Science.gov

Sample records for allowing direct observation

  1. A medaka model of cancer allowing direct observation of transplanted tumor cells in vivo at a cellular-level resolution.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Maruyama, Kouichi; Takenaka, Hikaru; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2009-08-18

    The recent success with small fish as an animal model of cancer with the aid of fluorescence technique has attracted cancer modelers' attention because it would be possible to directly visualize tumor cells in vivo in real time. Here, we report a medaka model capable of allowing the observation of various cell behaviors of transplanted tumor cells, such as cell proliferation and metastasis, which were visualized easily in vivo. We established medaka melanoma (MM) cells stably expressing GFP and transplanted them into nonirradiated and irradiated medaka. The tumor cells were grown at the injection sites in medaka, and the spatiotemporal changes were visualized under a fluorescence stereoscopic microscope at a cellular-level resolution, and even at a single-cell level. Tumor dormancy and metastasis were also observed. Interestingly, in irradiated medaka, accelerated tumor growth and metastasis of the transplanted tumor cells were directly visualized. Our medaka model provides an opportunity to visualize in vivo tumor cells "as seen in a culture dish" and would be useful for in vivo tumor cell biology. PMID:19666513

  2. Periodic reversal of direction allows Myxobacteria to swarm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yilin; Kaiser, A. Dale; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria can rapidly traverse surfaces from which they are extracting nutrient for growth. They generate flat, spreading colonies, called swarms because they resemble swarms of insects. We seek to understand how members of any dense swarm spread efficiently while being able to perceive and interfere minimally with the motion of others. To this end, we investigate swarms of the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus. Individual M. xanthus cells are elongated; they always move in the direction of their long axis; and they are in constant motion, repeatedly touching each other. Remarkably, they regularly reverse their gliding directions. We have constructed a detailed cell- and behavior-based computational model of M. xanthus swarming that allows the organization of cells to be computed. By using the model, we are able to show that reversals of gliding direction are essential for swarming and that reversals increase the outflow of cells across the edge of the swarm. Cells at the swarm edge gain maximum exposure to nutrient and oxygen. We also find that the reversal period predicted to maximize the outflow of cells is the same (within the errors of measurement) as the period observed in experiments with normal M. xanthus cells. This coincidence suggests that the circuit regulating reversals evolved to its current sensitivity under selection for growth achieved by swarming. Finally, we observe that, with time, reversals increase the cell alignment, and generate clusters of parallel cells. PMID:19164578

  3. Dipole-allowed direct band gap silicon superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young Jun; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Jooyoung; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-12-01

    Silicon is the most popular material used in electronic devices. However, its poor optical properties owing to its indirect band gap nature limit its usage in optoelectronic devices. Here we present the discovery of super-stable pure-silicon superlattice structures that can serve as promising materials for solar cell applications and can lead to the realization of pure Si-based optoelectronic devices. The structures are almost identical to that of bulk Si except that defective layers are intercalated in the diamond lattice. The superlattices exhibit dipole-allowed direct band gaps as well as indirect band gaps, providing ideal conditions for the investigation of a direct-to-indirect band gap transition. The fact that almost all structural portions of the superlattices originate from bulk Si warrants their stability and good lattice matching with bulk Si. Through first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we confirmed their thermal stability and propose a possible method to synthesize the defective layer through wafer bonding.

  4. Dipole-allowed direct band gap silicon superlattices

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Jun; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Jooyoung; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-01-01

    Silicon is the most popular material used in electronic devices. However, its poor optical properties owing to its indirect band gap nature limit its usage in optoelectronic devices. Here we present the discovery of super-stable pure-silicon superlattice structures that can serve as promising materials for solar cell applications and can lead to the realization of pure Si-based optoelectronic devices. The structures are almost identical to that of bulk Si except that defective layers are intercalated in the diamond lattice. The superlattices exhibit dipole-allowed direct band gaps as well as indirect band gaps, providing ideal conditions for the investigation of a direct-to-indirect band gap transition. The fact that almost all structural portions of the superlattices originate from bulk Si warrants their stability and good lattice matching with bulk Si. Through first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we confirmed their thermal stability and propose a possible method to synthesize the defective layer through wafer bonding. PMID:26656482

  5. Directional drilling allows quick exit from petrochemical plant

    SciTech Connect

    Halderman, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    Horizontal directional drilling uses specialty tools and techniques largely taken from the oil field and the mining industry to very accurately install pipelines, utilities and other conduits under obstacles such as rivers, beaches, environmentally sensitive areas, roadways, railroads, airfields, and congested pipeline corridors. In the early part of 1990, a particularly interesting problem confronted the pipeline engineers at Union Carbides 2,500-acre Seadrift plant near Port Lavaca, Texas. Having started up in 1954, the plant today is a major supplier of chemicals and plastics to industry, shipping more than two billion pounds per year. Since very large volumes of cooling water are needed for the operation of a petrochemical complex of this magnitude, years of expansion and modifications have caused the plant to become nearly surrounded by a number of rather large segmented ponds.

  6. Ovarian fluid allows directional cryptic female choice despite external fertilization.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Suzanne H; Stiver, Kelly A; Marsh-Rollo, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    In species with internal fertilization, females can favour certain males over others, not only before mating but also within the female's reproductive tract after mating. Here, we ask whether such directional post-mating (that is, cryptic) female mate choice can also occur in species with external fertilization. Using an in vitro sperm competition experiment, we demonstrate that female ovarian fluid (ovarian fluid) changes the outcome of sperm competition by decreasing the importance of sperm number thereby increasing the relative importance of sperm velocity. We further show that ovarian fluid does not differentially affect sperm from alternative male phenotypes, but generally enhances sperm velocity, motility, straightness and chemoattraction. Under natural conditions, female ovarian fluid likely increases the paternity of the preferred parental male phenotype, as these males release fewer but faster sperm. These results imply females have greater control over fertilization and potential to exert selection on males in species with external fertilization than previously thought possible. PMID:27529581

  7. Ovarian fluid allows directional cryptic female choice despite external fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Suzanne H.; Stiver, Kelly A.; Marsh-Rollo, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    In species with internal fertilization, females can favour certain males over others, not only before mating but also within the female's reproductive tract after mating. Here, we ask whether such directional post-mating (that is, cryptic) female mate choice can also occur in species with external fertilization. Using an in vitro sperm competition experiment, we demonstrate that female ovarian fluid (ovarian fluid) changes the outcome of sperm competition by decreasing the importance of sperm number thereby increasing the relative importance of sperm velocity. We further show that ovarian fluid does not differentially affect sperm from alternative male phenotypes, but generally enhances sperm velocity, motility, straightness and chemoattraction. Under natural conditions, female ovarian fluid likely increases the paternity of the preferred parental male phenotype, as these males release fewer but faster sperm. These results imply females have greater control over fertilization and potential to exert selection on males in species with external fertilization than previously thought possible. PMID:27529581

  8. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2013-06-12

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  9. Cosmological ensemble and directional averages of observables

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvin, Camille; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Maartens, Roy; Umeh, Obinna E-mail: chris.clarkson@gmail.com E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We show that at second order, ensemble averages of observables and directional averages do not commute due to gravitational lensing—observing the same thing in many directions over the sky is not the same as taking an ensemble average. In principle this non-commutativity is significant for a variety of quantities that we often use as observables and can lead to a bias in parameter estimation. We derive the relation between the ensemble average and the directional average of an observable, at second order in perturbation theory. We discuss the relevance of these two types of averages for making predictions of cosmological observables, focusing on observables related to distances and magnitudes. In particular, we show that the ensemble average of the distance in a given observed direction is increased by gravitational lensing, whereas the directional average of the distance is decreased. For a generic observable, there exists a particular function of the observable that is not affected by second-order lensing perturbations. We also show that standard areas have an advantage over standard rulers, and we discuss the subtleties involved in averaging in the case of supernova observations.

  10. Direct chromatin PCR (DC-PCR): hypotonic conditions allow differentiation of chromatin states during thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Vatolin, Sergei; Khan, Shahper N; Reu, Frederic J

    2012-01-01

    Current methods to study chromatin configuration are not well suited for high throughput drug screening since they require large cell numbers and multiple experimental steps that include centrifugation for isolation of nuclei or DNA. Here we show that site specific chromatin analysis can be achieved in one step by simply performing direct chromatin PCR (DC-PCR) on cells. The basic underlying observation was that standard hypotonic PCR buffers prevent global cellular chromatin solubilization during thermal cycling while more loosely organized chromatin can be amplified. Despite repeated heating to >90 °C, 41 of 61 tested 5' sequences of silenced genes (CDKN2A, PU.1, IRF4, FOSB, CD34) were not amplifiable while 47 could be amplified from expressing cells. Two gene regions (IRF4, FOSB) even required pre-heating of cells in isotonic media to allow this differentiation; otherwise none of 19 assayed sequences yielded PCR products. Cells with baseline expression or epigenetic reactivation gave similar DC-PCR results. Silencing during differentiation of CD34 positive cord blood cells closed respective chromatin while treatment of myeloma cells with an IRF4 transcriptional inhibitor opened a site to DC-PCR that was occupied by RNA polymerase II and NFκB as determined by ChIP. Translation into real-time PCR can not be achieved with commercial real-time PCR buffers which potently open chromatin, but even with simple ethidium bromide addition to standard PCR mastermix we were able to identify hits in small molecules screens that suppressed IRF4 expression or reactivated CDKN2A in myeloma cells using densitometry or visual inspection of PCR plates under UV light. While need in drug development inspired this work, application to genome-wide analysis appears feasible using phi29 for selective amplification of open cellular chromatin followed by library construction from supernatants since such supernatants yielded similar results as gene specific DC-PCR.

  11. Direct Observation: Assessing Orthopaedic Trainee Competence in the Ambulatory Setting.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Donna P; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Kalet, Adina; Egol, Kenneth A

    2016-09-01

    The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education requires that residency programs teach and assess trainees in six core competencies. Assessments are imperative to determine trainee competence and to ensure that excellent care is provided to all patients. A structured, direct observation program is feasible for assessing nontechnical core competencies and providing trainees with immediate constructive feedback. Direct observation of residents in the outpatient setting by trained faculty allows assessment of each core competency. Checklists are used to document residents' basic communication skills, clinical reasoning, physical examination methods, and medical record keeping. Faculty concerns regarding residents' professionalism, medical knowledge, fatigue, or ability to self-assess are tracked. Serial observations allow for the reinforcement and/or monitoring of skills and attitudes identified as needing improvement. Residents who require additional coaching are identified early in training. Progress in educational milestones is recorded, allowing an individualized educational program that ensures that future orthopaedic surgeons excel across all domains of medical and surgical competence. PMID:27479831

  12. Direct observation limits on antimatter gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, Mark; Lykken, Joe; Roberts, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed Antihydrogen Gravity experiment at Fermilab (P981) will directly measure the gravitational attraction g between antihydrogen and the Earth, with an accuracy of 1% or better. The following key question has been asked by the PAC: Is a possible 1% difference between g and g already ruled out by other evidence? This memo presents the key points of existing evidence, to answer whether such a difference is ruled out (a) on the basis of direct observational evidence; and/or (b) on the basis of indirect evidence, combined with reasoning based on strongly held theoretical assumptions. The bottom line is that there are no direct observations or measurements of gravitational asymmetry which address the antimatter sector. There is evidence which by indirect reasoning can be taken to rule out such a difference, but the analysis needed to draw that conclusion rests on models and assumptions which are in question for other reasons and are thus worth testing. There is no compelling evidence or theoretical reason to rule out such a difference at the 1% level.

  13. Direct observations of atmospheric aerosol nucleation.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, Markku; Kontkanen, Jenni; Junninen, Heikki; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Manninen, Hanna E; Nieminen, Tuomo; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sipilä, Mikko; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Rantala, Pekka; Franchin, Alessandro; Jokinen, Tuija; Järvinen, Emma; Äijälä, Mikko; Kangasluoma, Juha; Hakala, Jani; Aalto, Pasi P; Paasonen, Pauli; Mikkilä, Jyri; Vanhanen, Joonas; Aalto, Juho; Hakola, Hannele; Makkonen, Ulla; Ruuskanen, Taina; Mauldin, Roy L; Duplissy, Jonathan; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Bäck, Jaana; Kortelainen, Aki; Riipinen, Ilona; Kurtén, Theo; Johnston, Murray V; Smith, James N; Ehn, Mikael; Mentel, Thomas F; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Laaksonen, Ari; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-02-22

    Atmospheric nucleation is the dominant source of aerosol particles in the global atmosphere and an important player in aerosol climatic effects. The key steps of this process occur in the sub-2-nanometer (nm) size range, in which direct size-segregated observations have not been possible until very recently. Here, we present detailed observations of atmospheric nanoparticles and clusters down to 1-nm mobility diameter. We identified three separate size regimes below 2-nm diameter that build up a physically, chemically, and dynamically consistent framework on atmospheric nucleation--more specifically, aerosol formation via neutral pathways. Our findings emphasize the important role of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosol formation, subsequent aerosol growth, radiative forcing and associated feedbacks between biogenic emissions, clouds, and climate.

  14. Direct observation of laser guided corona discharges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Yingxia; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Cheng; Lu, Haihe; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser based lightning control holds a promising way to solve the problem of the long standing disaster of lightning strikes. But it is a challenging project due to insufficient understanding of the interaction between laser plasma channel and high voltage electric filed. In this work, a direct observation of laser guided corona discharge is reported. Laser filament guided streamer and leader types of corona discharges were observed. An enhanced ionization took place in the leader (filament) through the interaction with the high voltage discharging field. The fluorescence lifetime of laser filament guided corona discharge was measured to be several microseconds, which is 3 orders of magnitude longer than the fluorescence lifetime of laser filaments. This work could be advantageous towards a better understanding of laser assisted leader development in the atmosphere. PMID:26679271

  15. Direct observation of laser guided corona discharges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Yingxia; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Cheng; Lu, Haihe; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser based lightning control holds a promising way to solve the problem of the long standing disaster of lightning strikes. But it is a challenging project due to insufficient understanding of the interaction between laser plasma channel and high voltage electric filed. In this work, a direct observation of laser guided corona discharge is reported. Laser filament guided streamer and leader types of corona discharges were observed. An enhanced ionization took place in the leader (filament) through the interaction with the high voltage discharging field. The fluorescence lifetime of laser filament guided corona discharge was measured to be several microseconds, which is 3 orders of magnitude longer than the fluorescence lifetime of laser filaments. This work could be advantageous towards a better understanding of laser assisted leader development in the atmosphere. PMID:26679271

  16. Transgenic, Fluorescent Leishmania mexicana Allow Direct Analysis of the Proteome of Intracellular Amastigotes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Daniel; Lippuner, Christoph; Schmid, Monika; Ackermann, Renate; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E.; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Brinkmann, Volker; Arndt, Benjamin; Pleissner, Klaus Peter; Jungblut, Peter R.; Aebischer, Toni

    2008-01-01

    Investigating the proteome of intracellular pathogens is often hampered by inadequate methodologies to purify the pathogen free of host cell material. This has also precluded direct proteome analysis of the intracellular, amastigote form of Leishmania spp., protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of diseases that affect some 12 million patients worldwide. Here a method is presented that combines classic, isopycnic density centrifugation with fluorescent particle sorting for purification by exploiting transgenic, fluorescent parasites to allow direct proteome analysis of the purified organisms. By this approach the proteome of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amastigotes was compared with that of extracellular promastigotes that are transmitted by insect vectors. In total, 509 different proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and database search. This number corresponds to ∼6% of gene products predicted from the reference genome of Leishmania major. Intracellular amastigotes synthesized significantly more proteins with basic pI and showed a greater abundance of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism, which may reflect their living in acidic habitats and metabolic adaptation to nutrient availability, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses of the genes corresponding to the protein data sets produced clear evidence for skewed codon usage and translational bias in these organisms. Moreover analysis of the subset of genes whose products were more abundant in amastigotes revealed characteristic sequence motifs in 3′-untranslated regions that have been linked to translational control elements. This suggests that proteome data sets may be used to identify regulatory elements in mRNAs. Last but not least, at 6% coverage the proteome identified all vaccine antigens tested to date. Thus, the present data set provides a valuable resource for selection of candidate vaccine antigens. PMID:18474515

  17. Direct observation of sub-binomial light.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Tim J; Donati, Gaia; Jin, Xian-Min; Datta, Animesh; Barbieri, Marco; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-04-26

    Nonclassical states of light are necessary resources for quantum technologies such as cryptography, computation and the definition of metrological standards. Observing signatures of nonclassicality generally requires inferring either the photon number distribution or a quasiprobability distribution indirectly from a set of measurements. Here, we report an experiment in which the nonclassical character of families of quantum states is assessed by direct inspection of the outcomes from a multiplexed photon counter. This scheme does not register the actual photon number distribution; the statistics of the detector clicks alone serve as a witness of nonclassicality, as proposed by Sperling et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 093601 (2012)]. Our work paves a way for the practical characterization of increasingly sophisticated states and detectors. PMID:23679726

  18. Recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction allows rapid and seamless cloning of oligomeric genes.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jonathan R; Mackay, J Andrew; Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-04-12

    This paper reports a new strategy, recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction (PRe-RDL), to rapidly clone highly repetitive polypeptides of any sequence and specified length over a large range of molecular weights. In a single cycle of PRe-RDL, two halves of a parent plasmid, each containing a copy of an oligomer, are ligated together, thereby dimerizing the oligomer and reconstituting a functional plasmid. This process is carried out recursively to assemble an oligomeric gene with the desired number of repeats. PRe-RDL has several unique features that stem from the use of type IIs restriction endonucleases: first, PRe-RDL is a seamless cloning method that leaves no extraneous nucleotides at the ligation junction. Because it uses type IIs endonucleases to ligate the two halves of the plasmid, PRe-RDL also addresses the major limitation of RDL in that it abolishes any restriction on the gene sequence that can be oligomerized. The reconstitution of a functional plasmid only upon successful ligation in PRe-RDL also addresses two other limitations of RDL: the significant background from self-ligation of the vector observed in RDL, and the decreased efficiency of ligation due to nonproductive circularization of the insert. PRe-RDL can also be used to assemble genes that encode different sequences in a predetermined order to encode block copolymers or append leader and trailer peptide sequences to the oligomerized gene. PMID:20184309

  19. Wind direction modelling using multiple observation points.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshito; Mandic, Danilo P; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-02-28

    The prediction of wind direction is a prerequisite for the intelligent and efficient operation of wind turbines. This is a complex task, due to the intermittent behaviour of wind, its non-Gaussian and nonlinear nature, and the coupling between the wind speed and direction. To provide improved wind direction forecasting, we propose a nonlinear model with augmented information from an additional measurement point. This is further enhanced by making use of both the speed and direction components of the wind field vector. The analysis and a comprehensive set of simulations demonstrate that the proposed approach achieves improved prediction performance over the standard and persistent model. The potential of the proposed approach is justified by the fact that even relatively small improvements in the forecasts result in large gains in the produced output power.

  20. Prediction of direct band gap silicon superlattices with dipole-allowed optical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Oh, Young Jun; Lee, In-Ho; Lee, Jooyoung; Chang, K. J.

    While cubic diamond silicon (c-Si) is an important element in electronic devices, it has poor optical properties owing to its indirect gap nature, thereby limiting its applications to optoelectronic devices. Here, we report Si superlattice structures which are computationally designed to possess direct band gaps and excellent optical properties. The computational approach adopts density functional calculations and conformational space annealing for global optimization. The Si superlattices, which consist of alternating stacks of Si(111) layers and a defective layer with Seiwatz chains, have either direct or quasi-direct band gaps depending on the details of attacking layers. The photovoltaic efficiencies are calculated by solving Bethe-Salpeter equation together with quasiparticle G0W0 calculations. The strong direct optical transition is attributed to the overlap of the valence and conduction band edge states in the interface region. Our Si superlattices exhibit high thermal stability, with the energies lower by an order of magnitude than those of the previously reported Si allotropes. We discuss a possible route to the synthesis of the superlattices through wafer bonding. This work is supported by Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Grant No. SSTF-BA1401-08.

  1. 30 CFR 1220.011 - Schedule of allowable direct and allocable joint costs and credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operations, or specific engineering design problems related to equipment or facilities required for NPSL..., as are contract services calling for feasibility studies not directly related to specific engineering... commercial rates prevailing in the vicinity of the NPSL project area less 20 percent. For...

  2. 30 CFR 1220.011 - Schedule of allowable direct and allocable joint costs and credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operations, or specific engineering design problems related to equipment or facilities required for NPSL..., as are contract services calling for feasibility studies not directly related to specific engineering... commercial rates prevailing in the vicinity of the NPSL project area less 20 percent. For...

  3. 30 CFR 1220.011 - Schedule of allowable direct and allocable joint costs and credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engineering design problems related to equipment or facilities required for NPSL operations. (4) The cost of... services calling for feasibility studies not directly related to specific engineering design problems or... prevailing in the vicinity of the NPSL project area less 20 percent. For automotive equipment, the lessee...

  4. 30 CFR 220.011 - Schedule of allowable direct and allocable joint costs and credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operations, or specific engineering design problems related to equipment or facilities required for NPSL..., as are contract services calling for feasibility studies not directly related to specific engineering... commercial rates prevailing in the vicinity of the NPSL project area less 20 percent. For...

  5. 30 CFR 1220.011 - Schedule of allowable direct and allocable joint costs and credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... engineering design problems related to equipment or facilities required for NPSL operations. (4) The cost of... services calling for feasibility studies not directly related to specific engineering design problems or... prevailing in the vicinity of the NPSL project area less 20 percent. For automotive equipment, the lessee...

  6. Trehalose Glycopolymer Resists Allow Direct Writing of Protein Patterns by Electron-Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively cross-link to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometer and nanometer scale without requiring cleanroom conditions. PMID:25791943

  7. Trehalose glycopolymer resists allow direct writing of protein patterns by electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-03-01

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein, we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron-beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively crosslink to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron-beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high-precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometre and nanometre scale without requiring cleanroom conditions.

  8. Trehalose glycopolymer resists allow direct writing of protein patterns by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y; Maynard, Heather D

    2015-03-20

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein, we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron-beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively crosslink to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron-beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high-precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometre and nanometre scale without requiring cleanroom conditions.

  9. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  10. Remote-controlled bent sub aids directional drilling by allowing bend-angle change

    SciTech Connect

    Bardin, C.A.

    1989-01-30

    A remotely controlled bent sub has proved its usefulness and efficiency in drilling extended buildups (including drilling out cement and vertical trajectories) as well as in correction runs. The bent sub, T3000 Telepilote, was developed jointly by IFP (Institut Francais du Petrole) and SMFI (Societe Materiel de Forage International). The advantages of this tool range from the bend angles that can be remotely controlled from the surface and by the remote-control system itself. This system is compatible with all equipment in the drillstring, and in particular with MWD tools (positive mud pulse, negative mud pulse, etc.). One main advantage is that the zero position (straight configuration) of the bent sub allows continuous drilling without tripping in between drilling out cement and the vertical section, if any, and drilling the kickoff and buildup.

