginning to understand. This manuscript will summarize some considerations that are of utmost importance when translating oxidative stress into in vivo research. Helmut has been a key thought leader, researcher and mentor whose contributions to this field are immeasurable. PMID:27095213

  14. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  15. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  16. Upregulation of the mitochondrial Lon Protease allows adaptation to acute oxidative stress but dysregulation is associated with chronic stress, disease, and aging.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Jenny K; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2013-02-09

    The elimination of oxidatively modified proteins is a crucial process in maintaining cellular homeostasis, especially during stress. Mitochondria are protein-dense, high traffic compartments, whose polypeptides are constantly exposed to superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and other reactive species, generated by 'electron leakage' from the respiratory chain. The level of oxidative stress to mitochondrial proteins is not constant, but instead varies greatly with numerous metabolic and environmental factors. Oxidized mitochondrial proteins must be removed rapidly (by proteolytic degradation) or they will aggregate, cross-link, and cause toxicity. The Lon Protease is a key enzyme in the degradation of oxidized proteins within the mitochondrial matrix. Under conditions of acute stress Lon is highly inducible, possibly with the oxidant acting as the signal inducer, thereby providing increased protection. It seems that under chronic stress conditions, however, Lon levels actually decline. Lon levels also decline with age and with senescence, and senescent cells even lose the ability to induce Lon during acute stress. We propose that the regulation of Lon is biphasic, in that it is up-regulated during transient stress and down-regulated during chronic stress and aging, and we suggest that the loss of Lon responsiveness may be a significant factor in aging, and in age-related diseases.

  17. Contaminant and food limitation stress in an endangered estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Hammock, Bruce G; Hobbs, James A; Slater, Steven B; Acuña, Shawn; Teh, Swee J

    2015-11-01

    The abundance of Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), a fish species endemic to the upper San Francisco Estuary (SFE), is declining. Several causes for the population decline have been proposed, including food limitation and contaminant effects. Here, using juvenile Delta Smelt collected from throughout their range, we measured a suite of indices across three levels of biological organization (cellular, organ, individual) that reflect fish condition at temporal scales ranging from hours to weeks. Using these indices, the relative conditions of fish collected from five regions in the SFE were compared: Cache Slough, Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, Confluence, Suisun Bay and Suisun Marsh. Fish sampled from Suisun Bay and, to a lesser extent the Confluence, exhibited relatively poor short-term nutritional and growth indices and morphometric condition, while fish from the freshwater regions of the estuary, and Cache Slough in particular, exhibited the most apparent histopathological signs of contaminant exposure. In contrast, fish from the Suisun Marsh region exhibited higher short-term nutrition and growth indices, and better morphometric and histopathological condition. For instance, fish collected from Suisun Marsh had a mean stomach fullness, expressed as a percentage of fish weight, that was 3.4-fold higher than fish collected from Suisun Bay, while also exhibiting an incidence of histopathological lesions that was 11-fold lower than fish collected from Cache Slough. Thus, our findings support the hypothesis that multiple stressors, including food limitation and contaminants, are contributing to the decline of Delta Smelt, and that these stressors influence Delta Smelt heterogeneously across space. PMID:26081734

  18. Contaminant and food limitation stress in an endangered estuarine fish

    PubMed Central

    Hammock, Bruce G.; Hobbs, James A.; Slater, Steven B.; Acuña, Shawn; Teh, Swee J.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), a fish species endemic to the upper San Francisco Estuary (SFE), is declining. Several causes for the population decline have been proposed, including food limitation and contaminant effects. Here, using juvenile Delta Smelt collected from throughout their range, we measured a suite of indices across three levels of biological organization (cellular, organ, individual) that reflect fish condition at temporal scales ranging from hours to weeks. Using these indices, the relative conditions of fish collected from five regions in the SFE were compared: Cache Slough, Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, Confluence, Suisun Bay and Suisun Marsh. Fish sampled from Suisun Bay and, to a lesser extent the Confluence, exhibited relatively poor short-term nutritional and growth indices and morphometric condition, while fish from the freshwater regions of the estuary, and Cache Slough in particular, exhibited the most apparent histopathological signs of contaminant exposure. In contrast, fish from the Suisun Marsh region exhibited higher short-term nutrition and growth indices, and better morphometric and histopathological condition. For instance, fish collected from Suisun Marsh had a mean stomach fullness, expressed as a percentage of fish weight, that was 3.4-fold higher than fish collected from Suisun Bay, while also exhibiting an incidence of histopathological lesions that was 11-fold lower than fish collected from Cache Slough. Thus, our findings support the hypothesis that multiple stressors, including food limitation and contaminants, are contributing to the decline of Delta Smelt, and that these stressors influence Delta Smelt heterogeneously across space. PMID:26081734

  19. Ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation can both induce photoprotective capacity allowing barley to overcome high radiation stress.

    PubMed

    Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Štroch, Michal; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír; Tříska, Jan; Jansen, Marcel A K; Robson, T Matthew; Urban, Otmar

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of acclimation to ultraviolet (UV) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on photoprotective mechanisms in barley leaves. Barley plants were acclimated for 7 days under three combinations of high or low UV and PAR treatments ([UV-PAR-], [UV-PAR+], [UV+PAR+]). Subsequently, plants were exposed to short-term high radiation stress (HRS; defined by high intensities of PAR - 1000 μmol m(-2) s(-1), UV-A - 10 W m(-2) and UV-B 2 W m(-2) for 4 h), to test their photoprotective capacity. The barley variety sensitive to photooxidative stress (Barke) had low constitutive flavonoid content compared to the resistant variety (Bonus) under low UV and PAR intensities. The accumulation of lutonarin and 3-feruloylquinic acid, but not of saponarin, was greatly enhanced by high PAR and further increased by UV exposure. Acclimation of plants to both high UV and PAR intensities also increased the total pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ). Subsequent exposure to HRS revealed that prior acclimation to UV and PAR was able to ameliorate the negative consequences of HRS on photosynthesis. Both total contents of epidermal flavonols and the total pool of VAZ were closely correlated with small reductions in light-saturated CO2 assimilation rate and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry caused by HRS. Based on these results, we conclude that growth under high PAR can substantially increase the photoprotective capacity of barley plants compared with plants grown under low PAR. However, additional UV radiation is necessary to fully induce photoprotective mechanisms in the variety Barke. This study demonstrates that UV-exposure can lead to enhanced photoprotective capacity and can contribute to the induction of tolerance to high radiation stress in barley.

  20. Root elongation, water stress, and mechanical impedance: a review of limiting stresses and beneficial root tip traits.

    PubMed

    Bengough, A Glyn; McKenzie, B M; Hallett, P D; Valentine, T A

    2011-01-01

    Root elongation in drying soil is generally limited by a combination of mechanical impedance and water stress. Relationships between root elongation rate, water stress (matric potential), and mechanical impedance (penetration resistance) are reviewed, detailing the interactions between these closely related stresses. Root elongation is typically halved in repacked soils with penetrometer resistances >0.8-2 MPa, in the absence of water stress. Root elongation is halved by matric potentials drier than about -0.5 MPa in the absence of mechanical impedance. The likelihood of each stress limiting root elongation is discussed in relation to the soil strength characteristics of arable soils. A survey of 19 soils, with textures ranging from loamy sand to silty clay loam, found that ∼10% of penetration resistances were >2 MPa at a matric potential of -10 kPa, rising to nearly 50% >2 MPa at - 200 kPa. This suggests that mechanical impedance is often a major limitation to root elongation in these soils even under moderately wet conditions, and is important to consider in breeding programmes for drought-resistant crops. Root tip traits that may improve root penetration are considered with respect to overcoming the external (soil) and internal (cell wall) pressures resisting elongation. The potential role of root hairs in mechanically anchoring root tips is considered theoretically, and is judged particularly relevant to roots growing in biopores or from a loose seed bed into a compacted layer of soil. PMID:21118824

  1. Effects of group size and floor space allowance on grouped sows: aggression, stress, skin injuries, and reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, P H; Rice, M; Nash, J; Giri, K; Butler, K L; Tilbrook, A J; Morrison, R S

    2013-10-01

    A total of 3,120 sows, in 4 time replicates, were used to determine the effects of group size and floor space on sow welfare using behavioral, physiological, health, and fitness variables. Within 1 to 7 d postinsemination, sows were assigned randomly to treatments of a 3 by 6 factorial arrangement, with 3 group sizes (10, 30, or 80 sows/pen) and 6 floor space allowances (1.4, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, or 3.0 m(2)/sow). Sows were housed on partially slatted concrete floors, and overhead feeders delivered 4 times/day to provide a total of 2.5 kg of feed/sow. As pen space increased from 1.4 to 3.0 m(2)/sow, aggression at feeding decreased from about 9 to 7 bouts/sow (linear, P = 0.029) and plasma cortisol concentrations decreased from about 28 to 21 ng/mL (linear, P = 0.0089) at 2 d. Although the results are in accord with a linear decline from 1.4 to 3 m(2)/sow, the results are also in accord with a decline in these measurements from 1.4 to 1.8 m(2)/sow and no further decline greater than 1.8 m(2)/sow. Farrowing rate (percentage of inseminated sows that farrowed) also increased from about 60 to 75% as space increased from 1.4 to 3.0 m(2)/sow (linear, P = 0.012). Group size was related to skin injuries on d 9 (P = 0.0017), 23 (P = 0.0046), and 51 (P = 0.0006), with groups of 10 consistently having the lowest number of total injuries over this period. Based on the aggression and cortisol results, it is credible to judge that, within the range of floor space allowances studied, sow welfare improves with increased space. However, from a sow welfare perspective, the experiment had insufficient precision to determine what is an adequate space allowance for sows. Thus, although the results definitely support a space allowance of 1.4 m(2)/sow being too small, it is not possible to give guidance on an actual space allowance at mixing that is adequate. PMID:23893983

  2. Regulation Systems of Bacteria such as Escherichia coli in Response to Nutrient Limitation and Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    An overview was made to understand the regulation system of a bacterial cell such as Escherichia coli in response to nutrient limitation such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulfur, ion sources, and environmental stresses such as oxidative stress, acid shock, heat shock, and solvent stresses. It is quite important to understand how the cell detects environmental signals, integrate such information, and how the cell system is regulated. As for catabolite regulation, F1,6B P (FDP), PEP, and PYR play important roles in enzyme level regulation together with transcriptional regulation by such transcription factors as Cra, Fis, CsrA, and cAMP-Crp. αKG plays an important role in the coordinated control between carbon (C)- and nitrogen (N)-limitations, where αKG inhibits enzyme I (EI) of phosphotransferase system (PTS), thus regulating the glucose uptake rate in accordance with N level. As such, multiple regulation systems are co-ordinated for the cell synthesis and energy generation against nutrient limitations and environmental stresses. As for oxidative stress, the TCA cycle both generates and scavenges the reactive oxygen species (ROSs), where NADPH produced at ICDH and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathways play an important role in coping with oxidative stress. Solvent resistant mechanism was also considered for the stresses caused by biofuels and biochemicals production in the cell. PMID:24958385

  3. Delayed healing of a navicular stress fracture, following limited weight-bearing activity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 21-year-old man, a semiprofessional football (soccer) player, with a navicular stress fracture. It highlights the difficulty in diagnosing the condition and the complications arising from inadequate management. The case discusses the optimal management of these stress fractures and the detrimental role of weight-bearing recovery. The diagnosis of navicular stress fractures is challenging, and a high index of suspicion is required. The available literature indicates that limited weightbearing is not an appropriate treatment for navicular stress injuries. Non-weight-bearing (NWB) cast immobilisation for 6–8 weeks appears to be the gold standard treatment; however, open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) has similar success rates and an equal return-to-play time but should also be followed by a period of NWB. NWB cast immobilisation for 6 weeks remains a good second option at any time following failed limited weight-bearing activity. PMID:24618870

  4. Methodology of strength calculation under alternating stresses using the diagram of limiting amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovodov, V. V.; Valentov, A. V.; Kukhar, I. S.; Retyunskiy, O. Yu; Baraksanov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The work proposes the algorithm to calculate strength under alternating stresses using the developed methodology of building the diagram of limiting stresses. The overall safety factor is defined by the suggested formula. Strength calculations of components working under alternating stresses in the great majority of cases are conducted as the checking ones. It is primarily explained by the fact that the overall fatigue strength reduction factor (Kσg or Kτg) can only be chosen approximately during the component design as the engineer at this stage of work has just the approximate idea on the component size and shape.

  5. Disentangling the contributions of ontogeny and water stress to photosynthetic limitations in almond trees.

    PubMed

    Egea, Gregorio; González-Real, María M; Baille, Alain; Nortes, Pedro A; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Very few studies have attempted to disentangle the respective role of ontogeny and water stress on leaf photosynthetic attributes. The relative significance of both effects on photosynthetic attributes has been investigated in leaves of field-grown almond trees [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D. A. Webb] during four growth cycles. Leaf ontogeny resulted in enhanced leaf dry weight per unit area (W(a)), greater leaf dry-to-fresh weight ratio and lower N content per unit of leaf dry weight (N(w)). Concomitantly, area-based maximum carboxylation rate (V(cmax)), maximum electron transport rate (J(max)), mesophyll conductance to CO₂ diffusion (gm)' and light-saturated net photosynthesis (A(max)) declined in both well-watered and water-stressed almond leaves. Although g(m) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) seemed to be co-ordinated, a much stronger coordination in response to ontogeny and prolonged water stress was observed between g(m) and the leaf photosynthetic capacity. Under unrestricted water supply, the leaf age-related decline of A(max) was equally driven by diffusional and biochemical limitations. Under restricted soil water availability, A(max) was mainly limited by g(s) and, to a lesser extent, by photosynthetic capacity and g(m). When both ontogeny and water stress effects were combined, diffusional limitations was the main determinant of photosynthesis limitation, while stomatal and biochemical limitations contributed similarly.

  6. Determining erodibility, critical shear stress, and allowable discharge estimates for cohesive channels: case study in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Thoman, R.W.; Niezgoda, S.L.

    2008-12-15

    The continuous discharge of coalbed natural gas-produced (CBNG-produced) water within ephemeral, cohesive channels in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming can result in significant erosion. A study was completed to investigate channel stability in an attempt to correlate cohesive soil properties to critical shear stress. An in situ jet device was used to determine critical shear stress (tau{sub c}) and erodibility (k{sub d}); cohesive soil properties were determined following ASTM procedures for 25 reaches. The study sites were comprised of erodible to moderately resistant clays with tau{sub c} ranging from 0.11 to 15.35 Pa and k{sub d} ranging from 0.27 to 2.38 cm{sup 3}/N s. A relationship between five cohesive soil characteristics and tau{sub c} was developed and presented for use in deriving tau{sub c} for similar sites. Allowable discharges for CBNG-produced water were also derived using tau{sub c} and the tractive force method. An increase in the allowable discharge was found for channels in which vegetation was maintained. The information from this case study is critical to the development of a conservative methodology to establish allowable discharges while minimizing flow-induced instability.

  7. FANCD2 limits replication stress and genome instability in cells lacking BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Michl, Johanna; Zimmer, Jutta; Buffa, Francesca M; McDermott, Ultan; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2016-08-01

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 plays a key role in genome integrity by promoting replication-fork stability and homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair. Here we report that human cancer cells lacking BRCA2 rely on the Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 to limit replication-fork progression and genomic instability. Our results identify a new role of FANCD2 in limiting constitutive replication stress in BRCA2-deficient cells, thereby affecting cell survival and treatment responses. PMID:27322732

  8. Using the least limiting water range to evaluate water stress on crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress caused by adverse soil physical conditions can cause major reductions in plant biomass and grain yield. We evaluated the Least Limiting Water Range (LLWR) against a procedure (here called the Jones model) commonly used to model adverse soil condition to determine which method more accur...

  9. A Comparative Study Between Strain And Stress Based Forming Limit Analysis By Applying Several Phenomenological Yield Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Butuc, Marilena C.; Vincze, Gabriela T.; Gracio, Jose J.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2005-08-05

    The present work aims at analyzing a comparative study between the strain-based forming limit criterion (FLD) and the stress-based forming limit criterion (FLSD), under linear and complex strain paths. The selected material is an AA5182-0 aluminium alloy. Some relevant remarks about stress-based forming limit criterion concept are presented.

  10. Investigating genotype specific response in photosynthetic behavior under drought stress and nitrogen limitation in Brassica rapa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleban, J. R.; Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Weinig, C.; Aston, T.

    2015-12-01

    Challenges in terrestrial ecosystem modeling include characterizing the impact of stress on vegetation and the heterogeneous behavior of different species within the environment. In an effort to address these challenges the impacts of drought and nutrient limitation on the CO2 assimilation of multiple genotypes of Brassica rapa was investigated using the Farquhar Model (FM) of photosynthesis following a Bayesian parameterization and updating scheme. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements from an unstressed group (well-watered/well-fertilized) and two stressed groups (drought/well-fertilized and well-watered/nutrient limited) were used to estimate FM model parameters. Unstressed individuals were used to initialize Bayesian parameter estimation. Posterior mean estimates yielded a close fit with data as observed assimilation (An) closely matched predicted (Ap) with mean standard error for all individuals ranging from 0.8 to 3.1 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Posterior parameter distributions of the unstressed individuals were combined and fit to distributions to establish species level Bayesian priors of FM parameters for testing stress responses. Species level distributions of unstressed group identified mean maximum rates of carboxylation standardized to 25° (Vcmax25) as 101.8 μmol m-2 s-1 (± 29.0) and mean maximum rates of electron transport standardized to 25° (Jmax25) as 319.7 μmol m-2 s-1 (± 64.4). These updated priors were used to test the response of drought and nutrient limitations on assimilation. In the well-watered/nutrient limited group a decrease of 28.0 μmol m-2 s-1 was observed in mean estimate of Vcmax25, a decrease of 27.9 μmol m-2 s-1 in Jmax25 and a decrease in quantum yield from 0.40 mol photon/mol e- in unstressed individuals to 0.14 in the nutrient limited group. In the drought/well-fertilized group a decrease was also observed in Vcmax25 and Jmax25. The genotype specific unstressed and stressed responses were then used to

  11. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; López-Contreras, Andrés J.; Martínez, Dolores; Cañamero, Marta; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Isern, Joan; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Méndez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative stress during embryonic development influences ageing and predisposition to disease in adults. A protective mechanism against replicative stress is provided by the licensing of thousands of origins in G1 that are not necessarily activated in the subsequent S-phase. These ‘dormant' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our results indicate that hematopoietic progenitors are particularly sensitive to replication stress, and full origin licensing ensures their correct differentiation and functionality. PMID:26456157

  12. A glycine betaine importer limits Salmonella stress resistance and tissue colonization by reducing trehalose production.

    PubMed

    Pilonieta, M Carolina; Nagy, Toni A; Jorgensen, Dana R; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2012-04-01

    Mechanisms by which Salmonella establish chronic infections are not well understood. Microbes respond to stress by importing or producing compatible solutes, small molecules that stabilize proteins and lipids. The Salmonella locus opuABCD (also called OpuC) encodes a predicted importer of the compatible solute glycine betaine. Under stress conditions, if glycine betaine cannot be imported, Salmonella enterica produce the disaccharide trehalose, a highly effective compatible solute. We demonstrate that strains lacking opuABCD accumulate more trehalose under stress conditions than wild-type strains. ΔopuABCD mutant strains are more resistant to high-salt, low-pH and -hydrogen peroxide, conditions that mimic aspects of innate immunity, in a trehalose-dependent manner. In addition, ΔopuABCD mutant strains require the trehalose production genes to out-compete wild-type strains in mice and macrophages. These data suggest that in the absence of opuABCD, trehalose accumulation increases bacterial resistance to stress in broth and mice. Thus, opuABCD reduces bacterial colonization via a mechanism that limits trehalose production. Mechanisms by which microbes limit disease may reveal novel pathways as therapeutic targets.

  13. Animal performance and stress: responses and tolerance limits at different levels of biological organisation.

    PubMed

    Kassahn, Karin S; Crozier, Ross H; Pörtner, Hans O; Caley, M Julian

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology and the use of DNA microarrays for gene expression profiling are providing new insights into the animal stress response, particularly the effects of stress on gene regulation. However, interpretation of the complex transcriptional changes that occur during stress still poses many challenges because the relationship between changes at the transcriptional level and other levels of biological organisation is not well understood. To confront these challenges, a conceptual model linking physiological and transcriptional responses to stress would be helpful. Here, we provide the basis for one such model by synthesising data from organismal, endocrine, cellular, molecular, and genomic studies. We show using available examples from ectothermic vertebrates that reduced oxygen levels and oxidative stress are common to many stress conditions and that the responses to different types of stress, such as environmental, handling and confinement stress, often converge at the challenge of dealing with oxygen imbalance and oxidative stress. As a result, a common set of stress responses exists that is largely independent of the type of stressor applied. These common responses include the repair of DNA and protein damage, cell cycle arrest or apoptosis, changes in cellular metabolism that reflect the transition from a state of cellular growth to one of cellular repair, the release of stress hormones, changes in mitochondrial densities and properties, changes in oxygen transport capacities and changes in cardio-respiratory function. Changes at the transcriptional level recapitulate these common responses, with many stress-responsive genes functioning in cell cycle control, regulation of transcription, protein turnover, metabolism, and cellular repair. These common transcriptional responses to stress appear coordinated by only a limited number of stress-inducible and redox-sensitive transcription factors and signal transduction pathways, such as the

  14. Anode plasma formation as a possible mechanism for an electrical stress limit in cold cathode diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent interest in scaling electron beam pumped KrF fusion lasers to the energy levels thought necessary for ignition (MJ-class) has stimulated the development of technology related to broad-area electron beam generators. At this conference, McGeoch has proposed, based upon an examination of widespread electron beam pumped KrF laser data, that a fundamental limit for electrical stress within the electron gun diode exists. McGeoch and others have attributed the mechanism for the limit to gas evolution at the anode due to heating by the e-beam, and a consequent breakdown in the diode due to this gas.

  15. Ochratoxin A induces rat renal carcinogenicity with limited induction of oxidative stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Liye; Gao, Jing; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2014-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) has displayed nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenicity in mammals, however, no clear mechanisms have been identified detailing the relationship between oxidative stress and these toxicities. This study was performed to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the renal carcinogenicity induced by OTA. Rats were treated with 70 or 210 μg/kg b.w. OTA for 4 or 13 weeks. In the rats administrated with OTA for 13 weeks, the kidney was damaged seriously. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Karyomegaly was prominent in the tubular epithelium. Kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) was detected in the outer stripe of the outer medulla in both low- and high-dose groups. OTA increased the mRNA levels of clusterin in rat kidneys. Interestingly, OTA did not significantly alter the oxidative stress level in rat liver and kidney. Yet, some indications related to proliferation and carcinogenicity were observed. A dose-related increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was observed at 4 weeks in both liver and kidney, but at 13 weeks, only in the kidney. OTA down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and up-regulated vimentin and lipocalin 2 in rat kidney at 13 weeks. The p53 gene was decreased in both liver and kidney at 13 weeks. These results suggest that OTA caused apparent kidney damage within 13 weeks but exerted limited effect on oxidative stress parameters. It implies that cell proliferation is the proposed mode of action for OTA-induced renal carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • We studied OTA toxicities in both the rat liver and kidney for 13 weeks. • OTA exerts limited effects on oxidative stress in the rat liver and kidney. • OTA induced renal carcinogenicity resulting from cell proliferation.

