Science.gov

Sample records for allowable temperature limits

  1. Morphological changes in human and animal enamel rods with heating--especially limits in temperature allowing discrimination between human and animal teeth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Ohtani, S; Kato, S; Sugimoto, H; Miake, K; Nakamura, T

    1990-03-01

    Little has been revealed about making discrimination between human and animal using a piece of tooth found in a burned cadaver. From the viewpoint of forensic dental medicine, it is a theme no less valuable. This experimental study was attempted for this reason. Teeth from an individual body of human, monkey, dog, rabbit and rat were heated in turn on the muffle furnace. The heating temperatures were from 200 degrees C to 1,000 degrees C in time spans of 5, 30 and 60 minutes. After heating, each tooth and its control were observed by a scanning electron microscope (magnifying power: 3,500 x or 3,600 x). At heating temperature of 500 degrees C or 600 degrees C, enamel starts to come off in lumps and cracks appear in the enamel rods. The arcaded form in human and monkey, hexagon in dog, elongated chain in rabbit, rows of short, diagonal parallel lines equally directed at every other row in rat--these basic morphological features of the enamel rods--are retained till the heat reaches 700 degrees C. The enamel rods in monkey yield to heat more easily than those in human. At 600 degrees C many cracks appear and deformation of the arcaded form starts. With heating of 5 minutes at 800 degrees C the outline of the pattern is obscured. Human and animal teeth get varied forms of cracks in the enamel rods with heating more than 5 minutes at 800 degrees C. The structure of the enamel rods is broken and morphological characteristics are lost. This makes discrimination of human and animal quite difficult.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2133796

  2. 50 CFR 665.211 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665... Fisheries § 665.211 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing... Administrator shall publish a notice indicating the annual TAC limit in the Federal Register by August 31...

  3. 50 CFR 665.211 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665... Fisheries § 665.211 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing... Administrator shall publish a notice indicating the annual TAC limit in the Federal Register by August 31...

  4. 50 CFR 665.211 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665... Fisheries § 665.211 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing... Administrator shall publish a notice indicating the annual TAC limit in the Federal Register by August 31...

  5. 50 CFR 665.211 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665... Fisheries § 665.211 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing... Administrator shall publish a notice indicating the annual TAC limit in the Federal Register by August 31...

  6. 50 CFR 665.211 - Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. 665.211... Fisheries § 665.211 Total Allowable Catch (TAC) limit. (a) TAC limits will be set annually for the fishing... Administrator shall publish a notice indicating the annual TAC limit in the Federal Register by August 31...

  7. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  8. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  9. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  10. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  11. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by...

  12. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate in... training in the Center's field or topic. (b) Limitations on allowable costs. The following are...

  13. Average lifespan of radioelectronic equipment with allowance for resource limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    One of the reliability parameters of radioelectronic equipment is its average life span. The number of incidents during the operation of different items that make up the component base of radioelectronic equipment follows an exponential distribution. In general, the average life span for an exponential distribution is T mean = 1/λ, where λ is the rate of base incidents in a component per hour. This estimate is valid when considering the life span of radioelectronic equipment from zero to infinity. In reality, component base items and, correspondingly, radioelectronic equipment have resource limitations caused by the properties of their composing materials and manufacturing technique. The average life span of radioelectronic equipment will be different from the ideal life span of the equipment. This paper is aimed at calculating the average life span of radioelectronic equipment with allowance for resource limitations of constituent electronic component base items.

  14. Allowable gas temperature at outlet from furnace subject to slagging

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Alekhnovich; N.V. Artem'eva; V.V. Bogomolov

    2007-03-15

    The paper is devoted to substantiation and prediction of the allowable gas temperature at the outlet from a furnace subject to slagging. The non-optimality of values recommended by effective methodical instructions regarding the design of furnace devices is demonstrated. Utilizing knowledge gained from temperature measurements in boilers, and the situation regarding the slagging of heating surfaces located at the outlet from the furnace, new, frequently higher values are proposed. A method for evaluating the allowable gas temperature at the outlet from a furnace subject to slagging is suggested on the basis of data regarding the chemical composition of the mineral portion of coals.

  15. Allowable exposure limits for carbon dioxide during extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seter, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent was to review the research pertaining to human exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to recommend allowable exposure limits for extravehicular activity (EVA). Respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal systems may be adversely affected by chronic low dose CO2 exposure. Ventilation was increased 15 percent with 1 percent CO2 and 50 percent with 2 percent CO2. Chronic exposure to less than 2 percent CO2 led to 20 day cycles of uncompensated and compensated respiratory acidosis. Acid-base changes were small. Histopathologic changes in guinea pig lungs have been noted with long term exposure to 1 percent CO2. No changes were seen with exposure to 0.5 percent CO2. Cycling of bone calcium stores with associated changes in blood and urinary calcium levels occurs with long term CO2 exposure. Histologic changes in bone have been noted in guinea pigs exposed to 1 percent CO2. Renal calcification has been noted in guinea pigs with exposure to as low as 0.5 percent CO2. An increase in gastric acidity was noted in subjects with long term exposure to 1 percent CO2. Cardiovascular and neurologic function were largely unaffected. A decrease in the incidence of respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal disease was noted in submariners coincident with a decrease in ambient CO2 from 1.2 percent to 0.8-0.9 percent. Oxygen (O2) and CO2 stimulate respiration independently and cumulatively. The addition of CO2 to high dose O2 led to the faster onset of seizure activity in mice. Experiments evaluating the physiologic responses to intermittent, repetitive exposures to low dose CO2 and 100 percent O2 mixtures should be performed. A reduction in the current NASA standard for CO2 exposure during EVA of 1 percent (7.6 mmHg) for nominal and 2 percent (15.2 mmHg) for heavy exertion to 0.5 percent (3.8 mmHg) for nominal and 1 percent (7.6 mmHg) for heavy exertion may be prudent. At a minimum, the current NASA standard should not be liberalized.

  16. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... undergraduate Center including, but not limited to, the cost of— (1) Faculty and staff salaries and travel; (2) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate...

  17. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... undergraduate Center including, but not limited to, the cost of— (1) Faculty and staff salaries and travel; (2) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate...

  18. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... undergraduate Center including, but not limited to, the cost of— (1) Faculty and staff salaries and travel; (2) Library acquisitions; (3) Teaching and research materials; (4) Curriculum planning and development; (5) Bringing visiting scholars and faculty to the Center to teach, conduct research, or participate...

  19. [Limiting the allowable concentration of zearalenone in processed grain products].

    PubMed

    Tutel'ian, V A; L'vova, L S; Kravchenko, L V; Safronova, A M; Starovoĭtov, M L

    2002-01-01

    The distribution zearalenon (ZL) in products of processing of contaminated wheat, barley and maize grains was is investigated. Results of the data analysis on the investigation of an actual nutrition of the population in Russia is presented; the share of products of processing of contaminated wheat, barley and maize grains as part of the total ration was determined Varied values of Maximum Acceptable Concentration (MAC) of ZL based on the obtained results are offered: 1 mg/kg--for wheat, barley and maize grains; 0.2 mg/kg--for main products of grain processing, viz flour and groats. The application of these MAC-values for ZL ensures the conformity between the ones for raw materials and for products of processing of raw materials, as well as the limitation of the maximum possible ZL--intake within the bounds of Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for a man. PMID:12227016

  20. 34 CFR 609.41 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 609.41 Section 609.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STRENGTHENING HISTORICALLY BLACK GRADUATE INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM...

  1. 34 CFR 606.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 606.30 Section 606.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING HISPANIC-SERVING INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM What Conditions...

  2. 34 CFR 607.30 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 607.30 Section 607.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STRENGTHENING INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM What Conditions Must a Grantee...

  3. 34 CFR 608.40 - What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are allowable costs and what are the limitations on allowable costs? 608.40 Section 608.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STRENGTHENING HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES...

  4. 23 CFR 636.513 - Are limited negotiations allowed prior to contract execution?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are limited negotiations allowed prior to contract... Selection § 636.513 Are limited negotiations allowed prior to contract execution? (a) Yes, after the source selection but prior to contract execution, you may conduct limited negotiations with the selected...

  5. 23 CFR 636.513 - Are limited negotiations allowed prior to contract execution?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are limited negotiations allowed prior to contract... Selection § 636.513 Are limited negotiations allowed prior to contract execution? (a) Yes, after the source selection but prior to contract execution, you may conduct limited negotiations with the selected...

  6. 27 CFR 70.262 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AND ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.262 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or... credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the expiration of such period. (b) Limit on amount to...

  7. 27 CFR 70.262 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.262 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or... credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the expiration of such period. (b) Limit on amount to...

  8. 27 CFR 70.262 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.262 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or... credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the expiration of such period. (b) Limit on amount to...

  9. 27 CFR 70.262 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.262 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or... credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the expiration of such period. (b) Limit on amount to...

  10. 75 FR 359 - Guidance on Simultaneous Transmission Import Limit Studies; Notice Allowing Post-Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Guidance on Simultaneous Transmission Import Limit Studies; Notice Allowing... provide guidance for performing Simultaneous Transmission Import Limit (SIL) studies. All...

  11. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  12. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  13. 26 CFR 301.6511(b)-1 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(b)-1 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or refund of an overpayment is filed within the period of limitation prescribed in section 6511(a), no credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6511(b)-1 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(b)-1 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or refund of an overpayment is filed within the period of limitation prescribed in section 6511(a), no credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6511(b)-1 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(b)-1 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or refund of an overpayment is filed within the period of limitation prescribed in section 6511(a), no credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6511(b)-1 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(b)-1 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or refund of an overpayment is filed within the period of limitation prescribed in section 6511(a), no credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6511(b)-1 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(b)-1 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or refund of an overpayment is filed within the period of limitation prescribed in section 6511(a), no credit or refund shall be allowed or made after the...

  18. 27 CFR 70.262 - Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.262 Limitations on allowance of credits and refunds. (a) Effect of filing claim. Unless a claim for credit or refund of an overpayment is filed within the period of limitation prescribed in section 6511(a), no credit or refund...

  19. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  20. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  1. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  2. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  3. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  4. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  5. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  6. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  7. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  8. 34 CFR 280.41 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 280.41 Section 280.41 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM What...

  9. 34 CFR 658.40 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 658.40 Section 658.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND FOREIGN...

  10. 34 CFR 660.40 - What are the limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the limitations on allowable costs? 660.40 Section 660.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM What...

  11. Cryocoolers near their low-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper analyses the recently-observed temperature-time dependence in a GM-cooler near its low-temperature limit. The paper mainly focusses on GM-coolers with 4He as the working fluid, but some attention is also paid to pulse-tube refrigerators (PTR's) using 3He and many features of the treatment equally apply to Stirling coolers. Ample attention is paid to the thermodynamics of the cycle by considering the isentropes in the Tp-diagrams of 4He and 3He. The role of the line, where the thermal expansion coefficient is zero, is emphasized. Some fundamental thermodynamic relationships are derived.

  12. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  13. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.

  14. 41 CFR 302-17.3 - Types of moving expenses or allowances covered and general limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-RELOCATION INCOME TAX (RIT) ALLOWANCE § 302-17.3 Types of moving expenses or allowances covered and general... law authorizes reimbursement of additional income taxes resulting from certain moving expenses... actually paid or incurred, and are not allowable as a moving expense deduction for tax purposes. The...

  15. Determination of design allowable strength properties of elevated-temperature alloys. Part 1: Coated columbium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favor, R. J.; Maykuth, D. J.; Bartlett, E. S.; Mindlin, H.

    1972-01-01

    A program to determine the characteristics of two coated columbium alloy systems for spacecraft structures is discussed. The alloy was evaluated as coated base material, coated butt-welded material, and material thermal/pressure cycled prior to testing up to 30 cycles. Evaluation was by means of tensile tests covering the temperature range to 2400 F. Design allowables were computed and are presented as tables of data. The summary includes a room temperature property table, effect of temperature curves, and typical stress-strain curves.

  16. Radiation counting technique allows density measurement of metals in high-pressure/ high-temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillion, I. G.; Nelson, P. A.; Swanson, B. S.

    1967-01-01

    Radioactive tracers induced by neutron irradiation provide a gamma ray flux proportional to the density of a metal, allowing density measurement of these metals in extreme high-temperature and high-pressure environments. This concept is applicable to most metals, as well as other substances.

  17. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... emanate from a single commodity, such as oil or gas or a tract of land, it does not necessarily follow..., but are not limited to, intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells...

  18. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... emanate from a single commodity, such as oil or gas or a tract of land, it does not necessarily follow..., but are not limited to, intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells...

  19. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... emanate from a single commodity, such as oil or gas or a tract of land, it does not necessarily follow..., but are not limited to, intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells...

  20. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... as provided in § 1.172-5, or 26 CFR (1939) 39.122-4(c) (Regulations 118), as the case may be and, in... emanate from a single commodity, such as oil or gas or a tract of land, it does not necessarily follow..., but are not limited to, intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss As required in § 63.5450,...

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss As required in §§ 63.5305...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss As required in §§ 63.5305...

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss As required in § 63.5450,...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss As required in § 63.5450,...

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss As required in §§ 63.5305...

  7. Biological Limits of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Richard Y.

    1980-09-01

    Most biologists do not take into account that the greatest portion of today's biosphere is in the realm of environmental extremes, most of it being cold and under pressure. Since bacteria have the ability to adapt to environmental extremes, a close examination for the presence and/or growth of bacteria at high and low temperatures, low temperature and reduced pressure (less than 1 atm), low temperature and increased hydrostatic pressure should be made. It is also within the realm of possibility that life may have arisen in an environmental extreme on the primordial earth and then evolved over time to live under moderate temperatures and 1 atm. Microbial life has been demonstrated at temperatures slightly greater than 90°C, below 0°C, at hydrostatic pressures of 1100 atm, and possibly at cold temperatures in the atmosphere (less than 1 atm). Laboratory experiments have shown that certain enzyme reactions can occur above 100°C under hydrostatic pressure, at -26°C and at 5°C under hydrostatic pressure.

  8. Colloidal lenses allow high-temperature single-molecule imaging and improve fluorophore photostability

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jerrod J.; Stavrakis, Stavros; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Although single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was first demonstrated at near-absolute zero temperatures (1.8 K)1, the field has since advanced to include room-temperature observations2, largely owing to the use of objective lenses with high numerical aperture, brighter fluorophores and more sensitive detectors. This has opened the door for many chemical and biological systems to be studied at native temperatures at the single-molecule level both in vitro3–4 and in vivo5–6. However, it is difficult to study systems and phenomena at temperatures above 37 °C, because the index-matching fluids used with high-numerical-aperture objective lenses can conduct heat from the sample to the lens, and sustained exposure to high temperatures can cause the lens to fail. Here, we report that TiO2 colloids with diameters of 2 μm and a high refractive index can act as lenses that are capable of single-molecule imaging at 70 °C when placed in immediate proximity to an emitting molecule. The optical system is completed by a low-numerical-aperture optic that can have a long working distance and an air interface, which allows the sample to be independently heated. Colloidal lenses were used for parallel imaging of surface-immobilized single fluorophores and for real-time single-molecule measurements of mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes at 70 °C. Fluorophores in close proximity to TiO2 also showed a 40% increase in photostability due to a reduction of the excited-state lifetime. PMID:20023643

  9. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  10. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  11. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  12. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  13. 30 CFR 18.23 - Limitation of external surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limitation of external surface temperatures. 18.23 Section 18.23 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... and Design Requirements § 18.23 Limitation of external surface temperatures. The temperature of...

  14. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-1 - Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... property of certain public utilities. 1.167(l)-1 Section 1.167(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(l)-1 Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities. (a) In general—(1) Scope. Section 167(l) in general...

  15. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-1 - Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... property of certain public utilities. 1.167(l)-1 Section 1.167(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(l)-1 Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities. (a) In general—(1) Scope. Section 167(l) in general...

  16. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-1 - Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... property of certain public utilities. 1.167(l)-1 Section 1.167(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(l)-1 Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities. (a) In general—(1) Scope. Section 167(l) in general...

  17. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-1 - Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... property of certain public utilities. 1.167(l)-1 Section 1.167(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(l)-1 Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities. (a) In general—(1) Scope. Section 167(l) in general...

  18. Determination of allowable fluid temperature during start-up operation of outlet header under the assumption of constant and temperature-dependent material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rząsa, Dariusz; Duda, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Modern supercritical power plants operate at very high temperatures and pressures. Thus the construction elements are subjected to both high thermal and mechanical loads. As a result high stresses in those components are created. In order to operate safely, it is important to monitor stresses, especially during start-up and shut-down processes. The maximum stresses in the construction elements should not exceed the allowable stresses that are defined according to boiler regulations. It is important to find optimum operating parameters, that can assure safe heating and cooling processes. The optimum parameters define temperature and pressure histories that can keep the highest stresses within allowable limit and reduce operation time as much as possible. In this paper a new numerical method for determining optimum working fluid parameters is presented. In this method, properties of steel can be assumed as constant or temperature dependent. The constant value is taken usually at the average temperature of the operation cycle. For both cases optimal parameters are determined. Based on these parameters start-up operations for both cases are conducted. During entire processes stresses in the heated element are monitored. The results obtained are compared with German boiler regulations - Technische Regeln fur Dampfkessel 301.

  19. Determination of Temperature Limits for Radioactive Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1999-08-31

    This document provides a systematic approach for determining the temperature limits for a tank given that the supernate concentration is known, or for ''dry'' tanks, given that the supernate concentration from the last sample of free supernate that was collected is known. A decision tree was developed to provide the logic for the temperature limit determination.

  20. CMB: polarization and temperature waves from spatially limited cosmological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-05-01

    The most known inflationary model leaves traces in the form of Gaussian scale-invariant perturbations. It univoquely marks the CMB angular power spectrum. However, high energy physics may be more complicated and may leave other (and richer) traces, in the form of non-Gaussian scale-dependent perturbations. In this work we change our mind to the second issue. Instead of the CMB angular power spectrum only, we predict the temperature and polarization anisotropies from single well shaped spatially limited structures. These are generally characterized by some symmetries, and here we concentrate on the spherical ones. The treatment developed allows to express the anisotropy pattern as a function of (i) the geometrical coordinates of the particular structure under investigation, including its position relative to the last scattering surface, and (ii) the photon propagation direction n̂. Due to the wave-like behavior of the relevant equations, the general phenomenology that turns out is that for a localized initial inhomogeneity, the corresponding CMB perturbation propagates beyond the initial size, generating waves traveling outward with the sound velocity cs, and reaching the size of the sound horizon at the time we are examinating it. This behavior is a common feature of both the pure temperature and polarization anisotropies. The natural test of these computations will be the comparison with the observational data from the forthcoming high resolution CMB maps from the Planck mission.

  1. Thermal environment. [physiological basis for temperature tolerance limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The physiological effects, discomfort, and performance degradation associated with an imbalanced thermal environment are discussed. Temperature tolerance limits are set using thermoregulation models and experimental results. The effects of interacting environmental factors, individual variations, and exposure duration on tolerance limits are considered.

  2. Surface chemistry allows for abiotic precipitation of dolomite at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jennifer A.; Kenward, Paul A.; Fowle, David A.; Goldstein, Robert H.; González, Luis A.; Moore, David S.

    2013-09-01

    Although the mineral dolomite is abundant in ancient low-temperature sedimentary systems, it is scarce in modern systems below 50 °C. Chemical mechanism(s) enhancing its formation remain an enigma because abiotic dolomite has been challenging to synthesize at low temperature in laboratory settings. Microbial enhancement of dolomite precipitation at low temperature has been reported; however, it is still unclear exactly how microorganisms influence reaction kinetics. Here we document the abiotic synthesis of low-temperature dolomite in laboratory experiments and constrain possible mechanisms for dolomite formation. Ancient and modern seawater solution compositions, with identical pH and pCO2, were used to precipitate an ordered, stoichiometric dolomite phase at 30 °C in as few as 20 d. Mg-rich phases nucleate exclusively on carboxylated polystyrene spheres along with calcite, whereas aragonite forms in solution via homogeneous nucleation. We infer that Mg ions are complexed and dewatered by surface-bound carboxyl groups, thus decreasing the energy required for carbonation. These results indicate that natural surfaces, including organic matter and microbial biomass, possessing a high density of carboxyl groups may be a mechanism by which ordered dolomite nuclei form. Although environments rich in organic matter may be of interest, our data suggest that sharp biogeochemical interfaces that promote microbial death, as well as those with high salinity may, in part, control carboxyl-group density on organic carbon surfaces, consistent with origin of dolomites from microbial biofilms, as well as hypersaline and mixing zone environments.

  3. Consideration of Lower Allowable Impact Temperature for DOP-26 Iridium Alloy Fueled Clads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrabek, Emanuel A.

    2005-02-01

    The current DOE General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) was developed specifically for a SiGe Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which was to be launched on a Space Shuttle. In such a launch, if the final stage of the deployed spacecraft failed to ignite, the spacecraft and RTG would reenter the atmosphere after about three months in a Shuttle parking orbit. The indium alloy clad containing the radioisotope fuel would have then been at about 1300° C for the entire time on orbit. This would lead to some grain growth in the clad material, which would tend to decrease its ductility. Due to these constraints, it was concluded by the heat source community that safety considerations would require that the clads be maintained at a temperature of at least 930° C through impact. The safety testing for the GPHS RTG programs was therefore conducted with these conditions as guides. Within this set of guidelines, the heat source was shown to be able to safely handle all credible launch and reentry accident events in these missions. Currently proposed missions plan to use different power conversion systems and launch scenarios that are able to utilize much lower operating temperatures. Imposing the high operating and impact temperatures required by the SiGe RTG onto these new systems would lead to unnecessary added design complexity and probably a less robust system. If the heat source is operated so that the iridium alloy clads are generally maintained at less than 1000° C, essentially no grain growth would be experienced over normal mission lifetimes, and the clads would stay more ductile and able to safely withstand the resulting lower impact temperatures. Therefore DOE has embarked on a study to determine the lowest safe operating and impact temperatures for the GPHS. This paper presents the historical background and some preliminary results of this study.

  4. Final Report-- A Novel Storage Method for Concentrating Solar Power Plants Allowing Storage at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-29

    The main objective of the proposed work was the development and testing of a storage method that has the potential to fundamentally change the solar thermal industry. The development of a mathematical model that describes the phenomena involved in the heat storage and recovery was also a main objective of this work. Therefore, the goal was to prepare a design package allowing reliable scale-up and optimization of design.

  5. Upper Temperature Limits of Tropical Marine Ectotherms: Global Warming Implications

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh Dung T.; Morley, Simon A.; Lai, Chien-Houng; Clark, Melody S.; Tan, Koh Siang; Bates, Amanda E.; Peck, Lloyd S.

    2011-01-01

    Animal physiology, ecology and evolution are affected by temperature and it is expected that community structure will be strongly influenced by global warming. This is particularly relevant in the tropics, where organisms are already living close to their upper temperature limits and hence are highly vulnerable to rising temperature. Here we present data on upper temperature limits of 34 tropical marine ectotherm species from seven phyla living in intertidal and subtidal habitats. Short term thermal tolerances and vertical distributions were correlated, i.e., upper shore animals have higher thermal tolerance than lower shore and subtidal animals; however, animals, despite their respective tidal height, were susceptible to the same temperature in the long term. When temperatures were raised by 1°C hour−1, the upper lethal temperature range of intertidal ectotherms was 41–52°C, but this range was narrower and reduced to 37–41°C in subtidal animals. The rate of temperature change, however, affected intertidal and subtidal animals differently. In chronic heating experiments when temperature was raised weekly or monthly instead of every hour, upper temperature limits of subtidal species decreased from 40°C to 35.4°C, while the decrease was more than 10°C in high shore organisms. Hence in the long term, activity and survival of tropical marine organisms could be compromised just 2–3°C above present seawater temperatures. Differences between animals from environments that experience different levels of temperature variability suggest that the physiological mechanisms underlying thermal sensitivity may vary at different rates of warming. PMID:22242115

  6. Heat pipes for spacecraft temperature control: Their usefulness and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.; Stipandic, E.

    1972-01-01

    Heat pipes are used in spacecraft to equalize the temperature of structures and maintain temperature control of electronic components. Information is provided for a designer on: (1) a typical mounting technique, (2) choices available in wick geometries and fluids, (3) tests involved in flight-qualifying the design, and (4) heat pipe limitations. An evaluation of several heat pipe designs showed that the behavior of heat pipes at room temperature does not necessarily correlate with the classic equations used to predict their performance. They are sensitive to such parameters as temperature, fluid inventory, orientation, and noncondensable gases.

  7. Surface chemistry allows for abiotic precipitation of dolomite at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer A.; Kenward, Paul A.; Fowle, David A.; Goldstein, Robert H.; González, Luis A.; Moore, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the mineral dolomite is abundant in ancient low-temperature sedimentary systems, it is scarce in modern systems below 50 °C. Chemical mechanism(s) enhancing its formation remain an enigma because abiotic dolomite has been challenging to synthesize at low temperature in laboratory settings. Microbial enhancement of dolomite precipitation at low temperature has been reported; however, it is still unclear exactly how microorganisms influence reaction kinetics. Here we document the abiotic synthesis of low-temperature dolomite in laboratory experiments and constrain possible mechanisms for dolomite formation. Ancient and modern seawater solution compositions, with identical pH and pCO2, were used to precipitate an ordered, stoichiometric dolomite phase at 30 °C in as few as 20 d. Mg-rich phases nucleate exclusively on carboxylated polystyrene spheres along with calcite, whereas aragonite forms in solution via homogeneous nucleation. We infer that Mg ions are complexed and dewatered by surface-bound carboxyl groups, thus decreasing the energy required for carbonation. These results indicate that natural surfaces, including organic matter and microbial biomass, possessing a high density of carboxyl groups may be a mechanism by which ordered dolomite nuclei form. Although environments rich in organic matter may be of interest, our data suggest that sharp biogeochemical interfaces that promote microbial death, as well as those with high salinity may, in part, control carboxyl-group density on organic carbon surfaces, consistent with origin of dolomites from microbial biofilms, as well as hypersaline and mixing zone environments. PMID:23964124

  8. Upsettability and forming limit of magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heung Sik; Kim, Si Pom; Park, Young Chul; Park, Joon Hong; Baek, Seung Gul

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have become a center of special interest in the automotive industry. Due to their high specific mechanical properties, they offer a significant weight saving potential in modern vehicle constructions. Most Mg alloys show very good machinability and processability, and even the most complicated die casting parts can be easily produced. In this study, Microstructure, Vickers hardness and tensile tests were examined and performed for each specimen to verify effects of forming conditions. Also to verify upsettability and forming limit of the specimen at room temperature and elevated temperature, upsetting experiments were performed. For comparison, experiments at elevated temperature were performed for various Mg alloy, such as AZ31, AZ91, and AM50. The experimental results were compared with those of CAE analysis to propose forming limit of Magnesium alloys.

  9. Elephant Seals and Temperature Data: Calibrations and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, S. E.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    In recent years with technological advances, instruments deployed on diving marine animals have been used to sample the environment in addition to their behavior. Of all oceanographic variables one of the most valuable and easiest to record is temperature. Here we report on a series of lab calibration and field validation experiments that consider the accuracy of temperature measurements from animal borne ocean samplers. Additionally we consider whether sampling frequency or animal behavior affects the quality of the temperature data collected by marine animals. Rapid response, external temperature sensors on eight Wildlife Computers MK9 time-depth recorders (TDRs) were calibrated using water baths at the Naval Postgraduate School (Monterey, CA). These water baths are calibrated using a platinum thermistor to 0.001° C. Instruments from different production batches were calibrated before and after deployments on adult female northern elephant seals, to examine tag performance over time and under `normal' usage. Tag performance in the field was validated by comparisons with temperature data from a Seabird CTD. In April/May of 2004, casts to 200m were performed over the Monterey Canyon using a CTD array carrying MK9s. These casts were performed before and after the release of a juvenile elephant seal from the boat. The seal was also carrying an MK9 TDR, allowing the assessment of any animal effect on temperature profiles. Sampling frequency during these field validations was set at one second intervals and the data from TDRs on both the CTD and the seals was sub-sampled at four, eight, 30 and 300 (5 min) seconds. The sub-sampled data was used to determine thermocline depth, a thermocline depth zone and temperature gradients and assess whether sampling frequency or animal behavior affects the quality of temperature data. Preliminary analyses indicate that temperature sensors deployed on elephant seals can provide water column temperature data of high quality and

  10. A Low Temperature Limit for Life on Earth

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Morris, G. John; Fonseca, Fernanda; Murray, Benjamin J.; Price, Hannah C.

    2013-01-01

    There is no generally accepted value for the lower temperature limit for life on Earth. We present empirical evidence that free-living microbial cells cooling in the presence of external ice will undergo freeze-induced desiccation and a glass transition (vitrification) at a temperature between −10°C and −26°C. In contrast to intracellular freezing, vitrification does not result in death and cells may survive very low temperatures once vitrified. The high internal viscosity following vitrification means that diffusion of oxygen and metabolites is slowed to such an extent that cellular metabolism ceases. The temperature range for intracellular vitrification makes this a process of fundamental ecological significance for free-living microbes. It is only where extracellular ice is not present that cells can continue to metabolise below these temperatures, and water droplets in clouds provide an important example of such a habitat. In multicellular organisms the cells are isolated from ice in the environment, and the major factor dictating how they respond to low temperature is the physical state of the extracellular fluid. Where this fluid freezes, then the cells will dehydrate and vitrify in a manner analogous to free-living microbes. Where the extracellular fluid undercools then cells can continue to metabolise, albeit slowly, to temperatures below the vitrification temperature of free-living microbes. Evidence suggests that these cells do also eventually vitrify, but at lower temperatures that may be below −50°C. Since cells must return to a fluid state to resume metabolism and complete their life cycle, and ice is almost universally present in environments at sub-zero temperatures, we propose that the vitrification temperature represents a general lower thermal limit to life on Earth, though its precise value differs between unicellular (typically above −20°C) and multicellular organisms (typically below −20°C). Few multicellular organisms can

  11. Varying properties along lengths of temperature limited heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Xie, Xueying; Miller, David Scott; Ginestra, Jean Charles

    2011-07-26

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes an elongated heater in an opening in the formation. The elongated heater includes two or more portions along the length of the heater that have different power outputs. At least one portion of the elongated heater includes at least one temperature limited portion with at least one selected temperature at which the portion provides a reduced heat output. The heater is configured to provide heat to the formation with the different power outputs. The heater is configured so that the heater heats one or more portions of the formation at one or more selected heating rates.

  12. DATING: A computer code for determining allowable temperatures for dry storage of spent fuel in inert and nitrogen gases

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, E.P.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1988-12-01

    The DATING (Determining Allowable Temperatures in Inert and Nitrogen Gases) code can be used to calculate allowable initial temperatures for dry storage of light-water-reactor spent fuel. The calculations are based on the life fraction rule using both measured data and mechanistic equations as reported by Chin et al. (1986). The code is written in FORTRAN and utilizes an efficient numerical integration method for rapid calculations on IBM-compatible personal computers. This report documents the technical basis for the DATING calculations, describes the computational method and code statements, and includes a user's guide with examples. The software for the DATING code is available through the National Energy Software Center operated by Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439. 5 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Temperature Sensing Above 1000 C Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Chambers, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) is shown to produce remarkably high-intensity spin-allowed broadband luminescence with sufficiently long decay times to make effective luminescence-decay-time based temperature measurements above 1000 C. This phosphor is therefore an attractive alternative to the much lower luminescence intensity rare-earth-doped thermographic phosphors that are typically utilized at these elevated temperatures. In particular, Cr:GdAlO3 will be preferred over rare-earth-doped phosphors, such as Dy:YAG, at temperatures up to 1200 C for intensity-starved situations when the much lower emission intensity from rare-earth-doped phosphors is insufficient for accurate temperature measurements in the presence of significant radiation background. While transition-metal-doped phosphors such as Cr:Al2O3 (ruby) are known to exhibit high luminescence intensity at low dopant concentrations, quenching due to nonradiative decay pathways competing with the (sup 2)E to (sup 4)A(sub 2) radiative transition (R line) has typically restricted their use for temperature sensing to below 600 C. Thermal quenching of the broadband (sup 4)T(sub 2) to (sup 4)A(sub 2) radiative transition from Cr:GdAlO3, however, is delayed until much higher temperatures (above 1000 C). This spin-allowed broadband emission persists to high temperatures because the lower-lying (sup 2)E energy level acts as a reservoir to thermally populate the higher shorter-lived (sup 4)T(sub 2) energy level and because the activation energy for nonradiative crossover relaxation from the (sup 4)T(sub 2) level to the (sup 4)A(sub 2) ground state is high. The strong crystal field associated with the tight bonding of the AlO6 octahedra in the GdAlO3 perovskite structure is responsible for this behavior.

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather...), you must meet the appropriate emission limits in the following table: Type of Leather Product...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather...), you must meet the appropriate emission limits in the following table: Type of Leather Product...

  16. SY-101 Rapid Transfer Project Low Temperature Operations Review and Recommendations to Support Lower Temperature Limits

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    2000-01-10

    The lower temperature limit for the 241 SY-101 RAPID transfer project is currently set at 20 F Based on the analysis and recommendations in this document this limit can be lowered to 0 F. Analysis of all structures systems and components (SSCs) indicate that a reduction in operating temperature may be achieved with minor modifications to field-installed equipment. Following implementation of these changes it is recommended that the system requirements be amended to specify a temperature range for transfer or back dilute evolutions of 0 F to 100 F.

  17. Limitations of using a thermal imager for snow pit temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Jamieson, B.

    2013-10-01

    Driven by temperature gradients, kinetic snow metamorphism is important for avalanche formation. Even when gradients appear to be insufficient for kinetic metamorphism, based on temperatures measured 10 cm apart, faceting close to a~crust can still be observed. Recent studies that visualized small scale (< 10 cm) thermal structures in a profile of snow layers with an infrared (IR) camera produced interesting results. The studies found melt-freeze crusts to be warmer or cooler than the surrounding snow depending on the large scale gradient direction. However, an important assumption within the studies was that a thermal photo of a freshly exposed snow pit was similar enough to the internal temperature of the snow. In this study, we tested this assumption by recording thermal videos during the exposure of the snow pit wall. In the first minute, the results showed increasing gradients with time, both at melt-freeze crusts and at artificial surface structures such as shovel scours. Cutting through a crust with a cutting blade or a shovel produced small concavities (holes) even when the objective was to cut a planar surface. Our findings suggest there is a surface structure dependency of the thermal image, which is only observed at times with large temperature differences between air and snow. We were able to reproduce the hot-crust/cold-crust phenomenon and relate it entirely to surface structure in a temperature-controlled cold laboratory. Concave areas cooled or warmed slower compared with convex areas (bumps) when applying temperature differences between snow and air. This can be explained by increased radiative transfer or convection by air at convex areas. Thermal videos suggest that such processes influence the snow temperature within seconds. Our findings show the limitations of the use of a thermal camera for measuring pit-wall temperatures, particularly in scenarios where large gradients exist between air and snow and the interaction of snow pit and

  18. Limitations of using a thermal imager for snow pit temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Jamieson, B.