  11. Tagging motor memories with transcranial direct current stimulation allows later artificially-controlled retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Daichi; Yokoi, Atsushi; Kimura, Takahiro; Hirashima, Masaya; Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that human motor memories can be artificially tagged and later retrieved by noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Participants learned to adapt reaching movements to two conflicting dynamical environments that were each associated with a different tDCS polarity (anodal or cathodal tDCS) on the sensorimotor cortex. That is, we sought to determine whether divergent background activity levels within the sensorimotor cortex (anodal: higher activity; cathodal: lower activity) give rise to distinct motor memories. After a training session, application of each tDCS polarity automatically resulted in the retrieval of the motor memory corresponding to that polarity. These results reveal that artificial modulation of neural activity in the sensorimotor cortex through tDCS can act as a context for the formation and recollection of motor memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15378.001 PMID:27472899

  12. Tagging motor memories with transcranial direct current stimulation allows later artificially-controlled retrieval.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daichi; Yokoi, Atsushi; Kimura, Takahiro; Hirashima, Masaya; Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that human motor memories can be artificially tagged and later retrieved by noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Participants learned to adapt reaching movements to two conflicting dynamical environments that were each associated with a different tDCS polarity (anodal or cathodal tDCS) on the sensorimotor cortex. That is, we sought to determine whether divergent background activity levels within the sensorimotor cortex (anodal: higher activity; cathodal: lower activity) give rise to distinct motor memories. After a training session, application of each tDCS polarity automatically resulted in the retrieval of the motor memory corresponding to that polarity. These results reveal that artificial modulation of neural activity in the sensorimotor cortex through tDCS can act as a context for the formation and recollection of motor memories. PMID:27472899

  13. Direct observation of stepwise movement of a synthetic molecular transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, Shelley F. J.; Endo, Masayuki; Katsuda, Yousuke; Hidaka, Kumi; Bath, Jonathan; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Controlled motion at the nanoscale can be achieved by using Watson-Crick base-pairing to direct the assembly and operation of a molecular transport system consisting of a track, a motor and fuel, all made from DNA. Here, we assemble a 100-nm-long DNA track on a two-dimensional scaffold, and show that a DNA motor loaded at one end of the track moves autonomously and at a constant average speed along the full length of the track, a journey comprising 16 consecutive steps for the motor. Real-time atomic force microscopy allows direct observation of individual steps of a single motor, revealing mechanistic details of its operation. This precisely controlled, long-range transport could lead to the development of systems that could be programmed and routed by instructions encoded in the nucleotide sequences of the track and motor. Such systems might be used to create molecular assembly lines modelled on the ribosome.

  14. New directions in childhood obesity research: how a comprehensive biorepository will allow better prediction of outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is associated with the early development of diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, to date, traditional methods of research have failed to identify effective prevention and treatment strategies, and large numbers of children and adolescents continue to be at high risk of developing weight-related disease. Aim To establish a unique 'biorepository' of data and biological samples from overweight and obese children, in order to investigate the complex 'gene × environment' interactions that govern disease risk. Methods The 'Childhood Overweight BioRepository of Australia' collects baseline environmental, clinical and anthropometric data, alongside storage of blood samples for genetic, metabolic and hormonal profiles. Opportunities for longitudinal data collection have also been incorporated into the study design. National and international harmonisation of data and sample collection will achieve required statistical power. Results Ethical approval in the parent site has been obtained and early data indicate a high response rate among eligible participants (71%) with a high level of compliance for comprehensive data collection (range 56% to 97% for individual study components). Multi-site ethical approval is now underway. Conclusions In time, it is anticipated that this comprehensive approach to data collection will allow early identification of individuals most susceptible to disease, as well as facilitating refinement of prevention and treatment programs. PMID:20969745

  15. Bacterial RTX toxins allow acute ATP release from human erythrocytes directly through the toxin pore.

    PubMed

    Skals, Marianne; Bjaelde, Randi G; Reinholdt, Jesper; Poulsen, Knud; Vad, Brian S; Otzen, Daniel E; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2014-07-01

    ATP is as an extracellular signaling molecule able to amplify the cell lysis inflicted by certain bacterial toxins including the two RTX toxins α-hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli and leukotoxin A (LtxA) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Inhibition of P2X receptors completely blocks the RTX toxin-induced hemolysis over a larger concentration range. It is, however, at present not known how the ATP that provides the amplification is released from the attacked cells. Here we show that both HlyA and LtxA trigger acute release of ATP from human erythrocytes that preceded and were not caused by cell lysis. This early ATP release did not occur via previously described ATP-release pathways in the erythrocyte. Both HlyA and LtxA were capable of triggering ATP release in the presence of the pannexin 1 blockers carbenoxolone and probenecid, and the HlyA-induced ATP release was found to be similar in erythrocytes from pannexin 1 wild type and knock-out mice. Moreover, the voltage-dependent anion channel antagonist TRO19622 had no effect on ATP release by either of the toxins. Finally, we showed that both HlyA and LtxA were able to release ATP from ATP-loaded lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) vesicles devoid of any erythrocyte channels or transporters. Again we were able to show that this happened in a non-lytic fashion, using calcein-containing vesicles as controls. These data show that both toxins incorporate into lipid vesicles and allow ATP to be released. We suggest that both toxins cause acute ATP release by letting ATP pass the toxin pores in both human erythrocytes and artificial membranes.

  16. Direct Observation of Paramagnons in Palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Doubble, R.; Hayden, S M.; Dai, Pengcheng; Mook Jr, Herbert A; Thompson, James R; Frost, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report an inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin fluctuations in the nearly ferromagnetic element palladium. Dispersive over-damped collective magnetic excitations or 'paramagnons' are observed up to 128 meV. We analyze our results in terms of a Moriya-Lonzarich-type spin-fluctuation model and estimate the contribution of the spin fluctuations to the low-temperature heat capacity. In spite of the paramagnon excitations being relatively strong, their relaxation rates are large. This leads to a small contribution to the low-temperature electronic specific heat.

  17. Direct observation of ballistic Andreev reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Klapwijk, T. M.; Ryabchun, S. A.

    2014-12-15

    An overview is presented of experiments on ballistic electrical transport in inhomogeneous superconducting systems which are controlled by the process of Andreev reflection. The initial experiments based on the coexistence of a normal phase and a superconducting phase in the intermediate state led to the concept itself. It was followed by a focus on geometrically inhomogeneous systems like point contacts, which provided a very clear manifestation of the energy and direction dependence of the Andreev reflection process. The point contacts have recently evolved towards the atomic scale owing to the use of mechanical break-junctions, revealing a very detailed dependence of Andreev reflection on the macroscopic phase of the superconducting state. In present-day research, the superconducting in homogeneity is constructed by clean room technology and combines superconducting materials, for example, with low-dimensional materials and topological insulators. Alternatively, the superconductor is combined with nano-objects, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, or semiconducting nanowires. Each of these “inhomogeneous systems” provides a very interesting range of properties, all rooted in some manifestation of Andreev reflection.

  18. Relaxed Observance of Traditional Marriage Rules Allows Social Connectivity without Loss of Genetic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Elsa G; Hazelton, Martin L; Karafet, Tatiana M; Lansing, J Stephen; Sudoyo, Herawati; Cox, Murray P

    2015-09-01

    Marriage rules, the community prescriptions that dictate who an individual can or cannot marry, are extremely diverse and universally present in traditional societies. A major focus of research in the early decades of modern anthropology, marriage rules impose social and economic forces that help structure societies and forge connections between them. However, in those early anthropological studies, the biological benefits or disadvantages of marriage rules could not be determined. We revisit this question by applying a novel simulation framework and genome-wide data to explore the effects of Asymmetric Prescriptive Alliance, an elaborate set of marriage rules that has been a focus of research for many anthropologists. Simulations show that strict adherence to these marriage rules reduces genetic diversity on the autosomes, X chromosome and mitochondrial DNA, but relaxed compliance produces genetic diversity similar to random mating. Genome-wide data from the Indonesian community of Rindi, one of the early study populations for Asymmetric Prescriptive Alliance, are more consistent with relaxed compliance than strict adherence. We therefore suggest that, in practice, marriage rules are treated with sufficient flexibility to allow social connectivity without significant degradation of biological diversity.

  19. Relaxed Observance of Traditional Marriage Rules Allows Social Connectivity without Loss of Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Elsa G.; Hazelton, Martin L.; Karafet, Tatiana M.; Lansing, J. Stephen; Sudoyo, Herawati; Cox, Murray P.

    2015-01-01

    Marriage rules, the community prescriptions that dictate who an individual can or cannot marry, are extremely diverse and universally present in traditional societies. A major focus of research in the early decades of modern anthropology, marriage rules impose social and economic forces that help structure societies and forge connections between them. However, in those early anthropological studies, the biological benefits or disadvantages of marriage rules could not be determined. We revisit this question by applying a novel simulation framework and genome-wide data to explore the effects of Asymmetric Prescriptive Alliance, an elaborate set of marriage rules that has been a focus of research for many anthropologists. Simulations show that strict adherence to these marriage rules reduces genetic diversity on the autosomes, X chromosome and mitochondrial DNA, but relaxed compliance produces genetic diversity similar to random mating. Genome-wide data from the Indonesian community of Rindi, one of the early study populations for Asymmetric Prescriptive Alliance, are more consistent with relaxed compliance than strict adherence. We therefore suggest that, in practice, marriage rules are treated with sufficient flexibility to allow social connectivity without significant degradation of biological diversity. PMID:25968961

  20. Development of a Computer-Based System for the Unobtrusive Collection of Direct Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Happy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a computer-based system, the "Direct Observation Data System" (DODS), which allows for unobtrusive collection of direct observational data in the classroom and natural settings. At present, DODS consists of event-recording and duration-recording programs which can be remotely accessed. The device has implications for…

  1. Direct Behavioral Observation in School Settings: Bringing Science to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nock, Matthew K.; Kurtz, Steven M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Schools provide a useful, controlled setting for evaluating child behavior problems, yet direct observational coding procedures evaluated by child researchers have not been widely incorporated by practicing clinicians. This article provides a summary of procedures useful to clinicians performing direct behavioral observation in school settings. We…

  2. Direct allowance for the effects of thermodynamic nonideality in the quantitative characterization of protein self-association by osmometry.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R; Winzor, Donald J

    2009-12-01

    A procedure is described for the direct analysis of osmotic pressure data for reversibly dimerizing proteins that makes allowance for effects of thermodynamic nonideality on the statistical-mechanical basis of the potential-of-mean-force between molecules. Detailed consideration is also given to calculation of the magnitudes of the required virial coefficients. After illustration of the approach with analysis of simulated osmotic pressure data, the method is used to obtain dimerization constants from published osmotic pressure data for soybean proteinase inhibitor, hemoglobin and alpha-chymotrypsin. PMID:19782460

  3. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05-0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  4. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-14

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05–0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  5. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05–0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity. PMID:25829566

  6. Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-02-18

    Biological processes can occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales; from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Although no single experimental method can fully cover this entire phase space, many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on the very fast timescales and very small length scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast x-ray or electron pulses are now available that are expected to reveal new mechanistic insights for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by three-dimensional crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize smaller protein samples such as single particles or two-dimensional crystals that mimic the target protein’s native environment. These samples aren’t typically amenable to x-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has successfully imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years and permits data acquisition using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have only visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy capabilities into dynamics. A new 2nd generation DTEM that is currently being constructed has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on the micro- and nanosecond timescale. In addition to the enhanced temporal resolution, the DTEM also operates in the pump-probe regime that can permit visualizing reactions propagating in real-time. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to allow direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment.

  7. Direct Observation of Two Proton Radioactivity Using Digital Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Pfutzner, M.; Dominik, Wojciech; Janas, Z.; Miernik, K.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, Henryk; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, Waldemar; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, Mustafa; Stolz, A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently the observation of a new type of spontaneous radioactive decay has been claimed in which two protons are simultaneously ejected by an atomic nucleus from the ground state1,2,3. Experimental data obtained for the extremely neutron-deficient nuclei 45Fe and 54Zn, were interpreted as the first evidence of such a decay mode which has been sought since 1960.4 However, the technique applied in those studies allowed only measurements of the decay time and the total energy released. Particles emitted in the decay were not identified and the conclusions had to be supported by theoretical arguments. Here we show for the first time, directly and unambiguously, that 45Fe indeed disintegrates by two-proton decay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the decay branch of this isotope leads to various particle emission channels including two-proton and three-proton emission. To achieve this result we have developed a new type of detector V the Optical Time Projection Chamber (OTPC) in which digital photography is applied to nuclear physics for the first time. The detector records images of tracks from charged particles, allowing for their unambiguous identification and the reconstruction of decay events in three dimensions. This new and simple technique provides a powerful method to identify exotic decay channels involving emission of charged particles. It is expected that further studies with the OTPC device will yield important information on nuclei located at and beyond the proton drip-line, thus providing new material for testing and improving models of very unstable atomic nuclei.

  8. Plasmon Surface Polariton Dispersion by Direct Optical Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalen, J. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes several simple experiments that can be used to observe directly the dispersion curve of plasmon surface polaritons (PSP) on flat metal surfaces. A method is described of observing the increonental change in the wave vector of the PSP due to coatings that differ in thickness by a few nanometers. (Author/CS)

  9. Evaluation of Handheld Computers for Direct Systematic Classroom Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Michael W.; Gouwens, Donald A.; Schuh, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    Through this study the authors evaluate outcomes associated with the use of handheld computers by interventionists in improving the efficiency of direct systematic classroom observation. Information from observations is used by interventionists for treatment planning and evaluation. In this study, interventionists were trained to use personal…

  10. Applying direct observation to model workflow and assess adoption.

    PubMed

    Unertl, Kim M; Weinger, Matthew B; Johnson, Kevin B

    2006-01-01

    Lack of understanding about workflow can impair health IT system adoption. Observational techniques can provide valuable information about clinical workflow. A pilot study using direct observation was conducted in an outpatient chronic disease clinic. The goals of the study were to assess workflow and information flow and to develop a general model of workflow and information behavior. Over 55 hours of direct observation showed that the pilot site utilized many of the features of the informatics systems available to them, but also employed multiple non-electronic artifacts and workarounds. Gaps existed between clinic workflow and informatics tool workflow, as well as between institutional expectations of informatics tool use and actual use. Concurrent use of both paper-based and electronic systems resulted in duplication of effort and inefficiencies. A relatively short period of direct observation revealed important information about workflow and informatics tool adoption.

  11. Combined use of leaf size and economics traits allows direct comparison of hydrophyte and terrestrial herbaceous adaptive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Simon; Brusa, Guido; Sartori, Matteo; Cerabolini, Bruno E. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Hydrophytes generally exhibit highly acquisitive leaf economics. However, a range of growth forms is evident, from small, free-floating and rapidly growing Lemniden to large, broad-leaved Nymphaeiden, denoting variability in adaptive strategies. Traits used to classify adaptive strategies in terrestrial species, such as canopy height, are not applicable to hydrophytes. We hypothesize that hydrophyte leaf size traits and economics exhibit sufficient overlap with terrestrial species to allow a common classification of plant functional types, sensu Grime's CSR theory. Methods Leaf morpho-functional traits were measured for 61 species from 47 water bodies in lowland continental, sub-alpine and alpine bioclimatic zones in southern Europe and compared against the full leaf economics spectrum and leaf size range of terrestrial herbs, and between hydrophyte growth forms. Key Results Hydrophytes differed in the ranges and mean values of traits compared with herbs, but principal components analysis (PCA) demonstrated that both groups shared axes of trait variability: PCA1 encompassed size variation (area and mass), and PCA2 ranged from relatively dense, carbon-rich leaves to nitrogen-rich leaves of high specific leaf area (SLA). Most growth forms exhibited trait syndromes directly equivalent to herbs classified as R adapted, although Nymphaeiden ranged between C and SR adaptation. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that hydrophyte adaptive strategy variation reflects fundamental trade-offs in economics and size that govern all plants, and that hydrophyte adaptive strategies can be directly compared with terrestrial species by combining leaf economics and size traits. PMID:22337079

  12. External occulters for direct observation of exoplanets: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, W.; Schindhelm, E.; Arenberg, J.; Lo, A.; Polidan, R.; Kasdin, J.; Vanderbei, R.; Kilston, S.; Noecker, C.

    2007-09-01

    Perhaps the most compelling piece of science and exploration now under discussion for future space missions is the direct study of planets circling other stars. Indirect means have established planets as common in the universe but have given us a limited view of their actual characteristics. Direct observation holds the potential to map entire planetary systems, view newly forming planets, find Earth-like planets and perform photometry to search for major surface features. Direct observations will also enable spectroscopy of exoplanets and the search for evidence of simple life in the universe. Recent advances in the design of external occulters - starshades that block the light from the star while passing exoplanet light - have lowered their cost and improved their performance to the point where we can now envision a New Worlds Observer that is both buildable and affordable with today's technology. We will summarize recent studies of such missions and show they provide a very attractive alternative near term mission.

  13. Retinex Image Processing: Improved Fidelity To Direct Visual Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.

    1996-01-01

    Recorded color images differ from direct human viewing by the lack of dynamic range compression and color constancy. Research is summarized which develops the center/surround retinex concept originated by Edwin Land through a single scale design to a multi-scale design with color restoration (MSRCR). The MSRCR synthesizes dynamic range compression, color constancy, and color rendition and, thereby, approaches fidelity to direct observation.

  14. Modelling 1-minute directional observations of the global irradiance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, Peter; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Direct and diffuse irradiances from the sky has been collected at 1-minute intervals for about a year from the experimental station at the Technical University of Denmark for the IEA project "Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting". These data were gathered by pyrheliometers tracking the Sun, as well as with apertured pyranometers gathering 1/8th and 1/16th of the light from the sky in 45 degree azimuthal ranges pointed around the compass. The data are gathered in order to develop detailed models of the potentially available solar energy and its variations at high temporal resolution in order to gain a more detailed understanding of the solar resource. This is important for a better understanding of the sub-grid scale cloud variation that cannot be resolved with climate and weather models. It is also important for optimizing the operation of active solar energy systems such as photovoltaic plants and thermal solar collector arrays, and for passive solar energy and lighting to buildings. We present regression-based modelling of the observed data, and focus, here, on the statistical properties of the model fits. Using models based on the one hand on what is found in the literature and on physical expectations, and on the other hand on purely statistical models, we find solutions that can explain up to 90% of the variance in global radiation. The models leaning on physical insights include terms for the direct solar radiation, a term for the circum-solar radiation, a diffuse term and a term for the horizon brightening/darkening. The purely statistical model is found using data- and formula-validation approaches picking model expressions from a general catalogue of possible formulae. The method allows nesting of expressions, and the results found are dependent on and heavily constrained by the cross-validation carried out on statistically independent testing and training data-sets. Slightly better fits -- in terms of variance explained -- is found using the purely

  15. Routine hand hygiene audit by direct observation: has nemesis arrived?

    PubMed

    Gould, D J; Drey, N S; Creedon, S

    2011-04-01

    Infection prevention and control experts have expended valuable health service time developing and implementing tools to audit health workers' hand hygiene compliance by direct observation. Although described as the 'gold standard' approach to hand hygiene audit, this method is labour intensive and may be inaccurate unless performed by trained personnel who are regularly monitored to ensure quality control. New technological devices have been developed to generate 'real time' data, but the cost of installing them and using them during routine patient care has not been evaluated. Moreover, they do not provide as much information about the hand hygiene episode or the context in which hand hygiene has been performed as direct observation. Uptake of hand hygiene products offers an inexpensive alternative to direct observation. Although product uptake would not provide detailed information about the hand hygiene episode or local barriers to compliance, it could be used as a continuous monitoring tool. Regular inspection of the data by infection prevention and control teams and clinical staff would indicate when and where direct investigation of practice by direct observation and questioning of staff should be targeted by highly trained personnel to identify local problems and improve practice.

  16. Pain behavior observation: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Keefe, F J

    2000-01-01

    Individuals who have pain engage in certain pain-related behaviors that tend to communicate their pain to others. There is growing recognition that the careful observation of such pain behaviors is an important component of a comprehensive pain assessment. This article provides an overview of the current status of behavioral observation methods used to assess pain behavior. The first half of this article describes and evaluates the most commonly used pain behavior observation methods. These include self-observation methods such as activity diaries, and direct observation methods such as the use of standard behavior sampling methods and naturalistic observation methods. The second half of the article discusses several important future clinical and research applications of pain behavior observation methods. The need to develop practical, clinical methods for incorporating pain behavior observation methods into practice settings is emphasized. Important future research topics include studying the social context of pain behavior (eg, by examining how spouses respond to displays of pain behavior), examining the predictive validity of pain behavior (ie, how observed pain behaviors predict future disability and impairment), and identifying pain behavior subgroups within heterogeneous chronic pain populations. Further development and refinement of pain behavior observation methods is likely to increase our understanding of the varied ways that patients adapt to persistent pain.

  17. Positively charged nanogold label allows the observation of fine cell filopodia and flagella in solution by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Teramoto, Kanae; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-02-01

    Optical microscopy is generally the first choice to observe microbes and cells. However, its resolution is not always sufficient to reveal specific target structures, such as flagella and pili, which are only nanometers wide. ASEM is an attractive higher resolution alternative, as the sample is observed in aqueous solution at atmospheric pressure. Sample pretreatment for ASEM only comprises simple tasks including fixation, gold labeling, and reagent exchange, taking less than 1 h in total. The lengthy sample pretreatments often required for more classical electron microscopies, such as embedding and dehydration, are unnecessary, and native morphology is preserved. In this study, positively charged nanogold particles were used to label the surfaces of bacteria and cultured animal cells, exploiting their net negative surface charge. After gold enhancement to increase the size of the nanogold particles, ASEM imaging of the bacteria in aqueous solution revealed pili and delicate spiral flagella. This natural shape contrasts starkly with images of dried flagella recorded by standard SEM. Positively charged nanogold labeled the plasma membrane of cultured COS7 cells, and after enhancement allowed filopodia as thin as 100 nm in diameter to be clearly visualized. Based on these studies, ASEM combined with positively charged nanogold labeling promises to become an important tool for the study of cell morphology and dynamics in the near future.

  18. New Directions: Emerging Satellite Observations of Above-cloud Aerosols and Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar and passive sensors with multi-wavelength and polarization capabilities onboard the A-Train provide unprecedented opportunities of observing above-cloud aerosols and direct radiative forcing. Significant progress has been made in recent years in exploring these new aerosol remote sensing capabilities and generating unique datasets. The emerging observations will advance the understanding of aerosol climate forcing.

  19. Direct observation of condensate and vortex confinement in nanostructured superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, M.; Serrier-Garcia, L.; Perini, M.; Van de Vondel, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we report a scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of lithographically defined superconducting nanosquares. The obtained spectroscopic maps reveal the spatial evolution of both the superconducting condensate and the screening currents as a function of the applied magnetic field. The symmetry of the nanostructure is imposed on the condensate and it controls the distribution of the vortices inside the nanosquare. Our local study allows exploring the impact of small structural defects, omnipresent in these kind of structures, on both the supercurrent and vortex distribution. As a result, direct experimental evidence of vortex pinning and current crowding at the nanoscale has been obtained.

  20. SPICA Coronagraph for the Direct Observation of Exo-Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; S. W. Group

    2011-12-01

    We present a mid-infrared coronagraph which targets the direct observation of exo-planets for the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). Study and experiment are ongoing for an coronagraph for SPICA, and this coronagraph is currently regarded as an option of the focal plane instruments. The primary target of the SPICA coronagraph is the direct imaging and spectroscopy of exo-planets in infrared. The SPICA mission gives us a unique opportunity for high-contrast observations, because of its large telescope aperture (3.5 m), the clean point-spread function provided by the monolithic telescope mirrors, and the capability for infrared observations from space. Laboratory experiments were performed with a visible laser to demonstrate the principles of the coronagraph. In an experiment using a binary-shaped pupil coronagraph, it was demonstrated that the contrast exceeded the requirement of SPICA, 10×10-6. A coronagraph obtained using a binary-shaped pupil mask is a baseline solution for SPICA because of its feasibility and robustness, while the use of a phase-induced amplitude apodization/binary-mask hybrid coronagraph is also considered as an option. Further developments are ongoing in order to realize a mid-infrared coronagraph for SPICA. Considering SPICA to be an essential platform for coronagraphic studies, and taking into account the progress of key technologies, we propose to develop a mid-infrared coronagraph instrument for SPICA and to perform the direct observation of exo-planets by using it.