  16. Drought stress limits the geographic ranges of two tree species via different physiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, Leander D L; HilleRisLambers, Janneke

    2016-03-01

    Range shifts are among the most ubiquitous ecological responses to anthropogenic climate change and have large consequences for ecosystems. Unfortunately, the ecophysiological forces that constrain range boundaries are poorly understood, making it difficult to mechanistically project range shifts. To explore the physiological mechanisms by which drought stress controls dry range boundaries in trees, we quantified elevational variation in drought tolerance and in drought avoidance-related functional traits of a widespread gymnosperm (ponderosa pine - Pinus ponderosa) and angiosperm (trembling aspen - Populus tremuloides) tree species in the southwestern USA. Specifically, we quantified tree-to-tree variation in growth, water stress (predawn and midday xylem tension), drought avoidance traits (branch conductivity, leaf/needle size, tree height, leaf area-to-sapwood area ratio), and drought tolerance traits (xylem resistance to embolism, hydraulic safety margin, wood density) at the range margins and range center of each species. Although water stress increased and growth declined strongly at lower range margins of both species, ponderosa pine and aspen showed contrasting patterns of clinal trait variation. Trembling aspen increased its drought tolerance at its dry range edge by growing stronger but more carbon dense branch and leaf tissues, implying an increased cost of growth at its range boundary. By contrast, ponderosa pine showed little elevational variation in drought-related traits but avoided drought stress at low elevations by limiting transpiration through stomatal closure, such that its dry range boundary is associated with limited carbon assimilation even in average climatic conditions. Thus, the same climatic factor (drought) may drive range boundaries through different physiological mechanisms - a result that has important implications for process-based modeling approaches to tree biogeography. Further, we show that comparing intraspecific patterns of

  17. Drought stress limits the geographic ranges of two tree species via different physiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, Leander D L; HilleRisLambers, Janneke

    2016-03-01

    Range shifts are among the most ubiquitous ecological responses to anthropogenic climate change and have large consequences for ecosystems. Unfortunately, the ecophysiological forces that constrain range boundaries are poorly understood, making it difficult to mechanistically project range shifts. To explore the physiological mechanisms by which drought stress controls dry range boundaries in trees, we quantified elevational variation in drought tolerance and in drought avoidance-related functional traits of a widespread gymnosperm (ponderosa pine - Pinus ponderosa) and angiosperm (trembling aspen - Populus tremuloides) tree species in the southwestern USA. Specifically, we quantified tree-to-tree variation in growth, water stress (predawn and midday xylem tension), drought avoidance traits (branch conductivity, leaf/needle size, tree height, leaf area-to-sapwood area ratio), and drought tolerance traits (xylem resistance to embolism, hydraulic safety margin, wood density) at the range margins and range center of each species. Although water stress increased and growth declined strongly at lower range margins of both species, ponderosa pine and aspen showed contrasting patterns of clinal trait variation. Trembling aspen increased its drought tolerance at its dry range edge by growing stronger but more carbon dense branch and leaf tissues, implying an increased cost of growth at its range boundary. By contrast, ponderosa pine showed little elevational variation in drought-related traits but avoided drought stress at low elevations by limiting transpiration through stomatal closure, such that its dry range boundary is associated with limited carbon assimilation even in average climatic conditions. Thus, the same climatic factor (drought) may drive range boundaries through different physiological mechanisms - a result that has important implications for process-based modeling approaches to tree biogeography. Further, we show that comparing intraspecific patterns of

  18. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-02-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

  19. Features of the stress-strain state of Si/SiO{sub 2}/Ge heterostructures with germanium nanoislands of a limited density

    SciTech Connect

    Kuryliuk, V. V. Korotchenkov, O. A.

    2013-08-15

    Within the elastic continuum model, with the use of the finite-element method, the stress-strain state of silicon-germanium heterostructures with semispherical germanium islands grown on an oxidized silicon surface is calculated. It is shown that as the density of islands is increased to limiting values, in the SiGe structure with open quantum dots the value and spatial distribution of the elastic-strain fields significantly change. The results of theoretical calculation allow the heterostructure portions with the maximum variation in the stress-strain state to be determined. The position of such a portions can be controlled by changing the density of islands.

  20. Postdeployment driving stress and related occupational limitations among veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eric J; Peyton, Claudia G; Kim, David K; Nakama-Sato, Kristine K; Noble, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Difficulty in driving after deployment has emerged as an impediment for servicemembers returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF-OEF). This study explored postdeployment driving stress and related occupational limitations using two self-report instruments: the Driver's Stress Profile and the Driving and Occupational Limitations questionnaire. Data gathered from 103 OIF-OEF returnees confirmed that driving and related occupational issues occur postdeployment. Significant low to moderate correlations were found between postdeployment driving stress and limitations in community mobility, leisure, and social participation. The returnees who drove off base more frequently during deployment showed significantly higher levels of postdeployment driving stress than the returnees who drove off base less frequently. Moreover, the returnees who demonstrated higher levels of driving stress and occupational limitations required more time to resume normal driving postdeployment. Findings raise awareness about the need to design effective driver rehabilitation and community reintegration programs for this population.

  1. Reversible stress and strain limits of the critical current of practical REBCO and BSCCO wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, K.; Machiya, S.; Nishijima, G.

    2016-09-01

    Practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 tape-shaped wires are now manufactured on an industrial scale. They are a typical composite material consisting of superconducting layer/filaments together with functional components. These functional components affect directly the stress and strain dependences of the critical current. When applying an external stress R, the critical current I c was measured. Then the external stress was reduced to R = 0 and the recovered critical current I cr was again measured. The tensile stress and strain dependences of both normalized critical currents divided by the original value, I c/I c0 and I cr/I c0 were investigated. In general I cr/I c0 recovered close to unity when the applied stress was low, but its recovering level decreased gradually with increasing applied stress. The definition of the reversible stress and strain limits was investigated and its validity was proved using the cyclic loading test. The original definition of reversible stress and strain limits of critical current relates to: (1) when releasing the applied stress and strain, the I c shall recover to the original value, and (2) when applying the cyclic stresses, the I c shall keep the original value. Here, as a practical definition for the reversible stress and strain limits, the tensile stress and strain at 99% recovery of I c have been proposed. On the other hand, it was made clear that the stress and strain at I c 95% retention are not valid for use commonly as a criterion of reversible stress and strain limits for both practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 wires.

  2. Living to the range limit: consumer isotopic variation increases with environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Nessa E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Theoretically, each species’ ecological niche is phylogenetically-determined and expressed spatially as the species’ range. However, environmental stress gradients may directly or indirectly decrease individual performance, such that the precise process delimiting a species range may not be revealed simply by studying abundance patterns. In the intertidal habitat the vertical ranges of marine species may be constrained by their abilities to tolerate thermal and desiccation stress, which may act directly or indirectly, the latter by limiting the availability of preferred trophic resources. Therefore, we expected individuals at greater shore heights to show greater variation in diet alongside lower indices of physiological condition. Methods: We sampled the grazing gastropod Echinolittorina peruviana from the desert coastline of northern Chile at three shore heights, across eighteen regionally-representative shores. Stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) were extracted from E. peruviana and its putative food resources to estimate Bayesian ellipse area, carbon and nitrogen ranges and diet. Individual physiological condition was tracked by muscle % C and % N. Results: There was an increase in isotopic variation at high shore levels, where E. peruviana’s preferred resource, tide-deposited particulate organic matter (POM), appeared to decrease in dietary contribution, and was expected to be less abundant. Both muscle % C and % N of individuals decreased with height on the shore. Discussion: Individuals at higher stress levels appear to be less discriminating in diet, likely because of abiotic forcing, which decreases both consumer mobility and the availability of a preferred resource. Abiotic stress might be expected to increase trophic variation in other selective dietary generalist species. Where this coincides with a lower physiological condition may be a direct factor in setting their range limit. PMID:27280067

  3. Induction of the Sugar-Phosphate Stress Response Allows Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2-Methyl-4-Amino-5-Hydroxymethylpyrimidine Phosphate Synthase To Function in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lauren D.; Paxhia, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thiamine pyrophosphate is a required cofactor for all forms of life. The pyrimidine moiety of thiamine, 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hydroxymethylpyrimidine phosphate (HMP-P), is synthesized by different mechanisms in bacteria and plants compared to fungi. In this study, Salmonella enterica was used as a host to probe requirements for activity of the yeast HMP-P synthase, Thi5p. Thi5p synthesizes HMP-P from histidine and pyridoxal-5-phosphate and was reported to use a backbone histidine as the substrate, which would mean that it was a single-turnover enzyme. Heterologous expression of Thi5p did not complement an S. enterica HMP-P auxotroph during growth with glucose as the sole carbon source. Genetic analyses described here showed that Thi5p was activated in S. enterica by alleles of sgrR that induced the sugar-phosphate stress response. Deletion of ptsG (encodes enzyme IICB [EIICB] of the phosphotransferase system [PTS]) also allowed function of Thi5p and required sgrR but not sgrS. This result suggested that the role of sgrS in activation of Thi5p was to decrease PtsG activity. In total, the data herein supported the hypothesis that one mechanism to activate Thi5p in S. enterica grown on minimal medium containing glucose (minimal glucose medium) required decreased PtsG activity and an unidentified gene regulated by SgrR. IMPORTANCE This work describes a metabolic link between the sugar-phosphate stress response and the yeast thiamine biosynthetic enzyme Thi5p when heterologously expressed in Salmonella enterica during growth on minimal glucose medium. Suppressor analysis (i) identified a mutant class of the regulator SgrR that activate sugar-phosphate stress response constitutively and (ii) determined that Thi5p is conditionally active in S. enterica. These results emphasized the power of genetic systems in model organisms to uncover enzyme function and underlying metabolic network structure. PMID:26324451

  4. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  5. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  6. Ochratoxin A induces rat renal carcinogenicity with limited induction of oxidative stress responses.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Liye; Gao, Jing; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2014-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) has displayed nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenicity in mammals, however, no clear mechanisms have been identified detailing the relationship between oxidative stress and these toxicities. This study was performed to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the renal carcinogenicity induced by OTA. Rats were treated with 70 or 210 μg/kg b.w. OTA for 4 or 13 weeks. In the rats administrated with OTA for 13 weeks, the kidney was damaged seriously. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Karyomegaly was prominent in the tubular epithelium. Kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) was detected in the outer stripe of the outer medulla in both low- and high-dose groups. OTA increased the mRNA levels of clusterin in rat kidneys. Interestingly, OTA did not significantly alter the oxidative stress level in rat liver and kidney. Yet, some indications related to proliferation and carcinogenicity were observed. A dose-related increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was observed at 4 weeks in both liver and kidney, but at 13 weeks, only in the kidney. OTA down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and up-regulated vimentin and lipocalin 2 in rat kidney at 13 weeks. The p53 gene was decreased in both liver and kidney at 13 weeks. These results suggest that OTA caused apparent kidney damage within 13 weeks but exerted limited effect on oxidative stress parameters. It implies that cell proliferation is the proposed mode of action for OTA-induced renal carcinogenicity.

  7. The Establishment of a Hyperactive Structure Allows the Tumour Suppressor Protein p53 to Function through P-TEFb during Limited CDK9 Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Albert, Thomas K; Antrecht, Claudia; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Meisterernst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    CDK9 is the catalytic subunit of positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) that controls the transition of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) into elongation. CDK9 inhibitors block mRNA synthesis and trigger activation of the stress-sensitive p53 protein. This in turn induces transcription of CDKN1A (p21) and other cell cycle control genes. It is presently unclear if and how p53 circumvents a general P-TEFb-requirement when it activates its target genes. Our investigations using a panel of specific inhibitors reason for a critical role of CDK9 also in the case of direct inhibition of the kinase. At the prototypic p21 gene, the activator p53 initially accumulates at the pre-bound upstream enhancer followed-with significant delay-by de novo binding to a secondary enhancer site within the first intron of p21. This is accompanied by recruitment of the RNAPII initiation machinery to both elements. ChIP and functional analyses reason for a prominent role of CDK9 itself and elongation factor complexes PAF1c and SEC involved in pause and elongation control. It appears that the strong activation potential of p53 facilitates gene activation in the situation of global repression of RNAPII transcription. The data further underline the fundamental importance of CDK9 for class II gene transcription. PMID:26745862

  8. Indigenous soil bacteria and low moisture may limit but allow faecal bacteria to multiply and become a minor population in tropical soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.; Fujioka, R.

    2004-01-01

    The soil environment in Hawaii is generally characterised as sub-optimal but permissive to support the in situ growth of E. coli and enterococci. However, soil desiccation and competition for nutrients by major indigenous soil microflora have been identified as potential factors that could limit a rapid and continual growth of faecal indicator bacteria in this soil environment. Despite these limitations, the genetic capacities of E. coli and enterococci are robust enough to enable these bacteria to become established as minor populations of Hawaii's soil microflora. Although the concentrations of E. coli and enterococci may have represented a fraction of the total soil microbiota, their presence in this habitat was very significant, for two important reasons: (a) soil was a major environmental source of E. coli and enterococci, and (b) the elevated counts of these bacteria in streams that routinely exceeded the EPA standards were due to run-off from soil. As a result, E. coli and enterococci were inadequate indicators to measure the degree of faecal contamination and potential presence of sewage-borne pathogens in Hawaiian streams. ?? IWA Publishing 2004.

  9. PARP-2 sustains erythropoiesis in mice by limiting replicative stress in erythroid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Farrés, J; Llacuna, L; Martin-Caballero, J; Martínez, C; Lozano, J J; Ampurdanés, C; López-Contreras, A J; Florensa, L; Navarro, J; Ottina, E; Dantzer, F; Schreiber, V; Villunger, A; Fernández-Capetillo, O; Yélamos, J

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is a tightly regulated process in which multipotential hematopoietic stem cells produce mature red blood cells. Here we show that deletion of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) in mice leads to chronic anemia at steady state, despite increased erythropoietin plasma levels, a phenomenon not observed in mice lacking PARP-1. Loss of PARP-2 causes shortened lifespan of erythrocytes and impaired differentiation of erythroid progenitors. In erythroblasts, PARP-2 deficiency triggers replicative stress, as indicated by the presence of micronuclei, the accumulation of γ-H2AX (phospho-histone H2AX) in S-phase cells and constitutive CHK1 and replication protein A phosphorylation. Transcriptome analyses revealed the activation of the p53-dependent DNA-damage response pathways in PARP-2-deficient cells, culminating in the upregulation of cell-cycle and cell death regulators, concomitant with G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Strikingly, while loss of the proapoptotic p53 target gene Puma restored hematocrit levels in the PARP-2-deficient mice, loss of the cell-cycle regulator and CDK inhibitor p21 leads to perinatal death by exacerbating impaired fetal liver erythropoiesis in PARP-2-deficient embryos. Although the anemia displayed by PARP-2-deficient mice is compatible with life, mice die rapidly when exposed to stress-induced enhanced hemolysis. Our results pinpoint an essential role for PARP-2 in erythropoiesis by limiting replicative stress that becomes essential in the absence of p21 and in the context of enhanced hemolysis, highlighting the potential effect that might arise from the design and use of PARP inhibitors that specifically inactivate PARP proteins. PMID:25501596

  10. Fracture Prediction for High-strength Steel Sheet Subjected to Draw-bending Using Forming Limit Stress Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, C.; Hakoyama, T.; Kuwabara, T.; Fukiharu, H.

    2016-08-01

    A fracture criterion for sheet metals subjected to draw-bending is investigated using the concept of the forming limit stress criterion. The test material used is a 1.0-mm-thick high- strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 590MPa. The specimen undergoes bendingunbending under tension when passing over the die profile. The drawing speed was set to 5-100 mm • s-1. The magnitude of true stress σDB when a specimen fractured has been precisely determined. Moreover, multiaxial tube expansion tests of the test material are performed to measure the forming limit stress σPT of the test material under plane-strain tension. It is found that σDB is larger than σPT by 2.8-6.3%. Therefore, it is concluded that the forming limit stress criterion is effective as a fracture criterion in draw-bending.

  11. Natural variations in expression of regulatory and detoxification related genes under limiting phosphate and arsenate stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Tapsi; Kumar, Smita; Khare, Ria; Tripathi, Rudra D.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stress including nutrient deficiency and heavy metal toxicity severely affects plant growth, development, and productivity. Genetic variations within and in between species are one of the important factors in establishing interactions and responses of plants with the environment. In the recent past, natural variations in Arabidopsis thaliana have been used to understand plant development and response toward different stresses at genetic level. Phosphorus deficiency negatively affects plant growth and metabolism and modulates expression of the genes involved in Pi homeostasis. Arsenate, As(V), a chemical analog of Pi, is taken up by the plants via phosphate transport system. Studies suggest that during Pi deficiency, enhanced As(V) uptake leads to increased toxicity in plants. Here, the natural variations in Arabidopsis have been utilized to study the As(V) stress response under limiting Pi condition. The primary root length was compared to identify differential response of three Arabidopsis accessions (Col-0, Sij-1, and Slavi-1) under limiting Pi and As(V) stress. To study the molecular mechanisms responsible for the differential response, comprehensive expression profiling of the genes involved in uptake, detoxification, and regulatory mechanisms was carried out. Analysis suggests genetic variation-dependent regulatory mechanisms may affect differential response of Arabidopsis natural variants toward As(V) stress under limiting Pi condition. Therefore, it is hypothesized that detailed analysis of the natural variations under multiple stress conditions might help in the better understanding of the biological processes involved in stress tolerance and adaptation. PMID:26557133

  12. [Early stress tests following an uncomplicated myocardial infarct: a comparison between symptom-limited and submaximal tests].

    PubMed

    López, J; Carrasco, H A; Portillo, S; Maldonado, Z; Monzón de Briceño, Y

    1991-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of symptom-limited versus load-limited submaximal stress testing, 76 patients, during the first week post acute non-complicated myocardial infarction, were submitted to a symptom-limited Naughton-modified protocol stress test. At 2 METs, 3 METs and maximal effort levels, the tests were classified as positive or negative following the currently used criteria. After a mean follow-up of 15 months, the symptom-limited protocol showed the best sensitivity (95%), specificity (78%), positive (64%) and negative (98%) predictive value, and also the highest risk ratio (27.4) for prediction of subsequent coronary events (2p less than 0.01 vs 2 METs, 3 METs and 2D-Echocardiogram results). Forward stepped multiple correlation analysis indicated independent prognostic value for the results of the symptom-limited stress test (R2: .52 p less than 0.01) and for the location of the myocardial infarction (R2: .05 p less than 0.05) only. In addition, the discriminant prognostic power of the symptom-limited protocol was significant after the fourth month of follow-up (2p less than 0.05 vs submaximal tests and 2D-Echo). Therefore, we recommend the performance of a symptom-limited stress test during the first week post acute non-complicated myocardial infarction, provided that all coronary active medication has been withheld 24 hours before the test.

  13. Genome Wide Analysis of the Apple MYB Transcription Factor Family Allows the Identification of MdoMYB121 Gene Confering Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-Kai; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors (TFs) in plants. Although several MYB genes have been characterized to play roles in secondary metabolism, the MYB family has not yet been identified in apple. In this study, 229 apple MYB genes were identified through a genome-wide analysis and divided into 45 subgroups. A computational analysis was conducted using the apple genomic database to yield a complete overview of the MYB family, including the intron-exon organizations, the sequence features of the MYB DNA-binding domains, the carboxy-terminal motifs, and the chromosomal locations. Subsequently, the expression of 18 MYB genes, including 12 were chosen from stress-related subgroups, while another 6 ones from other subgroups, in response to various abiotic stresses was examined. It was found that several of these MYB genes, particularly MdoMYB121, were induced by multiple stresses. The MdoMYB121 was then further functionally characterized. Its predicted protein was found to be localized in the nucleus. A transgenic analysis indicated that the overexpression of the MdoMYB121 gene remarkably enhanced the tolerance to high salinity, drought, and cold stresses in transgenic tomato and apple plants. Our results indicate that the MYB genes are highly conserved in plant species and that MdoMYB121 can be used as a target gene in genetic engineering approaches to improve the tolerance of plants to multiple abiotic stresses. PMID:23950843

  14. Sugarcane for water-limited environments. Genetic variation in cane yield and sugar content in response to water stress.

    PubMed

    Basnayake, J; Jackson, P A; Inman-Bamber, N G; Lakshmanan, P

    2012-10-01

    Water limitation is a major production constraint for sugarcane worldwide. However, to date, there has been little investigation of patterns of genetic variation in the response to water stress in sugarcane. Field experiments were conducted over 3 years under fully irrigated and managed water stress conditions at two locations in Northern Queensland in Australia. Eighty-nine genetically diverse clones were evaluated for their yield performance and sugar attributes. Water stress treatments reduced cane yield [tonnes of cane per hectare (TCH)] and total dry matter (TDM) by 17-52% and 20-56%, respectively, compared with irrigated treatments in the same experiments. Nevertheless, there was little genotype×environment interaction variation for TCH, TDM, or commercial cane sugar (CCS), and hence high genetic correlations between the irrigated and water stress treatments across environments. Both commercial and unselected clones performed poorly under severe stress environments, while the commercial clones outperformed the unselected clones under mild and moderate stress conditions. The results presented here highlight the contribution of intrinsic potential yields (yield under well-irrigated conditions) of some selected and unselected clones to maintain relatively high productivity in a range of moderate stress conditions imposed. The physiological basis for the high genetic correlations is at present unclear, but some explanations are hypothesized. The choice of stress levels in selection trials would not appear to be a critical issue for sugarcane breeding programmes, at least for the early phases of selection, where similar ranking clones across a range of moderate water stresses may be expected.

  15. A phase-field approach to nonequilibrium phase transformations in elastic solids via an intermediate phase (melt) allowing for interface stresses.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I

    2016-04-28

    A phase-field approach for phase transformations (PTs) between three different phases at nonequilibrium temperatures is developed. It includes advanced mechanics, thermodynamically consistent interfacial stresses, and interface interactions. A thermodynamic Landau-Ginzburg potential developed in terms of polar order parameters satisfies the desired instability and equilibrium conditions for homogeneous phases. The interfacial stresses were introduced with some terms from large-strain formulation even though the small-strain assumption was utilized. The developed model is applied to study the PTs between two solid phases via a highly disordered intermediate phase (IP) or an intermediate melt (IM) hundreds of degrees below the melting temperature. In particular, the β ↔ δ PTs in HMX energetic crystals via IM are analyzed. The effects of various parameters (temperature, ratios of widths and energies of solid-solid (SS) to solid-melt (SM) interfaces, elastic energy, and interfacial stresses) on the formation, stability, and structure of the IM within a propagating SS interface are studied. Interfacial and elastic stresses within a SS interphase and their relaxation and redistribution with the appearance of a partial or complete IM are analyzed. The energy and structure of the critical nucleus (CN) of the IM are studied as well. In particular, the interfacial stresses increase the aspect-ratio of the CN. Although including elastic energy can drastically reduce the energy of the CN of the IM, the activation energy of the CN of the IM within the SS interface increases when interfacial tension is taken into account. The developed thermodynamic potential can also be modified to model other multiphase physical phenomena, such as multi-variant martensitic PTs, grain boundary and surface-induced pre-melting and PTs, as well as developing phase diagrams for IPs.

  16. Actin-Mediated Endocytosis Limits Intracellular Cr Accumulation and Cr Toxicity during Chromate Stress

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Sara L.; Avery, Simon V.

    2009-01-01

    Chromate toxicity is well documented, but the underlying toxic mechanism(s) has yet to be fully elucidated. Following a Cr toxicity screen against > 6000 heterozygous yeast mutants, here we show that Cr resistance requires normal function of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, Cr-stressed yeast cells exhibited an increased number of actin patches, the sites of endocytosis. This was coincident with a marked stimulation of endocytosis following Cr exposure. Genetic dissection of actin nucleation from endocytosis revealed that endocytosis, specifically, was required for Cr resistance. A series of further endocytosis mutants (sac6Δ, chc1Δ, end3Δ) exhibited elevated Cr sensitivity. These mutants also showed markedly elevated cellular Cr accumulation, explaining their sensitivities. In wild-type cells, an initial endocytosis-independent phase of Cr uptake was followed by an endocytosis-dependent decline in Cr accumulation. The results indicate that actin-mediated endocytosis is required to limit Cr accumulation and toxicity. It is proposed that this involves ubiquitin-dependent endocytic inactivation of a plasma membrane Cr transporter(s). We showed that such an action was not dependent on the transporters that have been characterized to date, the sulfate (and chromate) permeases Sul1p and Sul2p. PMID:19628586

  17. Physiological Responses of Zostera marina and Cymodocea nodosa to Light-Limitation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Silva, João; Barrote, Isabel; Costa, Monya M.; Albano, Sílvia; Santos, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The effects of light-limitation stress were investigated in natural stands of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Cymodocea nodosa in Ria Formosa coastal lagoon, southern Portugal. Three levels of light attenuation were imposed for 3 weeks in two adjacent meadows (2–3 m depth), each dominated by one species. The response of photosynthesis to light was determined with oxygen electrodes. Chlorophylls and carotenoids were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Soluble protein, carbohydrates, malondialdehyde and phenol contents were also analysed. Both species showed evident signs of photoacclimation. Their maximum photosynthetic rates were significantly reduced with shading. Ratios between specific light harvesting carotenoids and the epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids revealed significantly higher light harvesting efficiency of C. nodosa, a competitive advantage in a low light environment. The contents of both soluble sugars and starch were considerably lower in Z. marina plants, particularly in the rhizomes, decreasing even further with shading. The different carbohydrate energy storage strategies found between the two species clearly favour C. nodosa's resilience to light deprivation, a condition enhanced by its intrinsic arrangement of the pigment pool. On the other hand, Z. marina revealed a lower tolerance to light reduction, mostly due to a less plastic arrangement of the pigment pool and lower carbohydrate storage. Our findings indicate that Z. marina is close to a light-mediated ecophysiological threshold in Ria Formosa. PMID:24312260

  18. Chronic stress and moderate physical exercise prompt widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress in rodents produces depressive behaviors, whereas moderate physical exercise counteracts stress-induced depressive behaviors. Chronic stress and physical exercise appear to produce such opposing effects by changing the neural activity of specific brain regions. However, the detailed mechanisms through which the two different types of stimuli regulate brain function in opposite directions are not clearly understood. In the present study, we attempted to explore the neuroanatomical substrates mediating stress-induced behavioral changes and anti-depressant effects of exercise by examining stimulus-dependent c-Fos induction in the brains of mice that were exposed to repeated stress or exercise in a scheduled manner. Systematic and integrated analyses of c-Fos expression profiles indicated that various brain areas, including the prelimbic cortex, lateral septal area, and paraventricular nuclei of hypothalamus were commonly and strongly activated by both stress and exercise, while the lateral habenula and hippocampus were identified as being preferentially activated by stress and exercise, respectively. Exercise-dependent c-Fos expression in all regions examined in the brain occurred in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. These results suggest that chronic stress and moderate exercise produce counteractive effects on mood behaviors, along with prompting widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions. PMID:27539656

  19. Chronic stress and moderate physical exercise prompt widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress in rodents produces depressive behaviors, whereas moderate physical exercise counteracts stress-induced depressive behaviors. Chronic stress and physical exercise appear to produce such opposing effects by changing the neural activity of specific brain regions. However, the detailed mechanisms through which the two different types of stimuli regulate brain function in opposite directions are not clearly understood. In the present study, we attempted to explore the neuroanatomical substrates mediating stress-induced behavioral changes and anti-depressant effects of exercise by examining stimulus-dependent c-Fos induction in the brains of mice that were exposed to repeated stress or exercise in a scheduled manner. Systematic and integrated analyses of c-Fos expression profiles indicated that various brain areas, including the prelimbic cortex, lateral septal area, and paraventricular nuclei of hypothalamus were commonly and strongly activated by both stress and exercise, while the lateral habenula and hippocampus were identified as being preferentially activated by stress and exercise, respectively. Exercise-dependent c-Fos expression in all regions examined in the brain occurred in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. These results suggest that chronic stress and moderate exercise produce counteractive effects on mood behaviors, along with prompting widespread common activation and limited differential activation in specific brain regions.