    2014-03-01

    Driven by temperature gradients, kinetic snow metamorphism plays an import role in avalanche formation. When gradients based on temperatures measured 10 cm apart appear to be insufficient for kinetic metamorphism, faceting close to a crust can be observed. Recent studies that visualised small-scale (< 10 cm) thermal structures in a profile of snow layers with an infrared (IR) camera produced interesting results. The studies found melt-freeze crusts to be warmer or cooler than the surrounding snow depending on the large-scale gradient direction. However, an important assumption within these studies was that a thermal photo of a freshly exposed snow pit was similar enough to the internal temperature of the snow. In this study, we tested this assumption by recording thermal videos during the exposure of the snow pit wall. In the first minute, the results showed increasing gradients with time, both at melt-freeze crusts and artificial surface structures such as shovel scours. Cutting through a crust with a cutting blade or shovel produced small concavities (holes) even when the objective was to cut a planar surface. Our findings suggest there is a surface structure dependency of the thermal image, which was only observed at times during a strong cooling/warming of the exposed pit wall. We were able to reproduce the hot-crust/cold-crust phenomenon and relate it entirely to surface structure in a temperature-controlled cold laboratory. Concave areas cooled or warmed more slowly compared with convex areas (bumps) when applying temperature differences between snow and air. This can be explained by increased radiative and/or turbulent energy transfer at convex areas. Thermal videos suggest that such processes influence the snow temperature within seconds. Our findings show the limitations of using a thermal camera for measuring pit-wall temperatures, particularly during windy conditions, clear skies and large temperature differences between air and snow. At crusts or other

  19. Battery charge control with temperature compensated voltage limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thierfelder, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Battery charge control for orbiting spacecraft with mission durations from three to ten years, is a critical design feature that is discussed. Starting in 1974, the General Electric Space Systems Division designed, manufactured and tested battery systems for six different space programs. Three of these are geosynchronous missions, two are medium altitude missions and one is a near-earth mission. All six power subsystems contain nickel cadmium batteries which are charged using a temperature compensated voltage limit. This charging method was found to be successful in extending the life of nickel cadmium batteries in all three types of earth orbits. Test data and flight data are presented for each type of orbit.

  20. 26 CFR 1.42-1 - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or... OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.42-1 Limitation on low-income...

  1. The synchro-Compton limit of the brightness temperature of nonstationary radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slysh, V. I.

    1992-06-01

    The brightness temperature of synchrotron emission from nonstationary radio sources during the cooling down by the inverse Compton effect is calculated. It is shown that brightness temperatures as high as 5 x 10 exp 15 K at 1 GHz are allowed during the first day after injection of relativistic electrons of sufficiently high energy. This is about four orders of magnitude higher than the canonical synchro-Compton limit introduced by Kellermann and Pauliny-Toth (1969) for stationary radio sources. A stationary situation with the in situ first-order Fermi acceleration will give a brightness temperature of about 10 exp 15 K at 1 GHz due to the compensation of the inverse Compton losses by particle acceleration. The high brightness temperature effect is most pronounced at low frequencies and is proposed as the explanation of the LF variability phenomenon. Strong high-energy emission is predicted during phases of high brightness temperature.

  2. A new method for determining allowable medium temperature during transient operation of thick-walled elements in a supercritical power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Piotr; Rząsa, Dariusz

    2010-09-01

    Construction elements of supercritical power plants are subjected to high working pressures and high temperatures while operating. Under these conditions high stresses in the construction are created. In order to operate safely, it is important to monitor stresses, especially during start-up and shut-down processes. The maximum stresses in the construction elements should not exceed the allowable stress limit. The goal is to find optimum operating parameters that can assure safe heating and cooling processes [1-5]. The optimum parameters should guarantee that the allowable stresses are not exceeded and the entire process is conducted in the shortest time. In this work new numerical method for determining optimum working parameters is presented. Based on these parameters heating operations were conducted. Stresses were monitored during the entire processes. The results obtained were compared with the German boiler regulations - Technische Regeln für Dampfkessel 301.

  3. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  4. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  5. OVII and Temperature Limits on the Local Hot Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirtle, Robert; Petre, N.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Sauter, P.; Clavadetscher, K.; Fujimoto, R.; Hagihara, T.; Masui, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Wang, Q. D.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Yao, Y.; Yoshino, T.

    2013-01-01

    The observed ¼-keV (ROSAT R12 band) X-ray background originates largely in a region of hot ionized gas roughly 100 pc in extent surrounding the Sun known as the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). The observed flux is quite uniform at low latitudes (|b| < 30°), but there a several large areas at intermediate and high latitudes that are enhanced by factors of 2 - 3. Charge exchange between highly charged ions in the Solar wind and interstellar neutral H and He moving through interplanetary space might provide a very roughly isotropic contribution about equal to the low- latitude flux (Koutroumpa et al. 2008), but cannot produce the enhancements. Correlations with the interstellar absorbing column show that some of these bright regions are apparently due to clumps of hot gas in the Galactic halo, while many of them show no correlation and must be due to extensions of the LHB (Kuntz & Snowden 2000, Bellm & Vaillancourt 2005). Global fits of simple plasma emission spectra give temperatures near 1.0 x 106 K for both LHB and halo emission, but the possibility of a substantial contamination by charge exchange could distort this result in unknown ways. Thermal excitation of O VII is strongly temperature dependent in this range, so we have tried to correlate O VII fluxes measured with Suzaku with variations in ¼-keV intensity from the ROSAT R12 band map to determine the temperature. We take eleven O VII intensity measurements from Yoshino et al. (2009), one from Masui et al. (2009), and an additional eighteen from archival Suzaku pointings and correlate these with the R12 band local and halo intensities as separated by Kunzt & Snowden (2000). The lack of detectable correlation in both cases strongly limits any O VII production by the material producing the enhancements, and upper limits to the temperatures are set. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 and by NASA grant NNX09AF09G. *present address: Department

  6. Numerical method for determining the allowable medium temperature during transient operation of a thick-walled boiler element in power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rząsa, Dariusz; Duda, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    Secure and cost-effective power generation has become very important nowdays. Care must be taken while designing and operating modern steam power plants. There are regulations such as German boiler regulations (Technische Regeln für Dampfkessel 301) or European Standards that guide the user how to operate the steam power plants. However, those regulations are based on the quasi-steady state assumption and one dimensional temperature distribution in the entire element. This simplifications may not guarantee that the heating and cooling operations are conducted in the most efficient way. Thus, it was important to find an improved method that can allow to establish optimum parameters for heating and cooling operations. The optimum parameters should guarantee that the maximum total stresses in the construction element are in the allowable limits and the entire process is conducted in the shortest time. This paper summarizes mathematical descriptions how to optimize shut down process of power block devices. The optimization formulation is based on the assumption that the maximum total stresses in the whole construction element should be kept within allowable limits during cooling operation. Additionally, the operation should be processed in the shortest time possible.

  7. 50 CFR Table 1 (north) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10′ N....

  8. 50 CFR Table 1 (south) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10′ N....

  9. 50 CFR Table 1 (north) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10′ N....

  10. 50 CFR Table 1 (south) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10′ N....

  11. 50 CFR Table 1 (south) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10′ N....

  12. 50 CFR Table 1 (north) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10′ N....

  13. 50 CFR Table 1 (north) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting North of 40°10′ N....

  14. 50 CFR Table 1 (south) to Part 660... - Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limited Entry Trawl Rockfish Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10â² N. Lat. 1 Table 1... Conservation Areas and Landing Allowances for non-IFQ Species and Pacific Whiting South of 40°10′ N....

  15. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or local housing credit agency (temporary). 1.42-1T Section 1.42-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  16. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or local housing credit agency (temporary). 1.42-1T Section 1.42-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  17. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or local housing credit agency (temporary). 1.42-1T Section 1.42-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME...

  18. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or local housing credit agency (temporary). 1.42-1T Section 1.42-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  19. 26 CFR 1.42-1T - Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Limitation on low-income housing credit allowed with respect to qualified low-income buildings receiving housing credit allocations from a State or local housing credit agency (temporary). 1.42-1T Section 1.42-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  20. 41 CFR 302-7.16 - Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Is the maximum weight... Government OCONUS or upon return to CONUS? 302-7.16 Section 302-7.16 Public Contracts and Property Management...) General Rules § 302-7.16 Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited...

  1. 41 CFR 302-7.16 - Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is the maximum weight... Government OCONUS or upon return to CONUS? 302-7.16 Section 302-7.16 Public Contracts and Property Management...) General Rules § 302-7.16 Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited...

  2. 41 CFR 302-7.17 - Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Is the maximum weight... Government OCONUS or upon return to CONUS? 302-7.17 Section 302-7.17 Public Contracts and Property Management...) General Rules § 302-7.17 Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited...

  3. 41 CFR 302-7.17 - Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished or partly furnished by the Government OCONUS or upon return to CONUS? 302-7.17 Section 302-7.17 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation...

  4. Low and High Temperature Limits to PSII 1

    PubMed Central

    Terzaghi, William B.; Fork, David C.; Berry, Joseph A.; Field, Christopher B.

    1989-01-01

    Many studies have shown that membrane lipids of chilling-sensitive plants begin lateral phase separation (i.e. a minor component begins freezing) at chilling temperatures and that chilling-sensitive plants are often of tropical origin. We tested the hypothesis that membranes of tropical plants begin lateral phase separation at chilling temperatures, and that plants lower the temperature of lateral phase separation as they invade cooler habitats. To do so we studied plant species in one family confined to the tropics (Piperaceae) and in three families with both tropical and temperate representatives (Fabaceae [Leguminosae], Malvaceae, and Solanaceae). We determined lateral phase separation temperatures by measuring the temperature dependence of fluorescence from trans-parinaric acid inserted into liposomes prepared from isolated membrane phospholipids. In all families we detected lateral phase separations at significantly higher temperatures, on average, in species of tropical origin. To test for associated physiological effects we measured the temperature dependence of delayed light emission (DLE) by discs cut from the same leaves used for lipid analysis. We found that the temperature of maximum DLE upon chilling was strongly correlated with lateral phase separation temperatures, but was on average approximately 4°C lower. We also tested the hypothesis that photosystem II (PSII) (the most thermolabile component of photosynthesis) of tropical plants tolerates higher temperatures than PSII of temperate plants, using DLE and Fo chlorophyll fluorescence upon heating to measure the temperature at which PSII thermally denatured. We found little difference between the two groups in PSII denaturation temperature. We also found that the temperature of maximum DLA upon heating was not significantly different from the critical temperature for Fo fluorescence. Our results indicate that plants lowered their membrane freezing temperatures as they radiated from their tropical

  5. 26 CFR 20.2014-7 - Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... by section 2014(f)) ÷ $1,200,000 − $423,082.12 (factor H of the ratio stated at § 20.2014 3(a) × $172... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d). 20.2014-7 Section 20.2014-7 Internal Revenue...

  6. 26 CFR 20.2014-7 - Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... by section 2014(f)) ÷ $1,200,000 − $423,082.12 (factor H of the ratio stated at § 20.2014 3(a) × $172... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d). 20.2014-7 Section 20.2014-7 Internal Revenue...

  7. 26 CFR 20.2014-7 - Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... by section 2014(f)) ÷ $1,200,000 − $423,082.12 (factor H of the ratio stated at § 20.2014 3(a) × $172... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitation on credit if a deduction for foreign death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d). 20.2014-7 Section 20.2014-7 Internal Revenue...

  8. Body core temperature of rats subjected to daily exercise limited to a fixed time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shido, O.; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Sakurada, Sotaro; Kaneko, Yoshiko; Nagasaka, Tetsuo

    Several timed daily environmental cues alter the pattern of nycthemeral variations in body core temperature in rodents. The present study investigated the effect of timed exercise on variations of daily body core temperature. Male rats were housed in cages with a running wheel at an ambient temperature of 24° C with a 12:12 h light/dark cycle. Timed daily exercise rats (TEX) were allowed access to the wheel for 6 h in the last half of the dark phase, freely exercising rats (FEX) could run at any time, and sedentary rats (NEX) were not allowed to run. After a 3-week exercise period, all animals were denied access to the wheel. The intraabdominal temperatures (Tab) and spontaneous activities of rats were measured for 6 days after the exercise period. The Tab values of the TEX rats were significantly higher than those of the other two groups only in the last half of the dark phase, while Tab in the FEX and NEX rats showed no significant difference. The specific Tab changes in the TEX rats lasted for 2 days after the exercise period. Spontaneous activity levels were higher in the TEX rats than the FEX and NEX rats in the last half of the dark phase for 1 day after the exercise period. The results suggest that daily exercise limited to a fixed time per day modifies nycthemeral variations of body core temperature in rats so that the temperature increases during the period when the animals had previously exercised. Such a rise in body core temperature is partly attributed to an increase in the spontaneous activity level.

  9. Adjusting alloy compositions for selected properties in temperature limited heaters

    DOEpatents

    Brady; Michael Patrick , Horton, Jr.; Joseph Arno , Vitek; John Michael

    2010-03-23

    Heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Such heaters can be obtained by using the systems and methods described herein. The heater includes a heater section including iron, cobalt, and carbon. The heater section has a Curie temperature less than a phase transformation temperature. The Curie temperature is at least 740.degree. C. The heater section provides, when time varying current is applied to the heater section, an electrical resistance.

  10. Temperature limits trail following behaviour through pheromone decay in ants.

    PubMed

    van Oudenhove, Louise; Billoir, Elise; Boulay, Raphaël; Bernstein, Carlos; Cerdá, Xim

    2011-12-01

    In Mediterranean habitats, temperature affects both ant foraging behaviour and community structure. Many studies have shown that dominant species often forage at lower temperature than subordinates. Yet, the factors that constrain dominant species foraging activity in hot environments are still elusive. We used the dominant ant Tapinoma nigerrimum as a model species to test the hypothesis that high temperatures hinder trail following behaviour by accelerating pheromone degradation. First, field observations showed that high temperatures (> 30°C) reduce the foraging activity of T. nigerrimum independently of the daily and seasonal rhythms of this species. Second, we isolated the effect of high temperatures on pheromone trail efficacy from its effect on worker physiology. A marked substrate was heated during 10 min (five temperature treatments from 25°C to 60°C), cooled down to 25°C, and offered in a test choice to workers. At hot temperature treatments (>40°C), workers did not discriminate the previously marked substrate. High temperatures appeared therefore to accelerate pheromone degradation. Third, we assessed the pheromone decay dynamics by a mechanistic model fitted with Bayesian inference. The model predicted ant choice through the evolution of pheromone concentration on trails as a function of both temperature and time since pheromone deposition. Overall, our results highlighted that the effect of high temperatures on recruitment intensity was partly due to pheromone evaporation. In the Mediterranean ant communities, this might affect dominant species relying on chemical recruitment, more than subordinate ant species, less dependent on chemical communication and less sensitive to high temperatures. PMID:22038287

  11. Temperature limits trail following behaviour through pheromone decay in ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oudenhove, Louise; Billoir, Elise; Boulay, Raphaël; Bernstein, Carlos; Cerdá, Xim

    2011-12-01

    In Mediterranean habitats, temperature affects both ant foraging behaviour and community structure. Many studies have shown that dominant species often forage at lower temperature than subordinates. Yet, the factors that constrain dominant species foraging activity in hot environments are still elusive. We used the dominant ant Tapinoma nigerrimum as a model species to test the hypothesis that high temperatures hinder trail following behaviour by accelerating pheromone degradation. First, field observations showed that high temperatures (> 30°C) reduce the foraging activity of T. nigerrimum independently of the daily and seasonal rhythms of this species. Second, we isolated the effect of high temperatures on pheromone trail efficacy from its effect on worker physiology. A marked substrate was heated during 10 min (five temperature treatments from 25°C to 60°C), cooled down to 25°C, and offered in a test choice to workers. At hot temperature treatments (>40°C), workers did not discriminate the previously marked substrate. High temperatures appeared therefore to accelerate pheromone degradation. Third, we assessed the pheromone decay dynamics by a mechanistic model fitted with Bayesian inference. The model predicted ant choice through the evolution of pheromone concentration on trails as a function of both temperature and time since pheromone deposition. Overall, our results highlighted that the effect of high temperatures on recruitment intensity was partly due to pheromone evaporation. In the Mediterranean ant communities, this might affect dominant species relying on chemical recruitment, more than subordinate ant species, less dependent on chemical communication and less sensitive to high temperatures.

  12. Temperature limited heater utilizing non-ferromagnetic conductor

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar; Harold J. , Harris; Christopher Kelvin

    2012-07-17

    A heater is described. The heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The ferromagnetic conductor is positioned relative to the electrical conductor such that an electromagnetic field produced by time-varying current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor confines a majority of the flow of the electrical current to the electrical conductor at temperatures below or near a selected temperature.

  13. Upper Limit to Black Smoker Temperatures Not Yet in Sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devey, C. W.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2011-12-01

    The world's hottest-known black smoker vent field (Turtle Pits Field, 4°50'S, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) has previously been reported as showing transient venting temperatures up to 464°C (Koschinsky et al., 2008). The calculated Mg-free endmember fluid has low salinity (ca. 280 mM Cl) suggesting it is a separated vapour phase. This end-member chlorinity has remained constant over the period of 26 months during which samples were repeatedly collected. We present new data showing that venting at Turtle Pits has in fact reached measured exit temperatures of at least 524°C, that the measured temperature is related to where on the smoker samples are collected (with higher temperatures found near the base) and that sampling temperature and salinity are not correlated. These observations can be explained by a simple two-stage model consisting of (1) a stable, high-temperature vapour production region at depth and (2) a region of cooling of the vapours within the smoker structure at the seafloor by heat exchange with ambient seawater. Sub-seafloor vapour transport between these two regions must occur with negligible heat loss to the surrounding rock - deposition of high-temperature minerals (e.g., Cu-sulphides, anhydrite) may, however, occur. Future attempts to sample the vapour before heat exchange will demonstrate its true maximum temperature - there seems to be no a priori reason why it could not approach magmatic temperatures, however. From chemical and phase equilibrium constraints, the vapour production region must lie at pressures of >550 bars (the pressure at which a vapour of the measured salinity will be formed on the two-phase boundary at 524°C), in conflict with the 350 bars given by silica geobarometry of the fluids (Koschinsky et al., 2008). This discrepancy may be related to the absence of quartz in the reaction zone, the very high fluid temperatures (outside the 390-430°C validity region of the Si barometry calibration) or a lack of fluid/rock equilibrium

  14. Wavelength coincidence of allowed and intercombination multiplets in N III and O IV - A density and/or temperature diagnostic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Two multiplets of N III with different intensity dependence on source conditions fall in the same wavelength interval near 1750 A, and the analogous multiplets in O IV also lie close together. It is suggested that the multiplet pair can be useful for diagnostic purposes. The calculated ratios are consistent with available observations. A preliminary inspection of solar flare spectra shows the presence of the higher-density-indicating allowed multiple in O IV.

  15. Fluctuation induced diamagnetism in the zero magnetic field limit in a low temperature superconducting alloy.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, J; Carballeira, C; Vidal, F

    2001-10-15

    By using a Pb-18 at. % In alloy, the fluctuation induced diamagnetism was measured in the zero magnetic field limit, never observed until now in a low-T(C) superconductor. This allows us to disentangle the dynamic and the nonlocal electrodynamic effects from the short-wavelength fluctuation effects. The latter may be explained on the grounds of the Gaussian-Ginzburg-Landau approach by introducing a total energy cutoff in the fluctuation spectrum, which strongly suggests the existence of a well-defined temperature in the normal state above which all fluctuating modes vanish. This conclusion may also have implications when describing the superconducting state formation of the high-T(C) cuprates. PMID:11690233

  16. Stability limit of room air temperature of a VAV system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuba, Tadahiko; Kamimura, Kazuyuki; Kasahara, Masato; Kimbara, Akiomi; Kurosu, Shigeru; Murasawa, Itaru; Hashimoto, Yukihiko

    1998-12-31

    To control heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, it has been necessary to accept an analog system controlled mainly by proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) action. However, when conventional PID controllers are replaced with new digital controllers by selecting the same PID parameters as before, the control loops have often got into hunting phenomena, which result in undamped oscillations. Unstable control characteristics (such as huntings) are thought to be one of the crucial problems faced by field operators. The PID parameters must be carefully selected to avoid instabilities. In this study, a room space is simulated as a thermal system that is air-conditioned by a variable-air-volume (VAV) control system. A dynamic room model without infiltration or exfiltration, which is directly connected to a simple air-handling unit without an economizer, is developed. To explore the possible existence of huntings, a numerical system model is formulated as a bilinear system with time-delayed feedback, and a parametric analysis of the stability limit is presented. Results are given showing the stability region affected by the selection of control and system parameters. This analysis was conducted to help us tune the PID controllers for optimal HVAC control.

  17. Preferred temperature and thermal breadth of birds wintering in peninsular Spain: the limited effect of temperature on species distribution

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, David

    2016-01-01

    Background. The availability of environmental energy, as measured by temperature, is expected to limit the abundance and distribution of endotherms wintering at temperate latitudes. A prediction of this hypothesis is that birds should attain their highest abundances in warmer areas. However, there may be a spatial mismatch between species preferred habitats and species preferred temperatures, so some species might end-up wintering in sub-optimal thermal environments. Methods. We model the influence of minimum winter temperature on the relative abundance of 106 terrestrial bird species wintering in peninsular Spain, at 10 ×10 km2 resolution, using 95%-quantile regressions. We analyze general trends across species on the shape of the response curves, the environmental preferred temperature (at which the species abundance is maximized), the mean temperature in the area of distribution and the thermal breadth (area under the abundance-temperature curve). Results. Temperature explains a low proportion of variation in abundance. The most significant effect is on limiting the maximum potential abundance of species. Considering this upper-limit response, there is a large interspecific variability on the thermal preferences and specialization of species. Overall, there is a preponderance of positive relationships between species abundance and temperature; on average, species attain their maximum abundances in areas 1.9 °C warmer than the average temperature available in peninsular Spain. The mean temperature in the area of distribution is lower than the thermal preferences of the species. Discussion. Many species prefer the warmest areas to overwinter, which suggests that temperature imposes important restrictions to birds wintering in the Iberian Peninsula. However, one third of species overwinter in locations colder than their thermal preferences, probably reflecting the interaction between habitat and thermal requirements. There is a high inter-specific variation in

  18. Preferred temperature and thermal breadth of birds wintering in peninsular Spain: the limited effect of temperature on species distribution.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Luis M; Villén-Pérez, Sara; Palomino, David

    2016-01-01

    Background. The availability of environmental energy, as measured by temperature, is expected to limit the abundance and distribution of endotherms wintering at temperate latitudes. A prediction of this hypothesis is that birds should attain their highest abundances in warmer areas. However, there may be a spatial mismatch between species preferred habitats and species preferred temperatures, so some species might end-up wintering in sub-optimal thermal environments. Methods. We model the influence of minimum winter temperature on the relative abundance of 106 terrestrial bird species wintering in peninsular Spain, at 10 ×10 km(2) resolution, using 95%-quantile regressions. We analyze general trends across species on the shape of the response curves, the environmental preferred temperature (at which the species abundance is maximized), the mean temperature in the area of distribution and the thermal breadth (area under the abundance-temperature curve). Results. Temperature explains a low proportion of variation in abundance. The most significant effect is on limiting the maximum potential abundance of species. Considering this upper-limit response, there is a large interspecific variability on the thermal preferences and specialization of species. Overall, there is a preponderance of positive relationships between species abundance and temperature; on average, species attain their maximum abundances in areas 1.9 °C warmer than the average temperature available in peninsular Spain. The mean temperature in the area of distribution is lower than the thermal preferences of the species. Discussion. Many species prefer the warmest areas to overwinter, which suggests that temperature imposes important restrictions to birds wintering in the Iberian Peninsula. However, one third of species overwinter in locations colder than their thermal preferences, probably reflecting the interaction between habitat and thermal requirements. There is a high inter-specific variation in

  19. Climate change and temperature-dependent biogeography: oxygen limitation of thermal tolerance in animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pörtner, H. O.

    2001-03-01

    Recent years have shown a rise in mean global temperatures and a shift in the geographical distribution of ectothermic animals. For a cause and effect analysis the present paper discusses those physiological processes limiting thermal tolerance. The lower heat tolerance in metazoa compared with unicellular eukaryotes and bacteria suggests that a complex systemic rather than molecular process is limiting in metazoa. Whole-animal aerobic scope appears as the first process limited at low and high temperatures, linked to the progressively insufficient capacity of circulation and ventilation. Oxygen levels in body fluids may decrease, reflecting excessive oxygen demand at high temperatures or insufficient aerobic capacity of mitochondria at low temperatures. Aerobic scope falls at temperatures beyond the thermal optimum and vanishes at low or high critical temperatures when transition to an anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism occurs. The adjustment of mitochondrial densities on top of parallel molecular or membrane adjustments appears crucial for maintaining aerobic scope and for shifting thermal tolerance. In conclusion, the capacity of oxygen delivery matches full aerobic scope only within the thermal optimum. At temperatures outside this range, only time-limited survival is supported by residual aerobic scope, then anaerobic metabolism and finally molecular protection by heat shock proteins and antioxidative defence. In a cause and effect hierarchy, the progressive increase in oxygen limitation at extreme temperatures may even enhance oxidative and denaturation stress. As a corollary, capacity limitations at a complex level of organisation, the oxygen delivery system, define thermal tolerance limits before molecular functions become disturbed.

  20. Correlation between Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores and Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) allows the calculation of percent work productivity loss in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Küster, Denise

    2015-07-01

    Data on indirect costs are vital for cost-effectiveness studies from a societal perspective. In contrast to quality of life, information on productivity loss is rarely collected in psoriasis trials. We aimed to identify a model to deduce indirect costs (presenteeism and absenteeism) of psoriasis from the Dermatologic Life Quality Index (DLQI) of affected patients to facilitate health economic evaluations for psoriasis. We undertook a cross-sectional mapping study including 201 patients with physician-diagnosed psoriasis and investigated the relationship between quality of life (DLQI) and productivity loss (Work Limitations Questionnaire, WLQ--using the "output demands" subscale) using linear bootstrap regression analysis to set up an equation model allowing the calculation of percent work productivity loss per DLQI unit increase. DLQI and WLQ scores were significantly correlated (r = 0.47; p < 0.0001) The final equation model suggests a 0.545 and 0.560% decrease in productivity due to presenteeism and absenteeism per DLQI unit increase, with y-intercepts at 1.654 and 0.536, respectively. In the absence of data on indirect cost, work productivity loss due to psoriasis can be estimated from DLQI scores using the equations, Y = 0.545 × DLQI score + 1.654 for presenteeism (%) and Y = 0.560 × DLQI score + 0.536 for absenteeism (%). PMID:25940274

  1. Reproductive failure in Arabidopsis thaliana under transient carbohydrate limitation: flowers and very young siliques are jettisoned and the meristem is maintained to allow successful resumption of reproductive growth.

    PubMed

    Lauxmann, Martin A; Annunziata, Maria G; Brunoud, Géraldine; Wahl, Vanessa; Koczut, Andrzej; Burgos, Asdrubal; Olas, Justyna J; Maximova, Eugenia; Abel, Christin; Schlereth, Armin; Soja, Aleksandra M; Bläsing, Oliver E; Lunn, John E; Vernoux, Teva; Stitt, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The impact of transient carbon depletion on reproductive growth in Arabidopsis was investigated by transferring long-photoperiod-grown plants to continuous darkness and returning them to a light-dark cycle. After 2 days of darkness, carbon reserves were depleted in reproductive sinks, and RNA in situ hybridization of marker transcripts showed that carbon starvation responses had been initiated in the meristem, anthers and ovules. Dark treatments of 2 or more days resulted in a bare-segment phenotype on the floral stem, with 23-27 aborted siliques. These resulted from impaired growth of immature siliques and abortion of mature and immature flowers. Depolarization of PIN1 protein and increased DII-VENUS expression pointed to rapid collapse of auxin gradients in the meristem and inhibition of primordia initiation. After transfer back to a light-dark cycle, flowers appeared and formed viable siliques and seeds. A similar phenotype was seen after transfer to sub-compensation point irradiance or CO2 . It also appeared in a milder form after a moderate decrease in irradiance and developed spontaneously in short photoperiods. We conclude that Arabidopsis inhibits primordia initiation and aborts flowers and very young siliques in C-limited conditions. This curtails demand, safeguarding meristem function and allowing renewal of reproductive growth when carbon becomes available again. PMID:26351840

  2. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  3. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-01

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  4. Temperature sensing above 1000 °C using Cr-doped GdAlO3 spin-allowed broadband luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Chambers, M. D.

    2013-09-01

    Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) is shown to produce remarkably high-intensity spin-allowed broadband luminescence with sufficiently long decay times to make effective luminescence-decay-time-based temperature measurements above 1000 °C. This phosphor is therefore an attractive alternative to the much lower luminescence intensity rare-earth-doped thermographic phosphors that are typically utilized at these elevated temperatures. In particular, Cr:GdAlO3 will be preferred over rare-earth-doped phosphors, such as Dy:YAG, at temperatures up to 1200 °C for intensity-starved situations when the much lower emission intensity from rare-earth-doped phosphors is insufficient for accurate temperature measurements in the presence of significant radiation background. While transition-metal-doped phosphors such as Cr:Al2O3 (ruby) are known to exhibit high luminescence intensity at low dopant concentrations, quenching due to nonradiative decay pathways competing with the 2E to 4A2 radiative transition (R line) has typically restricted their use for temperature sensing to below 600 °C. Thermal quenching of the broadband 4T2 to 4A2 radiative transition from Cr:GdAlO3, however, is delayed until much higher temperatures (above 1000 °C). This spin-allowed broadband emission persists to high temperatures because the lower-lying 2E energy level acts as a reservoir to thermally populate the higher shorter-lived 4T2 energy level and because the activation energy for nonradiative crossover relaxation from the 4T2 level to the 4A2 ground state is high. The strong crystal field associated with the tight bonding of the AlO6 octahedra in the GdAlO3 perovskite structure is responsible for this behavior.

  5. Is there really an upper limit to river water temperatures in a changing climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S. B.

    2011-12-01

    In recent efforts to model river temperatures in a changing climate, investigators have frequently applied an s-shaped logistic equation to relate water temperatures to air temperatures. This s-shaped model has been justified by the presence of the freezing point at low temperatures and supposed enhanced evapotranspiration (ET) at high temperatures. Looking at large river systems (> 5000 km2) where mean air and water temperatures are in relative equilibrium, we analyze the 5-day mean air/water temperature relationship of 12 river systems located in different climatological regions of the US to reassess whether there is actually an upper limit to maximum river temperatures. For all 12 systems, a logistic regression model performs better than a linear regression model in relating river water temperatures to air temperature. However, direct examination of the air/water relationship indicates that the improvement in fit often originates only at low temperatures. Of the five systems where an improvement occurs at high temperatures, they are either located in arid regions, have mountain snowmelt extending into the early summer, or exhibit strong hysteresis. An assessment of hourly energy balance data for varying geographic regions suggests that arid regions are the only locales where energy losses at high temperatures due to ET may exceed energy inputs, thus leading to a plateau in water temperatures. This research suggests that logistic regression equations should be applied only after carefully considering the processes that may control temperature in a changing climate on the river of interest.

  6. Limitation of Grassland Productivity by Low Temperature and Seasonality of Growth.

    PubMed

    Wingler, Astrid; Hennessy, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of temperate grassland is limited by the response of plants to low temperature, affecting winter persistence and seasonal growth rates. During the winter, the growth of perennial grasses is restricted by a combination of low temperature and the lack of available light, but during early spring low ground temperature is the main limiting factor. Once temperature increases, growth is stimulated, resulting in a peak in growth in spring before growth rates decline later in the season. Growth is not primarily limited by the ability to photosynthesize, but controlled by active regulatory processes that, e.g., enable plants to restrict growth and conserve resources for cold acclimation and winter survival. An insufficient ability to cold acclimate can affect winter persistence, thereby also reducing grassland productivity. While some mechanistic knowledge is available that explains how low temperature limits plant growth, the seasonal mechanisms that promote growth in response to increasing spring temperatures but restrict growth later in the season are only partially understood. Here, we assess the available knowledge of the physiological and signaling processes that determine growth, including hormonal effects, on cellular growth and on carbohydrate metabolism. Using data for grass growth in Ireland, we identify environmental factors that limit growth at different times of the year. Ideas are proposed how developmental factors, e.g., epigenetic changes, can lead to seasonality of the growth response to temperature. We also discuss perspectives for modeling grass growth and breeding to improve grassland productivity in a changing climate. PMID:27512406

  7. Limitation of Grassland Productivity by Low Temperature and Seasonality of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wingler, Astrid; Hennessy, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of temperate grassland is limited by the response of plants to low temperature, affecting winter persistence and seasonal growth rates. During the winter, the growth of perennial grasses is restricted by a combination of low temperature and the lack of available light, but during early spring low ground temperature is the main limiting factor. Once temperature increases, growth is stimulated, resulting in a peak in growth in spring before growth rates decline later in the season. Growth is not primarily limited by the ability to photosynthesize, but controlled by active regulatory processes that, e.g., enable plants to restrict growth and conserve resources for cold acclimation and winter survival. An insufficient ability to cold acclimate can affect winter persistence, thereby also reducing grassland productivity. While some mechanistic knowledge is available that explains how low temperature limits plant growth, the seasonal mechanisms that promote growth in response to increasing spring temperatures but restrict growth later in the season are only partially understood. Here, we assess the available knowledge of the physiological and signaling processes that determine growth, including hormonal effects, on cellular growth and on carbohydrate metabolism. Using data for grass growth in Ireland, we identify environmental factors that limit growth at different times of the year. Ideas are proposed how developmental factors, e.g., epigenetic changes, can lead to seasonality of the growth response to temperature. We also discuss perspectives for modeling grass growth and breeding to improve grassland productivity in a changing climate. PMID:27512406

  8. Limiting temperature of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    The limiting temperature achieved by sympathetic cooling in an rf trap is calculated with a theoretical model in which no fitting parameters are used. The calculated result agrees well with observation. The dependence of the temperature on trapping parameters and ion mass is also analyzed. The results can be used for designing an rf trap system.

  9. Increased risk of phosphorus limitation at higher temperatures for Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Persson, Jonas; Wojewodzic, Marcin Włodzimierz; Hessen, Dag Olav; Andersen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate herbivores frequently face growth rate constraints due to their high demands for phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N). Temperature is a key modulator of growth rate, yet the interaction between temperature and P limitation on somatic growth rate is scarcely known. To investigate this interaction, we conducted a study on the somatic growth rate (SGR) of the cladoceran Daphnia magna, known to be susceptible to P-limitation. We determined the SGR across a broad range of dietary P content of algae (carbon (C):P ratios (125-790), and at different temperatures (10-25°C). There was a strong impact of both temperature and C:P ratio on the SGR of D. magna, and also a significant interaction between both factors was revealed. The negative effect of dietary C:P on growth rate was reduced with decreased temperature. We found no evidence of P limitation at lowest temperature, suggesting that enzyme kinetics or other measures of food quality overrides the demands for P to RNA and protein synthesis at low temperatures. These findings also indicate an increased risk of P limitation and thus reduced growth efficiency at high temperatures. PMID:20803219

  10. 41 CFR 302-7.17 - Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary storage limited when quarters are furnished...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Is the maximum weight... Government OCONUS or upon return to CONUS? 302-7.17 Section 302-7.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... BAGGAGE ALLOWANCE General Rules § 302-7.17 Is the maximum weight allowance for HHG and temporary...

