Science.gov

Sample records for allowable working pressure

  1. 46 CFR 151.03-37 - Maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable working pressure. 151.03-37 Section... working pressure. The maximum allowable working pressure shall be as defined in section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  2. 46 CFR 151.03-37 - Maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable working pressure. 151.03-37 Section... working pressure. The maximum allowable working pressure shall be as defined in section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  3. 46 CFR 151.03-37 - Maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable working pressure. 151.03-37 Section... working pressure. The maximum allowable working pressure shall be as defined in section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  4. 46 CFR 151.03-37 - Maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum allowable working pressure. 151.03-37 Section... working pressure. The maximum allowable working pressure shall be as defined in section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  5. 46 CFR 151.03-37 - Maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable working pressure. 151.03-37 Section... working pressure. The maximum allowable working pressure shall be as defined in section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  6. 46 CFR 54.10-5 - Maximum allowable working pressure (reproduces UG-98).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1.) (b) The maximum allowable working pressure for a vessel part is the maximum... loadings listed in UG-22 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (see 46 CFR 54.01-30... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Inspection, Reports, and Stamping § 54.10-5 Maximum allowable working...

  7. 46 CFR 52.01-55 - Increase in maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-55 Increase in maximum allowable working pressure. (a) When the maximum allowable working pressure of a boiler has been established, an increase in the pressure settings of its safety valves shall not be granted unless the boiler design meets the requirements of...

  8. 46 CFR 52.01-55 - Increase in maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-55 Increase in maximum allowable working pressure. (a) When the maximum allowable working pressure of a boiler has been established, an increase in the pressure settings of its safety valves shall not be granted unless the boiler design meets the requirements of...

  9. 46 CFR 52.01-55 - Increase in maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-55 Increase in maximum allowable working pressure. (a) When the maximum allowable working pressure of a boiler has been established, an increase in the pressure settings of its safety valves shall not be granted unless the boiler design meets the requirements of...

  10. 46 CFR 52.01-55 - Increase in maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-55 Increase in maximum allowable working pressure. (a) When the maximum allowable working pressure of a boiler has been established, an increase in the pressure settings of its safety valves shall not be granted unless the boiler design meets the requirements of...

  11. 46 CFR 52.01-55 - Increase in maximum allowable working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-55 Increase in maximum allowable working pressure. (a) When the maximum allowable working pressure of a boiler has been established, an increase in the pressure settings of its safety valves shall not be granted unless the boiler design meets the requirements of...

  12. 46 CFR 54.10-5 - Maximum allowable working pressure (reproduces UG-98).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1.) (b) The maximum allowable working pressure for a vessel part is the maximum... loadings listed in UG-22 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (see 46 CFR 54.01-30) that are likely to occur, or the designated coincident operating temperature, excluding any...

  13. 46 CFR 54.10-5 - Maximum allowable working pressure (reproduces UG-98).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1.) (b) The maximum allowable working pressure for a vessel part is the maximum... loadings listed in UG-22 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (see 46 CFR 54.01-30) that are likely to occur, or the designated coincident operating temperature, excluding any...

  14. 76 FR 1504 - Pipeline Safety: Establishing Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure or Maximum Operating Pressure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ...: Establishing Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure or Maximum Operating Pressure Using Record Evidence, and... system, especially when calculating Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP) or Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP), and to utilize these risk analyses in the identification of appropriate assessment...

  15. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  16. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  17. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  18. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.4145 Work-study allowance. (a) Eligibility. (1) A veteran or reservist... rate of three-quarter time or full time is eligible to receive a work-study allowance. (2) An...

  19. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work... rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  20. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work... rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  1. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670 Work... rate of pursuit of at least 75 percent may receive a work-study allowance in accordance with...

  2. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. 192.621 Section 192.621 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems....

  3. 49 CFR 192.623 - Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure; Low-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure; Low-pressure distribution systems. 192.623 Section 192.623 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.623 Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure;...

  4. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670...

  5. 38 CFR 21.9670 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work-study allowance. 21.9670 Section 21.9670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Payments-Educational Assistance § 21.9670...

  6. 77 FR 75699 - Pipeline Safety: Reporting of Exceedances of Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Allowable Operating Pressure AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA); DOT... owners and operators of gas transmission pipelines that if the pipeline pressure exceeds maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) plus the build-up allowed for operation of pressure-limiting or...

  7. Raising the Bar: Increased Hydraulic Pressure Allows Unprecedented High Power Densities in Pressure-Retarded Osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, AP; Yip, NY; Elimelech, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) has the potential to generate sustainable energy from salinity gradients. PRO is typically considered for operation with river water and seawater, but a far greater energy of mixing can be harnessed from hypersaline solutions. This study investigates the power density that can be obtained in PRO from such concentrated solutions. Thin-film composite membranes with an embedded woven mesh were supported by tricot fabric feed spacers in a specially designed crossflow cell to maximize the operating pressure of the system, reaching a stable applied hydraulic pressure of 48 bar (700 psi) for more than 10 h. Operation at this increased hydraulic pressure allowed unprecedented power densities, up to 60 W/m(2) with a 3 M (180 g/L) NaCl draw solution. Experimental power densities demonstrate reasonable agreement with power densities modeled using measured membrane properties, indicating high-pressure operation does not drastically alter membrane performance. Our findings exhibit the promise of the generation of power from high-pressure PRO with concentrated solutions.

  8. 49 CFR 192.623 - Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure; Low-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a low-pressure distribution system at a pressure high enough to...) No person may operate a low pressure distribution system at a pressure lower than the...

  9. 76 FR 67558 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for Work-Study Allowance) Activity: Comment Request... comments for information needed to determine a claimant's eligibility for work-study benefits. DATES.... Application for Work-Study Allowance, VA Form 22-8691. b. Student Work-Study Agreement (Advance Payment),...

  10. [Shift work and night work: what effect on blood pressure?].

    PubMed

    Cassat, M; Wuerzner, G; Burnier, M

    2015-09-01

    Shift work has become more and more common for the last thirty years. By definition, shift work disturbs the circadian rhythm and the internal clock. Even if the pathophysiological mechanisms are not well understood, a greater cardiovascular risk has been attributed to shift work. Cross-sectional and cohort studies have identified an association between shift work and an elevated blood pressure. Shift workers also present a higher incidence of hypertension and progression than day workers. Unfortunately, the heterogeneity of the studies, the multiple confounding factors, as well as the complexity to achieve a suitable comparison group make it impossible to draw firm clinical evidence. Nevertheless, this population needs a medical follow-up focused on the cardiovascular risks and blood pressure.

  11. 20 CFR 664.470 - Are paid work experiences allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are paid work experiences allowable... LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters § 664.470 Are paid work experiences allowable activities? Funds under the Act may be used to...

  12. 20 CFR 664.470 - Are paid work experiences allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Are paid work experiences allowable... LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters § 664.470 Are paid work experiences allowable activities? Funds under the Act...

  13. 20 CFR 664.470 - Are paid work experiences allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Are paid work experiences allowable... LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters § 664.470 Are paid work experiences allowable activities? Funds under the Act...

  14. 20 CFR 664.470 - Are paid work experiences allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are paid work experiences allowable... LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters § 664.470 Are paid work experiences allowable activities? Funds under the Act may be used to...

  15. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.

  16. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a maximum working pressure not less than the maximum pressure to which it may be subjected and at least 1034...

  17. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a maximum working pressure not less than the maximum pressure to which it may be subjected and at least 1034...

  18. 20 CFR 664.470 - Are paid work experiences allowable activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Are paid work experiences allowable activities? 664.470 Section 664.470 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program...

  19. Work Status, Work Satisfaction, and Blood Pressure Among Married Black and White Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauenstein, Louise S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study examined blood pressure levels of married women in relation to such work-related variables as work load, satisfaction with work, reported strain, and evaluated performance. Differences in work load were unrelated to blood pressure levels. However, currently unemployed working women had lower levels. (Author)

  20. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  1. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of maximum allowable operating pressure. (a) If the hoop stress corresponding to the established... locations. The corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 72 percent of the SMYS of the pipe in Class 2... pressure per § 192.620, the corresponding hoop stress may not exceed 80 percent of the SMYS of the pipe...

  3. Pressure-Volume Integral Expressions for Work in Irreversible Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gislason, Eric A.; Craig, Norman C.

    2007-01-01

    Different formulations of thermodynamic work "w" as a pressure-volume integral are examined for a piston moving against a gas in an irreversible process. Proper expressions are obtained using the instantaneous pressure of the gas on the piston as the integrand and also using certain external pressures as the integrand. There are two common yet…

  4. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section 154.556 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a...

  5. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section 154.556 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a...

  6. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section 154.556 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a...

  7. Postadsorption Work Function Tuning via Hydrogen Pressure Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The work function of metal substrates can be easily tuned, for instance, by adsorbing layers of molecular electron donors and acceptors. In this work, we discuss the possibility of changing the donor/acceptor mixing ratio reversibly after adsorption by choosing a donor/acceptor pair that is coupled via a redox reaction and that is in equilibrium with a surrounding gas phase. We discuss such a situation for the example of tetrafluoro-1,4-benzenediol (TFBD)/tetrafluoro-1,4-benzoquinone (TFBQ), adsorbed on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. We use density functional theory and ab initio thermodynamics to show that arbitrary TFBD/TFBQ mixing ratios can be set using hydrogen pressures attainable in low to ultrahigh vacuum. Adjusting the mixing ratio allows modifying the work function over a range of about 1 eV. Finally, we contrast single-species submonolayers with mixed layers to discuss why the resulting inhomogeneities in the electrostatic energy above the surface have different impacts on the interfacial level alignment and the work function. PMID:26692915

  8. Ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in strong magnetic field with allowance for pressure effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, P.; Pavlov, G. ); Potekhin, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization equilibrium in highly magnetized (B = 10[sup 10] to 10[sup 12]G) hydrogen is investigated at temperatures from 5 eV to 50 keV and densities in the range 10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 3] g/cm[sup 3]. We have used the occupation probability formalism in order to take into account the pressure and density effects. The occupation probabilities used are slightly modified as compared to those derived by Hummer and Mihalas. We find that pressure ionization degree varies with the form of microfield distribution function. The non-ionized fraction is increased by the magnetic field in most of the parameter space. It is large enough so that the bound-free absorption must be taken into account in realistic models of neutron star atmospheres.

  9. What happens at work stays at work? Workplace supervisory social interactions and blood pressure outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jennifer H K; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between workplace supervisory social interactions and blood pressure outcomes using hourly diary entries and ambulatory blood pressure data from an experience sampling study of 55 long-term care employees. After accounting for relevant cardiovascular controls, significant effects of supervisory interactions on cardiovascular reactivity and recovery were found. Multilevel analyses revealed that negatively perceived supervisory interactions predicted higher systolic blood pressure at work (B = -1.59, p < .05, N observations = 422). Using time-lagged hierarchical regression analyses, the average perceived valence of supervisory interactions at work predicted average systolic blood pressure recovery after work (B = -14.52, p < .05, N = 33). Specifically, negatively perceived supervisory interactions at work predicted poorer cardiovascular recovery after work. Suggestions for improving practices in organizations and in experience sampling research are discussed. PMID:26641481

  10. Alternative Work Schedules: Many Agencies Do Not Allow Employees the Full Flexibility Permitted by Law. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    A review was conducted of the extent to which selected federal agencies are allowing employees to use alternative work schedules (AWS) as authorized by the Federal Employees Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules Act. The statute permits, rather than requires, agencies to institute AWS programs. The study surveyed the policies and practices of 59…

  11. Job-related resources and the pressures of working life.

    PubMed

    Schieman, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Data from a 2011 representative sample of Canadian workers are used to test the resource versus the stress of higher status hypotheses. Drawing on the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R), the resource hypothesis predicts that job-related resources reduce job pressure. The stress of higher status hypothesis predicts that job-related resources increase job pressure. Findings tend to favor the resource hypothesis for job autonomy and schedule control, while supporting the stress of higher status for job authority and challenging work. These findings help elaborate on the "resource" concept in the JD-R model and identify unique ways that such resources might contribute to the pressures of working life.

  12. Working meeting on blood pressure measurement: suggestions for measuring blood pressure to use in populations surveys.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    As part of the Pan American Hypertension Initiative (PAHI), the Pan American Health Organization and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health of the United States of America conducted a working meeting to discuss blood pressure (BP) measurement methods used in various hypertension prevalence surveys and clinical trials, with the objective of developing a BP measurement protocol for use in hypertension prevalence surveys in the Americas. No such common protocol has existed in the Americas, so it has been difficult to compare hypertension prevention and intervention strategies. This piece describes a proposed standard method for measuring blood pressure for use in population surveys in the Region of the Americas. The piece covers: considerations for developing a common blood pressure measurement protocol, critical issues in measuring blood pressure in national surveys, minimum procedures for blood pressure measurement during surveillance, and quality assessment of blood pressure.

  13. Correlations in background activity control persistent state stability and allow execution of working memory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dipoppa, Mario; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) requires selective information gating, active information maintenance, and rapid active updating. Hence performing a WM task needs rapid and controlled transitions between neural persistent activity and the resting state. We propose that changes in correlations in neural activity provides a mechanism for the required WM operations. As a proof of principle, we implement sustained activity and WM in recurrently coupled spiking networks with neurons receiving excitatory random background activity where background correlations are induced by a common noise source. We first characterize how the level of background correlations controls the stability of the persistent state. With sufficiently high correlations, the sustained state becomes practically unstable, so it cannot be initiated by a transient stimulus. We exploit this in WM models implementing the delay match to sample task by modulating flexibly in time the correlation level at different phases of the task. The modulation sets the network in different working regimes: more prompt to gate in a signal or clear the memory. We examine how the correlations affect the ability of the network to perform the task when distractors are present. We show that in a winner-take-all version of the model, where two populations cross-inhibit, correlations make the distractor blocking robust. In a version of the mode where no cross inhibition is present, we show that appropriate modulation of correlation levels is sufficient to also block the distractor access while leaving the relevant memory trace in tact. The findings presented in this manuscript can form the basis for a new paradigm about how correlations are flexibly controlled by the cortical circuits to execute WM operations. PMID:24155714

  14. Influence of computer work under time pressure on cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Hu, Sijung; Yu, Hongliu

    2015-03-01

    Computer users are often under stress when required to complete computer work within a required time. Work stress has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The present study examined the effects of time pressure workload during computer tasks on cardiac activity in 20 healthy subjects. Heart rate, time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV) and Poincaré plot parameters were compared among five computer tasks and two rest periods. Faster heart rate and decreased standard deviation of R-R interval were noted in response to computer tasks under time pressure. The Poincaré plot parameters showed significant differences between different levels of time pressure workload during computer tasks, and between computer tasks and the rest periods. In contrast, no significant differences were identified for the frequency domain indices of HRV. The results suggest that the quantitative Poincaré plot analysis used in this study was able to reveal the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the autonomically regulated cardiac rhythm. Specifically, heightened vagal tone occurred during the relaxation computer tasks without time pressure. In contrast, the stressful computer tasks with added time pressure stimulated cardiac sympathetic activity.

  15. Old flying ice-rock body in space allows a glance at its inner working.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    I am studying old, cold bodies of rock and ice flying through space, usually far, far away from the Sun. They are even behind the last of the big 8 balls we call our home worlds. (There were 9 balls a few yearsago, but then one of the balls was not considered a ball anymore by some people and he/she had to leave the group.)Because they are so far away from the Sun, they remain dark and very cold for the most part of their life.That is why even most of the very nervous stuff sticks on them ever since. With stuff I mean the little things that the Sun, the big 8 balls, we humans and everything else that is flying around the Sun ismade of. The nervous ones quickly change into something wind like andcan get lost. But the cold on the ice-rock bodies slows this down andthey stick around. This makes those ice-rock bodies interesting tostudy, they did not change too much since they were made.I study news sent back from a computer controlled box flying around oneof those rock-ice things that is now closer to the Sun. When thespace between such a body and the Sun gets smaller, it warms up andsome of the ice changes into wind like things. We find out how muchof what stuff is flying away from that body and at what time.Then I and my friends put those numbers into a big ass computer to findout more on how those rock-ice bodies work. Where does the wind comefrom? Do they all come from the same place or only some? Is it really the Sun's fault? How many cups of ice change into wind each day? Many questions.

  16. Choking under pressure and working memory capacity: when performance pressure reduces fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Gimmig, David; Huguet, Pascal; Caverni, Jean-Paul; Cury, François

    2006-12-01

    Recent findings (Beilock & Carr, 2005) have demonstrated that only individuals with a high working memory capacity (WMC) "choke under pressure" on math problems with high working memory demands. This suggests that performance pressure hinders those who are the most qualified to succeed, because it consumes the WMC they usually rely on to achieve superior performance. This puts into question the use of performance in high-pressure situations as a means of distinguishing individuals with lesser or greater WMC potentials. While addressing several limitations of past research, we offer evidence that such choking (1) occurs only in individuals with high WMC, because of their anxiety-ridden perceptions of high-stakes situations, and (2) is not confined to tasks involving acquired skills and knowledge, but encompasses fluid reasoning abilities or intelligence (Gf). These findings have strong implications for assessments of people's intellectual capacities in academic, clinical, work, and research settings.

  17. The Loss Spiral of Work Pressure, Work-Home Interference and Exhaustion: Reciprocal Relations in a Three-Wave Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Bulters, Annemieke J.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the "loss spiral" hypothesis of work-home interference (WHI). Accordingly, work pressure was expected to lead to WHI and exhaustion, and, vice versa, exhaustion was expected to result in more WHI and work pressure over time. Results of SEM-analyses using three waves of data obtained from 335 employees of an employment agency…

  18. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  19. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  20. Working under pressure: a pilot study of nurse work in a postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Willis, Karen; Brown, Claire R; Sahlin, Ingrid; Svensson, Björn; Arnetz, Bengt B; Arnetz, Judith E

    2005-01-01

    Postoperative services provide an excellent setting to study nursing work due to the patients' needing highly technical, yet highly comforting, care. The current study examined nursing work in postoperative services in an attempt to discern how nursing work is structured. Observations of nursing interactions in a 14-bed postoperative unit of a large Swedish university hospital found that nursing work in this setting is highly intensive and multidimensional. The need to provide nursing interactions that are caring and respectful of patients, while at the same time ensuring a high level of technical capacity, was obvious throughout all stages of patient stays in this unit. Furthermore, although each interaction is necessarily time-limited there is a caring relationship sustained with each patient. There is a pattern of caring that emerges that can be encapsulated as a "contingent routine." Nursing work cannot be broken down into "dimensions of caring." The work is high-pressure and involves, by necessity, multitasking. There are many dimensions of nursing care, but, usually, these are supplied simultaneously.

  1. Accessory allowing an optical cell of 6-10 000 μm path for liquids and gases to be filled in vacuum and used under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    An accessory for introducing liquid or gaseous samples without any contamination into an evacuated cell for optical spectrometry is described. The procedure for its use is similar to that of sample injection into a gas-liquid chromatograph, no glove box or glove bag being needed. Main benefits are the wide choice of size of the samples, their recoverability, safety, and a range of optical paths allowing to measure the absorbance of strongly absorbing liquids and gases, very dilute liquid solutions, and liquefied gases under moderate pressure. Short path spectra of gaseous water pressure standards consent quantification of water partial pressure measured in common gas cells.

  2. 49 CFR 192.611 - Change in class location: Confirmation or revision of maximum allowable operating pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Change in class location: Confirmation or revision...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.611 Change in class location: Confirmation or revision... location, and the segment is in satisfactory physical condition, the maximum allowable operating...