  20. Medicare program; limit on the valuation of a depreciable asset recognized as an allowance for depreciation and interest on capital indebtedness after a change of ownership--HCFA. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare provider reimbursement regulations relative to allowable costs and sets a limit on the valuation of a depreciable asset that may be recognized in establishing an appropriate allowance for depreciation and for interest on capital indebtedness after a change of ownership that occurs on or after December 1, 1997. These provisions apply to providers that are reimbursed on the basis of reasonable costs. This change implements the mandate in section 4404 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (Pub. L. 105-33).

  1. Limited Nesting Stress Alters Maternal Behavior and In Vivo Intestinal Permeability in Male Wistar Pup Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Molet, Jenny; Million, Mulugeta; Mayer, Emeran; Taché, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    A few studies indicate that limited nesting stress (LNS) alters maternal behavior and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis of dams and offspring in male Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of LNS on maternal behavior in Wistar rats, and on the HPA axis, glycemia and in vivo intestinal permeability of male and female offspring. Intestinal permeability is known to be elevated during the first week postnatally and influenced by glucocorticoids. Dams and neonatal litters were subjected to LNS or normal nesting conditions (control) from days 2 to 10 postnatally. At day 10, blood was collected from pups for determination of glucose and plasma corticosterone by enzyme immunoassay and in vivo intestinal permeability by oral gavage of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran 4kDa. Dams exposed to LNS compared to control showed an increase in the percentage of time spent building a nest (118%), self-grooming (69%), and putting the pups back to the nest (167%). LNS male and female pups exhibited a reduction of body weight by 5% and 4%, adrenal weights/100g body weight by 17% and 18%, corticosterone plasma levels by 64% and 62% and blood glucose by 11% and 12% respectively compared to same sex control pups. In male LNS pups, intestinal permeability was increased by 2.7-fold while no change was observed in females compared to same sex control. There was no sex difference in any of the parameters in control pups except the body weight. These data indicate that Wistar dams subjected to LNS during the first postnatal week have an altered repertoire of maternal behaviors which affects the development of the HPA axis in both sexes and intestinal barrier function in male offspring. PMID:27149676

  2. The role of mesophyll conductance during water stress and recovery in tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris): acclimation or limitation?

    PubMed

    Galle, Alexander; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Tomas, Magdalena; Pou, Alicia; Medrano, Hipolito; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Flexas, Jaume

    2009-01-01

    While the responses of photosynthesis to water stress have been widely studied, acclimation to sustained water stress and recovery after re-watering is poorly understood. In particular, the factors limiting photosynthesis under these conditions, and their possible interactions with other environmental conditions, are unknown. To assess these issues, changes of photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation (A(N)) and its underlying limitations were followed during prolonged water stress and subsequent re-watering in tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) plants growing under three different climatic conditions: outdoors in summer, outdoors in spring, and indoors in a growth chamber. In particular, the regulation of stomatal conductance (g(s)), mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)), leaf photochemistry (chlorophyll fluorescence), and biochemistry (V(c,max)) were assessed. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence data revealed that water stress induced a similar degree of stomatal closure and decreased A(N) under all three conditions, while V(c,max) was unaffected. However, the behaviour of g(m) differed depending on the climatic conditions. In outdoor plants, g(m) strongly declined with water stress, but it recovered rapidly (1-2 d) after re-watering in spring while it remained low many days after re-watering in summer. In indoor plants, g(m) initially declined with water stress, but then recovered to control values during the acclimation period. These differences were reflected in different velocities of recovery of A(N) after re-watering, being the slowest in outdoor summer plants and the fastest in indoor plants. It is suggested that these differences among the experiments are related to the prevailing climatic conditions, i.e. to the fact that stress factors other than water stress have been superimposed (e.g. excessive light and elevated temperature). In conclusion, besides g(s), g(m) contributes greatly to the limitation of photosynthesis during water stress and during

  3. Sugarcane for water-limited environments. Genetic variation in cane yield and sugar content in response to water stress.

    PubMed

    Basnayake, J; Jackson, P A; Inman-Bamber, N G; Lakshmanan, P

    2012-10-01

    Water limitation is a major production constraint for sugarcane worldwide. However, to date, there has been little investigation of patterns of genetic variation in the response to water stress in sugarcane. Field experiments were conducted over 3 years under fully irrigated and managed water stress conditions at two locations in Northern Queensland in Australia. Eighty-nine genetically diverse clones were evaluated for their yield performance and sugar attributes. Water stress treatments reduced cane yield [tonnes of cane per hectare (TCH)] and total dry matter (TDM) by 17-52% and 20-56%, respectively, compared with irrigated treatments in the same experiments. Nevertheless, there was little genotype×environment interaction variation for TCH, TDM, or commercial cane sugar (CCS), and hence high genetic correlations between the irrigated and water stress treatments across environments. Both commercial and unselected clones performed poorly under severe stress environments, while the commercial clones outperformed the unselected clones under mild and moderate stress conditions. The results presented here highlight the contribution of intrinsic potential yields (yield under well-irrigated conditions) of some selected and unselected clones to maintain relatively high productivity in a range of moderate stress conditions imposed. The physiological basis for the high genetic correlations is at present unclear, but some explanations are hypothesized. The choice of stress levels in selection trials would not appear to be a critical issue for sugarcane breeding programmes, at least for the early phases of selection, where similar ranking clones across a range of moderate water stresses may be expected. PMID:22996675

  4. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  5. Diffusion limitations and metabolic factors associated with inhibition and recovery of photosynthesis following cold stress in Elymus nutans Griseb.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juanjuan; Gates, Roger N; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effects of cold stress (5°C) and re-warming (25°C) on gas exchange, photosystem II, key photosynthetic enzyme activities, gene expression, and carbohydrate metabolite concentrations in two Elymus nutans genotypes differing in cold resistance (DX, cold-tolerant and ZD, cold-sensitive). Cold stress led to irreversible reductions in photosynthetic rate. This reduction was accompanied by declining stomatal and mesophyll conductance (gs and gm), transpiration rate (Tr) and photochemical efficiency in both genotypes, however there were smaller decreases in DX than in ZD. Cold-tolerant DX maintained higher photosynthetic enzyme activities and transcript levels, as well as higher reducing sugar concentrations and sucrose accumulation. The relationship between Pn and internal leaf CO2 concentration (Pn/Ci curve) during cold and re-warming was analyzed to estimate the relative influence of stomatal and non-stomatal components on photosynthesis. Stomatal limitation, non-stomatal limitation, and CO2 compensation point (CP) increased in both genotypes under cold stress, but to a lesser extent in DX. Maximum CO2 assimilation rate (Pmax), and carboxylation efficiency (CE) declined, but DX had significantly higher levels of Pmax and CE than ZD. Following cold-stress recovery, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm), apparent electron transport rate (ETR), Rubisco activity, Rubisco activation state and CE in DX resumed to the control levels. In contrast, Pn, Pmax, gs, gm, and Tr recovered only partially for DX, suggesting that incomplete recovery of photosynthesis in DX may be mainly related to diffusion limitations. Higher Rubisco large subunit (RbcL) and Rubisco activase (RCA) transcript levels, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, and carbohydrate accumulation contributed to higher photosynthetic recovery in DX. These results indicate that the maintenance of higher Pn and Pmax under cold stress and recovery in cold-tolerant DX could be

  6. Limiting replication stress during somatic cell reprogramming reduces genomic instability in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J.; Gabut, Mathieu; Marion, Rosa M.; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Bua, Sabela; Ramirez, Oscar; Olalde, Iñigo; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Li, Han; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.; Batada, Nizar N.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from adult somatic cells is one of the most remarkable discoveries in recent decades. However, several works have reported evidence of genomic instability in iPSC, raising concerns on their biomedical use. The reasons behind the genomic instability observed in iPSC remain mostly unknown. Here we show that, similar to the phenomenon of oncogene-induced replication stress, the expression of reprogramming factors induces replication stress. Increasing the levels of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) reduces reprogramming-induced replication stress and increases the efficiency of iPSC generation. Similarly, nucleoside supplementation during reprogramming reduces the load of DNA damage and genomic rearrangements on iPSC. Our data reveal that lowering replication stress during reprogramming, genetically or chemically, provides a simple strategy to reduce genomic instability on mouse and human iPSC. PMID:26292731

  7. Taken to the limit--Is desiccation stress causing precocious encystment of trematode parasites in snails?

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Katie; Poulin, Robert

    2015-12-01

    When hosts experience environmental stress, the quantity and quality of resources they provide for parasites may be diminished, and host longevity may be decreased. Under stress, parasites may adopt alternative strategies to avoid fitness reductions. Trematode parasites typically have complex life cycles, involving asexual reproduction in a gastropod first intermediate host. A rare phenomenon, briefly mentioned in the literature, and termed 'precocious encystment' involves the next stage in the parasites' life cycle (metacercarial cyst) forming within the preceding stage (redia), while still inside the snail. In the trematode Parorchis sp. NZ using rocky shore snails exposed to long periods outside water, we hypothesised that this might be an adaptive strategy against desiccation, preventing parasite emergence from the snail. To test this, we first investigated the effect of prolonged desiccation on the survival of two species of high intertidal snails. Secondly, we measured the reproductive output (cercarial production) of the parasite under wet and dry conditions. Finally, we quantified the influence of desiccation stress on the occurrence of precocious encystment. Snail mortality was higher under dry conditions, indicating stress, and it was somewhat exacerbated for infected snails. Parasite reproductive output differed between wet and dry conditions, with parasites of snails kept in dry conditions producing more cercariae when placed in water. Little variation was observed in the occurrence of precocious encystment, although some subtle patterns emerged. Given the stresses associated with living in high intertidal environments, we discuss precocious encystment as a possible stress response in this trematode parasite. PMID:26344863

  8. Reduced stress shielding with limited micromotions using a carbon fibre composite biomimetic hip stem: a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Caouette, C; Yahia, L H; Bureau, M N

    2011-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) enjoys excellent rates of success in older patients, but younger patients are still at risk of aseptic loosening and bone resorption from stress shielding. One solution to the stress shielding problem is to use a hip stem with mechanical properties matching those of cortical bone. The objective of the present study was to investigate numerically the biomechanical performance of such a biomimetic hip stem based on a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated carbon fibre composite. A finite element model (FEM) of the biomimetic stem was constructed. Contact elements were studied to model the bone-implant interface in a non-osseointegrated and osseointegrated state in the best way. Three static load cases representing slow walking, stair climbing, and gait in a healthy individual were considered. Stress shielding and bone-implant interface micromotions were evaluated and compared with the results of a similar FEM based on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The composite stems allowed for reduced stress shielding when compared with a traditional Ti-6Al-4V stem. Micromotions were slightly higher with the composite stem, but remained below 40 microm on most of the HA-coated surface. It is concluded that a biomimetic composite stem might offer a better compromise between stress shielding and micromotions than the Ti-6Al-4V stem with the same external geometry.

  9. PERK Limits Drosophila Lifespan by Promoting Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Response to ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis requires precise control of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. In Drosophila, this control declines with age largely due to chronic activation of stress signaling and associated chronic inflammatory conditions. An important contributor to this condition is the age-associated increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here we show that the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) integrates both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous ER stress stimuli to induce ISC proliferation. In addition to responding to cell-intrinsic ER stress, PERK is also specifically activated in ISCs by JAK/Stat signaling in response to ER stress in neighboring cells. The activation of PERK is required for homeostatic regeneration, as well as for acute regenerative responses, yet the chronic engagement of this response becomes deleterious in aging flies. Accordingly, knocking down PERK in ISCs is sufficient to promote intestinal homeostasis and extend lifespan. Our studies highlight the significance of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response of the ER (UPRER) in intestinal homeostasis and provide a viable strategy to improve organismal health- and lifespan. PMID:25945494

  10. PERK Limits Drosophila Lifespan by Promoting Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Response to ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifen; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal homeostasis requires precise control of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. In Drosophila, this control declines with age largely due to chronic activation of stress signaling and associated chronic inflammatory conditions. An important contributor to this condition is the age-associated increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here we show that the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) integrates both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous ER stress stimuli to induce ISC proliferation. In addition to responding to cell-intrinsic ER stress, PERK is also specifically activated in ISCs by JAK/Stat signaling in response to ER stress in neighboring cells. The activation of PERK is required for homeostatic regeneration, as well as for acute regenerative responses, yet the chronic engagement of this response becomes deleterious in aging flies. Accordingly, knocking down PERK in ISCs is sufficient to promote intestinal homeostasis and extend lifespan. Our studies highlight the significance of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response of the ER (UPRER) in intestinal homeostasis and provide a viable strategy to improve organismal health- and lifespan. PMID:25945494

  11. PERK Limits Drosophila Lifespan by Promoting Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Response to ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifen; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal homeostasis requires precise control of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. In Drosophila, this control declines with age largely due to chronic activation of stress signaling and associated chronic inflammatory conditions. An important contributor to this condition is the age-associated increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here we show that the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) integrates both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous ER stress stimuli to induce ISC proliferation. In addition to responding to cell-intrinsic ER stress, PERK is also specifically activated in ISCs by JAK/Stat signaling in response to ER stress in neighboring cells. The activation of PERK is required for homeostatic regeneration, as well as for acute regenerative responses, yet the chronic engagement of this response becomes deleterious in aging flies. Accordingly, knocking down PERK in ISCs is sufficient to promote intestinal homeostasis and extend lifespan. Our studies highlight the significance of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response of the ER (UPRER) in intestinal homeostasis and provide a viable strategy to improve organismal health- and lifespan.

  12. Do mitochondria limit hot fish hearts? Understanding the role of mitochondrial function with heat stress in Notolabrus celidotus.

    PubMed

    Iftikar, Fathima I; Hickey, Anthony J R

    2013-01-01

    Hearts are the first organs to fail in animals exposed to heat stress. Predictions of climate change mediated increases in ocean temperatures suggest that the ectothermic heart may place tight constraints on the diversity and distribution of marine species with cardiovascular systems. For many such species, their upper temperature limits (Tmax) and respective heart failure (HF) temperature (T(HF)) are only a few degrees from current environmental temperatures. While the ectothermic cardiovascular system acts as an "ecological thermometer," the exact mechanism that mediates HF remains unresolved. We propose that heat-stressed cardiac mitochondria drive HF. Using a common New Zealand fish, Notolabrus celidotus, we determined the THF (27.5°C). Haemoglobin oxygen saturation appeared to be unaltered in the blood surrounding and within heat stressed hearts. Using high resolution respirometry coupled to fluorimeters, we explored temperature-mediated changes in respiration, ROS and ATP production, and overlaid these changes with T(HF). Even at saturating oxygen levels several mitochondrial components were compromised before T(HF). Importantly, the capacity to efficiently produce ATP in the heart is limited at 25°C, and this is prior to the acute T(HF) for N. celidotus. Membrane leakiness increased significantly at 25°C, as did cytochrome c release and permeability to NADH. Maximal flux rates and the capacity for the electron transport system to uncouple were also altered at 25°C. These data indicate that mitochondrial membrane integrity is lost, depressing ATP synthesis capacity and promoting cytochrome c release, prior to T(HF). Mitochondria can mediate HF in heat stressed hearts in fish and play a significant role in thermal stress tolerance, and perhaps limit species distributions by contributing to HF.

  13. Stress cardiomyopathy: Is it limited to Takotsubo syndrome? Problems of definition.

    PubMed

    Sarapultsev, Petr A; Sarapultsev, Alexey P

    2016-10-15

    In 2006, Takotsubo syndrome (TTC) was described as a distinct type of stress-induced cardiomyopathy (stress cardiomyopathy). However, when thinking about Takotsubo cardiomyopathy from the viewpoints of the AHA and ESC classifications, 2 possible problems may arise. The first potential problem is that a forecast of disease outcome is lacking in the ESC classification, whereas the AHA only states that 'outcome is favorable with appropriate medical therapy'. However, based on the literature data, one can make a general conclusion that occurrence of myocardial lesions in TTC (i.e., myocardial fibrosis and contraction-band necrosis) causes the same effects as in other diseases with similar levels of myocardial damage and should not be considered to have a lesser impact on mortality. To summarise, TTC can cause not only severe complications such as pulmonary oedema, cardiogenic shock, and dangerous ventricular arrhythmias, but also damage to the myocardium, which can result in the development of potentially fatal conditions even after the disappearance of LV apical ballooning. The second potential problem arises from the definition of TTC as a stress cardiomyopathy in the AHA classification. In fact, the main factors leading to TTC are stress and microvascular anginas, since, as has been already discussed, coronary spasm can cause myocardium stunning, resulting in persistent apical ballooning. Thus, based on this review, 3 distinct types of stress cardiomyopathies exist (variant angina, microvascular angina, and TTC), with poor prognosis. Adding these diseases to the classification of cardiomyopathies will facilitate diagnosis and preventive prolonged treatment, which should include intensive anti-stress therapy.

  14. Physical factors driving intertidal macroalgae distribution: physiological stress of a dominant fucoid at its southern limit.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Brezo; Arenas, F; Rubal, M; Burgués, S; Esteban, R; García-Plazaola, I; Figueroa, F L; Pereira, R; Saldaña, L; Sousa-Pinto, I; Trilla, A; Viejo, R M

    2012-10-01

    Climate change is driving species range shifts worldwide. However, physiological responses related to distributional changes are not fully understood. Oceanographers have reported an increase in ocean temperature in the northwest Iberian Peninsula that is potentially related to the decline in some cold-temperate intertidal macroalgae in the Cantabrian Sea, namely Fucus serratus. Low tide stress could also play a role in this decline. We performed one mensurative (in situ) and two manipulative (in culture) experiments designed to evaluate the interactive effects of some physical factors. The first experiment analysed field response to low tide stress in marginal (mid-Cantabrian Sea and northern Portugal) versus central (Galicia) populations of F. serratus. Then a second experiment was performed that utilized either harsh or mild summer conditions of atmospheric temperature, irradiance, humidity, and wind velocity to compare the responses of individuals from one marginal and one central population to low tide stress. Finally, the combined effect of sea temperature and the other factors was evaluated to detect interactive effects. Changes in frond growth, maximal photosynthetic quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)), temperature, and desiccation were found. Three additive factors (solar irradiation, ocean and air temperatures) were found to drive F. serratus distribution, except under mildly humid conditions that ameliorated atmospheric thermal stress (two additive factors). Mid-Cantabrian Sea temperatures have recently increased, reaching the inhibitory levels suggested in this study of F. serratus. We also expect an additive secondary contribution of low tide stress to this species decline. On the northern Portugal coast, ocean warming plus low tide stress has not reached this species' inhibition threshold. No significant differential responses attributed to the population of origin were found. Mechanistic approaches that are designed to analyse the interactive effects of

  15. Stress cardiomyopathy: Is it limited to Takotsubo syndrome? Problems of definition.

    PubMed

    Sarapultsev, Petr A; Sarapultsev, Alexey P

    2016-10-15

    In 2006, Takotsubo syndrome (TTC) was described as a distinct type of stress-induced cardiomyopathy (stress cardiomyopathy). However, when thinking about Takotsubo cardiomyopathy from the viewpoints of the AHA and ESC classifications, 2 possible problems may arise. The first potential problem is that a forecast of disease outcome is lacking in the ESC classification, whereas the AHA only states that 'outcome is favorable with appropriate medical therapy'. However, based on the literature data, one can make a general conclusion that occurrence of myocardial lesions in TTC (i.e., myocardial fibrosis and contraction-band necrosis) causes the same effects as in other diseases with similar levels of myocardial damage and should not be considered to have a lesser impact on mortality. To summarise, TTC can cause not only severe complications such as pulmonary oedema, cardiogenic shock, and dangerous ventricular arrhythmias, but also damage to the myocardium, which can result in the development of potentially fatal conditions even after the disappearance of LV apical ballooning. The second potential problem arises from the definition of TTC as a stress cardiomyopathy in the AHA classification. In fact, the main factors leading to TTC are stress and microvascular anginas, since, as has been already discussed, coronary spasm can cause myocardium stunning, resulting in persistent apical ballooning. Thus, based on this review, 3 distinct types of stress cardiomyopathies exist (variant angina, microvascular angina, and TTC), with poor prognosis. Adding these diseases to the classification of cardiomyopathies will facilitate diagnosis and preventive prolonged treatment, which should include intensive anti-stress therapy. PMID:27424315

  16. The immune system is limited by oxidative stress: Dietary selenium promotes optimal antioxidative status and greatest immune defense in pacu Piaractus mesopotamicus.