  11. Mirror symmetry breaking with limited enantioselective autocatalysis and temperature gradients: a stability survey.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Celia; Ribó, Josep M; Crusats, Joaquim; El-Hachemi, Zoubir; Moyano, Albert; Hochberg, David

    2013-02-01

    We analyze limited enantioselective (LES) autocatalysis in a temperature gradient and with internal flow/recycling of hot and cold material. Microreversibility forbids broken mirror symmetry for LES in the presence of a temperature gradient alone. This symmetry can be broken however when the auto-catalysis and limited enantioselective catalysis are each localized within the regions of low and high temperature, respectively. This scheme has been recently proposed as a plausible model for spontaneous emergence of chirality in abyssal hydrothermal vents. Regions in chemical parameter space are mapped out in which the racemic state is unstable and bifurcates to chiral solutions. PMID:23238372

  12. Overcoming the high-temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography limits to elute heavy compounds.

    PubMed

    Mahé, Laure; Courtiade, Marion; Dartiguelongue, Cyril; Ponthus, Jérémie; Souchon, Vincent; Thiébaut, Didier

    2012-03-16

    Overcoming high-temperature (HT) two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) limits is critical for the analysis of heavy hydrocarbons, particularly those contained in heavy petroleum fractions. To reach this goal, HT-GC × GC analysis was adapted from HT-GC Simulated Distillation (HT-GC SimDist) operating conditions as this analysis embraces compounds whose boiling point ranges from 35 °C to 700 °C and from a previous study that enabled the elution of linear alkane nC(60) and tetraaromatic compounds by HT-GC × GC. This paper shows that HT-GC × GC analysis using CO(2) cryogenic modulator and short wide bore columns with a thin film of stationary phase allows the elution of linear alkanes up to nC(68) (641 °C) as well as of highly aromatic hydrocarbons like coronene. Furthermore, compared to previous studies, an on-column injector was used to reduce discrimination of high boiling point compounds. PMID:22307150

  13. 26 CFR 1.1502-15A - Limitations on the allowance of built-in deductions for consolidated return years beginning...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subdivision (i) of this subparagraph, whether a deduction or loss with respect to any asset is economically.... (a) Limitation on built-in deductions—(1) General rule. Built-in deductions (as defined in... to capital loss carryovers to such year). If as a result of applying such limitations,...

  14. Priming and temperature limits for germination of dispersal units of Urochloa brizantha (Stapf) Webster cv. basilisk.

    PubMed

    Nakao, E A; Cardoso, V J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of priming treatments on the upper and lower thermal limits for germination of Urochloa brizantha cv. basilisk, and testing the hypothesis that pré-imbibition affect thermal parameters of the germination. Pre-imbibed seeds both in distilled water (0 MPa) and PEG 6000 solution (-0.5 MPa) were put to germinate in different temperatures. It is suggested that U. brizantha seeds have low response to priming when they were placed to germinate in medium where water is not limiting. The response of U. brizantha seeds to priming is dependent on the temperature and water potential conditions at which the seeds are pre-imbibed, as well as on the germination temperature. The optimum temperature for germination of U. brizantha shift toward warmer temperatures in primed seeds. Priming effect was more pronounced at temperatures closer to the upper and lower limit for germination, but probably that response cannot be accounted for changes in the thermal time constant (θT(g)) and ceiling temperature (Tc(g)). Otherwise, a decrease in the base temperature (Tb) was observed in primed seeds, suggesting that the Tb distribution in U. brizantha seeds is influenced by priming. PMID:25945643

  15. Temperature limitation may explain the containment of the trophozoites in the cornea during Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mattias Kiel; Nielsen, Kim; Hjortdal, Jesper; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov

    2014-12-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious sight-threatening disease. The relatively low temperature of the cornea may explain why amoebic infections usually are localized in this tissue and rarely spread to other parts of the eye. In this study, the growth rate of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was examined at different temperatures. The aim was to establish the optimal growth temperature for A. castellanii and to examine the growth within the vicinity of the core body temperature. The growth rates of four clinical and two environmental strains of A. castellanii were estimated at different temperatures, and temperature limitations for the trophozoite stage was established. Movements influenced by temperature gradients were monitored for two clinical strains of A. castellanii. The highest growth rate for each of the six amoebic strains tested was found to be close to 32 °C. The growth of the trophozoites of all examined strains was greatly reduced or completely halted at temperatures above 36 °C and encysted at the elevated temperature. Thus, the optimal growth temperature for the four strains of A. castellanii is close to the surface temperature of the human cornea, while the higher body core-temperature induced encysting of the amoebae. This may explain why most amoebic eye infections are confined to the cornea. PMID:25204727

  16. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  17. Thermal runaway limit of tubular reactors, defined at the inflection point of the temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, S.; Chovan, T.; Masri, B.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Pant, A.; Sen, S.; Vijayaragharvan, P. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Berty, J.M. )

    1992-09-01

    The predicted maximum temperature difference between reacting fluid and wall to avoid thermal runaways can be exceeded in production reactors. This has been known for some time but the explanation has been lacking. The reason for this deviation was found in that the traditional approximation of the sensitivity criterion by [Delta]T [le] RT[sup 2]/E is correct for a limiting value at the inflection point but not at the hot spot, where it can be much higher. The exact expression for the limiting value at the inflection point is the total temperature derivative of the rate, and this is proven in this paper mathematically. The total temperature derivative of a rate can be measured in a few, well-designed recycle reactor experiments. Results were checked by computer simulation of tubular reactors. Matching to those predicted from CSTR or recycle reactor (RR) measurements was excellent. The proposed interpretation explains why previously predicted limits could be exceeded in practice.

  18. Spontaneous ignition temperature limits of jet A fuel in research-combustor segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of inlet-air pressure and reference velocity on the spontaneous-ignition temperature limits of Jet A fuel were determined in a combustor segment with a primary-zone length of 0.076 m (3 in.). At a constant reference velocity of 21.4 m/sec (170 ft/sec), increasing the inlet-air pressure from 21 to 207 N/sq cm decreased the spontaneous-ignition temperature limit from approximately 700 to 555 K. At a constant inlet-air pressure of 41 N/sq cm, increasing the reference velocity from 12.2 to 30.5 m/sec increased the spontaneous-ignition temperature limit from approximately 575 to 800 K. Results are compared with other data in the literature.

  19. Effects of C/O Ratio and Temperature on Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Sunderland, P. B.; Chao, B. H.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, residence time and scalar dissipation rate. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with scalar dissipation rate lower than 2/s were found to have temperatures near 1400 K where C/O = 0.51, whereas flames with greater scalar dissipation rate required increased temperatures. This finding was valid across a broad range of fuel and oxidizer compositions and convection directions.

  20. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as 'source tilting'. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  1. Closed-form analytical solutions of high-temperature heat pipe startup and frozen startup limitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1992-01-01

    Previous numerical and experimental studies indicate that the high-temperature heat pipe startup process is characterized by a moving hot zone with relatively sharp fronts. Based on the above observation, a flat-front model for an approximate analytical solution is proposed. A closed-form solution related to the temperature distribution in the hot zone and the hot zone length as a function of time are obtained. The analytical results agree well with the corresponding experimental data, and provide a quick prediction method for the heat pipe startup performance. Finally, a heat pipe limitation related to the frozen startup process is identified, and an explicit criterion for the high-temperature heat pipe startup is derived. The frozen startup limit identified in this paper provides a fundamental guidance for high-temperature heat pipe design.

  2. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  3. Calculated flame temperature (CFT) modeling of fuel mixture lower flammability limits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuman; Rogers, William J; Mannan, M Sam

    2010-02-15

    Heat loss can affect experimental flammability limits, and it becomes indispensable to quantify flammability limits when apparatus quenching effect becomes significant. In this research, the lower flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures are predicted using calculated flame temperature (CFT) modeling, which is based on the principle of energy conservation. Specifically, the hydrocarbon mixture lower flammability limit is quantitatively correlated to its final flame temperature at non-adiabatic conditions. The modeling predictions are compared with experimental observations to verify the validity of CFT modeling, and the minor deviations between them indicated that CFT modeling can represent experimental measurements very well. Moreover, the CFT modeling results and Le Chatelier's Law predictions are also compared, and the agreement between them indicates that CFT modeling provides a theoretical justification for the Le Chatelier's Law. PMID:19819067

  4. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  5. The Effect of Piston-Head Temperature on Knock-Limited Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imming, Harry S.

    1944-01-01

    To determine the effect of piston-head temperature on knock-limited power. Tests were made in a supercharged CFR engine over a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.055 to 0.120, using S-3 reference fuel, AN-F-28, Amendment-2, aviation gasoline, and AN-F-28 plus 2 percent xylidines by weight. Tests were run at a compression ratio of 7.0 with inlet-air temperatures of 150 F and 250 F and at a compression ratio of 8.0 with an inlet-air temperature of 250 F. All other engine conditions were held constant. The piston-head temperature was varied by circulation of oil through passages in the crown of a liquid-cooled piston. This method of piston cooling decreased the piston-head temperature about 80 F. The data are not intended to constitute a recommendation as to the advisability of piston cooling in practice.

  6. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores. PMID:27109165

  7. Soil variability effects on canopy temperature in a limited irrigation experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy temperature was monitored on a continuous basis in a limited irrigation maize experiment, with 12 separate irrigation treatments and 4 replicates of each treatment. Soil electroconductivity (EC) was measured and mapped to quantify variation in soil texture throughout the plots, and was correl...

  8. About the Limited Benefit of Water Content and Temperature on Orthodox Seed Longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing water content and temperature increases the shelf life of orthodox seeds. A limit to these beneficial effects have been reported and debated over the last two decades, and guidelines for optimum seed storage remain unresolved. The central elements of the discussion are whether there are d...

  9. A novel method based on click chemistry, which overcomes limitations of cell cycle analysis by classical determination of BrdU incorporation, allowing multiplex antibody staining.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Paolo; Gasparri, Fabio; Pulici, Maurizio; Moll, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    Quantification of BrdU incorporation into DNA is a widely used technique to assess the cell cycle status of cells. DNA denaturation is required for BrdU detection with the drawback that most protein epitopes are destroyed and classical antibody staining techniques for multiplex analysis are not possible. To address this issue we have developed a novel method that overcomes the DNA denaturation step but still allows detection of BrdU. Cells were pulsed for a short time by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine, which is incorporated into DNA. The exposed nucleotide alkyne group of DNA was then derivatized in physiologic conditions by the copper (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) using BrdU azides. The resulting DNA-bound bromouracil moiety was subsequently detected by commercial anti-BrdU mAb without the need for a denaturation step. Continuous labeling with EdU showed a slightly increased anti-proliferative activity compared to BrdU. However, using a lower concentration of EdU for labeling can compensate for this. Alkynyl tags could be detected quickly by a highly specific reaction using BrdU azides. Fluorescence quenching by the DNA dye PI using both BrdU azides was negligible. Our labeling method is suitable for FCM and HCA and shows a higher signal to noise ratio than other methods. This method also allowed multiplex analysis by simultaneous detection of EdU-BrdU, caspase-3, and phospho-histone 3 mAbs, proving sensitivity and feasibility of this new technique. In addition, it has the potential for use in vivo, as exemplified for bone marrow studies. We have established a new method to determine the position of cells in the cell cycle. This is superior when compared to traditional BrdU detection since it allows multiplex analysis, is more sensitive and shows less quenching with PI. The method provides new opportunities to investigate changes in protein expression at different cell cycle stages using pulse labeling experiments. PMID:18521918

  10. Limiting temperatures of neutron rich nuclei: A possible interpretation of data from isotope yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Natowitz, J.B.; Hagel, K.; Wada, R.; Majka, Z.; Gonthier, P.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Xiao, B.; Zhao, Y.

    1995-11-01

    The recent ALADIN report of limiting temperatures for nuclear disassembly, derived from measurements of isotopic ratios for He and Li nuclei, is discussed. It is suggested that the entire excitation energy dependence which is observed may result from the fact that limiting temperatures for the onset of Coulomb instability are being measured for progressively lighter neutron rich nuclei as the excitation energy per nucleon increases. While the basic observation of plateauing in the intermediate excitation energy range remains valid, the higher excitation results may not signal entry into the vapor phase. The ALADIN result for {ital A}{approx}125, when combined with lower energy data, indicates a plateau temperature near 6.5 MeV over the range of 3--11 MeV/nucleon initial excitation energy.

  11. The chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can survive under phosphate-limiting conditions by expressing a C-P lyase operon that allows it to grow on phosphonates.

    PubMed

    Vera, Mario; Pagliai, Fernando; Guiliani, Nicolas; Jerez, Carlos A

    2008-03-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is of great importance in biomining operations. During the bioleaching of ores, microorganisms are subjected to a variety of environmental stresses and to the limitations of some nutrients, such as inorganic phosphate (P(i)), which is an essential component for all living cells. Although the primary source of phosphorus for microorganisms is P(i), some bacteria are also able to metabolize P(i) esters (with a C-O-P bond) and phosphonates (with a very inert C-P bond). By using bioinformatic analysis of genomic sequences of the type strain of A. ferrooxidans (ATCC 23270), we found that as part of a Pho regulon, this bacterium has a complete gene cluster encoding C-P lyase, which is the main bacterial enzyme involved in phosphonate (Pn) degradation in other microorganisms. A. ferrooxidans was able to grow in the presence of methyl-Pn or ethyl-Pn as an alternative phosphorus source. Under these growth conditions, a great reduction in inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) levels was seen compared with the level for cells grown in the presence of P(i). By means of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), DNA macroarrays, and real-time RT-PCR experiments, it was found that A. ferrooxidans phn genes were cotranscribed and their expression was induced when the microorganism was grown in methyl-Pn as the only phosphorus source. This is the first report of phosphonate utilization in a chemolithoautotrophic microorganism. The existence of a functional C-P lyase system is a clear advantage for the survival under P(i) limitation, a condition that may greatly affect the bioleaching of ores. PMID:18203861

  12. Low temperature limits photoperiod control of smolting in atlantic salmon through endocrine mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.; Moriyama, S.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the interaction of photoperiod and temperature in regulating the parr-smolt transformation and its endocrine control. Atlantic salmon juveniles were reared at a constant temperature of 10??C or ambient temperature (2??C from January to April followed by seasonal increase) under simulated natural day length. At 10??C, an increase in day length [16 h of light and 8 h of darkness (LD 16:8)] in February accelerated increases in gill Na+K+-ATPase activity, whereas fish at ambient temperature did not respond to increased day length. Increases in gill Na+K+-ATPase activity under both photoperiods occurred later at ambient temperature than at 10??C. Plasma growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor, and thyroxine increased within 7 days of increased day length at 10??C and remained elevated for 5-9 wk; the same photoperiod treatment at 2??C resulted in much smaller increases of shorter duration. Plasma cortisol increased transiently 3 and 5 wk after LD 16:8 at 10??C and ambient temperature, respectively. Plasma thyroxine was consistently higher at ambient temperature than at 10??C. Plasma triiodothyronine was initially higher at 10??C than at ambient temperature, and there was no response to LD 16:8 under either temperature regimen. There was a strong correlation between gill Na+K+-ATPase activity and plasma GH; correlations were weaker with other hormones. The results provide evidence that low temperature limits the physiological response to increased day length and that GH, insulin-like growth factor I, cortisol, and thyroid hormones mediate the environmental control of the parr-smolt transformation.

  13. Limitations of Photosynthesis in Pinus taeda L. (Loblolly Pine) at Low Soil Temperatures 1

    PubMed Central

    Day, Thomas A.; Heckathorn, Scott A.; DeLucia, Evan H.

    1991-01-01

    The relative importance of stomatal and nonstomatal limitations to net photosynthesis (A) and possible signals responsible for stomatal limitations were investigated in unhardened Pinus taeda seedlings at low soil temperatures. After 2 days at soil temperatures between 13 and 7°C, A was reduced by 20 to 50%, respectively. The reduction in A at these moderate root-chilling conditions appeared to be the result of stomatal limitations, based on the decrease in intercellular CO2 concentrations (ci). This conclusion was supported by A versus ci analysis and measurements of O2 evolution at saturating CO2, which suggested increases in stomatal but not biochemical limitations at these soil temperatures. Nonuniform stomatal apertures, which were demonstrated with abscisic acid, were not apparent 2 days after root chilling, and results of our A versus ci analysis appear valid. Bulk shoot water potential (ψ) declined as soil temperature dropped below 16°C. When half the root system of seedlings was chilled, shoot ψ and gas-exchange rates did not decline. Thus, nonhydraulic root-shoot signals were not implicated in stomatal limitations. The initial decrease in leaf conductance to water vapor after root chilling appeared to precede any detectable decrease in bulk fascicle ψ, but may be in response to a decrease in turgor of epidermal cells. These reductions in leaf conductance to water vapor, which occurred within 30 minutes of root chilling, could be delayed and temporarily reversed by reducing the leaf-to-air vapor-pressure deficit, suggesting that hydraulic signals may be involved in initiating stomatal closure. By independently manipulating the leaf-to-air vapor-pressure deficit of individual fascicles, we could induce uptake of water vapor through stomata, suggesting that nonsaturated conditions occur in the intercellular airspaces. There was an anomaly in our results on seedlings maintained for 2 days at soil temperatures below 7°C. Lower A appeared primarily the

  14. Limits on decaying dark energy density models from the CMB temperature-redshift relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Tortora, Crescenzo

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the thermodynamic and dynamical properties of a variable dark energy model with density scaling as ρx propto (1 + z)m, z being the redshift. These models lead to the creation/disruption of matter and radiation, which affect the cosmic evolution of both matter and radiation components in the Universe. In particular, we have studied the temperature-redshift relation of radiation, which has been constrained using a recent collection of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature measurements up to z ~ 3. We find that, within the uncertainties, the model is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant which does not exchange any particles with other components. Future observations, in particular measurements of CMB temperature at large redshift, will allow to give firmer bounds on the effective equation of state parameter weff for such types of dark energy models.

  15. Recognizing a limitation of the TBLC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Lun; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Chang; Xu, Changhai

    2016-04-20

    In this study, cotton was bleached at low temperatures with an activated peroxide system which was established by incorporating a bleach activator, namely, N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]caprolactam chloride (TBCC) into an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental results showed that the bleaching performance was unexpectedly diminished as the TBCC concentration was increased over the range of 25-100g/L. Kinetic adsorption experiment indicated that this was most likely ascribed to the adsorptive interactions of TBCC and the in situ-generated compounds with cotton fibers. Such a limitation was especially fatal to cold pad-batch bleaching process of cotton in which a high TBCC concentration was often required. The results of this study may stimulate further research to avoid or overcome the limitation of the TBCC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching. PMID:26876820

  16. Evolution of the ABC model among the segregated configurations in the zero-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misturini, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    We consider the ABC model on a ring in a strongly asymmetric regime. The main result asserts that the particles almost always form three pure domains (one of each species) and that this segregated shape evolves, in a proper time scale, as a Brownian motion on the circle, which may have a drift. This is, to our knowledge, the first proof of a zero-temperature limit for a non-reversible dynamics whose invariant measure is not explicitly known.

  17. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: Effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Amaral, M; Rippe, M P; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-08-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO:6872-2008 and assigned in accordance with two factors: (1) "surface treatment"-without treatment (as-sintered, Ctrl), grinding with coarse diamond bur (181µm; Grinding); and (2) "low-temperature aging (LTD)" - presence and absence. Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling. LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C under 2-bar pressure for 20h. Mean flexural fatigue limits (20,000 cycles) were determined under sinusoidal loading using stair case approach. For Lava ceramic, it was observed a statistical increase after grinding procedure and different behavior after LTD stimuli (Ctrltemperature aging promoted a statistical increase in the fatigue limit (Ctrltemperature aging did not damage the fatigue limit values significantly for both materials evaluated, even though those conditions promoted increase in m-phase. PMID:26828768

  18. Limits to sustained energy intake. XVI. Body temperature and physical activity of female mice during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Yuko; Bernard, Amelie; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Al Jothery, Aqeel; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2013-06-15

    Lactation is the most energy-demanding phase of mammalian reproduction, and lactation performance may be affected by events during pregnancy. For example, food intake may be limited in late pregnancy by competition for space in the abdomen between the alimentary tract and fetuses. Hence, females may need to compensate their energy budgets during pregnancy by reducing activity and lowering body temperature. We explored the relationships between energy intake, body mass, body temperature and physical activity throughout pregnancy in the MF1 mouse. Food intake and body mass of 26 females were recorded daily throughout pregnancy. Body temperature and physical activity were monitored every minute for 23 h a day by implanted transmitters. Body temperature and physical activity declined as pregnancy advanced, while energy intake and body mass increased. Compared with a pre-mating baseline period, mice increased energy intake by 56% in late pregnancy. Although body temperature declined as pregnancy progressed, this served mostly to reverse an increase between baseline and early pregnancy. Reduced physical activity may compensate the energy budget of pregnant mice but body temperature changes do not. Over the last 3 days of pregnancy, food intake declined. Individual variation in energy intake in the last phase of pregnancy was positively related to litter size at birth. As there was no association between the increase in body mass and the decline in intake, we suggest the decline was not caused by competition for abdominal space. These data suggest overall reproductive performance is probably not constrained by events during pregnancy. PMID:23720802

  19. Uptake of inorganic phosphate is a limiting factor for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during growth at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vicent, Isabel; Navarro, Alfonso; Mulet, Jose M; Sharma, Sukesh; Serrano, Ramón

    2015-05-01

    The fermenting ability of Saccharomyces at low temperatures is crucial for the development of alcoholic beverages, but the key factors for the cold tolerance of yeast are not well known. In this report, we present the results of a screening for genes able to confer cold tolerance by overexpression in a laboratory yeast strain auxotrophic for tryptophan. We identified genes of tryptophan permeases (TAT1 and TAT2), suggesting that the first limiting factor in the growth of tryptophan auxotrophic yeast at low temperatures is tryptophan uptake. This fact is of little relevance to industrial strains which are prototrophic for tryptophan. Then, we screened for genes able to confer growth at low temperatures in tryptophan-rich media and found several genes related to phosphate uptake (PHO84, PHO87, PHO90 and GTR1). This suggests that without tryptophan limitation, uptake of inorganic phosphate becomes the limiting factor. We have found that overexpression of the previously uncharacterized ORF YCR015c/CTO1 increases the uptake of inorganic phosphate. Also, genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (NSG2) cause improvement of growth at 10°C, dependent on tryptophan uptake, while the gluconeogenesis gene PCK1 and the proline biosynthesis gene PRO2 cause an improvement in growth at 10°C, independent of tryptophan and phosphate uptake. PMID:25725023

  20. Low temperature phase barium borate: A new optical limiter in continuous wave and nano pulsed regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeela, C.; Girisun, T. C. Sabari

    2015-11-01

    Low temperature phase barium borate was synthesized by hydrothermal method. XRD analysis confirms the formation of γ-BBO or hydrated barium polyborate (Ba3B6O9(OH)6) which crystallizes in monoclinic system in the P2/c space group. The molecular structure analysis shows the presence of dominant BO4 unit and the hydrated nature of material. γ-BBO exhibits sharp absorption edge at 202 nm and highly transparency in the UV-Visible-NIR region. The peak at 347 nm in the emission spectrum is due to the presence of self-trapped exciton. The third order nonlinear optical properties and limiting behavior of low temperature barium borate in both pulsed and continuous wave regime were studied. The effective 2PA absorption coefficient of γ-BBO under ns pulse excitation is estimated to be 0.38 × 10-10 m/W. The nonlinear absorption coefficient, refractive index and optical susceptibility of the material in cw regime were found to be in the order of 10-5 m W-1, 10-12 m2 W-1, 10-6 esu respectively. In both regimes, low temperature phase barium borate exhibits better optical limiting properties than high temperature phase β-BBO.

  1. Cell model and elastic moduli of disordered solids - Low temperature limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Simha, Robert; Papazoglou, Elisabeth

    1987-01-01

    The cell theory has been previously employed to compute the equation of state of a disordered condensed system. It is now generalized to include anisotropic stresses. The condition of affine deformation is adopted, transforming an orginally spherical into an ellipsoidal cell. With a Lennard-Jones n-m potential between nonbonded centers, the formal expression for the deformational free energy is derived. It is to be evaluated in the limit of the linear elastic range. Since the bulk modulus in this limit is already known, it is convenient to consider a uniaxial deformation. To begin with, restrictions are made to the low-temperature limit in the absence of entropy contributions. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio then follow.

  2. Promotion of Flowering by Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector and Virus Elimination at High Temperature Allow Accelerated Breeding of Apple and Pear

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Norioko; Li, Chunjiang; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Plant viral vectors are superior tools for genetic manipulation, allowing rapid induction or suppression of expression of a target gene in plants. This is a particularly effective technology for use in breeding fruit trees, which are difficult to manipulate using recombinant DNA technologies. We reported previously that if apple seed embryos (cotyledons) are infected with an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vector (ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1) concurrently expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana florigen (AtFT) gene and suppressing the expression of the apple MdTFL1-1 gene, the period prior to initial flowering (generally lasts 5–12 years) will be reduced to about 2 months. In this study, we examined whether or not ALSV vector technology can be used to promote flowering in pear, which undergoes a very long juvenile period (germination to flowering) similar to that of apple. The MdTFL1 sequence in ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 was replaced with a portion of the pear PcTFL1-1 gene. The resulting virus (ALSV-AtFT/PcTFL1) and ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 were used individually for inoculation to pear cotyledons immediately after germination in two inoculation groups. Those inoculated with ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 and ALSV-AtFT/PcTFL1 then initiated flower bud formation starting one to 3 months after inoculation, and subsequently exhibited continuous flowering and fruition by pollination. Conversely, Japanese pear exhibited extremely low systemic infection rates when inoculated with ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1, and failed to exhibit any induction of flowering. We also developed a simple method for eliminating ALSV vectors from infected plants. An evaluation of the method for eliminating the ALSV vectors from infected apple and pear seedlings revealed that a 4-week high-temperature (37°C) incubation of ALSV-infected apples and pears disabled the movement of ALSV to new growing tissues. This demonstrates that only high-temperature treatment can easily eliminate ALSV from infected fruit trees. A method combining the

  3. Promotion of Flowering by Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector and Virus Elimination at High Temperature Allow Accelerated Breeding of Apple and Pear.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Norioko; Li, Chunjiang; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Plant viral vectors are superior tools for genetic manipulation, allowing rapid induction or suppression of expression of a target gene in plants. This is a particularly effective technology for use in breeding fruit trees, which are difficult to manipulate using recombinant DNA technologies. We reported previously that if apple seed embryos (cotyledons) are infected with an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vector (ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1) concurrently expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana florigen (AtFT) gene and suppressing the expression of the apple MdTFL1-1 gene, the period prior to initial flowering (generally lasts 5-12 years) will be reduced to about 2 months. In this study, we examined whether or not ALSV vector technology can be used to promote flowering in pear, which undergoes a very long juvenile period (germination to flowering) similar to that of apple. The MdTFL1 sequence in ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 was replaced with a portion of the pear PcTFL1-1 gene. The resulting virus (ALSV-AtFT/PcTFL1) and ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 were used individually for inoculation to pear cotyledons immediately after germination in two inoculation groups. Those inoculated with ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 and ALSV-AtFT/PcTFL1 then initiated flower bud formation starting one to 3 months after inoculation, and subsequently exhibited continuous flowering and fruition by pollination. Conversely, Japanese pear exhibited extremely low systemic infection rates when inoculated with ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1, and failed to exhibit any induction of flowering. We also developed a simple method for eliminating ALSV vectors from infected plants. An evaluation of the method for eliminating the ALSV vectors from infected apple and pear seedlings revealed that a 4-week high-temperature (37°C) incubation of ALSV-infected apples and pears disabled the movement of ALSV to new growing tissues. This demonstrates that only high-temperature treatment can easily eliminate ALSV from infected fruit trees. A method combining the promotion

  4. Laboratory and Natural Constraints on the Temperature Limit for Preservation of the Dolomite Clumped Isotope Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, M. K.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic barriers generally inhibit intercrystalline equilibration of cations and isotopic compositions at temperatures below ~350˚C, greatly limiting the geothermometers available to study the upper 10-15 km of the crust. Calcite 'clumped' isotopes commonly appear to record homogeneous equilibrium during crystallization at surface temperatures, but kinetic models predict that reordering due to solid-state exchange among nearby carbonate groups modifies primary compositions at temperatures above ~115˚C on timescales of 10^6 - 10^8 years and fully re-equilibrates above 200˚C in most geological environments1. Slowly cooled dolomitic marbles commonly preserve apparent temperatures of ~300˚C, indicating that dolomite may have slower reordering kinetics and thus greater preservation of primary crystallization temperatures. If so, dolomite clumped isotope thermometry may be a useful geothermometer in much of the the shallow crust. We measured the kinetics of clumped isotope reordering in dolomite with heating experiments at 400-800˚C in a TZM cold seal apparatus pressurized with CO2. Results predict that no detectable reordering occurs in dolomite held at temperatures less than ~250˚C over timescales of up to 10^8 years, demonstrating the viability of the system as a shallow crustal geothermometer. The non-first order behavior observed in calcite1,2,3is exhibited by dolomite as well, albeit at higher temperatures. To test these predictions, we measured the clumped isotopic compositions of coexisting calcite and dolomite in marbles from the Notch Peak aureole, UT. Dolomite clumped isotope temperatures in the outer aureole match peak conditions predicted by thermal models up to ~275˚C, indicating that the system resisted reordering below this grade. Calcite clumped isotope temperatures are never greater than ~150˚C at all grades in the aureole; this is consistent with the ambient burial temperature in the section and indicates that all metamorphic calcite was fully

  5. Cadmium-dependent oxygen limitation affects temperature tolerance in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin).

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Cherkasov, Anton S; Pörtner, Hans-O; Bock, Christian; Sokolova, Inna M

    2008-04-01

    Marine ectotherms, including oysters are exposed to variable environmental conditions in coastal shallow waters and estuaries. In the light of global climate change, additional stressors like pollution might pose higher risk to populations. On the basis of the concept of oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance in aquatic ectotherms (40), we show that a persistent pollutant, cadmium, can have detrimental effects on oysters (Crassostrea virginica). During acute warming from 20 to 28 degrees C (4 degrees C/48 h) standard metabolic rate (SMR) rose in control and cadmium-exposed (50 microg Cd2+/l) animals, with a consistently higher SMR in Cd-exposed oysters. Additionally, Cd-exposed oysters showed a stronger temperature-dependent decrease in hemolymph oxygen partial pressures. This observation indicates that the effect of temperature on aerobic metabolism was exacerbated due to the additional Cd stress. The oxygen delivery systems could not provide enough oxygen to cover Cd-induced elevated metabolic demands at high temperatures. Interestingly, cardiac performance (measured as the heart rate and hemolymph supply to tissues) rose to a similar extent in control and Cd-exposed oysters with warming indicating that cardiac output was unable to compensate for elevated energy demand in Cd-exposed oysters. Together with the literature data on metal-induced reduction of ventilatory capacity, these findings suggest that synergistic effects of elevated temperatures and cadmium exposure led to oxygen limitation by impaired performance in oxygen supply through ventilation and circulation. Overall, cadmium exposure resulted in progressive hypoxemia in oysters at high temperatures, suggesting that the thermal tolerance window is narrowed in marine ectotherms inhabiting polluted areas compared with pristine environments. PMID:18272660

  6. Clark Lake microbursts - On a lower limit to type III burst brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Szabo, A.

    1987-01-01

    Further observations of solar microbursts by the Clark Lake radioheliograph are reported. The microbursts have properties consistent with weak type III bursts, with the implication that type III's can have brightness temperatures as low as 1 million K. The importance of this result is explored. A single model to explain the stronger type III bursts and the weaker microbursts is sought. It is shown that none of the models for stabilizing the strongest type III electron streams can explain the observed microbursts: these models have threshold levels of Langmuir waves which imply emission (due to spontaneous scattering off ions) with brightness temperatures in excess of those observed. It appears that either some vital physics is still missing from models for type III bursts, or that microbursts should have properties significantly different from those of type III bursts. In the latter case further observations should allow important tests of type III models.

  7. Nonlocal supercurrent in mesoscopic multiterminal SNS Josephson junction in the low-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golikova, T. E.; Wolf, M. J.; Beckmann, D.; Batov, I. E.; Bobkova, I. V.; Bobkov, A. M.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    A nonlocal supercurrent was observed in mesoscopic planar SNS Josephson junctions with additional normal-metal electrodes, where nonequilibrium quasiparticles were injected from a normal-metal electrode into one of the superconducting banks of the Josephson junction in the absence of a net transport current through the junction. We claim that the observed effect is due to a supercurrent counterflow, appearing to compensate for the quasiparticle flow in the SNS weak link. We have measured the responses of SNS junctions for different distances between the quasiparticle injector and the SNS junction at temperatures far below the superconducting transition temperature. The charge-imbalance relaxation length was estimated by using a modified Kadin, Smith, and Skocpol scheme in the case of a planar geometry. The model developed allows us to describe the interplay of charge imbalance and Josephson effects in the nanoscale proximity system in detail.

  8. Simple bridge detector for use with a low-temperature capacitance thermometer, and thermometer performance limits.

    PubMed

    Prober, D E

    1979-03-01

    A simple high-resolution bridge circuit for use with a glass-ceramic capacitance thermometer is described. This circuit allows a linear readout of capacitance changes and has better than 1 mK resolution and short-term stability. Performance limits of the thermometer itself are also reported. Irreproducibility of thermometer calibration upon thermal cycling can be as large as 0.3 K, and changes in the calibration slope dC/dT are also observed. The bridge circuit described partially compensates for these shifts in dC/dT. PMID:18699517

  9. Fast acclimation of freezing resistance suggests no influence of winter minimum temperature on the range limit of European beech.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Armando; Hoch, Günter; Vitasse, Yann

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature extremes drive species distribution at a global scale. Here, we assessed the acclimation potential of freezing resistance in European beech (Fagus sylvaticaL.) during winter. We specifically asked (i) how do beech populations growing in contrasting climates differ in their maximum freezing resistance, (ii) do differences result from genetic differentiation or phenotypic plasticity to preceding temperatures and (iii) is beech at risk of freezing damage in winter across its distribution range. We investigated the genetic and environmental components of freezing resistance in buds of adult beech trees from three different populations along a natural large temperature gradient in north-western Switzerland, including the site holding the cold temperature record in Switzerland. Freezing resistance of leaf primordia in buds varied significantly among populations, with LT50values (lethal temperature for 50% of samples) ranging from -25 to -40 °C, correlating with midwinter temperatures of the site of origin. Cambial meristems and the pith of shoots showed high freezing resistance in all three populations, with only a trend to lower freezing resistance at the warmer site. After hardening samples at -6 °C for 5 days, freezing resistance of leaf primordia increased in all provenances by up to 4.5 K. After additional hardening at -15 °C for 3 days, all leaf primordia were freezing resistant to -40 °C. We demonstrate that freezing resistance ofF. sylvaticahas a high ability to acclimate to temperature changes in winter, whereas the genetic differentiation of freezing resistance among populations seems negligible over this small geographic scale but large climatic gradient. In contrast to the assumption made in most of the species distribution models, we suggest that absolute minimum temperature in winter is unlikely to shape the cold range limit of beech. We conclude that the rapid acclimation of freezing resistance to winter temperatures allows

  10. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-picotesla sensitivity at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Anielski, Pawel; Gawlik, Wojciech; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2014-11-15

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature {sup 85}Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of 70 fT/√(Hz) at 7.6 μT. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from 5 μT to 75 μT. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor.