  3. The Effect of Pressure on High- and Low-Working-Memory Students: An Elaboration of the Choking under Pressure Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zuowei; Shah, Priti

    2014-01-01

    Sample: Fifty-three third and fourth graders from China participated in this study. Method: Participants' working memory (WM) was assessed by the Automated Operation Span task. Then, they solved mental addition problems of different types under low- and high-pressure conditions. Performance was analysed as a function of pressure condition,…

  4. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  5. How Ministers Understand and Address Emotional and Sexual Pressures in Ministry Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Genise Aria

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of ministers in regard to how they understand and address emotional and sexual pressures encountered in ministry work. The research was guided by four questions: How do practicing ministers in the Church of Antioch describe and understand pressures in their work settings that they see as emotional or sexual in…

  6. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  7. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  8. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  9. Seizing Workplace Learning Affordances in High-Pressure Work Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnaur, Dorina

    2010-01-01

    Work in call centres is often presented as a form of unskilled labour characterized by routinization, technological surveillance and tight management control aimed at reaching intensive performance targets. Beyond delivering business objectives, this control and efficiency strategy is often held to produce counterproductive effects with regard to…

  10. Response of multi-metric indices to anthropogenic pressures in distinct marine habitats: the need for recalibration to allow wider applicability.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Jayne E; Cooper, Keith M; Crowe, Tasman P; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Phillips, Graham

    2014-10-15

    Sustainable exploitation of coastal ecosystems is facilitated by tools which allow reliable assessment of their response to anthropogenic pressures. The Infaunal Quality Index (IQI) and Multivariate-AMBI (M-AMBI) were developed to classify the ecological status (ES) of benthos for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). The indices respond reliably to the impacts of organic enrichment in muddy sand habitats, but their applicability across a range of pressures and habitats is less well understood. The ability of the indices to predict changes in response to pressures in three distinct habitats, intertidal muddy sand, maerl and inshore gravel, was tested using pre-existing datasets. Both responded following the same patterns of variation as previously reported. The IQI was more conservative when responding to environmental conditions so may have greater predictive value in dynamic habitats to provide an early-warning system to managers'. Re-calibration of reference conditions is necessary to reliably reflect ES in different habitats.

  11. Linking Parents' Work Pressure and Adolescents' Well-Being: Insights into Dynamics in Dual-Earner Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouter, Ann C.; Bumpus, Matthew F.; Maguire, Mary C.; McHale, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    Examined connections between parents' work pressure and adolescent adjustment in 190 dual-earner families. Found that effects of work pressure on adolescent well-being were mediated by parental role overload and parent-adolescent conflict. Fathers' work pressure predicted both parents' feelings of role overload. Mothers' work pressure predicted…

  12. How Work Affects Divorce: The Mediating Role of Financial and Time Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poortman, Anne-Rigt

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether the financial and time pressures associated with spouses' working lives play a role in the relation between work and divorce during the first years of marriage. Using retrospective data from the Netherlands, the results show that divorce is more likely when the husband works on average fewer hours and the wife more…

  13. Long-Term Persistence of Relaxation-Induced Blood Pressure Lowering during the Working Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agras, W. Stewart; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Evaluated essential hypertension patients (N=30) 15 months after treatment consisting of either relaxation training or blood pressure monitoring. Results showed significantly greater lowering of diastolic blood pressure for those receiving relaxation training both in clinic and during the working day. (LLL)

  14. Expansion Work without the External Pressure and Thermodynamics in Terms of Quasistatic Irreversible Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that the formula for irreversible expansion work in most chemical thermodynamics textbooks does not apply during the expansion process. Instead of the "external pressure" P[subscript ext], the pressure P[subscript sys,mb] on the piston or other moving boundary (hence the subscript mb), which is nearly equal to the system…

  15. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  16. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  17. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  18. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  19. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their control. The steam locomotive owner shall establish the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to the... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION...

  20. Overtime in Relation to Blood Pressure and Mood during Work, Leisure, and Night Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Renate; Triemer, Antje

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the association between characteristics of the workplace and overtime. A sample of 117 women and 126 men were assessed over 24 hours of a working day by means of a computerized diary and ambulant monitoring of blood pressure. Of the total sample, 178 participants had a contractual weekly working time of 40 hours. Of these, 106…

  1. A Demands-Resources Model of Work Pressure in IT Student Task Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. Vance; Sheetz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an initial test of the group task demands-resources (GTD-R) model of group task performance among IT students. We theorize that demands and resources in group work influence formation of perceived group work pressure (GWP) and that heightened levels of GWP inhibit group task performance. A prior study identified 11 factors…

  2. On designing low pressure loss working spaces for a planar Stirling micromachine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachey, M.-A.; Léveillé, É.; Fréchette, L. G.; Formosa, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, research was undertaken with the objective to design low pressure loss working spaces for a Stirling cycle micro heat engine operating from low temperature waste heat. This planar free-piston heat engine is anticipated to operate at the kHz level with mm3 displacement. Given the resonant nature of the free-piston configuration, the complexity of its working gas’ flow geometry and its projected high operating frequency, flow analysis is relatively complex. Design considerations were thus based on fast prototyping and experimentation. Results show that geometrical features, such as a sharp 90° corner between the regenerator and working spaces, are strong contributors to pressure losses. This research culminated into a promising revised working space configuration for engine start-up, as it considerably reduced total pressure losses, more than 80% at Re = 700, from the original design.

  3. Experimental Study on a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Prime Mover with Air Working Gas at Various Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Achmadin, Wahyu N.; Murti, Prastowo; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Thermoacoustic prime mover is an energy conversion device which converts thermal energy into acoustic work (sound wave). The advantages of this machine are that it can work with air as the working gas and does not produce any exhaust gases, so that it is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an experimental study on a standing wave thermoacoustic prime mover with air as the working gas at various pressures from 0.05 MPa to 0.6 MPa. We found that 0.2 MPa is the optimum pressure which gives the lowest onset temperature difference of 355 °C. This pressure value would be more preferable in harnessing low grade heat sources to power the thermoacoustic prime mover. In addition, we find that the lowest onset temperature difference is obtained when rh /δ k ratio is 2.85, where r h is the hydraulic radius of the stack and δ k is the thermal penetration depth of the gas. Moreover, the pressure amplitude of the sound wave is significantly getting larger from 2.0 kPa to 9.0 kPa as the charged pressure increases from 0.05 MPa up to 0.6 MPa.

  4. Compressed-air work is entering the field of high pressures.

    PubMed

    Le Péchon, J Cl; Gourdon, G

    2010-01-01

    Since 1850, compressed-air work has been used to prevent shafts or tunnels under construction from flooding. Until the 1980s, workers were digging in compressed-air environments. Since the introduction of tunnel boring machines (TBMs), very little digging under pressure is needed. However, the wearing out of cutter-head tools requires inspection and repair. Compressed-air workers enter the pressurized working chamber only occasionally to perform such repairs. Pressures between 3.5 and 4.5 bar, that stand outside a reasonable range for air breathing, were reached by 2002. Offshore deep diving technology had to be adapted to TBM work. Several sites have used mixed gases: in Japan for deep shaft sinking (4.8 bar), in The Netherlands at Western Scheldt Tunnels (6.9 bar), in Russia for St. Petersburg Metro (5.8 bar) and in the United States at Seattle (5.8 bar). Several tunnel projects are in progress that may involve higher pressures: Hallandsås (Sweden) interventions in heliox saturation up to 13 bar, and Lake Mead (U.S.) interventions to about 12 bar (2010). Research on TBMs and grouting technologies tries to reduce the requirements for hyperbaric works. Adapted international rules, expertise and services for saturation work, shuttles and trained personnel matching industrial requirements are the challenges. PMID:20737925

  5. The effect on ambulatory blood pressure of working under favourably and unfavourably perceived supervisors

    PubMed Central

    Wager, N; Fieldman, G; Hussey, T

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the role played by employees' perceptions of their supervisors' interactional styles as a possible source of workplace stress that may be associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates from cardiovascular disorders in workers in the lower strata of organisational hierarchies. Methods: A controlled, quasi-experimental, field study of female healthcare assistants. Allocation to the experimental and control groups was based on participants' responses to a supervisor interactional style questionnaire. Experimental participants (n = 13) reported working under two divergently perceived supervisors at the same workplace, on different days. The control group (n = 15) worked either under one supervisor, or two similarly perceived supervisors. Ambulatory blood pressure was recorded every 30 minutes, over a 12 hour period for three days. Results: The control group showed a 3 mm Hg difference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and a non-significant difference in diastolic blood pressure (DBP; mean difference 1 mm Hg) between the two supervisor conditions. The experimental group showed significantly higher SBP (15 mm Hg) and DBP (7 mm Hg) when working under a less favoured compared to a favoured supervisor. The degree of divergence in perceptions of supervisors shows a significant positive relation with the difference in blood pressure between the two workdays. Divergence in perceptions of interpersonal fairness is the strongest predictor of difference in blood pressure. Conclusion: An unfavourably perceived supervisor is a potent workplace stressor, which might have a clinically significant impact on supervisees' cardiovascular functioning. PMID:12819279

  6. Bioactive glass thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering technique: The role of working pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, G. E.; Marcov, D. A.; Pasuk, I.; Miculescu, F.; Pina, S.; Tulyaganov, D. U.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

    2010-09-01

    Bioglass coatings were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering deposition at low temperature (150 °C) onto silicon substrates. The influence of argon pressure values used during deposition (0.2 Pa, 0.3 Pa and 0.4 Pa) on the short-range structure and biomineralization potential of the bioglass coatings was studied. The biomineralization capability was evaluated after 30 days of immersion in simulated body fluid. SEM-EDS, XRD and FTIR measurements were performed. The tests clearly showed strong biomineralization features for the bioglass films. The thickness of the chemically grown hydroxyapatite layers was more than twice greater for the BG films deposited at the highest working pressure, in comparison to those grown on the films obtained at lower working pressures. The paper attempts to explain this experimental fact based on structural and compositional considerations.

  7. Pressures from Work, Self, and Home in the Life Stages of Married Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Douglas T.

    1975-01-01

    Following Lopata's (1966) model of the life cycle of the married woman's role, it was predicted and found that a woman's life stage would be related to her role pressures (work, home, self, and time), conflict, and satisfaction. Age and number of roles were not as strongly related to these variables as was life stage. (Author)

  8. Blade Surface Pressure Distributions in a Rocket Engine Turbine: Experimental Work With On-Blade Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the unsteady aspects of turbine rotor flowfields is critical to successful future turbine designs. A technology program was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to increase the understanding of unsteady environments for rocket engine turbines. The experimental program involved instrumenting turbine rotor blades with surface-mounted high frequency response pressure transducers. The turbine model was then tested to measure the unsteady pressures on the rotor blades. The data obtained from the experimental program is unique in three respects. First, much more unsteady data was obtained (several minutes per set point) than has been possible in the past. Also, two independent unsteady data acquisition systems and fundamental signal processing approaches were used. Finally, an extensive steady performance database existed for the turbine model. This allowed an evaluation of the effect of the on-blade instrumentation on the turbine's performance. This unique data set, the lessons learned for acquiring this type of data, and the improvements made to the data analysis and prediction tools will contribute to future turbine programs such as those for reusable launch vehicles.

  9. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation.

    PubMed

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A

    2015-12-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  10. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P.; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  11. The curvilinear relationship between work pressure and momentary task performance: the role of state and trait core self-evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Hofmans, Joeri; Debusscher, Jonas; Dóci, Edina; Spanouli, Andromachi; De Fruyt, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several studies have demonstrated that core self-evaluations (CSE)–or one’s appraisals about one’s own self-worth, capabilities, and competences–relate to job outcomes, less is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. In the present study, we address this issue by examining the role of within- and between-person variation in CSE in the relationship between work pressure and task performance. We hypothesized that (a) work pressure relates to task performance in a curvilinear way, (b) state CSE mediates the curvilinear relationship between work pressure and task performance, and (c) the relationship between work pressure and state CSE is moderated by trait CSE. Our hypotheses were tested via a 10-day daily diary study with 55 employees in which trait CSE was measured at baseline, while work pressure, task performance, and state CSE were assessed on a daily basis. Bayesian multilevel path analysis showed that work pressure affects task performance via state CSE, with state CSE increasing as long as the employee feels that (s)he is able to handle the work pressure, while it decreases when the level of work pressure exceeds the employees’ coping abilities. Moreover, we found that for people low on trait CSE, the depleting effect of work pressure via state CSE happens for low levels of work pressure, while for people high in trait CSE the depleting effect is located at high levels of work pressure. Together, our findings suggest that the impact of work pressure on task performance is driven by a complex interplay of between- and within-person differences in CSE. PMID:26579053

  12. The curvilinear relationship between work pressure and momentary task performance: the role of state and trait core self-evaluations.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, Joeri; Debusscher, Jonas; Dóci, Edina; Spanouli, Andromachi; De Fruyt, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several studies have demonstrated that core self-evaluations (CSE)-or one's appraisals about one's own self-worth, capabilities, and competences-relate to job outcomes, less is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. In the present study, we address this issue by examining the role of within- and between-person variation in CSE in the relationship between work pressure and task performance. We hypothesized that (a) work pressure relates to task performance in a curvilinear way, (b) state CSE mediates the curvilinear relationship between work pressure and task performance, and (c) the relationship between work pressure and state CSE is moderated by trait CSE. Our hypotheses were tested via a 10-day daily diary study with 55 employees in which trait CSE was measured at baseline, while work pressure, task performance, and state CSE were assessed on a daily basis. Bayesian multilevel path analysis showed that work pressure affects task performance via state CSE, with state CSE increasing as long as the employee feels that (s)he is able to handle the work pressure, while it decreases when the level of work pressure exceeds the employees' coping abilities. Moreover, we found that for people low on trait CSE, the depleting effect of work pressure via state CSE happens for low levels of work pressure, while for people high in trait CSE the depleting effect is located at high levels of work pressure. Together, our findings suggest that the impact of work pressure on task performance is driven by a complex interplay of between- and within-person differences in CSE. PMID:26579053

  13. Elevated blood pressure, decreased heart rate variability and incomplete blood pressure recovery after a 12-hour night shift work.

    PubMed

    Su, Ta-Chen; Lin, Lian-Yu; Baker, Dean; Schnall, Peter L; Chen, Ming-Fong; Hwang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chen-Fang; Wang, Jung-Der

    2008-01-01

    Shift work has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to determine the hemodynamic effects of 12-hour (12-h) shifts, and changes in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) during 36 h rest time following 12-h shifts. Fifteen male shift workers with a mean age of 32.9 yr were recruited from a semiconductor factory. Ambulatory BP (AmBP) monitoring was performed for a total of 48 h for each participant. Six workers were monitored for 48 h by Holter electrocardiogram on both the day and night shifts. Paired self-comparison was used to estimate the difference between two hourly measurements of 12-h BP, HR, and HRV using the same timetable intra-individually. We also applied mixed models to estimate the effects of 12-h shifts on the delayed recovery of BP and heart rate (HR) in six workers who completed 96-h AmBP monitoring, including a 48-h night shift-rest period and another day shift period. Results showed that 12-h night shift work gave a persistently elevated systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) and HR, and decreased HRV compared to 12-h day shift work with the corresponding resting time. In addition, there was delayed SBP and DBP recovery on the first 12-h rest time in night shift workers, which was further demonstrated on the second 12-h rest time after adjustment for possible confounders through mixed models. In conclusion, 12-h night shift work may elevate BP and HR and decrease HRV. It is also associated with delayed BP recovery.

  14. MHD natural convection flow along a vertical wavy surface with heat generation and pressure work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, M. A.; Kabir, K. H.; Andallah, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of pressure work on MHD natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid along a uniformly heated vertical wavy surface with heat generation has been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are first transformed into a non-dimensional form using suitable set of dimensionless variables. The resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations are mapped into the domain of a vertical flat plate and then solved numerically employing the implicit finite difference method, known as Keller-box scheme. The numerical results for the velocity profiles, temperature profiles, skin friction coefficient, the rate of heat transfers, the streamlines and the isotherms are shown graphically and skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer have been shown in tabular form for different values of the selective set of parameters consisting of pressure work parameter Ge, the magnetic parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, heat generation parameter Q and the amplitude of the wavy surface.

  15. Evaluation of a work site relaxation training program using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, N; Vivona-Vaughan, E; Gochfeld, M

    1989-07-01

    The rising physical, emotional, and economic costs of excess stress in occupational settings have resulted in a proliferation of many work site stress management programs. These programs have attempted to effect reductions in workers' stress by applying standard psychological interventions (ie, muscle relaxation and meditation) to the general work force. The benefits of these interventions for asymptomatic employee populations remain to be established. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the physical and psychologic effects of an occupational stress management program for asymptomatic hazardous waste workers (N = 66). Both laboratory and ambulatory blood pressure (at home and at work) were monitored, and self-reported psychologic symptoms were measured. The results indicate that the stress management techniques decreased the diastolic blood pressure variability of asymptomatic workers (P less than .001); however, unlike previous studies, no reductions in laboratory blood pressures nor in psychologic symptoms were found. The efficacy of the procedures for asymptomatic employees is questioned and suggestions are made for future research.

  16. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  17. Work-hardening induced tensile ductility of bulk metallic glasses via high-pressure torsion.

    PubMed

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-23

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  18. Pressure support. Changes in ventilatory pattern and components of the work of breathing.

    PubMed

    Van de Graaff, W B; Gordey, K; Dornseif, S E; Dries, D J; Kleinman, B S; Kumar, P; Mathru, M

    1991-10-01

    To evaluate the interaction between patient and ventilator during widely varying levels of pressure support (PS) ventilation, we studied 33 patients who had undergone aortocoronary bypass. All patients were without preoperative evidence of lung disease and had left ventricular ejection fractions greater than 45 percent. We assessed both changes in ventilatory pattern and the use of an extension of the Campbell technique to determine the components of the mechanical work of breathing (WOB). Patients were placed on 0, 10, 20, and 30 cm H2O of PS. We found that increasing the pressure support level (PSL) did not change minute ventilation, PCO2, or pH despite large changes in both rate and depth of breathing. The inspiratory time fraction was consistently and progressively reduced as PS increased. Although mean inspiratory flow (MIF) increased by 75 +/- 9 (SE) percent as the PSL increased to 30 cm H2O, mean airway pressure rose only 3.5 +/- 0.1 cm H2O. Observed changes in the resistive and elastic components of WOB at PSL greater than 0 were consistent with values predicted from baseline observations and changes in VT and MIF demonstrating that the Campbell technique of separating resistive and elastic components of the patient's WOB during unassisted ventilation can be extended to the analysis of WOB during mechanical ventilation. We were surprised to observe that although inspiratory WOB fell 67 +/- 13 percent as the PSL increased to 30 cm H2O, postinspiratory work by the inspiratory muscles (WOBPIIM) did not show significant change. The persistence and substantial values of WOBPIIM in some patients suggested the presence of significant patient-ventilator dyssynchrony, especially at higher levels of PS. Total inspiratory WOB per minute, including both patient WOB and WOB by the ventilator, increased by 186 +/- 29 percent, demonstrating that PS results in a respiratory pattern requiring substantially greater total mechanical work.

  19. The effect of working gas pressure on the switching rate of a kivotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevsky, D. E.; Lavrukhin, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The switching rate in gas-discharge devices (kivotrons) based on an "open" discharge with counterpropagating electron beams is studied experimentally. Structures with a total cathode area of 2 cm2 were used. A monotonic reduction in the switching time with an increase in the working gas pressure and in the voltage amplitude at the time of breakdown is demonstrated. The minimum switching time is ~240 ps at a voltage of 17 kV. The maximum current rise rate, which is limited by the discharge circuit inductance, is 3 × 1012 A/s.

  20. Ultrasonic spectroscopy allows a rapid determination of the relative water content at the turgor loss point: a comparison with pressure-volume curves in 13 woody species.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Fariñas, María Dolores; Alvarez-Arenas, Tomás Gómez; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2013-07-01

    The turgor loss point (TLP), which is considered a threshold for many physiological processes, may be useful in plant-breeding programs or for the selection of reforestation species. Obtaining TLP through the standard pressure-volume (p-v) curve method in a large set of species is highly time-consuming and somewhat subjective. To solve this problem, we present an objective and a less time-consuming technique based on the leaf resonance able to calculate the relative water content (RWC) at TLP (RWCTLP). This method uses air-coupled broadband ultrasonic spectroscopy to obtain the sigmoidal relation between RWC and the standardized resonant frequency (f/fo). For the 13 species measured, the inflexion point of the RWC-f/fo relationship ( ) was not statistically different from the value of RWC at the TLP obtained with the p-v curves (RWCTLP p-v).