    PubMed

    Biller-Takahashi, Jaqueline D; Takahashi, Leonardo S; Mingatto, Fábio E; Urbinati, Elisabeth C

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reactive molecules containing oxygen, that form as byproducts of aerobic metabolism, including immune system processes. Too much ROS may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we examined whether it can also limit the production of immune system compounds. To assess the relationship between antioxidant status and immunity we evaluated the effect of dietary supplementation with organic selenium, given at various levels for 10 days, on the antioxidant and immune system of the pacu fish (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Fish fed a diet containing 0.6 mg Se-yeast kg(-1) showed significant improvement in antioxidant status, as well as in hematological and immunological profiles. Specifically, they had the highest counts for catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), red blood cells, and thrombocytes; the highest leukocyte count (particularly for monocytes); and the highest serum lysozyme activity. There was also a positive correlation between GPx and lysozyme in this group of fish. These findings indicate that short-term supplementation with 0.6 mg Se-yeast kg(-1) reestablished the antioxidative status, allowing the production of innate components which can boost immunity without the risk of oxidative stress. This study shows a relationship between oxidative stress and immunity, and, from a practical perspective, shows that improving immunity and health in pacu through the administration of selenium could improve their growth performance. PMID:26370542

  17. Limitations of the MMPI in the Research and Diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Vietnam Veterans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Avery; And Others

    The high incidence of reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Vietnam veterans has prompted researchers to search for reliable assessment and treatment procedures for this disorder. Although some encouraging preliminary data on the use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) have been obtained, it is uncertain if this…

  18. Limits on Bilingualism Revisited: Stress Deafness in Simultaneous French-Spanish Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupoux, Emmanuel; Peperkamp, Sharon; Sebastian-Galles, Nuria

    2010-01-01

    We probed simultaneous French-Spanish bilinguals for the perception of Spanish lexical stress using three tasks, two short-term memory encoding tasks and a speeded lexical decision. In all three tasks, the performance of the group of simultaneous bilinguals was intermediate between that of native speakers of Spanish on the one hand and French late…

  19. Proteomics of hyposaline stress in blue mussel congeners (genus Mytilus): implications for biogeographic range limits in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tomanek, Lars; Zuzow, Marcus J; Hitt, Lauren; Serafini, Loredana; Valenzuela, Jacob J

    2012-11-15

    Climate change is affecting species' physiology, pushing environmental tolerance limits and shifting distribution ranges. In addition to temperature and ocean acidification, increasing levels of hyposaline stress due to extreme precipitation events and freshwater runoff may be driving some of the reported recent range shifts in marine organisms. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we characterized the proteomic responses of the cold-adapted blue mussel Mytilus trossulus, a native to the Pacific coast of North America, and the warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis, a Mediterranean invader that has replaced the native from the southern part of its range, but may be limited from expanding north due to hyposaline stress. After exposing laboratory-acclimated mussels for 4 h to two different experimental treatments of hyposaline conditions and one control treatment (24.5, 29.8 and 35.0 psu, respectively) followed by a 0 and 24 h recovery at ambient salinity (35 psu), we detected changes in the abundance of molecular chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), indicating protein unfolding, during stress exposure. Other common responses included changes in small GTPases of the Ras superfamily during recovery, which suggests a role for vesicle transport, and cytoskeletal adjustments associated with cell volume, as indicated by cytoskeletal elements such as actin, tubulin, intermediate filaments and several actin-binding regulatory proteins. Changes of proteins involved in energy metabolism and scavenging of reactive oxygen species suggest a reduction in overall energy metabolism during recovery. Principal component analyses of protein abundances suggest that M. trossulus is able to respond to a greater hyposaline challenge (24.5 psu) than M. galloprovincialis (29.8 psu), as shown by changing abundances of proteins involved in protein chaperoning, vesicle transport, cytoskeletal adjustments by actin-regulatory proteins, energy metabolism and

  20. Proteomics of hyposaline stress in blue mussel congeners (genus Mytilus): implications for biogeographic range limits in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tomanek, Lars; Zuzow, Marcus J; Hitt, Lauren; Serafini, Loredana; Valenzuela, Jacob J

    2012-11-15

    Climate change is affecting species' physiology, pushing environmental tolerance limits and shifting distribution ranges. In addition to temperature and ocean acidification, increasing levels of hyposaline stress due to extreme precipitation events and freshwater runoff may be driving some of the reported recent range shifts in marine organisms. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we characterized the proteomic responses of the cold-adapted blue mussel Mytilus trossulus, a native to the Pacific coast of North America, and the warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis, a Mediterranean invader that has replaced the native from the southern part of its range, but may be limited from expanding north due to hyposaline stress. After exposing laboratory-acclimated mussels for 4 h to two different experimental treatments of hyposaline conditions and one control treatment (24.5, 29.8 and 35.0 psu, respectively) followed by a 0 and 24 h recovery at ambient salinity (35 psu), we detected changes in the abundance of molecular chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), indicating protein unfolding, during stress exposure. Other common responses included changes in small GTPases of the Ras superfamily during recovery, which suggests a role for vesicle transport, and cytoskeletal adjustments associated with cell volume, as indicated by cytoskeletal elements such as actin, tubulin, intermediate filaments and several actin-binding regulatory proteins. Changes of proteins involved in energy metabolism and scavenging of reactive oxygen species suggest a reduction in overall energy metabolism during recovery. Principal component analyses of protein abundances suggest that M. trossulus is able to respond to a greater hyposaline challenge (24.5 psu) than M. galloprovincialis (29.8 psu), as shown by changing abundances of proteins involved in protein chaperoning, vesicle transport, cytoskeletal adjustments by actin-regulatory proteins, energy metabolism and

  1. Limits on bilingualism revisited: stress 'deafness' in simultaneous French-Spanish bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Dupoux, Emmanuel; Peperkamp, Sharon; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria

    2010-02-01

    We probed simultaneous French-Spanish bilinguals for the perception of Spanish lexical stress using three tasks, two short-term memory encoding tasks and a speeded lexical decision. In all three tasks, the performance of the group of simultaneous bilinguals was intermediate between that of native speakers of Spanish on the one hand and French late learners of Spanish on the other hand. Using a composite stress 'deafness' index measure computed over the results of the three tasks, we found that the performance of the simultaneous bilinguals is best fitted by a bimodal distribution that corresponds to a mixture of the performance distributions of the two control groups. Correlation analyses showed that the variables explaining language dominance are linked to early language exposure. These findings are discussed in light of theories of language processing in bilinguals.

  2. Stress sensitivity of fault seismicity: A comparison between limited-offset oblique and major strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom; Stein, Ross S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Reasenberg, Paul A.

    1999-09-01

    We present a new three-dimensional inventory of the southern San Francisco Bay area faults and use it to calculate stress applied principally by the 1989 M = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and to compare fault seismicity rates before and after 1989. The major high-angle right-lateral faults exhibit a different response to the stress change than do minor oblique (right-lateral/thrust) faults. Seismicity on oblique-slip faults in the southern Santa Clara Valley thrust belt increased where the faults were undamped. The strong dependence of seismicity change on normal stress change implies a high coefficient of static friction. In contrast, we observe that faults with significant offset (>50-100 km) behave differently; microseismicity on the Hayward fault diminished where right-lateral shear stress was reduced and where it was undamped by the Loma Prieta earthquake. We observe a similar response on the San Andreas fault zone in southern California after the Landers earthquake sequence. Additionally, the offshore San Gregorio fault shows a seismicity rate increase where right-lateral/oblique shear stress was increased by the Loma Prieta earthquake despite also being clamped by it. These responses are consistent with either a low coefficient of static friction or high pore fluid pressures within the fault zones. We can explain the different behavior of the two styles of faults if those with large cumulative offset become impermeable through gouge buildup; coseismically pressurized pore fluids could be trapped and negate imposed normal stress changes, whereas in more limited offset faults, fluids could rapidly escape. The difference in behavior between minor and major faults may explain why frictional failure criteria that apply intermediate coefficients of static friction can be effective in describing the broad distributions of aftershocks that follow large earthquakes, since many of these events occur both inside and outside major fault zones.

  3. Stress sensitivity of fault seismicity: A comparison between limited-offset oblique and major strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Stein, R.S.; Simpson, R.W.; Reasenberg, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional inventory of the southern San Francisco Bay area faults and use it to calculate stress applied principally by the 1989 M = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and to compare fault seismicity rates before and after 1989. The major high-angle right-lateral faults exhibit a different response to the stress change than do minor oblique (right-lateral/thrust) faults. Seismicity on oblique-slip faults in the southern Santa Clara Valley thrust belt increased where the faults were unclamped. The strong dependence of seismicity change on normal stress change implies a high coefficient of static friction. In contrast, we observe that faults with significant offset (>50-100 km) behave differently; microseismicity on the Hayward fault diminished where right-lateral shear stress was reduced and where it was unclamped by the Loma Prieta earthquake. We observe a similar response on the San Andreas fault zone in southern California after the Landers earthquake sequence. Additionally, the offshore San Gregorio fault shows a seismicity rate increase where right-lateral/oblique shear stress was increased by the Loma Prieta earthquake despite also being clamped by it. These responses are consistent with either a low coefficient of static friction or high pore fluid pressures within the fault zones. We can explain the different behavior of the two styles of faults if those with large cumulative offset become impermeable through gouge buildup; coseismically pressurized pore fluids could be trapped and negate imposed normal stress changes, whereas in more limited offset faults, fluids could rapidly escape. The difference in behavior between minor and major faults may explain why frictional failure criteria that apply intermediate coefficients of static friction can be effective in describing the broad distributions of aftershocks that follow large earthquakes, since many of these events occur both inside and outside major fault zones.

  4. Thermal stress imposed by prototype bilayer and current ground crew chemical defense ensembles: a limited laboratory comparison. Final report, 30 June 1986-1 January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Krock, L.P.; Navalta, R.; Myhre, L.G.

    1988-07-01

    An open bilayer ground-crew chemical defense ensemble (CDE) was proposed to reduce the thermal burden during vapor-only exposure periods. This study compared the thermal-stress profile of the proposed ensemble to that produced by the currently employed closed CDE. Four subjects, alternating ensembles on separate days, walked on a treadmill in an environmental chamber at 5.3 km/h (3.3 mph) and 2% grade (an energy expenditure of 350 kcal/h) for alternating work/rest to achieve significant recovery. Mean total sweat production was lower (1.38 vs. 2.50 liters) and percent sweat evaporation greater (65.7% vs. 30.0%) in the prototype ensemble than in the CDE. The prototype ensemble provided greater heat dissipation and allowed more-efficient sweat evaporation which had the double benefit of reducing heat storage and limiting dehydration.

  5. Oxidative stress in skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial respiration and limits exercise capacity in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hirabayashi, Kagami; Matsushima, Shouji; Inoue, Naoki; Ohta, Yukihiro; Hamaguchi, Sanae; Sobirin, Mochamad A; Ono, Taisuke; Suga, Tadashi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Fumio; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    Insulin resistance or diabetes is associated with limited exercise capacity, which can be caused by the abnormal energy metabolism in skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress is involved in mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress could cause mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle and make contribution to exercise intolerance in diabetes. C57/BL6J mice were fed on normal diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 8 wk to induce obesity with insulin resistance and diabetes. Treadmill tests with expired gas analysis were performed to determine the exercise capacity and whole body oxygen uptake (Vo(2)). The work (vertical distance x body weight) to exhaustion was reduced in the HFD mice by 36%, accompanied by a 16% decrease of peak Vo(2). Mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration, electron transport chain complex I and III activities, and mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle were decreased in the HFD mice. Furthermore, superoxide production and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in skeletal muscle were significantly increased in the HFD mice. Intriguingly, the treatment of HFD-fed mice with apocynin [10 mmol/l; an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase activation] improved exercise intolerance and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle without affecting glucose metabolism itself. The exercise capacity and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle were impaired in type 2 diabetes, which might be due to enhanced oxidative stress. Therapies designed to regulate oxidative stress and maintain mitochondrial function could be beneficial to improve the exercise capacity in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Silicon (Si) alleviates cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) from zinc (Zn) toxicity stress by limiting Zn uptake and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Anwaar, Shad Ali; Ali, Shafaqat; Ali, Skhawat; Ishaque, Wajid; Farid, Mujahid; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Najeeb, Ullah; Abbas, Farhat; Sharif, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Silicon (Si) is as an important fertilizer element, which has been found effective in enhancing plant tolerance to variety of biotic and a-biotic stresses. This study investigates the Si potential to alleviate zinc (Zn) toxicity stress in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Cotton plants were grown in hydroponics and exposed to different Zn concentration, 0, 25, and 50 μM, alone and/or in combination with 1 mM Si. Incremental Zn concentration in growth media instigated the cellular oxidative damage that was evident from elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), electrolyte leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and consequently inhibited cotton growth, biomass, chlorophyll pigments, and photosynthetic process. Application of Si significantly suppressed Zn accumulation in various plant parts, i.e., roots, stems, and leaves and thus promoted biomass, photosynthetic, growth parameters, and antioxidant enzymes activity of Zn-stressed as well unstressed plants. In addition, Si reduced the MDA and H2O2 production and electrolyte leakage suggesting its role in protecting cotton plants from Zn toxicity-induced oxidative damage. Thus, the study indicated that exogenous Si application could improve growth and development of cotton crop experiencing Zn toxicity stress by limiting Zn bioavailability and oxidative damage.

  7. Heat stress-induced limitations to reproductive success in Gossypium hirsutum.

    PubMed

    Snider, John L; Oosterhuis, Derrick M; Skulman, Briggs W; Kawakami, Eduardo M

    2009-10-01

    Using in vitro systems, numerous authors have cited the sensitivity of pollen tube growth to high temperature as a major cause of low yields for crops with valuable reproductive structures. We investigated the hypothesis that in vivo fertilization efficiency would be negatively affected by heat stress-induced changes in energy reserves and calcium-mediated oxidative status in the pistil. Gossypium hirsutum plants exposed to optimal (30/20 degrees C) or high day temperature (38/20 degrees C) conditions during flowering were analyzed for fertilization efficiency via UV microscopic observation of pollen tube-containing ovules and for soluble carbohydrates, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), calcium, antioxidant enzyme activity and NADPH oxidase (NOX; EC 1.6.3.1) activity in the pistil. Leaf measurements included gas exchange, chlorophyll content, quantum efficiency and ATP content of the subtending leaf on the day of anthesis. In the pistil fertilization efficiency, soluble carbohydrates, ATP content and NOX activity declined significantly, whereas water soluble calcium and glutathione reductase (EC 1.8.1.7) activity increased, and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) activity remained unchanged. In leaves, heat stress decreased photosynthesis, quantum efficiency and chlorophyll content, but increased stomatal conductance. We conclude that decreased source leaf activity either inhibits pollen development, tube growth through the style or guidance to the ovules as a result of an insufficient energy supply to the developing pistil. We further conclude that a calcium-augmented antioxidant response in heat-stressed pistils interferes with enzymatic superoxide production needed for normal pollen tube growth and fertilization of the ovule. PMID:19656331

  8. Limited effects of hyperlipidemia on the arterial smooth muscle response to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Glagov, S; Grande, J P; Xu, C P; Giddens, D P; Zarins, C K

    1989-01-01

    Arteries respond to long-term changes in flow rate by alterations in caliber that tend to restore wall shear stress to normal baseline levels. Changes in radius, pressure, or geometric configuration elicit changes in structure and composition of the media in keeping with the altered level and distribution of tensile stresses. Similar stabilizing adaptations occur in the presence of conditions that induce the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, but the ultimate effectiveness of these reactions is variable. Several recent experiments provide information on the possible effects of hyperlipidemia on the smooth muscle cell (SMC) response to normal or increased levels of mechanical stress: (a) Normolipemic serum increases collagen synthesis by SMCs grown on purified elastin membranes compared to synthesis in serum-free medium, but synthesis is not further enhanced by cyclic stretching of the cells. Collagen production increase is less marked in hyperlipemic serum, but cyclic stretching raises synthesis to a degree comparable to that noted for serum-free medium. (b) The increase in artery diameter in response to increased flow rate and the elaboration of media components in relation to the increase in diameter are not hampered by hyperlipidemia. (c) The compensatory enlargement of arteries in response to plaque formation is not prevented by hyperlipidemia even in the presence of hypertension. (d) The healing of a transmural necrotizing injury of the media is, however, retarded and incomplete in the presence of hyperlipidemia. These findings indicate that hyperlipidemia per se does not necessarily interfere with the SMC response to mechanical stimuli. The usual adaptive reactions remain intact.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Bacterial persistence is an active σS stress response to metabolic flux limitation.

    PubMed

    Radzikowski, Jakub Leszek; Vedelaar, Silke; Siegel, David; Ortega, Álvaro Dario; Schmidt, Alexander; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-09-21

    While persisters are a health threat due to their transient antibiotic tolerance, little is known about their phenotype and what actually causes persistence. Using a new method for persister generation and high-throughput methods, we comprehensively mapped the molecular phenotype of Escherichia coli during the entry and in the state of persistence in nutrient-rich conditions. The persister proteome is characterized by σ(S)-mediated stress response and a shift to catabolism, a proteome that starved cells tried to but could not reach due to absence of a carbon and energy source. Metabolism of persisters is geared toward energy production, with depleted metabolite pools. We developed and experimentally verified a model, in which persistence is established through a system-level feedback: Strong perturbations of metabolic homeostasis cause metabolic fluxes to collapse, prohibiting adjustments toward restoring homeostasis. This vicious cycle is stabilized and modulated by high ppGpp levels, toxin/anti-toxin systems, and the σ(S)-mediated stress response. Our system-level model consistently integrates past findings with our new data, thereby providing an important basis for future research on persisters.

  10. Bacterial persistence is an active σS stress response to metabolic flux limitation.

    PubMed

    Radzikowski, Jakub Leszek; Vedelaar, Silke; Siegel, David; Ortega, Álvaro Dario; Schmidt, Alexander; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While persisters are a health threat due to their transient antibiotic tolerance, little is known about their phenotype and what actually causes persistence. Using a new method for persister generation and high-throughput methods, we comprehensively mapped the molecular phenotype of Escherichia coli during the entry and in the state of persistence in nutrient-rich conditions. The persister proteome is characterized by σ(S)-mediated stress response and a shift to catabolism, a proteome that starved cells tried to but could not reach due to absence of a carbon and energy source. Metabolism of persisters is geared toward energy production, with depleted metabolite pools. We developed and experimentally verified a model, in which persistence is established through a system-level feedback: Strong perturbations of metabolic homeostasis cause metabolic fluxes to collapse, prohibiting adjustments toward restoring homeostasis. This vicious cycle is stabilized and modulated by high ppGpp levels, toxin/anti-toxin systems, and the σ(S)-mediated stress response. Our system-level model consistently integrates past findings with our new data, thereby providing an important basis for future research on persisters. PMID:27655400

  11. Design, Analysis and Application of a Novel Test for Sheet Metal Forming Limits under Non-Planar Stress States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, Julian M.; Shouler, Daniel R.

    2011-05-01

    Recent work on incremental sheet forming processes has demonstrated that they induce non-planar stress states which give significantly increased forming limits. In previous work, we have extended the Marcinak-Kuczynski analysis for in-plane loading to include proportional loading with all six components of the stress tensor, and have represented the results as a generalised forming limit diagram. This paper proposes a first standardised test of forming limits under these conditions. A novel apparatus is constructed in which a sliding carriage can apply controllable compressive rolling, three-roll bending, or through thickness shearing to a sample undergoing uniaxial extension. Finite element analysis demonstrates the effect of this loading on deformation and details of equipment design are given. Initial trials are used to assess the repeatability of the tests and to confirm whether the strain states induced in the workpieces conform with finite element predictions. Tests to examine increases in formability under various loading conditions show greatly increased failure strains, but with some variability in results, and only partial agreement with analytical predictions.

  12. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in Appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  13. Life at the Limits: Capacities of Isolated and Cultured Lichen Symbionts to Resist Extreme Environmental Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, J.-P.; Rettberg, P.; Ott, S.

    2008-10-01

    Lichens are described as a symbiosis formed by a myco- and photobiont, capable of colonizing habitats where their separate symbionts would not be able to survive. Space simulation studies on the separated symbionts of the lichen Xanthoria elegans have been performed to test their capacity to resist the most extreme conditions. The isolated cultured symbiont cells were exposed to different doses of the UV spectrum, and to vacuum. Cultures of both symbionts were analysed by specific vitality tests (LIVE/DEAD-staining detected by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy). Growth capacity of symbiont cultures on different media was analysed after exposure to extreme environmental stresses. The data obtained support the hypothesis that the symbiotic state considerably enhances the ability of the respective symbionts to survive exposure to extreme conditions, including the conditions of space simulation. Species such as X. elegans may, therefore, be suitable for use as model organisms in exobiological studies.

  14. Life at the limits: capacities of isolated and cultured lichen symbionts to resist extreme environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    de Vera, J-P; Rettberg, P; Ott, S

    2008-10-01

    Lichens are described as a symbiosis formed by a myco- and photobiont, capable of colonizing habitats where their separate symbionts would not be able to survive. Space simulation studies on the separated symbionts of the lichen Xanthoria elegans have been performed to test their capacity to resist the most extreme conditions. The isolated cultured symbiont cells were exposed to different doses of the UV spectrum, and to vacuum. Cultures of both symbionts were analysed by specific vitality tests (LIVE/DEAD-staining detected by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy). Growth capacity of symbiont cultures on different media was analysed after exposure to extreme environmental stresses. The data obtained support the hypothesis that the symbiotic state considerably enhances the ability of the respective symbionts to survive exposure to extreme conditions, including the conditions of space simulation. Species such as X. elegans may, therefore, be suitable for use as model organisms in exobiological studies.

  15. Possibilities and limitations of rod-beam theories. [nonlinear distortion tensor and nonlinear stress tensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D.

    1979-01-01

    Rod-beam theories are founded on hypotheses such as Bernouilli's suggesting flat cross-sections under deformation. These assumptions, which make rod-beam theories possible, also limit the accuracy of their analysis. It is shown that from a certain order upward terms of geometrically nonlinear deformations contradict the rod-beam hypotheses. Consistent application of differential geometry calculus also reveals differences from existing rod theories of higher order. These differences are explained by simple examples.

  16. Interactive effects of water stress and xylem-limited bacterial infection on the water relations of a host vine.

    PubMed

    McElrone, Andrew J; Sherald, James L; Forseth, Irwin N

    2003-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited bacterial pathogen that causes bacterial leaf scorch in its hosts, has a diverse and extensive host range among plant species worldwide. Previous work has shown that water stress enhances leaf scorch symptom severity and progression along the stem in Parthenocissus quinquefolia infected by X. fastidiosa. The objective here was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the interaction of water stress and infection by X. fastidiosa. Using the eastern deciduous forest vine, P. quinquefolia, infection and water availability were manipulated while measuring leaf water potentials (psi(L)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), whole shoot hydraulic conductance (K(h)), per cent xylem embolism, and xylem vessel dimensions. No significant differences in any of the physiological measurements were found between control and infected plants prior to drought. Drought treatment significantly reduced psi(L) and g(s) at all leaf positions throughout the day in late summer in both years of the study. In addition, infection significantly reduced psi(L) and g(s) in the most basal leaf positions in late summer in both years. Whole shoot hydraulic conductance was reduced by both low water and infection treatments. However, per cent embolized vessels and mean vessel diameter were affected by drought treatment only. These results imply that the major effect of infection by X. fastidiosa occurs due to reduced hydraulic conductance caused by clogging of the vessels, and not increased cavitation and embolism of xylem elements. The reduced K(h) caused by X. fastidiosa infection acts additively with the water limitation imposed by Drought stress.

  17. Thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase is a limiting factor of antioxidative systems under photo-oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yabuta, Yukinori; Motoki, Takashi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Takeda, Toru; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the physiological importance of thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) in the active oxygen species-scavenging system of chloroplasts, the level of tAPX in tobacco plants was altered by expression of the tAPX cDNA in both sense and antisense orientation. The tobacco plants transformed with constructs of antisense tAPXs from spinach and tobacco could not be obtained, suggesting that the suppression of tAPX in higher plants had a severe effect on the growth even under normal conditions. In contrast, the transgenic tobacco plants (TpTAP-12) overexpressing tAPX, which had approximately 37-fold higher activity than that of the wild-type plants, were generated. The TpTAP-12 plants showed increased tolerance to oxidative stress caused by application of methylviologen (MV, 50 microm) under light intensity (300 and 1600 microE m(-2) sec(-1)) and by chilling stress with high light intensity (4 degrees C, 1000 microE m(-2) sec(-1)). At 24 h after the MV treatment under illumination at 300 microE m-2 sec-1, destruction of chlorophyll was observed in the wild-type plants, but not in the TpTAP-12 plants. The activities of thiol-modulated enzymes in the Calvin cycle, the level and redox status of ascorbate (AsA), and the activity of tAPX in the wild-type plants significantly decreased, while those in the TpTAP-12 plants were hardly changed. These observations suggest that tAPX is a limiting factor of antioxidative systems under photo-oxidative stress in chloroplasts, and that the enhanced activity of tAPX functions to maintain the AsA content and the redox status of AsA under stress conditions.