  1. Direct Observations of the Evolution of Polar Cap Ionization Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, B.; Lockwood, M. M.; Hu, H.; Moen, J. I.; Ruohoniemi, J.; Thomas, E. G.; Zhang, S.; Yang, H.; Liu, R.; McWilliams, K. A.; Baker, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Patches of ionization are common in the polar ionosphere where their motion and associated density gradients give variable disturbances to High Frequency (HF) radio communications, over-the-horizon radar location errors, and disruption and errors to satellite navigation and communication. Their formation and evolution are poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report direct observations of the full evolution of patches during a geomagnetic storm, including formation, polar cap entry, transpolar evolution, polar cap exit, and sunward return flow. Our observations show that modulation of nightside reconnection in the substorm cycle of the magnetosphere helps form the gaps between patches where steady convection would give a 'tongue' of ionization (TOI).

  2. Microcrack closure in rocks under stress - Direct observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batzle, M. L.; Simmons, G.; Siegfried, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Direct observations of the closure of microcracks in rocks under increasing stress are reported. Uniaxial stresses up to 300 bars were applied to untreated and previously heated samples of Westerly granite and Frederick diabase by a small hydraulic press which fit entirely within a scanning electron microscope. Crack closure characteristics are found to depend on crack orientation, with cracks perpendicular to the applied stress closing and those parallel tending to open, as well as crack aspect ratio, crack intersection properties, stress concentrations and surface roughness. Uniaxial and hydrostatic stress measurements are found to be strongly dependent on fracture content as observed by SEM, and the observed hysteresis in strain measurements in the first stress cycles is also related to microscopic processes

  3. Predicted and observed directional dependence of meteoroid/debris impacts on LDEF thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drolshagen, Gerhard

    1993-01-01

    The number of impacts from meteoroids and space debris particles to the various LDEF rows is calculated using ESABASE/DEBRIS, a 3-D numerical analysis tool. It is based on recent reference environment flux models and includes geometrical and directional effects. A comparison of model predictions and actual observations is made for penetrations of the thermal blankets which covered the UHCR experiment. The thermal blankets were located on all LDEF rows, except 3, 9, and 12. Because of their uniform composition and thickness, these blankets allow a direct analysis of the directional dependence of impacts and provide a test case for the latest meteoroid and debris flux models.

  4. Direct observation of intermolecular interactions mediated by hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Luigi; Thämer, Martin; Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-07-01

    Although intermolecular interactions are ubiquitous in physicochemical phenomena, their dynamics have proven difficult to observe directly, and most experiments rely on indirect measurements. Using broadband two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), we have measured the influence of hydrogen bonding on the intermolecular vibrational coupling between dimerized N-methylacetamide molecules. In addition to strong intramolecular coupling between N-H and C=O oscillators, cross-peaks in the broadband 2DIR spectrum appearing upon dimerization reveal strong intermolecular coupling that changes the character of the vibrations. In addition, dimerization changes the effects of intramolecular coupling, resulting in Fermi resonances between high and low-frequency modes. These results illustrate how hydrogen bonding influences the interplay of inter- and intramolecular vibrations, giving rise to correlated nuclear motions and significant changes in the vibrational structure of the amide group. These observations have direct impact on modeling and interpreting the IR spectra of proteins. In addition, they illustrate a general approach to direct molecular characterization of intermolecular interactions.

  5. Direct observation of intermolecular interactions mediated by hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    De Marco, Luigi; Reppert, Mike; Thämer, Martin; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-07-21

    Although intermolecular interactions are ubiquitous in physicochemical phenomena, their dynamics have proven difficult to observe directly, and most experiments rely on indirect measurements. Using broadband two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), we have measured the influence of hydrogen bonding on the intermolecular vibrational coupling between dimerized N-methylacetamide molecules. In addition to strong intramolecular coupling between N–H and C=O oscillators, cross-peaks in the broadband 2DIR spectrum appearing upon dimerization reveal strong intermolecular coupling that changes the character of the vibrations. In addition, dimerization changes the effects of intramolecular coupling, resulting in Fermi resonances between high and low-frequency modes. These results illustrate how hydrogen bonding influences the interplay of inter- and intramolecular vibrations, giving rise to correlated nuclear motions and significant changes in the vibrational structure of the amide group. These observations have direct impact on modeling and interpreting the IR spectra of proteins. In addition, they illustrate a general approach to direct molecular characterization of intermolecular interactions.

  6. Direct Observation of Luminescent Silver Clusters Confined in Faujasite Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Altantzis, Thomas; Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Baekelant, Wouter; Martinez, Gerardo T; Abakumov, Artem M; Tendeloo, Gustaaf Van; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Bals, Sara; Hofkens, Johan

    2016-08-23

    One of the ultimate goals in the study of metal clusters is the correlation between the atomic-scale organization and their physicochemical properties. However, direct observation of the atomic organization of such minuscule metal clusters is heavily hindered by radiation damage imposed by the different characterization techniques. We present direct evidence of the structural arrangement, at an atomic level, of luminescent silver species stabilized in faujasite (FAU) zeolites using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Two different silver clusters were identified in Ag-FAU zeolites, a trinuclear silver species associated with green emission and a tetranuclear silver species related to yellow emission. By combining direct imaging with complementary information obtained from X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis, we were able to elucidate the main differences at an atomic scale between luminescent (heat-treated) and nonluminescent (cation-exchanged) Ag-FAU zeolites. It is expected that such insights will trigger the directed synthesis of functional metal nanocluster-zeolite composites with tailored luminescent properties. PMID:27391548

  7. Direct observation of lubricant additives using tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunyun; Sanchez, Carlos; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Liang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Lubricants play important roles in daily activities such as driving, walking, and cooking. The current understanding of mechanisms of lubrication, particularly in mechanical systems, has been limited by the lack of capability in direct observation. Here, we report an in situ approach to directly observe the motion of additive particles in grease under the influence of shear. Using the K-edge tomography technique, it is possible to detect particular additives in a grease and observe their distribution through 3D visualization. A commercial grease as a reference was studied with and without an inorganic additive of Fe3O4 microparticles. The results showed that it was possible to identify these particles and track their movement. Under a shear stress, Fe3O4 particles were found to adhere to the edge of calcium complex thickeners commonly used in grease. Due to sliding, the grease formed a film with increased density. This approach enables in-line monitoring of a lubricant and future investigation in mechanisms of lubrication.

  8. Direct observation of closure domain wall mediated spin waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mozooni, Babak McCord, Jeffrey

    2015-07-27

    The generation and guiding of spin waves from and by magnetic domain walls are demonstrated. The spin waves radiate from pinned and oscillating magnetic closure domain walls and propagate linearly along a narrow path formed by the surrounding 180° asymmetric Bloch domain walls. The propagating spin wave modes are directly visualized by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr microscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. A linear relationship between excitation frequency, wavelength, and number of spin waves per domain exists. Independent of the field excitation frequency, a constant phase velocity of spin waves propagation is obtained. Spin waves characteristics can be tuned by varying the magnetic domain dynamics, allowing for variable spin wave characteristics with magnetic field characteristics and histories.

  9. Direct observation of closure domain wall mediated spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozooni, Babak; McCord, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The generation and guiding of spin waves from and by magnetic domain walls are demonstrated. The spin waves radiate from pinned and oscillating magnetic closure domain walls and propagate linearly along a narrow path formed by the surrounding 180° asymmetric Bloch domain walls. The propagating spin wave modes are directly visualized by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr microscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. A linear relationship between excitation frequency, wavelength, and number of spin waves per domain exists. Independent of the field excitation frequency, a constant phase velocity of spin waves propagation is obtained. Spin waves characteristics can be tuned by varying the magnetic domain dynamics, allowing for variable spin wave characteristics with magnetic field characteristics and histories.

  10. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves.

    PubMed

    Dockrey, J A; Horsley, S A R; Hooper, I R; Sambles, J R; Hibbins, A P

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  11. Direct state reconstruction with coupling-deformed pointer observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuanmin; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Wu, Shengjun

    2016-06-01

    Direct state tomography (DST) using weak measurements has received wide attention. Based on the concept of coupling-deformed pointer observables presented by Zhang et al. [Y.-X. Zhang, S. Wu, and Z.-B. Chen, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032128 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032128], a modified direct state tomography (MDST) is proposed, examined, and compared with other typical state tomography schemes. MDST has exact validity for measurements of any strength. We identify the strength needed to attain the highest efficiency level of MDST by using statistical theory. MDST is much more efficient than DST in the sense that far fewer samples are needed to reach DST's level of reconstruction accuracy. Moreover, MDST has no inherent bias when compared to DST.

  12. Direct observation of negative-index microwave surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Dockrey, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating in a negative-index material have wave-front propagation (wavevector, k) opposite in direction to that of energy flow (Poynting vector, S). Here we present an experimental realisation at microwave frequencies of an analogous surface wave phenomenon whereby a metasurface supports a surface mode that has two possible wavevector eigenstates within a narrow band of frequencies: one that supports surface waves with positive mode index, and another that supports surface waves with negative mode index. Phase sensitive measurements of the near-field of surface waves across the metasurface show the contrasting spatial evolution of the two eigenstates, providing a unique opportunity to directly observe the negative-index phenomenon. PMID:26903284

  13. Method for observing phase objects without halos or directional shadows.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshimasa; Kajitani, Kazuo; Ohde, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    A new microscopy method for observing phase objects without halos or directional shadows is proposed. The method is based on transformation of the surface profile of phase objects into a light intensity pattern. The key optical element is an annular aperture at the front focal plane of a condenser. The light flux passing through the annular aperture is changed by the specimen's surface profile and then passes through an objective and contributes to image formation. Theory and experimental results are presented. Phase images of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with clear outlines were obtained with this method.

  14. Direct observation of Kelvin waves excited by quantized vortex reconnection.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Enrico; Meichle, David P; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Hormoz, Sahand; Lathrop, Daniel P

    2014-03-25

    Quantized vortices are key features of quantum fluids such as superfluid helium and Bose-Einstein condensates. The reconnection of quantized vortices and subsequent emission of Kelvin waves along the vortices are thought to be central to dissipation in such systems. By visualizing the motion of submicron particles dispersed in superfluid (4)He, we have directly observed the emission of Kelvin waves from quantized vortex reconnection. We characterize one event in detail, using dimensionless similarity coordinates, and compare it with several theories. Finally, we give evidence for other examples of wavelike behavior in our system.

  15. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Falus, Peter; Preost, Sylvain

    2008-09-26

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  16. Direct observation of thermal relaxation in artificial spin ice.

    PubMed

    Farhan, A; Derlet, P M; Kleibert, A; Balan, A; Chopdekar, R V; Wyss, M; Perron, J; Scholl, A; Nolting, F; Heyderman, L J

    2013-08-01

    We study the thermal relaxation of artificial spin ice with photoemission electron microscopy, and are able to directly observe how such a system finds its way from an energetically excited state to the ground state. On plotting vertex-type populations as a function of time, we can characterize the relaxation, which occurs in two stages, namely a string and a domain regime. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations agree well with the temporal evolution of the magnetic state when including disorder, and the experimental results can be explained by considering the effective interaction energy associated with the separation of pairs of vertex excitations. PMID:23952441

  17. Direct observation of Kelvin waves excited by quantized vortex reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Fonda, Enrico; Meichle, David P.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Hormoz, Sahand; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Quantized vortices are key features of quantum fluids such as superfluid helium and Bose–Einstein condensates. The reconnection of quantized vortices and subsequent emission of Kelvin waves along the vortices are thought to be central to dissipation in such systems. By visualizing the motion of submicron particles dispersed in superfluid 4He, we have directly observed the emission of Kelvin waves from quantized vortex reconnection. We characterize one event in detail, using dimensionless similarity coordinates, and compare it with several theories. Finally, we give evidence for other examples of wavelike behavior in our system. PMID:24704878

  18. Direct observation of thitherto unobservable quantum phenomena by using electrons.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Akira

    2005-10-18

    Fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics, which were discussed only theoretically as "thought experiments" in the 1920s and 1930s, have begun to frequently show up in nanoscopic regions owing to recent rapid progress in advanced technologies. Quantum phenomena were once regarded as the ultimate factors limiting further miniaturization trends of microstructured electronic devices, but now they have begun to be actively used as the principles for new devices such as quantum computers. To directly observe what had been unobservable quantum phenomena, we have tried to develop bright and monochromatic electron beams for the last 35 years. Every time the brightness of an electron beam improved, fundamental experiments in quantum mechanics became possible, and quantum phenomena became observable by using the wave nature of electrons.

  19. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  20. Direct observations of the evolution of polar cap ionization patches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-He; Zhang, Bei-Chen; Lockwood, Michael; Hu, Hong-Qiao; Moen, Jøran; Ruohoniemi, J Michael; Thomas, Evan G; Zhang, Shun-Rong; Yang, Hui-Gen; Liu, Rui-Yuan; McWilliams, Kathryn A; Baker, Joseph B H

    2013-03-29

    Patches of ionization are common in the polar ionosphere, where their motion and associated density gradients give variable disturbances to high-frequency (HF) radio communications, over-the-horizon radar location errors, and disruption and errors to satellite navigation and communication. Their formation and evolution are poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report direct observations of the full evolution of patches during a geomagnetic storm, including formation, polar cap entry, transpolar evolution, polar cap exit, and sunward return flow. Our observations show that modulation of nightside reconnection in the substorm cycle of the magnetosphere helps form the gaps between patches where steady convection would give a "tongue" of ionization (TOI). PMID:23539601

  1. Direct observation of local atomic order in a metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Guan, Pengfei; Fujita, Takeshi; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Inoue, Akihisa; Yavari, Alain Reza; Sakurai, Toshio; Chen, Mingwei

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the atomic configuration of metallic glasses is a long-standing problem in materials science and solid-state physics. So far, only average structural information derived from diffraction and spectroscopic methods has been obtained. Although various atomic models have been proposed in the past fifty years, a direct observation of the local atomic structure in disordered materials has not been achieved. Here we report local atomic configurations of a metallic glass investigated by nanobeam electron diffraction combined with ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Distinct diffraction patterns from individual atomic clusters and their assemblies, which have been theoretically predicted as short- and medium-range order, can be experimentally observed. This study provides compelling evidence of the local atomic order in the disordered material and has important implications in understanding the atomic mechanisms of metallic-glass formation and properties.

  2. Direct observation of thitherto unobservable quantum phenomena by using electrons

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics, which were discussed only theoretically as “thought experiments” in the 1920s and 1930s, have begun to frequently show up in nanoscopic regions owing to recent rapid progress in advanced technologies. Quantum phenomena were once regarded as the ultimate factors limiting further miniaturization trends of microstructured electronic devices, but now they have begun to be actively used as the principles for new devices such as quantum computers. To directly observe what had been unobservable quantum phenomena, we have tried to develop bright and monochromatic electron beams for the last 35 years. Every time the brightness of an electron beam improved, fundamental experiments in quantum mechanics became possible, and quantum phenomena became observable by using the wave nature of electrons. PMID:16150719

  3. Directly observable optical properties of sprites in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bór, József

    2013-04-01

    Luminous optical emissions accompanying streamer-based natural electric breakdown processes initiating in the mesosphere are called sprites. 489 sprite events have been observed with a TV frame rate video system in Central Europe from Sopron (47.68N, 16.58E, 230 m MSL), Hungary between 2007 and 2009. On the basis of these observations, characteristic morphological properties of sprites, i.e. basic forms (e.g. column, carrot, angel, etc.) as well as common morphological features (e.g. tendrils, glows, puffs, beads, etc.), have been identified. Probable time sequences of streamer propagation directions were associated with each of the basic sprite forms. It is speculated that different sequences of streamer propagation directions can result in very similar final sprite shapes. The number and type variety of sprite elements appearing in an event as well as the total optical duration of an event was analyzed statistically. Jellyfish and dancing sprite events were considered as special subsets of sprite clusters. It was found that more than 90% of the recorded sprite elements appeared in clusters rather than alone and more than half of the clusters contained more than one basic sprite forms. The analysis showed that jellyfish sprites and clusters of column sprites featuring glows and tendrils do not tend to have optical lifetimes longer than 80 ms. Such very long optical lifetimes have not been observed in sprite clusters containing more than 25 elements of any type, either. In contrast to clusters containing sprite entities of only one form, sprite events showing more sprite forms seem to have extended optical durations more likely. The need for further investigation and for finding theoretical concepts to link these observations to electric conditions ambient for sprite formation is emphasized.

  4. Direct observation of photoinduced bent nitrosyl excited-state complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Steele, Ryan P.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-06-28

    Ground state structures with side-on nitrosyl ({eta}{sup 2}-NO) and isonitrosyl (ON) ligands have been observed in a variety of transition-metal complexes. In contrast, excited state structures with bent-NO ligands have been proposed for years but never directly observed. Here we use picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modeling to study the photochemistry of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO), a model transition-metal-NO compound. Surprisingly, we have observed no evidence for ON and {eta}{sup 2}-NO structural isomers, but have observed two bent-NO complexes. DFT modeling of the ground and excited state potentials indicates that the bent-NO complexes correspond to triplet excited states. Photolysis of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO) with a 400-nm pump pulse leads to population of a manifold of excited states which decay to form an excited state triplet bent-NO complex within 1 ps. This structure relaxes to the ground triplet state in ca. 350 ps to form a second bent-NO structure.

  5. Cylindrical 3D video display observable from all directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tomohiro; Kajiki, Yoshihiro; Honda, Toshio; Sato, Makoto

    2000-05-01

    We propose a 3D video displaying technique that multiple viewers can observe 3D images from 360 degrees of arc horizontally without 3D glasses. This technique uses a cylindrical parallax barrier and 1D light source array. We have developed an experimental display using this technique and have demonstrated 3D images observable form 360 degrees of arc horizontally without 3D glasses. Since this technique is based on the parallax panoramagram, the parallax number and resolution are limited by the diffraction at the parallax barrier. To avoid these limits, we improved the technique by revolving the parallax barrier. We have been developing a new experimental display using this improved technique. The display is capable of displaying cylindrical 3D video images within the diameter of 100 mm and the height of 128 mm. Images are described with the resolution of 1254 pixels circularly and 128 pixels vertically, and refreshed at 30Hz. Each pixel has the viewing angle of 60 degrees and that is divided into 70 views, therefore the angular parallax interval of each pixel is less than 1 degree. In such a case, observers may barely perceive parallax discretely. The pixels are arranged on a cylinder surface, therefore produced 3D images can be observed from all directions.

  6. Direct microscopic observation of forward osmosis membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yining; Wicaksana, Filicia; Tang, Chuyang Y; Fane, Anthony G

    2010-09-15

    This study describes the application of a noninvasive direct microscopic observation method for characterizing fouling of a forward osmosis (FO) membrane. The effect of the draw solution concentration, membrane orientation, and feed spacer on FO fouling was systematically investigated in a cross-flow setup using latex particles as model foulant in the feedwater. Higher draw solution (DS) concentrations (and thus increased flux levels) resulted in dramatic increase in the surface coverage by latex particles, suggesting that the critical flux concept might be applicable even for the osmotically driven FO process. Under identical draw solution concentrations, the active-layer-facing-the-feed-solution orientation (AL-FS) experienced significantly less fouling compared to the alternative orientation. This may be explained by the lower water flux in AL-FS, which is consistent with the critical flux concept. The use of a feed spacer not only dramatically enhanced the initial flux of the FO membrane, but also significantly improved the flux stability during FO fouling. Despite such beneficial effects of using the feed spacer, a significant amount of particle accumulation was found near the spacer filament, suggesting further opportunities for improved spacer design. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first direct microscopic observation study on FO fouling.

  7. Direct Observation Assessment of Milestones: Problems with Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Meghan; Kedia, Raashee; Promes, Susan B.; Swoboda, Thomas; O’Rourke, Kevin; Green, Walter; Liu, Rachel; Stansfield, Brent; Santen, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emergency medicine (EM) milestones are used to assess residents’ progress. While some milestone validity evidence exists, there is a lack of standardized tools available to reliably assess residents. Inherent to this is a concern that we may not be truly measuring what we intend to assess. The purpose of this study was to design a direct observation milestone assessment instrument supported by validity and reliability evidence. In addition, such a tool would further lend validity evidence to the EM milestones by demonstrating their accurate measurement. Methods This was a multi-center, prospective, observational validity study conducted at eight institutions. The Critical Care Direct Observation Tool (CDOT) was created to assess EM residents during resuscitations. This tool was designed using a modified Delphi method focused on content, response process, and internal structure validity. Paying special attention to content validity, the CDOT was developed by an expert panel, maintaining the use of the EM milestone wording. We built response process and internal consistency by piloting and revising the instrument. Raters were faculty who routinely assess residents on the milestones. A brief training video on utilization of the instrument was completed by all. Raters used the CDOT to assess simulated videos of three residents at different stages of training in a critical care scenario. We measured reliability using Fleiss’ kappa and interclass correlations. Results Two versions of the CDOT were used: one used the milestone levels as global rating scales with anchors, and the second reflected a current trend of a checklist response system. Although the raters who used the CDOT routinely rate residents in their practice, they did not score the residents’ performances in the videos comparably, which led to poor reliability. The Fleiss’ kappa of each of the items measured on both versions of the CDOT was near zero. Conclusion The validity and

  8. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panov, G; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-01

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi(b)- (Xi(b)+). We reconstruct the decay Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, with J/psi-->mu+mu-, and Xi--->Lambdapi--->ppi-pi- in pp collisions at square root of s =1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat)(-0.4)(+1.9)(syst) Xi(b)- candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat) +/- 0.015(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigma, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda, we measure the relative rate sigma(Xi(b-) x B(Xi)b})- -->J/psiXi-)/sigma(Lambda(b)) x B(Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda) = 0.28+/-0.09(stat)(-0.08)(+0.09)(syst). PMID:17930744

  9. Direct molecular dynamics observation of protein folding transition state ensemble.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Stanley, H Eugene; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2002-01-01

    The concept of the protein transition state ensemble (TSE), a collection of the conformations that have 50% probability to convert rapidly to the folded state and 50% chance to rapidly unfold, constitutes the basis of the modern interpretation of protein engineering experiments. It has been conjectured that conformations constituting the TSE in many proteins are the expanded and distorted forms of the native state built around a specific folding nucleus. This view has been supported by a number of on-lattice and off-lattice simulations. Here we report a direct observation and characterization of the TSE by molecular dynamic folding simulations of the C-Src SH3 domain, a small protein that has been extensively studied experimentally. Our analysis reveals a set of key interactions between residues, conserved by evolution, that must be formed to enter the kinetic basin of attraction of the native state. PMID:12496119

  10. Direct observation of acoustic oscillations in InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mariager, Simon O; Khakhulin, Dmitry; Lemke, Henrik T; Kjaer, Kasper S; Guerin, Laurent; Nuccio, Laura; Sørensen, Claus B; Nielsen, Martin M; Feidenhans'l, Robert

    2010-07-14

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity are used to directly measure three different acoustic oscillations of InAs nanowires. The oscillations are excited by a femtosecond laser pulse and evolve at three different time scales. We measure the absolute scale of the initial radial expansion of the fundamental breathing eigenmode and determine the frequency by transient optical reflectivity. For the extensional eigenmode we measure the oscillations of the average radial and axial lattice constants and determine the amplitude of oscillations and the average extension. Finally we observe a bending motion of the nanowires. The frequencies of the eigenmodes are in good agreements with predictions made by continuum elasticity theory and we find no difference in the speed of sound between the wurtzite nanowires and cubic bulk crystals, but the measured strain is influenced by the interaction between different modes. The wurtzite crystal structure of the nanowires however has an anisotropic thermal expansion.