  11. Transcriptome comparison reveals a genetic network regulating the lower temperature limit in fish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Liu, Yimeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Dong; Niu, Hongbo; Jiang, Shouwen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dongsheng; Han, Bingshe; Xu, Qianghua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional plasticity is a major driver of phenotypic differences between species. The lower temperature limit (LTL), namely the lower end of survival temperature, is an important trait delimiting the geographical distribution of a species, however, the genetic mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the inter-species transcriptional diversification in cold responses between zebrafish Danio rerio and tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, which were reared at a common temperature (28 °C) but have distinct LTLs. We identified significant expressional divergence between the two species in the orthologous genes from gills when the temperature cooled to the LTL of tilapia (8 °C). Five KEGG pathways were found sequentially over-represented in the zebrafish/tilapia divergently expressed genes in the duration (12 hour) of 8 °C exposure, forming a signaling cascade from metabolic regulation to apoptosis via FoxO signaling. Consistently, we found differential progression of apoptosis in the gills of the two species in which zebrafish manifested a delayed and milder apoptotic phenotype than tilapia, corresponding with a lower LTL of zebrafish. We identified diverged expression in 25 apoptosis-related transcription factors between the two species which forms an interacting network with diverged factors involving the FoxO signaling and metabolic regulation. We propose a genetic network which regulates LTL in fishes. PMID:27356472

  12. Transcriptome comparison reveals a genetic network regulating the lower temperature limit in fish

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Liu, Yimeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Dong; Niu, Hongbo; Jiang, Shouwen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dongsheng; Han, Bingshe; Xu, Qianghua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional plasticity is a major driver of phenotypic differences between species. The lower temperature limit (LTL), namely the lower end of survival temperature, is an important trait delimiting the geographical distribution of a species, however, the genetic mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the inter-species transcriptional diversification in cold responses between zebrafish Danio rerio and tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, which were reared at a common temperature (28 °C) but have distinct LTLs. We identified significant expressional divergence between the two species in the orthologous genes from gills when the temperature cooled to the LTL of tilapia (8 °C). Five KEGG pathways were found sequentially over-represented in the zebrafish/tilapia divergently expressed genes in the duration (12 hour) of 8 °C exposure, forming a signaling cascade from metabolic regulation to apoptosis via FoxO signaling. Consistently, we found differential progression of apoptosis in the gills of the two species in which zebrafish manifested a delayed and milder apoptotic phenotype than tilapia, corresponding with a lower LTL of zebrafish. We identified diverged expression in 25 apoptosis-related transcription factors between the two species which forms an interacting network with diverged factors involving the FoxO signaling and metabolic regulation. We propose a genetic network which regulates LTL in fishes. PMID:27356472

  13. Medicare program; limit on the valuation of a depreciable asset recognized as an allowance for depreciation and interest on capital indebtedness after a change of ownership--HCFA. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare provider reimbursement regulations relative to allowable costs and sets a limit on the valuation of a depreciable asset that may be recognized in establishing an appropriate allowance for depreciation and for interest on capital indebtedness after a change of ownership that occurs on or after December 1, 1997. These provisions apply to providers that are reimbursed on the basis of reasonable costs. This change implements the mandate in section 4404 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (Pub. L. 105-33). PMID:10177059

  14. Freezing temperatures as a limit to forest recruitment above tropical Andean treelines.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Evan M; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-07-01

    The elevation of altitudinal treelines is generally believed to occur where low mean temperatures during the growing season limit growth and prevent trees from establishing at higher elevations. Accordingly, treelines should move upslope with increasing global temperatures. Contrary to this prediction, tropical treelines have remained stable over the past several decades despite increasing mean temperatures. The observed stability of tropical treelines, coupled with the drastically different temperature profiles between temperate and tropical treelines, suggests that using mean measures of temperature to predict tropical treeline movements during climate change may be overly simplistic. We hypothesize that frost events at tropical treelines may slow climate driven treeline movement by preventing tree recruitment beyond the established forest canopy. To assess this hypothesis, we measured freezing resistance of four canopy-forming treeline species (Weinmannia fagaroides, Polylepis pauta, Clethra cuneata, and Gynoxys nitida) at two life stages (juvenile and adult) and during two seasons (warm-wet and cold-dry). Freezing resistances were then compared to microclimatic data to determine if freezing events in the grassland matrix above treeline are too harsh for these forest species. Freezing resistance varied among species and life stages from -5.7 degrees C for juveniles of P. pauta to -11.1 degrees C for juveniles of W. fagaroides. Over a four-year period, the lowest temperatures recorded at 10 cm above ground level in the grasslands above treeline and at treeline itself were -8.9 degrees C and -6.8 degrees C, respectively. Juveniles maintained freezing resistances similar to adults during the coldest parts of the year and ontogenetic differences in freezing resistance were only present during the warm season when temperatures did not represent a significant threat to active plant tissue. These findings support the hypothesis that rare extreme freezing events at and

  15. Limiting temperature of pion gas with the van der Waals equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poberezhnyuk, R. V.; Vovchenko, V.; Anchishkin, D. V.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The grand canonical ensemble formulation of the van der Waals equation of state that includes the effects of Bose statistics is applied to the equilibrium system of interacting pions. If the attractive interaction between pions is large enough, a limiting temperature T 0 emerges, i.e., no thermodynamical equilibrium is possible at T\\gt {T}0. The system pressure p, particle number density n, and energy density ε remain finite at T={T}0, whereas for T near T 0 both the specific heat C={{d}}\\varepsilon /{{d}}T and the scaled variance of particle number fluctuations ω [N] are proportional to {({T}0-T)}-1/2 and, thus, go to infinity at T\\to {T}0. The limiting temperature also corresponds to the softest point of the equation of state, i.e., the speed of sound squared {c}s2={{d}}p/{{d}}\\varepsilon goes to zero as {({T}0-T)}1/2. Very similar thermodynamical behavior takes place in the Hagedorn model for the special choice of a power, namely {m}-4, in the pre-exponential factor of the mass spectrum ρ (m).

  16. Status of high temperature superconductor cable and fault current limiter projects at American Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, J. F.; Yuan, J.

    2009-10-01

    This paper will describe the status of three key programs currently underway at American Superconductor Corp. The first program is the LIPA project which is a transmission voltage high temperature superconducting cable program, with funding support from the US Department of Energy. The 600 m cable, capable of carrying 574 MVA, was successfully installed and commissioned in LIPA grid on April 22, 2008. An overview of the project, system level design details and operational data will be provided. In addition, the status of the newly awarded LIPA II project will be described. The second program is Project Hydra, with funding support from the US Department of Homeland Security, to design, develop and demonstrate an HTS cable with fault current limiting functionality. The cable is 300 m long and is being designed to carry 96 MVA at a distribution level voltage of 13.8 kV. The cable will be permanently installed and energized in Manhattan, New York in 2010. The initial status of Project Hydra will be presented. The final program to be discussed is a transmission voltage, high temperature superconducting fault current limiter funded by the US DOE. The project encompasses the design, construction and test of a 115 kV FCL for power transmission within a time frame of 4-5 years. Installation and testing are planned for a Southern California Edison substation. A project overview and progress under the first phase will be reported.

  17. The upper explosion limit of lower alkanes and alkenes in air at elevated pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van den Schoor, F; Verplaetsen, F

    2006-01-16

    The upper explosion limit (UEL) of ethane-air, propane-air, n-butane-air, ethylene-air and propylene-air mixtures is determined experimentally at initial pressures up to 30 bar and temperatures up to 250 degrees C. The experiments are performed in a closed spherical vessel with an internal diameter of 200 mm. The mixtures are ignited by fusing a coiled tungsten wire, placed at the centre of the vessel, by electric current. Flame propagation is said to have taken place if there is a pressure rise of at least 1% of the initial pressure after ignition of the mixture. In the pressure-temperature range investigated, a linear dependence of UEL on temperature and a bilinear dependence on pressure are found except in the vicinity of the auto-ignition range. A comparison of the UEL data of the lower alkanes shows that the UEL expressed as equivalence ratio (the actual fuel/air ratio divided by the stoichiometric fuel/air ratio) increases with increasing carbon number in the homologous series of alkanes. PMID:16154265

  18. A holographic model for QCD in the Veneziano limit at finite temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, T.; Järvinen, M.; Kajantie, K.; Kiritsis, E.; Rosen, C.; Tuominen, K.

    2014-04-01

    A holographic model of QCD in the limit of large number of colors, N c , and massless fermion flavors, N f , but constant ratio x f = N f /N c is analyzed at finite temperature and chemical potential. The five dimensional gravity model contains three bulk fields: a scalar dilaton sourcing Tr F 2, a scalar tachyon dual to and a 4-vector dual to the baryon current γ μ q. The main result is the μ, T phase diagram of the holographic theory. A first order deconfining transition along T h ( μ) and a chiral transition at T χ ( μ) > T h ( μ) are found. The chiral transition is of second order for small μ and becomes of first order at larger μ. The two regimes are separated by a tricritical point. The dependence of thermodynamical quantities including the speed of sound and susceptibilities on the chemical potential and temperature is computed. A new quantum critical regime is found at zero temperature and finite chemical potential. It is controlled by an AdS2 × R 3 geometry and displays semi-local criticality.

  19. Fault current limiter based on high temperature superconductors - different concepts, test results, simulations, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, W.; Chen, M.; Lakner, M.; Rhyner, J.; Braun, D.; Lanz, W.

    2001-05-01

    All electric equipment in a power system has to be designed to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses of potential short-circuit currents. Any reduction of these currents can lead to significant cost savings. Among all current limiting devices, superconducting fault current limiters (SCFCL) offer ideal performance: in normal operation the SCFCL is in its superconducting state and has negligible impedance, in the event of a fault, the transition into the normal conducting state passively limits the current. Different high temperature superconductors (HTS) materials, like YBCO films, Bi2223 wires or Bi2212 bulk are under development for the use in SCFCL. Due to the brittle nature of HTS and the hot-spot problem, most HTS components for current limitation are composites comprising the HTS, a mechanical substrate or support, and an electrical bypass. The performance of the composites largely depend on the parameters: critical current density, I- V characteristics, thermal conductivity, thermal mass, and electrical bypass. Mainly two different concepts of SCFCL, namely, the “resistive” and the “shielded core” concept have been pursued in the past. In 1996 the first ever SCFCL was installed in a hydro-power plant. The device had a rated power of 1.2 MVA, it was of the “shielded core” type and was based on tubes of Bi2212-bulk material. The feasibility of the technology has been demonstrated in a one-year-endurance test. Recently more compact “resistive” SCFCLs based on the same Bi2212-bulk material have been developed. Theoretical models for the SCFCL show good agreement with experimental data. They are used to study the influence of SCFCLs in power systems in order to evaluate technical and economical advantages.

  20. Upper Temperature Limit of Environmental Barrier Coatings for Enabling Propulsion Materials Established

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis S.; Robinson, R. Craig

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC/SiC composites and Si3N4, are the prime candidates for hot section structural components of next-generation gas turbines. A key barrier to such an application is the rapid recession of silicon-based ceramics in combustion environments because of the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor (refs. 1 and 2). Environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) were developed to prevent recession in the High Speed Research--Enabling Propulsion Materials (HSR-EPM) Program (refs. 3 and 4). An investigation under the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program was undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center to establish the upper temperature limit of the EPM EBC.

  1. Application limits of the interpretation of near-surface temperature time series to assess groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, J. S.; Rivard, C.; Martel, R.; Lefebvre, R.

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to test the application limits of a groundwater recharge assessment technique based on the inversion of a vertical one-dimensional numerical model of advective-conductive heat transport, using temperature time series at three different depths (1, 3, 5 m) in the unsaturated zone. For this purpose, several synthetic hourly datasets of subsurface temperatures, representing various weather, ground cover, and soil texture conditions, thus covering a wide range of groundwater recharge values, were produced with the vertical one-dimensional coupled heat and moisture transport simulator SHAW (Simultaneous Heat and Water model). Estimates of the vertical flux of water in the soil were then retrieved from these realistic temperature profiles using a simple one-dimensional numerical simulator of advective and conductive heat transport in the unsaturated zone that was developed as part of this study. The water flux was assumed constant on a weekly, monthly, semiannual, and annual basis. From these vertical water flux estimates, annual (potential) groundwater recharge rates were then computed and results were compared to those calculated previously with SHAW to assess the accuracy of the method. Results showed that, under ideal conditions, it would be possible to estimate annual recharge rates that are above 200 mm/y, with an acceptable error of less than 20%. These "ideal" conditions include the resolution of the water flux on a weekly basis, error-free temperature measurements below the soil freezing zone, and model parameter values (thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the soil) known a priori with no uncertainty. However, this work demonstrates that the accuracy of the method is highly sensitive to the uncertainty of the input model parameters of the numerical model used to carry out the inversion and to measurement errors of temperature time series. For the conditions represented in this study, these findings suggest that, despite

  2. Upper Temperature Limit of Environmental Barrier Coatings Based on Mullite and BSAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis S.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) for Si-based ceramics consist of three layers: a silicon bond coat, an intermediate mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) or mullite + BSAS (1-xBaO-xSrO-Al2O3-2SiO2) layer, and a BSAS top coat. Areas of concern for long-term durability are environmental durability, chemical compatibility, silica volatility, phase stability, and thermal conductivity. Variants of this family of EBCs were applied to monolithic SiC and melt infiltrated SiC/SiC composites. Reaction between BSAS and silica results in low melting (approx. 1300 C) glasses at T > 1400 C, which can cause the spallation of the EBC. At temperatures greater than 1400 C, the BSAS top coat also degrades by formation of a porous structure, and it suffers significant recession via silica volatilization in water vapor-containing atmospheres. All of these degradation mechanisms can be EBC life-limiting factors. BSAS undergoes a very sluggish phase transformation (hexagonal celsian to monoclinic celsian), the implications of which are not fully understood at this point. There was evidence of rapid sintering at temperatures as low as 1300 C, as inferred from the sharp increase in thermal conductivity.

  3. Evaluation of lower flammability limits of fuel-air-diluent mixtures using calculated adiabatic flame temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Wong, W; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2006-03-17

    The lower flammability limit (LFL) of a fuel is the minimum composition in air over which a flame can propagate. Calculated adiabatic flame temperatures (CAFT) are a powerful tool to estimate the LFL of gas mixtures. Different CAFT values are used for the estimation of LFL. SuperChems is used by industry to perform flammability calculations under different initial conditions which depends on the selection of a threshold temperature. In this work, the CAFT at the LFL is suggested for mixtures of fuel-air and fuel-air-diluents. These CAFT can be used as the threshold values in SuperChems to calculate the LFL. This paper discusses an approach to evaluate the LFL in the presence of diluents such as N2 and CO2 by an algebraic method and by the application of SuperChems using CAFT as the basis of the calculations. The CAFT for different paraffinic and unsaturated hydrocarbons are presented as well as an average value per family of chemicals. PMID:16309829

  4. Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Darmann, Frank; Lombaerde, Robert; Moriconi, Franco; Nelson, Albert

    2012-03-01

    Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with warm bore diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged spider design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZP's product development program, the amount of HTS wire

  5. Practical limitations on the use of diurnal temperature signals to quantify groundwater upwelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin; Lautz, Laura K.; Buckley, Sean F.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater upwelling to streams creates unique habitat by influencing stream water quality and temperature; upwelling zones also serve as vectors for contamination when groundwater is degraded. Temperature time series data acquired along vertical profiles in the streambed have been applied to simple analytical models to determine rates of vertical fluid flux. These models are based on the downward propagation characteristics (amplitude attenuation and phase-lag) of the surface diurnal signal. Despite the popularity of these models, there are few published characterizations of moderate-to-strong upwelling. We attribute this limitation to the thermodynamics of upwelling, under which the downward conductive signal transport from the streambed interface occurs opposite the upward advective fluid flux. Governing equations describing the advection–diffusion of heat within the streambed predict that under upwelling conditions, signal amplitude attenuation will increase, but, counterintuitively, phase-lag will decrease. Therefore the extinction (measurable) depth of the diurnal signal is very shallow, but phase lag is also short, yielding low signal to noise ratio and poor model sensitivity. Conversely, amplitude attenuation over similar sensor spacing is strong, yielding greater potential model sensitivity. Here we present streambed thermal time series over a range of moderate to strong upwelling sites in the Quashnet River, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The predicted inverse relationship between phase-lag and rate of upwelling was observed in the field data over a range of conditions, but the observed phase-lags were consistently shorter than predicted. Analytical solutions for fluid flux based on signal amplitude attenuation return results consistent with numerical models and physical seepage meters, but the phase-lag analytical model results are generally unreasonable. Through numerical modeling we explore reasons why phase-lag may have been over-predicted by the

  6. Understanding microstructure-induced limitations of hydrogen transport in high temperature proton conductors: can nuclear microanalysis give an answer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    High temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) are envisioned as electrolytes for fuel cells working at intermediate temperature (400 C -- 600 C) to complement Y:ZrO2 electrolytes operating at 800 C -- 1000 C. The most mature HTPC are doped perovskites (ABO3) where tetravalent cation B is partially substituted by a trivalent one. Protons can be introduced in the lattice as point defects corresponding to hydroxyl groups on oxygen ion sites. In the temperature region of interest for technological applications, lattice vibrations allow the diffusion of protons by jumping and reorientation of O-H bonds (hoping mechanism). BaCeO3 or SrCeO3-based perovskites doped with a rare earth are the most widely studied compounds. However the proton conductance of these ceramics and their chemical stability are lower than the calculated values on single crystals and not sufficient to fulfill technological requirements. In most cases, the reasons for these discrepancies lie in uncontrolled microstructures with inter- and intra-granular defects that act as barriers for hydrogen diffusion but are preferential paths for chemical degradation by hydrolysis or carbonatation. Despite this crucial point, very few efforts are devoted to the optimization of microstructure of HTPC. Microstructure induced limitations are usually evidenced via impedance measurements which enable determination of respective contributions of bulk and grain boundaries to overall conductivity. Further information on hydrogen transport relevant for improvement of microstructure design requires local methods for hydrogen concentration measurement. Nuclear microanalysis, based on the use of MeV light ions microbeam, meets this demand. According to the chosen technique, nuclear reaction, elastic recoil or forward coincident scattering, the nuclear microprobe gives 2D-3D quantitative information on hydrogen distribution and diffusion within microstructure and enables to identify barriers and short-circuits.

  7. Limits to global and Australian temperature change this century based on expert judgment of climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, Michael R.; Colman, Robert; Bhend, Jonas; Moise, Aurel F.

    2016-07-01

    The projected warming of surface air temperature at the global and regional scale by the end of the century is directly related to emissions and Earth's climate sensitivity. Projections are typically produced using an ensemble of climate models such as CMIP5, however the range of climate sensitivity in models doesn't cover the entire range considered plausible by expert judgment. Of particular interest from a risk-management perspective is the lower impact outcome associated with low climate sensitivity and the low-probability, high-impact outcomes associated with the top of the range. Here we scale climate model output to the limits of expert judgment of climate sensitivity to explore these limits. This scaling indicates an expanded range of projected change for each emissions pathway, including a much higher upper bound for both the globe and Australia. We find the possibility of exceeding a warming of 2 °C since pre-industrial is projected under high emissions for every model even scaled to the lowest estimate of sensitivity, and is possible under low emissions under most estimates of sensitivity. Although these are not quantitative projections, the results may be useful to inform thinking about the limits to change until the sensitivity can be more reliably constrained, or this expanded range of possibilities can be explored in a more formal way. When viewing climate projections, accounting for these low-probability but high-impact outcomes in a risk management approach can complement the focus on the likely range of projections. They can also highlight the scale of the potential reduction in range of projections, should tight constraints on climate sensitivity be established by future research.

  8. Limiting the Temperatures in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in Warm Climates. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 7/74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, P.

    Formulas used in the calculation of cooling loads and indoor temperatures are employed to demonstrate the influence of various building parameters--such as thermal transmittance (U-value), solar absorptivity, and thermal storage--on the indoor thermal environment. The analysis leads to guidance on ways of limiting temperatures in naturally…

  9. Suspended Animation Extends Survival Limits of Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kin; Goldmark, Jesse P.

    2010-01-01

    The orderly progression through the cell division cycle is of paramount importance to all organisms, as improper progression through the cycle could result in defects with grave consequences. Previously, our lab has shown that model eukaryotes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Danio rerio all retain high viability after prolonged arrest in a state of anoxia-induced suspended animation, implying that in such a state, progression through the cell division cycle is reversibly arrested in an orderly manner. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae (both wild-type and several cold-sensitive strains) and C. elegans embryos exhibit a dramatic decrease in viability that is associated with dysregulation of the cell cycle when exposed to low temperatures. Further, we find that when the yeast or worms are first transitioned into a state of anoxia-induced suspended animation before cold exposure, the associated cold-induced viability defects are largely abrogated. We present evidence that by imposing an anoxia-induced reversible arrest of the cell cycle, the cells are prevented from engaging in aberrant cell cycle events in the cold, thus allowing the organisms to avoid the lethality that would have occurred in a cold, oxygenated environment. PMID:20462960

  10. Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Andrew B; Germino, Matthew J; Kueppers, Lara M

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is altering plant species distributions globally, and warming is expected to promote uphill shifts in mountain trees. However, at many cold-edge range limits, such as alpine treelines in the western United States, tree establishment may be colimited by low temperature and low moisture, making recruitment patterns with warming difficult to predict. We measured response functions linking carbon (C) assimilation and temperature- and moisture-related microclimatic factors for limber pine (Pinus flexilis) seedlings growing in a heating × watering experiment within and above the alpine treeline. We then extrapolated these response functions using observed microclimate conditions to estimate the net effects of warming and associated soil drying on C assimilation across an entire growing season. Moisture and temperature limitations were each estimated to reduce potential growing season C gain from a theoretical upper limit by 15-30% (c. 50% combined). Warming above current treeline conditions provided relatively little benefit to modeled net assimilation, whereas assimilation was sensitive to either wetter or drier conditions. Summer precipitation may be at least as important as temperature in constraining C gain by establishing subalpine trees at and above current alpine treelines as seasonally dry subalpine and alpine ecosystems continue to warm. PMID:25902893

  11. Exercise hyperthermia as a factor limiting physical performance - Temperature effect on muscle metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, S.; Brzezinska, Z.; Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trunk cooling on the muscle contents of ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate (CrP), and creatine, as well as of glycogen, some glycolytic intermediates, pyruvate, and lactate were assessed in 11 fasted dogs exercised at 20 C on treadmill to exhaustion. Without cooling, dogs were able to run 57 min, and their rectal (Tre) and muscle (Tm) temperatures increased to 41.8 and 43.0 C, respectively. Cooling with ice packs prolonged the ability to run by 45 percent, and resulted in lower Tre (by 1.1 C) and Tm (by 1.2 C). Depletion of muscle content of total high-energy phosphates (ATP + CrP) and glycogen, and increases in contents of AMP, pyruvate, and lactate were lower in cooled dogs than in non-cooled dogs. The muscle content of lactiate correlated positively with TM. These results indicate that hypothermia accelerates glycolysis, and shifts the equilibrium between high- and low-energy phosphates in favor of the latter. The adverse effect of hypothermia on muscle metabolism may be relevant to the limitation of endurance.

  12. Mixing it up in the Makassar Strait: Seasonal Reconstructions from Corals of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity Allow for Records of Source Water Mixing in the Makassar Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. A.; Goodkin, N.; Halide, H.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Suwargadi, B. W.; Suprinhanto, I.; Prayudi, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Indonesian seas provide a maze of passages through which relatively warm and fresh water flows from the equatorial Pacific to the Indian Ocean forming the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). As it flows, the ITF provides a transport pathway affecting heat and buoyancy fluxes throughout the region, interacting with both the Asian monsoon and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The present and past behavior of the ITF is therefore one of the keys to understanding regional and global climate variability. Past ITF behavior has been previously recorded in massive coral colonies, which serve as continuous, high-resolution climate archives because of their high linear extension rates and annual banding pattern. Here we present Sr/Ca-SST and δ18O-SSS calibrations from three Porites spp. coral colonies located in the southern Makassar Strait, through which roughly 75-80% of all ITF waters flow. At interannual timescales, we find that in all three corals Sr/Ca significantly (all p-values<0.05) correlates with sea surface temperature (SST) during the SE monsoon from July to September, while δ18O is correlated with sea surface salinity (SSS) during the NW monsoon from December to March (all p-values<0.05). HADI SST and SODA SSS instrumental temperature-salinity diagrams from our coral sites indicate that the southern Makassar Strait is a region of surface seawater mixing between end member water masses of the ITF during the SE monsoon. During the NW monsoon, however, end members of the South China Sea Throughflow (SCSTF) instead mix in the surface waters. The strength of our interannual calibrations suggests that it may be possible to reconstruct the ITF and SCSTF surface mixing patterns during their respective monsoon seasons. To preliminarily assess this, we present 150-year seasonally resolved records of Sr/Ca and δ18O to reconstruct surface water mixing in the southern Makassar Strait.

  13. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells

    PubMed Central

    Foxman, Ellen F.; Storer, James A.; Fitzgerald, Megan E.; Wasik, Bethany R.; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E.; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33–35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I–like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature. PMID:25561542

  14. Segregation of biomass in cyclic anaerobic/aerobic granular sludge allows the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Mari K H; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Kuenen, J Gijs; Yang, Jingjing; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-09-01

    A cyclic anaerobic/aerobic bubble column reactor was run for 420 days to study the competition for nitrite between nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Anammox) at low temperatures. An anaerobic feeding period with nitrite and ammonium in the influent followed by an aerated period was applied resulting in a biomass specific conversion rate of 0.18 ± 0.02 [gN(2) - N · gVSS(-1)· day(-1)] when the dissolved oxygen concentration was maintained at 1.0 mgO(2) · L(-1). An increase in white granules was observed in the reactor which were mainly located at the top of the settled sludge bed, whereas red granules were located at the bottom. FISH, activity tests, and qPCR techniques revealed that red biomass was dominated by Anammox bacteria and white granules by NOB. Granules from the top of the sludge bed were smaller and therefore had a higher aerobic volume fraction, a lower density, and consequently a slower settling rate. Sludge was manually removed from the top of the settled sludge bed to selectively remove NOB which resulted in an increased overall biomass specific N-conversion rate of 0.32 ± 0.02 [gN(2) - N · gVSS(-1) · day(-1)]. Biomass segregation in granular sludge reactors gives an extra opportunity to select for specific microbial groups by applying a different SRT for different microbial groups. PMID:21744798

  15. Dynamics of Kinetically Limited Strain and Threading Dislocations in Temperature- and Compositionally Graded ZnSSe/GaAs (001) Metamorphic Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the evolution of the strain and threading dislocation density in metamorphic compositionally and temperature-graded ZnS y Se1-y buffer layers. Linear variation in composition in conjunction with temperature grading may allow control over the relaxation process. Previously, we reported the development of a general kinetic model based on dislocation flow, which accounted for the time evolution of the strain relaxation in semiconductor structures under kinetically limited conditions, including interactions of threading and misfit defects. In this work, we studied ZnS y Se1-y /GaAs (001) heterostructures with linear compositional grading and a convex-upward (type A), linear (type B) or convex-downward (type C) temperature grading profile. The thermal budget available for relaxation in these types of structures is controlled by the temperature grading profile, made up of combinations of linear ramps and constant-temperature sections. In all cases, the temperature was varied from T 0 (400°C to 600°C) at the substrate interface to T F = 300°C at the surface. We also investigated the effect of varying the compositional gradient in the range from 0.18%/μm to 1.6%/μm. Structures with higher average temperature (greater thermal budget) and/or higher grading coefficient exhibited greater extent of relaxation and therefore reduced residual strain. Furthermore, controlling the extent of strain relaxation enabled optimization of the dislocation densities in these heterostructures.

  16. Dynamics of Kinetically Limited Strain and Threading Dislocations in Temperature- and Compositionally Graded ZnSSe/GaAs (001) Metamorphic Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the evolution of the strain and threading dislocation density in metamorphic compositionally and temperature-graded ZnS y Se1- y buffer layers. Linear variation in composition in conjunction with temperature grading may allow control over the relaxation process. Previously, we reported the development of a general kinetic model based on dislocation flow, which accounted for the time evolution of the strain relaxation in semiconductor structures under kinetically limited conditions, including interactions of threading and misfit defects. In this work, we studied ZnS y Se1- y /GaAs (001) heterostructures with linear compositional grading and a convex-upward (type A), linear (type B) or convex-downward (type C) temperature grading profile. The thermal budget available for relaxation in these types of structures is controlled by the temperature grading profile, made up of combinations of linear ramps and constant-temperature sections. In all cases, the temperature was varied from T 0 (400°C to 600°C) at the substrate interface to T F = 300°C at the surface. We also investigated the effect of varying the compositional gradient in the range from 0.18%/ μm to 1.6%/ μm. Structures with higher average temperature (greater thermal budget) and/or higher grading coefficient exhibited greater extent of relaxation and therefore reduced residual strain. Furthermore, controlling the extent of strain relaxation enabled optimization of the dislocation densities in these heterostructures.

  17. Characterization of Tensile Properties, Limiting Strains, and Deep Drawing Behavior of AA5754-H22 Sheet at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, Sudhy S.; Singh, Har Govind; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Dashwood, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Automotive industries are very much interested in characterization of formability improvement of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures before designing tools, heating systems, and processing sequences for fabrication of auto-body panels by warm forming technology. In this study, tensile tests of AA5754-H22 aluminum alloy were carried out at five different temperatures and three different strain rates to investigate the deformation behavior correlating with Cowper-Symonds constitutive equation. Laboratory scale warm forming facilities were designed and fabricated to perform limiting dome height and deep drawing tests to evaluate forming limit strains and drawability of sheet metal at different tool temperatures. The forming limit strain and dome height improved significantly when both the die and punch were heated to 200 °C. Remarkable improvement in deep drawn cup depth was observed when die and punch temperatures were maintained at 200 and 30 °C, respectively, producing a non-isothermal temperature gradient of approximately 93 °C across the blank from flange to center. The forming behavior at different isothermal and non-isothermal conditions were predicted successfully using a thermo-mechanical FE model incorporating temperature-dependent properties in Barlat-89 yield criterion coupled with Cowper-Symonds hardening model, and the thinning/failure location in deformed cups were validated implementing the experimental limiting strains as damage model.

  18. Joint effect of phosphorus limitation and temperature on alkaline phosphatase activity and somatic growth in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Wojewodzic, Marcin W; Kyle, Marcia; Elser, James J; Hessen, Dag O; Andersen, Tom

    2011-04-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a potential biomarker for phosphorus (P) limitation in zooplankton. However, knowledge about regulation of AP in this group is limited. In a laboratory acclimation experiment, we investigated changes in body AP concentration for Daphnia magna kept for 6 days at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C and fed algae with 10 different molar C:P ratios (95-660). In the same experiment, we also assessed somatic growth of the animals since phosphorus acquisition is linked to growth processes. Overall, non-linear but significant relationships of AP activity with C:P ratio were observed, but there was a stronger impact of temperature on AP activity than of P limitation. Animals from the lowest temperature treatment had higher normalized AP activity, which suggests the operation of biochemical temperature compensation mechanisms. Body AP activity increased by a factor of 1.67 for every 10 °C decrease in temperature. These results demonstrate that temperature strongly influences AP expression. Therefore, using AP as a P limitation marker in zooplankton needs to consider possible confounding effects of temperature. Both temperature and diet affected somatic growth. The temperature effect on somatic growth, expressed as the Q (10) value, responded non-linearly with C:P, with Q(10) ranging between 1.9 for lowest food C:P ratio and 1.4 for the most P-deficient food. The significant interaction between those two variables highlights the importance of studying temperature-dependent changes of growth responses to food quality. PMID:21153741

  19. Limiting esophageal temperature in radiofrequency ablation of left atrial tachyarrhythmias results in low incidence of thermal esophageal lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrio-esophageal fistula formation following radiofrequency ablation of left atrial tachyarrhythmias is a rare but devastating complication. Esophageal injuries are believed to be precursors of fistula formation and reported to occur in up to 47% of patients. This study investigates the incidence of esophageal lesions when real time esophageal temperature monitoring and temperature limitation is used. Methods 184 consecutive patients underwent open irrigated radiofrequency ablation of left atrial tachyarrhythmias. An esophageal temperature probe consisting of three independent thermocouples was used for temperature monitoring. A temperature limit of 40°C was defined to interrupt energy delivery. All patients underwent esophageal endoscopy the next day. Results Endoscopy revealed ulcer formation in 3/184 patients (1.6%). No patient developed atrio-esophageal fistula. Patient and disease characteristics had no influence on ulcer formation. The temperature threshold of 40°C was reached in 157/184 patients. A temperature overshoot after cessation of energy delivery was observed frequently. The mean maximal temperature was 40.8°C. Using a multiple regression analysis creating a box lesion that implies superior- and inferior lines at the posterior wall connecting the right and left encircling was an independent predictor of temperature. Six month follow-up showed an overall success rate of 78% documented as sinus rhythm in seven-day holter ECG. Conclusion Limitation of esophageal temperature to 40°C is associated with the lowest incidence of esophageal lesion formation published so far. This approach may contribute to increase the safety profile of radiofrequency ablation in the left atrium. PMID:20977747

  20. Rate-limiting mechanisms in high-temperature growth of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with large thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Hertenberger, S; Rudolph, D; Becker, J; Bichler, M; Finley, J J; Abstreiter, G; Koblmüller, G

    2012-06-15

    We identify the entire growth parameter space and rate-limiting mechanisms in non-catalytic InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Surprisingly huge growth temperature ranges are found with maximum temperatures close to ~600°C upon dramatic increase of V/III ratio, exceeding by far the typical growth temperature range for catalyst-assisted InAs NWs. Based on quantitative in situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, we determine the rate-limiting factors in high-temperature InAs NW growth by directly monitoring the critical desorption and thermal decomposition processes of InAs NWs. Both under dynamic (growth) and static (no growth, ultra-high vacuum) conditions the (111)-oriented InAs NWs evidence excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures even under negligible supersaturation. The rate-limiting factor for InAs NW growth is hence dominated by In desorption from the substrate surface. Closer investigation of the group-III and group-V flux dependences on growth rate reveals two apparent growth regimes, an As-rich and an In-rich regime defined by the effective As/In flux ratio, and maximum achievable growth rates of > 6 µm h(-1). The unique features of high-T growth and excellent thermal stability provide the opportunity for operation of InAs-based NW materials under caustic environment and further allow access to temperature regimes suitable for alloying non-catalytic InAs NWs with GaAs. PMID:22595881

  1. Rate-limiting mechanisms in high-temperature growth of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with large thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertenberger, S.; Rudolph, D.; Becker, J.; Bichler, M.; Finley, J. J.; Abstreiter, G.; Koblmüller, G.

    2012-06-01

    We identify the entire growth parameter space and rate-limiting mechanisms in non-catalytic InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Surprisingly huge growth temperature ranges are found with maximum temperatures close to ˜600 °C upon dramatic increase of V/III ratio, exceeding by far the typical growth temperature range for catalyst-assisted InAs NWs. Based on quantitative in situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, we determine the rate-limiting factors in high-temperature InAs NW growth by directly monitoring the critical desorption and thermal decomposition processes of InAs NWs. Both under dynamic (growth) and static (no growth, ultra-high vacuum) conditions the (111)-oriented InAs NWs evidence excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures even under negligible supersaturation. The rate-limiting factor for InAs NW growth is hence dominated by In desorption from the substrate surface. Closer investigation of the group-III and group-V flux dependences on growth rate reveals two apparent growth regimes, an As-rich and an In-rich regime defined by the effective As/In flux ratio, and maximum achievable growth rates of > 6 µm h-1. The unique features of high-T growth and excellent thermal stability provide the opportunity for operation of InAs-based NW materials under caustic environment and further allow access to temperature regimes suitable for alloying non-catalytic InAs NWs with GaAs.

  2. High resolution mapping of hyporheic fluxes using streambed temperatures: Recommendations and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Dylan J.; Lautz, Laura K.