  18. Sublethal salinity stress contributes to habitat limitation in an endangered estuarine fish.

    PubMed

    Komoroske, Lisa M; Jeffries, Ken M; Connon, Richard E; Dexter, Jason; Hasenbein, Matthias; Verhille, Christine; Fangue, Nann A

    2016-09-01

    As global change alters multiple environmental conditions, predicting species' responses can be challenging without understanding how each environmental factor influences organismal performance. Approaches quantifying mechanistic relationships can greatly complement correlative field data, strengthening our abilities to forecast global change impacts. Substantial salinity increases are projected in the San Francisco Estuary, California, due to anthropogenic water diversion and climatic changes, where the critically endangered delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) largely occurs in a low-salinity zone (LSZ), despite their ability to tolerate a much broader salinity range. In this study, we combined molecular and organismal measures to quantify the physiological mechanisms and sublethal responses involved in coping with salinity changes. Delta smelt utilize a suite of conserved molecular mechanisms to rapidly adjust their osmoregulatory physiology in response to salinity changes in estuarine environments. However, these responses can be energetically expensive, and delta smelt body condition was reduced at high salinities. Thus, acclimating to salinities outside the LSZ could impose energetic costs that constrain delta smelt's ability to exploit these habitats. By integrating data across biological levels, we provide key insight into the mechanistic relationships contributing to phenotypic plasticity and distribution limitations and advance the understanding of the molecular osmoregulatory responses in nonmodel estuarine fishes. PMID:27606005

  19. Red spruce physiology and growth in response to elevated CO[sub 2], water stress and nutrient limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Spruce-fir ecosystems of the eastern United States interest scientists because of reported changes in population growth. This research examined the growth and physical responses of red spruce seedlings (Picea rubens Sarg.) to change in atmospheric CO[sub 2], water and nutrient availability to determine the response of this species to potential climatic changes. Red spruce seedlings were grown from seed for 1 year in ambient (374 ppm) or elevated (713 ppm) CO[sub 2] in combination with low or high soil fertility treatment, and well-watered or water-stressed conditions. Red spruce seedlings grown with limited nutrient and water availability increased growth in elevated CO[sub 2] as did seedlings grown with high soil fertility treatment and ample water. At 12 months of age, elevated CO[sub 2]-grown seedlings had greater dry weight, height, diameter and specific leaf weight than ambient CO[sub 2[minus

  20. Work-related stress in midlife is associated with higher number of mobility limitation in older age-results from the FLAME study.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, Jenni; Hinrichs, Timo; Törmäkangas, Timo; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; von Bonsdorff, Monika E; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Klockars, Matti; Seitsamo, Jorma; Ilmarinen, Juhani; Rantanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether work-related stress symptoms in midlife are associated with a number of mobility limitations during three decades from midlife to late life. Data for the study come from the Finnish Longitudinal Study of Municipal Employees (FLAME). The study includes a total of 5429 public sector employees aged 44-58 years at baseline who had information available on work-related stress symptoms in 1981 and 1985 and mobility limitation score during the subsequent 28-year follow-up. Four midlife work-related stress profiles were identified: negative reactions to work and depressiveness, perceived decrease in cognition, sleep disturbances, and somatic symptoms. People with a high number of stress symptoms in 1981 and 1985 were categorized as having constant stress. The number of self-reported mobility limitations was computed based on an eight-item list of mobility tasks presented to the participants in 1992, 1997, and 2009. Data were analyzed using joint Poisson regression models. The study showed that depending on the stress profile, persons suffering from constant stress in midlife had a higher risk of 30-70 % for having one more mobility limitation during the following 28 years compared to persons without stress after adjusting for mortality, several lifestyle factors, and chronic conditions. A less pronounced risk increase (20-40 %) was observed for persons with occasional symptoms. The study suggests that effective interventions aiming to reduce work-related stress should focus on both primary and secondary prevention.

  1. Increase in family allowances.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    In July 1989 the family allowance structure in Australia was changed from a 4-rate to a 2-rate structure. The new rates were increased to $A9 a week for the 1st 3 children and $A12 for each additional child. The Family Allowance Supplment rate for children 13-15 years old was raised from $A31 to $A34.10/week. PMID:12344544

  2. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  3. All stressed out and nowhere to go: does evolvability limit adaptation in invasive species? An introduction to the symposium at the SSE/ASN/SSB meeting, June 2004.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, George W; Lee, Carol Eunmi

    2007-02-01

    Introduced and invasive species are major threats native species and communities and, quite naturally, most scientists and managers think of them in terms of ecological problems. However, species introductions are also experiments in evolution, both for the alien species and for the community that they colonize. We focus here on the introduced species because these offer opportunities to study the properties that allow a species to succeed in a novel habitat and the constraints that limit range expansion. Moreover, an increasing body of evidence from diverse taxa suggests that the introduced species often undergo rapid and observable evolutionary change in their new habitat. Evolution requires genetic variation, which may be decreased or expanded during an invasion, and an evolutionary mechanism such as genetic drift or natural selection. In this volume, we seek to understand how natural selection produces adaptive evolution during invasions. Key questions include what is the role of biotic and abiotic stress in driving adaptation, and what is the source of genetic variation in introduced populations. PMID:16924404

  4. Mechanisms for three kinds of limiting shear stresses appearing in the traction modes of viscous, viscoelastic, and glassy states of lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Fujita, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We present that the tractional flow of a lubricant shows three kinds of limiting shear stresses at which the shear stresses take place independently of the shear rates in its viscous, viscoelastic, and glassy states. We propose three models on the mechanisms for the limiting shear stresses, based on the data of Brillouin spectra and viscosity of viscoelastic liquids previously reported by us and based on the data of the deformation of glassy polymers referred from others. The Brillouin spectra of a viscoelastic lubricant measured at up to 5 GPa at 25 and 80 °C show that we could not observe a frequency dispersion in sound waves below 0.8 GPa at 80 °C, while we can observe the frequency dispersion above 0.1 MPa at 25 °C owing to the viscosity of the lubricant. This result predicts the viscous limiting shear stress in the viscous state owing to the disappearance of meso-structures by heating and shearing under pressure. The viscosity of a polymer measured around the glass transition temperature (Tg) shows that Tg determined by the viscosity measurement is 27 K lower than that determined by calorimetry. This result predicts the elastic limiting shear stress in the viscoelastic state near the glass transition pressure (Pg) owing to the shear thinning effect by shearing a lubricant film. In addition, there is the plastic limiting shear stress in the glassy state owing to the yield stress at which the tractional flow of a glassy lubricant behaves as a plastic solid.

  5. Heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a Dps family gene) protects Escherichia coli from nutrient limitation and abiotic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Om Prakash; Kumari, Nidhi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2010-03-26

    This study presents first hand data on the cloning and heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a dps family gene) in combating nutrients limitation and multiple abiotic stresses. The Escherichia coli transformed with pGEX-5X-2-all3940 construct when subjected to iron, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus limitation and carbofuron, copper, UV-B, heat, salt and cadmium stress registered significant increase in growth over the cells transformed with empty vector under iron (0%), carbon (0.05%), nitrogen (3.7 mM) and phosphorus (2 mM) limitation and carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), UV-B (10 min), heat (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v) and CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM) stress. Enhanced expression of all3940 gene measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR at different time points under above mentioned treatments clearly demonstrates its role in tolerance against aforesaid abiotic stresses. This study opens the gate for developing transgenic cyanobacteria capable of growing successfully under above mentioned stresses.

  6. Long-term strength and allowable stresses of grade 10Kh9MFB and X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91/P91) chromium heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Danyushevskiy, I. A.; Schenkova, I. A.; Prudnikov, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, grade X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91, P91) and 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) chromium steels are widely applied in equipment manufacturing for thermal power plants in Russia and abroad. Compilation and comparison of tensile, impact, and long-term strength tests results accumulated for many years of investigations of foreign grade X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, P91, and domestic grade 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) steels is carried out. The property identity of metals investigated is established. High strength and plastic properties of steels, from which pipes and other products are made, for operation under creep conditions are confirmed. Design characteristics of long-term strength on the basis of tests with more than one million of hour-samples are determined ( and at temperatures of 500-650°C). The table of recommended allowable stresses for grade 10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-SH, X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, and P91 steels is developed. The long-time properties of pipe welded joints of grade 10Kh9MFB+10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-Sh+10Kh9MFB-Sh, X10CrMoVNb9-1+X10CrMoVNb9-1, P91+P91, T91+T91, 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh)+X10CrMoVNb9-1(T/P91) steels is researched. The welded joint reduction factor is experimentally determined.

  7. Overexpression of TFAM or Twinkle Increases mtDNA Copy Number and Facilitates Cardioprotection Associated with Limited Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Arai, Shinobu; Saku, Keita; Kakino, Takamori; Tyynismaa, Henna; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Kang, Dongchon; Suomalainen, Anu; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number decreases in animal and human heart failure (HF), yet its role in cardiomyocytes remains to be elucidated. Thus, we investigated the cardioprotective function of increased mtDNA copy number resulting from the overexpression of human transcription factor A of mitochondria (TFAM) or Twinkle helicase in volume overload (VO)-induced HF. Methods and Results Two strains of transgenic (TG) mice, one overexpressing TFAM and the other overexpressing Twinkle helicase, exhibit an approximately 2-fold equivalent increase in mtDNA copy number in heart. These TG mice display similar attenuations in eccentric hypertrophy and improved cardiac function compared to wild-type (WT) mice without any deterioration of mitochondrial enzymatic activities in response to VO, which was accompanied by a reduction in matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and reactive oxygen species after 8 weeks of VO. Moreover, acute VO-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 upregulation was also suppressed at 24 h in both TG mice. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitoROS) upregulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed mitoROS and their upregulation. Additionally, mitoROS were equally suppressed in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts that overexpress hTFAM or rat Twinkle, both of which exhibit increased mtDNA copy number. Furthermore, mitoROS and mitochondrial protein oxidation from both TG mice were suppressed compared to WT mice. Conclusions The overexpression of TFAM or Twinkle results in increased mtDNA copy number and facilitates cardioprotection associated with limited mitochondrial oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that increasing mtDNA copy number could be a useful therapeutic strategy to target mitoROS in HF. PMID:25822152

  8. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those...

  9. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  10. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  11. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  12. Thermal onset of cellular and endocrine stress responses correspond to ecological limits in brook trout, an iconic cold-water fish

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Joseph G.; Nislow, Keith H.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to change the distribution and abundance of species, yet underlying physiological mechanisms are complex and methods for detecting populations at risk from rising temperature are poorly developed. There is increasing interest in using physiological mediators of the stress response as indicators of individual and population-level response to environmental stressors. Here, we use laboratory experiments to show that the temperature thresholds in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) for increased gill heat shock protein-70 (20.7°C) and plasma glucose (21.2°C) are similar to their proposed thermal ecological limit of 21.0°C. Field assays demonstrated increased plasma glucose, cortisol and heat shock protein-70 concentrations at field sites where mean daily temperature exceeded 21.0°C. Furthermore, population densities of brook trout were lowest at field sites where temperatures were warm enough to induce a stress response, and a co-occurring species with a higher thermal tolerance showed no evidence of physiological stress at a warm site. The congruence of stress responses and proposed thermal limits supports the use of these thresholds in models of changes in trout distribution under climate change scenarios and suggests that the induction of the stress response by elevated temperature may play a key role in driving the distribution of species. PMID:27293702

  13. Thermal onset of cellular and endocrine stress responses correspond to ecological limits in brook trout, an iconic cold-water fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, Joseph G; Nislow, Kieth H; McCormick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to change the distribution and abundance of species, yet underlying physiological mechanisms are complex and methods for detecting populations at risk from rising temperature are poorly developed. There is increasing interest in using physiological mediators of the stress response as indicators of individual and population-level response to environmental stressors. Here, we use laboratory experiments to show that the temperature thresholds in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) for increased gill heat shock protein-70 (20.7°C) and plasma glucose (21.2°C) are similar to their proposed thermal ecological limit of 21.0°C. Field assays demonstrated increased plasma glucose, cortisol and heat shock protein-70 concentrations at field sites where mean daily temperature exceeded 21.0°C. Furthermore, population densities of brook trout were lowest at field sites where temperatures were warm enough to induce a stress response, and a co-occurring species with a higher thermal tolerance showed no evidence of physiological stress at a warm site. The congruence of stress responses and proposed thermal limits supports the use of these thresholds in models of changes in trout distribution under climate change scenarios and suggests that the induction of the stress response by elevated temperature may play a key role in driving the distribution of species.

  14. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear... appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear clothing; or (B) A... allowance for each prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair)...

  15. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear... appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear clothing; or (B) A... allowance for each prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair)...

  16. Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) have greater blood volumes, higher diving metabolic rates and a longer aerobic dive limit when nutritionally stressed.

    PubMed

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Trites, Andrew W; Rosen, David A S

    2014-03-01

    Marine mammal foraging behaviour inherently depends on diving ability. Declining populations of Steller sea lions may be facing nutritional stress that could affect their diving ability through changes in body composition or metabolism. Our objective was to determine whether nutritional stress (restricted food intake resulting in a 10% decrease in body mass) altered the calculated aerobic dive limit (cADL) of four captive sea lions diving in the open ocean, and how this related to changes in observed dive behaviour. We measured diving metabolic rate (DMR), blood O2 stores, body composition and dive behaviour prior to and while under nutritional restriction. We found that nutritionally stressed sea lions increased the duration of their single long dives, and the proportion of time they spent at the surface during a cycle of four dives. Nutritionally stressed sea lions lost both lipid and lean mass, resulting in potentially lower muscle O2 stores. However, total body O2 stores increased due to rises in blood O2 stores associated with having higher blood volumes. Nutritionally stressed sea lions also had higher mass-specific metabolic rates. The greater rise in O2 stores relative to the increase in mass-specific DMR resulted in the sea lions having a longer cADL when nutritionally stressed. We conclude that there was no negative effect of nutritional stress on the diving ability of sea lions. However, nutritional stress did lower foraging efficiency and require more foraging time to meet energy requirements due to increases in diving metabolic rates and surface recovery times.

  17. Metabolic responses of eukaryotic microalgae to environmental stress limit the ability of FT-IR spectroscopy for species identification

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Thomas; Bajhaiya, Amit K.; Allwood, J. William; Goodacre, Royston; Pittman, Jon K.; Dean, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a robust method for macromolecular analysis and differentiation of microorganisms. However, most studies are performed in controlled conditions and it is unclear whether this tool is appropriate for the identification of eukaryotic microalgae species from variable environments. In order to address this, nine closely-related species of marine and freshwater microalgae were grown under controlled (non-stressed) and variable (non-stressed and stressed) conditions, including nutrient-stressed and wastewater-stressed conditions. Following optimization of data processing methods, FT-IR spectra from all species and conditions were compared. The substantial metabolic changes that were caused by nutrient starvation restricted the ability of FT-IR spectroscopy to differentiate the microalgal species grown under variable conditions efficiently. Comparison of unsupervised and supervised multivariate data analysis methods found that principal component-discriminant function analysis was able best to differentiate between some species under controlled conditions but still gave poor differentiation under variable environmental conditions. PMID:26839765

  18. Measurement of the forming limit stress curve using a multi-axial tube expansion test with a digital image correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoyama, Tomoyuki; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    A servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine with an optical 3D deformation analysis system (ARAMIS) was used to measure the multi-axial plastic deformation behavior of a high-strength steel sheet for a range of strain from initial yield to fracture. The testing machine is capable of applying arbitrary principal stress or strain paths to a tubular specimen using an electrical, closed-loop servo-control system for axial force and internal pressure. Tubular specimens with an inner diameter of 44.6 mm were fabricated from a high-strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 590 MPa and a thickness of 1.2 mm by roller bending and laser welding. Several linear and non-linear stress paths in the first quadrant of the stress space were applied to the tubular specimens in order to measure the forming limit curve (FLC) and forming limit stress curve (FLSC) of the as-received test material, in addition to the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates. The contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates measured for the linear stress path experiments were compared with those calculated using selected yield functions in order to identify the most appropriate yield function for the test material. Moreover, a Marciniak-Kuczyński type (M-K) forming limit analysis was performed using the most appropriate yield function. The calculated and measured FLC and FLSC were compared in order to validate the M-K approach. The path-dependence of the FLC and FLSC was also investigated.

  19. Measurement of the forming limit stress curve using a multi-axial tube expansion test with a digital image correlation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hakoyama, Tomoyuki; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2013-12-16

    A servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine with an optical 3D deformation analysis system (ARAMIS) was used to measure the multi-axial plastic deformation behavior of a high-strength steel sheet for a range of strain from initial yield to fracture. The testing machine is capable of applying arbitrary principal stress or strain paths to a tubular specimen using an electrical, closed-loop servo-control system for axial force and internal pressure. Tubular specimens with an inner diameter of 44.6 mm were fabricated from a high-strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 590 MPa and a thickness of 1.2 mm by roller bending and laser welding. Several linear and non-linear stress paths in the first quadrant of the stress space were applied to the tubular specimens in order to measure the forming limit curve (FLC) and forming limit stress curve (FLSC) of the as-received test material, in addition to the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates. The contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates measured for the linear stress path experiments were compared with those calculated using selected yield functions in order to identify the most appropriate yield function for the test material. Moreover, a Marciniak-Kuczyński type (M-K) forming limit analysis was performed using the most appropriate yield function. The calculated and measured FLC and FLSC were compared in order to validate the M-K approach. The path-dependence of the FLC and FLSC was also investigated.

  20. The evaluation of non-enzymatic antioxidants effects in limiting tumor- associated oxidative stress, in a tumor rat model.

    PubMed

    Grigorescu, R; Gruia, M I; Nacea, V; Nitu, C; Negoita, V; Glavan, D

    2015-01-01

    Active oxygen species are produced as a consequence of normal aerobic metabolism. Of these, free radicals are usually metabolized or inactivated in vivo by a team of antioxidants. Individual members are a trained team fighting antioxidants to prevent the generation of ROS, destroy or oxidizing potential of capture. In terms of physiological oxidative stress, induced tissue attack is minimal. A relative or absolute deficiency in the antioxidant defense may lead to increased oxidative stress and this event is associated with both the causes and consequences of diseases and cancer, included here. The aim of the study is to identify the role of antioxidant defense systems and the reduction of oxidative stress in dynamic growth and development of malignant tumors. Our in vivo study was developed and referred to carcinosarcoma carriers Wistar rats treated with non-enzymatic antioxidants: vitamin C, vitamin A, zinc salt (II), and arginine in various combinations. Treatment was initiated three weeks before tumor induction.

  1. Limit case analysis of the "stable indenter velocity" method for obtaining creep stress exponents from constant load indentation creep tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Dean, J.; Clyne, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    This study concerns a commonly-used procedure for evaluating the steady state creep stress exponent, n, from indentation data. The procedure involves monitoring the indenter displacement history under constant load and making the assumption that, once its velocity has stabilised, the system is in a quasi-steady state, with stage II creep dominating the behaviour. The stress and strain fields under the indenter are represented by "equivalent stress" and "equivalent strain rate" values. The estimate of n is then obtained as the gradient of a plot of the logarithm of the equivalent strain rate against the logarithm of the equivalent stress. Concerns have, however, been expressed about the reliability of this procedure, and indeed it has already been shown to be fundamentally flawed. In the present paper, it is demonstrated, using a very simple analysis, that, for a genuinely stable velocity, the procedure always leads to the same, constant value for n (either 1.0 or 0.5, depending on whether the tip shape is spherical or self-similar). This occurs irrespective of the value of the measured velocity, or indeed of any creep characteristic of the material. It is now clear that previously-measured values of n, obtained using this procedure, have varied in a more or less random fashion, depending on the functional form chosen to represent the displacement-time history and the experimental variables (tip shape and size, penetration depth, etc.), with little or no sensitivity to the true value of n.

  2. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable to the organization incurring the costs. The following chart lists the kinds of organizations and... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22... Administration § 66.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  3. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  4. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1207.22... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1207.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  5. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  6. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  7. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  8. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  9. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1470.22 Section 1470.22 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  10. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  11. 45 CFR 2541.220 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2541.220 Section 2541.220 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.220 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may...

  12. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  13. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate in...; and (8) Summer institutes in the United States or abroad designed to provide language and...

  14. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate in...; and (8) Summer institutes in the United States or abroad designed to provide language and...

  15. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate in...; and (8) Summer institutes in the United States or abroad designed to provide language and...

  16. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate in...; and (8) Summer institutes in the United States or abroad designed to provide language and...

  17. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES What Conditions Must Be...) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5...; and (8) Summer institutes in the United States or abroad designed to provide language and...

  18. LIMITATIONS OF EDDY CURRENT RESIDUAL STRESS PROFILING IN SURFACE-TREATED ENGINE ALLOYS OF VARIOUS HARDNESS LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Nabah, B. A.; Hassan, W. T.; Blodgett, M. P.; Nagy, P. B.

    2010-02-22

    Recent research results indicated that eddy current conductivity measurements might be exploited for nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated nickel-base superalloy components. This paper presents new results that indicate that in some popular nickel-base superalloys the relationship between the electric conductivity profile and the sought residual stress profile is more tenuous than previously thought. It is shown that in IN718 the relationship is very sensitive to the state of precipitation hardening and, if left uncorrected, could render the eddy current technique unsuitable for residual stress profiling in components of 36 HRC or harder, i.e., in most critical engine applications. The presented experimental results show that the observed dramatic change in the eddy current response of hardened IN718 to surface treatment is caused by very fine nanometer-scale features of the microstructure, such as gamma' and gamma'' precipitates, rather than micrometer-scale features, such as changing grain size or carbide precipitates.

  19. Environmental proteomics of the mussel Mytilus: implications for tolerance to stress and change in limits of biogeographic ranges in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tomanek, Lars

    2012-11-01

    Climate change will affect temperature extremes and averages, and hyposaline conditions in coastal areas due to extreme precipitation events and oceanic pH. How climate change will push species close to, or beyond, their physiological tolerance limits as well as change the limits of their biogeographic ranges can probably be investigated best in species that have already responded to climate change and whose distribution ranges are currently in flux. Blue mussels provide such a study system, with the invading warm-adapted Mediterranean Mytilus galloprovincialis having replaced the native more cold-adapted Mytilus trossulus from the southern part of its range in southern California over the past century, possibly due to climate change. However, freshwater input may prevent the latter species from expanding further north. We used a proteomics approach to characterize the responses of the two congeners to acute heat stress, chronic thermal acclimation, and hyposaline stress. In addition, we investigated the proteomic changes in response to decreasing seawater pH in another bivalve, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a common costressor during environmental stress, including oceanic acidification, and possibly cause modifications of cytoskeletal elements. All stressors disrupted protein homeostasis, indicated by the induction of molecular chaperones and, in the case of acute heat stress, proteasome isoforms, possibly due both to protein denaturation directly by the stressor and to the production of ROS. Acute stress by heat and hyposalinity changed several small G-proteins implicated in cytoskeletal modifications and vesicular transport, respectively. Changes in abundance of proteins involved in energy metabolism and ROS scavenging further suggest a possible trade-off during acute and chronic stress from heat and cold between ROS-generating NADH-producing pathways and ROS-scavenging NADPH

  20. Eleven-year prognostic value of dobutamine stress (99m)Tc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with limited exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Boiten, Hendrik J; van Domburg, Ron T; Valkema, Roelf; Schinkel, Arend F L

    2015-04-01

    Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography is a routine technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. However, information on the very long term prognostic value of dobutamine stress single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in patients with limited exercise capacity is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term prognostic value of dobutamine stress technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-sestamibi MPI in these patients. The study population consisted of a high-risk cohort of 531 consecutive patients with limited exercise capacity who underwent dobutamine stress (99m)Tc-sestamibi MPI for the assessment of known or suspected coronary artery disease. Follow-up was successful in 528 patients. Because of early revascularization, 55 patients were excluded. The present data are based on 473 patients. The end points were all-cause mortality, cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and late (>60 days) coronary revascularization. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were performed and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of very long term outcome. The mean age of the patients was 61 ± 12 years, and 58% were men. Abnormal results (defined as the presence of reversible or fixed defects) were observed in 312 patients (66%). During a mean follow-up period of 11.3 ± 6.7 years, 287 patients (61%) died (all-cause mortality), of whom 125 (26%) died due to cardiac causes. Nonfatal myocardial infarction occurred in 59 patients (12%). Late coronary revascularization was performed in 61 patients (13%). Univariate predictors of major cardiac events included age, male gender, previous infarction, diabetes mellitus, history of angina, heart failure, ST-segment changes, abnormal results on (99m)Tc-sestamibi scan, reversible defect, fixed defect, summed rest score, and summed stress score. Multivariate analysis identified abnormal results on MPI as a strong independent predictor of

  1. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... advance of allowance. (a) Allowance. Step 2+3 and Step 3 grant agreements will include an allowance for facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... would receive under paragraph (a) of this section. (5) In the event a Step 2+3, Step 3 or Step 7...

  2. Stress of the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Neurons in Stroke Can Be Maximally Limited by Combined Exposure to Hypercapnia and Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tregub, P P; Kulikov, V P; Motin, Yu G; Nagibaeva, M E; Zabrodina, A S

    2016-08-01

    We studied the expression of chaperone GRP-78 and transcription factor NF-kB during the development of ischemic tolerance of the brain after combined and isolated exposure to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Combined exposure to hypoxia and hypercapnia maximally increased the expression of chaperone GRP-78 and transcription factor NF-kB, while the formation of ischemia-induced tolerance under conditions of hypercapnic hypoxia can be associated with activation of adaptive stress mechanisms in the endoplasmic reticulum. Under these conditions, hypercapnia in combination with hypoxia is a priority factor for activation of GRP-78 and transcription factor NF-kB. PMID:27591867

  3. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Truckee Canal to Rock Dam Ditch) must be charged to the MAD except as provided in §§ 418.23 and 418.35 of... 308,319 acre-feet for the 1995 Example. The sample MAD corresponds to a system efficiency for...

  4. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Truckee Canal to Rock Dam Ditch) must be charged to the MAD except as provided in §§ 418.23 and 418.35 of... 308,319 acre-feet for the 1995 Example. The sample MAD corresponds to a system efficiency for...