  1. Load weight determination during dynamic working procedures using the pedar foot pressure distribution measuring system.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, R; Kupfer, J; Reinert, D

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: In 1994 a new BIA research project was launched, which deals with the development of a portable measuring system for recording of external stress parameters (e.g. body postures and handled load weights) at different places of employment. The investigations are carried out against the background of a newly recognized occupational disease (since 1993), which is that of damage of the spine following long-term repetitive lifting and carrying of heavy loads as well as working in an extreme trunk bending posture. As a part of the study it should be clarified if the worker's handled load weight can be determined by using a foot pressure distribution measuring system. METHODS:: In the case of a static working posture the handled load weight can simply be calculated by taking the difference of the measured weight and the known body rest weight of the worker. In dynamic situations the measured total foot reaction force consists of a static and a dynamic component, which is caused by the body movement and which is normally bigger than the load gravitational force. For load weight determination it is important to separate the dynamic forces from the measured total force to get an idea about its gravitational rest part. Therefore the body dynamics are measured synchronously to the foot pressure by using angle and angular velocity sensors. The herewith received data are used as input values for a developed biomechanical link segment model, with which it is possible to predict the foot reaction force. So even in dynamic situations an estimation of the handled load weight can be made by comparison of the predicted with the measured foot reaction force. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:: In laboratory tests the load weight could be determinated reliably for different working processes over a total measuring time of 40 seconds. During the measurements the Pedar insoles were placed directly under the foot so that the accuracy of the static force measurement was reasonably high

  2. Inspiratory pressure support compensates for the additional work of breathing caused by the endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Brochard, L; Rua, F; Lorino, H; Lemaire, F; Harf, A

    1991-11-01

    Breathing through an endotracheal tube and a demand valve may increase the work performed by the respiratory muscles. Inspiratory pressure support (PS) is known to reduce this work and might therefore compensate for this increased requirement. To test this hypothesis, we measured the work of breathing (WOB) in 11 patients whose tracheas were intubated. Five had no intrinsic lung disease, but six had chronic obstructive lung disease. We compared WOB measurements taken under several sets of conditions: during assisted breathing at four levels of PS, during unassisted breathing and connection to a T-piece, and after extubation of the trachea. During unassisted breathing via the ventilator circuit (PS set at 0 cmH20), the WOB per minute was greater than that after extubation, with a mean increase (+/- standard deviation) of 68 +/- 38% (10.3 +/- 5.1 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.7 J.min-1, P less than 0.01). While breathing through the T-piece, the WOB was 27 +/- 18% greater than after tracheal extubation (8.2 +/- 5.1 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.7 J.min-1, P less than 0.05). The principal reason why inspiratory work decreased after extubation was that the ventilatory requirement decreased. For each patient, we determined retrospectively, after extubation, the level of PS that had reduced WOB to its postextubation value and obtained levels ranging from 3.4 to 14.4 cmH2O. The PS level at which additional WOB was compensated for, was greater in patients with chronic lung disease than in those free of lung disease (12.0 +/- 1.9 vs. 5.7 +/- 1.5 cm H2O, P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Relationship of blood lead to blood pressure in a longitudinal study of working men

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.T.; Munoz, A.; Stein, A.; Sparrow, D.; Speizer, F.E.

    1986-05-01

    The relationship of lead exposure to blood pressure has been examined in a longitudinal study of a cohort of 89 Boston, Massachusetts, policemen. At the baseline examination, subjects had a blood lead determination and three consecutive blood pressure measurements. Triplicate blood pressure measurements were also taken at years 3, 4, and 5. Multivariate analysis revealed that, after correction for previous systolic blood pressure, body mass index, age, and smoking, a high level of blood lead was a significant predictor of subsequent elevation of systolic pressure. Bootstrap simulations of these models provided supporting evidence for the observed associations. These data suggest that lead exposure can significantly affect systolic pressure.

  4. Application of TPM indicators for analyzing work time of machines used in the pressure die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Stanisław; Czajkowska, Agnieszka; Stasiak-Betlejewska, Renata; Borade, Atul B.

    2014-05-01

    The article presents the application of total productive maintenance (TPM) to analyze the working time indicators of casting machines with particular emphasis on failures and unplanned downtime to reduce the proportion of emergency operation for preventive maintenance and diagnostics. The article presents that the influence of individual factors of complex machinery maintenance (TPM) is different and depends on the machines' modernity level. In an original way, by using correlation graphs, research findings on the impact of individual TPM factors on the castings quality were presented and interpreted. The examination results conducted for machines with varying modernity degrees allowed to determine changes within the impact of individual TPM factors depending on machine parameters. These results provide a rich source of information for the improvement processes on casting quality of the foundry industry that satisfies the automotive industry demand.

  5. The normal hourly variation of blood pressure in women: average patterns and the effect of work stress.

    PubMed

    James, G D; Moucha, O P; Pickering, T G

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pattern of diurnal variation of blood pressure in normotensive working women, and to assess the effect of work stress on this pattern. The subjects were 121 normotensive (based on clinic readings less than 140/90 mmHg) young women (age = 30.2 +/- 7.3 years; range 20-50) who wore an ambulatory blood pressure monitor on a workday from 9 am to 6 am the next day. The effect of work stress on the pattern of variation was assessed by comparing the hourly averages among women who perceived greater stress at work on the day of study ('work stressed') (n = 67) with those of women who perceived greater or equal stress at home on the day of study ('home stressed') (n = 54). The results showed that the systolic pressure of 'work stressed' women was 5-8 mmHg higher (P less than 0.05) and diastolic 3-4 mmHg higher (P less than 0.05) than 'home stressed' women for nearly every hour from 9 am to 6 pm. From 7 pm to 6 am, both groups were similar hour by hour. These data suggest that there is no intrinsic pattern of diurnal blood pressure variation (other than an awake-sleep cycle) in working women. The data also provide a reference standard for comparison with hypertensive women.

  6. Cellular assay optimization: part II: the use of a simple integrated robotic work cell to allow the multiplexed batching of cellular assays.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Marie A; Orme, Jonathan P; Roberts, Karen

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the implementation of an automated work cell with commercially available hardware and software, capable of handling up to 15 separate reagents for performing 96-well or 384-well assays but with a small footprint and only a single liquid dispenser and two plate washers. Extremely flexible software was used to enable this simple work cell to perform processes that would traditionally require a much larger, more expensive automation platform. With the development of the C-Myc assays for the targets DYRK, BMX, PERK, and FAK, the authors describe a software solution to multibatch assays to run simultaneously, reducing reagent dead volume and increasing the efficiency of running multiple assays such that the time to generate data across multiple targets was significantly shortened. Although a larger automated system with multiple robotic arms and extensive equipment would also be able to process multiple assays simultaneously, the work cell we have described represents an inexpensive and flexible, easily upgradable option suitable for a wider range of labs. PMID:21844326

  7. Effects of working pressure on physical properties of tungsten-oxide thin films sputtered from oxide target

    SciTech Connect

    Riech, I.; Acosta, M.; Pena, J. L.; Bartolo-Perez, P.

    2010-03-15

    Tungsten-oxide films were deposited on glass substrates from a metal-oxide target by nonreactive radio-frequency sputtering. The authors have studied the effect that changing Ar gas pressure has on the electrical, optical, and chemical composition in the thin films. Resistivity of WO{sub 3} changed ten orders of magnitude with working gas pressure values from 20 to 80 mTorr. Thin films deposited at 20 mTorr of Ar sputtering pressure showed lower resistivity and optical transmittance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed similar chemical composition for all samples irrespective of Ar pressure used. However, XPS analyses of the evolution of W 4f and O 1s peaks indicated a mixture of oxides dependent on the Ar pressure used during deposition.

  8. Auto-ignition of lubricating oil working at high pressures in a compressor for an air conditioner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul Jin; Choi, Hyo Hyun; Sohn, Chae Hoon

    2011-01-15

    Auto-ignition of lubricating oil working in a compressor for an air conditioner is studied experimentally. The adopted lubricating oil is an unknown mixture with multi-components and known to have flash point temperature of 170 °C. First, its auto-ignition temperature is measured 365 °C at atmospheric pressure. The lubricating oil works under high-pressure condition up to 30 atm and it is heated and cooled down repeatedly. Accordingly, auto-ignition temperatures or flammable limits of lubricating oil are required at high pressures with respect to fire safety. Because there is not a standard test method for the purpose, a new ignition-test method is proposed in this study and thereby, auto-ignition temperatures are measured over the pressure range below 30 atm. The measured temperatures range from 215 °C to 255 °C and they strongly depend on pressure of gas mixture consisting of oil vapor, nitrogen, and oxygen. They are close to flash point temperature and the lubricating oil can be hazardous when it works for high-pressure operating condition and abundant air flows into a compressor. PMID:20934810

  9. APJ1 and GRE3 homologs work in concert to allow growth in xylose in a natural Saccharomyces sensu stricto hybrid yeast.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Katja; Wenger, Jared W; Dunn, Barbara; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-06-01

    Creating Saccharomyces yeasts capable of efficient fermentation of pentoses such as xylose remains a key challenge in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. Metabolic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains has yielded xylose-fermenting strains, but these strains have not yet achieved industrial viability due largely to xylose fermentation being prohibitively slower than that of glucose. Recently, it has been shown that naturally occurring xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces species exist. Uncovering the genetic architecture of such strains will shed further light on xylose metabolism, suggesting additional engineering approaches or possibly even enabling the development of xylose-fermenting yeasts that are not genetically modified. We previously identified a hybrid yeast strain, the genome of which is largely Saccharomyces uvarum, which has the ability to grow on xylose as the sole carbon source. To circumvent the sterility of this hybrid strain, we developed a novel method to genetically characterize its xylose-utilization phenotype, using a tetraploid intermediate, followed by bulk segregant analysis in conjunction with high-throughput sequencing. We found that this strain's growth in xylose is governed by at least two genetic loci, within which we identified the responsible genes: one locus contains a known xylose-pathway gene, a novel homolog of the aldo-keto reductase gene GRE3, while a second locus contains a homolog of APJ1, which encodes a putative chaperone not previously connected to xylose metabolism. Our work demonstrates that the power of sequencing combined with bulk segregant analysis can also be applied to a nongenetically tractable hybrid strain that contains a complex, polygenic trait, and identifies new avenues for metabolic engineering as well as for construction of nongenetically modified xylose-fermenting strains.

  10. Accountability Pressure and Non-Achievement Student Behaviors. Working Paper 122

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbein, John B.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine how failing to make adequate yearly progress under No Child Left Behind (NCLB), and the accountability pressure that ensues, affects various non-achievement student behaviors. Using administrative data from North Carolina and leveraging a discontinuity in the determination of school failure, we examine the causal impact of…

  11. CONFERENCE NOTE: Comité Consultatif pour la Masse et les grandeurs apparentées (CCM), High Pressure and Medium Pressure Working Groups, Second International Seminar on Pressure Metrology from 1 kPa to 1 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The seminar will be held from 2 to 4 June 1993, preceding the next meeting of the CCM, at the Laboratoire National d'Essais (LNE), 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris, France. Scope of the Seminar The purpose of the seminar is to review the state of the art of pressure measurements in the 1 kPa to 1 GPa range and to present original and innovative contributions from standards laboratories and industry. Main Topics The seminar will be organized in six sessions as follows: Liquid-column manometers Piston gauge pressure standards Properties of liquids and gases relevant to pressure metrology Pressure transducers and transfer standards Pressure standard comparison (methods and results) Dynamic pressure measurements. Each topic will be introduced by a review paper presented by a session chairman. A final session, coordinated by Dr G F Molinar (IMGC), Chairman of the CCM High Pressure Working Group, and Dr P Stuart (NPL), Chairman of the CCM Medium Pressure Working Group, will deal with: Actual limits of accuracy of static pressure measurements in fluid media Fundamental problems in pressure metrology between I kPa and 1 GPa. Call for Papers Papers should be prepared for oral presentation and will be refereed by the session chairmen. The Proceedings will be published as a special issue of Metrologia. Papers should be written according to the instructions for authors printed on the inside back cover of this journal. A one-page abstract should be sent to Dr Molinar at the IMGC, to arrive before 31 January 1993. A participation fee of 900 FFr (175 US) will be charged. This will cover general expenses and a copy of the Proceedings. Hotel reservations, meals and transport are not included. Organizers For further information please contact: 1993 CCM Pressure Seminar, Dr G F Molinar, Istituto di Metrologia "G Colonnetti", Strada delle Cacce 73, 1-10135 Torino, Italy telephone (39) 11 39771; telex 212209 IMGCTO-I; fax (39) 11 346761. Contact at the LNE: J C Legras, telephone (33

  12. How Do Antihypertensive Drugs Work? Insights from Studies of the Renal Regulation of Arterial Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Digne-Malcolm, Holly; Frise, Matthew C.; Dorrington, Keith L.

    2016-01-01

    Though antihypertensive drugs have been in use for many decades, the mechanisms by which they act chronically to reduce blood pressure remain unclear. Over long periods, mean arterial blood pressure must match the perfusion pressure necessary for the kidney to achieve its role in eliminating the daily intake of salt and water. It follows that the kidney is the most likely target for the action of most effective antihypertensive agents used chronically in clinical practice today. Here we review the long-term renal actions of antihypertensive agents in human studies and find three different mechanisms of action for the drugs investigated. (i) Selective vasodilatation of the renal afferent arteriole (prazosin, indoramin, clonidine, moxonidine, α-methyldopa, some Ca++-channel blockers, angiotensin-receptor blockers, atenolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol, labetolol, hydrochlorothiazide, and furosemide). (ii) Inhibition of tubular solute reabsorption (propranolol, nadolol, oxprenolol, and indapamide). (iii) A combination of these first two mechanisms (amlodipine, nifedipine and ACE-inhibitors). These findings provide insights into the actions of antihypertensive drugs, and challenge misconceptions about the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of many of the agents. PMID:27524972

  13. How Do Antihypertensive Drugs Work? Insights from Studies of the Renal Regulation of Arterial Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Digne-Malcolm, Holly; Frise, Matthew C; Dorrington, Keith L

    2016-01-01

    Though antihypertensive drugs have been in use for many decades, the mechanisms by which they act chronically to reduce blood pressure remain unclear. Over long periods, mean arterial blood pressure must match the perfusion pressure necessary for the kidney to achieve its role in eliminating the daily intake of salt and water. It follows that the kidney is the most likely target for the action of most effective antihypertensive agents used chronically in clinical practice today. Here we review the long-term renal actions of antihypertensive agents in human studies and find three different mechanisms of action for the drugs investigated. (i) Selective vasodilatation of the renal afferent arteriole (prazosin, indoramin, clonidine, moxonidine, α-methyldopa, some Ca(++)-channel blockers, angiotensin-receptor blockers, atenolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol, labetolol, hydrochlorothiazide, and furosemide). (ii) Inhibition of tubular solute reabsorption (propranolol, nadolol, oxprenolol, and indapamide). (iii) A combination of these first two mechanisms (amlodipine, nifedipine and ACE-inhibitors). These findings provide insights into the actions of antihypertensive drugs, and challenge misconceptions about the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of many of the agents. PMID:27524972

  14. Taking Pressure off Families: Child-Care Subsidies Lessen Mothers' Work-Hour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Julie E.; Fagan, Jay; Laughlin, Lynda

    2006-01-01

    We use the Philadelphia Survey of Child Care and Work to model the effect of child-care subsidies and other ecological demands and resources on the work hour, shift, and overtime problems of 191 low-income urban mothers. Comparing subsidy applicants who do and do not receive cash payments for child care, we find that mothers who receive subsidies…

  15. Heavy physical work under time pressure: the garbage collection service--a case study.

    PubMed

    Camada, Ilza Mitsuko de Oliveira; Pataro, Silvana Maria Santos; Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The increased generation of garbage has become a problem in large cities, with greater demand for collection services. The collector is subjected to high workload. This study describes the work in garbage collection service, highlighting the requirements of time, resulting in physical and psychosocial demands to collectors. Ergonomic Work Analysis (EWA) - a method focused on the study of work in real situations was used. Initially, technical visits, global observations and unstructured interviews with different subjects of a garbage collection company were conducted. The following step of the systematic observations was accompanied by interviews conducted during the execution of tasks, inquiring about the actions taken, and also interviews about the actions, but conducted after the development of the tasks, photographic records and audiovisual recordings, of workers from two garbage collection teams. Contradictions between the prescribed work and activities (actual work) were identified, as well as the variability present in this process, and strategies adopted by these workers to regulate the workload. It was concluded that the insufficiency of means and the organizational structure of management ensue a situation where the collection process is maintained at the expense of hyper-requesting these workers, both physically and psychosocially. PMID:22316767

  16. An approach based on ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry allowing the quantification of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Birgit; Menzel, Nicole; Lander, Vera; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-15

    A method for the analysis of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters in complex mixtures was established. The approach was based on a previously not described combination of three elements: (i) the formation of [M-FA+H](+) fragment ions via APCI (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization), (ii) a highly efficient UHPLC-based separation on a 1.7 μ C8 column, previously established for phytostanyl fatty acid esters, allowing the distinction of individual fatty acid esters sharing the same sterol/stanol nucleus and of isotope peaks of phytosteryl fatty acid esters and corresponding phytostanyl fatty acid esters based on these [M-FA+H](+) fragment ions, and (iii) the adjustment of the APCI conditions allowing the differential APCI-MS-SIM (single ion monitoring) detection of phytostanyl esters of linoleic and linolenic acid based on their distinct formation of a [M+H](+) ion. The usefulness of the methodology was demonstrated by the analysis of a commercially available enriched margarine. Two runs per sample allowed the quantification of 35 target analytes; the total amounts of esters were between 124.7 and 125.3g/kg, being in good agreement with the labelled 125 g/kg. Validation data were elaborated for 35 individual fatty acid esters of sitosterol, campesterol, brassicasterol, stigmasterol, sitostanol and campestanol. Recovery rates ranged from 95 to 106%; the coefficients of variation were consistently <5%, except for stigmasteryl-18:1. The approach describes for the first time a quantification of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters and thus closes an analytical gap related to this class of health-relevant food constituents.

  17. Commitment under pressure: experienced therapists' inner work during difficult therapeutic impasses.

    PubMed

    Moltu, Christian; Binder, Per-Einar; Nielsen, Geir Høstmark

    2010-05-01

    Interviews were conducted to explore the recall of impasse experiences of 12 highly skilled and experienced therapists. Participants were interviewed in depth individually about a specific impasse from their experience that resolved successfully. The transcribed interviews were analysed using qualitative methodology. The authors found that participants understood their reported impasse experiences as important for their professional development. The category of "helpful subjective presence" describes the mode of being with patients that the participants found therapeutic. The categories of "losing hope" and "difficult feelings in the therapist in the here and now" are processes that threaten the helpful presence. The participants' inner work on the two latter categories is identified as a key to the successful resolution of impasses. PMID:20099206

  18. Stress in highly demanding IT jobs: transformational leadership moderates the impact of time pressure on exhaustion and work-life balance.

    PubMed

    Syrek, Christine J; Apostel, Ella; Antoni, Conny H

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate transformational leadership as a potential moderator of the negative relationship of time pressure to work-life balance and of the positive relationship between time pressure and exhaustion. Recent research regards time pressure as a challenge stressor; while being positively related to motivation and performance, time pressure also increases employee strain and decreases well-being. Building on the Job Demand-Resources model, we hypothesize that transformational leadership moderates the relationships between time pressure and both employees' exhaustion and work-life balance such that both relationships will be weaker when transformational leadership is higher. Of seven information technology organizations in Germany, 262 employees participated in the study. Established scales for time pressure, transformational leadership, work-life balance, and exhaustion were used, all showing good internal consistencies. The results support our assumptions. Specifically, we find that under high transformational leadership the impact of time pressure on exhaustion and work-life balance was less strong. The results of this study suggest that, particularly under high time pressure, transformational leadership is an important factor for both employees' work-life balance and exhaustion.

  19. Stress in highly demanding IT jobs: transformational leadership moderates the impact of time pressure on exhaustion and work-life balance.

    PubMed

    Syrek, Christine J; Apostel, Ella; Antoni, Conny H

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate transformational leadership as a potential moderator of the negative relationship of time pressure to work-life balance and of the positive relationship between time pressure and exhaustion. Recent research regards time pressure as a challenge stressor; while being positively related to motivation and performance, time pressure also increases employee strain and decreases well-being. Building on the Job Demand-Resources model, we hypothesize that transformational leadership moderates the relationships between time pressure and both employees' exhaustion and work-life balance such that both relationships will be weaker when transformational leadership is higher. Of seven information technology organizations in Germany, 262 employees participated in the study. Established scales for time pressure, transformational leadership, work-life balance, and exhaustion were used, all showing good internal consistencies. The results support our assumptions. Specifically, we find that under high transformational leadership the impact of time pressure on exhaustion and work-life balance was less strong. The results of this study suggest that, particularly under high time pressure, transformational leadership is an important factor for both employees' work-life balance and exhaustion. PMID:23834443

  20. Performance-based contracting in home-care work in The Netherlands: professionalism under pressure?

    PubMed

    Oomkens, Rosanne; Hoogenboom, Marcel; Knijn, Trudie

    2016-07-01

    supportive managers for both autonomy and job satisfaction (H4) can help home-care organisations improve the attractiveness of home-care work.

  1. [Features of the sanitary-educational work in opisthorchiasis under conditions of migration pressure in an endemic region].