  11. Dust resuspension under weak wind conditions: direct observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhetiani, O. G.; Gledzer, E. B.; Artamonova, M. S.; Iordanskii, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    Here we report the results of the direct observations of fine scale mineral dust aerosol carried out over extensive sand areas in desertificated lands of Kalmykia in 2007, 2009 and 2010 under conditions of weak wind and strong heating of the surface with near absence of saltation processes. Measurements show that the fine mineral dust aerosol in the chosen region constitutes a considerable fraction of the entire air aerosol in the atmospheric surface layer (in terms of both the number of particles and their mass). Data of fine aerosol mass concentrations are treated on the basis of physical model estimates obtained for fluid dynamic parameters in the viscous thermal boundary layer near the ground surface. The deviations of mass concentrations from background are linked to temperature drop in the thermal layer near the surface and the value of friction velocity.

  12. Direct observation of smectic layers in thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Gao, M; Diorio, N; Weissflog, W; Baumeister, U; Sprunt, S; Gleeson, J T; Jákli, A

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate subnanometer resolution cryo-TEM imaging of smectic layers in the smectic and nematic phases of two bent-core liquid crystals. Our results show perfect periodicity over several hundred layers in the smectic phase and also provide the first direct evidence of smectic clusters on length scales of 30-50 nm in a nematic liquid crystal. The results are corroborated with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The observation of smectic clusters in the nematic phase is of special interest in bent-core liquid crystals, where the smectic clusters are stable over wide temperature ranges, in contrast to the well-known pretransitional "cybotactic" clusters that appear only in the vicinity of a bulk smectic phase. The means to characterize and manipulate this nanoscale molecular order could open up completely new liquid crystal-based technologies.

  13. Direct observation of the CRAND proton radiation belt source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of geomagnetically trapped 27-45 MeV protons following the November 2003 magnetic storm show a gradual intensity rise that is interpreted as a direct measurement of the cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) source strength. The intensity rise is simulated by combining the detector response function with a model CRAND source, obtained by drift-averaging neutron intensity from Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The simulation, for 2.4

  14. Responses to the advanced notice of proposed rulemaking EPA published on June 6, 1996 regarding changes to the EPA allowance auctions and elimination of the direct sale

    SciTech Connect

    Critchfield, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    On June 6, 1996, EPA`s Acid Rain Program published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) in the Federal Register seeking comment on: (1) whether to change the design of the annual sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) allowance auctions; (2) whether to change the timing of the allowance auctions; (3) whether to change the requirement that the minimum price of offered allowances must be in whole dollars, and (4) whether EPA should propose the ability to submit allowance transfers electronically. EPA also published on that day a proposed and direct final rule on whether to eliminate the direct sale. This paper documents the issues addressed in the ANPRM, the comments EPA received, and EPA`s responses to those comments. EPA received comments from 14 separate commenters.

  15. Direct observation of electron dynamics in the attosecond domain.

    PubMed

    Föhlisch, A; Feulner, P; Hennies, F; Fink, A; Menzel, D; Sanchez-Portal, D; Echenique, P M; Wurth, W

    2005-07-21

    Dynamical processes are commonly investigated using laser pump-probe experiments, with a pump pulse exciting the system of interest and a second probe pulse tracking its temporal evolution as a function of the delay between the pulses. Because the time resolution attainable in such experiments depends on the temporal definition of the laser pulses, pulse compression to 200 attoseconds (1 as = 10(-18) s) is a promising recent development. These ultrafast pulses have been fully characterized, and used to directly measure light waves and electronic relaxation in free atoms. But attosecond pulses can only be realized in the extreme ultraviolet and X-ray regime; in contrast, the optical laser pulses typically used for experiments on complex systems last several femtoseconds (1 fs = 10(-15) s). Here we monitor the dynamics of ultrafast electron transfer--a process important in photo- and electrochemistry and used in solid-state solar cells, molecular electronics and single-electron devices--on attosecond timescales using core-hole spectroscopy. We push the method, which uses the lifetime of a core electron hole as an internal reference clock for following dynamic processes, into the attosecond regime by focusing on short-lived holes with initial and final states in the same electronic shell. This allows us to show that electron transfer from an adsorbed sulphur atom to a ruthenium surface proceeds in about 320 as. PMID:16034414

  16. Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM.

    PubMed

    Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel D

    2013-02-01

    Biological processes occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales: from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on these very fast and very small scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast X-ray or electron pulses are expected to reveal novel mechanistic details for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by 3D crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize small protein samples such as single particles or 2D crystals that mimic the target protein's native environment. These samples are not typically amenable to X-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy into a dynamic regime using pump-probe imaging. A new second-generation DTEM, which is currently being constructed, has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on micro- and nanosecond timescales. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to enable direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment and visualize reactions propagating in real time. PMID:23315566

  17. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  18. The cosmic microwave background: observing directly the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is a relict of the early universe. Its perfect 2.725K blackbody spectrum demonstrates that the universe underwent a hot, ionized early phase; its anisotropy (about 80 µK rms) provides strong evidence for the presence of photon-matter oscillations in the primeval plasma, shaping the initial phase of the formation of structures; its polarization state (about 3 µK rms), and in particular its rotational component (less than 0.1 µK rms) might allow to study the inflation process in the very early universe, and the physics of extremely high energies, impossible to reach with accelerators. The CMB is observed by means of microwave and mm-wave telescopes, and its measurements drove the development of ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors, sophisticated modulators, and advanced cryogenic and space technologies. Here we focus on the new frontiers of CMB research: the precision measurements of its linear polarization state, at large and intermediate angular scales, and the measurement of the inverse-Compton effect of CMB photons crossing clusters of Galaxies. In this framework, we will describe the formidable experimental challenges faced by ground-based, near-space and space experiments, using large arrays of detectors. We will show that sensitivity and mapping speed improvement obtained with these arrays must be accompanied by a corresponding reduction of systematic effects (especially for CMB polarimeters), and by improved knowledge of foreground emission, to fully exploit the huge scientific potential of these missions.

  19. Microcrack closure in rocks under stress: direct observation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzle, M.L.; Simmons, G.; Siegfried, R.W.

    1980-12-10

    Microcrack closure in rocks under increasing stress was observed directly with a scanning electron microscope. Uniaxial stresses to 300 bars were applied with a small hydraulic press to specimens of Westerly (RI) granite, both unheated and previously heat cycled to 500/sup 0/C, and of Frederick (MD) diabase, heat cycled to 700/sup 0/C. Closure characteristics (rate, final closure pressure, etc.) depend on crack orientation, shape, surface roughness, and on the nature of fracture intersections and interactions. Cracks perpendicular to the applied stress closed while those parallel to the stress tended to open. Long, narrow cracks (low aspect ratio) closed at relatively low pressures. At some intersections, one fracture would open while another simultaneously closed, depending upon their orientations. Many fractures closed uniformly even though offset by other fractures. Local stress concentrations often caused new fracturing at low applied stress. Some fractures were propped open until material lodged inside was crushed. Significant irreversible damage occurred during the first stress cycle. Closure characteristics varied significantly among the samples. The unheated granite has cracks with rough, pitted, and mismatched walls. Only partial closure occurred under stress with many sections remaining open. Crack porosity is reduced but continues to be interconnected. Fractures in the preheated granite and diabase are also irregular, but the walls are well-matched and closure is nearly complete. The cracks in the heated granite closed at lower stresses than in the diabase. As the maximum stress was approached for the heated granite, new transgranular cracks formed and preexisting cracks were enlarged. The variations in closure rate and character were also observed in strain measurements.

  20. Method for observing phase objects without halos and directional shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshimasa; Kajitani, Kazuo; Ohde, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    A new microscopy method for observing phase objects without halos and directional shadows is proposed. The key optical element is an annular aperture at the front focal plane of a condenser with a larger diameter than those used in standard phase contrast microscopy. The light flux passing through the annular aperture is changed by the specimen's surface profile and then passes through an objective and contributes to image formation. This paper presents essential conditions for realizing the method. In this paper, images of colonies formed by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using this method are compared with the conventional phase contrast method and the bright-field method when the NA of the illumination is small to identify differences among these techniques. The outlines of the iPS cells are clearly visible with this method, whereas they are not clearly visible due to halos when using the phase contrast method or due to weak contrast when using the bright-field method. Other images using this method are also presented to demonstrate a capacity of this method: a mouse ovum and superimposition of several different images of mouse iPS cells.

  1. Dust resuspension under weak wind conditions: direct observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhetiani, O. G.; Gledzer, E. B.; Artamonova, M. S.; Iordanskii, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    The results of direct observations of fine mineral dust aerosol (0.15-15 μm) were carried out on extensive sand areas in desertificated lands of Kalmykia in 2007, 2009, and 2010 under conditions of weak wind and strong heating of the surface, almost in the absence of saltation processes. These results show that the fine mineral dust aerosol (0.15-0.5 μm) in the region under consideration contributes considerably to the total aerosol content of the atmospheric surface layer. Data on the mass concentrations of fine aerosol are treated on the basis of physical model estimates obtained for fluid dynamic parameters in the viscous thermal boundary layer near the ground surface. Deviations of these mass concentrations from their background values are related to a temperature drop in the thermal layer at the surface and from the values of friction velocity. For small and moderate values of friction velocity, these mass concentrations increase proportionally to a temperature drop with an exponent of about 0.5, and, for high friction velocities, this exponent becomes negative (~-0.5), which implies a decrease in these concentrations with an increase in a temperature drop.

  2. Direct observation of interface instability during crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.; Feigelson, R. S.; Elwell, D.

    1982-01-01

    The general aim of this investigation was to study interface stability and solute segregation phenomena during crystallization of a model system. Emphasis was to be placed on direct observational studies partly because this offered the possibility at a later stage of performing related experiments under substantially convection-free conditions in the space shuttle. The major achievements described in this report are: (1) the development of a new model system for fundamental studies of crystal growth from the melt and the measurement of a range of material parameters necessary for comparison of experiment with theory. (2) The introduction of a new method of measuring segregation coefficient using absorption of a laser beam by the liquid phase. (3) The comparison of segregation in crystals grown by gradient freezing and by pulling from the melt. (4) The introduction into the theory of solute segregation of an interface field term and comparison with experiment. (5) The introduction of the interface field term into the theories of constitutional supercooling and morphological stability and assessment of its importance.

  3. Genetic-Algorithm Discovery of a Direct-Gap and Optically Allowed Superstructure from Indirect-Gap Si and Ge Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avezac, Mayeul; Luo, Jun-Wei; Chanier, Thomas; Zunger, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Combining two indirect-gap materials—with different electronic and optical gaps—to create a direct gap material represents an ongoing theoretical challenge with potentially rewarding practical implications, such as optoelectronics integration on a single wafer. We provide an unexpected solution to this classic problem, by spatially melding two indirect-gap materials (Si and Ge) into one strongly dipole-allowed direct-gap material. We leverage a combination of genetic algorithms with a pseudopotential Hamiltonian to search through the astronomic number of variants of Sin/Gem/…/Sip/Geq superstructures grown on (001) Si1-xGex. The search reveals a robust configurational motif—SiGe2Si2Ge2SiGen on (001) SixGe1-x substrate (x≤0.4) presenting a direct and dipole-allowed gap resulting from an enhanced Γ-X coupling at the band edges.

  4. Using direct clinical observation to assess the quality of cesarean delivery in Afghanistan: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As part of a National Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) Needs Assessment, a special study was undertaken in July 2010 to examine the quality of cesarean deliveries in Afghanistan and examine the utility of direct clinical observation as an assessment method in low-resource settings. Methods This cross-sectional assessment of the quality of cesareans at 14 facilities in Afghanistan included a survey of surgeons regarding their routine cesarean practices, direct observation of 29 cesarean deliveries and comparison of observations with facility records for 34 additional cesareans conducted during the 3 days prior to the observation period at each facility. For both observed cases and record reviews, we assessed time intervals between specified points of care-arrival to the ward, first evaluation, detection of a complication, decision for cesarean, incision, and birth. Results All time intervals with the exception of “decision to skin incision” were longer in the record reviews than in observed cases. Prior cesarean was the most common primary indication for all cases. All mothers in both groups observed survived through one hour postpartum. Among newborns there were two stillbirths (7%) in observed births and seven (21%) record reviews. Although our sample is too small to show statistical significance, the difference is noteworthy. In six of the reviewed cesareans resulting in stillbirth, a fetal heart rate was recorded in the operating theater, although four were recorded as macerated. For the two fresh stillbirths, the cesarean surgeries were recorded as scheduled and not urgent. Conclusions Direct observation of cesarean deliveries enabled us to assess a number of preoperative, postoperative, and intraoperative procedures that are often not described in medical records in low resource settings. Comparison of observations with findings from provider interviews and facility records allowed us to infer whether observed practices were typical

  5. Direct observation of optical precursors in a cold potassium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heejeong

    This thesis considers how an electromagnetic field propagates through a dispersive linear dielectric in the case when the field is turned on suddenly. It has been predicted nearly 100 years ago that the point in the waveform where the field first turns on (the front) propagates precisely at the speed of light in vacuum. Furthermore, it is predicted that distinct wave-packets develop after the front, but before the arrival of the main part of the field (the main signal). These wave-packets are known as optical precursors. It was believed that precursors are an ultra-fast phenomena, persisting only for a few optical cycles, and that they have an exceedingly small amplitude. I describe a method to increase the duration of optical precursors into the nanosecond range using a dielectric with a narrow resonance. I also show how to increase the precursor amplitude by tuning the carrier frequency of the field near the resonance frequency of the oscillators making up the dielectric medium. The field emerging from the dielectric consists of a several-nanosecond-long spike occurring immediately after the front with near 100% transmission, which subsequently decays to a constant value expected from Beer's Law of absorption. I demonstrate, using a modern asymptotic theory, that the spike consists of both the Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors. Thus, my measurement is the first direct observation of optical precursors. The precursor research might be useful for imaging applications requiring penetrating optical radiation, such as in biological systems, or in optical communication systems. While the asymptotic theory explains qualitatively my observations, I find that there are large quantitative disagreements. I hypothesize that these errors are due to the fact that I use a weakly-dispersive narrow-resonance medium for which this theory has never been tested. I suggest empirical fixes to the theory by comparison to my data. I also compare the asymptotic theory and data to a

  6. Direct Observations Of Microbial Activity At Extreme Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.; Cody, G. D.; Fogel, M.; Hazen, R. M.; Hemley, R. J.; Huntress, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial communities adapt to a wide range of pressures, temperatures, salinities, pH, and oxidation states. Although, significant attention has been focused on the effects of high and low temperature on physiology, there is some evidence that elevated pressure may also manifest interesting effects on cellular physiology, such as enzyme inactivation, cell-membrane breach, and suppression of protein interactions with various substrates. However, exactly how these factors affect intact cells is not well understood. In this study, we have adapted diamond anvil cells to explore the effects of high pressure on microbial life. We used the rate of microbial formate oxidation as a probe of metabolic viability. The utilization of formate by microorganisms is a fundamental metabolic process in anaerobic environments. We monitored in-situ microbial formate oxidation via molecular spectroscopy for Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Furthermore, direct microscopic observations indicate that these cells maintain their ability for cellular division upon decompression from such high pressures. Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. These results imply that pressure may not be a significant impediment to life. The maximum pressure explored in this work is equivalent to a depth of ~ 50 km below Earth's crust, or ~ 160 km in a hypothetical ocean. The pressures encountered at the depths of thick ice caps and deep crustal subsurface may not be a limiting factor for the existence of life. This suggests that deep (water/ice) layers of Europa, Callisto, or Ganymede, subduction zones on Earth, and the

  7. Tracking individual membrane proteins and their biochemistry: The power of direct observation.

    PubMed

    Barden, Adam O; Goler, Adam S; Humphreys, Sara C; Tabatabaei, Samaneh; Lochner, Martin; Ruepp, Marc-David; Jack, Thomas; Simonin, Jonathan; Thompson, Andrew J; Jones, Jeffrey P; Brozik, James A

    2015-11-01

    The advent of single molecule fluorescence microscopy has allowed experimental molecular biophysics and biochemistry to transcend traditional ensemble measurements, where the behavior of individual proteins could not be precisely sampled. The recent explosion in popularity of new super-resolution and super-localization techniques coupled with technical advances in optical designs and fast highly sensitive cameras with single photon sensitivity and millisecond time resolution have made it possible to track key motions, reactions, and interactions of individual proteins with high temporal resolution and spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. Within the purview of membrane proteins and ligand gated ion channels (LGICs), these outstanding advances in single molecule microscopy allow for the direct observation of discrete biochemical states and their fluctuation dynamics. Such observations are fundamentally important for understanding molecular-level mechanisms governing these systems. Examples reviewed here include the effects of allostery on the stoichiometry of ligand binding in the presence of fluorescent ligands; the observation of subdomain partitioning of membrane proteins due to microenvironment effects; and the use of single particle tracking experiments to elucidate characteristics of membrane protein diffusion and the direct measurement of thermodynamic properties, which govern the free energy landscape of protein dimerization. The review of such characteristic topics represents a snapshot of efforts to push the boundaries of fluorescence microscopy of membrane proteins to the absolute limit. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'.

  8. Genetic-Algorithm Discovery of a Direct-Gap and Optically Allowed Superstructure from Indirect-Gap Si and Ge Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    d'Avezac, M.; Luo, J. W.; Chanier, T.; Zunger, A.

    2012-01-13

    Combining two indirect-gap materials - with different electronic and optical gaps - to create a direct gap material represents an ongoing theoretical challenge with potentially rewarding practical implications, such as optoelectronics integration on a single wafer. We provide an unexpected solution to this classic problem, by spatially melding two indirect-gap materials (Si and Ge) into one strongly dipole-allowed direct-gap material. We leverage a combination of genetic algorithms with a pseudopotential Hamiltonian to search through the astronomic number of variants of Si{sub n}/Ge{sub m}/.../Si{sub p}/Ge{sub q} superstructures grown on (001) Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}. The search reveals a robust configurational motif - SiGe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}SiGe{sub n} on (001) Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} substrate (x {le} 0.4) presenting a direct and dipole-allowed gap resulting from an enhanced {Gamma}-X coupling at the band edges.

  9. Examining the Agreement of Direct Behavior Ratings and Systematic Direct Observation Data for On-Task and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Sassu, Kari A.; Chanese, Julie A. M.; Glazer, Amy D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous findings indicating a moderate association between teacher perceptions of behavior as measured by direct behavior ratings (DBRs) and systematic direct observation (SDO) conducted by an external observer. In this study, data regarding student on-task and disruptive behavior were collected via SDO…

  10. Direct observation shows superposition and large scale flexibility within cytoplasmic dynein motors moving along microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Hiroshi; Shima, Tomohiro; Sutoh, Kazuo; Walker, Matthew L.; Knight, Peter J.; Kon, Takahide; Burgess, Stan A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a dimeric AAA+ motor protein that performs critical roles in eukaryotic cells by moving along microtubules using ATP. Here using cryo-electron microscopy we directly observe the structure of Dictyostelium discoideum dynein dimers on microtubules at near-physiological ATP concentrations. They display remarkable flexibility at a hinge close to the microtubule binding domain (the stalkhead) producing a wide range of head positions. About half the molecules have the two heads separated from one another, with both leading and trailing motors attached to the microtubule. The other half have the two heads and stalks closely superposed in a front-to-back arrangement of the AAA+ rings, suggesting specific contact between the heads. All stalks point towards the microtubule minus end. Mean stalk angles depend on the separation between their stalkheads, which allows estimation of inter-head tension. These findings provide a structural framework for understanding dynein's directionality and unusual stepping behaviour. PMID:26365535

  11. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  12. Direct observation shows superposition and large scale flexibility within cytoplasmic dynein motors moving along microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Hiroshi; Shima, Tomohiro; Sutoh, Kazuo; Walker, Matthew L.; Knight, Peter J.; Kon, Takahide; Burgess, Stan A.

    2015-09-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a dimeric AAA+ motor protein that performs critical roles in eukaryotic cells by moving along microtubules using ATP. Here using cryo-electron microscopy we directly observe the structure of Dictyostelium discoideum dynein dimers on microtubules at near-physiological ATP concentrations. They display remarkable flexibility at a hinge close to the microtubule binding domain (the stalkhead) producing a wide range of head positions. About half the molecules have the two heads separated from one another, with both leading and trailing motors attached to the microtubule. The other half have the two heads and stalks closely superposed in a front-to-back arrangement of the AAA+ rings, suggesting specific contact between the heads. All stalks point towards the microtubule minus end. Mean stalk angles depend on the separation between their stalkheads, which allows estimation of inter-head tension. These findings provide a structural framework for understanding dynein's directionality and unusual stepping behaviour.

  13. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF A COROTATING INTERACTION REGION BY THREE SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Tappin, S. J. Howard, T. A

    2009-09-10

    White-light observations of interplanetary disturbances have been dominated by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). This is because the other type of disturbance, the corotating interaction region (CIR), has proved difficult to detect using white-light imagers. Recently, a number of papers have appeared presenting CIR observations using the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Heliospheric Imagers (HIs), but have mostly only focused on a single spacecraft and imager. In this paper, we present observations of a single CIR that was observed by all three current white-light heliospheric imagers (SMEI and both STEREO HIs), as well as the in situ instruments on both STEREO satellites and ACE. We begin with a discussion of the geometry of the CIR structure, and show how the apparent leading edge structure is expected to change as it corotates relative to the observer. We use these calculations to predict elongation-time profiles for CIRs of different speeds for each of the imagers, and also to predict the arrival times at the in situ instruments. We show that although all three measured different parts, they combine to produce a self-consistent picture of the CIR. Finally, we offer some thoughts on why CIRs have proved so difficult to detect in white-light heliospheric images.

  14. The nature of the redshift and directly observed quasar statistics.

    PubMed

    Segal, I E; Nicoll, J F; Wu, P; Zhou, Z

    1991-07-01

    The nature of the cosmic redshift is one of the most fundamental questions in modern science. Hubble's discovery of the apparent Expansion of the Universe is derived from observations on a small number of galaxies at very low redshifts. Today, quasar redshifts have a range more than 1000 times greater than those in Hubble's sample, and represent more than 100 times as many objects. A recent comprehensive compilation of published measurements provides the basis for a study indicating that quasar observations are not in good agreement with the original predictions of the Expanding Universe theory, but are well fit by the predictions of an alternative theory having fewer adjustable parameters.