  5. The temperature response of CO2 assimilation, photochemical activities and Rubisco activation in Camelina sativa, a potential bioenergy crop with limited capacity for acclimation to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E

    2012-11-01

    The temperature optimum of photosynthesis coincides with the average daytime temperature in a species' native environment. Moderate heat stress occurs when temperatures exceed the optimum, inhibiting photosynthesis and decreasing productivity. In the present study, the temperature response of photosynthesis and the potential for heat acclimation was evaluated for Camelina sativa, a bioenergy crop. The temperature optimum of net CO(2) assimilation rate (A) under atmospheric conditions was 30-32 °C and was only slightly higher under non-photorespiratory conditions. The activation state of Rubisco was closely correlated with A at supra-optimal temperatures, exhibiting a parallel decrease with increasing leaf temperature. At both control and elevated temperatures, the modeled response of A to intercellular CO(2) concentration was consistent with Rubisco limiting A at ambient CO(2). Rubisco activation and photochemical activities were affected by moderate heat stress at lower temperatures in camelina than in the warm-adapted species cotton and tobacco. Growth under conditions that imposed a daily interval of moderate heat stress caused a 63 % reduction in camelina seed yield. Levels of cpn60 protein were elevated under the higher growth temperature, but acclimation of photosynthesis was minimal. Inactivation of Rubisco in camelina at temperatures above 35 °C was consistent with the temperature response of Rubisco activase activity and indicated that Rubisco activase was a prime target of inhibition by moderate heat stress in camelina. That photosynthesis exhibited no acclimation to moderate heat stress will likely impact the development of camelina and other cool season Brassicaceae as sources of bioenergy in a warmer world.

  6. What's All the Noise? Differentiating Dimensions of Acoustic Stress and the Limits to Meta-Analysis: Reply to Smith (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalma, J. L.; Hancock, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Smith (2012) has provided pertinent observations on our recently published meta-analytic review (Szalma & Hancock, 2011) of the effects of acoustic noise on performance. His main points are as follows: (a) our review excluded some areas of research; (b) there were conceptual problems with our moderator analyses; and (c) limitations to…

  7. Evaluation of the Maximum Allowable Cost Program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. James; Hefner, Dennis; Dobson, Allen; Hardy, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    This article summarizes an evaluation of the Maximum Allowable Cost (MAC)-Estimated Acquisition Cost (EAC) program, the Federal Government's cost-containment program for prescription drugs.1 The MAC-EAC regulations which became effective on August 26, 1976, have four major components: (1) Maximum Allowable Cost reimbursement limits for selected multisource or generically available drugs; (2) Estimated Acquisition Cost reimbursement limits for all drugs; (3) “usual and customary” reimbursement limits for all drugs; and (4) a directive that professional fee studies be performed by each State. The study examines the benefits and costs of the MAC reimbursement limits for 15 dosage forms of five multisource drugs and EAC reimbursement limits for all drugs for five selected States as of 1979. PMID:10309857

  8. Effects of chemical stress and food limitation on the energy reserves and growth of turbot, Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Kerambrun, E; Henry, F; Rabhi, K; Amara, R

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the present study is to examine the growth and energetic performance of juvenile turbot after exposure to contaminated sediment and during the subsequent recovery period with or without food limitation. We designed a two-step experiment by first exposing juvenile turbot to harbour sediment for 26 days and then transferring them to clean sea water with different frequencies of feeding for 35 days. Without food limitation, fish previously exposed to contaminated sediment compensated for weight, length and lipid reserve losses; we did not record any differences in size, Fulton's K condition index and triacylglycerol/sterol (TAG/ST) ratio after the 35-day depuration period compared to the reference fish. This result could be related to the compensatory growth mechanism observed in a wide range of fish species following a period of growth depression. With food limitation during the 35-day depuration period, recovery growth was not sufficient to restore length and weight values similar to the reference fish. Moreover, turbot previously exposed to contaminated sediment and subsequently fed twice or once a week exhibited extremely low TAG/ST ratios, but the reference fish submitted to the same restrictive feeding conditions did not. This study indicates that juvenile fish affected by chemical pollution can improve their biological performance if pollution events are followed by a period of abundant food. However, if pollution events occur during periods of food scarcity, e.g. in winter, storage of energy reserves will be compromised. PMID:25015714

  9. Using dendrochonology to crossdate year of death in trees: limitations with stressed trees in a diffuse mortality context. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angers, V. A.; Bergeron, Y.; Drapeau, P.

    2013-12-01

    Dendrochronological crossdating of dead trees is commonly used to reconstruct mortality patterns over time. This method assumes that the year of formation of the last growth ring corresponds to the year of the death of the tree. Trees experiencing important stress, such as defoliation, drought or senescence, may rely on very few resources to allocate to growth and may favour other vital physiological functions over growth. Even if the tree is still living, growth may thus be reduced or even supressed during a stressful event. When a tree dies following this event and that there is a lag between year of last ring production and year of actual death, crossdating underestimates the actual year of death. As ring formation is not uniform across the bole, growth may occur only in some parts of the tree and may be detectable only if multiple bole samples are analysed. In this study, we wanted to investigate how the growth patterns of dying trees influence estimation of year of death when crossdating. Our research questions were the following 1) Is there a difference (hereafter referred as 'lag') between the last year of growth ring formation in disc samples collected at different heights in dead trees? 2) If so, what is the range of magnitude of these lags? and 3) Is this magnitude range influenced by the causes of death? Sampled sites were located in northwestern Quebec (Canada), over an area overlapping the eastern mixedwood and coniferous boreal forests. Four tree species were examined: Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) and black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP). Trees that died following fire, self-thinning, defoliation and senescence were sampled. Two to three discs were collected on each dead tree (snags and logs) at different heights. Dendrochronological analyses were conducted to determine year of last growth ring production by crossdating. The more severe the disturbance, the

  10. The Tangle of Student Allowances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Norman J.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the distribution of student financial aid in Australia focuses on these issues: direct vs. indirect payment to students; inequality in living allowances given to secondary and postsecondary students; and distribution of expense allowances by state government and living allowances by the Commonwealth. (MSE)

  11. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  12. Water stress and nitrogen limitation effects on corn (Zea mays L.) competition with a C3 and a C4 weed.

    PubMed

    Zand, E; Soufizadeh, S; Eskandari, A

    2006-01-01

    To examine how drought and nitrogen limitation might affect crop competitive ability with C3 or C4 weeds, a two year experiment was conducted at the research field of Plant Pest and Disease Research Institute, Karaj, in 2002 and 2003. Irrigation interval (every 7d and 14d (moderate drought stress)), nitrogen rate (recommended and 1/4 recommended), and crop-weed competition (corn, corn-common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.), corn-redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), and corn-common lambsquarters-redroot pigweed) were studied in a split-factorial design with 4 replications, with irrigation interval as the main plot, and factorial combination of the other two factors as the sub-plot. Grain yield, harvest index (HI), water and nitrogen use efficiencies (WUE and NUE, respectively) were measured at harvest. Drought and nitrogen deficiency reduced corn grain yield and HI (except for corn-redroot pigweed and corn-common lambsquarters treatments under drought stress). Redroot pigweed was found inhibitorier to corn compared to common lambsquarters in all irrigation and nitrogen levels. Corn WUE reduced under drought condition and competition, but drought caused less reduction in corn WUE when it competed with common lambsquarters compared to redroot pigweed. This shows that drought has more negative effect on C3 weeds (probably due to higher reduction in stomatal conductance and increment in photo-respiration under these conditions compared to a C4 plant). The same result was obtained for corn NUE under nitrogen limitation and competition. In other words, nitrogen deficiency had more inhibitory effect on common lambsquarters competitive ability compared with redroot pigweed. Totally, it was concluded that drought stress and nitrogen deficiency, as the two results of climate change, had more negative effect on C3 weeds compared with C4.

  13. On the Use of Leaf Spectral Indices to Assess Water Status and Photosynthetic Limitations in Olea europaea L. during Water-Stress and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengsen; Wahbi, Said; Tsonev, Tsonko; Haworth, Matthew; Liu, Shirong; Centritto, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Diffusional limitations to photosynthesis, relative water content (RWC), pigment concentrations and their association with reflectance indices were studied in olive (Olea europaea) saplings subjected to water-stress and re-watering. RWC decreased sharply as drought progressed. Following rewatering, RWC gradually increased to pre-stress values. Photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs), mesophyll conductance (gm), total conductance (gt), photochemical reflectance index (PRI), water index (WI) and relative depth index (RDI) closely followed RWC. In contrast, carotenoid concentration, the carotenoid to chlorophyll ratio, water content reflectance index (WCRI) and structural independent pigment index (SIPI) showed an opposite trend to that of RWC. Photosynthesis scaled linearly with leaf conductance to CO2; however, A measured under non-photorespiratory conditions (A1%O2) was approximately two times greater than A measured at 21% [O2], indicating that photorespiration likely increased in response to drought. A1%O2 also significantly correlated with leaf conductance parameters. These relationships were apparent in saturation type curves, indicating that under non-photorespiratory conditions, CO2 conductance was not the major limitations to A. PRI was significant correlated with RWC. PRI was also very sensitive to pigment concentrations and photosynthesis, and significantly tracked all CO2 conductance parameters. WI, RDI and WCRI were all significantly correlated with RWC, and most notably to leaf transpiration. Overall, PRI correlated more closely with carotenoid concentration than SIPI; whereas WI tracked leaf transpiration more effectively than RDI and WCRI. This study clearly demonstrates that PRI and WI can be used for the fast detection of physiological traits of olive trees subjected to water-stress. PMID:25136798

  14. On the use of leaf spectral indices to assess water status and photosynthetic limitations in Olea europaea L. during water-stress and recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengsen; Wahbi, Said; Tsonev, Tsonko; Haworth, Matthew; Liu, Shirong; Centritto, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Diffusional limitations to photosynthesis, relative water content (RWC), pigment concentrations and their association with reflectance indices were studied in olive (Olea europaea) saplings subjected to water-stress and re-watering. RWC decreased sharply as drought progressed. Following rewatering, RWC gradually increased to pre-stress values. Photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs), mesophyll conductance (gm), total conductance (gt), photochemical reflectance index (PRI), water index (WI) and relative depth index (RDI) closely followed RWC. In contrast, carotenoid concentration, the carotenoid to chlorophyll ratio, water content reflectance index (WCRI) and structural independent pigment index (SIPI) showed an opposite trend to that of RWC. Photosynthesis scaled linearly with leaf conductance to CO2; however, A measured under non-photorespiratory conditions (A1%O2) was approximately two times greater than A measured at 21% [O2], indicating that photorespiration likely increased in response to drought. A1%O2 also significantly correlated with leaf conductance parameters. These relationships were apparent in saturation type curves, indicating that under non-photorespiratory conditions, CO2 conductance was not the major limitations to A. PRI was significant correlated with RWC. PRI was also very sensitive to pigment concentrations and photosynthesis, and significantly tracked all CO2 conductance parameters. WI, RDI and WCRI were all significantly correlated with RWC, and most notably to leaf transpiration. Overall, PRI correlated more closely with carotenoid concentration than SIPI; whereas WI tracked leaf transpiration more effectively than RDI and WCRI. This study clearly demonstrates that PRI and WI can be used for the fast detection of physiological traits of olive trees subjected to water-stress.

  15. Interactive role of elevated CO[sub 2], nutrient limitations, and water stress in the growth responses of red spruce seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. Virginia Tech., Blacksburg )

    1993-05-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings were grown from seed for 5 mo in ambient (362 ppm) or elevated (711 ppm) CO[sub 2] exposure treatments were crossed with two levels of soil fertility and water stress treatments to determine if seedling dry weight, size, and fixed growth responses to elevated CO[sub 2] depended on nutrient and water supply. Seedling dry weight and size responses to elevated CO[sub 2] at 5 mo did not depend on nutrient and water supply. Seedlings grown in both soil fertility treatments and water stress treatments responded similarly to CO[sub 2] treatment. Water stress and CO[sub 2] treatments did have an interactive influence on the fixed growth potential of the terminal leader. Leaf weight, leaf area, and height to the terminal leader of water-stressed seedlings were greater in seedlings exposed to elevated CO[sub 2] during budset than seedlings exposed to ambient CO[sub 2]. Total new fixed growth (lateral plus terminal) and total terminal fixed growth (leaf plus stem) were greater in seedlings that formed shoot primordia in elevated CO[sub 2] than in ambient CO[sub 2]. Red spruce seedlings grown in elevated CO[sub 2] for 5 mo had greater stem diameter, height, branching density, leaf weight, root weight, stem weight, total weight, and mean relative growth rate (RGR) from 3 to 5 mo than seedlings grown in ambient CO[sub 2]. Red spruce seedling responses to elevated CO[sub 2] suggest that seedling establishment in natural environments may be enhanced when ambient CO[sub 2] concentrations rise even if water and nutrient availabilities are limited.

  16. Cellular responses associated with ROS production and cell fate decision in early stress response to iron limitation in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chun-Shan; Liang, Jun-Rong; Lin, Qun; Li, Caixia; Bowler, Chris; Anderson, Donald M; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xin-Wei; Gao, Ya-Hui

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of how diatoms cope with the rapid fluctuations in iron bioavailability in marine environments may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying their ecological success, in particular their ability to proliferate rapidly during favorable conditions. In this study, using in vivo biochemical markers and whole-cell iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, we explored the cellular responses associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell fate decision during the early response to Fe limitation in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Fe limitation caused a significant decrease in Photosystem (PS) II photosynthetic efficiency, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain in PS I, and blockage of the respiratory chain in complexes III and IV, which could all result in excess ROS accumulation. The increase in ROS likely triggered programmed cell death (PCD) in some of the Fe-limited cells through synthesis of a series of proteins involved in the delicate balance between pro-survival and pro-PCD factors. The results provide molecular-level insights into the major strategies that may be employed by T. pseudonana in response to Fe-limitation: the reduction of cell population density through PCD to reduce competition for available Fe, the reallocation of intracellular nitrogen and Fe to ensure survival, and an increase in expression of antioxidant and anti-PCD proteins to cope with stress.

  17. Cellular Responses Associated with ROS Production and Cell Fate Decision in Early Stress Response to Iron Limitation in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of how diatoms cope with the rapid fluctuations in iron bioavailability in marine environments may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying their ecological success, in particular their ability to proliferate rapidly during favorable conditions. In this study, using in vivo biochemical markers and whole-cell iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, we explored the cellular responses associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell fate decision during the early response to Fe limitation in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Fe limitation caused a significant decrease in Photosystem (PS) II photosynthetic efficiency, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain in PS I, and blockage of the respiratory chain in complexes III and IV, which could all result in excess ROS accumulation. The increase in ROS likely triggered programmed cell death (PCD) in some of the Fe-limited cells through synthesis of a series of proteins involved in the delicate balance between pro-survival and pro-PCD factors. The results provide molecular-level insights into the major strategies that may be employed by T. pseudonana in response to Fe-limitation: the reduction of cell population density through PCD to reduce competition for available Fe, the reallocation of intracellular nitrogen and Fe to ensure survival, and an increase in expression of antioxidant and anti-PCD proteins to cope with stress. PMID:25372880

  18. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  19. Constraints on microbial biogeography in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments: energetic limits, thermal stress, and upward compression of metabolic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckay, L. J.; Klokman, V.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Subsurface hydrothermal temperatures and flow cause upward compression of geochemical and metabolic zones in Guaymas Basin seafloor sediments. The Guaymas hydrothermal system can be viewed as an accessible seafloor analog to deep, geothermally heated sedimentary microbial ecosystems. Using push core samples collected by the Alvin submersible (Cruises AT15-40 and 56 in 2008 and 2009) we are investigating thermal limits and substrate concentration ranges and their influence on microbial biogeography. Hydrothermally active sediments at Guaymas Basin host a wide range of shallow subsurface temperatures: from 3°C to 200°C in the upper 45 centimeters. A combination of extreme temperatures and compressed geochemical zonation limits the depth range of microbial colonization in Guaymas sediments. Microbial abundance is relatively high in Guaymas surface sediments, peaking around 10^10 cells/ml and decreasing to below detection at very hot temperatures. Our data describe how the biogeography of physiological modes—in particular anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) —is shaped by localized physicochemical conditions in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments. Microbial oxidation changes the δ13C signature of porewater methane (CH4) from its baseline value of -43‰ (Welhan, 1988; Pearson et al., 2005) towards heavier values within a temperature window up to ca. 80°C; at higher temperatures, no CH4 oxidation imprint can be detected. δ13C values for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicate that bacterial remineralization of organic carbon may occur up to 100°C. 13C depleted DIC correlates well with 13C enriched CH4 in situ pinpointing zones of AOM between, for example, 20 and 40 cm below seafloor and 30°C and 50°C. 16S rDNA clone libraries support these suggested zones with the regular occurrence of (AN)aerobic (ME)thanotrophic Archaea. Given its high temperature tolerance, AOM can occur widely in the geothermally and hydrothermally heated subsurface.

  20. Ischemic preconditioning elevates cardiac stress protein but does not limit infarct size 24 or 48 h later in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Fujiwara, H; Yamasaki, K; Miyamae, M; Yokota, R; Hasegawa, K; Fujiwara, T; Sasayama, S

    1994-10-01

    We investigated whether ischemic preconditioning (PC) produced a second window of protection by delayed synthesis of cardioprotective proteins. Anesthetized open-chest rabbits were subjected to 30 min of coronary occlusion and 3 h of reperfusion. PC was elicited by 5 min of ischemia and was separated from sustained ischemia by 5 min, 2 h, or 24 h of reperfusion. Infarct size (% area at risk) was markedly limited by PC with 5 min of reperfusion when compared with controls (13.3 +/- 2.5 vs. 46.8 +/- 7.0%; P < 0.05). This protective effect was lost when the interval between PC and sustained ischemia was extended to 2 h (47.8 +/- 4.8%; P = NS vs. control) and did not reoccur even when it was extended to 24 h (44.2 +/- 6.5%; P = NS vs. sham-operated control). To potentiate induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs), a PC protocol involving four 5-min episodes of ischemia and reperfusion was also used and was separated from sustained ischemia by 24 or 48 h of reperfusion. However, neither of these protocols was protective, and limitation of infarct size was not observed (55.5 +/- 5.9 and 53.4 +/- 6.5% in 24 and 48 h of reperfusion, respectively; P = NS vs. corresponding sham-operated control). Myocardial expression of HSPs was examined using a monoclonal antibody against 72- to 73-kDa HSP in additional rabbits. Immunoreactivity was observed in the myocardium at 24 and 48 h after PC, but not immediately after PC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  2. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  3. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  4. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  5. 76 FR 70883 - Clothing Allowance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2011 (76 FR 5733-5734), VA proposed to amend its... appliances affecting different articles of clothing. 76 FR 5733; Sursely, 551 F.3d at 1356. VA will make the... allowances. The amendment provides for an annual clothing allowance for each qualifying prosthetic...

  6. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2007-12-25

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  7. Combined Efficacy of Gallic Acid and MiADMSA with Limited Beneficial Effects Over MiADMSA Against Arsenic-induced Oxidative Stress in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Flora, Sjs

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid is an organic acid known for its antioxidant and anticancer properties. The present study is focused on evaluating the role of gallic acid in providing better therapeutic outcomes against arsenic-induced toxicity. Animals pre-exposed to arsenic were treated with monoisoamyl meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA), a new chelating drug, alone and in combination with gallic acid, consecutively for 10 days. The study suggests that (1) gallic acid in presence of MiADMSA is only moderately beneficial against arsenic, (2) monotherapy with gallic acid is more effective than in combination with MiADMSA after arsenic exposure in reducing oxidative injury, and (3) MiADMSA monotherapy as reported previously provides significant therapeutic efficacy against arsenic. Thus, based on the present results, we conclude that gallic acid is effective against arsenic-induced oxidative stress but provides limited additional beneficial effects when administered in combination with MiADMSA. We still recommend that lower doses of gallic acid be evaluated both individually and in combination with MiADMSA, as it might not exhibit the shortcomings we observed with higher doses in this study.

  8. Early Life Stress Induced by Limited Nesting Material Produces Metabolic Resilience in Response to a High-Fat and High-Sugar Diet in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher P.; Wang, Kristy W.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions experienced in early life can profoundly influence long-term metabolic health, but the additive impact of poor nutrition is poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that early life stress (ELS) induced by limited nesting material (LN) combined with high-fat and high-sugar diet (HFHS) post-weaning would worsen diet-related metabolic risk. Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to LN, postnatal days 2–9, and at weaning (3 weeks), siblings were given unlimited access to chow or HFHS resulting in (Con-Chow, Con-HFHS, LN-Chow, and LN-HFHS, n = 11–15/group). Glucose and insulin tolerance were tested and rats were killed at 13 weeks. LN rats weighed less at weaning but were not different to control at 13 weeks; HFHS diet led to similar increases in body weight. LN-chow rats had improved glucose and insulin tolerance relative to Con-Chow, whereas LN-HFHS improved insulin sensitivity versus Con-HFHS, associated with increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1-alpha (Pgc-1α) mRNA in muscle. No effect of LN on plasma or liver triglycerides was observed, and hepatic gluconeogenic regulatory genes were unaltered. In summary, this study demonstrates that ELS induced by LN conferred some metabolic protection against insulin and/or glucose intolerance in a diet-dependent manner during adulthood. PMID:26441828

  9. Combined Efficacy of Gallic Acid and MiADMSA with Limited Beneficial Effects Over MiADMSA Against Arsenic-induced Oxidative Stress in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Flora, SJS

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid is an organic acid known for its antioxidant and anticancer properties. The present study is focused on evaluating the role of gallic acid in providing better therapeutic outcomes against arsenic-induced toxicity. Animals pre-exposed to arsenic were treated with monoisoamyl meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA), a new chelating drug, alone and in combination with gallic acid, consecutively for 10 days. The study suggests that (1) gallic acid in presence of MiADMSA is only moderately beneficial against arsenic, (2) monotherapy with gallic acid is more effective than in combination with MiADMSA after arsenic exposure in reducing oxidative injury, and (3) MiADMSA monotherapy as reported previously provides significant therapeutic efficacy against arsenic. Thus, based on the present results, we conclude that gallic acid is effective against arsenic-induced oxidative stress but provides limited additional beneficial effects when administered in combination with MiADMSA. We still recommend that lower doses of gallic acid be evaluated both individually and in combination with MiADMSA, as it might not exhibit the shortcomings we observed with higher doses in this study. PMID:26339189

  10. Prenatal exposure to escitalopram and/or stress in rats produces limited effects on endocrine, behavioral, or gene expression measures in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Chase H.; Stowe, Zachary N.; Neigh, Gretchen N.; Olson, Darin E.; Owens, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Stress and/or antidepressants during pregnancy have been implicated in a wide range of long-term effects in the offspring. We investigated the long-term effects of prenatal stress and/or clinically relevant antidepressant exposure on male adult offspring in a model of the pharmacotherapy of maternal depression. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered clinically relevant exposure to the antidepressant escitalopram throughout gestation. Subsequently, pregnant females were exposed on gestational days 10–20 to a chronic unpredictable mild stress paradigm. The male offspring were analyzed in adulthood. Baseline physiological measurements were largely unaltered by prenatal manipulations. Behavioral characterization of the male offspring, with or without pre-exposure to an acute stressor, did not reveal any group differences. Prenatal stress exposure resulted in a faster return towards baseline following the peak response to an acute restraint stressor, but not an airpuff startle stressor, in adulthood. Microarray analysis of the hippocampus and hypothalamus comparing all treatment groups revealed no significantly-altered transcripts. Real time PCR of the hippocampus confirmed that several transcripts in the CRFergic, serotonergic, and neural plasticity pathways were unaffected by prenatal exposures. This stress model of maternal depression and its treatment indicate that escitalopram use and/or stress during pregnancy produced no alterations in our measures of male adult behavior or the transcriptome, however prenatal stress exposure resulted in some evidence for increased glucocorticoid negative feedback following an acute restraint stress. Study design should be carefully considered before implications for human health are ascribed to prenatal exposure to stress or antidepressant medication. PMID:23906943