    PubMed

    Pustovalova, V Ia

    2002-01-01

    Under migration pressure, sanitary educational work is ineffective in the endemic area: newcomers' awareness of opisthorchiasis does not improve as their residence prolongs, the number of persons who recognize the harm of eating of raw fish and meat is increased. Hygienic education of newcomers is late and done only among a part of their contingent. Its unconvincing character is confirmed by late referral of those infected for being treated and struck off the register. Attention to the local population is being relaxed, which determines the low level of knowledge of what measures should be also made to prevent infection in this contingent which is an additional channel of information for new comers. The established epidemic situation in the opisthorchiasis-endemic area is largely determined by the fact that medical specialists know this problem badly.

  2. Increase in family allowances.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    In July 1989 the family allowance structure in Australia was changed from a 4-rate to a 2-rate structure. The new rates were increased to $A9 a week for the 1st 3 children and $A12 for each additional child. The Family Allowance Supplment rate for children 13-15 years old was raised from $A31 to $A34.10/week. PMID:12344544

  3. Work Capability and physiological effects predictive studies. 4: In He-O2 excursions to pressures of 400- 800- 1200- and 1600 feet of sea water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J. (Editor); Gelfand, R. (Editor); Clark, J. M. (Editor); Fletcher, M. E. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experiments which exposed men in chambers, breathing helium with oxygen, to progressive increases of pressure equivalent to 400-800-1200-1600 feet of sea water (fsw) were conducted. Rates of compression and exposure to stable high pressure. Goals included: 1) determination of the specific character and time course of onset of physiological and performance decrements during the intentionally rapid compressions, and determination of rates of adaptation on reaching stable elevated pressure; 2) investigation of accelerated methods for decompression in deep saturation excursion diving; and 3) determination of competence in practical work performed in water at pressures equivalent to the extreme diving depths of 1200 and 1600 fsw.

  4. Perceived job stress but not individual cardiovascular reactivity to stress is related to higher blood pressure at work.

    PubMed

    Fauvel, J P; Quelin, P; Ducher, M; Rakotomalala, H; Laville, M

    2001-07-01

    Psychological stress has been reported to be related to higher blood pressure (BP) and unfavorable cardiovascular profile. However, because of the complexity of personal stress management, a multilevel stress measurement strategy is needed. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the respective influences of the subjective perception of professional strain (high demand and low latitude) and cardiovascular reactivity to a stress test (Stroop stress test) on BP. Worksite BP was measured in 303 healthy normotensive subjects, 18 to 55 years of age, who worked in the same chemical company. In a subset of 70 randomly selected subjects, 24-hour ambulatory BP was performed to assess BP during working hours. The 20% of subjects who reported the highest job strain (high-strain group) or the highest BP stress reactivity (high-responder group) were compared with the remaining subjects (80%) (non-high-strain or low-responder groups). Subjects who submitted to the highest job strain had significantly higher ambulatory diastolic BP (4.5 mm Hg, P=0.015) during only working hours, whereas BP was similar during the remaining hours. Worksite BP and stress cardiovascular reactivity were similar between job strain groups. BP stress reactivity did not influence worksite and ambulatory BP. Spontaneous BP variability assessed by standard deviation and spectral analysis was equivalent between complementary groups. Prevalence of microalbuminuria was significantly higher in the high-responder group (8.2% versus 2.5% in low responders) and only slightly higher in the high-strain group (6.2% versus 3.2% in non-high strain). Potential confounding factors, such as age, gender, alcohol consumption, salt intake, body mass index, and occupation, which were equivalent between groups, did not interfere with our results. Our study quantifies high-professional strain effects on BP levels that appear to be higher only during the working period and to be independent from spontaneous BP

  5. Variation of Pressure with Depth of Water: Working with High-Tech and Low-Cost Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornek, Funda; Zziwa, Byansi Jude; Taganahan, Teresita D.

    2013-01-01

    When you dive underwater, you feel the pressure on your ears and, as you dive deeper, more pressure is felt. This article presents an activity that teachers might find useful for demonstrating the relationship between water depth and pressure. (Contains 5 figures and 1 table.)

  6. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  7. Overexpression of EAR1 and SSH4 that encode PPxY proteins in the multivesicular body provides stability to tryptophan permease Tat2, allowing yeast cells to grow under high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Toshiki; Usui, Keiko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Tryptophan uptake in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is susceptible to high hydrostatic pressure and it limits the growth of tryptophan auxotrophic (Trp-) strains under pressures of 15-25 MPa. The susceptibility of tryptophan uptake is accounted for by the pressure-induced degradation of tryptophan permease Tat2 occurring in a Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase-dependent manner. Ear1 and Ssh4 are multivesicular body proteins that physically interact with Rsp5. We found that overexpression of either of the EAR1 or SSH4 genes enabled the Trp- cells to grow at 15-25 MPa. EAR1 and SSH4 appeared to provide stability to the Tat2 protein when overexpressed. The result suggests that Ear1 and Ssh4 negatively regulate Rsp5 on ubiquitination of Tat2. Currently, high hydrostatic pressure is widely used in bioscience and biotechnology for structurally perturbing macromolecules such as proteins and lipids or in food processing and sterilizing microbes. We suggest that hydrostatic pressure is an operative experimental parameter to screen yeast genes specifically for regulation of Tat2 through the function of Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase.

  8. Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

    2013-01-01

    In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

  9. Influence of working gas pressure on structure and properties of WO3 films reactively deposited by rf magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Tanabe, J.; Yamada, N.; Nakabayashi, H.

    2003-07-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) films with thickness of 0.9-6.7 μm have been deposited on glass-slide substrates, using rf magnetron sputtering in an atmosphere of mixture 80% Ar and 20% O2. The as-deposited films had a dark metallic color, like the W target, at a working gas pressure PW of 1 mTorr. Yellow films resulted at a PW of 3 mTorr. With a further increase of PW, the film color changed to pale yellow. From the x-ray diffraction patterns, the as-deposited films were polycrystalline crystallizing in the monoclinic crystal structure with high c-axis orientation perpendicular to the film plane. The optical transmittance of the films deposited at a PW of 1 mTorr is nearly zero. However, the transmittance of the films deposited at other PW are larger than 70% in the wavelength, λ, ranging from 500 to 900 nm. With decreasing λ to 400 nm, the transmittance decreases steeply to zero. The λ at this absorption edge is longer than that in TiO2 and comes in the visible region. The surface morphology of the films depends on PW. This different morphology may be attributed to the effect of the substrate heating by plasma emission because of the high plasma density at higher PW. The morphology of the films may also depend on the crystallinity of the WO3 films. As PW increased, the surfaces of the films became rougher but the grain sizes of the films did not always become larger. The WO3 films deposited in this study may be used for the underlayer of TiO2 photocatalyst.

  10. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  11. Methodology and technology for peripheral and central blood pressure and blood pressure variability measurement: current status and future directions - Position statement of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, George S; Parati, Gianfranco; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Achimastos, Apostolos; Andreadis, Emanouel; Asmar, Roland; Avolio, Alberto; Benetos, Athanase; Bilo, Grzegorz; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Castiglioni, Paolo; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Dolan, Eamon; Head, Geoffrey; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Kollias, Anastasios; Kotsis, Vasilis; Manios, Efstathios; McManus, Richard; Mengden, Thomas; Mihailidou, Anastasia; Myers, Martin; Niiranen, Teemu; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Padfield, Paul; Palatini, Paolo; Papaioannou, Theodore; Protogerou, Athanasios; Redon, Josep; Verdecchia, Paolo; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; O'Brien, Eoin

    2016-09-01

    Office blood pressure measurement has been the basis for hypertension evaluation for almost a century. However, the evaluation of blood pressure out of the office using ambulatory or self-home monitoring is now strongly recommended for the accurate diagnosis in many, if not all, cases with suspected hypertension. Moreover, there is evidence that the variability of blood pressure might offer prognostic information that is independent of the average blood pressure level. Recently, advancement in technology has provided noninvasive evaluation of central (aortic) blood pressure, which might have attributes that are additive to the conventional brachial blood pressure measurement. This position statement, developed by international experts, deals with key research and practical issues in regard to peripheral blood pressure measurement (office, home, and ambulatory), blood pressure variability, and central blood pressure measurement. The objective is to present current achievements, identify gaps in knowledge and issues concerning clinical application, and present relevant research questions and directions to investigators and manufacturers for future research and development (primary goal).

  12. Methodology and technology for peripheral and central blood pressure and blood pressure variability measurement: current status and future directions - Position statement of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, George S; Parati, Gianfranco; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Achimastos, Apostolos; Andreadis, Emanouel; Asmar, Roland; Avolio, Alberto; Benetos, Athanase; Bilo, Grzegorz; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Castiglioni, Paolo; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Dolan, Eamon; Head, Geoffrey; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Kollias, Anastasios; Kotsis, Vasilis; Manios, Efstathios; McManus, Richard; Mengden, Thomas; Mihailidou, Anastasia; Myers, Martin; Niiranen, Teemu; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Padfield, Paul; Palatini, Paolo; Papaioannou, Theodore; Protogerou, Athanasios; Redon, Josep; Verdecchia, Paolo; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; O'Brien, Eoin

    2016-09-01

    Office blood pressure measurement has been the basis for hypertension evaluation for almost a century. However, the evaluation of blood pressure out of the office using ambulatory or self-home monitoring is now strongly recommended for the accurate diagnosis in many, if not all, cases with suspected hypertension. Moreover, there is evidence that the variability of blood pressure might offer prognostic information that is independent of the average blood pressure level. Recently, advancement in technology has provided noninvasive evaluation of central (aortic) blood pressure, which might have attributes that are additive to the conventional brachial blood pressure measurement. This position statement, developed by international experts, deals with key research and practical issues in regard to peripheral blood pressure measurement (office, home, and ambulatory), blood pressure variability, and central blood pressure measurement. The objective is to present current achievements, identify gaps in knowledge and issues concerning clinical application, and present relevant research questions and directions to investigators and manufacturers for future research and development (primary goal). PMID:27214089

  13. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Adolescents Analysis of Risk by 2004 National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group Staging Criteria

    PubMed Central

    McNiece, Karen L.; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Samuels, Joshua; Bell, Cynthia; Garcia, Kathleen; Poffenbarger, Timothy; Sorof, Jonathan M.; Portman, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    The National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents recently recommended staging hypertension (HTN) in children and adolescents based on blood pressure severity. The use of blood pressure staging and its corresponding therapeutic approach was examined in this pooled analysis assessing the risk for end-organ damage, specifically left ventricular hypertrophy among hypertensive adolescents stratified by working group criteria. Newly diagnosed hypertensive adolescents and normotensive control subjects similar in age, race/ethnicity, gender, and body mass index completed casual and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements, M-mode echocardiography, and fasting serum laboratories. Hypertensive subjects had higher insulin and cholesterol but similar glucose levels as compared with control subjects. Among subjects with stage 1 HTN by casual blood pressure, 34% had white-coat HTN as opposed to 15% of stage 2 hypertensive subjects. Of the subjects with normal casual measurements, 20% had HTN by ambulatory monitoring. Subjects with stage 2 HTN by casual measurement alone (odds ratio: 4.13; 95% CI: 1.04 to 16.48) and after 24-hour ambulatory confirmation (odds ratio: 7.23; 95% CI: 1.28 to 40.68) had increased odds for left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the risk for left ventricular hypertrophy was similar for subjects with masked and confirmed stage 1 HTN, whereas subjects with white-coat HTN had a risk comparable to normotensive subjects. Thus, recommendations that adolescents with stage 2 HTN by casual measurements alone receive medication initially along with therapeutic lifestyle counseling are reasonable, though ambulatory blood pressure monitoring remains a valuable tool for evaluating children with stage 2 HTN, because >10% have white-coat HTN. PMID:17592068

  14. The influence of working gas pressure on interlayer mixing in magnetron-deposited Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Pershyn, Yuriy; Gullikson, Erik; Artyukov, Igor; Kondratenko, Valeriy; Sevryukova, Victoriya; Voronov, Dmitriy; Zubarev, Evgeniy; Vinogradov, Alexander

    2011-08-08

    Impact of Ar gas pressure (1-4 mTorr) on the growth of amorphous interlayers in Mo/Si multilayers deposited by magnetron sputtering was investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering ({lambda} = 0.154 nm) and methods of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Some reduction of thickness of the amorphous inter-layers with Ar pressure increase was found, while composition of the layers was enriched with molybdenum. The interface modification resulted in raise of EUV reflectance of the Mo/Si multilayers.

  15. Separating chokers from nonchokers: predicting real-life tennis performance under pressure from behavioral tasks that tap into working memory functioning.

    PubMed

    Bijleveld, Erik; Veling, Harm

    2014-08-01

    To better understand the characteristics of athletes who tend to underperform under pressure, we investigated how (a) working memory (WM) capacity and (b) responsiveness of the dopamine system shape real-life performance under pressure. We expected that athletes with smaller WM capacity or a more responsive dopamine system (as operationalized with a risk-taking measure) are especially prone to fail during decisive moments. In a sample of competitive tennis players, WM capacity was measured with the Automated Operation Span task (AOSPAN); responsiveness of the dopamine system was measured with a risk-taking measure, the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART). As expected, higher AOSPAN scores predicted better performance during decisive sets; higher BART scores predicted worse performance during decisive sets. These findings indicate that real-life tennis performance can be predicted from behavioral tasks that tap into WM functioning and risk taking, and suggest that the ability to effectively use WM despite pressure separates chokers from nonchokers. PMID:25226603

  16. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... advance of allowance. (a) Allowance. Step 2+3 and Step 3 grant agreements will include an allowance for facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... would receive under paragraph (a) of this section. (5) In the event a Step 2+3, Step 3 or Step 7...

  17. Act No. 89-488 of 10 July 1989 containing provisions concerning agreements relating to insurance allowances for workers deprived of employment, the professional equality of women and men, labour and manpower examiners, foreign workers, and illicit work.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    Among other things, this French Act provides the following with respect to equality of opportunity in employment: 1) businesses with fewer than 300 workers may enter into agreements with the state permitting them to receive financial aid to carry out a study of their situation with respect to professional equality of women and men and measures that can be taken to restore equality of opportunity between women and men, such as temporary remedial plans that benefit only women; and 2) employers and workers' organizations are given 2 years to enter into collective bargaining to amend their contracts to remove all provisions that give special benefits to women, other than provisions establishing temporary remedial plans. The Act also strengthens the prohibitions on employing foreigners illegally in the following ways: 1) it provides that no person may directly or through another employ a foreigner without a work permit; 2) it makes it a crime, punishable by imprisonment for 2 months' to 2 years' and/or a fine of 2,000-200,000 francs for anyone other than an artist's agent to receive money, value, or personal property for bringing a foreign worker into France or arranging his or her hiring; 3) it raises the maximum penalty for using fraud or a false statement to obtain a work permit for a foreigner from 1 to 2 years' imprisonment for first offenders and from 3 to 4 years' imprisonment for repeat offenders; and 4) it raises penalties for lodging a foreigner illegally and for seeking from a foreign worker reimbursement for costs associated with bringing the worker to France and hiring him or her, or exacting from the worker a fee upon hiring.

  18. Act No. 89-488 of 10 July 1989 containing provisions concerning agreements relating to insurance allowances for workers deprived of employment, the professional equality of women and men, labour and manpower examiners, foreign workers, and illicit work.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    Among other things, this French Act provides the following with respect to equality of opportunity in employment: 1) businesses with fewer than 300 workers may enter into agreements with the state permitting them to receive financial aid to carry out a study of their situation with respect to professional equality of women and men and measures that can be taken to restore equality of opportunity between women and men, such as temporary remedial plans that benefit only women; and 2) employers and workers' organizations are given 2 years to enter into collective bargaining to amend their contracts to remove all provisions that give special benefits to women, other than provisions establishing temporary remedial plans. The Act also strengthens the prohibitions on employing foreigners illegally in the following ways: 1) it provides that no person may directly or through another employ a foreigner without a work permit; 2) it makes it a crime, punishable by imprisonment for 2 months' to 2 years' and/or a fine of 2,000-200,000 francs for anyone other than an artist's agent to receive money, value, or personal property for bringing a foreign worker into France or arranging his or her hiring; 3) it raises the maximum penalty for using fraud or a false statement to obtain a work permit for a foreigner from 1 to 2 years' imprisonment for first offenders and from 3 to 4 years' imprisonment for repeat offenders; and 4) it raises penalties for lodging a foreigner illegally and for seeking from a foreign worker reimbursement for costs associated with bringing the worker to France and hiring him or her, or exacting from the worker a fee upon hiring. PMID:12344130

  19. A frictional work predictive method for the initiation of solid high explosives from low-pressure impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S.K.; Green, L.G.; Lee, C.G.

    1993-07-01

    The goal of these tests was to provide information that would aid in the prediction of HE response in accident situations where the initiating stimulus was less than that required for direct shock initiation. Before these tests were run, a prediction of threshold impact velocity was made (70m/s) using a rough average of previously reported threshold factional work from skid tests (1 cal/cm{sub 2}) and the experimental value for coefficient of friction of 0.5({plus_minus}) measured in the same tests for PBX-9404. The actual testing proved the threshold impact velocity to be much less, and the pretest prediction was not only wrong, it was not conservative. This work presents a methodology for more accurately predicting the reaction threshold for HE involved in an accident such as an airplane crash or a severe land transportation accident. The main focus of this work is on LX-10-1 (94.5% 5.5% Viton A binder, density 1.86g/cm{sup 3}). Additional work was done on LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% KelF binder, density 1.90g/cm{sub 3}), a very insensitive explosive. The explicit two-dimensional finite element code, DYNA2D, was used to model the tests and predict the HE response. The finite element mesh of the projectile and target were generated using MAZE. The post-processing of the DYNA2D analysis was done with ORION.

  20. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz) ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-cancer cell interactions, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the morphology and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level of human lung adenocarcinoma cell (A549) and human bladder cancer cell (EJ) were explored. The experimental results show that the plasma can effectively control the intracellular concentrations of ROS. Although there exist slight differences in the production of ROS, helium, argon, or nitrogen plasma jets are found to be useful in enhancing the intracellular ROS concentrations in cancer cells.

  1. The Tangle of Student Allowances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Norman J.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the distribution of student financial aid in Australia focuses on these issues: direct vs. indirect payment to students; inequality in living allowances given to secondary and postsecondary students; and distribution of expense allowances by state government and living allowances by the Commonwealth. (MSE)

  2. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  3. 38 CFR 21.4145 - Work-study allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pursuing a program of education under either 38 U.S.C. chapter 30, 32 or 33 or 10 U.S.C. chapter 1606 at a... person is pursuing a program of education in a State; and (iii) The eligible person is not pursuing a...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Administration of Educational Assistance Programs...

  4. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  5. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  6. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  7. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  8. 76 FR 70883 - Clothing Allowance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2011 (76 FR 5733-5734), VA proposed to amend its... appliances affecting different articles of clothing. 76 FR 5733; Sursely, 551 F.3d at 1356. VA will make the... allowances. The amendment provides for an annual clothing allowance for each qualifying prosthetic...

  9. Attachment Fitting for Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Carrigan, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    This invention provides sealed access to the interior of a pressure vessel and consists of a tube. a collar, redundant seals, and a port. The port allows the seals to be pressurized and seated before the pressure vessel becomes pressurized.

  10. Blood Pressure, Sleep Quality and Fatigue in Shift Working Police Officers: Effects of a Twelve Hour Roster System on Cardiovascular and Sleep Health

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jaymen L.; Lal, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Police officers have been reported to exhibit a high incidence of pathologies, which present prematurely in an otherwise healthy population. Shift work has also been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and sleep disorders, attributable to its propensity for circadian rhythm dysfunction. However, contention exists as to whether shift work has a direct effect upon blood pressure (BP) regulation. Methods: This cross-sectional study sought to determine changes in BP and associations with the overall sleep quality and fatigue in 206 general duties police officers (n = 140 males) of the New South Wales Police Force in Australia. The subjects’ BP was assessed before and after their twelve hour shift, during which time they also completed the Lifestyle Appraisal Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Results: Poor sleep quality (PSQI) and fatigue severity (FSS) were found to predominate in the sample (69% and 51% respectively). Although there was no change in BP for male participants, female officers’ systolic blood pressure (SBP) was found to increase significantly across the shift (p < 0.001), but with no change found in females’ diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Finally, higher pre and post-shift SBP (r = −0.26, p = 0.001; r = −0.25, p = 0.001, respectively) and DBP (r = −0.26, p = 0.001; r = −0.26, p = 0.001, respectively) were significantly correlated with lower FSS scores after accounting for age, waist-hip ratio and lifestyle risk factors. Conclusions: Based on these preliminary findings, there was a significant increase in SBP of female police officers after shift work, while BP and fatigue levels in all police officers were strongly related. Moreover, the predominating poor sleep quality and impact of fatigue in this sample remain a concern. Further research is required to ensure the physiological welfare of police officers, while strategies must be

  11. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Job Location and Development Program § 675.33...