  15. A simple hardware model for the direct observation of voltage-clamp performance under realistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Draguhn, A; Pfeiffer, M; Heinemann, U; Polder, R

    1997-12-30

    A new hardware cell model for electrophysiological recording has been constructed which allows for the assessment of voltage clamp accuracy in different recording situations. Each compartment consists of a capacitor in parallel with a variable resistor and can be connected to other compartments by a variable axial resistance. The simulated membrane resistance can be changed extrinsically by a command voltage input which is optically coupled to the cell without any direct galvanic contact. Each compartment possesses a buffer amplifier which reads out the potential at the simulated membrane element, (e.g. 'somatic' or 'dendritic' potential). The model allows for the direct observation of typical situations and problems arising in electrophysiological experiments. We used the model to monitor deviations between the 'intracellular' and the command voltage, e.g. due to series resistance errors. We also used the model to simulate synaptic currents which were generated by triangular membrane conductance changes. The results demonstrate the strong influence of synaptic location and series resistance on voltage clamp fidelity. The cell model is a new and easy-to-handle tool for the observation of voltage control under realistic experimental conditions. PMID:9497006

  16. Clear Direction. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature article,…

  17. Direct observation of warping in the plasma sheet of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Roelof, E. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    The ENA images from the Ion Neutral CAmera (INCA) on the Cassini spacecraft are projected onto the noon-midnight plane of Sun-Saturn orbital coordinates, and a composite ``image'' of Saturn's plasma sheet is constructed from dawn-side observations of 20-50 keV hydrogens obtained from days 352 to 361 in 2004. The maxima in the intensity contours define the center of the plasma sheet in the noon-midnight plane. This plasma sheet surface displays a distinct bending or ``warping'' above Saturn's equatorial plane at radial distances of beyond ~15 RS on the nightside. On the dayside, the plasma sheet lies close to the equator all the way to the magnetopause. The observed warping agrees with the ``bowl'' model derived from measurements of Saturn's magnetic field, but fits more closely a simple third-order polynomial.

  18. Direct observation of bubble-assisted electroluminescence in liquid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdal, E.; Arazi, L.; Chepel, V.; Rappaport, M. L.; Vartsky, D.; Breskin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Bubble formation in liquid xenon underneath a Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) electrode immersed in liquid xenon was observed with a CCD camera. With voltage across the THGEM, the appearance of bubbles was correlated with that of electroluminescence signals induced by ionization electrons from alpha-particle tracks. This confirms recent indirect evidence that the observed photons are due to electroluminescence within a xenon vapor layer trapped under the electrode. The bubbles seem to emerge spontaneously due to heat flow from 300 K into the liquid, or in a controlled manner by locally boiling the liquid with resistive wires. Controlled bubble formation resulted in energy resolution of σ/E ≈ 7.5% for ~ 6000 ionization electrons. The phenomenon could pave ways towards the conception of large-volume `local dual-phase' noble-liquid TPCs.

  19. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When and how is a directly observed collection... directly observed collection conducted? (a) As an employer, you must direct an immediate collection under... paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section); or (2) You observed materials brought to the collection site or...

  20. Direct Observation of the Three-State Folding of a Single Protein Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Ciro; Shank, Elizabeth A.; Bustamante, Carlos; Marqusee, Susan

    2005-09-01

    We used force-measuring optical tweezers to induce complete mechanical unfolding and refolding of individual Escherichia coli ribonuclease H (RNase H) molecules. The protein unfolds in a two-state manner and refolds through an intermediate that correlates with the transient molten globule-like intermediate observed in bulk studies. This intermediate displays unusual mechanical compliance and unfolds at substantially lower forces than the native state. In a narrow range of forces, the molecule hops between the unfolded and intermediate states in real time. Occasionally, hopping was observed to stop as the molecule crossed the folding barrier directly from the intermediate, demonstrating that the intermediate is on-pathway. These studies allow us to map the energy landscape of RNase H.

  1. Direct observation of fungal aggregates in sand dune soil.

    PubMed

    Clough, K S; Sutton, J C

    1978-03-01

    The mycorrhizal fungus Glomerus in association with bean hosts, Phaseolus vulgaris L., growing in pot cultures and grass hosts, Calamovilfa longiflora (Hook). Scribn and Andropogon sp. growing on Lake Huron sand dunes produced extensive external mycelium. This mycelium was the dominant factor in the aggregation of soil particles. Light and scanning electron microscope studies indicated that the sand grains were attached to the hyphae. An amorphous deposit was often present at the interfaces of sand grains and hyphae. It appeared to act as an adhesive. Staining procedures indicated that this material contained polysaccharide. Other microogranisms were observed in association with the Glomus hyphae and the amorphous deposits.

  2. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  3. Providers' response to child eating behaviors: A direct observation study.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Alison; Vaughn, Amber E; Fallon, Megan; Hennessy, Erin; Burney, Regan; Østbye, Truls; Ward, Dianne S

    2016-10-01

    Child care providers play an important role in feeding young children, yet little is known about children's influence on providers' feeding practices. This qualitative study examines provider and child (18 months -4 years) feeding interactions. Trained data collectors observed 200 eating occasions in 48 family child care homes and recorded providers' responses to children's meal and snack time behaviors. Child behaviors initiating provider feeding practices were identified and practices were coded according to higher order constructs identified in a recent feeding practices content map. Analysis examined the most common feeding practices providers used to respond to each child behavior. Providers were predominately female (100%), African-American (75%), and obese (77%) and a third of children were overweight/obese (33%). Commonly observed child behaviors were: verbal and non-verbal refusals, verbal and non-verbal acceptance, being "all done", attempts for praise/attention, and asking for seconds. Children's acceptance of food elicited more autonomy supportive practices vs. coercive controlling. Requests for seconds was the most common behavior, resulting in coercive controlling practices (e.g., insisting child eat certain food or clean plate). Future interventions should train providers on responding to children's behaviors and helping children become more aware of internal satiety and hunger cues. PMID:27328098

  4. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  5. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead's thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  6. Direct Experimental Observation of a Practical AC Zeeman Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Rotunno, Andrew; Du, Shuangli; Aubin, Seth

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the spin-dependent AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-field gradients on an atom chip. We measure the AC Zeeman force on ultracold 87 Rb atoms by observing its effect on the motion of atoms in free-fall and on those confined in a trap. We have studied the force as a function of microwave frequency detuning from a hyperfine transition at 6.8 GHz at several magnetic field strengths and have observed its characteristic bipolar and resonant features predicted by two-level dressed atom theory. We find that the force is several times the strength of gravity in our setup, and that it can be targeted to a specific hyperfine transition while leaving other hyperfine states and transitions relatively unaffected. We find that our measurements are reasonably consistent with theory and are working towards a parameter-free comparison. AC Zeeman potentials offer the possibility of targeting qualitatively different trapping potentials to different spin states, a capability currently absent from the toolbox of atomic quantum control techniques. In particular, an AC Zeeman potential could be used as the beamsplitter for a spin-dependent atom interferometer or for engineering a quantum gate. Work supported by AFOSR and W&M, and in part by AFRL.

  7. New Directions in the NOAO Observing Proposal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasson, David; Bell, Dave

    For the past eight years NOAO has been refining its on-line observing proposal system. Virtually all related processes are now handled electronically. Members of the astronomical community can submit proposals through email, web form, or via the Gemini Phase I Tool. NOAO staff can use the system to do administrative tasks, scheduling, and compilation of various statistics. In addition, all information relevant to the TAC process is made available on-line, including the proposals themselves (in HTML, PDF and PostScript) and technical comments. Grades and TAC comments are entered and edited through web forms, and can be sorted and filtered according to specified criteria. Current developments include a move away from proprietary solutions, toward open standards such as SQL (in the form of the MySQL relational database system), Perl, PHP and XML.

  8. Direct observation of light focusing by single photoreceptor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Błaszczak, Zuzanna; Kreysing, Moritz; Guck, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    The vertebrate retina is inverted with respect to its optical function, which requires light to pass through the entire tissue prior to detection. The last significant barrier for photons to overcome is the outer nuclear layer formed by photoreceptor cell (PRC) nuclei. Here we experimentally characterise the optical properties of PRC nuclei using bright-field defocusing microscopy to capture near-field intensity distributions behind individual nuclei. We find that some nuclei efficiently focus incident light confirming earlier predictions based on comparative studies of chromatin organisation in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. The emergence of light focusing during the development of mouse nuclei highlights the acquired nature of the observed lens-like behaviour. Optical characterisation of these nuclei is an important first step towards an improved understanding of how light transmission through the retina is influenced by its constituents.

  9. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process.

  10. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ivo R; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-04-14

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process. PMID:27042934

  11. An Unroofing Method to Observe the Cytoskeleton Directly at Molecular Resolution Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Usukura, Eiji; Narita, Akihiro; Yagi, Akira; Ito, Shuichi; Usukura, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    An improved unroofing method enabled the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to reach directly into a cell to visualize the intracellular cytoskeletal actin filaments, microtubules, clathrin coats, and caveolae in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at a higher resolution than conventional electron microscopy. All of the actin filaments clearly exhibited a short periodicity of approximately 5–6 nm, which was derived from globular actins linked to each other to form filaments, as well as a long helical periodicity. The polarity of the actin filaments appeared to be determined by the shape of the periodic striations. Microtubules were identified based on their thickness. Clathrin coats and caveolae were observed on the cytoplasmic surface of cell membranes. The area containing clathrin molecules and their terminal domains was directly visualized. Characteristic ridge structures located at the surface of the caveolae were observed at high resolution, similar to those observed with electron microscopy (EM). Overall, unroofing allowed intracellular AFM imaging in a liquid environment with a level of quality equivalent or superior to that of EM. Thus, AFMs are anticipated to provide cutting-edge findings in cell biology and histology. PMID:27273367

  12. An Unroofing Method to Observe the Cytoskeleton Directly at Molecular Resolution Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Usukura, Eiji; Narita, Akihiro; Yagi, Akira; Ito, Shuichi; Usukura, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    An improved unroofing method enabled the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to reach directly into a cell to visualize the intracellular cytoskeletal actin filaments, microtubules, clathrin coats, and caveolae in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at a higher resolution than conventional electron microscopy. All of the actin filaments clearly exhibited a short periodicity of approximately 5-6 nm, which was derived from globular actins linked to each other to form filaments, as well as a long helical periodicity. The polarity of the actin filaments appeared to be determined by the shape of the periodic striations. Microtubules were identified based on their thickness. Clathrin coats and caveolae were observed on the cytoplasmic surface of cell membranes. The area containing clathrin molecules and their terminal domains was directly visualized. Characteristic ridge structures located at the surface of the caveolae were observed at high resolution, similar to those observed with electron microscopy (EM). Overall, unroofing allowed intracellular AFM imaging in a liquid environment with a level of quality equivalent or superior to that of EM. Thus, AFMs are anticipated to provide cutting-edge findings in cell biology and histology. PMID:27273367

  13. Direct observation of completely processed calcium carbonate dust particles.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-01-01

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9-11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  14. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  15. Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-05-27

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  16. Direct observation of OH formation from stabilised Criegee intermediates.

    PubMed

    Novelli, A; Vereecken, L; Lelieveld, J; Harder, H

    2014-10-01

    The syn-CH3CHOO Criegee intermediate formed from the ozonolysis of propene and (E)-2-butene was detected via unimolecular decomposition and subsequent detection of OH radicals by a LIF-FAGE instrument. An observed time dependent OH concentration profile was analysed using a detailed model focusing on the speciated chemistry of Criegee intermediates based on the recent literature. The absolute OH concentration was found to depend on the steady state concentration of syn-CH3CHOO at the injection point while the time dependence of the OH concentration profile was influenced by the sum of the rates of unimolecular decomposition of syn-CH3CHOO and wall loss. By varying the most relevant parameters influencing the SCI chemistry in the model and based on the temporal OH concentration profile, the unimolecular decomposition rate k (293 K) of syn-CH3CHOO was shown to lie within the range 3-30 s(-1), where a value of 20 ± 10 s(-1) yields the best agreement with the CI chemistry literature. PMID:25119645

  17. Direct observation of resonance effects in laser cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zweiback, J

    1999-06-01

    Time resolved dynamics of high intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters have been studied with both theoretical analysis and experiment. A short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser system, which could produce 50 mJ of energy in a 50 fs pulse, was built to perform these experiments. The laser used a novel single grating stretcher and was pumped, in part, by a custom Nd:YLF laser system, including 19 mm Nd:YLF amplifiers. It was found that there is an optimal pulse width to maximize absorption for a given cluster size. This optimal pulse width ranged from 400 fs for 85 A radius xenon clusters to 1.2 ps for 205 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters. Using a pump-probe configuration, the absorption of the probe radiation was observed to reach a maximum for a particular time delay between pump and probe, dependent on the cluster size. The delay for peak absorption was 800, 1400, and 2100 fs for 85 {angstrom}, 130 {angstrom}, and 170 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters respectively. Model calculations suggest that these effects are due to resonant heating of the spherical plasma in agreement with the hydrodynamic interpretation of cluster interactions. While this simple hydrodynamic code produces reasonable agreement with data, it does not include bulk plasma or non-linear propagation effects and is limited to the regime where resonant behavior dominates. We also measured the scattered laser light from the laser-cluster interaction. Similar to the absorption measurements, there is an optimal pulse width which maximizes the scattered signal. This pulse width is larger than the optimal pulse width for absorption. This disagrees with model calculations which show both pulse widths being similar. Further experiments measuring the scattered light in a pump-probe configuration should help to resolve this disagreement.

  18. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  19. Direct in situ observation of nanoparticle synthesis in a liquid crystal surfactant template.

    PubMed

    Parent, Lucas R; Robinson, David B; Woehl, Taylor J; Ristenpart, William D; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel D; Arslan, Ilke

    2012-04-24

    Controlled and reproducible synthesis of tailored materials is essential in many fields of nanoscience. In order to control synthesis, there must be a fundamental understanding of nanostructure evolution on the length scale of its features. Growth mechanisms are usually inferred from methods such as (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM), where nanostructures are characterized after growth is complete. Such post mortem analysis techniques cannot provide the information essential to optimize the synthesis process, because they cannot measure nanostructure development as it proceeds in real time. This is especially true in the complex rheological fluids used in preparation of nanoporous materials. Here we show direct in situ observations of synthesis in a highly viscous lyotropic liquid crystal template on the nanoscale using a fluid stage in the STEM. The nanoparticles nucleate and grow to ∼5 nm particles, at which point growth continues through the formation of connections with other nanoparticles around the micelles to form clusters. Upon reaching a critical size (>10-15 nm), the clusters become highly mobile in the template, displacing and trapping micelles within the growing structure to form spherical, porous nanoparticles. The final products match those synthesized in the lab ex situ. This ability to directly observe synthesis on the nanoscale in rheological fluids, such as concentrated aqueous surfactants, provides an unprecedented understanding of the fundamental steps of nanomaterial synthesis. This in turn allows for the synthesis of next-generation materials that can strongly impact important technologies such as organic photovoltaics, energy storage devices, catalysis, and biomedical devices.

  20. Direct Observation of Teacher-Directed IEP Meetings: Establishing the Need for Student IEP Meeting Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James E.; Van Dycke, Jamie L.; Greene, Barbara A.; Gardner, J. Emmett; Christensen, W. Robert; Woods, Lee L.; Lovett, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The 1997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) called for an increase in student involvement in individualized education program (IEP) meetings. To determine the extent of student involvement in educational planning, this study observed 109 middle and high school IEP meetings; 90% of the participants completed a…

  1. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds.

  2. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE COOLING OF THE CASSIOPEIA A NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Heinke, Craig O.; Ho, Wynn C. G. E-mail: wynnho@slac.stanford.ed

    2010-08-20

    The cooling rate of young neutron stars (NSs) gives direct insight into their internal makeup. Although the temperatures of several young NSs have been measured, until now a young NS has never been observed to decrease in temperature over time. We fit nine years of archival Chandra ACIS spectra of the likely NS in the {approx}330 yr old Cassiopeia A supernova remnant with our non-magnetic carbon atmosphere model. Our fits show a relative decline in the surface temperature by 4% (5.4{sigma}, from (2.12 {+-} 0.01) x 10{sup 6} K in 2000 to (2.04 {+-} 0.01) x 10{sup 6} K in 2009) and the observed flux by 21%. Using a simple model for NS cooling, we show that this temperature decline could indicate that the NS became isothermal sometime between 1965 and 1980, and constrains some combinations of neutrino emission mechanisms and envelope compositions. However, the NS is likely to have become isothermal soon after formation, in which case the temperature history suggests episodes of additional heating or more rapid cooling. Observations over the next few years will allow us to test possible explanations for the temperature evolution.

  3. Direct observation of mobility state transitions in RNA trajectories by sensitive single molecule feedback tracking

    PubMed Central

    Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Kaminski, Tim P.; Scherer, Katharina; Rinne, Jennifer S.; Heckel, Alexander; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Observation and tracking of fluorescently labeled molecules and particles in living cells reveals detailed information about intracellular processes on the molecular level. Whereas light microscopic particle observation is usually limited to two-dimensional projections of short trajectory segments, we report here image-based real-time three-dimensional single particle tracking in an active feedback loop with single molecule sensitivity. We tracked particles carrying only 1–3 fluorophores deep inside living tissue with high spatio-temporal resolution. Using this approach, we succeeded to acquire trajectories containing several hundred localizations. We present statistical methods to find significant deviations from random Brownian motion in such trajectories. The analysis allowed us to directly observe transitions in the mobility of ribosomal (r)RNA and Balbiani ring (BR) messenger (m)RNA particles in living Chironomus tentans salivary gland cell nuclei. We found that BR mRNA particles displayed phases of reduced mobility, while rRNA particles showed distinct binding events in and near nucleoli. PMID:25414330

  4. Validation of a New Counter for Direct Observation of Physical Activity in Parks

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Cohen, Deborah A.; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Raaen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prior tools to observe large groups of people in parks have not allowed disaggregation of physical activity levels by age group and gender simultaneously, making it impossible to determine which subgroups engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). This study aims to examine the reliability of a 12-button counter to simultaneously assess MVPA by age and gender subgroups in park settings. Methods A total of 1,160 pairs of observations were conducted in 481 target areas of 19 neighborhood parks in the great Los Angeles area between June 2013 and March 2014. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by Pearson’s correlation, intra-class correlation (ICC), and agreement probability in the total metabolic equivalents (METs) and METs spent in MVPA. Cosine similarity was used to check the resemblance of distributions among age and gender categories. Pictures taken in a total of 112 target areas at the beginning of the observations were used as a second check on the reliability of direct observation. Results Inter-rater reliability was high for the total METs and METs in all age and gender categories (between 0.82 and 0.97), except for male seniors (correlations and ICC between 0.64 and 0.77, agreement probability 0.85 to 0.86). Reliability was higher for total METs than for METs spent in MVPA. Correlation and ICC between observers’ measurement and picture-based counts are also high (between 0.79 and 0.94). Conclusion Trained observers can reliably use the 12-button counter to accurately assess PA distribution and disparities by age and gender. PMID:26103584

  5. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  6. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  7. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  8. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  9. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26.115 Section 26.115 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures...

  10. Mid-depth recirculation observed in the interior Labrador and Irminger seas by direct velocity measurements

    PubMed

    Lavender; Davis; Owens

    2000-09-01

    The Labrador Sea is one of the sites where convection exports surface water to the deep ocean in winter as part of the thermohaline circulation. Labrador Sea water is characteristically cold and fresh, and it can be traced at intermediate depths (500-2,000 m) across the North Atlantic Ocean, to the south and to the east of the Labrador Sea. Widespread observations of the ocean currents that lead to this distribution of Labrador Sea water have, however, been difficult and therefore scarce. We have used more than 200 subsurface floats to measure directly basin-wide horizontal velocities at various depths in the Labrador and Irminger seas. We observe unanticipated recirculations of the mid-depth (approximately 700 m) cyclonic boundary currents in both basins, leading to an anticyclonic flow in the interior of the Labrador basin. About 40% of the floats from the region of deep convection left the basin within one year and were rapidly transported in the anticyclonic flow to the Irminger basin, and also eastwards into the subpolar gyre. Surprisingly, the float tracks did not clearly depict the deep western boundary current, which is the expected main pathway of Labrador Sea water in the thermohaline circulation. Rather, the flow along the boundary near Flemish Cap is dominated by eddies that transport water offshore. Our detailed observations of the velocity structure with a high data coverage suggest that we may have to revise our picture of the formation and spreading of Labrador Sea water, and future studies with similar instrumentation will allow new insights on the intermediate depth ocean circulation.

  11. Wide-field direct CCD observations supporting the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission's Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Angione, Ron; Talbert, Freddie; Cheng, K.-P.; Smith, Eric; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1993-01-01

    Wide field direct CCD observations are being obtained to support and complement the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) images provided by Astro's Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during a Space Shuttle flight in December 1990. Because of the wide variety of projects addressed by UIT, the fields observed include (1) galactic supernova remnants such as the Cygnus Loop and globular clusters such as Omega Cen and M79; (2) the Magellanic Clouds, M33, M81, and other galaxies in the Local Group; and (3) rich clusters of galaxies, principally the Perseus cluster and Abell 1367. Ground-based observations have been obtained for virtually all of the Astro-1 UIT fields. The optical images allow identification of individual UV sources in each field and provide the long baseline in wavelength necessary for accurate analysis of UV-bright sources. To facilitate use of our optical images for analysis of UIT data and other projects, we plan to archive them, with the UIT images, at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), where they will be universally accessible via anonymous FTP. The UIT, one of three telescopes comprising the Astro spacecraft, is a 38-cm f/9 Ritchey-Chretien telescope on which high quantum efficiency, solar-blind image tubes are used to record VUV images on photographic film. Five filters with passbands centered between 1250A and 2500A provide both VUV colors and a measurement of extinction via the 2200A dust feature. The resulting calibrated VUV pictures are 40 arcminutes in diameter at 2.5 arcseconds resolution. The capabilities of UIT, therefore, complement HST's WFPC: the latter has 40 times greater collecting area, while UIT's usable field has 170 times WFPC's field area.

  12. Mid-depth recirculation observed in the interior Labrador and Irminger seas by direct velocity measurements

    PubMed

    Lavender; Davis; Owens

    2000-09-01

    The Labrador Sea is one of the sites where convection exports surface water to the deep ocean in winter as part of the thermohaline circulation. Labrador Sea water is characteristically cold and fresh, and it can be traced at intermediate depths (500-2,000 m) across the North Atlantic Ocean, to the south and to the east of the Labrador Sea. Widespread observations of the ocean currents that lead to this distribution of Labrador Sea water have, however, been difficult and therefore scarce. We have used more than 200 subsurface floats to measure directly basin-wide horizontal velocities at various depths in the Labrador and Irminger seas. We observe unanticipated recirculations of the mid-depth (approximately 700 m) cyclonic boundary currents in both basins, leading to an anticyclonic flow in the interior of the Labrador basin. About 40% of the floats from the region of deep convection left the basin within one year and were rapidly transported in the anticyclonic flow to the Irminger basin, and also eastwards into the subpolar gyre. Surprisingly, the float tracks did not clearly depict the deep western boundary current, which is the expected main pathway of Labrador Sea water in the thermohaline circulation. Rather, the flow along the boundary near Flemish Cap is dominated by eddies that transport water offshore. Our detailed observations of the velocity structure with a high data coverage suggest that we may have to revise our picture of the formation and spreading of Labrador Sea water, and future studies with similar instrumentation will allow new insights on the intermediate depth ocean circulation. PMID:10993072

  13. Direct Retrieval of Line-of-Sight Atmospheric Structure From Limb Sounding Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livesey, N.; Read, W.

    1999-01-01

    Optimal estimation of atmospheric temperature and composition from limb sounding observations is extended to the direct retrieval of line-of-sight atmospheric structure that can be obtained in certain limb viewing geometries.