  11. Prenatal exposure to escitalopram and/or stress in rats produces limited effects on endocrine, behavioral, or gene expression measures in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Chase H; Stowe, Zachary N; Neigh, Gretchen N; Olson, Darin E; Owens, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Stress and/or antidepressants during pregnancy have been implicated in a wide range of long-term effects in the offspring. We investigated the long-term effects of prenatal stress and/or clinically relevant antidepressant exposure on male adult offspring in a model of the pharmacotherapy of maternal depression. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered clinically relevant exposure to the antidepressant escitalopram throughout gestation. Subsequently, pregnant females were exposed on gestational days 10-20 to a chronic unpredictable mild stress paradigm. The male offspring were analyzed in adulthood. Baseline physiological measurements were largely unaltered by prenatal manipulations. Behavioral characterization of the male offspring, with or without pre-exposure to an acute stressor, did not reveal any group differences. Prenatal stress exposure resulted in a faster return towards baseline following the peak response to an acute restraint stressor, but not an airpuff startle stressor, in adulthood. Microarray analysis of the hippocampus and hypothalamus comparing all treatment groups revealed no significantly-altered transcripts. Real time PCR of the hippocampus confirmed that several transcripts in the CRFergic, serotonergic, and neural plasticity pathways were unaffected by prenatal exposures. This stress model of maternal depression and its treatment indicate that escitalopram use and/or stress during pregnancy produced no alterations in our measures of male adult behavior or the transcriptome, however prenatal stress exposure resulted in some evidence for increased glucocorticoid negative feedback following an acute restraint stress. Study design should be carefully considered before implications for human health are ascribed to prenatal exposure to stress or antidepressant medication. PMID:23906943

  12. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  13. Unraveling Main Limiting Sites of Photosynthesis under Below- and Above-Ground Heat Stress in Cucumber and the Alleviatory Role of Luffa Rootstock

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Ahammed, Golam J.; Zhou, Guona; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most thermo-sensitive processes in plants. Although the severity of heat stress could be attenuated by grafting approach, the primary damaged site of photosynthesis system under heat stress and the regulatory mechanism of rootstock-mediated heat tolerance are poorly understood. In the current study, cucumber plants grafted onto their own roots and heat-tolerant luffa roots were exposed to root-zone heat (25/40°C) and aerial heat (40/25°C) individually and in combination (40/40°C) to understand the response of photosynthetic process by investigating energy absorption and distribution, electron transport in photosystem (PS) II and I, and CO2 assimilation. According to the results, root-zone heat stress inhibited photosynthesis mainly through decreasing Rubisco activity, while aerial heat stress mainly through inhibiting PSII acceptor side. The imbalance in light absorption and utilization resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen species that caused damage to photosynthetic apparatus, forming a vicious cycle. On the contrary, grafting cucumber onto heat-tolerant luffa rootstock alleviated heat-induced photosynthetic inhibition and oxidative stress by maintaining higher root vitality, HSP70 accumulation, and antioxidant potential. PMID:27313587

  14. Unraveling Main Limiting Sites of Photosynthesis under Below- and Above-Ground Heat Stress in Cucumber and the Alleviatory Role of Luffa Rootstock.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Ahammed, Golam J; Zhou, Guona; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most thermo-sensitive processes in plants. Although the severity of heat stress could be attenuated by grafting approach, the primary damaged site of photosynthesis system under heat stress and the regulatory mechanism of rootstock-mediated heat tolerance are poorly understood. In the current study, cucumber plants grafted onto their own roots and heat-tolerant luffa roots were exposed to root-zone heat (25/40°C) and aerial heat (40/25°C) individually and in combination (40/40°C) to understand the response of photosynthetic process by investigating energy absorption and distribution, electron transport in photosystem (PS) II and I, and CO2 assimilation. According to the results, root-zone heat stress inhibited photosynthesis mainly through decreasing Rubisco activity, while aerial heat stress mainly through inhibiting PSII acceptor side. The imbalance in light absorption and utilization resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen species that caused damage to photosynthetic apparatus, forming a vicious cycle. On the contrary, grafting cucumber onto heat-tolerant luffa rootstock alleviated heat-induced photosynthetic inhibition and oxidative stress by maintaining higher root vitality, HSP70 accumulation, and antioxidant potential. PMID:27313587

  15. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  16. σ(B) plays a limited role in the ability of Listeria monocytogenes strain F2365 to survive oxidative and acid stress and in its virulence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Oliver, H F; Orsi, R H; Wiedmann, M; Boor, K J

    2013-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes strain F2365 was the first strain representative of serotype 4b (lineage I) to be sequenced in 2004, suggesting it could become the model organism for this serotype, which is associated with most human outbreaks of listeriosis worldwide to date. F2365 itself is an outbreak strain that was involved in the listeriosis outbreak associated with Mexican-style soft cheese in California in 1985. In this study, we show through phenotypic and transcriptomic analysis that L. monocytogenes strain F2365 has reduced ability to respond to acid and oxidative stress. F2365 has neither the σ(B)-dependent ability to survive acid or oxidative stress nor the σ(B)-dependent ability to infect Caco-2 epithelial cells in vitro or guinea pigs in vivo. More studies are needed to determine whether the atypical σ(B)-independent response to stress observed in F2365 is strain specific, serotype specific, or even lineage specific.

  17. Selective Serotonin-norepinephrine Re-uptake Inhibition Limits Renovas-cular-hypertension Induced Cognitive Impairment, Endothelial Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Injury.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension has been reported to induce cognitive decline and dementia of vascular origin. Serotonin- norepinephrine reuptake transporters take part in the control of inflammation, cognitive functions, motivational acts and deterioration of neurons. This study was carried out to examine the effect of venlafaxine; a specific serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), in two-kidney-one-clip-2K1C (renovascular hypertension) provoked vascular dementia (VaD) in albino rats. 2K1C technique was performed to provoke renovascular-hypertension in adult male albino Wistar rats. Learning and memory were assessed by using the elevated plus maze and Morris water maze. Mean arterial blood pressure- MABP, as well as endothelial function, were assessed by means of BIOPAC system. Serum nitrosative stress (nitrite/ nitrate), aortic superoxide anion, brain oxidative stress, inflammation, cholinergic dysfunction and brain damage (2,3,5-triphenylterazolium chloride staining) were also assessed. 2K1C has increased MABP, endothelial dysfunction as well as learning and memory impairments. 2K1C method has increased serum nitrosative stress (reduced nitrite/nitrate level), oxidative stress (increased brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and aortic superoxide anion content along with decreased levels of brain superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and catalase), brain inflammation (increased myeloperoxidase), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetylcholinesterase activity) and brain damage. Treatment with venlafaxine considerably attenuated renovascular-hypertension induced cognition impairment, endothelial dysfunction, serum nitrosative stress, brain and aortic oxidative stress, cholinergic function, inflammation as well as cerebral damage. The finding of this study indicates that specific modulation of the serotonin-norepinephrine transporter perhaps regarded as potential interventions for the management of renovascular hypertension provoked VaD. PMID:26915517

  18. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  19. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  20. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  1. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  2. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  3. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  4. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  5. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  6. Stress echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    Echocardiography stress test; Stress test - echocardiography; CAD - stress echocardiography; Coronary artery disease - stress echocardiography; Chest pain - stress echocardiography; Angina - stress echocardiography; ...

  7. Managing Leadership Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Vidula; Campbell, Michael; McDowell-Larsen, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Everyone experiences stress, and leaders face the additional stress brought about by the unique demands of leadership: having to make decisions with limited information, to manage conflict, to do more with less ...and faster! The consequences of stress can include health problems and deteriorating relationships. Knowing what signs of stress to…

  8. Pregnancy Weight Gain Limitation by a Supervised Nutritional Program Influences Placental NF-κB/IKK Complex Expression and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zerón, Hugo Mendieta; Flores, Alejandro Parada; Chávez, Araceli Amaya; Alanís, Adriana Garduño; Ferreyra, María del Carmen Colín; Benítez, Jonnathan Guadalupe Santillán; Castañeda, Violeta Saraí Morales; García, Ma. Victoria Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway and oxidative stress participate in endothelial dysfunction, which is one of the causes of pre-eclampsia. Among the human antioxidant mechanisms, there are the enzymes catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Our aim was to measure NF-κB, its inhibitor (IKK) and oxidative stress in placenta and umbilical cord of pregnant women submitted to a supervised nutritional program. Methods Two groups were conformed: A) 14 pregnant women with individualized nutritional counseling, and B) 12 pregnant women without nutritional guidance. NF-κB and IKK were assessed by real time PCR (RT-PCR). Enzymatic activity of CAT, GPx, lipoperoxidation (LPO) and SOD were also evaluated. Results Pregnant women that followed a supervised nutritional program had lower levels of systolic (p=0.03) and diastolic pressure (p=0.043) although they were heavier than the control group (p=0.048). Among all the women, the Spearman correlation was positive between weight gain and placental NF-κB expression (1, p≤0.01). In the placenta, women with nutritional advice had lower enzymatic activity of GPx (p≤0.038) and showed a tendency of IKK to be higher than in women without a nutritional supervised program. Conclusion A supervised nutritional program in pregnancy offers a proven option to control weight gain, hypertension, NF-κB/IKK complex expression and oxidative stress reactions in the placenta. PMID:23772281

  9. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  10. Neural control of chronic stress adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Stress initiates adaptive processes that allow the organism to physiologically cope with prolonged or intermittent exposure to real or perceived threats. A major component of this response is repeated activation of glucocorticoid secretion by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, which promotes redistribution of energy in a wide range of organ systems, including the brain. Prolonged or cumulative increases in glucocorticoid secretion can reduce benefits afforded by enhanced stress reactivity and eventually become maladaptive. The long-term impact of stress is kept in check by the process of habituation, which reduces HPA axis responses upon repeated exposure to homotypic stressors and likely limits deleterious actions of prolonged glucocorticoid secretion. Habituation is regulated by limbic stress-regulatory sites, and is at least in part glucocorticoid feedback-dependent. Chronic stress also sensitizes reactivity to new stimuli. While sensitization may be important in maintaining response flexibility in response to new threats, it may also add to the cumulative impact of glucocorticoids on the brain and body. Finally, unpredictable or severe stress exposure may cause long-term and lasting dysregulation of the HPA axis, likely due to altered limbic control of stress effector pathways. Stress-related disorders, such as depression and PTSD, are accompanied by glucocorticoid imbalances and structural/ functional alterations in limbic circuits that resemble those seen following chronic stress, suggesting that inappropriate processing of stressful information may be part of the pathological process. PMID:23964212

  11. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  12. Mixed weak-perturbative solution method for Maxwell's equations of diffusion with Müller's partial stress tensor in the low velocity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faliagas, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Maxwell's theory of multicomponent diffusion and subsequent extensions are based on systems of mass and momentum conservation equations. The partial stress tensor, which is involved in these equations, is expressed in terms of the gradients of velocity fields by statistical and continuum mechanical methods. We propose a method for the solution of Maxwell's equations of diffusion coupled with Müller's expression for the partial stress tensor. The proposed method consists in a singular perturbation process, followed by a weak (finite element) analysis of the resulting PDE systems. The singularity involved in the obtained equations was treated by a special technique, by which lower-order systems were supplemented by proper combinations of higher-order equations. The method proved particularly efficient for the solution of the Maxwell-Müller system, eventually reducing the number of unknown fields to that of the classical Navier-Stokes/Fick system. It was applied to the classical Stefan tube problem and the Hagen-Poiseuille flow in a hollow-fiber membrane tube. Numerical results for these problems are presented, and compared with the Navier-Stokes/Fick approximation. It is shown that the 0-th order term of the Maxwell-Müller equations differs from a properly formulated Navier-Stokes/Fick system, by a numerically insignificant amount. Numerical results for 1st-order terms indicate a good agreement of the classical approximation (with properly formulated Navier-Stokes and Fick's equations) with the Maxwell-Müller system, in the studied cases.

  13. Mec1, INO80, and the PAF1 complex cooperate to limit transcription replication conflicts through RNAPII removal during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Jérôme; Gerhold, Christian-Benedikt; Tosi, Alessandro; Hustedt, Nicole; Seeber, Andrew; Sack, Ragna; Herzog, Franz; Pasero, Philippe; Shimada, Kenji; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Gasser, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells ensure DNA replication in the face of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated transcription, especially under conditions of replicative stress. Here we present genetic and proteomic analyses from budding yeast that uncover links between the DNA replication checkpoint sensor Mec1–Ddc2 (ATR–ATRIP), the chromatin remodeling complex INO80C (INO80 complex), and the transcription complex PAF1C (PAF1 complex). We found that a subset of chromatin-bound RNAPII is degraded in a manner dependent on Mec1, INO80, and PAF1 complexes in cells exposed to hydroxyurea (HU). On HU, Mec1 triggers the efficient removal of PAF1C and RNAPII from transcribed genes near early firing origins. Failure to evict RNAPII correlates inversely with recovery from replication stress: paf1Δ cells, like ino80 and mec1 mutants, fail to restart forks efficiently after stalling. Our data reveal unexpected synergies between INO80C, Mec1, and PAF1C in the maintenance of genome integrity and suggest a mechanism of RNAPII degradation that reduces transcription–replication fork collision. PMID:26798134

  14. Impact-echo and impulse response stress-wave methods: advantages and limitations for the evaluation of highway pavement concrete overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Allen G.; Hertlein, Bernhard H.; Lim, Malcolm K.; Michols, Kevin

    1996-11-01

    Concrete overlays with thickness ranging between 25 mm and 300 mm are frequently used to restore and strengthen existing concrete pavements and bridge approach slabs. Differences in the strengths and elastic moduli of the overlay and the substrate, as well as the cleanliness and roughness of the interface between the two layers affect the medium and long term performance of these structures. Debonding at the interface, excessive tensile stresses at the base of the overlay and delamination within the upper layer are commonly occurring problems. If these defects are not detected and corrected in god time, the deterioration of the overlay under the action of heavy axle loads is rapid and becomes expensive to fix. Nondestructive methods are required to identify the budding problems of the type described above, by surveying overlay systems quickly and economically. Stress wave methods for flaw detection in concrete structures and foundations have shown great promise in recent years. The Impact-Echo test has been applied successfully to many diverse concrete material problems. The Impulse Response test is proven in the detection of flaws in deep concrete foundations, as well as the location of poor support conditions beneath and delaminations within concrete slabs on grade. This paper presents a case study where both methods were used to examine a stepped concrete overlay on approach slabs to bridge decks on a heavily trafficked interstate highway. The two test methods are briefly described, and a comparison is drawn emphasizing the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques.

  15. Loss of the oxidative stress regulator OxyR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 impairs growth under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Vinckx, Tiffany; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Pyoverdine is the main siderophore secreted by fluorescent pseudomonads to scavenge iron in the extracellular environment. Iron uptake, however, needs to be tightly regulated, because free iron stimulates the formation of highly toxic oxygen derivatives. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcriptional regulator OxyR plays a key role in the upregulation of defense mechanisms against oxidative stress as it stimulates the expression of the antioxidant genes katB, ahpB and ahpCF after contact with oxidative stress-generating agents. Inactivation of the oxyR gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 and in P. aeruginosa PAO1 impairs pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake. The pyoverdine utilization defect can be restored by complementation with the oxyR gene of P. aeruginosa, as well as by adding catalase. Growth of the oxyR mutant in low- or high-iron media is also impaired at a low, but not at a high inoculum density. Uptake of radioactive (59)Fe pyoverdine is, however, not affected by the oxyR mutation, nor is the transcription of the fpvA gene encoding the ferripyoverdine receptor, suggesting that the defect lies in the inability to remove iron from the ferrisiderophore. PMID:19054085

  16. Methods of mesophyll conductance estimation: its impact on key biochemical parameters and photosynthetic limitations in phosphorus-stressed soybean across CO2.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthetic potential in C3 plants is largely limited by CO2 diffusion through stomata (Ls) and mesophyll (Lm) and photo-biochemical (Lb) processes. Accurate estimation of mesophyll conductance (gm) using gas exchange (GE) and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) parameters of the photosynthetic proces...

  17. K-Ras Activation Induces Differential Sensitivity to Sulfur Amino Acid Limitation and Deprivation and to Oxidative and Anti-Oxidative Stress in Mouse Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Gaia; Spinelli, Michela; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells have an increased demand for amino acids and require transport even of non-essential amino acids to support their increased proliferation rate. Besides their major role as protein synthesis precursors, the two proteinogenic sulfur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine, play specific biological functions. In humans, methionine is essential for cell growth and development and may act as a precursor for cysteine synthesis. Cysteine is a precursor for the biosynthesis of glutathione, the major scavenger for reactive oxygen species. Methodology and Principal Findings We study the effect of K-ras oncogene activation in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts on transport and metabolism of cysteine and methionine. We show that cysteine limitation and deprivation cause apoptotic cell death (cytotoxic effect) in both normal and K-ras-transformed fibroblasts, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in reduced glutathione. Anti-oxidants glutathione and MitoTEMPO inhibit apoptosis, but only cysteine-containing glutathione partially rescues the cell growth defect induced by limiting cysteine. Methionine limitation and deprivation has a cytostatic effect on mouse fibroblasts, unaffected by glutathione. K-ras-transformed cells–but not their parental NIH3T3—are extremely sensitive to methionine limitation. This fragility correlates with decreased expression of the Slc6a15 gene—encoding the nutrient transporter SBAT1, known to exhibit a strong preference for methionine—and decreased methionine uptake. Conclusions and Significance Overall, limitation of sulfur-containing amino acids results in a more dramatic perturbation of the oxido-reductive balance in K-ras-transformed cells compared to NIH3T3 cells. Growth defects induced by cysteine limitation in mouse fibroblasts are largely–though not exclusively–due to cysteine utilization in the synthesis of glutathione, mouse fibroblasts requiring an exogenous cysteine source for

  18. Limited ATF4 Expression in Degenerating Retinas with Ongoing ER Stress Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bhootada, Yogesh; Kotla, Pravallika; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Bebok, Zsuzsanna; Athar, Mohammad; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    T17M rhodopsin expression in rod photoreceptors leads to severe retinal degeneration and is associated with the activation of ER stress related Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling. Here, we show a novel role of a UPR transcription factor, ATF4, in photoreceptor cellular pathology. We demonstrated a pro-death role for ATF4 overexpression during autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Based on our results in ATF4 knockout mice and adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery of ATF4 to the retina, we validated a novel therapeutic approach targeting ATF4 over the course of retinal degeneration. In T17M rhodopsin retinas, we observed ATF4 overexpression concomitantly with reduction of p62 and elevation of p53 levels. These molecular alterations, together with increased CHOP and caspase-3/7 activity, possibly contributed to the mechanism of photoreceptor cell loss. Conversely, ATF4 knockdown retarded retinal degeneration in 1-month-old T17M Rhodopsin mice and promoted photoreceptor survival, as measured by scotopic and photopic ERGs and photoreceptor nuclei row counts. Similarly, ATF4 knockdown also markedly delayed retinal degeneration in 3-month-old ADRP animals. This delay was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in UPR signaling, the launching of anti-oxidant defense, initiation of autophagy, and improvement of rhodopsin biosynthesis which together perhaps combat the cellular stress associated with T17M rhodopsin. Our data indicate that augmented ATF4 signals during retinal degeneration plays a cytotoxic role by triggering photoreceptor cell death. Future ADRP therapy regulating ATF4 expression can be developed to treat retinal degenerative disorders associated with activated UPR. PMID:27144303

  19. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... Allowable costs. (a) DOE determines allowability of costs in accordance with the cost principles...

  20. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... Institutions” codified at 2 CFR 220. The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined...

  1. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  2. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  3. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  4. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  5. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  6. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  7. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  8. 50 CFR 80.15 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., see 5 CFR 1310.3.). (b) What is required to determine the allowability of costs? Source documents or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 80.15 Section 80.15... WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.15 Allowable costs. (a) What...

  9. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  10. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  11. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  12. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1180.56 Section 1180.56 Public... by a Grantee General Administrative Responsibilities § 1180.56 Allowable costs. (a) Determination of costs allowable under a grant is made in accordance with government-wide cost principles in...

  13. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  14. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  15. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  16. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  17. 24 CFR 17.43 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Allowable claims. (a) A claim may be allowed only if: (1) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly...) of this section, and the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss of... types of claims may be allowed, unless excluded by §§ 17.44 and 17.45: (1) Property loss or damage...

  18. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.228... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  19. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.439... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  20. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items...

  1. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items...

  2. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items...

  3. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  4. Methods of mesophyll conductance estimation: its impact on key biochemical parameters and photosynthetic limitations in phosphorus-stressed soybean across CO2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shardendu K; Reddy, Vangimalla R

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of various methods, the rapid estimation of mesophyll conductance (gm ) for a large number of samples is still a daunting challenge. Although the accurate estimation of gm is critical to partition photosynthetic limitations by stomatal (Ls ) and mesophyll (Lm ) conductance and by photo-biochemical (Lb ) processes, the impact of various gm estimation methods on this is ambiguous. As phosphorus (P) starvation and elevated CO2 (eCO2 ) strongly affect photosynthetic processes, their combined effect on the proportional changes in these limitations are not well understood. To investigate this, while also evaluating distinct recent methods of gm estimation sharing few common theories and assumptions, soybean was grown under a range of P nutrition at ambient and eCO2 . Methods significantly affected gm and carboxylation efficiency (VCmax ) but not other photosynthetic parameters. In all the methods, all photosynthetic parameters responded similarly to treatments. However, the percentage difference between VCmax assuming finite and infinite gm was highly inconsistent among methods. The primary mechanism responsible for P limitation to soybean photosynthesis was not CO2 diffusion limitations but Lb comprised of reduced chlorophyll, photochemistry and biochemical processes. The eCO2 decreased Lb but increased Lm without affecting Ls across leaf P concentration. Although each method explored advances of our understanding about gm variability, they all require assumptions of varying degrees, which lead to the discrepancy in the gm values. Among the methods, the oxygen sensitivity-based gm estimation appeared to be suitable for the quick assessment of a large number of samples or genotypes. Digital tools are provided for the easy estimation of gm for some methods.

  5. Alteration of the Physical and Chemical Structure of the Primary Cell Wall of Growth-Limited Plant Cells Adapted to Osmotic Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Iraki, Naim M.; Bressan, Ray A.; Hasegawa, P. M.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1989-01-01

    Cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) adapted to grow in severe osmotic stress of 428 millimolar NaCl (−23 bar) or 30% polyethylene glycol 8000 (−28 bar) exhibit a drastically altered growth physiology that results in slower cell expansion and fully expanded cells with volumes only one-fifth to one-eighth those of unadapted cells. This reduced cell volume occurs despite maintenance of turgor pressures sometimes severalfold higher than those of unadapted cells. This report and others (NM Iraki et al [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 000-000 and 000-000) document physical and biochemical alterations of the cell walls which might explain how adapted cells decrease the ability of the wall to expand despite diversion of carbon used for osmotic adjustment away from synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Tensile strength measured by a gas decompression technique showed empirically that walls of NaCl-adapted cells are much weaker than those of unadapted cells. Correlated with this weakening was a substantial decrease in the proportion of crystalline cellulose in the primary cell wall. Even though the amount of insoluble protein associated with the wall was increased relative to other wall components, the amount of hydroxyproline in the insoluble protein of the wall was only about 10% that of unadapted cells. These results indicate that a cellulosic-extensin framework is a primary determinant of absolute wall tensile strength, but complete formation of this framework apparently is sacrificed to divert carbon to substances needed for osmotic adjustment. We propose that the absolute mass of this framework is not a principal determinant of the ability of the cell wall to extend. PMID:16667031

  6. 13 CFR 120.971 - Allowable fees paid by Borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Development Company Loan Program (504) Fees § 120.971 Allowable fees paid by Borrower. (a) CDC fees. The fees a CDC may charge the Borrower in connection with a 504 loan and Debenture are limited to the following: (1) Processing fee. The CDC may charge up to 1.5 percent of the net Debenture proceeds to...

  7. 13 CFR 120.971 - Allowable fees paid by Borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Development Company Loan Program (504) Fees § 120.971 Allowable fees paid by Borrower. (a) CDC fees. The fees a CDC may charge the Borrower in connection with a 504 loan and Debenture are limited to the following: (1) Processing fee. The CDC may charge up to 1.5 percent of the net Debenture proceeds to...

  8. 13 CFR 120.971 - Allowable fees paid by Borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Development Company Loan Program (504) Fees § 120.971 Allowable fees paid by Borrower. (a) CDC fees. The fees a CDC may charge the Borrower in connection with a 504 loan and Debenture are limited to the following: (1) Processing fee. The CDC may charge up to 1.5 percent of the net Debenture proceeds to...

  9. 13 CFR 120.971 - Allowable fees paid by Borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Development Company Loan Program (504) Fees § 120.971 Allowable fees paid by Borrower. (a) CDC fees. The fees a CDC may charge the Borrower in connection with a 504 loan and Debenture are limited to the following: (1) Processing fee. The CDC may charge up to 1.5 percent of the net Debenture proceeds to...

  10. 13 CFR 120.971 - Allowable fees paid by Borrower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Development Company Loan Program (504) Fees § 120.971 Allowable fees paid by Borrower. (a) CDC fees. The fees a CDC may charge the Borrower in connection with a 504 loan and Debenture are limited to the following: (1) Processing fee. The CDC may charge up to 1.5 percent of the net Debenture proceeds to...