    2015-05-01

    Analytical solutions to the 1D heat transport equation can be used to derive point measurements of flux between surface water and groundwater from streambed temperature time series. Recent studies have used empirical relationships between measured flux and point-in-time observations of streambed temperatures to produce detailed plan view maps of flux from instantaneous temperature maps. Here, the accuracy of such flux maps, derived using streambed temperatures as a quantitative proxy, was assessed from synthetic streambed temperature data generated by numerical flow and transport simulations. The use of numerical simulations is advantageous because maps of flux from the temperature proxy method can be compared to known flux maps to quantify error. Empirical flux-temperature relationships are most accurate if developed from data collected when stream temperatures are at a maximum. The true relationship between flux and streambed temperature will generally be non-linear and well approximated as a cubic function, although linear relationships may be applied when data density is low. Intermediate fluxes (±1.0 m/day) returned by the temperature proxy method have errors typically less than ±0.1 m/day. Errors in estimated flux increase for strong upwelling (>1.0 m/day) or downwelling (<-1.0 m/day), although the direction of flux is still accurate.

  3. Nitrate Transport and Not Photoinhibition Limits Growth of the Freshwater Cyanobacterium Synechococcus Species PCC 6301 at Low Temperature1

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Bryant, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of low temperature on cell growth, photosynthesis, photoinhibition, and nitrate assimilation was examined in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 6301 to determine the factor that limits growth. Synechococcus sp. PCC 6301 grew exponentially between 20°C and 38°C, the growth rate decreased with decreasing temperature, and growth ceased at 15°C. The rate of photosynthetic oxygen evolution decreased more slowly with temperature than the growth rate, and more than 20% of the activity at 38°C remained at 15°C. Oxygen evolution was rapidly inactivated at high light intensity (3 mE m−2 s−1) at 15°C. Little or no loss of oxygen evolution was observed under the normal light intensity (250 μE m−2 s−1) for growth at 15°C. The decrease in the rate of nitrate consumption by cells as a function of temperature was similar to the decrease in the growth rate. Cells could not actively take up nitrate or nitrite at 15°C, although nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase were still active. These data demonstrate that growth at low temperature is not limited by a decrease in the rate of photosynthetic electron transport or by photoinhibition, but that inactivation of the nitrate/nitrite transporter limits growth at low temperature. PMID:9952475

  4. On the discharge capability and its limiting factors of commercial 18650 Li-ion cell at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiang

    We here study the discharge capability of commercial 18650 cylindrical lithium-ion cells at low temperatures. The discharge capacity at -20 °C ranges from 67 to 88% of the rated capacity at 0.2 C rate, which is good. However, the cell discharge capacity varies substantially at -30 and -40 °C among the studied cells. It ranges from 2 to 70% of the rated capacity at -30 °C, and 0 to 30% at -40 °C at 0.2 C rate. The cell impedance at 1 kHz increases very little from room temperature down to -20 or -30 °C in general, which does not correlate with the cell discharge capability. However, the dc impedance is increased by a factor of about ten at -30 °C and about twenty at -40 °C from room temperature. The discharge capability at low temperature correlates well with the dc resistance at both room and low temperatures. The limiting factors in the discharge capability at low temperatures and the direction for the future improvement are discussed according to the cell discharge capability, the electrode geometric area, the cell impedance at 1 kHz, and the dc impedance at various temperatures. It appears that the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte and lithium solid diffusion in the electrode do not limit the cell discharge capability, while the lithium diffusion in the SEI layer on the positive surface may be the limiting factor. Cell discharge capability at low temperature does not correlate with cycle life at room temperature.

  5. A simple temperature-based model predicts the upper latitudinal limit of the temperate coral Astrangia poculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimond, J. L.; Kerwin, A. H.; Rotjan, R.; Sharp, K.; Stewart, F. J.; Thornhill, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    A few hardy ahermatypic scleractinian corals occur in shallow waters well outside of the tropics, but little is known concerning their distribution limits at high latitudes. Using field data on the growth of Astrangia poculata over an annual period near its northern range limit in Rhode Island, USA, we tested the hypothesis that the distribution of this coral is limited by low temperature. A simple model based on satellite sea surface temperature and field growth data at monthly temporal resolution was used to estimate annual net coral growth north and south of the known range limit of A. poculata. Annual net coral growth was the result of new polyp budding above ~10 °C minus polyp loss below ~10 °C, which is caused by a state of torpor that leads to overgrowth by encroaching and settling organisms. The model accurately predicted A. poculata's range limit around Cape Cod, Massachusetts, predicting no net growth northward as a result of corals' inability to counteract polyp loss during winter with sufficient polyp budding during summer. The model also indicated that the range limit of A. poculata coincides with a decline in the benefit of associating with symbiotic dinoflagellates ( Symbiodinium B2/ S. psygmophilum), suggesting that symbiosis may become a liability under colder temperatures. While we cannot exclude the potential role of other coral life history traits or environmental factors in setting A. poculata's northern range limit, our analysis suggests that low temperature constrains the growth and persistence of adult corals and would preclude coral growth northward of Cape Cod.

  6. Simulated Seasonal Photoperiods and Fluctuating Temperatures Have Limited Effects on Blood Feeding and Life History in Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Westby, K M; Juliano, S A

    2015-09-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors change seasonally and impact life history in temperate-zone ectotherms. Temperature and photoperiod are factors that change in predictable ways. Most studies testing for effects of temperature on vectors use constant temperatures and ignore potential correlated effects of photoperiod. In two experiments, we tested for effects of larval rearing environments creating ecologically relevant temperatures and photoperiods simulating early and late season conditions (June and August), or constant temperatures (cool and warm) with the June or August photoperiods, respectively. We determined effects on survivorship, development, size, and a composite performance index in a temperate-zone population of Aedes triseriatus (Say). We followed cohorts of resulting females, all held under the same environmental conditions, to assess carry-over effects of rearing conditions for larvae on longevity, blood feeding, and egg production. Larval survivorship was affected by treatment in one experiment. Development time was greater in the June and cool treatments, but the constant and fluctuating temperatures did not differ. Significantly larger mosquitoes were produced in fluctuating versus constant temperature treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on the composite performance index. Adult female longevity was lower after rearing at constant versus fluctuating temperature, but there was no difference between June and August, nor did size affect longevity. There was no effect of treatments on blood feeding and a limited effect on egg production. We conclude that seasonal temperatures and photoperiods during development have limited effects on this population of A. triseriatus and find little evidence of strong effects of fluctuating versus constant temperatures. PMID:26336255

  7. Plasticity of protective mechanisms only partially explains interactive effects of temperature and UVR on upper thermal limits.

    PubMed

    Kern, Pippa; Cramp, Rebecca L; Seebacher, Frank; Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Ensiyeh; Franklin, Craig E

    2015-12-01

    Temperature and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are key environmental drivers that are linked in their effects on cellular damage. Exposure to both high temperatures and UVR can cause cellular damage that result in the up-regulation of common protective mechanisms, such as the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and antioxidants. As such, the interactive effects of these stressors at the cellular level may determine physiological limits, such as thermal tolerance. Furthermore, antioxidant activity is often thermally sensitive, which may lead to temperature dependent effects of UVR exposure. Here we examined the interactive effects of temperature and UVR on upper thermal limits, Hsp70 abundance, oxidative damage and antioxidant (catalase) activity. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to one of three temperature treatments (constant 18°C, constant 28°C and daily fluctuations between 18 and 28°C) in the presence or absence of UVR. Tadpoles were tested for upper thermal limits (CTmax), induction of Hsp70, oxidative damage and catalase activity. Our results show that CTmax was influenced by an interactive effect between temperature and UVR treatment. For tadpoles kept in cold temperatures, exposure to UVR led to cross-tolerance to high temperatures, increasing CTmax. Plasticity in this trait was not fully explained by changes in the lower level mechanistic traits examined. These results highlight the difficulty in predicting the mechanistic basis for the interactive effects of multiple stressors on whole animal traits. Multifactorial studies may therefore be required to understand how complex mechanistic processes shape physiological tolerances, and determine responses to environmental variation. PMID:26408107

  8. Influence of temperature on growth and peak oil biosynthesis in a carbon-limited medium by Pythium irregulare'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kinetic analysis was investigated for a carbon-limited medium, with a carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 5.0, supporting the growth of the 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5; omega-3)accumulating fungal organism Pythium irregulare. The productivity and yield parameters at three temperatures, 14, 21, ...

  9. In Situ Thermal Ion Temperature Measurements in the E Region Ionosphere: Techniques, Results, and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Knudsen, D. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of thermal ion temperature are rare at E region altitudes, which are too low for satellites. Here we present ion temperature measurements from a Thermal Ion Imager (TII) that flew on NASA sounding rocket 36.234 (the "Joule-2" mission) into the nightside E region ionosphere on 19 January 2007 from Poker Flat, AK. The TII is an electrostatic ion energy/angle imager that provides 2D ion distributions at 8 ms resolution. Ion temperatures are derived at altitudes between 100 km and 190 km by modelling the detector total count rate versus ion bulk flow angle with respect to the plane of the imager's field of view. Modelling this count rate spin profile shows that the analysis technique is robust against a number of error sources, including variability in payload floating potential, ion upflow, and aperture widening due to reflections from electrode surfaces. A significant uncertainty is associated with the average mass of the ions, which is not measured independently. Using the International Reference Ionosphere model to estimate ion mass, we obtain an ion temperature of 1300 K at 125 km, increasing to more than 3000 K at 180 km. These temperatures are much larger than neutral temperatures obtained from an ionization gauge on the same rocket (Tn˜500 K at 125 km, ˜600 K at 180 km), and do not agree with incoherent scatter radar observations in the vicinity of the rocket. These anomalous ion temperatures are, however, consistent with results from an independent analysis of the shape of the ion distribution images from a similar instrument on a separate payload flown 10 minutes earlier [Archer, MSc Thesis, University of Calgary, 2009]. We conclude that the high ion temperature readings are an artifact related to the environment in the vicinity of the probe, and investigate mechanisms for the cause. We discuss the implications of this effect for future in situ attempts to measure ion temperature in the E region ionosphere.

  10. R/D task plan: Response of fish to different simulated temperature rate limits

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the program is to determine the maximum temperature rate increase that can be tolerated by fish without loss of the ability to escape rising water temperatures. These data will form the basis for recommended power ascension rates during reactor restart. Activities required to meet the program objective include the task of simulating a range of possible temperature rate increases in the laboratory and analyzing the response of fish in an experimental environment. In addition to the primary task, scoping activities will be conducted to evaluate laboratory process control equipment, behavioral data collection equipment, and collect specific behavioral energetics data. 2 refs.

  11. Temperature-dependent ballistic transport in a channel with length below the scattering-limited mean free path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vijay K.; Zainal Abidin, Mastura Shafinaz; Tan, Michael L. P.; Riyadi, Munawar A.

    2012-03-01

    The temperature-dependent ballistic transport, using nonequilibrium Arora distribution function (NEADF), is shown to result in mobility degradation with reduction in channel length, in direct contrast to expectation of a collision-free transport. The ballistic mean free path (mfp) is much higher than the scattering-limited long-channel mfp, yet the mobility is amazingly lower. High-field effects, converting stochastic velocity vectors to streamlined ones, are found to be negligible when the applied voltage is less than the critical voltage appropriate for a ballistic mfp, especially at cryogenic temperatures. Excellent agreement with the experimental data on a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor is obtained. The applications of NEADF are shown to cover a wide spectrum, covering regimes from the scattering-limited to ballistic, from nondegenerate to degenerate, from nanowire to bulk, from low- to high-temperature, and from a low electric field to an extremely high electric field.

  12. Recoil-limited laser cooling of 87Sr atoms near the Fermi temperature.

    PubMed

    Mukaiyama, Takashi; Katori, Hidetoshi; Ido, Tetsuya; Li, Ying; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2003-03-21

    A dynamic magneto-optical trap, which relies on the rapid randomization of population in Zeeman substates, has been demonstrated for fermionic strontium atoms on the 1S0-3P1 intercombination transition. The obtained sample, 1x10(6) atoms at a temperature of 2 microK in the trap, was further Doppler cooled and polarized in a far-off resonant optical lattice to achieve 2 times the Fermi temperature. PMID:12688925

  13. Effects of Upper-Limit Water Temperatures on the Dispersal of the Asian Clam Corbicula fluminea

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Inês Correia; Pereira, Joana Luísa; Costa, Raquel; Gonçalves, Fernando; Prezant, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Temperature is a determinant environmental variable in metabolic rates of organisms ultimately influencing important physiological and behavioural features. Stressful conditions such as increasing temperature, particularly within high ranges occurring in the summer, have been suggested to induce flotation behaviour in Corbicula fluminea which may be important in dispersal of this invasive species. However, there has been no experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. It was already proven that C. fluminea drift is supported by a mucilaginous drogue line produced by mucocytes present in the ctenidia. Detailed microscopic examination of changes in these cells and quantification of clam flotation following one, two and three weeks of exposure to 22, 25 and 30°C was carried out so that the effects of increasing water temperatures in dispersal patterns could be discussed. Results show that changes in temperature triggered an acceleration of the mucocytes production and stimulated flotation behaviour, especially following one week of exposure. Dilution of these effects occurred following longer exposure periods. It is possible that these bivalves perceive changing temperature as a stress and respond accordingly in the short-term, and then acclimate to the new environmental conditions. The response patterns suggest that increasing water temperatures could stimulate C. fluminea population expansion. PMID:23056377

  14. Variation in the temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic soil respiration in response to pulse water events and substrate limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, D.

    2011-12-01

    limitation 3) Soil respiration is uncoupled from temperature under extreme substrate limitation. Our experiment will lead to improved understanding of the factors regulating heterotrophic soil respiration in arid environments as well as our ability to predict changing relationships between temperature and soil respiration under extreme environmental conditions.

  15. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  16. Limitations of predicting in vivo biostability of multiphase polyurethane elastomers using temperature-accelerated degradation testing.

    PubMed

    Padsalgikar, Ajay; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Genevieve; Touchet, Tyler; Iacob, Ciprian; Mellin, Lisa; Norlin-Weissenrieder, Anna; Runt, James

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane biostability has been the subject of intense research since the failure of polyether polyurethane pacemaker leads in the 1980s. Accelerated in vitro testing has been used to isolate degradation mechanisms and predict clinical performance of biomaterials. However, validation that in vitro methods reproduce in vivo degradation is critical to the selection of appropriate tests. High temperature has been proposed as a method to accelerate degradation. However, correlation of such data to in vivo performance is poor for polyurethanes due to the impact of temperature on microstructure. In this study, we characterize the lack of correlation between hydrolytic degradation predicted using a high temperature aging model of a polydimethylsiloxane-based polyurethane and its in vivo performance. Most notably, the predicted molecular weight and tensile property changes from the accelerated aging study did not correlate with clinical explants subjected to human biological stresses in real time through 5 years. Further, DMTA, ATR-FTIR, and SAXS experiments on samples aged for 2 weeks in PBS indicated greater phase separation in samples aged at 85°C compared to those aged at 37°C and unaged controls. These results confirm that microstructural changes occur at high temperatures that do not occur at in vivo temperatures. In addition, water absorption studies demonstrated that water saturation levels increased significantly with temperature. This study highlights that the multiphase morphology of polyurethane precludes the use of temperature accelerated biodegradation for the prediction of clinical performance and provides critical information in designing appropriate in vitro tests for this class of materials. PMID:24810790

  17. An alternative approach to comparing long- and short-lived emissions in light of the 2&amp;deg;C global temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen; Bowerman, Niel; Lowe, Jason; Huntingford, Chris; Frame, Dave; Allen, Myles; Gohar, Laila; Millar, Richard

    2014-05-01

    International climate policy has defined its goal in terms of limiting global average temperature, specifically to 2°C above pre-industrial levels. Emissions of several different greenhouse gases (GHGs) are currently aggregated and traded in terms of their carbon dioxide equivalent. The metric used for aggregating and trading is the 100-year Global Warming Potential (GWP100). Importantly though, the GWP100 does not measure temperature and so does clearly indicate the relative value of different emissions in the context of a global temperature limit. Recent developments in climate research have led to two different, potentially conflicting, perspectives on priorities in reducing emissions. First, a clear link has been demonstrated between cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide and peak temperature. This emphasises the need for carbon dioxide emissions to fall to near zero and provides a conceptually neat way to frame policy, but says little about the role of other GHGs. Second, other studies have shown that emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), many of which currently lie outside climate policy, have a substantial near-term effect on climate. It has been suggested that immediate SLCP reductions will therefore increase the chance of staying below 2°C and may even "buy time" for carbon dioxide reductions. This presentation summarises two recent papers which clarify the roles of SLCPs and long-lived GHGs in determining peak global temperature, and propose new emission metrics to reflect these. SLCP emissions reductions in a given decade have a significant impact on peak temperature only if carbon dioxide emissions are already falling. Immediate action on SLCPs might potentially "buy time" for adaptation by reducing near-term warming, but it does not buy time to delay reductions in carbon dioxide compared with delayed SLCP reductions. Peak temperature is ultimately constrained by cumulative emissions of several long-lived gases (including carbon dioxide

  18. Limitations When Using Proxies of Atmospheric Circulation to Infer Regional Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, E. P.; Wake, C. P.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    One objective of ice core paleoclimatology is to reconstruct past variability of climate parameters such as surface air temperature. Stable isotope ratios of ice cores collected from some locations can be used with confidence to reconstruct regional air temperature. Other glaciochemical records (e.g., major ions) have been used as proxies for regional atmospheric circulation patterns, including the Arctic Oscillation and Pacific-North American pattern, typically based on the strength of semi-permanent sea level pressure centers such as the Icelandic Low and Aleutian Low. The Arctic Oscillation and Pacific North American pattern are associated with regional air temperature anomalies, and consequently ice core proxies of these circulation patterns could be used to infer paleotemperature patterns. However, detailed analysis of the 20th Century Reanalysis dataset (1871-2008) for the Northern Hemisphere winter suggests that these atmospheric circulation patterns do not always result in the same regional air temperature anomalies. A principal component analysis of detrended and area-weighted winter (December-March) temperature and sea level pressure was performed, and the leading eigenmodes were compared, along with the winter mean positions of the Icelandic and Aleutian Lows. Robust results based on multiple statistical analyses were obtained only when the extreme seasonal values of these variables were examined. Although statistically significant results were obtained when looking at temperature patterns associated with specific sea level pressure patterns and the positions of the Icelandic and Aleutian Lows, more consistent relationships were found when examining sea level pressure patterns associated with the leading eigenmodes of temperature. The seasons of extreme eigenvalues of the leading temperature eigenmodes are associated with mean positions of the Icelandic and Aleutian Lows at climatologically extreme north/south and west/east locations, respectively

  19. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  20. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  1. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  2. Accuracy limitations on Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Fry, E S; Emery, Y; Quan, X; Katz, J W

    1997-09-20

    There are five mutually dependent variables relevant to Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean; they are (1) the Brillouin shift, (2) the sound speed, (3) the index of refraction, (4) the temperature, and (5) the salinity. We use three well-known relations to analyze rigorously the interdependence of these five variables. Clearly, a Brillouin shift measurement does not provide a stand-alone determination of temperature or sound speed; one more variable or one more relation must be known. The use of mean values of salinity that have been obtained by an analysis of a large set of historical in situ data is considered for this additional relation. PMID:18259560

  3. Limitations of temperature measurement in the aural canal with an ear mould integrated sensor.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, L P J; de Haan, A; de Koning, J J; Clairbois, H E; Daanen, H A M

    2011-09-01

    Aural canal temperature measurement using an ear mould integrated sensor (T(ac)) might be a method suited for continuous non-invasive core temperature estimation in operational settings. We studied the effect of ambient temperature, wind and high intensity exercise on T(ac) and its ability to predict esophageal (T(es)) and rectal temperatures (T(re)). Seven subjects performed a protocol of rest at 21, 10 and 30 °C, followed by exercise and recovery at 30 °C. The subjects performed the protocol twice: with and without face-wind from halfway through the 30 °C rest period. Extra auricle insulation was applied at one side. Ambient temperature changes affected T(ac) significantly, while T(es) and T(re) remained stable. Insulating the auricle reduced but did not abolish this effect. Wind had an immediate cooling effect on T(ac) independent of auricle insulation. During exercise and recovery in 30 °C, T(ac) provided acceptable group predictions of T(re) in trials without wind (bias: -0.66 ± 0.21 °C covered, -1.20 ± 0.15 °C uncovered). Bias was considerably higher with wind, but variability was similar (-1.73 ± 0.11 °C covered, -2.49 ± 0.04 °C uncovered). Individual predictions of T(es) and T(re) showed more variation, especially with wind. We conclude that T(ac) may be used for core temperature assessment of groups in warm and stable conditions. PMID:21788686

  4. Complex terrain alters temperature and moisture limitations of forest soil respiration across a semiarid to subalpine gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E. M.; Barnard, H. R.; Adams, H. R.; Burns, M. A.; Gallo, E.; Brooks, P. D.

    2015-04-01

    Forest soil respiration is a major carbon (C) flux that is characterized by significant variability in space and time. We quantified growing season soil respiration during both a drought year and a nondrought year across a complex landscape to identify how landscape and climate interact to control soil respiration. We asked the following questions: (1) How does soil respiration vary across the catchments due to terrain-induced variability in moisture availability and temperature? (2) Does the relative importance of moisture versus temperature limitation of respiration vary across space and time? And (3) what terrain elements are important for dictating the pattern of soil respiration and its controls? Moisture superseded temperature in explaining watershed respiration patterns, with wetter yet cooler areas higher up and on north facing slopes yielding greater soil respiration than lower and south facing areas. Wetter subalpine forests had reduced moisture limitation in favor of greater seasonal temperature limitation, and the reverse was true for low-elevation semiarid forests. Coincident climate poorly predicted soil respiration in the montane transition zone; however, antecedent precipitation from the prior 10 days provided additional explanatory power. A seasonal trend in respiration remained after accounting for microclimate effects, suggesting that local climate alone may not adequately predict seasonal variability in soil respiration in montane forests. Soil respiration climate controls were more strongly related to topography during the drought year highlighting the importance of landscape complexity in ecosystem response to drought.

  5. Complex terrain alters temperature and moisture limitations of forest soil respiration across a semiarid to subalpine gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Barnard, H.R.; Adams, H.R.; Burns, M.A.; Gallo, E.; Brooks, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Forest soil respiration is a major carbon (C) flux that is characterized by significant variability in space and time. We quantified growing season soil respiration during both a drought year and a nondrought year across a complex landscape to identify how landscape and climate interact to control soil respiration. We asked the following questions: (1) How does soil respiration vary across the catchments due to terrain-induced variability in moisture availability and temperature? (2) Does the relative importance of moisture versus temperature limitation of respiration vary across space and time? And (3) what terrain elements are important for dictating the pattern of soil respiration and its controls? Moisture superseded temperature in explaining watershed respiration patterns, with wetter yet cooler areas higher up and on north facing slopes yielding greater soil respiration than lower and south facing areas. Wetter subalpine forests had reduced moisture limitation in favor of greater seasonal temperature limitation, and the reverse was true for low-elevation semiarid forests. Coincident climate poorly predicted soil respiration in the montane transition zone; however, antecedent precipitation from the prior 10 days provided additional explanatory power. A seasonal trend in respiration remained after accounting for microclimate effects, suggesting that local climate alone may not adequately predict seasonal variability in soil respiration in montane forests. Soil respiration climate controls were more strongly related to topography during the drought year highlighting the importance of landscape complexity in ecosystem response to drought.

  6. Temperature response of mesophyll conductance. Implications for the determination of Rubisco enzyme kinetics and for limitations to photosynthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Carl J; Portis, Archie R; Nakano, Hiromi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Long, Stephen P

    2002-12-01

    CO(2) transfer conductance from the intercellular airspaces of the leaf into the chloroplast, defined as mesophyll conductance (g(m)), is finite. Therefore, it will limit photosynthesis when CO(2) is not saturating, as in C3 leaves in the present atmosphere. Little is known about the processes that determine the magnitude of g(m). The process dominating g(m) is uncertain, though carbonic anhydrase, aquaporins, and the diffusivity of CO(2) in water have all been suggested. The response of g(m) to temperature (10 degrees C-40 degrees C) in mature leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv W38) was determined using measurements of leaf carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange, coupled with modulated chlorophyll fluorescence. These measurements revealed a temperature coefficient (Q(10)) of approximately 2.2 for g(m), suggesting control by a protein-facilitated process because the Q(10) for diffusion of CO(2) in water is about 1.25. Further, g(m) values are maximal at 35 degrees C to 37.5 degrees C, again suggesting a protein-facilitated process, but with a lower energy of deactivation than Rubisco. Using the temperature response of g(m) to calculate CO(2) at Rubisco, the kinetic parameters of Rubisco were calculated in vivo from 10 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Using these parameters, we determined the limitation imposed on photosynthesis by g(m). Despite an exponential rise with temperature, g(m) does not keep pace with increased capacity for CO(2) uptake at the site of Rubisco. The fraction of the total limitations to CO(2) uptake within the leaf attributable to g(m) rose from 0.10 at 10 degrees C to 0.22 at 40 degrees C. This shows that transfer of CO(2) from the intercellular air space to Rubisco is a very substantial limitation on photosynthesis, especially at high temperature. PMID:12481082

  7. Temperature Response of Mesophyll Conductance. Implications for the Determination of Rubisco Enzyme Kinetics and for Limitations to Photosynthesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bernacchi, Carl J.; Portis, Archie R.; Nakano, Hiromi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Long, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    CO2 transfer conductance from the intercellular airspaces of the leaf into the chloroplast, defined as mesophyll conductance (gm), is finite. Therefore, it will limit photosynthesis when CO2 is not saturating, as in C3 leaves in the present atmosphere. Little is known about the processes that determine the magnitude of gm. The process dominating gm is uncertain, though carbonic anhydrase, aquaporins, and the diffusivity of CO2 in water have all been suggested. The response of gm to temperature (10°C–40°C) in mature leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv W38) was determined using measurements of leaf carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange, coupled with modulated chlorophyll fluorescence. These measurements revealed a temperature coefficient (Q10) of approximately 2.2 for gm, suggesting control by a protein-facilitated process because the Q10 for diffusion of CO2 in water is about 1.25. Further, gm values are maximal at 35°C to 37.5°C, again suggesting a protein-facilitated process, but with a lower energy of deactivation than Rubisco. Using the temperature response of gm to calculate CO2 at Rubisco, the kinetic parameters of Rubisco were calculated in vivo from 10°C to 40°C. Using these parameters, we determined the limitation imposed on photosynthesis by gm. Despite an exponential rise with temperature, gm does not keep pace with increased capacity for CO2 uptake at the site of Rubisco. The fraction of the total limitations to CO2 uptake within the leaf attributable to gm rose from 0.10 at 10°C to 0.22 at 40°C. This shows that transfer of CO2 from the intercellular air space to Rubisco is a very substantial limitation on photosynthesis, especially at high temperature. PMID:12481082

  8. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation.

    PubMed

    Booster, N A; Su, F Y; Adolph, S C; Ahn, A N

    2015-04-01

    Tarantulas extend the femur-patella (proximal) and tibia-metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R(2)) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind-legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  9. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation

    PubMed Central

    Booster, N. A.; Su, F. Y.; Adolph, S. C.; Ahn, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tarantulas extend the femur–patella (proximal) and tibia–metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R2) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind­legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  10. Limited Capacity for Faster Digestion in Larval Coral Reef Fish at an Elevated Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of extreme, short-term temperature spikes in coastal regions during summer months is predicted to increase with ongoing climate change. In tropical systems, these changes are predicted to increase the metabolic demand of coral reef fish larvae while also altering the plankton communities upon which the larvae feed during their pelagic phase. The consequences of these predictions remain speculative in the absence of empirical data on the interactive effects of warm temperatures on the metabolism, postprandial processes and growth responses of coral reef fish larvae. Here, we tested the effect of increased temperature on the metabolism, postprandial performance and fine-scale growth patterns of a coral reef fish (Amphiprion percula) in the latter half of its ~11-d larval phase. First, we measured the length and weight of fed versus fasted larvae (N = 340; mean body mass 4.1±0.05 mg) across fine temporal scales at a typical current summer temperature (28.5°C) and a temperature that is likely be encountered during warm summer periods later this century (31.5°C). Second, we measured routine metabolic rate (Mo2 routine) and the energetics of the postprandial processes (i.e., digestion, absorption and assimilation of a meal; termed specific dynamic action (SDA)) at both temperatures. Larvae fed voraciously when provided with food for a 12-hour period and displayed a temperature-independent increase in mass of 40.1% (28.5°C) and 42.6% (31.5°C), which was largely associated with the mass of prey in the gut. A subsequent 12-h fasting period revealed that the larvae had grown 21.2±4.8% (28.5°C) and 22.8±8.8% (31.5°C) in mass and 10.3±2.0% (28.5°C) and 7.8±2.6% (31.5°C) in length compared with pre-feeding values (no significant temperature effect). Mo2 routine was 55±16% higher at 31.5°C and peak Mo2 during the postprandial period was 28±11% higher at 31.5°C, yet elevated temperature had no significant effect on SDA (0.51±0.06 J at 28.5°C vs

  11. Limited Capacity for Faster Digestion in Larval Coral Reef Fish at an Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Ian M; Clark, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of extreme, short-term temperature spikes in coastal regions during summer months is predicted to increase with ongoing climate change. In tropical systems, these changes are predicted to increase the metabolic demand of coral reef fish larvae while also altering the plankton communities upon which the larvae feed during their pelagic phase. The consequences of these predictions remain speculative in the absence of empirical data on the interactive effects of warm temperatures on the metabolism, postprandial processes and growth responses of coral reef fish larvae. Here, we tested the effect of increased temperature on the metabolism, postprandial performance and fine-scale growth patterns of a coral reef fish (Amphiprion percula) in the latter half of its ~11-d larval phase. First, we measured the length and weight of fed versus fasted larvae (N = 340; mean body mass 4.1±0.05 mg) across fine temporal scales at a typical current summer temperature (28.5°C) and a temperature that is likely be encountered during warm summer periods later this century (31.5°C). Second, we measured routine metabolic rate (Mo2 routine) and the energetics of the postprandial processes (i.e., digestion, absorption and assimilation of a meal; termed specific dynamic action (SDA)) at both temperatures. Larvae fed voraciously when provided with food for a 12-hour period and displayed a temperature-independent increase in mass of 40.1% (28.5°C) and 42.6% (31.5°C), which was largely associated with the mass of prey in the gut. A subsequent 12-h fasting period revealed that the larvae had grown 21.2±4.8% (28.5°C) and 22.8±8.8% (31.5°C) in mass and 10.3±2.0% (28.5°C) and 7.8±2.6% (31.5°C) in length compared with pre-feeding values (no significant temperature effect). Mo2 routine was 55±16% higher at 31.5°C and peak Mo2 during the postprandial period was 28±11% higher at 31.5°C, yet elevated temperature had no significant effect on SDA (0.51±0.06 J at 28.5°C vs

  12. High temperatures limit plant growth but hasten flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus) independently of vernalisation.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Vandoorne, Bertrand; Descamps, Christophe; Périlleux, Claire; Dielen, Vincent; Van Herck, Jean-Claude; Quinet, Muriel

    2014-01-15

    An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a major crop in northern Europe, and it is cultivated as a source of inulin. This polysaccharide is stored in the tap root during the first growing season when the plant grows as a leafy rosette, whereas bolting and flowering occur in the second year after winter vernalisation. The impact of heat stress on plant phenology, water status, photosynthesis-related parameters, and inulin content was studied in the field and under controlled phytotron conditions. In the field, plants of the Crescendo cultivar were cultivated under a closed plastic-panelled greenhouse to investigate heat-stress conditions, while the control plants were shielded with a similar, but open, structure. In the phytotrons, the Crescendo and Fredonia cultivars were exposed to high temperatures (35°C day/28°C night) and compared to control conditions (17°C) over 10 weeks. In the field, heat reduced the root weight, the inulin content of the root and its degree of polymerisation in non-bolting plants. Flowering was observed in 12% of the heat stressed plants during the first growing season in the field. In the phytotron, the heat stress increased the total number of leaves per plant, but reduced the mean leaf area. Photosynthesis efficiency was increased in these plants, whereas osmotic potential was decreased. High temperature was also found to induced flowering of up to 50% of these plants, especially for the Fredonia cultivar. In conclusion, high temperatures induced a reduction in the growth of root chicory, although photosynthesis is not affected. Flowering was also induced, which indicates that high temperatures can partly substitute for the vernalisation requirement for the flowering of root chicory. PMID:24331425

  13. Experimental Limiting Oxygen Concentrations for Nine Organic Solvents at Temperatures and Pressures Relevant to Aerobic Oxidations in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Applications of aerobic oxidation methods in pharmaceutical manufacturing are limited in part because mixtures of oxygen gas and organic solvents often create the potential for a flammable atmosphere. To address this issue, limiting oxygen concentration (LOC) values, which define the minimum partial pressure of oxygen that supports a combustible mixture, have been measured for nine commonly used organic solvents at elevated temperatures and pressures. The solvents include acetic acid, N-methylpyrrolidone, dimethyl sulfoxide, tert-amyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, methanol, acetonitrile, and toluene. The data obtained from these studies help define safe operating conditions for the use of oxygen with organic solvents. PMID:26622165

  14. Exploring the limits: A low-pressure, low-temperature Haber-Bosch process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Medford, Andrew James; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Khan, Tuhin Suvra; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2014-04-01

    The Haber-Bosch process for ammonia synthesis has been suggested to be the most important invention of the 20th century, and called the ‘Bellwether reaction in heterogeneous catalysis’. We examine the catalyst requirements for a new low-pressure, low-temperature synthesis process. We show that the absence of such a process for conventional transition metal catalysts can be understood as a consequence of a scaling relation between the activation energy for N2 dissociation and N adsorption energy found at the surface of these materials. A better catalyst cannot obey this scaling relation. We define the ideal scaling relation characterizing the most active catalyst possible, and show that it is theoretically possible to have a low pressure, low-temperature Haber-Bosch process. The challenge is to find new classes of catalyst materials with properties approaching the ideal, and we discuss the possibility that transition metal compounds have such properties.

  15. Coupling between Solid 3He on Aerogel and Superfluid 3He in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Whitehead, R. C. V.; Skyba, P.

    2006-09-07

    We have cooled liquid 3He contained in a 98% open aerogel sample surrounded by bulk superfluid 3He-B at zero pressure to below 120 {mu}K. The aerogel sample is placed in a quasiparticle blackbody radiator cooled by a Lancaster-style nuclear cooling stage to {approx}200 {mu}K. We monitor the temperature of the 3He inside the blackbody radiator using a vibrating wire resonator. We find that reducing the magnetic field on the aerogel sample causes substantial cooling of all the superfluid inside the blackbody radiator. We believe this is due to the demagnetization of the solid 3He layers on the aerogel strands. This system has potential for achieving extremely low temperatures in the confined fluid.

  16. LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub α}/T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α}/T {sub ∥p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub α} and T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α} and T {sub ∥p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

  17. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:23664304

  18. More about chiral symmetry restoration at finite temperature in the planar limit

    SciTech Connect

    R. Narayanan; H. Neuberger

    2007-03-01

    In the planar limit, in the deconfined phase, the Euclidean Dirac operator has a spectral gap around zero. We show that functions of eigenvalues close to the spectral edge, which are independent of common rescalings and shifts gauge configuration by gauge configuration, have distributions described by a Gaussian Hermitian matrix model. However, combinations of eigenvalues that are scale and shift invariant only on the average, do not match this matrix model.