  14. Direct retrieval of ocean surface evaporation and latent heat flux from the spacebased observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) provides the opportunity to improve the spacebased estimation of evaporation. An algorithm for retrieving evaporation directly from the radiances observed by the TRMM Microwave Imager and its validation results are described.

  15. Direct observation of roaming radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-21

    The thermal dissociation of acetaldehyde has been studied with the reflected shock tube technique using H(D)-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry detection. The use of an unreversed light source yields extraordinarily sensitive H atom detection. As a result, we are able to measure both the total decomposition rate and the branching to radical versus molecular channels. This branching provides a direct measure of the contribution from the roaming radical mechanism since the contributions from the usual tight transition states are predicted by theory to be negligible. The experimental observations also provide a measure of the rate coefficient for H + CH{sub 3}CHO. Another set of experiments employing C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I as an H-atom source provides additional data for this rate coefficient that extends to lower temperature. An evaluation of the available experimental results for H + CH{sub 3}CHO can be expressed by a three-parameter Arrhenius expression as k = 7.66 x 10{sup -20}T{sup 2.75} exp((-486 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (298-1415 K). Analogous experiments employing C{sub 2}D{sub 5}I as a D-atom source allow for the study of the isotopically substituted reaction. The present experiments are the only direct measure for this reaction rate constant, and the results can be expressed by an Arrhenius expression as k = 5.20 x 10{sup -10} exp((-4430 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (1151-1354 K). The H/D + CH{sub 3}CHO reactions are also studied with ab initio transition-state theory, and the results are in remarkably good agreement with the current experimental data.

  16. Nuclear structure from direct reactions with rare isotopes: observables, methods and highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obertelli, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    An overview of direct reactions employed for nuclear structure studies is presented. The basic and most used analysis methods of elastic and inelastic scattering, transfer reactions and intermediate-energy removal reactions are reviewed. The most relevant observables from direct reactions regarding the nuclear many-body problem, as well as related experimental techniques, are illustrated through recent achievements with unstable nuclei.

  17. Direct observation of electron propagation and dielectric screening on the atomic length scale.

    PubMed

    Neppl, S; Ernstorfer, R; Cavalieri, A L; Lemell, C; Wachter, G; Magerl, E; Bothschafter, E M; Jobst, M; Hofstetter, M; Kleineberg, U; Barth, J V; Menzel, D; Burgdörfer, J; Feulner, P; Krausz, F; Kienberger, R

    2015-01-15

    The propagation and transport of electrons in crystals is a fundamental process pertaining to the functioning of most electronic devices. Microscopic theories describe this phenomenon as being based on the motion of Bloch wave packets. These wave packets are superpositions of individual Bloch states with the group velocity determined by the dispersion of the electronic band structure near the central wavevector in momentum space. This concept has been verified experimentally in artificial superlattices by the observation of Bloch oscillations--periodic oscillations of electrons in real and momentum space. Here we present a direct observation of electron wave packet motion in a real-space and real-time experiment, on length and time scales shorter than the Bloch oscillation amplitude and period. We show that attosecond metrology (1 as = 10(-18) seconds) now enables quantitative insight into weakly disturbed electron wave packet propagation on the atomic length scale without being hampered by scattering effects, which inevitably occur over macroscopic propagation length scales. We use sub-femtosecond (less than 10(-15) seconds) extreme-ultraviolet light pulses to launch photoelectron wave packets inside a tungsten crystal that is covered by magnesium films of varied, well-defined thicknesses of a few ångströms. Probing the moment of arrival of the wave packets at the surface with attosecond precision reveals free-electron-like, ballistic propagation behaviour inside the magnesium adlayer--constituting the semi-classical limit of Bloch wave packet motion. Real-time access to electron transport through atomic layers and interfaces promises unprecedented insight into phenomena that may enable the scaling of electronic and photonic circuits to atomic dimensions. In addition, this experiment allows us to determine the penetration depth of electrical fields at optical frequencies at solid interfaces on the atomic scale. PMID:25592539

  18. Direct Observation of Sub-Poissonian Number Statistics in a Degenerate Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chuu, C.-S.; Schreck, F.; Meyrath, T.P.; Hanssen, J.L.; Price, G.N.; Raizen, M.G.

    2005-12-31

    We report the direct observation of sub-Poissonian number fluctuation for a degenerate Bose gas confined in an optical trap. Reduction of number fluctuations below the Poissonian limit is observed for average numbers that range from 300 to 60 atoms.

  19. The Stochastic Engine Initiative: Improving Prediction of Behavior in Geologic Environments We Cannot Directly Observe

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Nitao, J; Newmark, R; Carle, S; Ramirez, A; Harris, D; Johnson, J; Johnson, V; Ermak, D; Sugiyama, G; Hanley, W; Sengupta, S; Daily, W; Glaser, R; Dyer, K; Fogg, G; Zhang, Y; Yu, Z; Levine, R

    2002-05-09

    , and most importantly an ability to obtain disparate data sets that are directly affected by the system configuration. Our initial earth-sciences application uses models for lithology, flow and transport, geochemistry, and geophysical imaging; the system configuration (base representation) being refined is the rock type at each underground location. In the initial stages of this initiative we demonstrated a two-stage analysis of synthetic Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) data and hydraulic flow information (Newmark et al., 2002). We used these results to develop algorithms that improve efficiency of the Metropolis search and provide accurate diagnostic evaluation during the search. Using actual data from a highly contaminated A/M outfall and solvent tank storage areas at the Savannah River Site (SRS), we used the stochastic engine to resolve lithology using ERT data. SRS will use these methods in their design and implementation of steam cleanup of the largest trichloroethylene (TCE) source in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. We have implemented ''soft conditioning'' algorithms that allow us to use a variety of data types to control the initial representations, and most importantly, to use the final distribution resulting from one stochastic engine analysis as the initial distribution for a subsequent analysis. We have created a web-based interface that will allow collaborators like SRS to enter data and observe results of calculations on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) supercomputers in an interactive mode. All engine functions operate in three dimensions, and a parallel implementation on Linux cluster machines is in initial testing. The method will be extended to include active process analysis, in which an ongoing data stream is used to continuously update the understanding of the system configuration. Applications to other types of state spaces, such as chemical parameters in a reacting system or atmospheric plume movement, are being

  20. Direct observation of the transition from indirect to direct bandgap in atomically thin epitaxial MoSe2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chang, Tay-Rong; Zhou, Bo; Cui, Yong-Tao; Yan, Hao; Liu, Zhongkai; Schmitt, Felix; Lee, James; Moore, Rob; Chen, Yulin; Lin, Hsin; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Hussain, Zahid; Bansil, Arun; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2014-02-01

    Quantum systems in confined geometries are host to novel physical phenomena. Examples include quantum Hall systems in semiconductors and Dirac electrons in graphene. Interest in such systems has also been intensified by the recent discovery of a large enhancement in photoluminescence quantum efficiency and a potential route to valleytronics in atomically thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te), which are closely related to the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition in monolayers. Here, we report the first direct observation of the transition from indirect to direct bandgap in monolayer samples by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on high-quality thin films of MoSe2 with variable thickness, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The band structure measured experimentally indicates a stronger tendency of monolayer MoSe2 towards a direct bandgap, as well as a larger gap size, than theoretically predicted. Moreover, our finding of a significant spin-splitting of ∼ 180 meV at the valence band maximum of a monolayer MoSe2 film could expand its possible application to spintronic devices.

  1. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over premotor cortex facilitates observational learning of a motor sequence.

    PubMed

    Wade, Stephanie; Hammond, Geoff

    2015-06-01

    Motor skills, including complex movement sequences, can be acquired by observing a model without physical practice of the skill, a phenomenon known as observational learning. Observational learning of motor skills engages the same memory substrate as physical practice, and is thought to be mediated by the action observation network, a bilateral fronto-parietal circuit with mirror-like properties. We examined the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over premotor cortex, a key node of the action observation network, on observational learning of a serial response time task. Results showed that anodal tDCS during observation of the to-be-learned sequence facilitated reaction times in the subsequent behavioral test. The study provides evidence that increasing excitability of the action observation network during observation can facilitate later motor skill acquisition.

  2. Objectively Optimized Observation Direction System Providing Situational Awareness for a Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulov, O.; Lary, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    There is great utility in having a flexible and automated objective observation direction system for the decadal survey missions and beyond. Such a system allows us to optimize the observations made by suite of sensors to address specific goals from long term monitoring to rapid response. We have developed such a prototype using a network of communicating software elements to control a heterogeneous network of sensor systems, which can have multiple modes and flexible viewing geometries. Our system makes sensor systems intelligent and situationally aware. Together they form a sensor web of multiple sensors working together and capable of automated target selection, i.e. the sensors “know” where they are, what they are able to observe, what targets and with what priorities they should observe. This system is implemented in three components. The first component is a Sensor Web simulator. The Sensor Web simulator describes the capabilities and locations of each sensor as a function of time, whether they are orbital, sub-orbital, or ground based. The simulator has been implemented using AGIs Satellite Tool Kit (STK). STK makes it easy to analyze and visualize optimal solutions for complex space scenarios, and perform complex analysis of land, sea, air, space assets, and shares results in one integrated solution. The second component is target scheduler that was implemented with STK Scheduler. STK Scheduler is powered by a scheduling engine that finds better solutions in a shorter amount of time than traditional heuristic algorithms. The global search algorithm within this engine is based on neural network technology that is capable of finding solutions to larger and more complex problems and maximizing the value of limited resources. The third component is a modeling and data assimilation system. It provides situational awareness by supplying the time evolution of uncertainty and information content metrics that are used to tell us what we need to observe and the

  3. Direct observation of markovian behavior of the mechanical unfolding of individual proteins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Kuske, Rachel; Li, Hongbin

    2008-07-01

    Single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy is a valuable tool to analyze unfolding kinetics of proteins. Previous force-clamp spectroscopy experiments have demonstrated that the mechanical unfolding of ubiquitin deviates from the generally assumed Markovian behavior and involves the features of glassy dynamics. Here we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to study the unfolding kinetics of a computationally designed fast-folding mutant of the small protein GB1, which shares a similar beta-grasp fold as ubiquitin. By treating the mechanical unfolding of polyproteins as the superposition of multiple identical Poisson processes, we developed a simple stochastic analysis approach to analyze the dwell time distribution of individual unfolding events in polyprotein unfolding trajectories. Our results unambiguously demonstrate that the mechanical unfolding of NuG2 fulfills all criteria of a memoryless Markovian process. This result, in contrast with the complex mechanical unfolding behaviors observed for ubiquitin, serves as a direct experimental demonstration of the Markovian behavior for the mechanical unfolding of a protein and reveals the complexity of the unfolding dynamics among structurally similar proteins. Furthermore, we extended our method into a robust and efficient pseudo-dwell-time analysis method, which allows one to make full use of all the unfolding events obtained in force-clamp experiments without categorizing the unfolding events. This method enabled us to measure the key parameters characterizing the mechanical unfolding energy landscape of NuG2 with improved precision. We anticipate that the methods demonstrated here will find broad applications in single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy studies for a wide range of proteins.

  4. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of phenol and d5-phenol: Direct observation of cyclopentadiene formation via cyclohexadienone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Barney Ellison, G.

    2012-01-01

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d5-phenol (C6H5OH and C6D5OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the μtubular reactor of approximately 50-100 μs. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C6H5OH → c-C6H6 = O → c-C5H6 + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C5H6 → c-C5H5 + H → HC≡CH + HCCCH2. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C6H5O-H → C6H5O + H → c-C5H5 + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C6H4-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C6H4-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  5. Photographic observation of magnetic domain structure with three-dimensional local magnetization direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-07-01

    The direction of magnetization of a magnetic material is possibly oriented three-dimensionally because of the presence of magnetic anisotropy field, self-demagnetizing field, and stray field. Therefore, the three-dimensional detection of the direction of magnetization is required. The method of magnetic domain observation by photographic imaging utilizing the Kerr effect is widely used. If the perpendicular magnetization components exist, there is a problem that obliquely incident light has superimposed longitudinal Kerr and polar Kerr effects. To perform the three-dimensional detection of magnetization direction, it is necessary to eliminate the influence of the polar Kerr effect from the Kerr effect of obliquely incident light. We report the photographic observation of the magnetic domain structure and the detection of the three-dimensional local magnetization direction using the Kerr effect, applying only an in-plane saturation magnetic field.

  6. Direct observation of molecularly-aligned molecules in the second physisorbed layer-CO/Ag(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-G.; Hong, S.-H.; Ahner, J.; Zhao, X.; Chen, L.; Johnson, J.K.; Yates, J.T., Jr.

    2006-01-25

    We report the direct observation of oriented second-layer physisorbed molecules on a single crystal surface by electron stimulated desorption. Experiments and simulations show that the orientation of the second-layer physisorbed CO molecules on Ag(110) is the result of both electrostatic and dispersion forces from the underlying chemisorbed CO and Ag atoms. At 25 K, the physisorbed C-O bond is tilted and azimuthally oriented with the C-O bond axis inclined in an azimuthal plane at 45° to the principal Ag( 110) azimuthal crystallographic directions. The O atom in CO is directed outward, giving an O+ beam at 43° to the normal.

  7. Direct observation of grain growth from molten silicon formed by micro-thermal-plasma-jet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shohei; Fujita, Yuji; Kamikura, Takahiro; Sakaike, Kohei; Akazawa, Muneki; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Hanafusa, Hiroaki; Higashi, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Phase transformation of amorphous-silicon during millisecond annealing using micro-thermal-plasma-jet irradiation was directly observed using a high-speed camera with microsecond time resolution. An oval-shaped molten-silicon region adjacent to the solid phase crystallization region was clearly observed, followed by lateral large grain growth perpendicular to a liquid-solid interface. Furthermore, leading wave crystallization (LWC), which showed intermittent explosive crystallization, was discovered in front of the moving molten region. The growth mechanism of LWC has been investigated on the basis of numerical simulation implementing explosive movement of a thin liquid layer driven by released latent heat diffusion in a lateral direction. PMID:23185095

  8. Direct observation of grain growth from molten silicon formed by micro-thermal-plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Shohei; Fujita, Yuji; Kamikura, Takahiro; Sakaike, Kohei; Akazawa, Muneki; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Hanafusa, Hiroaki; Higashi, Seiichiro

    2012-10-22

    Phase transformation of amorphous-silicon during millisecond annealing using micro-thermal-plasma-jet irradiation was directly observed using a high-speed camera with microsecond time resolution. An oval-shaped molten-silicon region adjacent to the solid phase crystallization region was clearly observed, followed by lateral large grain growth perpendicular to a liquid-solid interface. Furthermore, leading wave crystallization (LWC), which showed intermittent explosive crystallization, was discovered in front of the moving molten region. The growth mechanism of LWC has been investigated on the basis of numerical simulation implementing explosive movement of a thin liquid layer driven by released latent heat diffusion in a lateral direction.

  9. Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence from nickel thin films: Fixed angle observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberg, Micah; Aslan, Kadir; Hortle, Elinor; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-04-01

    Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence (SPCC) from nickel thin films is demonstrated. Free-space and angular-dependent SPCC emission from blue, green and turquoise chemiluminescent solutions placed onto nickel thin films attached to a hemispherical prism were measured. SPCC emission was found to be highly directional and preferentially p-polarized, in contrast to the unpolarized and isotropic chemiluminescence emission. The largest SPCC emission for all chemiluminescence solutions was observed at a fixed observation angle of 60°, which was also predicted by theoretical Fresnel calculations. It was found that nickel thin films did not have a catalytic effect on chemiluminescence emission.

  10. Observation of trichomonads infection in a child with periodontitis by direct microscopy at the dental office.

    PubMed

    Marty, Mathieu; Bonner, Mark; Vaysse, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenicity of Trichomonas species is well documented. Although their exact involvement in gum disease is not fully understood, recent studies suggest a correlation between these protozoa and periodontitis. This case report details the first chair-side observation in Europe of an oral trichomonad infection in a child with periodontitis, by direct microscopy. The dramatic recovery of the patient, observed following administration of an anti-parasitic treatment, confirms the necessity of further investigation in this field.

  11. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A.; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A. S.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system. PMID:27625602

  12. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A S; Rodrigues, Erika C; Vargas, Claudia D

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system. PMID:27625602

  13. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A.; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A. S.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system.

  14. Observations of the directional distribution of the wind energy input function over swell waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Behnam; Babanin, Alex V.; Baldock, Tom E.

    2016-02-01

    Field measurements of wind stress over shallow water swell traveling in different directions relative to the wind are presented. The directional distribution of the measured stresses is used to confirm the previously proposed but unverified directional distribution of the wind energy input function. The observed wind energy input function is found to follow a much narrower distribution (β∝cos⁡3.6θ) than the Plant (1982) cosine distribution. The observation of negative stress angles at large wind-wave angles, however, indicates that the onset of negative wind shearing occurs at about θ≈ 50°, and supports the use of the Snyder et al. (1981) directional distribution. Taking into account the reverse momentum transfer from swell to the wind, Snyder's proposed parameterization is found to perform exceptionally well in explaining the observed narrow directional distribution of the wind energy input function, and predicting the wind drag coefficients. The empirical coefficient (ɛ) in Snyder's parameterization is hypothesised to be a function of the wave shape parameter, with ɛ value increasing as the wave shape changes between sinusoidal, sawtooth, and sharp-crested shoaling waves.

  15. Ethical aspects of directly observed treatment for tuberculosis: a cross-cultural comparison

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a major global public health challenge, and a majority of countries have adopted a version of the global strategy to fight Tuberculosis, Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS). Drawing on results from research in Ethiopia and Norway, the aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss ethical aspects of the practice of Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) in a cross-cultural perspective. Discussion Research from Ethiopia and Norway demonstrates that the rigid enforcement of directly observed treatment conflicts with patient autonomy, dignity and integrity. The treatment practices, especially when imposed in its strictest forms, expose those who have Tuberculosis to extra burdens and costs. Socially disadvantaged groups, such as the homeless, those employed as day labourers and those lacking rights as employees, face the highest burdens. Summary From an ethical standpoint, we argue that a rigid practice of directly observed treatment is difficult to justify, and that responsiveness to social determinants of Tuberculosis should become an integral part of the management of Tuberculosis. PMID:23819555

  16. Directly Observed Interaction within Adolescent Romantic Relationships: What Have We Learned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Deborah P.; Shulman, Shmuel

    2008-01-01

    Review and conceptual analysis of the papers in this special issue calls attention to several important methodological and conceptual issues surrounding the direct observation of adolescent romantic couples. It also provides an important new foundation of knowledge about the nature of adolescents' romantic relationships. Connections with previous…

  17. Considering Systematic Direct Observation after a Century of Research--Commentary on the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine P.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Systematic Direct Observation (SDO) has played a pivotal role in the field of Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders (EBD) since its inception as a key part of understanding more about the behaviors, contexts that impact them, and the effective supports necessary for this population. This methodology is an ongoing charge for everyone. The authors…

  18. Observational Learning of Academic and Social Behaviors during Small-Group Direct Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that small-group direct instruction is effective and efficient for teaching students with and without disabilities, although relatively few studies have been conducted with heterogeneous groups of preschool participants. In addition, previous studies have primarily assessed whether observational learning occurred for…

  19. Affective Evaluations of Objects Are Influenced by Observed Gaze Direction and Emotional Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayliss, Andrew P.; Frischen, Alexandra; Fenske, Mark J.; Tipper, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    Gaze direction signals another person's focus of interest. Facial expressions convey information about their mental state. Appropriate responses to these signals should reflect their combined influence, yet current evidence suggests that gaze-cueing effects for objects near an observed face are not modulated by its emotional expression. Here, we…

  20. The Impact of Observation Duration on the Accuracy of Data Obtained from Direct Behavior Rating (DBR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Christ, Theodore J.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Boice-Mallach, Christina H.; Briesch, Amy

    2011-01-01

    In this study, evaluation of direct behavior rating (DBR) occurred with regard to two primary areas: (a) accuracy of ratings with varied instrumentation (anchoring: proportional or absolute) and procedures (observation length: 5 min, 10 min, or 20 min) and (b) one-week test-retest reliability. Participants viewed video clips of a typical third…

  1. Standardizing the Pre-Licensure Supervision Process: A Commentary on Advocating for Direct Observation of Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Neal D.; Erickson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The present paper advocates for standardized regulations and laws for supervision of pre-licensed counselors in the United States, particularly for direct observation of clinical skills. A review of regulations by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Office of Professional Affairs (2012) reveals that only two states (Arizona and North…

  2. Assessing nurses' hand hygiene practices by direct observation or self-report.

    PubMed

    Larson, Elaine L; Aiello, Allison E; Cimiotti, Jeannie P

    2004-01-01

    Methods of obtaining data on hand hygiene practices have not been well validated. The purpose of this study was to compare two methods of assessment of hand hygiene practices--direct observation and self-report using diaries. For 22 months, nursing staff (n = 119) from two neonatal ICUs recorded their hand hygiene practices on a diary card one shift/month (n = 1,071 diary cards). The same data were collected in monthly 1-hour direct observation sessions (n = 206 hours). Amount of time in gloves and total hand hygiene episodes/hour did not differ significantly by diary or observation, but four other specific parameters were significantly different. If hand hygiene practices are to be assessed over time, the same method must be used. Given these measurement limitations, more valid, practical, and less costly methods are needed.

  3. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes.

  4. Metabolic profiling of plant extracts using direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allows for high-throughput phenotypic characterization according to genetic and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    García-Flores, Martín; Juárez-Colunga, Sheila; García-Casarrubias, Adrián; Trachsel, Samuel; Winkler, Robert; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-01-28

    In comparison to the exponential increase of genotyping methods, phenotyping strategies are lagging behind in agricultural sciences. Genetic improvement depends upon the abundance of quantitative phenotypic data and the statistical partitioning of variance into environmental, genetic, and random effects. A metabolic phenotyping strategy was adapted to increase sample throughput while saving reagents, reducing cost, and simplifying data analysis. The chemical profiles of stem extracts from maize plants grown under low nitrogen (LN) or control trial (CT) were analyzed using optimized protocols for direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DIESI-MS). Specific ions significantly decreased or increased because of environmental (LN versus CT) or genotypic effects. Biochemical profiling with DIESI-MS had a superior cost-benefit compared to other standard analytical technologies (e.g., ultraviolet, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection) routinely used for plant breeding. The method can be successfully applied in maize, strawberry, coffee, and other crop species. PMID:25588121

  5. A Review of Direct Observation Research within the Past Decade in the Field of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Reesha M.; Wachsmuth, Sean T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reviewed prominent journals within the field of emotional and behavioral disorders to identify direct observation approaches, reported reliability statistics, and key features of direct observation. Selected journals were systematically reviewed for the past 10 years identifying and quantifying specific direct observation systems and…

  6. Evaluating worker vibration exposures using self-reported and direct observation estimates of exposure duration.

    PubMed

    McCallig, Margaret; Paddan, Gurmail; Van Lente, Eric; Moore, Ken; Coggins, Marie

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare objective and subjective methods of collecting exposure time data for hand arm vibration (HAV) and whole-body vibration (WBV), and to evaluate the impact of inaccurate exposure times' on the calculation of the average vibration exposure over an 8 h working day A(8). The study was carried out in the engineering services and maintenance departments of a construction and property management company. Worker exposure time data was collected using three methods, questionnaire surveys, daily worker interviews and 8 h direct workplace observations. Vibration magnitudes (m/s(2)) were measured for a range of hand tools and vehicles, and daily vibration exposure estimates A(8) were calculated using exposure times observed, reported in interview and self reported in the questionnaire. Results from the study showed that self-reported exposure time estimates from the questionnaire survey were a factor of 9.0 (median value) times greater for HAV and a factor of 6.0 (median value) times greater for WBV when compared with direct observation estimates. Exposure times reported in interview were higher, than those observed, but more reliable than those self reported in the questionnaire; a factor of 2.1 (median value) times greater for HAV and a factor of 1.4 (median value) times greater for WBV. A(8) values calculated using questionnaire exposure times were up to 66% and 75% greater for sources of HAV and WBV respectively when compared to A(8) values calculated using observed exposure times. For the purposes of carrying out a reliable risk assessment, results from this study indicate that direct measurements of worker exposure time are not recommended over questionnaires especially where work is highly variable for example in construction and property management. Worker interviews or direct workplace observation methods were found to be reliable alternative methods for collecting exposure time.