  11. 48 CFR 31.201-2 - Determining allowability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... principles in this subpart are mandatory unless the contract is CAS-covered (see 48 CFR 9903). Business units... the following requirements: (1) Reasonableness. (2) Allocability. (3) Standards promulgated by the CAS... selected CAS and limit the allowability of costs to the amounts determined using the criteria in...

  12. 48 CFR 31.201-2 - Determining allowability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... principles in this subpart are mandatory unless the contract is CAS-covered (see 48 CFR 9903). Business units... the following requirements: (1) Reasonableness. (2) Allocability. (3) Standards promulgated by the CAS... selected CAS and limit the allowability of costs to the amounts determined using the criteria in...

  13. 48 CFR 31.201-2 - Determining allowability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... principles in this subpart are mandatory unless the contract is CAS-covered (see 48 CFR 9903). Business units... the following requirements: (1) Reasonableness. (2) Allocability. (3) Standards promulgated by the CAS... selected CAS and limit the allowability of costs to the amounts determined using the criteria in...

  14. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not allowable if: (1) The damage or loss was caused wholly or partly by the negligent or wrongful act... damage or loss occurred in quarters occupied by the claimant within the 50 states and the District of..., or other directive. This does not apply to limitation imposed on the weight of shipments of...

  15. 34 CFR 645.40 - What are allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Courses in English language instruction for project participants with limited proficiency in English and for whom English language proficiency is necessary to succeed in postsecondary education. (l... What are allowable costs? The cost principles that apply to the Upward Bound Program are in 34 CFR...

  16. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  17. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  18. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  19. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  20. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  1. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  2. 20 CFR 437.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type...

  3. 34 CFR 642.40 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 642.40 Section 642.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FEDERAL TRIO PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 642.40 Allowable costs....

  4. 10 CFR 600.222 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular. 48 CFR 931.2 Hospitals 45 CFR part 74... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  5. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance...

  6. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance with the cost...

  7. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... the same trip in the same vehicle. (2) Lodging and meals. The cost allowable for lodging and meals for... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part...

  8. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... the same trip in the same vehicle. (2) Lodging and meals. The cost allowable for lodging and meals for... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part...

  9. 30 CFR 206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating allowances. 206.160 Section 206.160 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any other provisions...

  10. Moral Appraisals Affect Doing/Allowing Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Fiery; Knobe, Joshua; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An extensive body of research suggests that the distinction between doing and allowing plays a critical role in shaping moral appraisals. Here, we report evidence from a pair of experiments suggesting that the converse is also true: moral appraisals affect doing/allowing judgments. Specifically, morally bad behavior is more likely to be construed…

  11. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  12. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable activities. Allowable activities are those listed in § 632.78-80 except that community service employment is...

  13. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable activities. Allowable activities are those listed in § 632.78-80 except that community service employment is...

  14. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802...

  15. 4 CFR 5.6 - Allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowances. 5.6 Section 5.6 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM COMPENSATION § 5.6 Allowances. The provisions of chapter 59 of title 5, U.S. Code and the implementing regulations for the Executive Branch apply to Government...

  16. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section...

  17. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33... HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE NATIONAL URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM Response Cooperative Agreements § 208.33 Allowable costs. (a) Cost neutrality. DHS policy is that an Alert or Activation should...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  19. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR part 29-70... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 633.303 Section 633.303... FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.303 Allowable costs. (a) General....

  20. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  1. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Public... Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a particular set of Federal principles...

  2. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 230, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A-122).” The allowability of... CFR part 220, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21).” The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of appendix E of 45 CFR...

  3. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  4. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31... Contracts with Hospitals.” (iv) Governmental organizations. Allowability for State, local, or...

  5. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.211 Compensation allowable. (a) The amount of compensation allowable is the reasonable cost of assessing damages, and...

  6. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1303.24 Section 1303.24 Food... Quotas § 1303.24 Inventory allowance. (a) For the purpose of determining individual manufacturing quotas... sufficient to maintain an inventory equal to, (1) For current manufacturers, 50 percent of his...

  7. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  8. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  9. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  10. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  11. 75 FR 4098 - Utility Allowance Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Utility Allowance Adjustments AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... are required to advise the Secretary of the need for and request of a new utility allowance for... whether the information will have practical utility; (2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate...

  12. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of allowable costs that are in accordance with uniform cost accounting standards and comply with cost... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.27 Allowable... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles...

  13. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal costs of the current accounting period are all allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  14. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of allowable costs that are in accordance with uniform cost accounting standards and comply with cost... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.27 Allowable... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles...

  15. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal costs of the current accounting period are all allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  16. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal costs of the current accounting period are all allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  17. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of allowable costs that are in accordance with uniform cost accounting standards and comply with cost... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.27 Allowable... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  19. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  20. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  1. The Role of Allowances in Adolescent Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joanne; Yung, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Examines high school student perceptions of allowances and the conditions under which they are received. Finds that, contrary to adult conceptions, students perceive allowances as an entitlement or earned income rather than as an educational opportunity promoting financial decision making and money management. (FMW)

  2. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  3. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  4. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  5. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 30.27 Allowable..., “Cost Principles for State and Local Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit... organizations and those non-profit organizations listed in Attachment C to Circular A-122 is determined...

  6. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 49.27 Allowable... for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit... organizations and those non-profit organizations listed in Attachment C to Circular A-122 is determined...

  7. Family allowances and fertility: socioeconomic differences.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Jona

    2009-08-01

    This article explores socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances on fertility. Although several studies have examined the relationship between cash benefits and fertility, few studies have addressed the possible differential effects of cash benefits on families of different income or education levels. I reconstructed the birth histories of women in the past two Israeli censuses of 1983 and 1995 to study socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances up to the seventh parity. The results indicate that family allowances have a significant effect at every parity. Using female education as an indicator of socioeconomic status, I find that socioeconomic status is a significant modifier of the effect of family allowances. Family allowances seem to have a relatively large impact on more-educated women.

  8. Allowance trading: Correcting the past and looking to the future

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, A.Y.; Canter, L.W.

    1995-09-01

    Allowance trading is basic to the Title IV acid rain provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in the United States; the provisions seek to achieve a 10-million-ton reduction in annual sulfur dioxide emissions from the electric power utility industry. Allowance trading, a market-based approach, is conceptually similar to the emissions trading policy of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). An allowance is defined as the authorization to emit, during or after a specified calendar year, one ton of sulfur dioxide. This paper provides an overview of the allowance trading program by summarizing some important features, particularly as they are responsive to limitations and concern as related to the precursor emissions trading program in the early to mid-1980s. Such features include a simple definition of baseline emission levels, encouragements for nationwide trading, disincentives for accumulation of excess allowance,s opportunities for leasing other short-term allowance transfer arrangements, enforcement provisions, and benefits of bonus allowances and early emission reductions. Adherence to implementation protocols for the acid rain provisions of Title IV of the CAAA will provide a good opportunity to evaluate this market-based approach for environmental quality management.

  9. Determination of allowable fluid temperature during start-up operation of outlet header under the assumption of constant and temperature-dependent material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rząsa, Dariusz; Duda, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Modern supercritical power plants operate at very high temperatures and pressures. Thus the construction elements are subjected to both high thermal and mechanical loads. As a result high stresses in those components are created. In order to operate safely, it is important to monitor stresses, especially during start-up and shut-down processes. The maximum stresses in the construction elements should not exceed the allowable stresses that are defined according to boiler regulations. It is important to find optimum operating parameters, that can assure safe heating and cooling processes. The optimum parameters define temperature and pressure histories that can keep the highest stresses within allowable limit and reduce operation time as much as possible. In this paper a new numerical method for determining optimum working fluid parameters is presented. In this method, properties of steel can be assumed as constant or temperature dependent. The constant value is taken usually at the average temperature of the operation cycle. For both cases optimal parameters are determined. Based on these parameters start-up operations for both cases are conducted. During entire processes stresses in the heated element are monitored. The results obtained are compared with German boiler regulations - Technische Regeln fur Dampfkessel 301.

  10. Imaging stress.

    PubMed

    Brielle, Shlomi; Gura, Rotem; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in cell biology and imaging approaches are changing the way we study cellular stress, protein misfolding, and aggregation. Studies have begun to show that stress responses are even more variegated and dynamic than previously thought, encompassing nano-scale reorganization of cytosolic machinery that occurs almost instantaneously, much faster than transcriptional responses. Moreover, protein and mRNA quality control is often organized into highly dynamic macromolecular assemblies, or dynamic droplets, which could easily be mistaken for dysfunctional "aggregates," but which are, in fact, regulated functional compartments. The nano-scale architecture of stress-response ranges from diffraction-limited structures like stress granules, P-bodies, and stress foci to slightly larger quality control inclusions like juxta nuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ) and insoluble protein deposit compartment (IPOD), as well as others. Examining the biochemical and physical properties of these dynamic structures necessitates live cell imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, and techniques to make quantitative measurements with respect to movement, localization, and mobility. Hence, it is important to note some of the most recent observations, while casting an eye towards new imaging approaches that offer the possibility of collecting entirely new kinds of data from living cells.

  11. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... occurred. (7) Claims for automobiles, only when required to perform official business or parked on a... amount allowed is the value of the vehicle at the time of loss as determined by the National...

  12. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a wheelchair) because of such disability and such disability is the loss or loss of use of a hand or... wheelchair. (b) Effective August 1, 1972, the initial lump sum clothing allowance is due and payable...

  13. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a wheelchair) because of such disability and such disability is the loss or loss of use of a hand or... wheelchair. (b) Effective August 1, 1972, the initial lump sum clothing allowance is due and payable...

  14. Higher Education Tax Allowances: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Larry L.

    1976-01-01

    Tax allowances are receiving renewed attention at the federal level. Various forms are evaluated that would aid middle-income students and private institutions, and specific bills and proposals are examined. (Editor/LBH)

  15. Self-serving appraisal as a cognitive coping strategy to deal with age-related limitations: an empirical study with elderly adults in a real-life stressful situation.

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Rudi; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, I

    2006-03-01

    Elderly people are often confronted with stressful events that threaten psychological homeostasis. Nevertheless, the lack of a general age-related drop in life satisfaction remains intriguing. The objective of this study was to analyze the basic mechanisms of perceived control and self-protective processes. Eighty-four elderly adults who underwent a fitness-to-drive evaluation were asked how they appraised their performance in a driving simulation task and were classified as over-estimators versus people who estimated their performance correctly and people who didn't overestimate their performance. Decreased physical resources were related to self-serving appraisal and less depressive feelings. The results are in line with theories on self-immunizing processes and provide support for the use of cognitive therapies in dealing with age-related limitations.

  16. 38 CFR 3.1706 - Burial allowance for a veteran who died while hospitalized by VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... within a State, or to the border limits of the United States. (2) VA may pay the plot or interment allowance for burial in a veterans cemetery under § 3.1707, Plot or interment allowance. (Authority: 38...

  17. Quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Cabello, Adán

    2015-12-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory and a necessary resource for quantum computation and communication. It is therefore important to investigate how large contextuality can be in quantum theory. Linear contextuality witnesses can be expressed as a sum S of n probabilities, and the independence number α and the Tsirelson-like number ϑ of the corresponding exclusivity graph are, respectively, the maximum of S for noncontextual theories and for the theory under consideration. A theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality if it has scenarios in which ϑ /α approaches n . Here we show that quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality despite what is suggested by the examination of the quantum violations of Bell and noncontextuality inequalities considered in the past. Our proof is not constructive and does not single out explicit scenarios. Nevertheless, we identify scenarios in which quantum theory allows for almost-absolute-maximal contextuality.

  18. Using EPA`s allowance tracking system to assess the allowance market

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, M.; Kruger, J.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a credible framework for analyzing private allowance transfers recorded in EPA`s Allowance Tracking System (ATS) is essential for effective assessment of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) allowance market. The ATS began recording transfers of allowances in March, 1994, and since then has served as an automated record of allowance holdings and transfers of ownership. Though primarily concerned with determining compliance, the ATS contains details of private allowance transfers representing what is believed to be a significant portion of overall SO{sub 2} allowance market activity. This paper will analyze these private transfers recorded in ATS and will develop relevant categories for classification purposes. The resulting categorization will enable consistent analysis of the SO{sub 2} allowance market and provide substantial insight into the level and type of allowance trading activity under the Acid Rain Program.

  19. 44 CFR 208.41 - Administrative allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative allowance. 208.41 Section 208.41 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE NATIONAL URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM Response Cooperative Agreements § 208.41...

  20. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or...

  1. 49 CFR 18.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not...

  2. Manpower Training Allowances: Financial Assistance or Investment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, Georges

    1975-01-01

    The author compares the differing approaches of Germany, Sweden, France, and Australia for providing financial support to adults enrolled in vocational training programs, focusing on training allowances for recurrent education. He concludes that without some governmental maintenance program, it is unlikely that adults can utilize even tuition-free…

  3. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  4. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  5. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  6. 32 CFR 33.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency. ... allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of...

  7. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... contractor receiving a. cost-type contract under an assistance award, there is a set of Federal principles... principles applicable to the entity incurring the costs. (b) Governmental organizations. Allowability...

  8. 40 CFR 258.74 - Allowable mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... located in the United States amounting to at least the sum of current closure, post-closure care... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Financial Assurance Criteria § 258.74 Allowable mechanisms. The mechanisms... and examined by a Federal or State agency. A copy of the trust agreement must be placed in...

  9. 40 CFR 258.74 - Allowable mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... located in the United States amounting to at least the sum of current closure, post-closure care... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Financial Assurance Criteria § 258.74 Allowable mechanisms. The mechanisms... and examined by a Federal or State agency. A copy of the trust agreement must be placed in...

  10. 40 CFR 258.74 - Allowable mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... located in the United States amounting to at least the sum of current closure, post-closure care... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Financial Assurance Criteria § 258.74 Allowable mechanisms. The mechanisms... and examined by a Federal or State agency. A copy of the trust agreement must be placed in...

  11. 42 CFR 405.2468 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 405.2468 Section 405.2468 Public... FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health... 413 of this subchapter. (b) Typical rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center...

  12. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217 Section 136.217 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  13. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235 Section 136.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  14. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223 Section 136.223 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  15. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211 Section 136.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  16. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205 Section 136.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  17. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229 Section 136.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  18. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service with the Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent... the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident... authorized places. Claims may be allowable for damage to, or loss of, property arising from fire,...

  19. 33 CFR 136.241 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.241...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.241...

  20. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.217...

  1. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.205...

  2. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.223...

  3. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.235...

  4. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.229...

  5. 29 CFR 15.41 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... if the claim is cognizable under the Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C. 2677). (c) A claim for damage... Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.41 Allowable claims. (a)(1) A claim for damage...

  6. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  7. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  8. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  9. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  10. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  11. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  12. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  13. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  14. 38 CFR 21.5822 - Subsistence allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and on GPO... will make payments of subsistence allowance on the first day of the month following the month for which... enrollment certification so late that payment cannot be made on the first day of the month following...

  15. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-12-31

    The use of the SO{sub 2} allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO{sub 2} emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO{sub 2} for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO{sub x} emission averaging, the utility would average NO{sub x} emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  16. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  17. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  18. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  19. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  20. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of the SO[sub 2] allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO[sub 2] emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO[sub 2] for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO[sub x] emission averaging, the utility would average NO[sub x] emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  1. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  2. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  3. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  4. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING NET PROFIT SHARE PAYMENT FOR OUTER CONTINENTAL...

  5. 30 CFR 220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 220.012 Section 220.012 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING NET PROFIT SHARE PAYMENT FOR OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS...

  6. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... principles applicable to the organization incurring the costs. The following chart lists the kinds of... CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1273.22 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  8. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  9. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  10. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  11. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  12. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime awards from DoD Components, and those that are subrecipients under prime awards to other organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  13. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime awards from DoD Components, and those that are subrecipients under prime awards to other organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  14. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Local Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations.” The... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part...

  15. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS...

  16. 40 CFR 280.33 - Repairs allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.33 Repairs allowed. Owners and operators of UST systems must ensure... operating properly. (f) UST system owners and operators must maintain records of each repair for...

  17. 40 CFR 280.33 - Repairs allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.33 Repairs allowed. Owners and operators of UST systems must ensure... operating properly. (f) UST system owners and operators must maintain records of each repair for...

  18. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 14.27 Section...

  19. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR 29-70 and 41 CFR 1-15.7. (c) Costs associated with repairs, maintenance, and capital improvements of existing... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 632.37 Section...

  20. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (Authority: Pub... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs....

  1. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3019.27 Section 3019.27...

  2. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs....

  3. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2543.27 Section 2543.27...

  4. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section...

  5. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section...

  6. 43 CFR 12.62 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 12.62 Section 12.62... COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and...

  7. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  8. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  9. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  10. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable claims. 180.104 Section 180.104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY... are payable: (i) Where personal funds were accepted by responsible Government personnel with...

  11. Family allowance and family planning in Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Plank, S J

    1978-01-01

    Family allowances designed to promote maternal and child health and welfare could be self-defeating if they stimulated otherwise unwanted births, as often assumed. That assumption, with its public health and demographic implications, needs testing. An attempt to test it was made in Chile in 1969--1970 through interviews with 945 wives receiving an allowance and 690 non-recipients. Recipients practiced contraception significantly more than did non-recipients. This was not explained by wives' educational attainment or employment, the couples' earnings, or number of living children, but was associated with a 50 per cent greater utilization of professional prenatal care by recipients during the most recent pregnancy; women with such care (regardless of allowance status) were 75 per cent more likely than others to control their fertility. Prenatal care was probably sought more by recipients in part because an additional stipend was provided as soon as pregnancy was confirmed, usually at clinics with integrated family planning. Greater family income, attributable to the allowance, probably also contributed to the recipients' better prenatal attention and to contraceptive practice. Noteworthy, too, was the finding that with the number of living children controlled, contraceptive practice was significantly greater amoung couples who had never lost a child. PMID:717610

  12. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent or wrongful act or... subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident to service with the Department... excluded: (1) Property or damage in quarters or other authorized places. Claims may be allowable for...

  13. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part...

  14. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part...

  15. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency....

  16. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency....

  17. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost... organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and Procedures or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to ED. (b)...

  18. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost... organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and Procedures or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to ED. (b)...

  19. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost... organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and Procedures or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to ED. (b)...

  20. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency....

  1. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL..., Local and Indian Tribal Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for...

  2. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Job Location and Development Program § 675.33...

  3. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES ACT § 34.4 Allowable claims. (a) What you can claim. (1) Claims for damage or loss may... for property damage or loss by fire, flood, hurricane, theft, or other serious occurrence may be... a civilian employee outside the U.S. is a local inhabitant. (3) Claims for damage to, or loss...

  4. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pounds net weight authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7) by commercial..., against loss or damage in transit, if a bid from a licensed insurer is obtained by the individual and... allowable costs shall be: (A) If the trailer is hauled by private vehicle, the cost per mile for the use...

  5. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for which the claim is made. For example, borrowed property may be the subject of a claim. (c) Subject... the claimant is a local inhabitant; or (iii) Any warehouse, office, working area, or other place... Government other than OPM. (11) Borrowed property. Claims may be allowed for borrowed property that has...

  6. Stress effects on mood, HPA axis, and autonomic response: comparison of three psychosocial stress paradigms.

    PubMed

    Giles, Grace E; Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Taylor, Holly A; Kanarek, Robin B

    2014-01-01

    Extensive experimental psychology research has attempted to parse the complex relationship between psychosocial stress, mood, cognitive performance, and physiological changes. To do so, it is necessary to have effective, validated methods to experimentally induce psychosocial stress. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is the most commonly used method of experimentally inducing psychosocial stress, but it is resource intensive. Less resource intense psychosocial stress tasks include the Socially Evaluative Cold Pressor Task (SECPT) and a computerized mental arithmetic task (MAT). These tasks effectively produce a physiological and psychological stress response and have the benefits of requiring fewer experimenters and affording data collection from multiple participants simultaneously. The objective of this study was to compare the magnitude and duration of these three experimental psychosocial stress induction paradigms. On each of four separate days, participants completed either a control non-stressful task or one of the three experimental stressors: the TSST, SECPT, or MAT. We measured mood, working memory performance, salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase (AA), and heart rate. The TSST and SECPT exerted the most robust effects on mood and physiological measures. TSST effects were generally evident immediately post-stress as well as 10- and 20-minutes after stress cessation, whereas SECPT effects were generally limited to the duration of the stressor. The stress duration is a key determinant when planning a study that utilizes an experimental stressor, as researchers may be interested in collecting dependent measures prior to stress cessation. In this way, the TSST would allow the investigator a longer window to administer tasks of interest.

  7. 76 FR 32340 - Federal Travel Regulation; Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances (Taxes); Relocation Allowances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances (Taxes); Relocation Allowances (Taxes) AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide... Relocation Advisory Board (GRAB) concerning calculation of reimbursements for taxes on relocation expenses. In addition, this proposed rule alters the process for calculating reimbursements for taxes...

  8. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  9. 78 FR 26637 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowance-Relocation Income Tax (RIT) Allowable Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowance--Relocation Income Tax (RIT) Allowable Tables AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide Policy (OGP), General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION... June 25, 2008 (73 FR 35952), specifying that GSA would no longer publish the RIT Allowance tables...

  10. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  11. Overcoming job stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... allow workers a say in making decisions, lacks organization, or has policies that are not family-friendly. Issues with others. Problems with your boss or co-workers are a common source of stress. Fear for your future. You may feel stress ...

  12. Torque wrench allows readings from inaccessible locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Barnardo, M.

    1966-01-01

    Torque wrench with an adjustable drive shaft permits indicator to remain in view when used on sections of equipment with limited access. The shaft is capable of protruding from either side of the wrench head by means of spring loaded balls.

  13. 44 CFR 295.21 - Allowable compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Claimant for future damages the amount of the payment will be Discounted to Present Value. (d) Destruction... contents, and compensation for any decrease in the value of land on which the structure sat pursuant to... trees and landscaping will be limited to 25% of the pre-fire value of the structure and lot....

  14. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  15. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  16. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  17. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  18. Robust technique allowing manufacturing superoleophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman; Chaniel, Gilad; Taitelbaum, Haim; Bormashenko, Yelena

    2013-04-01

    We report the robust technique allowing manufacturing of superhydrophobic and oleophobic (omniphobic) surfaces with industrial grade low density polyethylene. The reported process includes two stages: (1) hot embossing of polyethylene with micro-scaled steel gauzes; (2) treatment of embossed surfaces with cold radiofrequency plasma of tetrafluoromethane. The reported surfaces demonstrate not only pronounced superhydrophobicity but also superoleophobicity. Superoleophobicity results from the hierarchical nano-scaled topography of fluorinated polyethylene surface. The observed superoleophobicity is strengthened by the hydrophobic recovery. The stability of the Cassie wetting regime was studied.

  19. Plant responsiveness to root–root communication of stress cues

    PubMed Central

    Falik, Omer; Mordoch, Yonat; Ben-Natan, Daniel; Vanunu, Miriam; Goldstein, Oron; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Phenotypic plasticity is based on the organism's ability to perceive, integrate and respond to multiple signals and cues informative of environmental opportunities and perils. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that plants are able to adapt to imminent threats by perceiving cues emitted from their damaged neighbours. Here, the hypothesis was tested that unstressed plants are able to perceive and respond to stress cues emitted from their drought- and osmotically stressed neighbours and to induce stress responses in additional unstressed plants. Methods Split-root Pisum sativum, Cynodon dactylon, Digitaria sanguinalis and Stenotaphrum secundatum plants were subjected to osmotic stress or drought while sharing one of their rooting volumes with an unstressed neighbour, which in turn shared its other rooting volume with additional unstressed neighbours. Following the kinetics of stomatal aperture allowed testing for stress responses in both the stressed plants and their unstressed neighbours. Key Results In both P. sativum plants and the three wild clonal grasses, infliction of osmotic stress or drought caused stomatal closure in both the stressed plants and in their unstressed neighbours. While both continuous osmotic stress and drought induced prolonged stomatal closure and limited acclimation in stressed plants, their unstressed neighbours habituated to the stress cues and opened their stomata 3–24 h after the beginning of stress induction. Conclusions The results demonstrate a novel type of plant communication, by which plants might be able to increase their readiness to probable future osmotic and drought stresses. Further work is underway to decipher the identity and mode of operation of the involved communication vectors and to assess the potential ecological costs and benefits of emitting and perceiving drought and osmotic stress cues under various ecological scenarios. PMID:22408186

  20. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corresponding provisions of prior revenue laws. If, in each of five consecutive taxable years (including at... under the corresponding provisions of prior revenue laws) of such individual shall be recomputed for... section 172, or the corresponding provisions of prior revenue laws, the amount of any net operating...