  12. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for which the claim is made. For example, borrowed property may be the subject of a claim. (c) Subject... the claimant is a local inhabitant; or (iii) Any warehouse, office, working area, or other place... Government other than OPM. (11) Borrowed property. Claims may be allowed for borrowed property that has...

  13. 5 CFR 591.307 - Payment of allowance rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... nature of assigned work. (g) When a remote duty post is determined by the Office of Personnel Management... ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.307 Payment of allowance rate... approved work schedule of the employee precludes use of the transportation services that may be...

  14. Pressure testing of torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.D.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P.

    1995-12-01

    Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

  15. Flange weld pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Device allows localized high-pressure proof test. Use of tool eliminates need to block off far end of pipe; only small amount of pressurizing gas is needed; only small area needs to be cleared of personnel for proof test.

  16. Temperature impacts on the set pressure of soft seated pressure relief valves

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.J.; Zirps, G.T.; Gleason, R.B.

    1995-11-01

    From a safety standpoint, regardless of plant or facility type, the most important pieces of equipment are the pressure relief devices. The most critical characteristics of a pressure relief device are its set pressure and the related relieving capacity. The Set Pressure of a pressure relief device is defined as that value of increasing inlet static pressure at which the discharge becomes continuous (ASME PTC 25-1994, Performance Test Codes). To preclude an unsafe overpressure situation, the set pressure of the pressure relief device must not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the equipment or system being protected. Because of testing facility limitations, size or pressure, pressure relief valves intended for elevated temperature service are often set using ambient temperature air. Adjustments are made to the ambient valve opening pressures to compensate for the temperature differences. The extent of the adjustments to the pressure relief valve set pressure is important to ensure the valve will provide the required overpressure protection at the elevated in-service temperature.

  17. Linear motor compressor with pressure stabilization ports for use in refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Young, N. O.

    1985-11-19

    A pressure stabilization system for a linear compressor piston in which a check valve and passages within the piston permit communication between a compressor work space and a non-working volume of gas through an orifice in the piston cylinder. The check valve and ports allow momentary fluid communication between the dead space volume and the working volume. The fluid communication serves to stabilize working volume pressure and counteract the effects of gas leakage about the piston and into the dead volume. This fluid communication only occurs when dead volume pressure is greater than working volume pressure and port and are axially aligned.

  18. Central arterial pressure assessment with intensity POF sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Gonçalves, Steve; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; Pinto, João. L.; André, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The central pressure monitoring is considered a new key factor in hypertension assessment and cardiovascular prevention. In this work, it is presented the central arterial systolic pressure assessment with an intensity based POF sensor. The device was tested in four subjects, and stable pulse waves were obtained, allowing the calculation of the central pressure for all the subjects. The results shown that the sensor performs reliably, being a simple and low-cost solution to the intended application.

  19. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... segment, determined in accordance with subparts C and D of this part. (2) 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, for a segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless... devices in series that meet the requirements of § 192.197(c). (3) 25 p.s.i. (172 kPa) gage in segments...

  20. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  1. Carbon dioxide laser with an e-beam-initiated discharge produced in the working gas mixture at a pressure up to 5 atm

    SciTech Connect

    Orlovskii, Viktor M; Alekseev, S B; Tarasenko, Viktor F

    2011-11-30

    A high-pressure CO{sub 2} laser with a discharge initiated by an electron beam of sub-nanosecond duration in the laser gas mixture at a pressure up to 5 atm is fabricated. For the 20-ns pulses the energy from the active volume {approx} 4 cm{sup 3} amounted to 40 mJ. The laser operation at a pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz is demonstrated. In the gas mixture CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2}:He = 1:1:6 at a pressure 5 atm, the specific energy deposition of {approx} 0.07 J cm{sup -3} atm{sup -1} is obtained in the process of a non-self-sustained discharge with ionisation amplification.

  2. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  3. Pressurized hopper

    SciTech Connect

    Densley, P.J.; Goldmann, L.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given. (DLC)

  4. Assessment Data at Your Fingertips: Advances Allow for Timely Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolch, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The ever-increasing standards of No Child Left Behind regulations and various state assessments have put more pressure on teachers and administrators to monitor the learning process. Fortunately, the advent of technology is allowing teachers to test more often to prepare students for high-stakes tests and for districts to understand results for…

  5. Is It Safe to Allow Cell Phones in School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Cell phones were banned from most schools years ago, but after the Columbine High School and 9/11 tragedies, parents started pressuring some school boards and administrators to reverse the bans. On its surface, allowing students to have cell phones under the guise of improved school safety may seem like a "no-brainer" to many board members and…

  6. 5 CFR 591.306 - Employee eligibility for an allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.306 Employee... duty station at or within a remote post of duty approved under § 591.304, regardless of type of appointment or work schedule, only (1) when the employee travels the prescribed minimum distance and time,...

  7. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  8. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  10. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-522). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  11. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  12. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  13. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-ENG). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  14. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-ENG). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  15. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-ENG). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  16. Optical trapping at gigapascal pressures.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Richard W; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Saglimbeni, Filippo; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Diamond anvil cells allow the behavior of materials to be studied at pressures up to hundreds of gigapascals in a small and convenient instrument. However, physical access to the sample is impossible once it is pressurized. We show that optical tweezers can be used to hold and manipulate particles in such a cell, confining micron-sized transparent beads in the focus of a laser beam. Here, we use a modified optical tweezers geometry, allowing us to trap through an objective lens with a higher working distance, overcoming the constraints imposed by the limited angular acceptance of the anvil cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique by measuring water's viscosity at pressures of up to 1.3 GPa. In contrast to previous viscosity measurements in anvil cells, our technique measures absolute viscosity and does not require scaling to the accepted value at atmospheric pressure. This method could also measure the frequency dependence of viscosity as well as being sensitive to anisotropy in the medium's viscosity.

  17. High Frequency Sacral Root Nerve Block Allows Bladder Voiding

    PubMed Central

    Boger, Adam S.; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    1) Aims Dyssynergic reflexive external urethral sphincter (EUS) activity following spinal cord injury can prevent bladder voiding, resulting in significant medical complications. Irreversible sphincterotomies or neurotomies can prevent EUS activation and allow bladder voiding, but may cause incontinence or loss of sacral reflexes. We investigated whether kilohertz frequency (KF) electrical conduction block of the sacral roots could prevent EUS activation and allow bladder voiding. 2) Methods The S2 sacral nerve roots were stimulated bilaterally to generate bladder pressure in 6 cats. One S1 nerve root was stimulated proximally (20 Hz biphasic pulse trains) to evoke EUS pressure, simulating worst-case dyssynergic EUS reflexes. KF waveforms (12.5 kHz biphasic square wave) applied to an electrode implanted distally on the S1 nerve root blocked nerve conduction, preventing the increase in EUS pressure and allowing voiding. 3) Results Applying KF waveforms increased bladder voiding in single, limited-duration trials from 3 ± 6% to 59 ± 12%. Voiding could be increased to 82 ± 9% of the initial bladder volume by repeating or increasing the duration of the trials. 4) Conclusions Sacral nerve block can prevent EUS activation and allow complete bladder voiding, potentially eliminating the need for a neurotomy. Eliminating neurotomy requirements could increase patient acceptance of bladder voiding neuroprostheses, increasing patient quality of life and reducing the cost of patient care. PMID:22473837

  18. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  19. Effect of forward rapidly rotating shift work on circadian rhythms of arterial pressure, heart rate and oral temperature in air traffic controllers.

    PubMed

    Stoynev, A G; Minkova, N K

    1998-02-01

    Twenty-four-hour records of arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), oral temperature (OT) and physical and mental performance were obtained in air traffic controllers during morning (n = 16), afternoon (n = 17) and night (n = 19) shifts. Data were analyzed by the cosinor method. The results obtained during the morning shift were as follows (mesor/amplitude/acrophase): systolic AP (mm Hg)--113.6/10.0/16:03 h; diastolic AP--71.1/8.2/15:19 h; mean AP--85.6/8.8/15:41 h; HR (beats/min)--77.5/8.9/16:00 h; OT (dg C)--36.71/0.21/15:49 h; right-hand grip strength (kg)--49.8/2.0/17:43 h; left-hand grip strength--46.1/2.0/16:08 h; mental performance (calculations/min)--14.9/1.1/16:39 h. During the night shift either no change of the circadian acrophases (HR, right-hand grip strength) or acrophase delays ranging from about 2 h (systolic AP, OT, mental performance) up to 3 h (diastolic and mean AP, left-hand grip strength) were observed. Our data suggest that the shift system studied does not significantly alter the circadian rhythms, and does not induce a desynchronization, particularly as concerns arterial pressure and oral temperature.

  20. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  1. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... Allowable costs. (a) DOE determines allowability of costs in accordance with the cost principles...

  2. 7 CFR 550.25 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... at 2 CFR part 230. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is... at 2 CFR part 225. The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in... Institutions” codified at 2 CFR 220. The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined...

  3. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  4. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  5. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  6. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  7. 20 CFR 211.8 - Displacement allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Displacement allowance. 211.8 Section 211.8 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.8 Displacement allowance. An allowance paid to an employee because he has...

  8. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  9. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  10. 50 CFR 80.15 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., see 5 CFR 1310.3.). (b) What is required to determine the allowability of costs? Source documents or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 80.15 Section 80.15... WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.15 Allowable costs. (a) What...

  11. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those...

  12. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  13. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  14. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  15. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1180.56 Section 1180.56 Public... by a Grantee General Administrative Responsibilities § 1180.56 Allowable costs. (a) Determination of costs allowable under a grant is made in accordance with government-wide cost principles in...

  16. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  17. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  18. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  19. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  20. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  1. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  2. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  3. 24 CFR 17.43 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Allowable claims. (a) A claim may be allowed only if: (1) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly...) of this section, and the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss of... types of claims may be allowed, unless excluded by §§ 17.44 and 17.45: (1) Property loss or damage...

  4. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.228... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22... costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid in accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  5. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.439... Allowable costs. (a) General requirements for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  6. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  7. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  8. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  9. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  10. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  11. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  12. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  13. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  14. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  15. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  16. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items...

  17. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items...

  18. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items...

  19. Power spectral density analysis of the electromyogram from a work task performed in a full pressure suit. Ph.D. Thesis - Houston Univ.; [for determining muscular fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafevers, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Surface electromyograms (EMG) taken from three upper torso muscles during a push-pull task were analyzed by a power spectral density technique to determine the utility of the spectral analysis for identifying changes in the EMG caused by muscular fatigue. The results confirmed the value of the frequency analysis for identifying fatigue producing muscular performance. Data revealed reliable differences between muscles in fatigue induced responses to various locations in the reach envelope at which the subjects were required to perform the push-pull exercise, and the differential sensitivity of individual muscles to the various reach positions; i.e., certain reach positions imposed more fatigue related shifts in EMG power than did others. It was found that a pressurized space suit changed the pattern of normal shirtsleeve muscle fatigue responses in all three of the muscles.

  20. Miniaturized pressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Swink, Don G.

    1991-01-01

    The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  1. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  2. An Empirical Comparison of Joint and Stratified Frameworks for Studying G × E Interactions: Systolic Blood Pressure and Smoking in the CHARGE Gene-Lifestyle Interactions Working Group.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun Ju; Winkler, Thomas W; Manning, Alisa K; Aschard, Hugues; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert V; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brown, Michael R; Morrison, Alanna C; Fornage, Myriam; Lin, Li-An; Richard, Melissa; Bartz, Traci M; Psaty, Bruce M; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Marten, Jonathan; Rudan, Igor; Feitosa, Mary F; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Deng, Xuan; Fisher, Virginia A; Zhou, Yanhua; Bielak, Lawrence F; Smith, Jennifer; Huffman, Jennifer E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Smith, Blair H; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rice, Treva K; Arnett, Donna; Schwander, Karen; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I; Alfred, Tamuno; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Amin, Najaf; Franco, Oscar H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vojinovic, Dina; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Kardia, Sharon; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Rice, Kenneth; Borecki, Ingrid B; Rao, Dabeeru C; Gauderman, W James; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2016-07-01

    Studying gene-environment (G × E) interactions is important, as they extend our knowledge of the genetic architecture of complex traits and may help to identify novel variants not detected via analysis of main effects alone. The main statistical framework for studying G × E interactions uses a single regression model that includes both the genetic main and G × E interaction effects (the "joint" framework). The alternative "stratified" framework combines results from genetic main-effect analyses carried out separately within the exposed and unexposed groups. Although there have been several investigations using theory and simulation, an empirical comparison of the two frameworks is lacking. Here, we compare the two frameworks using results from genome-wide association studies of systolic blood pressure for 3.2 million low frequency and 6.5 million common variants across 20 cohorts of European ancestry, comprising 79,731 individuals. Our cohorts have sample sizes ranging from 456 to 22,983 and include both family-based and population-based samples. In cohort-specific analyses, the two frameworks provided similar inference for population-based cohorts. The agreement was reduced for family-based cohorts. In meta-analyses, agreement between the two frameworks was less than that observed in cohort-specific analyses, despite the increased sample size. In meta-analyses, agreement depended on (1) the minor allele frequency, (2) inclusion of family-based cohorts in meta-analysis, and (3) filtering scheme. The stratified framework appears to approximate the joint framework well only for common variants in population-based cohorts. We conclude that the joint framework is the preferred approach and should be used to control false positives when dealing with low-frequency variants and/or family-based cohorts.

  3. An Empirical Comparison of Joint and Stratified Frameworks for Studying G × E Interactions: Systolic Blood Pressure and Smoking in the CHARGE Gene-Lifestyle Interactions Working Group.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun Ju; Winkler, Thomas W; Manning, Alisa K; Aschard, Hugues; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert V; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brown, Michael R; Morrison, Alanna C; Fornage, Myriam; Lin, Li-An; Richard, Melissa; Bartz, Traci M; Psaty, Bruce M; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Marten, Jonathan; Rudan, Igor; Feitosa, Mary F; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Deng, Xuan; Fisher, Virginia A; Zhou, Yanhua; Bielak, Lawrence F; Smith, Jennifer; Huffman, Jennifer E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Smith, Blair H; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rice, Treva K; Arnett, Donna; Schwander, Karen; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I; Alfred, Tamuno; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Amin, Najaf; Franco, Oscar H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vojinovic, Dina; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Kardia, Sharon; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Rice, Kenneth; Borecki, Ingrid B; Rao, Dabeeru C; Gauderman, W James; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2016-07-01

    Studying gene-environment (G × E) interactions is important, as they extend our knowledge of the genetic architecture of complex traits and may help to identify novel variants not detected via analysis of main effects alone. The main statistical framework for studying G × E interactions uses a single regression model that includes both the genetic main and G × E interaction effects (the "joint" framework). The alternative "stratified" framework combines results from genetic main-effect analyses carried out separately within the exposed and unexposed groups. Although there have been several investigations using theory and simulation, an empirical comparison of the two frameworks is lacking. Here, we compare the two frameworks using results from genome-wide association studies of systolic blood pressure for 3.2 million low frequency and 6.5 million common variants across 20 cohorts of European ancestry, comprising 79,731 individuals. Our cohorts have sample sizes ranging from 456 to 22,983 and include both family-based and population-based samples. In cohort-specific analyses, the two frameworks provided similar inference for population-based cohorts. The agreement was reduced for family-based cohorts. In meta-analyses, agreement between the two frameworks was less than that observed in cohort-specific analyses, despite the increased sample size. In meta-analyses, agreement depended on (1) the minor allele frequency, (2) inclusion of family-based cohorts in meta-analysis, and (3) filtering scheme. The stratified framework appears to approximate the joint framework well only for common variants in population-based cohorts. We conclude that the joint framework is the preferred approach and should be used to control false positives when dealing with low-frequency variants and/or family-based cohorts. PMID:27230302

  4. Low-Pressure Generator Makes Cleanrooms Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Kennedy Space Center work in cleanrooms: laboratories with high degrees of cleanliness provided by strict control of particles such as dust, lint, or human skin. They are contaminant-free facilities, where the air is repeatedly filtered, and surfaces are smooth to prevent particles from getting lodged. Technicians working in these environments wear specially designed cleanroom "bunny suits" and booties over their street clothes, as well as gloves and face masks to avoid any contamination that may be imparted from the outside world. Even normal paper is not allowed in cleanrooms, only cleanroom low-particulate paper. These are sensitive environments where precision work, like the production of silicon chips or hard disk drives, is performed. Often in cleanrooms, positive air pressure is used to force particles outside of the isolated area. The air pressure in the Kennedy cleanrooms is monitored using high-accuracy, low-differential pressure transducers that require periodic calibration. Calibration of the transducers is a tricky business. In prior years, the analysis was performed by sending the transducers to the Kennedy Standards Laboratory, where a very expensive cross-floated, labor- intensive, dead-weight test was conducted. In the early 1990s, scientists at Kennedy determined to develop a technique and find equipment to perform qualification testing on new low-differential pressure transducers in an accurate, cost-effective manner onsite, without requiring an environmentally controlled room. They decided to use the highly accurate, cost-effective Setra Model C264 as the test transducer. For qualification testing of the Setra, though, a portable, lower-cost calibrator was needed that could control the differential pressure to a high degree of resolution and transfer the accuracy of the Standards Laboratory testing to the qualification testing. The researchers decided that, to generate the low-differential pressure setpoints needed for

  5. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  6. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  7. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  8. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  9. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  10. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  11. 20 CFR 437.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type...

  12. 34 CFR 642.40 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 642.40 Section 642.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FEDERAL TRIO PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 642.40 Allowable costs....

  13. 10 CFR 600.222 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular. 48 CFR 931.2 Hospitals 45 CFR part 74... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  14. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance...

  15. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance with the cost...

  16. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... the same trip in the same vehicle. (2) Lodging and meals. The cost allowable for lodging and meals for... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part...

  17. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... the same trip in the same vehicle. (2) Lodging and meals. The cost allowable for lodging and meals for... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part...

  18. 30 CFR 206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating allowances. 206.160 Section 206.160 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any other provisions...

  19. Moral Appraisals Affect Doing/Allowing Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Fiery; Knobe, Joshua; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An extensive body of research suggests that the distinction between doing and allowing plays a critical role in shaping moral appraisals. Here, we report evidence from a pair of experiments suggesting that the converse is also true: moral appraisals affect doing/allowing judgments. Specifically, morally bad behavior is more likely to be construed…

  20. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  1. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable activities. Allowable activities are those listed in § 632.78-80 except that community service employment is...

  2. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable activities. Allowable activities are those listed in § 632.78-80 except that community service employment is...

  3. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802...

  4. 4 CFR 5.6 - Allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowances. 5.6 Section 5.6 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM COMPENSATION § 5.6 Allowances. The provisions of chapter 59 of title 5, U.S. Code and the implementing regulations for the Executive Branch apply to Government...

  5. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section...

  6. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable to the organization incurring the costs. The following chart lists the kinds of organizations and... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22... Administration § 66.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  7. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33... HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE NATIONAL URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM Response Cooperative Agreements § 208.33 Allowable costs. (a) Cost neutrality. DHS policy is that an Alert or Activation should...

  8. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  9. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and an organization named in OMB Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  10. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1207.22... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1207.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  11. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  12. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on...

  13. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR part 29-70... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 633.303 Section 633.303... FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.303 Allowable costs. (a) General....

  14. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  15. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds...

  16. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  17. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1470.22 Section 1470.22 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  18. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Public... Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a particular set of Federal principles...

  19. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  20. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 230, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A-122).” The allowability of... CFR part 220, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21).” The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of appendix E of 45 CFR...

  1. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  2. 45 CFR 2541.220 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2541.220 Section 2541.220 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.220 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may...

  3. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be...

  4. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Organizations.” (iii) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part 74... OMB Circular A-122 is determined in accordance with the for-profit costs principles in 48 CFR part 31... Contracts with Hospitals.” (iv) Governmental organizations. Allowability for State, local, or...

  5. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.211 Compensation allowable. (a) The amount of compensation allowable is the reasonable cost of assessing damages, and...