  7. Direct Observation of Localized Radial Oxygen Migration in Functioning Tantalum Oxide Memristors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Graves, Catherine E; Strachan, John Paul; Grafals, Emmanuelle Merced; Kilcoyne, Arthur L David; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Weker, Johanna Nelson; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2016-04-13

    Oxygen migration in tantalum oxide, a promising next-generation storage material, is studied using in operando X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. This approach allows a physical description of the evolution of conduction channel and eventual device failure. The observed ring-like patterns of oxygen concentration are modeled using thermophoretic forces and Fick diffusion, establishing the critical role of temperature-driven oxygen migration. PMID:26833926

  8. A Novel 7-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Clonotyping Test Allows Rapid Prediction of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Directly From Urine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Billig, Mariya; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Aprikian, Pavel; Chan, Diana; Pseunova, Julietta; Rechkina, Elena; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Fang, Ferric C.; Johnson, James R.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Escherichia coli is a highly clonal pathogen. Extraintestinal isolates belong to a limited number of genetically related groups, which often exhibit characteristic antimicrobial resistance profiles. Methods. We developed a rapid clonotyping method for extraintestinal E coli based on detection of the presence or absence of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 2 genes (fumC and fimH). A reference set of 2559 E coli isolates, primarily of urinary origin, was used to predict the resolving power of the 7-SNP-based typing method, and 582 representative strains from this set were used to evaluate test robustness. Results. Fifty-four unique SNP combinations (“septatypes”) were identified in the reference strains. These septatypes yielded a clonal group resolution power on par with that of traditional multilocus sequence typing. In 72% of isolates, septatype identity predicted sequence type identity with at least 90% (mean, 97%) accuracy. Most septatypes exhibited highly distinctive antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The 7-SNP-based test could be performed with high specificity and sensitivity using single or multiplex conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR. In the latter format, E coli presence and septatype identity were determined directly in urine specimens within 45 minutes with bacterial loads as low as 102 colony-forming units/mL and, at clinically significant bacterial loads, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions. 7-SNP-based typing of E coli can be used for both epidemiological studies and clinical diagnostics, which could greatly improve the empirical selection of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26925427

  9. The Tangle of Student Allowances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Norman J.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the distribution of student financial aid in Australia focuses on these issues: direct vs. indirect payment to students; inequality in living allowances given to secondary and postsecondary students; and distribution of expense allowances by state government and living allowances by the Commonwealth. (MSE)

  10. THE STRUCTURE OF A SELF-GRAVITATING PROTOPLANETARY DISK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR DIRECT IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Takayuki

    2011-09-20

    We consider the effects of self-gravity on the hydrostatic balance in the vertical direction of a gaseous disk and discuss the possible signature of the self-gravity that may be captured by direct imaging observations of protoplanetary disks in the future. In this paper, we consider a vertically isothermal disk in order to isolate the effects of self-gravity. The specific disk model we consider in this paper is the one with a radial surface density gap, at which the Toomre's Q-parameter of the disk varies rapidly in the radial direction. We calculate the vertical structure of the disk including the effects of self-gravity. We then calculate the scattered light and the dust thermal emission. We find that if the disk is massive enough and the effects of self-gravity come into play, a weak bump-like structure at the gap edge appears in the near-infrared (NIR) scattered light, while no such bump-like structure is seen in the submillimeter (sub-mm) dust continuum image. The appearance of the bump is caused by the variation of the height of the surface in the NIR wavelength. If such a bump-like feature is detected in future direct imaging observations, combined with sub-mm observations, it will give us useful information about the physical states of the disk.

  11. Unimolecular Thermal Decomposition of Phenol and d5-Phenol: Direct Observation of Cyclopentadiene Formation via Cyclohexadienone

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, A. M.; Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.; Carstensen, H. H.; Barney, E. G.

    2012-01-28

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d{sub 5}-phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 6}D{sub 5}OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular ({mu}tubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the {mu}tubular reactor of approximately 50-100 {micro}s. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH {yields} c-C{sub 6}H{sub 6} = O {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6} + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6} {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + H {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH + HCCCH{sub 2}. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O-H {yields} C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O + H {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  12. Direct observation of photonic jets and corresponding backscattering enhancement at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Ong, C. K.

    2009-06-01

    We report the direct observation of photonic nanojets that emerged from the shadow side of a dielectric cylinder illuminated by plane waves in the microwave frequencies (8-13 GHz). Using our recently developed two-dimensional spatial field mapping system, we carried out a point-by-point measurement of both the phase and intensity of spatial electric field distribution inside and around scattering dielectric cylinders. The direct electric field maps confirm the subwavelength waist of the photonic jet. In addition, we also confirmed the superbackscattering enhancement induced by the presence of a particle much smaller than the initial focusing cylinder within the photonic jet.

  13. Protein structure. Direct observation of structure-function relationship in a nucleic acid-processing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Matthew J; Whitley, Kevin D; Jia, Haifeng; Sokoloski, Joshua; Lohman, Timothy M; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-04-17

    The relationship between protein three-dimensional structure and function is essential for mechanism determination. Unfortunately, most techniques do not provide a direct measurement of this relationship. Structural data are typically limited to static pictures, and function must be inferred. Conversely, functional assays usually provide little information on structural conformation. We developed a single-molecule technique combining optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy that allows for both measurements simultaneously. Here we present measurements of UvrD, a DNA repair helicase, that directly and unambiguously reveal the connection between its structure and function. Our data reveal that UvrD exhibits two distinct types of unwinding activity regulated by its stoichiometry. Furthermore, two UvrD conformational states, termed "closed" and "open," correlate with movement toward or away from the DNA fork.

  14. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  15. Gravity Waves Generated by Convection: A New Idealized Model Tool and Direct Validation with Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    In climate models, gravity waves remain too poorly resolved to be directly modelled. Instead, simplified parameterizations are used to include gravity wave effects on model winds. A few climate models link some of the parameterized waves to convective sources, providing a mechanism for feedback between changes in convection and gravity wave-driven changes in circulation in the tropics and above high-latitude storms. These convective wave parameterizations are based on limited case studies with cloud-resolving models, but they are poorly constrained by observational validation, and tuning parameters have large uncertainties. Our new work distills results from complex, full-physics cloud-resolving model studies to essential variables for gravity wave generation. We use the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model to study relationships between precipitation, latent heating/cooling and other cloud properties to the spectrum of gravity wave momentum flux above midlatitude storm systems. Results show the gravity wave spectrum is surprisingly insensitive to the representation of microphysics in WRF. This is good news for use of these models for gravity wave parameterization development since microphysical properties are a key uncertainty. We further use the full-physics cloud-resolving model as a tool to directly link observed precipitation variability to gravity wave generation. We show that waves in an idealized model forced with radar-observed precipitation can quantitatively reproduce instantaneous satellite-observed features of the gravity wave field above storms, which is a powerful validation of our understanding of waves generated by convection. The idealized model directly links observations of surface precipitation to observed waves in the stratosphere, and the simplicity of the model permits deep/large-area domains for studies of wave-mean flow interactions. This unique validated model tool permits quantitative studies of gravity wave driving of regional

  16. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  17. Direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogenlike donor state in insulating SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Salman, Z; Prokscha, T; Amato, A; Morenzoni, E; Scheuermann, R; Sedlak, K; Suter, A

    2014-10-10

    We present a direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogenlike muonium state in SrTiO(3) which confirms the theoretical prediction that interstitial hydrogen may act as a shallow donor in this material. The formation of this muonium state is temperature dependent and appears below ∼ 70K. From the temperature dependence we estimate an activation energy of ∼ 50 meV in the bulk and ∼ 23 meV near the free surface. The field and directional dependence of the muonium precession frequencies further supports the shallow impurity state with a rare example of a fully anisotropic hyperfine tensor. From these measurements we determine the strength of the hyperfine interaction and propose that the muon occupies an interstitial site near the face of the oxygen octahedron in SrTiO(3). The observed shallow donor state provides new insight for tailoring the electronic and optical properties of SrTiO(3)-based oxide interface systems.

  18. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  19. Direct observation of surface plasmons in YBCO by attenuated total reflection of light in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, D. G.; Smyth, C. C.; Sellai, A.; McCafferty, P. G.; Dawson, P.; Morrow, T.; Graham, W. G.

    1994-02-01

    Surface plasmons have been observed directly in YBCO films in an Otto-geometry attenuated total reflection measurement at a wavelength of 3.392 μm. The laser deposited films are c-axis oriented on an MgO substrate. This observation confirms theoretical deductions from complex dielectric function data. Measured data have been fitted to a theoretical model and are compared with the optical constants determined by Bozovic [1]. The investigations have been extended to films with other orientations to investigate whether material anisotropy is reflected in the results and non-metallic behaviour is found.

  20. Direct observation of a photoinduced nonstabilized nitrile imine structure in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shao-Liang; Wang, Yizhong; Yu, Zhipeng; Lin, Qing; Coppens, Philip

    2009-12-23

    We report the direct observation of a bent geometry for a nonstabilized nitrile imine in a metal-coordination crystal. The photoinduced tetrazole ring rupture to release N(2) appears to depend on the size of voids around the N(3)-N(4) bond in the crystal lattice. We further observed the selective formation of the 1,3-addition product when a reactive nitrile imine was photogenerated in water. Overall, the bent nitrile imine geometry agrees with the 1,3-dipolar structure, a transient reactive species that mediates the photoinduced 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition in the aqueous medium.

  1. Directivity Patterns of Complex Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, T.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Complex solar type III-like radio bursts are a group of type III bursts that occur in association with slowly drifting type II radio bursts excited by coronal mass ejection (CME) driven shock waves. We presentsimultaneous observations of these radio bursts from the STEREO A, B and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies, located at different vantage points in the ecliptic plane. Using these stereoscopic observations, wedetermine the directivity of these complex radio bursts. We estimate the angles between the directions of the magnetic field at the sources and the lines connecting the source to the spacecraft (viewing angles) by assuming that the sources are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere. We estimate the normalized peak intensities of these bursts (directivity factors) at each spacecraft using their time profiles at each spacecraft. These observations indicate that the complex type III bursts can be divided into two groups: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field, and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone. We show that the bursts , which are emitted along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source are very intense, and their intensities steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. We have developed a ray tracing code and computed the distributions of the trajectories of rays emitted at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency. The comparison of the observed emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relativelyweaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  2. Direct time-domain observation of laser pulse filaments in transparent media

    SciTech Connect

    Dachraoui, H.; Oberer, C.; Michelswirth,; Heinzmann, U.

    2010-10-15

    The interplay among self-focusing, energy depletion, and plasma formation is fundamental to the understanding of laser-matter interaction. In this article, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses experiencing conical emission, self-focusing, self-guiding, beam filamentation, plasma defocusing, and continuum generation in wide-band-gap dielectrics. We demonstrate that continuum generation involves different mechanisms as a function of deposited energy.

  3. Effect of illuminance on the directions of chromostereopsis and transverse chromatic aberration observed with natural pupils.

    PubMed

    Simonet, P; Campbell, M C

    1990-07-01

    The direction of chromostereopsis observed with a natural pupil and the direction of the monocularly perceived disparity between coloured targets (F and C lines - 486 and 656 nm) have been measured in a sample of 30 subjects at 10 and 1000 lx. At both illumination levels approximately equal numbers of subjects perceived positive and negative chromostereopsis. When the ambient illumination was increased, a reversal in the direction of the chromostereopsis occurred for 16 subjects. For six of them a change from a positive to a negative chromostereopsis was observed, a pattern not reported in previous studies. In most cases at both high and low illuminance, there was an absence of perception of a monocular disparity (transverse chromatic aberration), although chromostereopsis was reported, indicating that binocular information can be obtained from sub-threshold monocular disparities. At low illuminance, the lack of correlation between the direction of chromostereopsis and transverse chromatic aberration (TCA) may indicate that there may be a supplementary binocular factor in chromostereopsis.

  4. Controllability and observability analysis for vertex domination centrality in directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yue; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Topological centrality is a significant measure for characterising the relative importance of a node in a complex network. For directed networks that model dynamic processes, however, it is of more practical importance to quantify a vertex's ability to dominate (control or observe) the state of other vertices. In this paper, based on the determination of controllable and observable subspaces under the global minimum-cost condition, we introduce a novel direction-specific index, domination centrality, to assess the intervention capabilities of vertices in a directed network. Statistical studies demonstrate that the domination centrality is, to a great extent, encoded by the underlying network's degree distribution and that most network positions through which one can intervene in a system are vertices with high domination centrality rather than network hubs. To analyse the interaction and functional dependence between vertices when they are used to dominate a network, we define the domination similarity and detect significant functional modules in glossary and metabolic networks through clustering analysis. The experimental results provide strong evidence that our indices are effective and practical in accurately depicting the structure of directed networks. PMID:24954137

  5. Three-dimensional atomic force microscopy: interaction force vector by direct observation of tip trajectory.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Krishna P; Grayer, Justin S; King, Gavin M

    2013-11-13

    The prospect of a robust three-dimensional atomic force microscope (AFM) holds significant promise in nanoscience. Yet, in conventional AFM, the tip-sample interaction force vector is not directly accessible. We scatter a focused laser directly off an AFM tip apex to rapidly and precisely measure the tapping tip trajectory in three-dimensional space. This data also yields three-dimensional cantilever spring constants, effective masses, and hence, the tip-sample interaction force components via Newton's second law. Significant lateral forces representing 49 and 13% of the normal force (Fz = 152 ± 17 pN) were observed in common tapping mode conditions as a silicon tip intermittently contacted a glass substrate in aqueous solution; as a consequence, the direction of the force vector tilted considerably more than expected. When addressing the surface of a lipid bilayer, the behavior of the force components differed significantly from that observed on glass. This is attributed to the lateral mobility of the lipid membrane coupled with its elastic properties. Direct access to interaction components Fx, Fy, and Fz provides a more complete view of tip dynamics that underlie force microscope operation and can form the foundation of a three-dimensional AFM in a plurality of conditions.

  6. Controllability and observability analysis for vertex domination centrality in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yue; Wang, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Topological centrality is a significant measure for characterising the relative importance of a node in a complex network. For directed networks that model dynamic processes, however, it is of more practical importance to quantify a vertex's ability to dominate (control or observe) the state of other vertices. In this paper, based on the determination of controllable and observable subspaces under the global minimum-cost condition, we introduce a novel direction-specific index, domination centrality, to assess the intervention capabilities of vertices in a directed network. Statistical studies demonstrate that the domination centrality is, to a great extent, encoded by the underlying network's degree distribution and that most network positions through which one can intervene in a system are vertices with high domination centrality rather than network hubs. To analyse the interaction and functional dependence between vertices when they are used to dominate a network, we define the domination similarity and detect significant functional modules in glossary and metabolic networks through clustering analysis. The experimental results provide strong evidence that our indices are effective and practical in accurately depicting the structure of directed networks.

  7. Warming experiments elucidate the drivers of observed directional changes in tundra vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Robert D; May, Jeremy L; Kremers, Kelseyann S; Tweedie, Craig E; Oberbauer, Steven F; Liebig, Jennifer A; Botting, Timothy F; Barrett, Robert T; Gregory, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have clearly linked long-term monitoring with in situ experiments to clarify potential drivers of observed change at a given site. This is especially necessary when findings from a site are applied to a much broader geographic area. Here, we document vegetation change at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, occurring naturally and due to experimental warming over nearly two decades. An examination of plant cover, canopy height, and community indices showed more significant differences between years than due to experimental warming. However, changes with warming were more consistent than changes between years and were cumulative in many cases. Most cases of directional change observed in the control plots over time corresponded with a directional change in response to experimental warming. These included increases in canopy height and decreases in lichen cover. Experimental warming resulted in additional increases in evergreen shrub cover and decreases in diversity and bryophyte cover. This study suggests that the directional changes occurring at the sites are primarily due to warming and indicates that further changes are likely in the next two decades if the regional warming trend continues. These findings provide an example of the utility of coupling in situ experiments with long-term monitoring to accurately document vegetation change in response to global change and to identify the underlying mechanisms driving observed changes. PMID:26140204

  8. Warming experiments elucidate the drivers of observed directional changes in tundra vegetation.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Robert D; May, Jeremy L; Kremers, Kelseyann S; Tweedie, Craig E; Oberbauer, Steven F; Liebig, Jennifer A; Botting, Timothy F; Barrett, Robert T; Gregory, Jessica L

    2015-05-01

    Few studies have clearly linked long-term monitoring with in situ experiments to clarify potential drivers of observed change at a given site. This is especially necessary when findings from a site are applied to a much broader geographic area. Here, we document vegetation change at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, occurring naturally and due to experimental warming over nearly two decades. An examination of plant cover, canopy height, and community indices showed more significant differences between years than due to experimental warming. However, changes with warming were more consistent than changes between years and were cumulative in many cases. Most cases of directional change observed in the control plots over time corresponded with a directional change in response to experimental warming. These included increases in canopy height and decreases in lichen cover. Experimental warming resulted in additional increases in evergreen shrub cover and decreases in diversity and bryophyte cover. This study suggests that the directional changes occurring at the sites are primarily due to warming and indicates that further changes are likely in the next two decades if the regional warming trend continues. These findings provide an example of the utility of coupling in situ experiments with long-term monitoring to accurately document vegetation change in response to global change and to identify the underlying mechanisms driving observed changes.

  9. Direct observation of phagocytosis and NET-formation by neutrophils in infected lungs using 2-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hasenberg, Mike; Köhler, Anja; Bonifatius, Susanne; Jeron, Andreas; Gunzer, Matthias

    2011-06-02

    After the gastrointestinal tract, the lung is the second largest surface for interaction between the vertebrate body and the environment. Here, an effective gas exchange must be maintained, while at the same time avoiding infection by the multiple pathogens that are inhaled during normal breathing. To achieve this, a superb set of defense strategies combining humoral and cellular immune mechanisms exists. One of the most effective measures for acute defense of the lung is the recruitment of neutrophils, which either phagocytose the inhaled pathogens or kill them by releasing cytotoxic chemicals. A recent addition to the arsenal of neutrophils is their explosive release of extracellular DNA-NETs by which bacteria or fungi can be caught or inactivated even after the NET releasing cells have died. We present here a method that allows one to directly observe neutrophils, migrating within a recently infected lung, phagocytosing fungal pathogens as well as visualize the extensive NETs that they have produced throughout the infected tissue. The method describes the preparation of thick viable lung slices 7 hours after intratracheal infection of mice with conidia of the mold Aspergillus fumigatus and their examination by multicolor time-lapse 2-photon microscopy. This approach allows one to directly investigate antifungal defense in native lung tissue and thus opens a new avenue for the detailed investigation of pulmonary immunity.

  10. Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex state in CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Carlton, D.; Park, J. S.; Meng, Y.; Arenholz, E.; Doran, A.; Young, A.T.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, C.; Zhao, H. W.; Bokor, J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2010-12-21

    In magnetic thin films, a magnetic vortex is a state in which the magnetization vector curls around the center of a confined structure. A vortex state in a thin film disk, for example, is a topological object characterized by the vortex polarity and the winding number. In ferromagnetic (FM) disks, these parameters govern many fundamental properties of the vortex such as its gyroscopic rotation, polarity reversal, core motion, and vortex pair excitation. However, in antiferromagnetic (AFM) disks, though there has been indirect evidence of the vortex state through observations of the induced FM-ordered spins in the AFM disk, they have never been observed directly in experiment. By fabricating single crystalline NiO/Fe/Ag(001) and CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks and using X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD), we show direct observation of the vortex state in an AFM disk of AFM/FM bilayer system. We observe that there are two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analog in FM structures. Finally, we show that a frozen AFM vortex can bias a FM vortex at low temperature.

  11. Home Videophones Improve Direct Observation in Tuberculosis Treatment: A Mixed Methods Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Victoria A.; Karnon, Jonathan; Eliott, Jaklin A.; Hiller, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of direct observation to monitor tuberculosis treatment is controversial: cost, practical difficulties, and lack of patient acceptability limit effectiveness. Telehealth is a promising alternative delivery method for improving implementation. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a telehealth service delivering direct observation, compared to an in-person drive-around service. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was conducted within a community nursing service in South Australia. Telehealth patients received daily video calls at home on a desktop videophone provided by the nursing call center. A retrospective cohort study assessed the effectiveness of the telehealth and traditional forms of observation, defined by the proportion of missed observations recorded in case notes. This data was inputted to a model, estimating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of telehealth. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with current patients, community nursing and Chest Clinic staff, concerning service acceptability, usability and sustainability. The percentage of missed observations for the telehealth service was 12.1 (n = 58), compared to 31.1 for the in-person service (n = 70). Most of the difference of 18.9% (95% CI: 12.2 – 25.4) was due to fewer pre-arranged absences. The economic analysis calculated the ICER to be AUD$1.32 (95% CI: $0.51 – $2.26) per extra day of successful observation. The video service used less staff time, and became dominant if implemented on a larger scale and/or with decreased technology costs. Qualitative analysis found enabling factors of flexible timing, high patient acceptance, staff efficiency, and Chest Clinic support. Substantial technical problems were manageable, and improved liaison between the nursing service and Chest Clinic was an unexpected side-benefit. Conclusions/Significance Home video observation is a patient-centered, resource efficient way of

  12. Accuracy and reliability of direct observations of home-packed lunches in elementary schools by trained nutrition students.

    PubMed

    Richter, Shannon L; Vandervet, Laura M; Macaskill, Lesley A; Salvadori, Marina I; Seabrook, Jamie A; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2012-10-01

    Increased attention has been directed toward the school food environment because children consume important contributions toward their daily food intake while at school. In Canada, most elementary school students bring a lunch to school and there are minimal data on the composition and consumption of these lunches. Dietary assessment of home-packed lunches is challenging compared with assessment of standardized school meals due to greater diversity of items, nonstandard portions, and opaque containers. We assessed accuracy and reliability of a food observation method whereby upper-year nutrition students (n=15) were trained to assess packed lunch contents and intake in elementary schools. Accuracy and reliability was assessed during 2010-2011 in three observational phases: sample lunches, volunteer-consumed lunches, and elementary school students' lunches (n=32). Observers accurately identified 96% and 95% of items in the sample and volunteer lunches, respectively. Similarly, they accurately reported portion sizes for 86% and 94% of the items in the sample and volunteer lunches, thus showing improvements in successive phases. Interobserver reliability for amount consumed, by portion size and macronutrient content, ranged from 0.79 to 0.88 in the volunteer-consumed lunches and 0.78 to 0.86 in the students' lunches, with a majority ≥0.80. It is noteworthy that the analyses for the amount consumed were conducted as absolute amounts with no allowances for discrepancies, which differs from other interobserver reliability assessments where as much as 25% discrepancy is considered agreement. Observers with prior nutrition knowledge assessed packed lunch contents and intake accurately and reliably by direct observation in an elementary school setting. PMID:23017569

  13. Direct observation of Li diffusion in Li-doped ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohua; Yu, Lei; Hudak, Bethany M.; Chang, Yao-Jen; Baek, Hyeonjun; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Strachan, Douglas R.; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Guiton, Beth S.