  19. Increasing the Upper Temperature Oxidation Limit of Alumina Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Unocic, Kinga A; Lance, Michael J; Santella, Michael L; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Walker, Larry R

    2011-01-01

    A family of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development for use in aggressive oxidizing conditions from {approx}600-900 C. These alloys exhibit promising mechanical properties but oxidation resistance in air with water vapor environments is currently limited to {approx}800 C due to a transition from external protective alumina scale formation to internal oxidation of aluminum with increasing temperature. The oxidation behavior of a series of AFA alloys was systematically studied as a function of Cr, Si, Al, C, and B additions in an effort to provide a basis to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit. Oxidation exposures were conducted in air with 10% water vapor environments from 800-1000 C, with post oxidation characterization of the 900 C exposed samples by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSLS). Increased levels of Al, C, and B additions were found to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit in air with water vapor to between 950 and 1000 C. These findings are discussed in terms of alloy microstructure and possible gettering of hydrogen from water vapor at second phase carbide and boride precipitates.

  20. Temperature effect on behaviour, oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion and tolerance limit of the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, R; Syed Mohamed, H E; Shahul Hameed, P

    2008-07-01

    The present study has been carried out to determine the effect of temperature on behaviour, oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion and tolerance limit of the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba, which were collected at Kalpakkam. The fish fingerlings were placed at different temperatures, based on the thermal tolerance limit of fish and thermal outfall of the Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). The thermal tolerance experiments were conducted in two ways: in direct exposure and in gradually increasing temperature for duration of 48 hr. The upper and lower lethal temperatures for the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba were 38.5 degrees C and 14 degrees C respectively. During tolerance experiment, no mortality was observed at 33 degrees C and 35 degrees C. But at 38 degrees C with gradual increase in temperature, 100% loss of equilibrium was observed at 37.7 degrees C in 36 min and mortality was observed at 38 degrees C in 55 min. On the contrary, when the fish fingerlings A. djidaba were directly exposed to 38 degrees C, almost 100% loss of equilibrium and mortality were recorded in 15 min and 31 min respectively. At 40 degrees C with gradual increase in temperature, 100% loss of equilibrium was recorded at 38.5 degrees C in 46 min and mortality was recorded at 39 degrees C in 50 min. On the other hand, when the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba were directly exposed to 40 degrees C, 100% mortality occurred immediately within one minute. These behavioral responses include an elevated temperature of deltaT 10 degrees C, surfacing, dashing against glass wall, jumping out of the water, etc. In general, the rate of oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion was found to enhance with increasing temperature. The oxygen consumption was found to increase from 0.97 mg O2/g/hr at 30 degrees C to 2.2 mg O2/g/hr at 35 degrees C. Similarly, the excretion of ammonia also increased from 3.18 microg/g/hr at 30 degrees C to 5.91 microg/g/hr at 35 degrees C. In the present study, it was

  1. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Kunhwi; Houseworth, Jim

    2015-07-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  2. Effects of temperature and glucose limitation on coal solubilization by Candida ML13

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B. )

    1991-04-01

    Biological processing has received considerable attention in recent years as a technology for the utilization of low-ranked coals. Several fungi and actinomycetes have been shown to liquefy highly oxidized coal in pure culture under aerobic conditions. This report describes the optimization of cultural conditions for coal solubilization by Candida sp. ML13, an organism originally isolated from a naturally weathered coal seam. Coal solubilization by surface cultures of Candida sp. has previously been demonstrated. The author describes here the elicitation of the activity in submerged cultures as well as the effect of carbohydrate concentration, carbon source, temperature, and agitation rate on coal solubilization by this organism.

  3. Linear viscoelastic limits of asphalt concrete at low and intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yusuf A.

    The purpose of this dissertation is to demonstrate the hypothesis that a region at which the behavior of asphalt concrete can be represented as a linear viscoelastic material can be determined at low and intermediate temperatures considering the stresses and strains typically developed in the pavements under traffic loading. Six mixtures containing different aggregate gradations and nominal maximum aggregate sizes varying from 12.5 to 37.5 mm were used in this study. The asphalt binder grade was the same for all mixtures. The mixtures were compacted to 7 +/- 1% air voids, using the Superpave Gyratory Compactor. Tests were conducted at low temperatures (-20°C and -10°C), using the indirect tensile test machine, and at intermediate temperatures (4°C and 20°C), using the Superpave shear machine. To determine the linear viscoelastic range of asphalt concrete, a relaxation test for 150 s, followed by a creep test for another 150 s, was conducted at 150 and 200 microstrains (1 microstrain = 1 x 10-6), at -20°C, and at 150 and 300 microstrains, at -10°C. A creep test for 200 s, followed by a recovery test for another 200 s, was conducted at stress levels up to 800 kPa at 4°C and up to 500 kPa at 20°C. At -20°C and -10°C, the behavior of the mixtures was linear viscoelastic at 200 and 300 microstrains, respectively. At intermediate temperatures (4°C and 20°C), an envelope defining the linear and nonlinear region in terms of stress as a function of shear creep compliance was constructed for all the mixtures. For creep tests conducted at 20°C, it was discovered that the commonly used protocol to verify the proportionality condition of linear viscoelastic behavior was unable to detect the appearance of nonlinear behavior at certain imposed shear stress levels. Said nonlinear behavior was easily detected, however, when checking the satisfaction of the superposition condition. The envelope constructed for determining when the material becomes nonlinear should be

  4. The kinetic dose limit in room-temperature time-resolved macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M.; Šrajer, V.; Purwar, N.; Tripathi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein X-ray structures are determined with ionizing radiation that damages the protein at high X-ray doses. As a result, diffraction patterns deteriorate with the increased absorbed dose. Several strategies such as sample freezing or scavenging of X-ray-generated free radicals are currently employed to minimize this damage. However, little is known about how the absorbed X-ray dose affects time-resolved Laue data collected at physiological temperatures where the protein is fully functional in the crystal, and how the kinetic analysis of such data depends on the absorbed dose. Here, direct evidence for the impact of radiation damage on the function of a protein is presented using time-resolved macromolecular crystallography. The effect of radiation damage on the kinetic analysis of time-resolved X-ray data is also explored. PMID:22338689

  5. Advantages and limitations of cadmium selenide room temperature gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.

    1989-11-01

    State-of-the-art technology of spectrometer grade CdSe gamma ray detectors is presented in this paper. It is shown that high resistivity CdSe single crystals can be reproducibly grown by the temperature gradient solution zoning technique. Zone refining of Se used for crystal growth is found to reduce efficiently the concentration of Cu trace impurities, which are mainly responsible for the electron trapping. The charge carrier transport parameters are studied in detail, and the perspective of further improvement of the energy resolution of CdSe detectors are discussed. A comparison with the performance of CdTe and HgI2 nuclear radiation detectors is also given.

  6. Summer declines in activity and body temperature offer polar bears limited energy savings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whiteman, J.P.; Harlow, H.J.; Durner, George M.; Anderson-Sprecher, R.; Albeke, Shannon E.; Regehr, Eric V.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Ben-David, M.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) summer on the sea ice or, where it melts, on shore. Although the physiology of “ice” bears in summer is unknown, “shore” bears purportedly minimize energy losses by entering a hibernation-like state when deprived of food. Such a strategy could partially compensate for the loss of on-ice foraging opportunities caused by climate change. However, here we report gradual, moderate declines in activity and body temperature of both shore and ice bears in summer, resembling energy expenditures typical of fasting, nonhibernating mammals. Also, we found that to avoid unsustainable heat loss while swimming, bears employed unusual heterothermy of the body core. Thus, although well adapted to seasonal ice melt, polar bears appear susceptible to deleterious declines in body condition during the lengthening period of summer food deprivation.

  7. Animal physiology. Summer declines in activity and body temperature offer polar bears limited energy savings.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, J P; Harlow, H J; Durner, G M; Anderson-Sprecher, R; Albeke, S E; Regehr, E V; Amstrup, S C; Ben-David, M

    2015-07-17

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) summer on the sea ice or, where it melts, on shore. Although the physiology of "ice" bears in summer is unknown, "shore" bears purportedly minimize energy losses by entering a hibernation-like state when deprived of food. Such a strategy could partially compensate for the loss of on-ice foraging opportunities caused by climate change. However, here we report gradual, moderate declines in activity and body temperature of both shore and ice bears in summer, resembling energy expenditures typical of fasting, nonhibernating mammals. Also, we found that to avoid unsustainable heat loss while swimming, bears employed unusual heterothermy of the body core. Thus, although well adapted to seasonal ice melt, polar bears appear susceptible to deleterious declines in body condition during the lengthening period of summer food deprivation. PMID:26185248

  8. Thermal Transport by Ballistic Quasiparticles in Superfluid 3He-B in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Martin, H.; Pickett, G. R.; Roberts, J. E.; Tsepelin, V.

    2006-09-07

    In the temperature range below 0.2Tc, the gas of thermal excitations from the superfluid 3He-B ground state is in the ultra-dilute ballistic regime. Here we discuss preliminary measurements of the transport properties of this quasiparticle gas in a cell of cylindrical geometry with dimensions much smaller than any mean free path. The vertical cylinder, constructed from epoxy-coated paper, has vibrating wire resonator (VWR) heaters and thermometers at the top and bottom, and a small aperture at the top which provides the only exit for quasiparticles. Using the thermometer VWRs, we measure the difference in quasiparticle density between the top and bottom of the tube when we excite the top or bottom VWR heater. This gives information about the transport of energy along the cylindrical 3He sample and hence about the scattering behaviour involved when a quasiparticle impinges on the cylinder wall.

  9. Re-evaluation of temperature at the updip limit of locked portion of Nankai megasplay inferred from IODP Site C0002 temperature observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Takamitsu; Kinoshita, Masataka; Araki, Eichiro; Kimura, Toshinori; Kyo, Masanori; Namba, Yasuhiro; Kido, Yukari; Sanada, Yoshinori; Thu, Moe Kyaw

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, the first long-term borehole monitoring system was deployed at approximately 900 m below the sea floor (mbsf) and was assumed to be situated above the updip limit of the seismogenic zone in the Nankai Trough off Kumano (Site C0002). Four temperature records show that the effect of drilling diminished in less than 2 years. Based on in situ temperatures and thermal conductivities measured on core samples, the temperature measurements and heat flow at 900 mbsf are estimated to be 37.9°C and 56 ± 1 mW/m2, respectively. This heat flow value is in excellent agreement with that from the shallow borehole temperature corrected for rapid sedimentation in the Kumano Basin. We use these values in the present study to extrapolate the temperature below 900 mbsf for a megasplay fault at approximately 5,200 mbsf and a plate boundary fault at approximately 7,000 mbsf. To extrapolate the temperature downward, we use logging-while-drilling (LWD) bit resistivity data as a proxy for porosity and estimate thermal conductivity from this porosity using a geometrical mean model. The one-dimensional (1-D) thermal conduction model used for the extrapolation includes radioactive heat and frictional heat production at the plate boundary fault. The estimated temperature at the megasplay ranges from 132°C to 149°C, depending on the assumed thermal conductivity and radioactive heat production values. These values are significantly higher, by up to 40°C, than some of previous two-dimensional (2-D) numerical model predictions that can account for the high heat flow seaward of the deformation front, including a hydrothermal circulation within the subducted igneous oceanic crust. However, our results are in good agreement with those of the 2-D model, which does not include the advection cooling effect. The results imply that 2-D geometrical effects as well as the influence of the advective cooling may be critical and should be evaluated more quantitatively. Revision of 2-D simulation by

  10. GYRO-ORBIT SIZE, BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE LIMIT, AND IMPLAUSIBILITY OF COHERENT EMISSION BY BUNCHING IN SYNCHROTRON RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2012-06-15

    We show that an upper limit on the maximum brightness temperature for a self-absorbed incoherent synchrotron radio source is obtained from the size of its gyro orbits, which in turn must lie well within the confines of the total source extent. These temperature limits are obtained without recourse to inverse Compton effects or the condition of equipartition of energy between magnetic fields and relativistic particles. For radio variables, the intra-day variability implies brightness temperatures {approx}10{sup 19} K in the comoving rest frame of the source. This, if interpreted purely due to an incoherent synchrotron emission, would imply gyroradii >10{sup 28} cm, the size of the universe, while from the causality arguments the inferred maximum size of the source in such a case is {approx}< 10{sup 15} cm. Such high brightness temperatures are sometimes modeled in the literature as some coherent emission process where bunches of non-thermal particles are somehow formed that radiate in phase. We show that, unlike in the case of curvature radiation models proposed in pulsars, in the synchrotron radiation mechanism the oppositely charged particles would contribute together to the coherent phenomenon without the need to form separate bunches of the opposite charges. At the same time we show that bunches would disperse over dimensions larger than a wavelength in time shorter than the gyro orbital period ({approx}< 0.1 s). Therefore, a coherent emission by bunches cannot be a plausible explanation of the high brightness temperatures inferred in extragalactic radio sources showing variability over a few hours or longer.

  11. Relativistic entrainment matrix of a superfluid nucleon-hyperon mixture: The zero temperature limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Kantor, Elena M.; Haensel, Pawel

    2009-05-15

    We calculate the relativistic entrainment matrix Y{sub ik} at zero temperature for a nucleon-hyperon mixture composed of neutrons, protons, and {lambda} and {sigma}{sup -} hyperons, as well as electrons and muons. This matrix is analogous to the entrainment matrix (also termed mass-density matrix or Andreev-Bashkin matrix) of nonrelativistic theory. It is an important ingredient for modeling the pulsations of massive neutron stars with superfluid nucleon-hyperon cores. The calculation is done in the frame of the relativistic Landau Fermi-liquid theory generalized to the case of superfluid mixtures; the matrix Y{sub ik} is expressed through the Landau parameters of nucleon-hyperon matter. The results are illustrated with a particular example of the {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} mean-field model with scalar self-interactions. Using this model, we calculate the matrix Y{sub ik} and the Landau parameters. We also analyze the stability of the ground state of nucleon-hyperon matter with respect to small perturbations.

  12. Ocean acidification limits temperature-induced poleward expansion of coral habitats around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yara, Y.; Vogt, M.; Fujii, M.; Yamano, H.; Hauri, C.; Steinacher, M.; Gruber, N.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Using results from four coupled global carbon cycle-climate models combined with in situ observations, we estimate the combined effects of future global warming and ocean acidification on potential habitats for tropical/subtropical and temperate coral communities in the seas around Japan. The suitability of the coral habitats are identified primarily on the basis of the currently observed ranges for temperature and saturation states Ω with regard to aragonite (Ωarag). We find that under the "business as usual" SRES A2 scenario, coral habitats will expand northward by several hundred kilometers by the end of this century. At the same time, coral habitats are projected to become sandwiched between the tropical regions, where the frequency of coral bleaching will increase, and the temperate-to-subpolar latitudes, where Ωarag will become too low to support sufficiently high calcification rates. As a result, the area of coral habitats around Japan that is suitable to tropical-subtropical communities will be reduced by half by the 2020s to 2030s, and is projected to disappear by the 2030s to 2040s. The suitable habitats for the temperate coral communities are also becoming smaller, although at a less pronounced rate due to their higher tolerance for low Ωarag.

  13. Limits on the ion temperature anisotropy in the turbulent intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxies is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields. This is in contrast to previous cosmological MHD simulations that are successful in explaining the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities that can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasi-linear theory to estimate the ion scattering rate resulting from the parallel firehose, mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instability thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model that bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvénic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  14. Ocean acidification limits temperature-induced poleward expansion of coral habitats around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yara, Y.; Vogt, M.; Fujii, M.; Yamano, H.; Hauri, C.; Steinacher, M.; Gruber, N.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Using results from four coupled global carbon cycle-climate models combined with in situ observations, we estimate the effects of future global warming and ocean acidification on potential habitats for tropical/subtropical and temperate coral communities in the seas around Japan. The suitability of coral habitats is classified on the basis of the currently observed regional ranges for temperature and saturation states with regard to aragonite (Ωarag). We find that, under the "business as usual" SRES A2 scenario, coral habitats are projected to expand northward by several hundred kilometers by the end of this century. At the same time, coral habitats are projected to become sandwiched between regions where the frequency of coral bleaching will increase, and regions where Ωarag will become too low to support sufficiently high calcification rates. As a result, the habitat suitable for tropical/subtropical corals around Japan may be reduced by half by the 2020s to 2030s, and is projected to disappear by the 2030s to 2040s. The habitat suitable for the temperate coral communities is also projected to decrease, although at a less pronounced rate, due to the higher tolerance of temperate corals for low Ωarag. Our study has two important caveats: first, it does not consider the potential adaptation of the coral communities, which would permit them to colonize habitats that are outside their current range. Second, it also does not consider whether or not coral communities can migrate quickly enough to actually occupy newly emerging habitats. As such, our results serve as a baseline for the assessment of the future evolution of coral habitats, but the consideration of important biological and ecological factors and feedbacks will be required to make more accurate projections.

  15. Winter temperatures decrease swimming performance and limit distributions of tropical damselfishes

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Jacob L.; Steffensen, John F.; Jones, Geoffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs within 10° of the equator generally experience ≤3°C seasonal variation in water temperature. Ectotherms that have evolved in these conditions are therefore expected to exhibit narrow thermal optima and be very sensitive to the greater thermal variability (>6°C) experienced at higher latitudes (≥10°N/S). The impact of increased thermal variability on the fitness and distribution of thermally sensitive reef ectotherms is currently unknown. Here, we examine site-attached planktivorous coral reef damselfishes that rely on their physiological capacity to swim and forage in the water column year round. We focus on 10 species spanning four evolutionarily distinct genera from a region of the Great Barrier Reef that experiences ≥6°C difference between seasons. Four ecologically important indicators showed reduced performance during the winter low (23°C) compared with the summer peak (29°C), with effect sizes varying among species and genera, as follows: (i) the energy available for activity (aerobic scope) was reduced by 35–45% in five species and three genera; (ii) the energetically most efficient swimming speed was reduced by 17% across all species; and (iii) the maximal critical swimming speed and (iv) the gait transition speed (the swimming mode predominantly used for foraging) were reduced by 16–42% in six species spanning all four genera. Comparisons with field surveys within and across latitudes showed that species-specific distributions were strongly correlated with these performance indicators. Species occupy habitats where they can swim faster than prevailing habitat currents year round, and >95% of individuals were observed only in habitats where the gait transition speed can be maintained at or above habitat currents. Thermal fluctuation at higher latitudes appears to reduce performance as well as the possible distribution of species and genera within and among coral reef habitats. Ultimately, thermal variability across latitudes may

  16. Winter temperatures decrease swimming performance and limit distributions of tropical damselfishes.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jacob L; Steffensen, John F; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs within 10° of the equator generally experience ≤3°C seasonal variation in water temperature. Ectotherms that have evolved in these conditions are therefore expected to exhibit narrow thermal optima and be very sensitive to the greater thermal variability (>6°C) experienced at higher latitudes (≥10°N/S). The impact of increased thermal variability on the fitness and distribution of thermally sensitive reef ectotherms is currently unknown. Here, we examine site-attached planktivorous coral reef damselfishes that rely on their physiological capacity to swim and forage in the water column year round. We focus on 10 species spanning four evolutionarily distinct genera from a region of the Great Barrier Reef that experiences ≥6°C difference between seasons. Four ecologically important indicators showed reduced performance during the winter low (23°C) compared with the summer peak (29°C), with effect sizes varying among species and genera, as follows: (i) the energy available for activity (aerobic scope) was reduced by 35-45% in five species and three genera; (ii) the energetically most efficient swimming speed was reduced by 17% across all species; and (iii) the maximal critical swimming speed and (iv) the gait transition speed (the swimming mode predominantly used for foraging) were reduced by 16-42% in six species spanning all four genera. Comparisons with field surveys within and across latitudes showed that species-specific distributions were strongly correlated with these performance indicators. Species occupy habitats where they can swim faster than prevailing habitat currents year round, and >95% of individuals were observed only in habitats where the gait transition speed can be maintained at or above habitat currents. Thermal fluctuation at higher latitudes appears to reduce performance as well as the possible distribution of species and genera within and among coral reef habitats. Ultimately, thermal variability across latitudes may

  17. Increases in the evolutionary potential of upper thermal limits under warmer temperatures in two rainforest Drosophila species.

    PubMed

    van Heerwaarden, Belinda; Malmberg, Michelle; Sgrò, Carla M

    2016-02-01

    Tropical and subtropical species represent the majority of biodiversity. These species are predicted to lack the capacity to evolve higher thermal limits in response to selection imposed by climatic change. However, these assessments have relied on indirect estimates of adaptive capacity, using conditions that do not reflect environmental changes projected under climate change. Using a paternal half-sib full-sib breeding design, we estimated the additive genetic variance and narrow-sense heritability for adult upper thermal limits in two rainforest-restricted species of Drosophila reared under two thermal regimes, reflecting increases in seasonal temperature projected for the Wet Tropics of Australia and under standard laboratory conditions (constant 25°C). Estimates of additive genetic variation and narrow-sense heritability for adult heat tolerance were significantly different from zero in both species under projected summer, but not winter or constant, thermal regimes. In contrast, significant broad-sense genetic variation was apparent in all thermal regimes for egg-to-adult viability. Environment-dependent changes in the expression of genetic variation for adult upper thermal limits suggest that predicting adaptive responses to climate change will be difficult. Estimating adaptive capacity under conditions that do not reflect future environmental conditions may provide limited insight into evolutionary responses to climate change. PMID:26703976

  18. Temperature and food concentration have limited influence on the mixture toxicity of copper and Microcystis aeruginosa to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2016-03-01

    Standard ecotoxicity tests are conducted under constant and favorable experimental conditions. In natural communities, however, the toxicity of chemicals may be influenced by abiotic and biotic environmental factors. Firstly, the authors examined the influence of temperature and total food concentration on the nature of the combined effects of copper (Cu) and the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa to Daphnia magna (i.e., whether the combined effects deviated from noninteraction). Secondly, the authors investigated the relative influence of the percentage of M. aeruginosa in the diet, temperature, and total food concentration on chronic Cu toxicity to D. magna. The nature of the combined effects between Cu and M. aeruginosa (i.e., synergism according to the independent action reference model and noninteraction according to concentration addition reference model) was not affected by temperature and total food concentration. In line with other studies, the concentration addition reference model gave rise to more protective predictions of mixture toxicity than the independent action reference model, thus confirming the former model's suitability as a conservative scenario for evaluating mixture toxicity of Cu and M. aeruginosa under the temperature and food concentrations tested. Further, the 21-d median effective concentration for Cu based on reproduction varied between 20 μg/L and 100 μg/L, and the results indicate that the percentage of M. aeruginosa explained 76% of the variance in the Cu median effective concentration for reproduction, whereas the effects of temperature and total food were limited (together explaining 11% of the variance). The present study suggests that environmental risk assessment of Cu should consider specific situations where harmful M. aeruginosa blooms can co-occur with elevated Cu exposure. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:742-749. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26354710

  19. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  20. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those...

  1. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  2. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  3. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  4. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  5. Life Limiting Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar shear strength of four different fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites was determined with doublenotch shear test specimens as a function of test rate at elevated temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1316 C in air. Life limiting behavior, represented as interlaminar shear strength degradation with decreasing test rate, was significant for 2-D crossplied SiC/MAS-5 and 2-D plain-woven C/SiC composites, but insignificant for 2-D plain-woven SiC/SiC and 2-D woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, Michigan) SiC/SiC composites. A phenomenological, power-law delayed failure model was proposed to account for and to quantify the rate dependency of interlaminar shear strength of the composites. Additional stress rupture testing in interlaminar shear was conducted at elevated temperatures to validate the proposed model. The model was in good agreement with SiC/MAS-5 and C/SiC composites, but in poor to reasonable agreement with Sylramic SiC/SiC. Constant shear stress-rate testing was proposed as a possible means of life prediction testing methodology for ceramic matrix composites subjected to interlaminar shear at elevated temperatures when short lifetimes are expected.

  6. The spall strength and Hugoniot elastic limit of mono-crystalline and polycrystalline copper near melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razorenov, S. V.; Zaretsky, E. B.; Savinykh, A. S.

    2014-05-01

    In present work, the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) and spall strength of polycrystalline commercial grade copper and single crystal copper of <100> and <111> orientations were determined for sample temperatures varying from 20 to 1081°C. The differently preheated samples whose thickness varied between 0.5 and 2 mm were shock-loaded by copper plates of 1-mm thickness accelerated up to 300-400 m/s velocity in the 58mm smooth bore gas gun, or by aluminium plates of 0.4 mm in thickness (~660 m/s), accelerated with explosive facilities. The velocity histories of the free rear surface of the loaded samples were recorded with VISAR laser velocimeter. The velocity histories of the samples of polycrystalline copper demonstrate 9-fold growth of the stress at HEL between room and melting temperatures. Unlike other metals commercial grade copper maintains very high spall strength near the melting point Tm; it is only twice as low as that of the copper at 0.85 Tm. The copper single crystals of both orientations also demonstrate substantial spall strength at 0.94 Tm (1000°C). At the same time, the increase of the stress at HEL with temperature in these samples is much weaker than that found for polycrystalline samples of copper.

  7. Examining soil carbon uncertainty in a global model: response of microbial decomposition to temperature, moisture and nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Pitman, A. J.; Zhang, Q.; Abramowitz, G.; Wang, Y.-P.

    2013-11-01

    Reliable projections of future climate require land-atmosphere carbon (C) fluxes to be represented realistically in Earth system models (ESMs). There are several sources of uncertainty in how carbon is parameterised in these models. First, while interactions between the C, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles have been implemented in some models, these lead to diverse changes in land-atmosphere fluxes. Second, while the first-order parameterisation of soil organic matter decomposition is similar between models, formulations of the control of the soil physical state on microbial activity vary widely. For the first time, we address these sources of uncertainty simultaneously by implementing three soil moisture and three soil temperature respiration functions in an ESM that can be run with three degrees of biogeochemical nutrient limitation (C-only, C and N, and C and N and P). All 27 possible combinations of response functions and biogeochemical mode are equilibrated before transient historical (1850-2005) simulations are performed. As expected, implementing N and P limitation reduces the land carbon sink, transforming some regional sinks into net sources over the historical period. Meanwhile, regardless of which nutrient mode is used, various combinations of response functions imply a two-fold difference in the net ecosystem accumulation and a four-fold difference in equilibrated total soil C. We further show that regions with initially larger pools are more likely to become carbon sources, especially when nutrient availability limits the response of primary production to increasing atmospheric CO2. Simulating changes in soil C content therefore critically depends on both nutrient limitation and the choice of respiration functions.

  8. The Thermal Boundary Resistance of the Superfluid 3He A-B Phase Interface in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Martin, H.; Pickett, G. R.; Roberts, J. E.; Tsepelin, V.

    2006-09-07

    We have constructed a vertical cylindrical cell in which we cool superfluid 3He to the low temperature limit. At the top and bottom of this cylinder are pairs of vibrating wire resonators (VWRs), one to act as a heater and the other as a thermometer. Quasiparticle excitations are created by driving the heater VWRs. These excitations can only leave the cylinder via a small hole at the top. Using a shaped magnetic field, we can produce a layer of A phase across the tube, while maintaining low field B phase in the vicinity of the VWRs for reliable thermometry. Preliminary results show that the two A-B interfaces lead to a measurable extra resistance for quasiparticles between the top and bottom of the cylinder.

  9. Best-estimate Mark 22 power and temperature limits during the flow instability phase of K Reactor LBLOCAs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, S.; Steiner, J.; Motley, F.; Morgan, M.

    1992-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing independent analyses to the Department of Energy in its endeavor to enhance the safe operation of the K Reactor located at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). LANL has performed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic system simulations to assess the impact of hypothesized accidents in the K Reactor. In particular, the large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) was one of the major transients that was analyzed. The LBLOCA consists of two distinct thermal-hydraulic phases: the flow instability (FI) phase and the emergency coolant system (ECS) phase. Each phase results in reactor temperature and power limits that are determined using different criteria. This document provides a detailed discussion of the simulations of these phases.

  10. Room temperature diode-pumped Yb:CaYAlO4 laser with near quantum limit slope efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. D.; Tang, D. Y.; Xu, X. D.; Li, D. Z.; Zhang, J.; Xu, C. W.; Cong, Z. H.; Xu, J.

    2011-03-01

    The room temperature continuous wave (CW) laser performance of a compact Yb:CaYAlO4 (Yb:CYA) laser with near quantum limit slope efficiency is demonstrated. Pumped with a CW diode operating at 979 nm, the laser emitted a maximum CW output power of 2.3 W at 1050 nm. The corresponding slope efficiency was found to be 92% while the optical to optical conversion efficiency was 70%. The laser can also be continuously tuned from 1008 nm to 1063 nm using an intra-cavity SF 10 prism. The round trip cavity losses of Yb:CYA was 0.6% while the loss coefficient of the crystal was 0.01 cm-1.

  11. Is the Growth of Birch at the UPPER Timberline in the Himalayas Limited By Moisture or By Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, E.; Dawadi, B.; Pederson, N.; Eckstein, D.

    2014-12-01

    Birch (Betula) trees and forests are found across much of the temperate and boreal zones of the Northern Hemisphere. Yet, despite being an ecologically-significant genus, it is much less-well studied compared to common genera like Pinus, Picea, Juniperus, Quercus, and Fagus. In the Himalayas, Himalayan birch (Betula utilis) is a widespread, important broadleaf timberline species that survives in mountain rain shadows via access to water from snowmelt. Because precipitation in the Nepalese Himalayas decreases with increasing elevation, we hypothesized that the growth of birch at the upper timberlines between 3,900 and 4,150 m a.s.l. is primarily limited by moisture availability rather than by low temperature. To verify this assumption, a total of 292 increment cores were extracted from 211 birch trees at nine timberline sites. The synchronous occurrence of narrow rings and high inter-series correlations within and among sites evidenced a reliable cross-dating and a common climatic signal in the tree-ring widths variations. From March-May, all nine tree-ring width site chronologies showed a strongly positive response to total precipitation and a less strongly negative response to temperature. During the instrumental meteorological record (after 1960), years with a high percentage of missing rings coincided with pre-monsoon drought events. Periods of below-average growth are in phase with well-known drought events all over monsoon Asia, showing additional evidence that Himalayan birch growth at the upper timberlines is persistently limited by moisture availability. Our study describes the rare case of a drought-induced altitudinal timberline that is composed by a broadleaf tree species.

  12. Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient suggests limited acclimatization potential to warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R.; Wahl, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This suggests regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This suggests variable acclimatization potential to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization potential in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals.

  13. Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient suggests limited acclimatization potential to warming.

    PubMed

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R; Wahl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This suggests regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This suggests variable acclimatization potential to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization potential in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals. PMID:25754672

  14. Examining soil carbon uncertainty in a global model: response of microbial decomposition to temperature, moisture and nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Pitman, A. J.; Zhang, Q.; Abramowitz, G.; Wang, Y.-P.

    2013-06-01

    Reliable projections of future climate require land-atmosphere carbon (C) fluxes to be represented realistically in Earth System Models. There are several sources of uncertainty in how carbon is parameterized in these models. First, while interactions between the C, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles have been implemented in some models, these lead to diverse changes in land-atmosphere fluxes. Second, while the parameterization of soil organic matter decomposition is similar between models, formulations of the control of the soil physical state on microbial activity vary widely. We address these sources uncertainty by implementing three soil moisture (SMRF) and three soil temperature (STRF) respiration functions in an Earth System Model that can be run with three degrees of biogeochemical nutrient limitation (C-only, C and N, and C and N and P). All 27 possible combinations of a SMRF with a STRF and a biogeochemical mode are equilibrated before transient historical (1850-2005) simulations are performed. As expected, implementing N and P limitation reduces the land carbon sink, transforming some regions from net sinks to net sources over the historical period (1850-2005). Differences in the soil C balance implied by the various SMRFs and STRFs also change the sign of some regional sinks. Further, although the absolute uncertainty in global carbon uptake is reduced, the uncertainty due to the SMRFs and STRFs grows relative to the inter-annual variability in net uptake when N and P limitations are added. We also demonstrate that the equilibrated soil C also depend on the shape of the SMRF and STRF. Equilibration using different STRFs and SMRFs and nutrient limitation generates a six-fold range of global soil C that largely mirrors the range in available (17) CMIP5 models. Simulating the historical change in soil carbon therefore critically depends on the choice of STRF, SMRF and nutrient limitation, as it controls the equilibrated state to which transient

  15. Limits to sustained energy intake XXIV: impact of suckling behaviour on the body temperatures of lactating female mice

    PubMed Central

    Gamo, Y.; Bernard, A.; Troup, C.; Munro, F.; Derrer, K.; Jeannesson, N.; Campbell, A.; Gray, H.; Miller, J.; Dixon, J.; Mitchell, S. E.; Hambly, C.; Vaanholt, L. M.; Speakman, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential causes of high body temperature (Tb) during lactation in mice as a putative limit on energy intake. In particular we explored whether or not offspring contributed to heat retention in mothers while suckling. Tb and physical activity were monitored in 26 female MF1 mice using intraperitoneally implanted transmitters. In addition, maternal behaviour was scored each minute for 8 h d−1 throughout lactation. Mothers that raised larger litters tended to have higher Tb while nursing inside nests (P < 0.05), suggesting that nursing offspring may have influenced heat retention. However, Tb during nursing was not higher than that recorded during other behaviours. In addition, the highest Tb during the observation period was not measured during nursing behaviour. Finally, there was no indication that mothers discontinued suckling because of a progressive rise in their Tb while suckling. Tb throughout lactation was correlated with daily increases in energy intake. Chronic hyperthermia during lactation was not caused by increased heat retention due to surrounding offspring. Other factors, like metabolic heat produced as a by-product of milk production or energy intake may be more important factors. Heat dissipation limits are probably not a phenomenon restricted to lactation. PMID:27157478

  16. Limits to sustained energy intake XXIV: impact of suckling behaviour on the body temperatures of lactating female mice.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Y; Bernard, A; Troup, C; Munro, F; Derrer, K; Jeannesson, N; Campbell, A; Gray, H; Miller, J; Dixon, J; Mitchell, S E; Hambly, C; Vaanholt, L M; Speakman, J R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential causes of high body temperature (Tb) during lactation in mice as a putative limit on energy intake. In particular we explored whether or not offspring contributed to heat retention in mothers while suckling. Tb and physical activity were monitored in 26 female MF1 mice using intraperitoneally implanted transmitters. In addition, maternal behaviour was scored each minute for 8 h d(-1) throughout lactation. Mothers that raised larger litters tended to have higher Tb while nursing inside nests (P < 0.05), suggesting that nursing offspring may have influenced heat retention. However, Tb during nursing was not higher than that recorded during other behaviours. In addition, the highest Tb during the observation period was not measured during nursing behaviour. Finally, there was no indication that mothers discontinued suckling because of a progressive rise in their Tb while suckling. Tb throughout lactation was correlated with daily increases in energy intake. Chronic hyperthermia during lactation was not caused by increased heat retention due to surrounding offspring. Other factors, like metabolic heat produced as a by-product of milk production or energy intake may be more important factors. Heat dissipation limits are probably not a phenomenon restricted to lactation. PMID:27157478

  17. Limited tolerance by insects to high temperatures across tropical elevational gradients and the implications of global warming for extinction.