  6. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1303.24 Section 1303.24 Food... Quotas § 1303.24 Inventory allowance. (a) For the purpose of determining individual manufacturing quotas... sufficient to maintain an inventory equal to, (1) For current manufacturers, 50 percent of his...

  7. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  8. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  9. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  10. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74... Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (b) Indirect costs. Unless restricted by...

  11. 75 FR 4098 - Utility Allowance Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Utility Allowance Adjustments AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... are required to advise the Secretary of the need for and request of a new utility allowance for... whether the information will have practical utility; (2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate...

  12. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of allowable costs that are in accordance with uniform cost accounting standards and comply with cost... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.27 Allowable... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles...

  13. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal costs of the current accounting period are all allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  14. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of allowable costs that are in accordance with uniform cost accounting standards and comply with cost... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.27 Allowable... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles...

  15. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal costs of the current accounting period are all allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  16. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal costs of the current accounting period are all allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  17. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of allowable costs that are in accordance with uniform cost accounting standards and comply with cost... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 32.27 Allowable... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  19. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  20. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating allowances. 1206.160 Section 1206.160 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any...

  1. The Role of Allowances in Adolescent Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joanne; Yung, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Examines high school student perceptions of allowances and the conditions under which they are received. Finds that, contrary to adult conceptions, students perceive allowances as an entitlement or earned income rather than as an educational opportunity promoting financial decision making and money management. (FMW)

  2. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  3. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  4. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION UNIFORM...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  5. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 30.27 Allowable..., “Cost Principles for State and Local Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit... organizations and those non-profit organizations listed in Attachment C to Circular A-122 is determined...

  6. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 49.27 Allowable... for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit... organizations and those non-profit organizations listed in Attachment C to Circular A-122 is determined...

  7. Family allowances and fertility: socioeconomic differences.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Jona

    2009-08-01

    This article explores socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances on fertility. Although several studies have examined the relationship between cash benefits and fertility, few studies have addressed the possible differential effects of cash benefits on families of different income or education levels. I reconstructed the birth histories of women in the past two Israeli censuses of 1983 and 1995 to study socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances up to the seventh parity. The results indicate that family allowances have a significant effect at every parity. Using female education as an indicator of socioeconomic status, I find that socioeconomic status is a significant modifier of the effect of family allowances. Family allowances seem to have a relatively large impact on more-educated women.

  8. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  9. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  10. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  11. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  12. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  13. Right ventricular failure due to chronic pressure load: What have we learned in animal models since the NIH working group statement?

    PubMed

    Borgdorff, Marinus A J; Dickinson, Michael G; Berger, Rolf M F; Bartelds, Beatrijs

    2015-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure determines outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension, congenital heart diseases and in left ventricular failure. In 2006, the Working Group on Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Right Heart Failure of the NIH advocated the development of preclinical models to study the pathophysiology and pathobiology of RV failure. In this review, we summarize the progress of research into the pathobiology of RV failure and potential therapeutic interventions. The picture emerging from this research is that RV adaptation to increased afterload is characterized by increased contractility, dilatation and hypertrophy. Clinical RV failure is associated with progressive diastolic deterioration and disturbed ventricular-arterial coupling in the presence of increased contractility. The pathobiology of the failing RV shows similarities with that of the LV and is marked by lack of adequate increase in capillary density leading to a hypoxic environment and oxidative stress and a metabolic switch from fatty acids to glucose utilization. However, RV failure also has characteristic features. So far, therapies aiming to specifically improve RV function have had limited success. The use of beta blockers and sildenafil may hold promise, but new therapies have to be developed. The use of recently developed animal models will aid in further understanding of the pathobiology of RV failure and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  14. Capillary pressure experiments under simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of residual trapping to a long-term storage of CO2 in saline aquifers mainly depends on the drainage capillary pressure of a reservoir and the hysteresis of the drainage and imbibition branches of the capillary pressure curve. However, the experimental database of capillary pressure measured at relevant pT conditions is still scarce. Here, we present an experimental set-up, which allows for the performance of capillary pressure experiments with a semi-permeable disk (porous plate) at simulated reservoir conditions. In the framework of the EU funded project CO2CARE, drainage and imbibition cycles are performed on Triassic sandstone samples. We use a temperature controlled oil pressure autoclave to apply a maximum confining pressure of 400 bar and a maximum working temperature of 150°C. The fluid displacement, and hence the sample saturation is controlled by a gear pump with a fine resolution of 0.01 ml. Additionally, the capillary pressure experiment is combined with measurements of elastic wave velocities as well as of the electrical resistivity. In this case, P and S wave velocities and the formation resistivity factor are determined as functions of the brine/ CO2 saturation. The experiment provides information about the efficiency of the capillary trapping of the sample and a calibration of the petrophysical properties on saturation.

  15. Measurement of endolymphatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Mom, T; Pavier, Y; Giraudet, F; Gilain, L; Avan, P

    2015-04-01

    Endolymphatic pressure measurement is of interest both to researchers in the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing and ENT physicians dealing with Menière's disease or similar conditions. It is generally agreed that endolymphatic hydrops is associated with Menière's disease and is accompanied by increased hydrostatic pressure. Endolymphatic pressure, however, cannot be measured precisely without endangering hearing, making the association between hydrops and increased endolymphatic pressure difficult to demonstrate. Several integrated in vivo models have been developed since the 1960s, but only a few allow measurement of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure. Models associating measurement of hydrostatic pressure and endolymphatic potential and assessment of cochlear function are of value to elucidate the pathophysiology of endolymphatic hydrops. The present article presents the main types of models and discusses their respective interest.

  16. Turbine governor change allows wide fuel gas choice

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Rolls-Royce Olympus SK30 turbine gen-sets providing power for Marathon Oil`s Brae A platform in the North Sea have recently been refitted with TC95-03 microprocessor governor control systems supplied by Turbine Controls Ltd., of, Leicester, England. The new control systems have been fitted to avoid the poor transient performance and damage that could occur under such conditions. The new fuel control system is designed to detect Wobbe Index variations while maintaining necessary protection and safety requirements of the gas turbine. In addition to being able to cope with varying gas composition, the governor has been programmed to permit variable fuel gas pressure. This has allowed the fuel gas pressure regulator to be removed, thereby eliminating many of the problems associated with the regulator. A fuel gas pressure transmitter has been added. In addition, replacing the governor has allowed some fairly minor modifications to start-up, loading and fuel changeover logic. These have resulted in significant improvements in the start-up and operational reliability.

  17. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... occurred. (7) Claims for automobiles, only when required to perform official business or parked on a... amount allowed is the value of the vehicle at the time of loss as determined by the National...

  18. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a wheelchair) because of such disability and such disability is the loss or loss of use of a hand or... wheelchair. (b) Effective August 1, 1972, the initial lump sum clothing allowance is due and payable...

  19. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a wheelchair) because of such disability and such disability is the loss or loss of use of a hand or... wheelchair. (b) Effective August 1, 1972, the initial lump sum clothing allowance is due and payable...

  20. Higher Education Tax Allowances: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Larry L.

    1976-01-01

    Tax allowances are receiving renewed attention at the federal level. Various forms are evaluated that would aid middle-income students and private institutions, and specific bills and proposals are examined. (Editor/LBH)

  1. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  2. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  3. 40 CFR 35.940-5 - Disputes concerning allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disputes concerning allowable costs. 35.940-5 Section 35.940-5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water...

  4. 40 CFR 35.940 - Determination of allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of allowable costs. 35.940 Section 35.940 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  5. 20 CFR 617.21 - Reemployment services and allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reemployment services and allowances. 617.21 Section 617.21 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TRADE... services may include work orientation, basic education, communication skills, child care, and any...

  6. 40 CFR 35.2205 - Maximum allowable project cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; (ii) The initial amounts approved for force account work to be performed on the project; (iii) The... an allowance under § 35.2025 and for contingencies; and (2) Five percent of the sum of the amounts..., each subagreement awarded on or after the effective date of this regulation will be five percent of...

  7. Funding Child Rearing: Child Allowance and Parental Leave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, James R.

    1996-01-01

    Two financing plans are proposed to address needs for an allowance for poor households to fund child-care: financing from redirected existing funds; and a program of voluntary parental leave to ensure the adequacy of infant care, financed through a payroll tax increase. These proposals would help parents balance work and family obligations. (SLD)

  8. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.

    1984-05-30

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pins passageway extending through the assembly.

  9. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-02-03

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  10. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  11. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    has been compared to the standard hospital bed as well as to two other commercially available pressure relief mattresses. The most recent advance in pressure ulcer prevention is the development of the ALTERN8* seating system. This seating system provides regular periods of pressure relief and stimulation of blood flow to skin areas while users are seated. By offering the combination of pressure relief therapy and an increase in blood flow, the ALTERN8* reportedly creates an optimum pressure ulcer healing environment. Foam is the most commonly used material for pressure reduction and pressure ulcer prevention and treatment for the mobile individual. For those immobilized individuals who can achieve a passive standing position, a powered wheelchair that allows the individual to achieve a passive standing position is recommended. The beneficial effects of passive standing have been documented by comprehensive scientific studies. These benefits include reduction of seating pressure, decreased bone demineralization, increased blander pressure, enhanced orthostatic circulatory regulation, reduction in muscular tone, decrease in upper extremity muscle stress, and enhanced functional status in general. In the absence of these dynamic alternating pressure seating systems and mattresses, there are enormous medicolegal implications to the healthcare facility. Because there is not sufficient staff to provide pressure relief to rotate the patient every 2 hours in a hospital setting, with the exception of the intensive care unit, the immobile patient is prone to develop pressure ulcers. The cost of caring for these preventable pressure ulcers may now be as high as 60,000 dollars per patient. The occupational physical strain sustained by nursing personnel in rotating their patients has led to occupational back pain in nurses, a major source of morbidity in the healthcare environment.

  12. Internal pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dowalo, James A [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-16

    A pressure sensor for sensing changes in pressure in an enclosed vessel may include a first chamber having at least one expandable section therein that allows that first chamber to change in length. A reference member mounted within the first chamber moves as a result of changes in length of the first chamber. A second chamber having an expandable section therein allows the second chamber to change in length in response to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel. The second chamber is operatively associated with the first chamber so that changes in length of the second chamber result in changes in length of the first chamber. A sensor operatively associated with the reference member detects changes in position of the reference member. Changes in position of the reference member are related to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel.

  13. Quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Cabello, Adán

    2015-12-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory and a necessary resource for quantum computation and communication. It is therefore important to investigate how large contextuality can be in quantum theory. Linear contextuality witnesses can be expressed as a sum S of n probabilities, and the independence number α and the Tsirelson-like number ϑ of the corresponding exclusivity graph are, respectively, the maximum of S for noncontextual theories and for the theory under consideration. A theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality if it has scenarios in which ϑ /α approaches n . Here we show that quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality despite what is suggested by the examination of the quantum violations of Bell and noncontextuality inequalities considered in the past. Our proof is not constructive and does not single out explicit scenarios. Nevertheless, we identify scenarios in which quantum theory allows for almost-absolute-maximal contextuality.

  14. Using EPA`s allowance tracking system to assess the allowance market

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, M.; Kruger, J.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a credible framework for analyzing private allowance transfers recorded in EPA`s Allowance Tracking System (ATS) is essential for effective assessment of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) allowance market. The ATS began recording transfers of allowances in March, 1994, and since then has served as an automated record of allowance holdings and transfers of ownership. Though primarily concerned with determining compliance, the ATS contains details of private allowance transfers representing what is believed to be a significant portion of overall SO{sub 2} allowance market activity. This paper will analyze these private transfers recorded in ATS and will develop relevant categories for classification purposes. The resulting categorization will enable consistent analysis of the SO{sub 2} allowance market and provide substantial insight into the level and type of allowance trading activity under the Acid Rain Program.

  15. New tool allows selective multi-lateral re-entry

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This article overviews the world`s first application of a downhole tool installed after the drilling and completion of a lateral borehole from a larger backbone casing, to allow future access to the lateral using through-tubing, coiled tubing operations. The system described is based on the Multi Lateral Selective Re-Entry System, or MLR (trademark), supplied by Pressure Control Engineering Ltd. (PCE) of Poole, Dorset, England. Primary equipment used in creating the lateral completion and its tieback to the backbone liner was supplied by Sperry Sun.

  16. Rate-based screening of pressure-dependent reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheu, David M.; Lada, Thomas A.; Green, William H.; Dean, Anthony M.; Grenda, Jeffrey M.

    2001-08-01

    Computer tools to automatically generate large gas-phase kinetic models find increasing use in industry. Until recently, mechanism generation algorithms have been restricted to generating kinetic models in the high-pressure limit, unless special adjustments are made for particular cases. A new approach, recently presented, allows the automated generation of pressure-dependent reaction networks for chemically and thermally activated reactions (Grenda et al., 2000; Grenda and Dean, in preparation; Grenda et al., 1998; see Refs. [1-3]). These pressure-dependent reaction networks can be quite large and can contain a large number of unimportant pathways. We thus present an algorithm for the automated screening of pressure-dependent reaction networks. It allows a computer to discover and incorporate pressure-dependent reactions in a manner consistent with the existing rate-based model generation method. The new algorithm works by using a partially-explored (or "screened") pressure-dependent reaction network to predict rate constants, and updating predictions as more parts of the network are discovered. It requires only partial knowledge of the network connectivity, and allows the user to explore only the important channels at a given temperature and pressure. Applications to vinyl + O 2, 1-naphthyl + acetylene and phenylvinyl radical dissociation are presented. We show that the error involved in using a truncated pressure-dependent network to predict a rate constant is insignificant, for all channels whose yields are significantly greater than a user-specified tolerance. A bound for the truncation error is given. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using screened networks to predict pressure-dependent rate constants k(T,P).

  17. 44 CFR 208.41 - Administrative allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative allowance. 208.41 Section 208.41 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE NATIONAL URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM Response Cooperative Agreements § 208.41...

  18. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or...

  19. 49 CFR 18.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not...

  20. Manpower Training Allowances: Financial Assistance or Investment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, Georges

    1975-01-01

    The author compares the differing approaches of Germany, Sweden, France, and Australia for providing financial support to adults enrolled in vocational training programs, focusing on training allowances for recurrent education. He concludes that without some governmental maintenance program, it is unlikely that adults can utilize even tuition-free…

  1. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  2. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  3. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  4. 32 CFR 33.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency. ... allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of...

  5. 32 CFR 32.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contractors is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E to 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for... contractor receiving a. cost-type contract under an assistance award, there is a set of Federal principles... principles applicable to the entity incurring the costs. (b) Governmental organizations. Allowability...

  6. 40 CFR 258.74 - Allowable mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... located in the United States amounting to at least the sum of current closure, post-closure care... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Financial Assurance Criteria § 258.74 Allowable mechanisms. The mechanisms... and examined by a Federal or State agency. A copy of the trust agreement must be placed in...

  7. 40 CFR 258.74 - Allowable mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... located in the United States amounting to at least the sum of current closure, post-closure care... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Financial Assurance Criteria § 258.74 Allowable mechanisms. The mechanisms... and examined by a Federal or State agency. A copy of the trust agreement must be placed in...

  8. 40 CFR 258.74 - Allowable mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... located in the United States amounting to at least the sum of current closure, post-closure care... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Financial Assurance Criteria § 258.74 Allowable mechanisms. The mechanisms... and examined by a Federal or State agency. A copy of the trust agreement must be placed in...

  9. 42 CFR 405.2468 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 405.2468 Section 405.2468 Public... FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health... 413 of this subchapter. (b) Typical rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center...

  10. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217 Section 136.217 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  11. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235 Section 136.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  12. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223 Section 136.223 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  13. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211 Section 136.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  14. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205 Section 136.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  15. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229 Section 136.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  16. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service with the Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent... the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident... authorized places. Claims may be allowable for damage to, or loss of, property arising from fire,...

  17. 33 CFR 136.241 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.241...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.241...

  18. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.217...

  19. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.205...

  20. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.223...

  1. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.235...

  2. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.229...

  3. 29 CFR 15.41 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... if the claim is cognizable under the Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C. 2677). (c) A claim for damage... Secretary of Labor ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND RELATED STATUTES Claims Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.41 Allowable claims. (a)(1) A claim for damage...

  4. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  5. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  6. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  7. 14 CFR 1260.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1260.127 Section 1260.127 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements With Institutions of Higher...

  8. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  9. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  10. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  11. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1403... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  12. 38 CFR 21.5822 - Subsistence allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and on GPO... will make payments of subsistence allowance on the first day of the month following the month for which... enrollment certification so late that payment cannot be made on the first day of the month following...

  13. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-12-31

    The use of the SO{sub 2} allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO{sub 2} emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO{sub 2} for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO{sub x} emission averaging, the utility would average NO{sub x} emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  14. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  15. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  16. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  17. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 30.27 Section 30.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE UNIFORM...-recognized Indian tribal governments is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  18. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of the SO[sub 2] allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO[sub 2] emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO[sub 2] for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO[sub x] emission averaging, the utility would average NO[sub x] emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  19. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  20. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  1. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES... under § 1220.011(c) that are salvaged, returned, or used for the benefit of non-NPSL operations....

  2. 30 CFR 1220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 1220.012 Section 1220.012 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING NET PROFIT SHARE PAYMENT FOR OUTER CONTINENTAL...

  3. 30 CFR 220.012 - Overhead allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead allowance. 220.012 Section 220.012 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING NET PROFIT SHARE PAYMENT FOR OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS...

  4. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... principles applicable to the organization incurring the costs. The following chart lists the kinds of... CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 1273.22 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  6. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  7. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  8. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  9. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24...

  10. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime awards from DoD Components, and those that are subrecipients under prime awards to other organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  11. 32 CFR 34.17 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime awards from DoD Components, and those that are subrecipients under prime awards to other organizations, is to be determined in accordance with: (1) The for-profit cost principles in 48 CFR parts 31 and.... (3) Hospitals. Allowability is determined in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR part...

  12. 10 CFR 600.127 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Local Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations.” The... incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part...

  13. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS...

  14. 40 CFR 280.33 - Repairs allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.33 Repairs allowed. Owners and operators of UST systems must ensure... operating properly. (f) UST system owners and operators must maintain records of each repair for...

  15. 40 CFR 280.33 - Repairs allowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.33 Repairs allowed. Owners and operators of UST systems must ensure... operating properly. (f) UST system owners and operators must maintain records of each repair for...

  16. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 14.27 Section...

  17. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... otherwise indicated below, direct and indirect costs shall be charged in accordance with 41 CFR 29-70 and 41 CFR 1-15.7. (c) Costs associated with repairs, maintenance, and capital improvements of existing... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 632.37 Section...

  18. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. (Authority: Pub... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs....

  19. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3019.27 Section 3019.27...

  20. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the provisions of Appendix E of 45 CFR Part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to... the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR Part 31. ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs....

  1. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants and... provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2543.27 Section 2543.27...

  2. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section...

  3. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section...

  4. 43 CFR 12.62 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 12.62 Section 12.62... COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and...

  5. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  6. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  7. 10 CFR 440.18 - Allowable expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the purchase of vehicles or other certain types of equipment as defined in 10 CFR part 600 may be... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allowable expenditures. 440.18 Section 440.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.18...

  8. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear... appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear clothing; or (B) A... allowance for each prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair)...

  9. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear... appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear clothing; or (B) A... allowance for each prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair)...

  10. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allowable claims. 180.104 Section 180.104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY... are payable: (i) Where personal funds were accepted by responsible Government personnel with...

  11. Family allowance and family planning in Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Plank, S J

    1978-01-01

    Family allowances designed to promote maternal and child health and welfare could be self-defeating if they stimulated otherwise unwanted births, as often assumed. That assumption, with its public health and demographic implications, needs testing. An attempt to test it was made in Chile in 1969--1970 through interviews with 945 wives receiving an allowance and 690 non-recipients. Recipients practiced contraception significantly more than did non-recipients. This was not explained by wives' educational attainment or employment, the couples' earnings, or number of living children, but was associated with a 50 per cent greater utilization of professional prenatal care by recipients during the most recent pregnancy; women with such care (regardless of allowance status) were 75 per cent more likely than others to control their fertility. Prenatal care was probably sought more by recipients in part because an additional stipend was provided as soon as pregnancy was confirmed, usually at clinics with integrated family planning. Greater family income, attributable to the allowance, probably also contributed to the recipients' better prenatal attention and to contraceptive practice. Noteworthy, too, was the finding that with the number of living children controlled, contraceptive practice was significantly greater amoung couples who had never lost a child. PMID:717610

  12. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent or wrongful act or... subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident to service with the Department... excluded: (1) Property or damage in quarters or other authorized places. Claims may be allowable for...

  13. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part...

  14. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs. Bid and proposal costs of past..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... determined in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part...

  15. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency....

  16. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency....

  17. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost... organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and Procedures or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to ED. (b)...

  18. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost... organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and Procedures or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to ED. (b)...

  19. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost... organization other than a hospital and an educational institution 48 CFR part 31 Contract Cost Principles and Procedures or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to ED. (b)...

  20. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 13.22... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency....

  1. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL..., Local and Indian Tribal Governments.” The allowability of costs incurred by non-profit organizations is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-122, “Cost Principles for...

  2. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES ACT § 34.4 Allowable claims. (a) What you can claim. (1) Claims for damage or loss may... for property damage or loss by fire, flood, hurricane, theft, or other serious occurrence may be... a civilian employee outside the U.S. is a local inhabitant. (3) Claims for damage to, or loss...

  3. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pounds net weight authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7) by commercial..., against loss or damage in transit, if a bid from a licensed insurer is obtained by the individual and... allowable costs shall be: (A) If the trailer is hauled by private vehicle, the cost per mile for the use...

  4. 76 FR 32340 - Federal Travel Regulation; Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances (Taxes); Relocation Allowances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances (Taxes); Relocation Allowances (Taxes) AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide... Relocation Advisory Board (GRAB) concerning calculation of reimbursements for taxes on relocation expenses. In addition, this proposed rule alters the process for calculating reimbursements for taxes...

  5. 78 FR 26637 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowance-Relocation Income Tax (RIT) Allowable Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowance--Relocation Income Tax (RIT) Allowable Tables AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide Policy (OGP), General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION... June 25, 2008 (73 FR 35952), specifying that GSA would no longer publish the RIT Allowance tables...

  6. Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weatherup, Robert S; Eren, Baran; Hao, Yibo; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel B

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is demonstrated using single-layer graphene membranes as photoelectron-transparent barriers that sustain pressure differences in excess of 6 orders of magnitude. The graphene serves as a support for catalyst nanoparticles under atmospheric pressure reaction conditions (up to 1.5 bar), where XPS allows the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles and gas phase species to be simultaneously probed. We thereby observe that the Cu(2+) oxidation state is stable in O2 (1 bar) but is spontaneously reduced under vacuum. We further demonstrate the detection of various gas-phase species (Ar, CO, CO2, N2, O2) in the pressure range 10-1500 mbar including species with low photoionization cross sections (He, H2). Pressure-dependent changes in the apparent binding energies of gas-phase species are observed, attributable to changes in work function of the metal-coated grids supporting the graphene. We expect atmospheric pressure XPS based on this graphene membrane approach to be a valuable tool for studying nanoparticle catalysis.

  7. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  8. Evaluation of the Maximum Allowable Cost Program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. James; Hefner, Dennis; Dobson, Allen; Hardy, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    This article summarizes an evaluation of the Maximum Allowable Cost (MAC)-Estimated Acquisition Cost (EAC) program, the Federal Government's cost-containment program for prescription drugs.1 The MAC-EAC regulations which became effective on August 26, 1976, have four major components: (1) Maximum Allowable Cost reimbursement limits for selected multisource or generically available drugs; (2) Estimated Acquisition Cost reimbursement limits for all drugs; (3) “usual and customary” reimbursement limits for all drugs; and (4) a directive that professional fee studies be performed by each State. The study examines the benefits and costs of the MAC reimbursement limits for 15 dosage forms of five multisource drugs and EAC reimbursement limits for all drugs for five selected States as of 1979. PMID:10309857

  9. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  10. Slimhole advancements allow economic offshore exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, E.

    1995-07-01

    Slimhole drilling technology is a proven method to reduce well cost in remote areas of the world. It also provides advantages in offshore drilling and production applications where smaller tubular sizes can make marginal fields economic. The technological accomplishments within the industry have provided a sound basis to apply slimhole technology offshore worldwide. And it is feasible to develop methods to apply this technology to more sever applications, including deeper wells, high-pressure wells and hole problem areas, such as troublesome shales. Such applications will require additional technology development to be adequately prepared for proper well designs and possible contingencies during drilling. From the experience to date with this technology, it is feasible to design wells to total drilled depths of 12,000 ft--15,000 ft onshore or offshore. For purposes of this article, a slimhole well is one with the diameter at TD less than 6-in.

  11. 38 CFR 21.260 - Subsistence allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 374.93 465.08 548.05 39.95 Nonpay or nominal pay work experience in a Federal, State, or local agency... exceed the difference between the monthly training wage, not including overtime, and the entrance journeyman wage for the veteran's objective. 3 The quarter-time rate may be paid only during...

  12. Robust technique allowing manufacturing superoleophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman; Chaniel, Gilad; Taitelbaum, Haim; Bormashenko, Yelena

    2013-04-01

    We report the robust technique allowing manufacturing of superhydrophobic and oleophobic (omniphobic) surfaces with industrial grade low density polyethylene. The reported process includes two stages: (1) hot embossing of polyethylene with micro-scaled steel gauzes; (2) treatment of embossed surfaces with cold radiofrequency plasma of tetrafluoromethane. The reported surfaces demonstrate not only pronounced superhydrophobicity but also superoleophobicity. Superoleophobicity results from the hierarchical nano-scaled topography of fluorinated polyethylene surface. The observed superoleophobicity is strengthened by the hydrophobic recovery. The stability of the Cassie wetting regime was studied.

  13. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  14. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  15. Man Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    Current achievements in environments at pressures higher than atmospheric are reviewed, ranging from the uses of hyperbaric oxygen for treatment to the concept of residence at high pressure for extended Continental Shelf exploration and very deep caisson work. A case is made for the use of high oxygen pressures in the treatment of hypoxias of acute onset, of certain infections, and as an adjunct to radiotherapy. Achievement of the desired high tissue tensions of oxygen while avoiding toxicity requires careful choice of both pressure and duration of exposure. Man has successfully dived to 1000 feet in the sea, and has remained for weeks at high pressures. Adequate prophylactic decompression remains a major problem, since current recompression procedures are to a large extent empirically derived. There are grounds for expecting improved prophylactic and therapeutic procedures when present studies are completed. PMID:14217256

  16. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p < 0.15 MPa) and jet trays are used, and in deaerator tank, a developed "flooded" sparger is applied, which allows to significantly increase the intensity of the heat and mass exchange processes in the apparatus. The use of the two efficient stages in a column and a "flooded" sparger in a tank allows to reliably guarantee the necessary water heating and deaeration. Steam or "superheated" water of the temperature of t ≥ 125°C can be used as the coolant in the deaerators. The commissioning tests of the new deaerator prototypes of the capacity of 800 and 500 t/h in the HPP conditions showed their sustainable, reliable, and efficient work in the designed range of hydraulic and thermal loads. The content of solved oxygen and free carbon dioxide in make-up water after deaerators meets the requirements of State Standard GOST 16860-88, the operating rules and regulations, and the customer's specifications. Based on these results, the proposals were developed on the structure and the design of deaerators of the productivity of more than 800 t/h for the use in circuits of large heating systems and the preparation of feed water to the TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  17. 76 FR 16629 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA) Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-- Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA... transferee's increased tax burden due to an employee's official permanent change of station is now available... Register (73 FR 35952) specifying that the General Services Administration (GSA) would no longer...

  18. 75 FR 14442 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA) Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-- Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA... Amendment 2008-04 in the Federal Register (73 FR 35952) specifying that GSA would no longer publish the RITA... 16, 2010 and applies to relocations during tax year 2008 and earlier. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  19. 42 CFR 61.9 - Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.9 Payments: Stipends;...

  20. 42 CFR 61.9 - Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.9 Payments: Stipends;...

  1. 42 CFR 61.8 - Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. 61.8 Section 61.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.8 Benefits:...

  2. 42 CFR 61.9 - Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.9 Payments: Stipends;...

  3. 42 CFR 61.8 - Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. 61.8 Section 61.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.8 Benefits:...

  4. 42 CFR 61.9 - Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.9 Payments: Stipends;...

  5. 42 CFR 61.8 - Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. 61.8 Section 61.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.8 Benefits:...

  6. 42 CFR 61.8 - Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. 61.8 Section 61.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.8 Benefits:...

  7. 42 CFR 61.8 - Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. 61.8 Section 61.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.8 Benefits:...

  8. 42 CFR 61.9 - Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.9 Payments: Stipends;...

  9. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  10. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  11. Proactive life extension of pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Lloyd

    1998-03-01

    For a company to maintain its competitive edge in today's global market every opportunity to gain an advantage must be exploited. Many companies are strategically focusing on improved utilization of existing equipment as well as regulatory compliance. Abbott Laboratories is no exception. Pharmaceutical companies such as Abbott Laboratories realize that reliability and availability of their production equipment is critical to be successful and competitive. Abbott Laboratories, like many of our competitors, is working to improve safety, minimize downtime and maximize the productivity and efficiency of key production equipment such as the pressure vessels utilized in our processes. The correct strategy in obtaining these objectives is to perform meaningful inspection with prioritization based on hazard analysis and risk. The inspection data gathered in Abbott Laboratories pressure vessel program allows informed decisions leading to improved process control. The results of the program are reduced risks to the corporation and employees when operating pressure retaining equipment. Accurate and meaningful inspection methods become the cornerstone of a program allowing proper preventative maintenance actions to occur. Successful preventative/predictive maintenance programs must utilize meaningful nondestructive evaluation techniques and inspection methods. Nondestructive examination methods require accurate useful tools that allow rapid inspection for the entire pressure vessel. Results from the examination must allow the owner to prove compliance of all applicable regulatory laws and codes. At Abbott Laboratories the use of advanced NDE techniques, primarily B-scan ultrasonics, has provided us with the proper tools allowing us to obtain our objectives. Abbott Laboratories uses B-scan ultrasonics utilizing a pulse echo pitch catch technique to provide essential data on our pressure vessels. Equipment downtime is reduced because the nondestructive examination usually takes

  12. Fast pressure-sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, C.

    1976-01-01

    Miniature silicon-diaphragm sensors and signal multiplexer are mounted to ganged zero-operate-calibrate pressure selector switches. Device allows in-situ calibration, can be computer controlled, and measures at approximately 10,000 readings per second.

  13. Pressure-Directed Assembly: Nanostructures Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hongyou

    Precise control of structural parameters through nanoscale engineering to improve optical and electronic properties of functional nanomaterials continuously remains an outstanding challenge. Previous work has been conducted largely at ambient pressure and relies on specific chemical or physical interactions such as van der Waals interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, chemical reactions, ligand-receptor interactions, etc. In this presentation, I will introduce a new pressure-directed assembly method that uses mechanical compressive force applied to nanoparticle arrays to induce structural phase transition and to consolidate new nanomaterials with precisely controlled structures and tunable properties. By manipulating nanoparticle coupling through external pressure, instead of through chemistry, a reversible change in their assemblies and properties can be achieved and demonstrated. In addition, over a certain threshold, the external pressure will force these nanoparticles into contact, thereby allowing the formation and consolidation of one- to three-dimensional nanostructures. Through pressure induced nanoparticle assembly, materials engineering and synthesis become remarkably flexible without relying on traditional crystallization process where atoms/ions are locked in a specific crystal structure. Therefore, morphology or architecture can be readily tuned to produce desirable properties for practical applications. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Computational Analyses of Pressurization in Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Mattick, Stephen; Lee, Chun P.; Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry

    2008-01-01

    A) Advanced Gas/Liquid Framework with Real Fluids Property Routines: I. A multi-fluid formulation in the preconditioned CRUNCH CFD(Registered TradeMark) code developed where a mixture of liquid and gases can be specified: a) Various options for Equation of state specification available (from simplified ideal fluid mixtures, to real fluid EOS such as SRK or BWR models). b) Vaporization of liquids driven by pressure value relative to vapor pressure and combustion of vapors allowed. c) Extensive validation has been undertaken. II. Currently working on developing primary break-up models and surface tension effects for more rigorous phase-change modeling and interfacial dynamics B) Framework Applied to Run-time Tanks at Ground Test Facilities C) Framework Used For J-2 Upper Stage Tank Modeling: 1) NASA MSFC tank pressurization: a) Hydrogen and oxygen tank pre-press, repress and draining being modeled at NASA MSFC. 2) NASA AMES tank safety effort a) liquid hydrogen and oxygen are separated by a baffle in the J-2 tank. We are modeling pressure rise and possible combustion if a hole develops in the baffle and liquid hydrogen leaks into the oxygen tank. Tank pressure rise rates simulated and risk of combustion evaluated.

  15. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  16. Integrating Spirituality Into Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Seth

    2008-01-01

    School leaders do work that is both demanding and draining. Amid the day-to-day pressures of managing their school districts, many are seeking inspiration and deeper meaning. As a result, some are increasingly looking to integrate their spirituality and their work. In this article, the author describes three individuals interviewed as part of the…

  17. Back to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The economic downturn hit working America particularly hard, as agricultural, automotive, manufacturing, and retail jobs in many corners of the country all but evaporated. Consumers continue to cut back, and jobless rates in many states have eclipsed levels not seen in decades. Out of work and under pressure, many Americans are turning to the…

  18. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for selected airborne contaminants, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) for contaminants, and to review SMAC's for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee on Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMAC's for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMAC's for 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the first 11 SMAC reports that have been reviewed for their application of the guidelines developed in the first phase of this activity and approved by the subcommittee.

  19. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was <3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be

  20. Theoretical analysis of a pressure setting and control system with PWM direction control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avram, M.; Duminică, D.; Cartal, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper tackles theoretical aspects concerning an original automated system that sets and controls the pressure inside a tank chamber of fixed volume. The structure of the system integrates an original device developed and designed by the authors. The device digitally controls the one way flow of the working fluid using pulse width modulation, allowing the free flow in the other way. The purpose of this research stage was the theoretical establishing of the variation law of the pressure inside the controlled chamber.

  1. A Venturi microregulator array module for distributed pressure control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dustin S.; Langelier, Sean M.; Zeitoun, Ramsey I.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure-driven flow control systems are a critical component in many microfluidic devices. Compartmentalization of this functionality into a stand-alone module possessing a simple interface would allow reduction of the number of pneumatic interconnects required for fluidic control. Ideally, such a module would also be sufficiently compact for implementation in portable platforms. In our current work, we show the feasibility of using a modular array of Venturi pressure microregulators for coordinated droplet manipulation. The arrayed microregulators share a single pressure input and are capable of outputting electronically controlled pressures that can be independently set between ±1.3 kPa. Because the Venturi microregulator operates by thermal perturbation of a choked gas flow, this output range corresponds to a temperature variation between 20 and 95°C. Using the array, we demonstrate loading, splitting, merging, and independent movement of multiple droplets in a valveless microchannel network. PMID:20938490

  2. Working Out Works for Shawn Kelly | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer When Shawn Kelly found out last year that he had high blood pressure, he was determined to do something about it. Luckily for Kelly, an instrumentation technician III, Facilities Maintenance and Engineering, he works at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), where he can take advantage of the gym there, known as the Wellness Center.

  3. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 192.619, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  4. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for certain steel pipelines. 192.620 Section 192.620 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL...

  5. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 192.619, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  6. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 192.619, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  7. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for certain steel pipelines. 192.620 Section 192.620 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL...

  8. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for certain steel pipelines. 192.620 Section 192.620 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL...

  9. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 192.619, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  10. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 192.619, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION...

  11. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for certain steel pipelines. 192.620 Section 192.620 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL...

  12. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 192.111(b), (c), or (d) or, if none of these paragraphs apply, in accordance with the following table... was tested after construction by a factor determined in the following table: Class location... that includes a moisture analyzer, chromatograph, and periodic hydrogen sulfide sampling. (iv)...

  13. Pressurized lunar rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; McClure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar

    1992-05-01

    The pressurized lunar rover (PLR) consists of a 7 m long, 3 m diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, directional lighting, cameras, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The PLR shell is constructed of a layered carbon-fiber/foam composite. The rover has six 1.5 m diameter wheels on the main body and two 1.5 m diameter wheels on the trailer. The wheels are constructed of composites and flex to increase traction and shock absorption. The wheels are each attached to a double A-arm aluminum suspension, which allows each wheel 1 m of vertical motion. In conjunction with a 0.75 m ground clearance, the suspension aids the rover in negotiating the uneven lunar terrain. The 15 N-m torque brushless electric motors are mounted with harmonic drive units inside each of the wheels. The rover is steered by electrically varying the speeds of the wheels on either side of the rover. The PLR trailer contains a radiosotope thermoelectric generator providing 6.7 kW. A secondary back-up energy storage system for short-term high-power needs is provided by a bank of batteries. The trailer can be detached to facilitate docking of the main body with the lunar base via an airlock located in the rear of the PLR. The airlock is also used for EVA operation during missions. Life support is a partly regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center. The water absorbs any damaging radiation, allowing the command center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. Guidance, navigation, and control are supplied by a strapdown inertial measurement unit that works with the on-board computer. Star mappers provide periodic error correction.

  14. Pressurized Lunar Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; Mcclure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar

    1992-01-01

    The pressurized lunar rover (PLR) consists of a 7 m long, 3 m diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, directional lighting, cameras, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The PLR shell is constructed of a layered carbon-fiber/foam composite. The rover has six 1.5 m diameter wheels on the main body and two 1.5 m diameter wheels on the trailer. The wheels are constructed of composites and flex to increase traction and shock absorption. The wheels are each attached to a double A-arm aluminum suspension, which allows each wheel 1 m of vertical motion. In conjunction with a 0.75 m ground clearance, the suspension aids the rover in negotiating the uneven lunar terrain. The 15 N-m torque brushless electric motors are mounted with harmonic drive units inside each of the wheels. The rover is steered by electrically varying the speeds of the wheels on either side of the rover. The PLR trailer contains a radiosotope thermoelectric generator providing 6.7 kW. A secondary back-up energy storage system for short-term high-power needs is provided by a bank of batteries. The trailer can be detached to facilitate docking of the main body with the lunar base via an airlock located in the rear of the PLR. The airlock is also used for EVA operation during missions. Life support is a partly regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center. The water absorbs any damaging radiation, allowing the command center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. Guidance, navigation, and control are supplied by a strapdown inertial measurement unit that works with the on-board computer. Star mappers provide periodic error correction. The PLR is capable of voice, video, and data transmission. It is equipped with two 5 W X-band transponder

  15. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  16. Recommended dietary allowances harmonization in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Barba, Corazon Vc; Cabrera, Ma Isabel Z

    2008-01-01

    Issues and opportunities for RDA harmonization within the SEA region were first raised during the First Regional Forum and Workshop "RDAs: Scientific Basis and Future Directions", held in Singapore in March 1997. A regional review on RDAs in SEA showed general similarities for the different RDAs, although in some cases a country listed an exceptionally high or low RDA for a particular nutrient for a specific group. It also revealed differences in physiologic groupings and reference body weights, nutrients included and units of expression. Realizing these differences in RDA components between countries which makes technical composition different, a consensus on the need for regional collaboration and harmonization of RDAs was reached by participants from Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. A follow-up workshop was organized to work towards agreement throughout the region on common approaches, concepts and terminologies; application and uses, format and a research agenda. Round table discussions were held to arrive at specific recommendations for achieving harmonization. While divergence in opinions were expected, some clear-cut agreements were settled. Globalization envisions to achieve economic growth and development, with the effects expected to ripple through health, nutrition and welfare improvements. The harmonization of RDAs in SEA seeks to reach this vision by strengthening R and D capabilities (both logistic and manpower) within the region and within the countries in the region, as well as harmonizing the efforts of governments and industry within the region to reduce potential trade barriers such as those relating to food and nutrition quality assurance standards. PMID:18460439

  17. [The family allowance and expenditures on children].