    PubMed

    García-Robledo, Carlos; Kuprewicz, Erin K; Staines, Charles L; Erwin, Terry L; Kress, W John

    2016-01-19

    The critical thermal maximum (CTmax), the temperature at which motor control is lost in animals, has the potential to determine if species will tolerate global warming. For insects, tolerance to high temperatures decreases with latitude, suggesting that similar patterns may exist along elevational gradients as well. This study explored how CTmax varies among species and populations of a group of diverse tropical insect herbivores, the rolled-leaf beetles, across both broad and narrow elevational gradients. Data from 6,948 field observations and 8,700 museum specimens were used to map the elevational distributions of rolled-leaf beetles on two mountains in Costa Rica. CTmax was determined for 1,252 individual beetles representing all populations across the gradients. Initial morphological identifications suggested a total of 26 species with populations at different elevations displaying contrasting upper thermal limits. However, compared with morphological identifications, DNA barcodes (cytochrome oxidase I) revealed significant cryptic species diversity. DNA barcodes identified 42 species and haplotypes across 11 species complexes. These 42 species displayed much narrower elevational distributions and values of CTmax than the 26 morphologically defined species. In general, species found at middle elevations and on mountaintops are less tolerant to high temperatures than species restricted to lowland habitats. Species with broad elevational distributions display high CTmax throughout their ranges. We found no significant phylogenetic signal in CTmax, geography, or elevational range. The narrow variance in CTmax values for most rolled-leaf beetles, especially high-elevation species, suggests that the risk of extinction of insects may be substantial under some projected rates of global warming. PMID:26729867

  18. Limited tolerance by insects to high temperatures across tropical elevational gradients and the implications of global warming for extinction

    PubMed Central

    García-Robledo, Carlos; Kuprewicz, Erin K.; Staines, Charles L.; Erwin, Terry L.; Kress, W. John

    2016-01-01

    The critical thermal maximum (CTmax), the temperature at which motor control is lost in animals, has the potential to determine if species will tolerate global warming. For insects, tolerance to high temperatures decreases with latitude, suggesting that similar patterns may exist along elevational gradients as well. This study explored how CTmax varies among species and populations of a group of diverse tropical insect herbivores, the rolled-leaf beetles, across both broad and narrow elevational gradients. Data from 6,948 field observations and 8,700 museum specimens were used to map the elevational distributions of rolled-leaf beetles on two mountains in Costa Rica. CTmax was determined for 1,252 individual beetles representing all populations across the gradients. Initial morphological identifications suggested a total of 26 species with populations at different elevations displaying contrasting upper thermal limits. However, compared with morphological identifications, DNA barcodes (cytochrome oxidase I) revealed significant cryptic species diversity. DNA barcodes identified 42 species and haplotypes across 11 species complexes. These 42 species displayed much narrower elevational distributions and values of CTmax than the 26 morphologically defined species. In general, species found at middle elevations and on mountaintops are less tolerant to high temperatures than species restricted to lowland habitats. Species with broad elevational distributions display high CTmax throughout their ranges. We found no significant phylogenetic signal in CTmax, geography, or elevational range. The narrow variance in CTmax values for most rolled-leaf beetles, especially high-elevation species, suggests that the risk of extinction of insects may be substantial under some projected rates of global warming. PMID:26729867

  19. Low-temperature self-limiting atomic layer deposition of wurtzite InN on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report on self-limiting growth of InN thin films at substrate temperatures as low as 200 °C by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). The precursors used in growth experiments were trimethylindium (TMI) and N2 plasma. Process parameters including TMI pulse time, N2 plasma exposure time, purge time, and deposition temperature have been optimized for self-limiting growth of InN with in ALD window. With the increase in exposure time of N2 plasma from 40 s to 100 s at 200 °C, growth rate showed a significant decrease from 1.60 to 0.64 Å/cycle. At 200 °C, growth rate saturated as 0.64 Å/cycle for TMI dose starting from 0.07 s. Structural, optical, and morphological characterization of InN were carried out in detail. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure of the grown InN films. Refractive index of the InN film deposited at 200 °C was found to be 2.66 at 650 nm. 48 nm-thick InN films exhibited relatively smooth surfaces with Rms surface roughness values of 0.98 nm, while the film density was extracted as 6.30 g/cm3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements depicted the peaks of indium, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen on the film surface and quantitative information revealed that films are nearly stoichiometric with rather low impurity content. In3d and N1s high-resolution scans confirmed the presence of InN with peaks located at 443.5 and 396.8 eV, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) further confirmed the polycrystalline structure of InN thin films and elemental mapping revealed uniform distribution of indium and nitrogen along the scanned area of the InN film. Spectral absorption measurements exhibited an optical band edge around 1.9 eV. Our findings demonstrate that HCPA-ALD might be a promising technique to grow crystalline wurtzite InN thin films at low substrate temperatures.

  20. Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyes, Andrew B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Kueppers, Lara M.

    2015-01-01

    Summer precipitation may be at least as important as temperature in constraining C gain by establishing subalpine trees at and above current alpine treelines as seasonally dry subalpine and alpine ecosystems continue to warm.

  1. Towards Determining the Upper Temperature Limits to Life on Earth: An In-situ Sulfide-Microbial Incubator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D.; Baross, J.; Delaney, J.; Girguis, P.; Schrenk, M.

    2004-12-01

    Determining the maximum conditions under which life thrives, survives, and expires is critical to understanding how and where life might have evolved on our planet and for investigation of life in extraterrestrial environments. Submarine black smoker systems are optimal sites to study such questions because thermal gradients are extreme and accessible within the chimney walls under high-pressure conditions. Intact cells containing DNA and ribosomes have been observed even within the most extreme environments of sulfide structure walls bounded by 300\\deg C fluids. Membrane lipids from archaea have been detected in sulfide flanges and chimneys where temperatures are believed to be 200-300\\deg C. However, a balanced inquiry into the limits of life must focus on characterization of the actual conditions in a given system that favor reactions necessary to initiate and/or sustain life. At present, in-situ instrumentation of sulfide deposits is the only effective way to gain direct access to these natural high-temperature environments for documentation and experimentation. With this goal in mind, three prototype microbial incubators were developed with funding from the NSF, University of Washington, and the W.M. Keck Foundation. The incubators were deployed in 2003 in the walls of active black smoker chimneys in the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. All instruments were successfully recovered in 2004, and one was redeployed for a short time-series experiment. Each 53-cm-long titanium assembly houses 27 temperature sensors that record temperatures from 0 to 500\\deg C within three discrete incubation chambers. Data are logged in a separate housing and inductively coupled links provide access to the data loggers without removal of the instruments. During the initial deployment, data were collected from 189 to 245 days, with up to ˜478° K temperature measurements completed for an individual instrument. Temperatures within the chimney

  2. 14 CFR 29.1521 - Powerplant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... temperature (for turbine engines); (4) The maximum allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the... or torque for each engine considering the power input limitations of the transmission with one engine... allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the power input limitations of the transmission...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1521 - Powerplant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... temperature (for turbine engines); (4) The maximum allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the... or torque for each engine considering the power input limitations of the transmission with one engine... allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the power input limitations of the transmission...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1521 - Powerplant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... temperature (for turbine engines); (4) The maximum allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the... or torque for each engine considering the power input limitations of the transmission with one engine... allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the power input limitations of the transmission...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1521 - Powerplant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... temperature (for turbine engines); (4) The maximum allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the... or torque for each engine considering the power input limitations of the transmission with one engine... allowable power or torque for each engine, considering the power input limitations of the transmission...

  6. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  7. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1470.22 Section 1470.22 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  8. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  9. 45 CFR 2541.220 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2541.220 Section 2541.220 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.220 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may...

  10. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  11. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22... Administration § 66.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  12. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  13. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  14. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  15. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  16. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  17. 32 CFR 33.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 33.22 Section 33.22 National... Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 33.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use...

  18. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  19. 40 CFR 31.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 31.22 Section 31.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 31.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  20. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  1. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  2. Effect of temperature on frictional behavior of smectite and illite: Implication for the updip limit of seismogenic zone along subduction thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Katayama, I.

    2014-12-01

    Along plate boundary subduction thrusts, the transformation of smectite to illite within fault gouge at temperatures of ~150C is one of the key mineralogical changes thought to control the updip limit of seismicity. Saffer and Marone (2003) reported illite shale exhibited only velocity-strengthening behavior, whereas illite is widely expected to be velocity-weakening behavior. The limitation of their experiments were temperature, in which the frictional experiments were csrried out at room temperature, although the updip limit of seismogenic zone is thermally controlled that occurs at temperature around 150C. Therefore, in this study, we determined the effect of temperature of frictional properties of smectite and illite and discuss whether the smectite-illite transition accounts for the updip limit of seismogenic zone along subduction thrust. In the frictional experiments, we determined the velocity dependence of sliding friction, which is a key parameter for stable or unstable sliding. After steady-state sliding, the loading velocity of 3 μm/s was abruptly changed to 33 μm/s in each frictional experiments to determine the velocity dependence of these clay minerals. The velocity dependence of both smectite and illite at room temperature shows always positive at normal stress higher than 40 MPa, which is similar to the results of Saffer and Marone (2003). However, at temperature of 200C, illite shows negative values of (a-b), suggesting that illite exhibits unstable velocity-weakening behavior. den Hartog et al. (2012) also showed the velocity-weakening for illite gouge by high temperature ring shear experiments, but the transition from velocity strengthening to weakening occurs at temperature around 250C. These results explain that smectite is potentially aseismic for stable sliding at the subduction thrust, whereas illite becomes seismic due to a negative velocity dependence and unstable sliding at high temperatures. Thus, the smectite-illite transition has a

  3. 34 CFR 656.30 - What are allowable costs and limitations on allowable costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; and (8) Summer institutes in the United States or abroad designed to provide language and area... study in the subject area on which the Center focuses. (3) Grant funds may not be used to supplant...

  4. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Y.; Kanegae, R.

    2016-01-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz−1/2, which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise. PMID:27312284

  5. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Y.; Kanegae, R.

    2016-06-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz‑1/2, which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise.

  6. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, R

    2016-01-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz(-1/2), which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise. PMID:27312284

  7. Modelling the impact of temperature-induced life history plasticity and mate limitation on the epidemic potential of a marine ectoparasite.

    PubMed

    Groner, Maya L; Gettinby, George; Stormoen, Marit; Revie, Crawford W; Cox, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is hypothesized to contribute to increased pathogenicity and virulence of many marine diseases. The sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is an ectoparasite of salmonids that exhibits strong life-history plasticity in response to temperature; however, the effect of temperature on the epidemiology of this parasite has not been rigorously examined. We used matrix population modelling to examine the influence of temperature on demographic parameters of sea lice parasitizing farmed salmon. Demographically-stochastic population projection matrices were created using parameters from the existing literature on vital rates of sea lice at different fixed temperatures and yearly temperature profiles. In addition, we quantified the effectiveness of a single stage-specific control applied at different times during a year with seasonal temperature changes. We found that the epidemic potential of sea lice increased with temperature due to a decrease in generation time and an increase in the net reproductive rate. In addition, mate limitation constrained population growth more at low temperatures than at high temperatures. Our model predicts that control measures targeting preadults and chalimus are most effective regardless of the temperature. The predictions from this model suggest that temperature can dramatically change vital rates of sea lice and can increase population growth. The results of this study suggest that sea surface temperatures should be considered when choosing salmon farm sites and designing management plans to control sea louse infestations. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of matrix population modelling for epidemiological studies. PMID:24505493

  8. Modelling the Impact of Temperature-Induced Life History Plasticity and Mate Limitation on the Epidemic Potential of a Marine Ectoparasite

    PubMed Central

    Groner, Maya L.; Gettinby, George; Stormoen, Marit; Revie, Crawford W.; Cox, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is hypothesized to contribute to increased pathogenicity and virulence of many marine diseases. The sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is an ectoparasite of salmonids that exhibits strong life-history plasticity in response to temperature; however, the effect of temperature on the epidemiology of this parasite has not been rigorously examined. We used matrix population modelling to examine the influence of temperature on demographic parameters of sea lice parasitizing farmed salmon. Demographically-stochastic population projection matrices were created using parameters from the existing literature on vital rates of sea lice at different fixed temperatures and yearly temperature profiles. In addition, we quantified the effectiveness of a single stage-specific control applied at different times during a year with seasonal temperature changes. We found that the epidemic potential of sea lice increased with temperature due to a decrease in generation time and an increase in the net reproductive rate. In addition, mate limitation constrained population growth more at low temperatures than at high temperatures. Our model predicts that control measures targeting preadults and chalimus are most effective regardless of the temperature. The predictions from this model suggest that temperature can dramatically change vital rates of sea lice and can increase population growth. The results of this study suggest that sea surface temperatures should be considered when choosing salmon farm sites and designing management plans to control sea louse infestations. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of matrix population modelling for epidemiological studies. PMID:24505493

  9. Allowable carbon emissions lowered by multiple climate targets.

    PubMed

    Steinacher, Marco; Joos, Fortunat; Stocker, Thomas F

    2013-07-11

    Climate targets are designed to inform policies that would limit the magnitude and impacts of climate change caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and other substances. The target that is currently recognized by most world governments places a limit of two degrees Celsius on the global mean warming since preindustrial times. This would require large sustained reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during the twenty-first century and beyond. Such a global temperature target, however, is not sufficient to control many other quantities, such as transient sea level rise, ocean acidification and net primary production on land. Here, using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC) in an observation-informed Bayesian approach, we show that allowable carbon emissions are substantially reduced when multiple climate targets are set. We take into account uncertainties in physical and carbon cycle model parameters, radiative efficiencies, climate sensitivity and carbon cycle feedbacks along with a large set of observational constraints. Within this framework, we explore a broad range of economically feasible greenhouse gas scenarios from the integrated assessment community to determine the likelihood of meeting a combination of specific global and regional targets under various assumptions. For any given likelihood of meeting a set of such targets, the allowable cumulative emissions are greatly reduced from those inferred from the temperature target alone. Therefore, temperature targets alone are unable to comprehensively limit the risks from anthropogenic emissions. PMID:23823728

  10. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... season to reflect anticipated water-righted acres to be irrigated. At the start of the irrigation season... irrigation season, the required target efficiency must be recalculated for the irrigation season based on the... established by the Bureau at least 2 weeks before the start of each irrigation season. All releases of...

  11. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... season to reflect anticipated water-righted acres to be irrigated. At the start of the irrigation season... irrigation season, the required target efficiency must be recalculated for the irrigation season based on the... established by the Bureau at least 2 weeks before the start of each irrigation season. All releases of...

  12. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... season to reflect anticipated water-righted acres to be irrigated. At the start of the irrigation season... irrigation season, the required target efficiency must be recalculated for the irrigation season based on the... established by the Bureau at least 2 weeks before the start of each irrigation season. All releases of...

  13. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provisional water budget in the Newlands Project Water Budget table must be recalculated for each irrigation season to reflect anticipated water-righted acres to be irrigated. At the start of the irrigation season... established by the Bureau at least 2 weeks before the start of each irrigation season. All releases of...

  14. 43 CFR 418.13 - Maximum allowable limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OPERATING CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR THE NEWLANDS RECLAMATION PROJECT, NEVADA... Truckee Canal to Rock Dam Ditch) must be charged to the MAD except as provided in §§ 418.23 and 418.35...

  15. Interaction Effects of Light, Temperature and Nutrient Limitations (N, P and Si) on Growth, Stoichiometry and Photosynthetic Parameters of the Cold-Water Diatom Chaetoceros wighamii.

    PubMed

    Spilling, Kristian; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Simis, Stefan; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Light (20-450 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), temperature (3-11 °C) and inorganic nutrient composition (nutrient replete and N, P and Si limitation) were manipulated to study their combined influence on growth, stoichiometry (C:N:P:Chl a) and primary production of the cold water diatom Chaetoceros wighamii. During exponential growth, the maximum growth rate (~0.8 d(-1)) was observed at high temperature and light; at 3 °C the growth rate was ~30% lower under similar light conditions. The interaction effect of light and temperature were clearly visible from growth and cellular stoichiometry. The average C:N:P molar ratio was 80:13:1 during exponential growth, but the range, due to different light acclimation, was widest at the lowest temperature, reaching very low C:P (~50) and N:P ratios (~8) at low light and temperature. The C:Chl a ratio had also a wider range at the lowest temperature during exponential growth, ranging 16-48 (weight ratio) at 3 °C compared with 17-33 at 11 °C. During exponential growth, there was no clear trend in the Chl a normalized, initial slope (α*) of the photosynthesis-irradiance (PE) curve, but the maximum photosynthetic production (P(m)) was highest for cultures acclimated to the highest light and temperature. During the stationary growth phase, the stoichiometric relationship depended on the limiting nutrient, but with generally increasing C:N:P ratio. The average photosynthetic quotient (PQ) during exponential growth was 1.26 but decreased to <1 under nutrient and light limitation, probably due to photorespiration. The results clearly demonstrate that there are interaction effects between light, temperature and nutrient limitation, and the data suggests greater variability of key parameters at low temperature. Understanding these dynamics will be important for improving models of aquatic primary production and biogeochemical cycles in a warming climate. PMID:25993327

  16. Evaluation of the Maximum Allowable Cost Program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. James; Hefner, Dennis; Dobson, Allen; Hardy, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    This article summarizes an evaluation of the Maximum Allowable Cost (MAC)-Estimated Acquisition Cost (EAC) program, the Federal Government's cost-containment program for prescription drugs.1 The MAC-EAC regulations which became effective on August 26, 1976, have four major components: (1) Maximum Allowable Cost reimbursement limits for selected multisource or generically available drugs; (2) Estimated Acquisition Cost reimbursement limits for all drugs; (3) “usual and customary” reimbursement limits for all drugs; and (4) a directive that professional fee studies be performed by each State. The study examines the benefits and costs of the MAC reimbursement limits for 15 dosage forms of five multisource drugs and EAC reimbursement limits for all drugs for five selected States as of 1979. PMID:10309857

  17. Higher growth temperatures decreased net carbon assimilation and biomass accumulation of northern red oak seedlings near the southern limit of the species range.

    PubMed

    Wertin, Timothy M; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O

    2011-12-01

    If an increase in temperature will limit the growth of a species, it will be in the warmest portion of the species distribution. Therefore, in this study we examined the effects of elevated temperature on net carbon assimilation and biomass production of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings grown near the southern limit of the species distribution. Seedlings were grown in chambers in elevated CO(2) (700 µmol mol(-1)) at three temperature conditions, ambient (tracking diurnal and seasonal variation in outdoor temperature), ambient +3 °C and ambient +6 °C, which produced mean growing season temperatures of 23, 26 and 29 °C, respectively. A group of seedlings was also grown in ambient [CO(2)] and ambient temperature as a check of the growth response to elevated [CO(2)]. Net photosynthesis and leaf respiration, photosynthetic capacity (V(cmax), J(max) and triose phosphate utilization (TPU)) and chlorophyll fluorescence, as well as seedling height, diameter and biomass, were measured during one growing season. Higher growth temperatures reduced net photosynthesis, increased respiration and reduced height, diameter and biomass production. Maximum net photosynthesis at saturating [CO(2)] and maximum rate of electron transport (J(max)) were lowest throughout the growing season in seedlings grown in the highest temperature regime. These parameters were also lower in June, but not in July or September, in seedlings grown at +3 °C above ambient, compared with those grown in ambient temperature, indicating no impairment of photosynthetic capacity with a moderate increase in air temperature. An unusual and potentially important observation was that foliar respiration did not acclimate to growth temperature, resulting in substantially higher leaf respiration at the higher growth temperatures. Lower net carbon assimilation was correlated with lower growth at higher temperatures. Total biomass at the end of the growing season decreased in direct proportion to the

  18. Variation in the daily rhythm of body temperature of free-living Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx): does water limitation drive heterothermy?

    PubMed

    Hetem, Robyn Sheila; Strauss, Willem Maartin; Fick, Linda Gayle; Maloney, Shane Kevin; Meyer, Leith Carl Rodney; Shobrak, Mohammed; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Heterothermy, a variability in body temperature beyond the limits of homeothermy, has been advanced as a key adaptation of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) to their arid-zone life. We measured body temperature using implanted data loggers, for a 1-year period, in five oryx free-living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia. As predicted for adaptive heterothermy, during hot months compared to cooler months, not only were maximum daily body temperatures higher (41.1 ± 0.3 vs. 39.7 ± 0.1°C, P = 0.0002) but minimum daily body temperatures also were lower (36.1 ± 0.3 vs. 36.8 ± 0.2°C, P = 0.04), resulting in a larger daily amplitude of the body temperature rhythm (5.0 ± 0.5 vs. 2.9 ± 0.2°C, P = 0.0007), while mean daily body temperature rose by only 0.4°C. The maximum daily amplitude of the body temperature rhythm reached 7.7°C for two of our oryx during the hot-dry period, the largest amplitude ever recorded for a large mammal. Body temperature variability was influenced not only by ambient temperature but also water availability, with oryx displaying larger daily amplitudes of the body temperature rhythm during warm-dry months compared to warm-wet months (3.6 ± 0.6 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3°C, P = 0.005), even though ambient temperatures were the same. Free-living Arabian oryx therefore employ heterothermy greater than that recorded in any other large mammal, but water limitation, rather than high ambient temperature, seems to be the primary driver of this heterothermy. PMID:20502901

  19. Conserved and narrow temperature limits in alpine insects: Thermal tolerance and supercooling points of the ice-crawlers, Grylloblatta (Insecta: Grylloblattodea: Grylloblattidae).

    PubMed

    Schoville, Sean D; Slatyer, Rachel A; Bergdahl, James C; Valdez, Glenda A

    2015-07-01

    For many terrestrial species, habitat associations and range size are dependent on physiological limits, which in turn may influence large-scale patterns of species diversity. The temperature range experienced by individuals is considered to shape the breadth of the thermal niche, with species occupying temporally and/or geographically stable climates tolerating a narrow temperature range. High-elevation environments experience large temperature fluctuations, with frequent periods below 0 °C, but Grylloblatta (Grylloblattodea: Grylloblattidae) occupy climatically stable microhabitats within this region. Here we test critical thermal limits and supercooling points for five Grylloblatta populations from across a large geographic area, to examine whether the stable microhabitats of this group are associated with a narrow thermal niche and assess their capacity to tolerate cold conditions. Thermal limits are highly conserved in Grylloblatta, despite substantial genetic divergence among populations spanning 1500 m elevation and being separated by over 500 km. Further, Grylloblatta show exceptionally narrow thermal limits compared to other insect taxa with little capacity to improve cold tolerance via plasticity. In contrast, upper thermal limits were significantly depressed by cold acclimation. Grylloblatta maintain coordinated movement until they freeze, and they die upon freezing. Convergence of the critical thermal minima, supercooling point and lower lethal limits point to adaptation to a cold but, importantly, constant thermal environment. These physiological data provide an explanation for the high endemism and patchy distribution of Grylloblatta, which relies on subterranean retreats to accommodate narrow thermal limits. These retreats are currently buffered from temperature fluctuations by snow cover, and a declining snowpack thus places Grylloblatta at risk of exposure to temperatures beyond its tolerance capacity. PMID:25956197

  20. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  1. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-15

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  2. Interaction Effects of Light, Temperature and Nutrient Limitations (N, P and Si) on Growth, Stoichiometry and Photosynthetic Parameters of the Cold-Water Diatom Chaetoceros wighamii

    PubMed Central

    Spilling, Kristian; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Simis, Stefan; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Light (20-450 μmol photons m-2 s-1), temperature (3-11°C) and inorganic nutrient composition (nutrient replete and N, P and Si limitation) were manipulated to study their combined influence on growth, stoichiometry (C:N:P:Chl a) and primary production of the cold water diatom Chaetoceros wighamii. During exponential growth, the maximum growth rate (~0.8 d-1) was observed at high temperture and light; at 3°C the growth rate was ~30% lower under similar light conditions. The interaction effect of light and temperature were clearly visible from growth and cellular stoichiometry. The average C:N:P molar ratio was 80:13:1 during exponential growth, but the range, due to different light acclimation, was widest at the lowest temperature, reaching very low C:P (~50) and N:P ratios (~8) at low light and temperature. The C:Chl a ratio had also a wider range at the lowest temperature during exponential growth, ranging 16-48 (weight ratio) at 3°C compared with 17-33 at 11°C. During exponential growth, there was no clear trend in the Chl a normalized, initial slope (α*) of the photosynthesis-irradiance (PE) curve, but the maximum photosynthetic production (Pm) was highest for cultures acclimated to the highest light and temperature. During the stationary growth phase, the stoichiometric relationship depended on the limiting nutrient, but with generally increasing C:N:P ratio. The average photosynthetic quotient (PQ) during exponential growth was 1.26 but decreased to <1 under nutrient and light limitation, probably due to photorespiration. The results clearly demonstrate that there are interaction effects between light, temperature and nutrient limitation, and the data suggests greater variability of key parameters at low temperature. Understanding these dynamics will be important for improving models of aquatic primary production and biogeochemical cycles in a warming climate. PMID:25993327

  3. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  4. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  5. Seeking the Limits of Low-Temperature Nuclear Fusion: Sticking in Muon-Catalyzed Fusion, and Piezonuclear Fusion in Deuterium/condensed Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    Studies seeking an upper limit of two types of low temperature nuclear fusion is presented. The upper limit for muon catalyzed fusion is generally considered to be the number of fusions per muon obtainable. The limiting factor has been found to be how often the muon remains bound to the alpha produced by the fusion, known as the "sticking fraction." Experiments directly measuring the sticking and determining the sticking using high tritium fractions are presented. In deuterium/condensed matter systems the question is nearly whether nuclear fusion proceeds at all. Experiments where neutrons around deuterided titanium and palladium are measured are presented.

  6. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  7. Budget-limited thermal biology: Design, construction and performance of a large, walk-in style temperature-controlled chamber.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Eloy; Agosta, Salvatore J

    2016-05-01

    We describe a partial redesign of the conventional air-conditioning system and apply it to the construction of a relatively large (1.87m(3) air mass), walk-in style temperature-controlled chamber (TCC) using parts easily obtained in most countries. We conducted several tests to demonstrate the performance of the TCC. Across the physiologically relevant range of 5-37°C, the TCC took 26.5-50.0min to reach the desired set point temperature. Once at set point, temperature inside the chamber was controlled with an accuracy of ±1.0°C. User-entry effects on deviations from and return times to set point temperature were minimal. Overall, performance of the TCC was sufficient to make precise physiological measurements of insect metabolic rate while controlling assay temperature. Major advantages of the TCC include its simplicity, flexibility, and low cost. PMID:27157331

  8. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  9. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO₂] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David M; Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; Siebers, Matthew H; Gray, Sharon B; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on (1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vc,max) and the maximum potential linear electron flux through photosystem II (Jmax), (2) the associated responses of leaf structural and chemical properties related to A, as well as (3) the stomatal limitation (l) imposed on A, for soybean over two growing seasons in a conventionally managed agricultural field in Illinois, USA. Acclimation to elevated [CO2] was consistent over two growing seasons with respect to Vc,max and Jmax. However, elevated temperature significantly decreased Jmax contributing to lower photosynthetic stimulation by elevated CO2. Large seasonal differences in precipitation altered soil moisture availability modulating the complex effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on biochemical and structural properties related to A. Elevated temperature also reduced the benefit of elevated [CO2] by eliminating decreases in stomatal limitation at elevated [CO2]. These results highlight the critical importance of considering multiple environmental factors (i.e. temperature, moisture, [CO2]) when trying to predict plant productivity in the context of climate change. PMID:25113459

  10. Limitations to the room temperature mobility of two- and three-dimensional electron liquids in SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, Evgeny; Himmetoglu, Burak; Kajdos, Adam P.; Moetakef, Pouya; Cain, Tyler A.; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-02-09

    We analyze and compare the temperature dependence of the electron mobility of two- and three-dimensional electron liquids in SrTiO{sub 3}. The contributions of electron-electron scattering must be taken into account to accurately describe the mobility in both cases. For uniformly doped, three-dimensional electron liquids, the room temperature mobility crosses over from longitudinal optical (LO) phonon-scattering-limited to electron-electron-scattering-limited as a function of carrier density. In high-density, two-dimensional electron liquids, LO phonon scattering is completely screened and the mobility is dominated by electron-electron scattering up to room temperature. The possible origins of the observed behavior and the consequences for approaches to improve the mobility are discussed.

  11. Active (air-cooled) vs. passive (phase change material) thermal management of high power lithium-ion packs: Limitation of temperature rise and uniformity of temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, Rami; Kizilel, R.; Selman, J. R.; Al-Hallaj, S.

    The effectiveness of passive cooling by phase change materials (PCM) is compared with that of active (forced air) cooling. Numerical simulations were performed at different discharge rates, operating temperatures and ambient temperatures of a compact Li-ion battery pack suitable for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) propulsion. The results were also compared with experimental results. The PCM cooling mode uses a micro-composite graphite-PCM matrix surrounding the array of cells, while the active cooling mode uses air blown through the gaps between the cells in the same array. The results show that at stressful conditions, i.e. at high discharge rates and at high operating or ambient temperatures (for example 40-45 °C), air-cooling is not a proper thermal management system to keep the temperature of the cell in the desirable operating range without expending significant fan power. On the other hand, the passive cooling system is able to meet the operating range requirements under these same stressful conditions without the need for additional fan power.

  12. Extreme high temperature redox kinetics in ceria: exploration of the transition from gas-phase to material-kinetic limitations.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ho-Il; Davenport, Timothy C; Gopal, Chirranjeevi Balaji; Haile, Sossina M

    2016-08-01

    The redox kinetics of undoped ceria (CeO2-δ) are investigated by the electrical conductivity relaxation method in the oxygen partial pressure range of -4.3 ≤ log(pO2/atm) ≤ -2.0 at 1400 °C. It is demonstrated that extremely large gas flow rates, relative to the mass of the oxide, are required in order to overcome gas phase limitations and access the material kinetic properties. Using these high flow rate conditions, the surface reaction rate constant kchem is found to obey the correlation log(kchem/cm s(-1)) = (0.84 ± 0.02) × log(pO2/atm) - (0.99 ± 0.05) and increases with oxygen partial pressure. This increase contrasts the known behavior of the dominant defect species, oxygen vacancies and free electrons, which decrease in concentration with increasing oxygen partial pressure. For the sample geometries employed, diffusion was too fast to be detected. At low gas flow rates, the relaxation process becomes limited by the capacity of the sweep gas to supply/remove oxygen to/from the oxide. An analytical expression is derived for the relaxation in the gas-phase limited regime, and the result reveals an exponential decay profile, identical in form to that known for a surface reaction limited process. Thus, measurements under varied gas flow rates are required to differentiate between surface reaction limited and gas flow limited behavior. PMID:27425414

  13. Ambient temperature shapes reproductive output during pregnancy and lactation in the common vole (Microtus arvalis): a test of the heat dissipation limit theory.

    PubMed

    Simons, Mirre J P; Reimert, Inonge; van der Vinne, Vincent; Hambly, Catherine; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Speakman, John R; Gerkema, Menno P

    2011-01-01

    The heat dissipation limit theory suggests that heat generated during metabolism limits energy intake and, thus, reproductive output. Experiments in laboratory strains of mice and rats, and also domestic livestock generally support this theory. Selection for many generations in the laboratory and in livestock has increased litter size or productivity in these animals. To test the wider validity of the heat dissipation limit theory, we studied common voles (Microtus arvalis), which have small litter sizes by comparison with mice and rats, and regular addition of wild-caught individuals of this species to our laboratory colony ensures a natural genetic background. A crossover design of ambient temperatures (21 and 30°C) during pregnancy and lactation was used. High ambient temperature during lactation decreased milk production, slowing pup growth. The effect on pup growth was amplified when ambient temperature was also high during pregnancy. Shaving fur off dams at 30°C resulted in faster growth of pups; however, no significant increase in food intake and or milk production was detected. With increasing litter size (natural and enlarged), asymptotic food intake during lactation levelled off in the largest litters at both 21 and 30°C. Interestingly, the effects of lactation temperature on pup growth where also observed at smaller litter sizes. This suggests that vole dams trade-off costs associated with hyperthermia during lactation with the yield from investment in pup growth. Moreover, pup survival was higher at 30°C, despite lower growth, probably owing to thermoregulatory benefits. It remains to be seen how the balance is established between the negative effect of high ambient temperature on maternal milk production and pup growth (and/or future reproduction of the dam) and the positive effect of high temperatures on pup survival. This balance ultimately determines the effect of different ambient temperatures on reproductive success. PMID:21147967

  14. Respiratory Response of the Deep-Sea Amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis Indicates Bathymetric Range Limitation by Temperature and Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alastair; Thatje, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Depth zonation of fauna on continental margins is well documented. Whilst increasing hydrostatic pressure with depth has long been considered a factor contributing significantly to this pattern, discussion of the relative significance of decreasing temperature with depth has continued. This study investigates the physiological tolerances of fed and starved specimens of the bathyal lysianassoid amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis at varying temperature to acute pressure exposure by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption. Acclimation to atmospheric pressure is shown to have no significant interaction with temperature and/or pressure effects. Similarly, starvation is shown to have no significant effect on the interaction of temperature and pressure. Subsequently, the effect of pressure on respiration rate is revealed to be dependent on temperature: pressure equivalent to 2000 m depth was tolerated at 1 and 3°C; pressure equivalent to 2500 m depth was tolerated at 5.5°C; at 10°C pressure equivalent to 3000 m depth was tolerated. The variation in tolerance is consistent with the natural distribution range reported for this species. There are clear implications for hypotheses relating to the observed phenomenon of a biodiversity bottleneck between 2000 and 3000 metres, and for the potential for bathymetric range shifts in response to global climate change. PMID:22174838

  15. How do High Temperatures Limit Broccoli Production: Is It Possible for this Cole Crop to Take the Heat?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is generally thought that broccoli does not grow well in most environments during summer months in the eastern United States, because high temperatures can damage the developing heads causing the harvested vegetable to be unmarketable. Identification of broccoli varieties that produce a quality ...

  16. A NATIONAL COMPENDIUM OF FRESHWATER FISH AND WATER TEMPERATURE DATA. VOLUME I: DATA MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES, OUTPUT EXAMPLES AND LIMITATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study resulted in the compilation of a computer data base containing historical fish distribution data with accompanying water temperature data from about 1930-1972 for over 300 species of freshwater fish from 574 locations in the United States and provides the first ...

  17. Replacing effective spectral radiance by temperature in occupational exposure limits to protect against retinal thermal injury from light and near IR radiation.