    PubMed

    Istvan, B

    1998-10-01

    This article describes the 1857 census of Transylvania (then a province of Hungary, now part of present-day Romania) broken down into provincial, county, and district units, which was published in 1859. In 1861, it was published in the statistical tables of the monarchy in Vienna, Austria. The data were republished by a working group in Cluj, Romania, as part of a series of demographic studies publishing census data in Transylvania from the earliest times to the present day. Data were gathered about the number of dwellings and apartments, the population (native or foreign), religion, occupation, sex, marital status, and age groups. Another version of the census was also published in the Romanian language after the recognition of the equal legal and linguistic status of Romanians in 1863. The total population was 2,174,137, comprised of 1,291,233 Romanians, 576,468 Hungarians, 193,135 Germans, and the rest being Gypsies, Jews, and Armenians. According to religious denominations, all Romanians were of the Greek Orthodox or Greek Catholic faith; most Hungarians belonged to the Roman Catholic, Reformed, or Unitarian Churches; and most Germans were Lutherans (a sizable portion of Hungarians were also Lutherans). 75% of the Gypsies were adherents of Romanian religions, while 25% followed one of the Hungarian churches. Some comparisons were also made between the data of other demographic surveys and estimations pertaining to this period of time. The outcomes concerning the ethnic and religious groups differed slightly to the benefit of either Hungarians or Romanians without significantly altering the final results of the ethnic composition of the province, where around 60% of the population was Romanian, 27% Hungarian, and 9.0% German. PMID:12294776

  18. Allowing for heterogeneity in monetary subjective well-being valuations.

    PubMed

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil

    2011-03-01

    Recent research on 'happiness' regression equations has shown how monetary values can be put on the well-being effects of many life events (like health problems, marriage or the death of a spouse). Potentially, such work has practical implications for policy-makers and the courts. However, this article argues that we need to be careful in such work to use the appropriate statistical method. It goes beyond previous research and allows for heterogeneity in the subjective well-being scales. Using less restrictive models than the current literature, the article argues that standard linear or ordered response models seem consistently to overstate valuations. With data from the UK, it provides new monetary estimates of the well-being consequences of a number of health problems, social capital indicators, marital status changes and social relationships.

  19. On Time Performance Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael

    2013-01-01

    Within many operations, the pressures for on-time performance are high. Each month, on-time statistics are reported to the Department of Transportation and made public. There is a natural tendency for employees under pressure to do their best to meet these objectives. As a result, pressure to get the job done within the allotted time may cause personnel to deviate from procedures and policies. Additionally, inadequate or unavailable resources may drive employees to work around standard processes that are seen as barriers. However, bypassing practices to enable on-time performance may affect more than the statistics. ASRS reports often highlight on-time performance pressures which may result in impact across all workgroups in an attempt to achieve on-time performance. Reporters often provide in-depth insights into their experiences which can be used by industry to identify and focus on the implementation of systemic fixes.

  20. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  1. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...

  2. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  3. ECN Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-18

    This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

  4. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  5. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  6. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  7. (2) H and (139) La NMR Spectroscopy in Aqueous Solutions at Geochemical Pressures.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Gerardo; Pilgrim, Corey D; Martin, Michele N; Colla, Christopher A; Klavins, Peter; Augustine, Matthew P; Casey, William H

    2015-12-14

    Nuclear spin relaxation rates of (2) H and (139) La in LaCl3 +(2) H2 O and La(ClO4 )3 +(2) H2 O solutions were determined as a function of pressure in order to demonstrate a new NMR probe designed for solution spectroscopy at geochemical pressures. The (2) H longitudinal relaxation rates (T1 ) vary linearly to 1.6 GPa, consistent with previous work at lower pressures. The (139) La T1 values vary both with solution chemistry and pressure, but converge with pressure, suggesting that the combined effects of increased viscosity and enhanced rates of ligand exchange control relaxation. This simple NMR probe design allows experiments on aqueous solutions to pressures corresponding roughly to those at the base of the Earth's continental crust. PMID:26404025

  8. Allowing the Biblical Text to Do Its Pedagogical Work: Connecting Interpretative Activity and Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Elie

    2007-01-01

    Drawing upon scholarly literary approaches to biblical narratives, this article offers both a theoretical view and a method for teaching and learning which connect interpretative activity of biblical narratives with moral education. The theoretical section of the article discusses the pedagogical rather than propositional nature of biblical…

  9. [Chrysotile asbestos: biological effects, the work environment highest allowable concentration and neoplasm risk].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, H; Wiecek, E

    2000-01-01

    The authors present the most essential data on physical and chemical properties of chrysotile, sources of its emission, the extent of occupational exposure, and biological effect, used in setting MAC values for chrysotile-containing dusts. Exploitable asbestos deposits do not exist in Poland, but admixtures of asbestos minerals have been found in some deposits of mineral raw materials located in the area of Lower Silesia (melafir, gabbro, dolomite. ore, nickel, magnesite, serpentinite). In the 1970s, about 100,000 tonnes of asbestos, containing 90% of chrysotile, were used annually in Poland. This figure decreased to 30,000 tonnes in 1991. In 1985 the use of crocidolite asbestos was stopped, and in 1999, the use of asbestos-containing products was banned by the virtue of the legal act. At present, the Minister of Economy in agreement with the Minister of Environmental Protection sets regularly the list of asbestos-containing products permitted for the production or in the customs area. Nowadays, the range of dust concentrations in plants which use asbestos products amounts to 0.1-0.6 mg/m3 for total dust and 0.002-0.07 f/cm3 for respirable mineral fibres; and during exploitation of rock raw material deposits 0.7-280 mg/m3, and 0.01-3.3 f/cm3, respectively. During the years 1976-96, 1520 cases of asbestos-related occupational diseases were diagnosed. This figure included 1314 cases of asbestosis, 154 cases of lung cancer and 52 cases of pleura mesothelioma. MAC values for chrysotile and chrysotile-containing dusts are: 0.2 f/cm3 and 1 mg/m3.

  10. [Chrysotile asbestos: biological effects, the work environment highest allowable concentration and neoplasm risk].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, H; Wiecek, E

    2000-01-01

    The authors present the most essential data on physical and chemical properties of chrysotile, sources of its emission, the extent of occupational exposure, and biological effect, used in setting MAC values for chrysotile-containing dusts. Exploitable asbestos deposits do not exist in Poland, but admixtures of asbestos minerals have been found in some deposits of mineral raw materials located in the area of Lower Silesia (melafir, gabbro, dolomite. ore, nickel, magnesite, serpentinite). In the 1970s, about 100,000 tonnes of asbestos, containing 90% of chrysotile, were used annually in Poland. This figure decreased to 30,000 tonnes in 1991. In 1985 the use of crocidolite asbestos was stopped, and in 1999, the use of asbestos-containing products was banned by the virtue of the legal act. At present, the Minister of Economy in agreement with the Minister of Environmental Protection sets regularly the list of asbestos-containing products permitted for the production or in the customs area. Nowadays, the range of dust concentrations in plants which use asbestos products amounts to 0.1-0.6 mg/m3 for total dust and 0.002-0.07 f/cm3 for respirable mineral fibres; and during exploitation of rock raw material deposits 0.7-280 mg/m3, and 0.01-3.3 f/cm3, respectively. During the years 1976-96, 1520 cases of asbestos-related occupational diseases were diagnosed. This figure included 1314 cases of asbestosis, 154 cases of lung cancer and 52 cases of pleura mesothelioma. MAC values for chrysotile and chrysotile-containing dusts are: 0.2 f/cm3 and 1 mg/m3. PMID:11002475

  11. The synthesis of substances under high static pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, N. V.

    1986-05-01

    Phase transitions of many substances occur under extremely high pressures and temperatures. The development of such conditions is possible within a limited reaction vessel volume of a special high pressure apparatus. In order to obtain pressures of 5 to 8 GPa in a reaction volume a high-pressure apparatus is loaded by anvils of hydraulic presses whose working force is 1 to 10 MN. The heating of substances up to 1500-2000 K is carried out by direct current transmission or a reaction vessel is provided with special resistors. The high pressure apparatus (HPA) consists of a number of elements whose yield and heat conductivities differ. This defines the pressure and temperature gradients within the reaction vessel volume and throughout the HPA as a whole. The dimensions and the design pecularities of HPA substantially affect its temperature and pressure fields. The basic principles of the theory of large plastic deformations and those of the mechanics of deformation in solids are considered. The temperature and pressure fields in the HPA reaction volume of model shape and dimensions are defined as a result of solving associated non-linear non-stationary problems of electro- and heat-conductivity in HPA and those of thermal plasticity by the method of finite elements. The probable arrangement and volume of various phases (initial low pressure phase, synthesized high pressure phase and those of the solid and melted metal solvent) were investigated. The characteristics allowing the quantitative evaluation of the efficiency of the selected pressure level within the reaction vessel prior to the heating cycle were proved to be valid.

  12. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  13. Funding child rearing: child allowance and parental leave.

    PubMed

    Walker, J R

    1996-01-01

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care. The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs. Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth or adoption of a child. If families did not have enough dollars in their accounts to cover the cost of the leave, the federal government would extend a low-interest loan to them, which they would have to pay back. The amount individuals receive through Social Security would be adjusted upward or downward according to the balances in their parental leave accounts at retirement. The author suggests that both proposals would help parents balance work and family obligations and protect parental freedom of choice over the care and upbringing of their children.

  14. NMR in a Diamond Anvil Pressure Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Matthew; Dioguardi, Adam; Weir, Samuel; Bush, Blaine; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Deemyad, Shanti; Curro, Nichlas

    We present recent advances in the use of diamond anvil pressure cells in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. This technique allows access to new regions of the phase diagrams of iron pnictide and heavy fermion materials, and promises to allow NMR experiments under pressures not previously accessible.

  15. Transpulmonary pressure monitoring during mechanical ventilation: a bench-to-bedside review.

    PubMed

    Mietto, Cristina; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Chiumello, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Different ventilation strategies have been suggested in the past in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Airway pressure monitoring alone is inadequate to assure optimal ventilatory support in ARDS patients. The assessment of transpulmonary pressure (PTP) can help clinicians to tailor mechanical ventilation to the individual patient needs. Transpulmonary pressure monitoring, defined as airway pressure (Paw) minus intrathoracic pressure (ITP), provides essential information about chest wall mechanics and its effects on the respiratory system and lung mechanics. The positioning of an esophageal catheter is required to measure the esophageal pressure (Peso), which is clinically used as a surrogate for ITP or pleural pressure (Ppl), and calculates the transpulmonary pressure. The benefits of such a ventilation approach are avoiding excessive lung stress and individualizing the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) setting. The aim is to prevent over-distention of alveoli and the cyclic recruitment/derecruitment or shear stress of lung parenchyma, mechanisms associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Knowledge of the real lung distending pressure, i.e. the transpulmonary pressure, has shown to be useful in both controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation. In the latter ventilator modes, Peso measurement allows one to assess a patient's respiratory effort, patient-ventilator asynchrony, intrinsic PEEP and the calculation of work of breathing. Conditions that have an impact on Peso, such as abdominal hypertension, will also be discussed briefly.

  16. Transpulmonary pressure monitoring during mechanical ventilation: a bench-to-bedside review.

    PubMed

    Mietto, Cristina; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Chiumello, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Different ventilation strategies have been suggested in the past in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Airway pressure monitoring alone is inadequate to assure optimal ventilatory support in ARDS patients. The assessment of transpulmonary pressure (PTP) can help clinicians to tailor mechanical ventilation to the individual patient needs. Transpulmonary pressure monitoring, defined as airway pressure (Paw) minus intrathoracic pressure (ITP), provides essential information about chest wall mechanics and its effects on the respiratory system and lung mechanics. The positioning of an esophageal catheter is required to measure the esophageal pressure (Peso), which is clinically used as a surrogate for ITP or pleural pressure (Ppl), and calculates the transpulmonary pressure. The benefits of such a ventilation approach are avoiding excessive lung stress and individualizing the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) setting. The aim is to prevent over-distention of alveoli and the cyclic recruitment/derecruitment or shear stress of lung parenchyma, mechanisms associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Knowledge of the real lung distending pressure, i.e. the transpulmonary pressure, has shown to be useful in both controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation. In the latter ventilator modes, Peso measurement allows one to assess a patient's respiratory effort, patient-ventilator asynchrony, intrinsic PEEP and the calculation of work of breathing. Conditions that have an impact on Peso, such as abdominal hypertension, will also be discussed briefly. PMID:26575165

  17. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  18. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  19. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  20. 17 CFR 190.07 - Calculation of allowed net equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of allowed net... BANKRUPTCY § 190.07 Calculation of allowed net equity. Allowed net equity shall be computed as follows: (a) Allowed claim. The allowed net equity claim of a customer shall be equal to the aggregate of the...

  1. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  2. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  3. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  4. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  5. Pressurized Lunar Rover (PLR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; Mcclure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Bulsara, Vatsal; Kokan, David; Shariff, Shaun; Svarverud, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design a manned pressurized lunar rover (PLR) for long-range transportation and for exploration of the lunar surface. The vehicle must be capable of operating on a 14-day mission, traveling within a radius of 500 km during a lunar day or within a 50-km radius during a lunar night. The vehicle must accommodate a nominal crew of four, support two 28-hour EVA's, and in case of emergency, support a crew of six when near the lunar base. A nominal speed of ten km/hr and capability of towing a trailer with a mass of two mt are required. Two preliminary designs have been developed by two independent student teams. The PLR 1 design proposes a seven meter long cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, lighting, robotic arms, tools, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The rover uses a simple mobility system with six wheels on the main vehicle and two on the trailer. The nonpressurized trailer contains a modular radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) supplying 6.5 kW continuous power. A secondary energy storage for short-term peak power needs is provided by a bank of lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries. The life support system is partly a regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center allowing the center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. The PLR 1 has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a top speed of 18 km/hr and is capable of towing three metric tons, in addition to the RTG trailer. The PLR 2 configuration consists of two four-meter diameter, cylindrical hulls which are passively connected by a flexible passageway, resulting in the overall vehicle length of 11 m. The vehicle is driven by eight independently suspended wheels. The dual-cylinder concept allows articulated as well as double

  6. Pressurized Lunar Rover (PLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; McClure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Bulsara, Vatsal; Kokan, David; Shariff, Shaun; Svarverud, Eric

    The objective of this project was to design a manned pressurized lunar rover (PLR) for long-range transportation and for exploration of the lunar surface. The vehicle must be capable of operating on a 14-day mission, traveling within a radius of 500 km during a lunar day or within a 50-km radius during a lunar night. The vehicle must accommodate a nominal crew of four, support two 28-hour EVA's, and in case of emergency, support a crew of six when near the lunar base. A nominal speed of ten km/hr and capability of towing a trailer with a mass of two mt are required. Two preliminary designs have been developed by two independent student teams. The PLR 1 design proposes a seven meter long cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, lighting, robotic arms, tools, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The rover uses a simple mobility system with six wheels on the main vehicle and two on the trailer. The nonpressurized trailer contains a modular radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) supplying 6.5 kW continuous power. A secondary energy storage for short-term peak power needs is provided by a bank of lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries. The life support system is partly a regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center allowing the center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. The PLR 1 has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a top speed of 18 km/hr and is capable of towing three metric tons, in addition to the RTG trailer. The PLR 2 configuration consists of two four-meter diameter, cylindrical hulls which are passively connected by a flexible passageway, resulting in the overall vehicle length of 11 m. The vehicle is driven by eight independently suspended wheels. The dual-cylinder concept allows articulated as well as double

  7. Foundational Performance Analyses of Pressure Gain Combustion Thermodynamic Benefits for Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Kaemming, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    A methodology is described whereby the work extracted by a turbine exposed to the fundamentally nonuniform flowfield from a representative pressure gain combustor (PGC) may be assessed. The method uses an idealized constant volume cycle, often referred to as an Atkinson or Humphrey cycle, to model the PGC. Output from this model is used as input to a scalable turbine efficiency function (i.e., a map), which in turn allows for the calculation of useful work throughout the cycle. Integration over the entire cycle yields mass-averaged work extraction. The unsteady turbine work extraction is compared to steady work extraction calculations based on various averaging techniques for characterizing the combustor exit pressure and temperature. It is found that averages associated with momentum flux (as opposed to entropy or kinetic energy) provide the best match. This result suggests that momentum-based averaging is the most appropriate figure-of-merit to use as a PGC performance metric. Using the mass-averaged work extraction methodology, it is also found that the design turbine pressure ratio for maximum work extraction is significantly higher than that for a turbine fed by a constant pressure combustor with similar inlet conditions and equivalence ratio. Limited results are presented whereby the constant volume cycle is replaced by output from a detonation-based PGC simulation. The results in terms of averaging techniques and design pressure ratio are similar.

  8. 30 CFR 1206.261 - Transportation allowances-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the quantity of clean coal output and the rejected waste material. The transportation allowance shall be authorized for the total production which is transported. Transportation allowances shall be..., the transportation allowance shall be authorized for the total production which is...

  9. 30 CFR 1206.460 - Transportation allowances-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the quantity of clean coal output and the rejected waste material. The transportation allowance shall be authorized for the total production which is transported. Transportation allowances shall be..., the transportation allowance shall be authorized for the total production which is...

  10. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  11. [Pressure sores: management and treatment].

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, D; Seron, A; Jacquerye, A; Bustillo, A; Strale, H; Haubrechts, J; Del Marmol, V

    1997-09-01

    The global management of pressure sores is best ensured with a multidisciplinary approach. We present the experience of the "Groupe de Travail Escarres" (Pressure Sore Workgroup) which gathers physicians and nurses interested with this pathology. The majority of the decubitus ulcers will heal spontaneously with a conservative treatment only. This treatment typically aims at relieving the causes that lead to pressure sores, at eliminating the necrotic tissues, at obtaining favourable local conditions to allow wound healing and at controlling the health status of the patient. Surgical treatment of pressure sores is indicated when wound healing does not occur and when the health status of the patient is sufficiently good. Defect coverage is best carried out using myocutaneous flaps since their excellent blood supply allows a good cleansing of the wound. PMID:9411658

  12. Heterogeneous Catalysis under pressure - In-situ neutron diffraction under industrial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Timur; Girgsdies, Frank; Kasatkin, Igor; Kunkes, Edward; Liss, Klaus-Dieter; Peterson, Vanessa K.; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2012-02-01

    The present work describes the application of a tubular reactor that allows in-situ neutron diffraction on working catalysts at high pressures. The designed reactor enables the application to a sample of industrially-relevant reaction conditions, i.e., in a temperature range up to 330° C and 60 bar pressure, coupled with online gas-analysis. Application of the cell is demonstrated by ammonia synthesis over a commercial catalyst with diffraction data obtained from the high-resolution powder diffractometer, Echidna, at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO.

  13. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  14. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  15. Pressure independence of granular flow through an aperture.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, M A; Grande, J G; Calvo, A; Pugnaloni, L A; Géminard, J-C

    2010-06-11

    We experimentally demonstrate that the flow rate of granular material through an aperture is controlled by the exit velocity imposed on the particles and not by the pressure at the base, contrary to what is often assumed in previous work. This result is achieved by studying the discharge process of a dense packing of monosized disks through an orifice. The flow is driven by a conveyor belt. This two-dimensional horizontal setup allows us to independently control the velocity at which the disks escape the horizontal silo and the pressure in the vicinity of the aperture. The flow rate is found to be proportional to the belt velocity, independent of the amount of disks in the container and, thus, independent of the pressure in the outlet region. In addition, this specific configuration makes it possible to get information on the system dynamics from a single image of the disks that rest on the conveyor belt after the discharge. PMID:20867272

  16. Implantable blood pressure sensor for analyzing elasticity in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Ayala, Marco; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando; Reyes-Barranca, Alfredo; Sánchez de la Peña, Salvador; Álvarez-Chavez, José A.

    2009-03-01

    MEMS technology could be an option for the development of a pressure sensor which allows the monitoring of several electronic signals in humans. In this work, a comparison is made between the typical elasticity curves of several arteries in the human body and the elasticity obtained for MEMS silicon microstructures such as membranes and cantilevers employing Finite Element analysis tools. The purpose is to identify which types of microstructures are mechanically compatible with human arteries. The goal is to integrate a blood pressure sensor which can be implanted in proximity with an artery. The expected benefits for this type of sensor are mainly to reduce the problems associated with the use of bulk devices through the day and during several days. Such a sensor could give precise blood pressure readings in a continuous or periodic form, i.e. information that is especially important for some critical cases of hypertension patients.

  17. Very small ionization pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A very small ionization pressure gauge has been developed to operate in the pressure range 10/sup -6/ Torr to 100..mu... A metal construction and external cooling fins result in a very rugged device with exceptionally small outgassing properties. The gauge also incorporates a replaceable filament-grid assembly on a single plug which allows the simple replacement of both the filament and the grid when needed.

  18. Peace Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortright, David

    1994-01-01

    Debates the impetus behind the easing of Cold War tensions. Suggests that political pressure, through the organized campaigns of peace movements in the United States and Europe, created a political climate in Washington for arms control and restraint. (LZ)

  19. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  20. 20 CFR 641.630 - What private sector training activities are allowable under section 502(e)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What private sector training activities are... activities are allowable under section 502(e)? Allowable activities authorized under section 502(e) include... employers; (3) Work experience with private-for-profit employers; (4) Adult basic education; (5)...