    PubMed

    Madjidi, Faramarz; Behroozy, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to visible light and near infrared (NIR) radiation in the wavelength region of 380 to 1400 nm may cause thermal retinal injury. In this analysis, the effective spectral radiance of a hot source is replaced by its temperature in the exposure limit values in the region of 380-1400 nm. This article describes the development and implementation of a computer code to predict those temperatures, corresponding to the exposure limits proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Viewing duration and apparent diameter of the source were inputs for the computer code. At the first stage, an infinite series was created for calculation of spectral radiance by integration with Planck's law. At the second stage for calculation of effective spectral radiance, the initial terms of this infinite series were selected and integration was performed by multiplying these terms by a weighting factor R(λ) in the wavelength region 380-1400 nm. At the third stage, using a computer code, the source temperature that can emit the same effective spectral radiance was found. As a result, based only on measuring the source temperature and accounting for the exposure time and the apparent diameter of the source, it is possible to decide whether the exposure to visible and NIR in any 8-hr workday is permissible. The substitution of source temperature for effective spectral radiance provides a convenient way to evaluate exposure to visible light and NIR. PMID:25175283

  18. High-level expression of ice nuclei in a Pseudomonas syringae strain is induced by nutrient limitation and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; LaDuca, R; Fall, R

    1993-07-01

    Attempts were made to maximize the expression of ice nuclei in Pseudomonas syringae T1 isolated from a tomato leaf. Nutritional starvation for nitrogen, phosphorous, sulfur, or iron but not carbon at 32 degrees C, coupled to a shift to 14 to 18 degrees C, led to the rapid induction of type 1 ice nuclei (i.e., ice nuclei active at temperatures warmer than -5 degrees C). Induction was most pronounced in stationary-phase cells that were grown with sorbitol as the carbon source and cooled rapidly, and under optimal conditions, the expression of type 1 ice nuclei increased from < 1 per 10(7) cells (i.e., not detectable) to 1 in every cell in 2 to 3 h. The induction was blocked by protein and RNA synthesis inhibitors, indicative of new gene expression. Pulse-labeling of nongrowing cultures with [35S]methionine after a shift to a low temperature demonstrated that the synthesis of a new set of "low-temperature" proteins was induced. Induced ice nuclei were stable at a low temperature, with no loss in activity at 4 degrees C after 8 days, but after a shift back to 32 degrees C, type 1 ice nuclei completely disappeared, with a half-life of approximately 1 h. Repeated cycles of low-temperature induction and high-temperature turnover of these ice nuclei could be demonstrated with the same nongrowing cells. Not all P. syringae strains from tomato or other plants were fully induced under the same culture conditions as strain T1, but all showed increased expression of type 1 ice nuclei after the shift to the low temperature. In support of this view, analysis of the published DNA sequence preceding the translational start site of the inaZ gene (R. L. Green and G. Warren, Nature [London] 317:645-648, 1985) suggests the presence of a gearbox-type promoter (M. Vincente, S. R. Kushner, T. Garrido, and M. Aldea, Mol. Microbiol. 5:2085-2091, 1991). PMID:8320222

  19. Photoemission results and understanding of high-temperature superconducting oxides: Non-issues, real issues, limitations and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritondo, G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors argue that the photoelectric effect in high-temperature superconductors is not only a source of extremely valuable information, but one of the most important and interesting open problems in today`s physics. Even without a complete picture of this phenomenon, very important conclusions can be obtained from an empirical analysis of photoemission data, notably on the parity (see Onellion`s article in this volume) and on the link between superconductivity and Anderson locations But a complete theoretical framework is urgently needed. Its development can contribute to the conceptual revolution that might be necessary to understand high-temperature superconductivity, as the Drude-Fermi-Landau revolution was necessary to understand metallic conductivity.

  20. High temperature limits in vivo pollen tube growth rates by altering diurnal carbohydrate balance in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum pistils.

    PubMed

    Snider, John L; Oosterhuis, Derrick M; Loka, Dimitra A; Kawakami, Eduardo M

    2011-07-15

    It has recently been reported that high temperature slows in vivo pollen tube growth rates in Gossypium hirsutum pistils under field conditions. Although numerous physical and biochemical pollen-pistil interactions are necessary for in vivo pollen tube growth to occur, studies investigating the influence of heat-induced changes in pistil biochemistry on in vivo pollen tube growth rates are lacking. We hypothesized that high temperature would alter diurnal pistil biochemistry and that pollen tube growth rates would be dependent upon the soluble carbohydrate content of the pistil during pollen tube growth. G. hirsutum seeds were sown on different dates to obtain flowers exposed to contrasting ambient temperatures but at the same developmental stage. Diurnal pistil measurements included carbohydrate balance, glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.8.1.7), soluble protein, superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), NADPH oxidase (NOX; EC 1.6.3.1), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and water-soluble calcium. Soluble carbohydrate levels in cotton pistils were as much as 67.5% lower under high temperature conditions (34.6 °C maximum air temperature; August 4, 2009) than under cooler conditions (29.9 °C maximum air temperature; August 14, 2009). Regression analysis revealed that pollen tube growth rates were highly correlated with the soluble carbohydrate content of the pistil during pollen tube growth (r² = 0.932). Higher ambient temperature conditions on August 4 increased GR activity in the pistil only during periods not associated with in vivo pollen tube growth; pistil protein content declined earlier in the day under high temperatures; SOD and NOX were unaffected by either sample date or time of day; pistil ATP and water soluble calcium were unaffected by the warmer temperatures. We conclude that moderate heat stress significantly alters diurnal carbohydrate balance in the pistil and suggest that pollen tube growth rate through the style may be limited by soluble carbohydrate

  1. Minimally self-consistent T-matrix approximation to describe the low-temperature properties of the Hubbard model in the atomic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verga, S.; Gooding, R. J.; Marsiglio, F.

    2005-04-01

    The atomic limit of the Hubbard model is a simple single-site problem which can be solved exactly, and all one- and two-particle Green’s functions can be obtained analytically. These solutions can thus serve as a means of critiquing the success of various approximate theories which might be applied to the full Hubbard model. In particular, we have examined the T -matrix approximation for the attractive Hubbard model in the atomic limit, which should give reasonable results at low electronic densities, if one can avoid the spurious phase transition that results when a fully non-self-consistent T -matrix approximation is employed—previously we have shown that any level of self-consistency guarantees that this phase transition is correctly suppressed to zero temperature in two dimensions or less. Here, a minimally self-consistent T -matrix approximation is shown to be successful in reproducing the exact results for the atomic limit, while fully self-consistent T -matrix results do not agree with the known solutions. Of particular note is that the minimally self-consistent T -matrix approximation reproduces not only one- and two-particle (static) thermodynamic quantities, but it also exactly reproduces the one-particle spectral function at low but nonzero temperatures. We also make a comparison to the two-particle self-consistent approach of Vilk and Tremblay, and find that the minimally self-consistent T -matrix theory can give better results over a broader temperature range.

  2. Explosion and combustion properties of alkylsilanes I : temperature-composition limits of explosion for methyl-,dimethyl-,trimethyl-,tetramethyl-,and vinylsilane at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schalla, Rose L; Mcdonald, Glen E

    1954-01-01

    The explosion limits of five alkylsilanes were determined as a function of temperature and composition at a pressure of 1 atmosphere. Over a fuel concentration range of 2 to 10 percent, the lowest temperatures (zero C) below which explosion did not occur for the five fuels studied were: tetramethylsilane (CHsub3)sub4Si, 450 degrees; trimethlysilane (CHsub3)sub3SiH, 310 degrees;dimethylsilane (CHsub3)sub2SiHsub2, 220 degrees; methylsilane CHsub3SiHsub3, 130 degrees; and vinylsilane Hsub2C=CH-SiHsub3, 90 degrees. Explosion limits for hydrocarbons analogous to these silanes fall in a temperature range of 500 degrees to 600 degrees C. Since the explosion temperatures of the alkylsilanes are lower than those of the hydrocarbons and since they decrease as hydrogen atoms are substituted for methyl groups, it was concluded that the Si-H bond is more readily susceptible to oxidation than the C-H bond.

  3. The Effect of Temperature and Hydrogen Limited Growth on the Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Thermodesulfatator indicus, a Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, J.; Reysenbach, A.; Habicht, K.; Canfield, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, producing sulfide depleted in 34S. Although isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction of pure cultures has been extensively studied, most of the research to date has focused on mesophilic sulfate reducers, particularly for the species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Results from these studies show that: 1) fractionations range from 3-46‰ with an average around 18‰ , 2) when organic electron donors are utilized, the extent of fractionation is dependent on the rate of sulfate reduction, with decreasing fractionations observed with higher specific rates, 3) fractionations are suppressed with low sulfate concentrations, and when hydrogen is used as the electron donor. High specific sulfate-reduction rates are encountered when sulfate-reducing bacteria metabolize at their optimal temperature and under non-limiting substrate conditions. Changes in both temperature and substrate availability could shift fractionations from those expressed under optimal growth conditions. Sulfate reducers may frequently experience substrate limitation and sub-optimal growth temperatures in the environment. Therefore it is important to understand how sulfate-reducing bacteria fractionate sulfur isotopes under conditions that more closely resemble the restrictions imposed by the environment. In this study the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfatator indicus was explored during sulfate reduction under a wide range of temperatures and with both hydrogen-saturating and hydrogen-limited conditions. T. indicus is a thermophilic (temperature optimum = 70° C) chemolithotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which was recently isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Central Indian Ridge. This bacterium represents the type species of a new genus and to date is the most deeply branching sulfate-reducing bacterium known. T. indicus was grown in carbonate-buffered salt-water medium

  4. A temperature dependent study on charge dynamics in organic molecular device: Effect of shallow traps on space charge limited behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A. K.; Kavala, A. K.

    2014-04-01

    Shallow traps play a significant role in influencing charge dynamics through organic molecular thin films, such as pentacene. Sandwich cells of pentacene capped by gold electrodes are an excellent specimen to study the nature of underlying charge dynamics. In this paper, self-consistent numerical simulation of I-V characteristics is performed at various temperatures. The results have revealed negative value of Poole Frenkel coefficient. The location of trap energy level is found to be located at 0.24 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbit (HOMO) level of pentacene. Other physical parameters related to trap levels, such as density of states due to traps and effective carrier density due to traps, have also been estimated in this study.

  5. Use and Limitations of a Climate-Quality Data Record to Study Temperature Trends on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has been documented in recent literature along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data since 1981. Using a recently-developed climate-quality data record, 11- and 12-year trends in the clear-sky ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet have been studied using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product. Daily and monthly MODIS ISTs of the Greenland Ice Sheet beginning on 1 March 2000 and continuing through 31 December 2010 are now available at 6.25-km spatial resolution on a polar stereographic grid as described in Hall et al. (submitted). This record will be elevated in status to a climate-data record (CDR) when more years of data become available either from the MODIS on the Terra or Aqua satellites, or from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to be launched in October 2011. Maps showing the maximum extent of melt for the entire ice sheet and for the six major drainage basins have been developed from the MODIS IST dataset. Twelve-year trends of the duration of the melt season on the ice sheet vary in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the course of the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. IST 12-year trends are compared with in-situ data, and climate data from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) Reanalysis.

  6. Temperature-driven self-assembly of self-limiting uniform supraparticles from non-uniform unimolecular micelles.

    PubMed

    Picco, Agustín S; Yameen, Basit; Knoll, Wolfgang; Ceolín, Marcelo R; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the self-assembly of non-uniform unimolecular micelles constituted of a hyperbranched polyester core decorated with a corona of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) chains has been studied. As revealed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), these unimicelles form uniform supraparticles through a thermally-induced self-limited process, as well as exhibit molecular features commonly observed in PNIPAm-based gels. We believe that these results provide new insights into the application of stimuli-responsive polymeric materials as versatile building blocks to build up soft supraparticles displaying well-defined dimensional characteristics. PMID:26990953

  7. New Stands of Species of the Paramecium aurelia Complex; is the Occurrence of Particular Species Limited by Temperature Barriers?

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Prajer, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of ciliates, especially the Paramecium aurelia complex, has not yet been studied in many parts of the world, or sampling was done only occasionally. Generally, the southern hemisphere still awaits investigation. In North America only the USA was studied in greater detail; the majority of species of the complex were there recorded. In Asia, more frequent sampling was performed only in Japan and Asiatic Russia. Europe was studied more carefully, however, a different number of habitats was studied in particular zones of Europe, the least in the southern zone. New stands of P. tetraurelia , P. sexaurelia, P. octaurelia, and P. novaurelia were revealed as a result of the present investigations carried out in Africa (Mozambique--P. tetraurelia, P. sexaurelia), Asia (Indonesia--P. sexaurelia), borderland of Asia and Europe (Georgia--P. octaurelia), and Europe (Macedonia--P. tetraurelia and Romania--P. novaurelia). Are climatic zones the main factor limiting the occurrence of species of the P. aurelia complex? Analysis of data on the distribution of the P. aurelia species complex in warm "tropical" zones on different continents may suggest such preferences for some species, including P. sexaurelia, P. octaurelia, P. tredecaurelia, P. quadecaurelia. The first two of these species were recorded herein in warm or "tropical" zone. PMID:26462333

  8. Age-Associated Induction of Cell Membrane CD47 Limits Basal and Temperature-Induced Changes in Cutaneous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Natasha M.; Roberts, David D.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through binding to and activation of the cell receptor CD47, inhibits basal and thermal-mediated cutaneous blood flow. Background Data Abnormal and decreased cutaneous blood flow in response to temperature changes or vasoactive agents is a feature of cardiovascular disease and aging. The reasons for decreased cutaneous blood flow remain incompletely understood. Further, a role for matricellular proteins in the regulation skin blood flow has never been proposed. Methods C57BL/6 wild type, TSP1- and CD47-null 12 and 72 week old male mice underwent analysis of skin blood flow (SkBF) via laser Doppler in response to thermal stress and vasoactive challenge. Results Young and aged TSP1- and CD47-null mice displayed enhanced basal and thermal sensitive SkFB changes compared to age matched wild type controls. Nitric oxide-mediated increases in SkBF were also greater in null mice. TSP1 and CD47 were expressed in skin from young wild type mice, and both were significantly upregulated in aged animals. Tissue 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a potent vasodilator, was greater in skin samples from null mice compared to wild type regardless of age. Finally, treating wild type animals with a CD47 monoclonal antibody, that inhibits TSP1 activation of CD47, enhanced SkBF in both young and aged animals. Conclusions The above results suggest that secreted TSP1, via its cognate receptor CD47, acutely modulates SkBF. These data further support therapeutically targeting CD47 to mitigate age-associated loss of SkBF and maximize wound healing. PMID:23275312

  9. Vietnam recommended dietary allowances 2007.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nguyen Cong; Hoan, Pham Van

    2008-01-01

    It has been well acknowledged that Vietnam is undergoing a nutrition transition. With a rapid change in the country's reform and economic growth, food supply at the macronutrient level has improved. Changes of the Vietnamese diet include significantly more foods of animal origin, and an increase of fat/oils, and ripe fruits. Consequently, nutritional problems in Vietnam now include not only malnutrition but also overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and other chronic diseases related to nutrition and lifestyles. The recognition of these shifts, which is also associated with morbidity and mortality, was a major factor in the need to review and update the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for the Vietnamese population. This revised RDA established an important science-based tool for evaluation of nutrition adequacy, for teaching, and for scientific communications within Vietnam. It is expected that the 2007 Vietnam RDA and its conversion to food-based dietary guidelines will facilitate education to the public, as well as the policy implementation of programs for prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and addressing the double burden of both under and over nutrition. PMID:18460440

  10. ITER Experts' meeting on density limits

    SciTech Connect

    Borrass, K.; Igitkhanov, Y.L.; Uckan, N.A.

    1989-12-01

    The necessity of achieving a prescribed wall load or fusion power essentially determines the plasma pressure in a device like ITER. The range of operation densities and temperatures compatible with this condition is constrained by the problems of power exhaust and the disruptive density limit. The maximum allowable heat loads on the divertor plates and the maximum allowable sheath edge temperature practically impose a lower limit on the operating densities, whereas the disruptive density limit imposes an upper limit. For most of the density limit scalings proposed in the past an overlap of the two constraints or at best a very narrow accessible density range is predicted for ITER. Improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms is therefore a crucial issue in order to provide a more reliable basis for extrapolation to ITER and to identify possible ways of alleviating the problem.

  11. Antiphase Light and Temperature Cycles Affect PHYTOCHROME B-Controlled Ethylene Sensitivity and Biosynthesis, Limiting Leaf Movement and Growth of Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Ralph; van Zanten, Martijn; Pierik, Ronald; Bouwmeester, Harro; van der Krol, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In the natural environment, days are generally warmer than the night, resulting in a positive day/night temperature difference (+DIF). Plants have adapted to these conditions, and when exposed to antiphase light and temperature cycles (cold photoperiod/warm night [−DIF]), most species exhibit reduced elongation growth. To study the physiological mechanism of how light and temperature cycles affect plant growth, we used infrared imaging to dissect growth dynamics under +DIF and −DIF in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that −DIF altered leaf growth patterns, decreasing the amplitude and delaying the phase of leaf movement. Ethylene application restored leaf growth in −DIF conditions, and constitutive ethylene signaling mutants maintain robust leaf movement amplitudes under −DIF, indicating that ethylene signaling becomes limiting under these conditions. In response to −DIF, the phase of ethylene emission advanced 2 h, but total ethylene emission was not reduced. However, expression analysis on members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase ethylene biosynthesis gene family showed that ACS2 activity is specifically suppressed in the petiole region under −DIF conditions. Indeed, petioles of plants under −DIF had reduced ACC content, and application of ACC to the petiole restored leaf growth patterns. Moreover, acs2 mutants displayed reduced leaf movement under +DIF, similar to wild-type plants under −DIF. In addition, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor PHYTOCHROME B restricts ethylene biosynthesis and constrains the −DIF-induced phase shift in rhythmic growth. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into how fluctuating temperature cycles regulate plant growth. PMID:23979970

  12. Effect of acclimation temperature on the upper thermal tolerance of Colorado River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus: thermal limits of a North American salmonid.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Z E; Myrick, C A; Rogers, K B

    2012-06-01

    In an effort to explore the thermal limitations of Colorado River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus, the critical thermal maxima (T(cmax) ) of 1+ year Lake Nanita strain O. c. pleuriticus were evaluated when acclimated to 10, 15 and 20° C. The mean ±s.d.T(cmax) for O. c. pleuriticus acclimated to 10° C was 24·6 ± 2·0°C (n = 30), for 15° C-acclimated fish was 26·9 ± 1·5° C (n = 23) and for 20° C-acclimated fish was 29·4 ± 1·1° C (n = 28); these results showed a marked thermal acclimation effect (Q₁₀ = 1·20). Interestingly, there was a size effect within treatments, wherein the T(cmax) of larger fish was significantly lower than that of smaller fish acclimated to the same temperature. The critical thermal tolerances of age 0 year O. c. pleuriticus were also evaluated from three separate populations: Lake Nanita, Trapper Creek and Carr Creek reared under 'common-garden' conditions prior to thermal acclimation. The Trapper Creek population had significantly warmer T(cmax) than the Lake Nanita population, but that of the Carr Creek fish had T(cmax) similar to both Trapper Creek and Lake Nanita fish. A comparison of these O. c. pleuriticus T(cmax) results with those of other stream-dwelling salmonids suggested that O. c. pleuriticus are less resistant to rapid thermal fluctuations when acclimated to cold temperatures, but can tolerate similar temperatures when acclimated to warmer temperatures. PMID:22650425

  13. Family Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Dr Robert Smith surveys the history of birth control and sounds a warning for the future of mankind, if the population explosion is allowed to continue unchecked. He stresses the importance of the role of the general practitioner in the limitation of births. Sir Theodore Fox describes the work of the Family Planning Association and stresses that, increasingly, this is a specialist service covering all aspects of fertility. He also feels that the general practitioner has a role in family planning. PMID:5954261

  14. Enhancement of upconverted luminescence in Er3+:TeO2 glass on increasing the temperature and concentration of Yb3+ beyond the critical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anant Kumar; Tripathi, Garima; Rai, S. B.; Rai, Anita

    2007-05-01

    Enhancement of upconverted luminescence in Er3+/Yb3+:TeO2 has been observed with increase in the concentration of Yb3+ on excitation with 780nm laser radiation. It is further noted that the upconversion is increased even above the quenching limit on increasing the temperature of the glass. The incident radiation excites Yb3+ indirectly via Er3+ resulting in a strong blue emission from Yb3+ and green and red emissions from Er3+. The UV emission from Er3+ at 380nm involves three near infrared photons when there is no Yb3+ in the glass but when Yb3+ is also present, this behaves as a two photon process. The lifetime of the S3/24 level of Er3+ in glasses containing only Er3+ and also those containing both Er3+ and Yb3+ has also been measured in different conditions.

  15. Estimation of lower flammability limits of C-H compounds in air at atmospheric pressure, evaluation of temperature dependence and diluent effect.

    PubMed

    Mendiburu, Andrés Z; de Carvalho, João A; Coronado, Christian R

    2015-03-21

    Estimation of the lower flammability limits of C-H compounds at 25 °C and 1 atm; at moderate temperatures and in presence of diluent was the objective of this study. A set of 120 C-H compounds was divided into a correlation set and a prediction set of 60 compounds each. The absolute average relative error for the total set was 7.89%; for the correlation set, it was 6.09%; and for the prediction set it was 9.68%. However, it was shown that by considering different sources of experimental data the values were reduced to 6.5% for the prediction set and to 6.29% for the total set. The method showed consistency with Le Chatelier's law for binary mixtures of C-H compounds. When tested for a temperature range from 5 °C to 100 °C, the absolute average relative errors were 2.41% for methane; 4.78% for propane; 0.29% for iso-butane and 3.86% for propylene. When nitrogen was added, the absolute average relative errors were 2.48% for methane; 5.13% for propane; 0.11% for iso-butane and 0.15% for propylene. When carbon dioxide was added, the absolute relative errors were 1.80% for methane; 5.38% for propane; 0.86% for iso-butane and 1.06% for propylene. PMID:25528241

  16. Limiting thermal regimes of active disk elements under steady-state pumping and two-dimensional temperature distribution inside the disk

    SciTech Connect

    Alpat'ev, A N; Lis, Denis A; Smirnov, V A; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2010-09-10

    An analytic expression describing the stationary two-dimensional axially symmetric temperature distribution in a disk active element (AE) is derived upon pumping the entire disk whose thickness is 0.01 cm {<=} h {<=} 0.3 cm and the diameter-to-thickness ratio is 1 {<=} d/h {<=} 100. Thermomechanical stresses are calculated. It is shown that from the point of view of the disk damage, the tangential stress on the disk side face constitutes the major threat. For different scaling parameters x =d/h, the limiting lasing powers P{sub las} are estimated in multimode approximation, which can be obtained using a disk AE in the case of end and side cooling for different heat exchange coefficients a (by the example of an Nd : YAG crystal). It is found that the side cooling can decrease P{sub las} in some situations. The priority regions are established in the space of the parameters h, x, and a which, while increasing the pump intensity, are accompanied by one of the three events violating the normal operation of the laser: deterioration of spectral and luminescent AE parameters due to heating, malfunctioning of the cooling regime, or thermomechanical damage of the disk. It is shown that an increase in the scaling parameter x smoothes the radial temperature profile and the thermoelastic stress distribution profile. (lasers)

  17. [Effects of plastic mulch on soil moisture and temperature and limiting factors to yield increase for dryland spring maize in the North China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yao; Zhang, Li-Feng; Li, Zhi-Hong; Jia, Jian-Ming; Fan, Feng-Cui; Shi, Yu-Fang

    2014-11-01

    Four treatments, including ridge tillage with plastic mulch (RP), ridge tillage without mulch (RB), flat tillage with plastic mulch (FP) and flat tillage without mulch (FB), were carried out to examine the tillage type and mulch on the effects of soil moisture and temperature, yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of dry land spring maize in the North China. Results showed that the average soil temperature was increased by 1-3 °C and the accumulated soil temperature was increased by 155.2-280.9 °C from sowing to tasseling by plastic mulch, and the growing duration was extended by 5.9-10.7 d. The water conservation effect of plastic mulch was significant from sowing to the seedling establishment, with WUE being increased by 81.6%-136.4% under mulch as compared with that without mulch. From the seedling to jointing stage, which coincided with the dry period in the region, soil water utilization by the maize under mulch could reach the depth of 80-100 cm, and its WUE was about 17.0%-21.6% lower than the maize without mulch, since the latter was affected by dry stress. With the coming of rainy season around the trumpeting stage, soil water in each treatment was replenished and maintained at relative high level up to harvest. Yield of maize was increased by 9.5% under RP as compared with RB. However, yield was reduced by 5.0% under FP, due to the plastic film under flat tillage prevented the infiltration of rainfall and waterlogging occurred. No significant difference in yield was found between RB and FB. Higher yield of spring maize was limited because of the mismatching in water supply and demand characterized by soil water shortage before the rainy season and abundant soil water storage after the rainy season. PMID:25898617

  18. Seal allows blind assembly and thermal expansion of components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The design of a seal consisting of two concentric cylinders with outer and inner threaded elements attached to each side of the system interface withstands large temperature changes and allows for blind assembly.

  19. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  20. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  1. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  2. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  3. 42 CFR 489.31 - Allowable charges: Blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable charges: Blood. 489.31 Section 489.31... Allowable charges: Blood. (a) Limitations on charges. (1) A provider may charge the beneficiary (or other person on his or her behalf) only for the first three pints of blood or units of packed red...

  4. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  5. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  6. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  7. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  8. 40 CFR 467.05 - Removal allowances for pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ALUMINUM FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 467.05 Removal allowances for pretreatment standards. Removal allowances pursuant to 40 CFR 403.7(a) may be granted for the toxic metals limited in 40 CFR part 467 when used as indicator pollutants....

  9. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowance rates. 591.305 Section 591.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may not exceed $10 a day....

  10. Study to define low voltage and low temperature operating limits of the Pioneer 10/11 Meteoroid Detection Equipment (MDE) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Pioneer 10/11 meteoroid detection equipment (MDE) pressure cells were tested at liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid helium (LHe) temperatures with the excitation voltage controlled as a parameter. The cells failed by firing because of pressurizing gas condensation as the temperature was lowered from LN2 to LHe temperature and when raised from LHe temperature. A study was conducted to determine cell pressure as a function of temperature, and cell failure was estimated as a function of temperature and excitation voltage. The electronic system was also studied, and a profile of primary spacecraft voltage (nominally 28 Vdc) and temperature corresponding to electronic system failure was determined experimentally.

  11. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  12. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  13. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  14. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  15. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  16. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  17. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-522). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  18. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  19. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  20. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  1. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... clothing allowance; multiple types of garments affected. A veteran is entitled to an annual clothing...) Two clothing allowances; single type of garment affected. A veteran is entitled to two annual...

  2. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  3. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1180.56 Section 1180.56 Public... by a Grantee General Administrative Responsibilities § 1180.56 Allowable costs. (a) Determination of costs allowable under a grant is made in accordance with government-wide cost principles in...

  4. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  5. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  6. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... Financial and Program Management § 34.17 Allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined...

  7. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  8. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... Financial and Program Management § 34.17 Allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined...

  9. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  10. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  11. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  12. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  13. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  14. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  15. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  16. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable activities. Allowable activities are...

  17. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that...

  18. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  19. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  20. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  1. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  2. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  3. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  4. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  5. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  6. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  7. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  8. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  9. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  10. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  11. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  12. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  13. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs....

  14. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  15. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  16. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  17. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  18. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  19. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  20. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those requirements as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained in paragraph (b) of this... CFR part 207. (c) Pre-award costs. FEMA may fund eligible pre-award planning or project costs at...

  1. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  2. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  3. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  9. Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allow Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Clifford Russell

    The PASADENA effect is a method for transient high-sensitivity proton spin-labelling by molecular addition of dihydrogen. When the parahydrogen mole fraction differs from the high-temperature limit of 1/4, this population difference constitutes a form of spin order which can be converted to magnetization observable by NMR. Large NMR signals are observed, if subsequent to the hydrogen addition, the two protons experience magnetic inequivalence and spin -spin coupling and if observation is made before spin-lattice relaxation restores the equilibrium spin order. The analogous effect for D_2 is also possible. The kinetic mechanisms of the homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts which permit the realization of the PASADENA effect have been the target of the experimental applications. Rates determined in PASADENA studies pertain to the active catalytic species, since only these molecules can contribute to the enhanced signals from which all kinetic inferences are made. The sensitivity enhancement has also led to the identification of a novel intermediate in the mechanism for the Rh(DIPHOS)^+ catalyzed hydrogenation of styrene. The rate of conversion of this species into product and starting material has been studied using two -dimensional NMR. The dramatically improved sensitivity should make it possible to observe key catalytic intermediates which do not build up in sufficient quantity to allow detection by conventional NMR arising from Curie-Law magnetization. The study of surface sites which bind pairwise with H_2 is also a potentially fruitful area for future experimental work. The ambient temperature NMR spectroscopy of surfaces is not often feasible due to sensitivity limitations. Simulations have been performed using typical shift and coupling parameters in an effort to characterize the enhanced lineshapes which can be expected. The inverse of the PASADENA effect has also been proposed, whereby the spin order of a molecule containing hydrogen is probed by measuring

  10. At the edge of the thermal window: effects of elevated temperature on the resting metabolism, hypoxia tolerance and upper critical thermal limit of a widespread African cichlid

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Laura H.; Chapman, Lauren J.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical inland fishes are predicted to be especially vulnerable to thermal stress because they experience small temperature fluctuations that may select for narrow thermal windows. In this study, we measured resting metabolic rate (RMR), critical oxygen tension (Pcrit) and critical thermal maximum (CTMax) of the widespread African cichlid (Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae) in response to short-term acclimation to temperatures within and above their natural thermal range. Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor collected in Lake Kayanja, Uganda, a population living near the upper thermal range of the species, were acclimated to 23, 26, 29 and 32°C for 3 days directly after capture, and RMR and Pcrit were then quantified. In a second group of P. multicolor from the same population, CTMax and the thermal onset of agitation were determined for fish acclimated to 26, 29 and 32°C for 7 days. Both RMR and Pcrit were significantly higher in fish acclimated to 32°C, indicating decreased tolerance to hypoxia and increased metabolic requirements at temperatures only slightly (∼1°C) above their natural thermal range. The CTMax increased with acclimation temperature, indicating some degree of thermal compensation induced by short-term exposure to higher temperatures. However, agitation temperature (likely to represent an avoidance response to increased temperature during CTMax trials) showed no increase with acclimation temperature. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that P. multicolor is able to maintain its RMR and Pcrit across the range of temperatures characteristic of its natural habitat, but incurs a higher cost of resting metabolism and reduced hypoxia tolerance at temperatures slightly above its present range. PMID:27293734

  11. Influence of salinity and temperature on the physiology of Limia melanonotata (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliidae): A search for abiotic factors limiting insular distribution in Hispaniola

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, D.C.; Walsh, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated salinity and temperature effects on routine metabolic rate (RMR), temperature tolerance (CTMax, critical thermal maximum), and salinity tolerance of Limia melanonotata, a poecliid fish that occurs in west-central inland waters of Hispaniola. Routine metabolic rate and CTMax were measured in fish acclimated to three salinities (0, 30, and 60 ppt) and temperatures (25??, 30??, and 35??C) for nine temperature-salinity combinations. Salinity and temperature did not significantly interact in their effect on RMR. For combined salinity acclimations, adjusted RMR (ANCOVA) was significantly lower at 25??C than either 30?? or 35??C. For combined temperature acclimations, mean RMR was significantly lower at 60 ppt than either 0 or 30 ppt. Salinity and temperature had a significant interactive effect on temperature tolerance. Mean CTMax was significantly higher at 30?? than 25??C at all salinities, but at 35??C was significantly higher than at 25?? or 30??C only among fish acclimated in fresh water. Fish exposed to a chronic increase in salinity experienced most mortality in a salinity range of 70-107 ppt, with females exhibiting greater salinity tolerance than males. Limia melanonotata approaches the upper extreme in salinity and temperature tolerances known for poeciliids. Our results also suggest that L. melanonotata may reduce energy expenditures at environmental extremes to tolerate harsh conditions for extended periods. Despite its curythermal and euryhaline adaptations, L. melanonotata has a relatively restricted inland range in Hispaniola and is unknown from inshore brackish or marine habitats. The present distribution of this species and congeners may be the result of a combination of factors that include historical zoogeography and ecological requirements.

  12. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Claims not allowed. 11.74 Section 11.74 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF..., or other directive. This does not apply to limitation imposed on the weight of shipments of...

  13. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims not allowed. 11.74 Section 11.74 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF..., or other directive. This does not apply to limitation imposed on the weight of shipments of...

  14. 5 CFR 180.105 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Claims not allowed. 180.105 Section 180.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES... directive. This does not apply to limitations imposed on the weight of shipments of household goods....

  15. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Claims not allowed. 11.74 Section 11.74 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF..., or other directive. This does not apply to limitation imposed on the weight of shipments of...

  16. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Claims not allowed. 11.74 Section 11.74 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF..., or other directive. This does not apply to limitation imposed on the weight of shipments of...

  17. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Claims not allowed. 11.74 Section 11.74 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF..., or other directive. This does not apply to limitation imposed on the weight of shipments of...

  18. 48 CFR 31.201-2 - Determining allowability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... principles in this subpart are mandatory unless the contract is CAS-covered (see 48 CFR 9903). Business units... the following requirements: (1) Reasonableness. (2) Allocability. (3) Standards promulgated by the CAS... selected CAS and limit the allowability of costs to the amounts determined using the criteria in...

  19. 48 CFR 31.201-2 - Determining allowability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... principles in this subpart are mandatory unless the contract is CAS-covered (see 48 CFR 9903). Business units... the following requirements: (1) Reasonableness. (2) Allocability. (3) Standards promulgated by the CAS... selected CAS and limit the allowability of costs to the amounts determined using the criteria in...

  20. 48 CFR 31.201-2 - Determining allowability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... principles in this subpart are mandatory unless the contract is CAS-covered (see 48 CFR 9903). Business units... the following requirements: (1) Reasonableness. (2) Allocability. (3) Standards promulgated by the CAS... selected CAS and limit the allowability of costs to the amounts determined using the criteria in...

  1. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  2. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  3. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  4. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  5. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  6. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  7. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  8. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  9. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 230, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A-122).” The allowability of... CFR part 220, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21).” The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of appendix E of 45 CFR...

  10. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  11. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802...

  12. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802...

  13. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable...

  14. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable...

  15. 19 CFR 191.141 - Drawback allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drawback allowance. 191.141 Section 191.141 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.141 Drawback allowance. Section 313(h) of the...

  16. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  17. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  18. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  19. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  20. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  1. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  2. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. Program Management ... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  3. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  4. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  5. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clothing allowance. 3.810 Section 3.810 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.810 Clothing allowance. (a) Except as provided in paragraph...

  6. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section...

  7. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  8. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  9. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  10. Moral Appraisals Affect Doing/Allowing Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Fiery; Knobe, Joshua; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An extensive body of research suggests that the distinction between doing and allowing plays a critical role in shaping moral appraisals. Here, we report evidence from a pair of experiments suggesting that the converse is also true: moral appraisals affect doing/allowing judgments. Specifically, morally bad behavior is more likely to be construed…

  11. 4 CFR 5.6 - Allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowances. 5.6 Section 5.6 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM COMPENSATION § 5.6 Allowances. The provisions of chapter 59 of title 5, U.S. Code and the implementing regulations for the Executive Branch apply to Government...

  12. 28 CFR 100.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 100.11 Section 100.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) COST RECOVERY REGULATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 § 100.11 Allowable costs. (a) Costs that are eligible...

  13. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  14. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  15. 30 CFR 735.24 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 735.24 Section 735.24 Mineral... AND ENFORCEMENT § 735.24 Allowable costs. The Director or his authorized designee shall determine costs which may be reimbursed according to Office of Management and Budget Circular No. A-87....

  16. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR part 29-70... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 633.303 Section 633.303... FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.303 Allowable costs. (a) General....

  17. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs specified... and other Part B supplier services furnished under arrangements is an allowable cost to the extent it... reasonable if they— (A) Do not exceed those that a prudent and cost-conscious buyer would incur to...

  18. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food... EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24 Inventory... registered manufacturer shall be allowed as a part of the quota an amount sufficient to maintain an...

  19. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1303.24 Section 1303.24 Food... Quotas § 1303.24 Inventory allowance. (a) For the purpose of determining individual manufacturing quotas... sufficient to maintain an inventory equal to, (1) For current manufacturers, 50 percent of his...

  20. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) OMB Circular A-122 does not cover the treatment of bid and proposal...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a.... Allowability of costs must be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable to the...