    2016-05-01

    The direct observation of Li diffusion in Li-doped zinc oxide nanowires (NWs) was realized by using in situ heating in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). A continuous increase of low atomic mass regions within a single NW was observed between 200 °C and 600 °C when heated in vacuum, which was explained by the conversion of interstitial to substitutional Li in the ZnO NW host lattice. A kick-out mechanism is introduced to explain the migration and conversion of the interstitial Li (Lii) to Zn-site substitutional Li (LiZn), and this mechanism is verified with low-temperature (11 K) photoluminescence measurements on as-grown and annealed Li-doped zinc oxide NWs, as well as the observation of an increase of NW surface roughing with applied bias.

  14. Does prey size matter? Novel observations of feeding in the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) allow a test of predator-prey size relationships.

    PubMed

    Fossette, Sabrina; Gleiss, Adrian C; Casey, James P; Lewis, Andrew R; Hays, Graeme C

    2012-06-23

    Optimal foraging models predict that large predators should concentrate on large prey in order to maximize their net gain of energy intake. Here, we show that the largest species of sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea, does not strictly adhere to this general pattern. Field observations combined with a theoretical model suggest that a 300 kg leatherback turtle would meet its energetic requirements by feeding for 3-4 h a day on 4 g jellyfish, but only if prey were aggregated in high-density patches. Therefore, prey abundance rather than prey size may, in some cases, be the overriding parameter for foraging leatherbacks. This is a classic example where the presence of small prey in the diet of a large marine predator may reflect profitable foraging decisions if the relatively low energy intake per small individual prey is offset by high encounter rates and minimal capture and handling costs. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantitative estimates of intake rate for this species. PMID:22090203

  15. Observations of black carbon induced semi direct effect over Northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, A. S.; Pandithurai, G.; Safai, P. D.; Dipu, S.; Prabha, T. V.; Konwar, M.

    2014-12-01

    This article reports observational evidence of Black Carbon (BC) induced cloud burning effect (Semi direct effect) for the first time over a mountainous location in North east India. Simultaneous aircraft observations of Black Carbon (BC) mass concentrations and cloud microphysical parameters were carried out over Guwahati, in Northeast India during Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) Phase-I in 2009. Elevated pollution layers of BC (concentration exceeding 1 μg m-3) were observed over the site up to 7 km on different experimental days (August 30, September 4 and 6 in 2009) in the cloud regime. The vertical heating rate and radiative forcing induced by elevated BC layers in the cloud regime were estimated using an optical model along with a radiative transfer model. The instantaneous vertical heating rate induced by BC in cloud layers is found to be as high as 2.65 K/day. The instantaneous vertical heating by BC is found to be inducing a significant reduction in the measured cloud liquid water content (LWC) over the site. Subsequently, the BC stimulated heating has been found to be reducing the cloud fraction (CFR) and thus inducing a “cloud burning effect (Semi direct effect)”, over the region. The estimated instantaneous BC induced radiative forcing in the cloud regime is found to be +12.7-+45.1 W m-2 during the experimental periods. This large warming and reduction in cloudiness can decrease the precipitation over the region. However, more simultaneous BC-cloud observations and further research are necessary to establish a stable “semi-direct effect” over the region.

  16. An accuracy measurement method for star trackers based on direct astronomic observation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; You, Zheng; Chu, Daping

    2016-03-07

    Star tracker is one of the most promising optical attitude measurement devices and it is widely used in spacecraft for its high accuracy. However, how to realize and verify such an accuracy remains a crucial but unsolved issue until now. The authenticity of the accuracy measurement method of a star tracker will eventually determine the satellite performance. A new and robust accuracy measurement method for a star tracker based on the direct astronomical observation is proposed here. In comparison with the conventional method with simulated stars, this method utilizes real navigation stars as observation targets which makes the measurement results more authoritative and authentic. Transformations between different coordinate systems are conducted on the account of the precision movements of the Earth, and the error curves of directional vectors are obtained along the three axes. Based on error analysis and accuracy definitions, a three-axis accuracy evaluation criterion has been proposed in this paper, which could determine pointing and rolling accuracy of a star tracker directly. Experimental measurements confirm that this method is effective and convenient to implement. Such a measurement environment is close to the in-orbit conditions and it can satisfy the stringent requirement for high-accuracy star trackers.

  17. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  18. Direct observation and quantification of extracellular long-range electron flow in anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2013-03-01

    Some anaerobic microorganisms are capable of transporting electrons outside their cell to distant electron acceptors such as metals, minerals or partner species. Previous studies have focused primarily on transport over short distances (< 1 μm) via diffusion of molecular intermediates, or alternatively via tunneling or thermally-activated hopping across biomolecules. However, we have found that Geobacter sulfurreducens can transport electrons over long distances (> 10 μm) using pili filaments that show organic metal-like conductivity. Pili also enable direct exchange of electrons among syntrophic Geobacter co-cultures. In order to establish the physical principles underlying this remarkable electron transport, we have employed a novel scanning probe microscopy-based method to perform quantitative measurements of electron flow at a single cell level under physiological conditions. Using this nanoscopic approach, we have directly observed the propagation and distribution of injected electrons in individual native bacterial extracellular proteins. Our direct measurements demonstrate unambiguously for the first time that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are a novel class of electronically functional proteins that can sustain electron flow in a surprising manner that has not been observed previously in any other natural protein. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences and NSF-NSEC Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing grant no. CMMI-1025020.

  19. An accuracy measurement method for star trackers based on direct astronomic observation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; You, Zheng; Chu, Daping

    2016-01-01

    Star tracker is one of the most promising optical attitude measurement devices and it is widely used in spacecraft for its high accuracy. However, how to realize and verify such an accuracy remains a crucial but unsolved issue until now. The authenticity of the accuracy measurement method of a star tracker will eventually determine the satellite performance. A new and robust accuracy measurement method for a star tracker based on the direct astronomical observation is proposed here. In comparison with the conventional method with simulated stars, this method utilizes real navigation stars as observation targets which makes the measurement results more authoritative and authentic. Transformations between different coordinate systems are conducted on the account of the precision movements of the Earth, and the error curves of directional vectors are obtained along the three axes. Based on error analysis and accuracy definitions, a three-axis accuracy evaluation criterion has been proposed in this paper, which could determine pointing and rolling accuracy of a star tracker directly. Experimental measurements confirm that this method is effective and convenient to implement. Such a measurement environment is close to the in-orbit conditions and it can satisfy the stringent requirement for high-accuracy star trackers. PMID:26948412

  20. An accuracy measurement method for star trackers based on direct astronomic observation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; You, Zheng; Chu, Daping

    2016-01-01

    Star tracker is one of the most promising optical attitude measurement devices and it is widely used in spacecraft for its high accuracy. However, how to realize and verify such an accuracy remains a crucial but unsolved issue until now. The authenticity of the accuracy measurement method of a star tracker will eventually determine the satellite performance. A new and robust accuracy measurement method for a star tracker based on the direct astronomical observation is proposed here. In comparison with the conventional method with simulated stars, this method utilizes real navigation stars as observation targets which makes the measurement results more authoritative and authentic. Transformations between different coordinate systems are conducted on the account of the precision movements of the Earth, and the error curves of directional vectors are obtained along the three axes. Based on error analysis and accuracy definitions, a three-axis accuracy evaluation criterion has been proposed in this paper, which could determine pointing and rolling accuracy of a star tracker directly. Experimental measurements confirm that this method is effective and convenient to implement. Such a measurement environment is close to the in-orbit conditions and it can satisfy the stringent requirement for high-accuracy star trackers. PMID:26948412

  1. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2015-05-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  2. C.L.I.P.--continuous live imaging platform for direct observation of C. elegans physiological processes.

    PubMed

    Krajniak, Jan; Hao, Yan; Mak, Ho Yi; Lu, Hang

    2013-08-01

    Direct observation of developmental and physiological changes in certain model organisms over time has been technically challenging. In the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, these studies require frequent or continuous imaging at physiologically benign conditions. However, standard methods use anaesthetics, glue, or microbeads, which prevent animals from feeding during the experiment. Thus, the animals' normal physiological function may be affected over time. Here we present a platform designed for dynamic studies of C. elegans. The system is capable of immobilizing only the animals' bodies under benign conditions and without physical deformation. Simultaneously, the animals' heads remain free to move and feed for the duration of the experiment. This allows for high-resolution and high-magnification fluorescent imaging of immobilized and feeding animals. The system is very easy to fabricate, set up, and operate, and should be widely applicable to many problems in developmental and physiological studies.

  3. Direct Observation of a Nonheme Iron(IV)–Oxo Complex That Mediates Aromatic C–F Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of a pentadentate ligand with strategically designed fluorinated arene groups in the second coordination sphere of a nonheme iron center is reported. The oxidatively resistant fluorine substituents allow for the trapping and characterization of an FeIV(O) complex at −20 °C. Upon warming of the FeIV(O) complex, an unprecedented arene C–F hydroxylation reaction occurs. Computational studies support the finding that substrate orientation is a critical factor in the observed reactivity. This work not only gives rare direct evidence for the participation of an FeIV(O) species in arene hydroxylation but also provides the first example of a high-valent iron–oxo complex that mediates aromatic C–F hydroxylation. PMID:25246108

  4. Proposal to directly observe the Kondo effect through enhanced photoinduced scattering of cold fermionic and bosonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich J.

    2016-02-01

    We propose an experimental protocol to directly observe the Kondo effect by scattering ultracold atoms. We propose using an optical Feshbach resonance to engineer Kondo-type spin-dependent interactions in a system with ultracold 6Li and 87Rb gases. We calculate the momentum transferred from the 87Rb gas to the 6Li gas in a scattering experiment and show that it has a logarithmically enhanced temperature dependence, characteristic of the Kondo effect, and analogous to the resistivity of alloys with magnetic impurities. Experimentally detecting this enhancement will give a different perspective on the Kondo effect, and allow us to explore a rich variety of problems such as the Kondo lattice problem and heavy-fermion systems.

  5. Apparatus for Direct Optical Fiber Through-Lens Illumination of Microscopy or Observational Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadogawa, Hiroshi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    In one embodiment of the invention, a microscope or other observational apparatus, comprises a hollow tube, a lens mounted to the tube, a light source and at least one flexible optical fiber having an input end and an output end. The input end is positioned to receive light from the light source, and the output end is positioned within the tube so as to directly project light along a straight path to the lens to illuminate an object to be viewed. The path of projected light is uninterrupted and free of light deflecting elements. By passing the light through the lens, the light can be diffused or otherwise defocused to provide more uniform illumination across the surface of the object, increasing the quality of the image of the object seen by the viewer. The direct undeflected and uninterrupted projection of light, without change of direction, eliminates the need for light-deflecting elements, such as beam-splitters, mirrors, prisms, or the like, to direct the projected light towards the object.

  6. Direct laboratory observation of fluid distribution and its influence on acoustic properties of patchy saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Clennell, B.; Pervukhina, M.; Shulakova, V.; Mueller, T.; Gurevich, B.

    2009-04-01

    samples (38 mm in diameter, approximately 60 mm long) were dried in oven under reduced pressure. In dynamic saturation experiments, samples were jacketed in the experimental cell, made from transparent for X-radiation material (PMMA). Distillate water was injected into the sample from the one side. Fluid distribution in such "dynamic" experiment: both spatial and time dependant was measured using X-ray Computer Tomograph (CT) with resolution 0.2 x 0.2 x 1 mm3. Velocities (Vp, and Vs) at ultrasonic frequency of 1 MHz, were measured in the direction perpendicular to initial direction of the fluid flow injection. Sample saturation was estimated from the CT results. In "quasi static" experiments samples were saturated during long period of time (over 2 weeks) to achieve uniform distribution of liquid inside the sample. Saturation was determined by measurement of the weight of water fraction. All experiments were performed at laboratory environments at temperature 25 C. Ultrasonic velocities and fluid saturations were measured simultaneously during water injection into sandstone core samples. The experimental results obtained on low-permeability samples show that at low saturation values the velocity-saturation dependence can be described by the Gassmann-Wood relationship. However, with increasing saturation a sharp increase of P-wave velocity is observed, eventually approaching the Gassmann-Hill relationship. We connect the characteristics of the transition behavior of the velocity-saturation relationships to the increasing size of the patches inside the rock sample. In particular, we show that for relatively large fluid injection rate this transition occurs at smaller degrees of saturation as compared with high injection rate. We model the experimental data using the so-called White model (Toms 2007) that assumes fluid patch distribution as a periodic assemblage of concentric spheres. We can observe reasonable agreement between experimental results and theoretical

  7. Increasing Reliability of Direct Observation Measurement Approaches in Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders Research Using Generalizability Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Prykanowski, Debra; Hirn, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Reliability of direct observation outcomes ensures the results are consistent, dependable, and trustworthy. Typically, reliability of direct observation measurement approaches is assessed using interobserver agreement (IOA) and the calculation of observer agreement (e.g., percentage of agreement). However, IOA does not address intraobserver…

  8. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Park, Chiwoo; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-01-08

    Direct observations of solution-phase nanoparticle growth using in situ liquid transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have demonstrated the importance of “non-classical” growth mechanisms, such as aggregation and coalescence, on the growth and final morphology of nanocrystals at the atomic and single nanoparticle scales. To date, groups have quantitatively interpreted the mean growth rate of nanoparticles in terms of the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) model for Ostwald ripening, but less attention has been paid to modeling the corresponding particle size distribution. Here we use in situ fluid stage scanning TEM to demonstrate that silver nanoparticles grow by a length-scale dependent mechanism, where individual nanoparticles grow by monomer attachment but ensemble-scale growth is dominated by aggregation. Although our observed mean nanoparticle growth rate is consistent with the LSW model, we show that the corresponding particle size distribution is broader and more symmetric than predicted by LSW. Following direct observations of aggregation, we interpret the ensemble-scale growth using Smoluchowski kinetics and demonstrate that the Smoluchowski model quantitatively captures the mean growth rate and particle size distribution.

  9. Direct observation of the ferroelectric polarization in the layered perovskite Bi4Ti3O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushihara, Daisuke; Komabuchi, Mai; Ishizawa, Nobuo; Iwata, Makoto; Fukuda, Koichiro; Asaka, Toru

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the crystal structure and ferroelectric domains of Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-crystal X-ray diffractometry. From the extinction rule, we determined that the space group in the ferroelectric phase of BTO is P1a1 rather than B2cb and B1a1 which have been proposed previously. We successfully refined the crystal structure based on the space group P1a1. The 180° and 90° ferroelectric domain structures were observed by the [001]-zone dark-field TEM imaging. In the 180° domain structure, we determined that one component of the polarization vector is parallel to the a-axis. An annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ABF-STEM) was performed for the direct observation of the crystal structures. The ABF-STEM images displayed the contrasts with respect to every atomic position in spite of the highly distorted structure of BTO. We could evaluate the tilting and distortion of the [TiO6] octahedra relatively. Therefore, we directly observed the ferroelectric displacements of Bi and Ti ions.

  10. Counseling and directly observed medication for primary care buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brent A.; Barry, Declan T.; Sullivan, Lynn E.; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Cutter, Christopher J.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Counseling and medication adherence can affect opioid agonist treatment outcomes. We investigated the impact of two counseling intensities and two medication dispensing methods in patients receiving buprenorphine (BUP) in primary care. Methods In a 12-week trial, patients were assigned to Physician Management (PM) with weekly BUP dispensing (n = 28) vs. PM and directly observed, thrice-weekly BUP and cognitive behavioral therapy (PM+DOT/CBT; n = 27) based on therapist availability. Fifteen minute PM visits were provided at entry, after induction and then monthly. CBT was weekly 45-minute sessions provided by trained therapists. Results Treatment groups differed on baseline characteristics of years of opioid use, history of detoxification from opioids, and opioid negative urines during induction. Analyses adjusting for baseline characteristics showed no significant differences between groups on retention or drug use based on self-report or urines. Patient satisfaction was high across conditions, indicating acceptability of CBT counseling with observed medication. The number of CBT sessions attended was significantly associated with improved outcome, and session attendance was associated with a greater abstinence the following week. Conclusions Although the current findings were non-significant, DOT plus individual CBT sessions was feasible and acceptable to patients. Additional research evaluating the independent effect of directly observed medication and CBT counseling is needed. PMID:22614936

  11. A Flexible Reporter System for Direct Observation and Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Binwu; Raviv, Asaf; Esposito, Dominic; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Daniel, Catherine; Nghiem, Bao Tram; Garfield, Susan; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Robles, Ana I.; Smith, William I.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Ravin, Rea; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time. PMID:25497455

  12. A flexible reporter system for direct observation and isolation of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Binwu; Raviv, Asaf; Esposito, Dominic; Flanders, Kathleen C; Daniel, Catherine; Nghiem, Bao Tram; Garfield, Susan; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Robles, Ana I; Smith, William I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Ravin, Rea; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2015-01-13

    Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time.

  13. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions.

  14. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Johannes W; Thaler, Klemens M; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions. PMID:26979973

  15. Direct assessment of groundwater vulnerability from single observations of multiple contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worrall, F.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Groundwater vulnerability is a central concept in pollution risk assessment, yet its estimation has been largely a matter of expert judgment. This work applies a method for the direct calculation of vulnerability from monitoring well observations of pesticide concentrations. The method has two major advantages: it is independent of the compounds being examined, and it has a direct probabilistic interpretation making it ideal for risk assessment. The methodology was applied to data from a groundwater monitoring program in the midwestern United States. The distribution of the vulnerabilities was skewed toward zero. Spatial distribution of the vulnerabilities shows them to be controlled by both regional and local factors. Methods are presented for estimating the necessary sample sizes for vulnerability studies. The further application of the approach developed in this study to understanding groundwater pollution is discussed.

  16. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions. PMID:26979973

  17. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  18. Direct observation of protein microcrystals in crystallization buffer by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yuusuke; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Senda, Miki; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Senda, Toshiya; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystallography requires high quality crystals above a given size. This requirement not only limits the proteins to be analyzed, but also reduces the speed of the structure determination. Indeed, the tertiary structures of many physiologically important proteins remain elusive because of the so-called "crystallization bottleneck". Once microcrystals have been obtained, crystallization conditions can be optimized to produce bigger and better crystals. However, the identification of microcrystals can be difficult due to the resolution limit of optical microscopy. Electron microscopy has sometimes been utilized instead, with the disadvantage that the microcrystals usually must be observed in vacuum, which precludes the usage for crystal screening. The atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) allows samples to be observed in solution. Here, we report the use of this instrument in combination with a special thin-membrane dish with a crystallization well. It was possible to observe protein crystals of lysozyme, lipase B and a histone chaperone TAF-Iβ in crystallization buffers, without the use of staining procedures. The smallest crystals observed with ASEM were a few μm in width, and ASEM can be used with non-transparent solutions. Furthermore, the growth of salt crystals could be monitored in the ASEM, and the difference in contrast between salt and protein crystals made it easy to distinguish between these two types of microcrystals. These results indicate that the ASEM could be an important new tool for the screening of protein microcrystals.

  19. Direct Observation of Protein Microcrystals in Crystallization Buffer by Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yuusuke; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Senda, Miki; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Senda, Toshiya; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystallography requires high quality crystals above a given size. This requirement not only limits the proteins to be analyzed, but also reduces the speed of the structure determination. Indeed, the tertiary structures of many physiologically important proteins remain elusive because of the so-called “crystallization bottleneck”. Once microcrystals have been obtained, crystallization conditions can be optimized to produce bigger and better crystals. However, the identification of microcrystals can be difficult due to the resolution limit of optical microscopy. Electron microscopy has sometimes been utilized instead, with the disadvantage that the microcrystals usually must be observed in vacuum, which precludes the usage for crystal screening. The atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) allows samples to be observed in solution. Here, we report the use of this instrument in combination with a special thin-membrane dish with a crystallization well. It was possible to observe protein crystals of lysozyme, lipase B and a histone chaperone TAF-Iβ in crystallization buffers, without the use of staining procedures. The smallest crystals observed with ASEM were a few μm in width, and ASEM can be used with non-transparent solutions. Furthermore, the growth of salt crystals could be monitored in the ASEM, and the difference in contrast between salt and protein crystals made it easy to distinguish between these two types of microcrystals. These results indicate that the ASEM could be an important new tool for the screening of protein microcrystals. PMID:22949879

  20. Direct observation of protein microcrystals in crystallization buffer by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yuusuke; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Senda, Miki; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Senda, Toshiya; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystallography requires high quality crystals above a given size. This requirement not only limits the proteins to be analyzed, but also reduces the speed of the structure determination. Indeed, the tertiary structures of many physiologically important proteins remain elusive because of the so-called "crystallization bottleneck". Once microcrystals have been obtained, crystallization conditions can be optimized to produce bigger and better crystals. However, the identification of microcrystals can be difficult due to the resolution limit of optical microscopy. Electron microscopy has sometimes been utilized instead, with the disadvantage that the microcrystals usually must be observed in vacuum, which precludes the usage for crystal screening. The atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) allows samples to be observed in solution. Here, we report the use of this instrument in combination with a special thin-membrane dish with a crystallization well. It was possible to observe protein crystals of lysozyme, lipase B and a histone chaperone TAF-Iβ in crystallization buffers, without the use of staining procedures. The smallest crystals observed with ASEM were a few μm in width, and ASEM can be used with non-transparent solutions. Furthermore, the growth of salt crystals could be monitored in the ASEM, and the difference in contrast between salt and protein crystals made it easy to distinguish between these two types of microcrystals. These results indicate that the ASEM could be an important new tool for the screening of protein microcrystals. PMID:22949879

  1. Direct Observation of a Localized Magnetic Soliton in a Spin-Transfer Nanocontact.

    PubMed

    Backes, D; Macià, F; Bonetti, S; Kukreja, R; Ohldag, H; Kent, A D

    2015-09-18

    We report the direct observation of a localized magnetic soliton in a spin-transfer nanocontact using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. Experiments are conducted on a lithographically defined 150 nm diameter nanocontact to an ultrathin ferromagnetic multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Element-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism images show an abrupt onset of a magnetic soliton excitation localized beneath the nanocontact at a threshold current. However, the amplitude of the excitation ≃25° at the contact center is far less than that predicted (⪅180°), showing that the spin dynamics is not described by existing models. PMID:26431016

  2. Direct observation of resonant scattering phase shifts and their energy dependence.

    PubMed

    Gensemer, Stephen D; Martin-Wells, Ross B; Bennett, Aaron W; Gibble, Kurt

    2012-12-28

    We scan the collision energy of two clouds of cesium atoms between 12 and 50  μK in an atomic fountain clock. By directly detecting the difference of s-wave scattering phase shifts, we observe a rapid variation of a scattering phase shift through a series of Feshbach resonances. At the energies we use, resonances that overlap at threshold become resolved. Our statistical phase uncertainty of 8 mrad can be improved in future precision measurements of Feshbach resonances to accurately determine the Cs-Cs interactions, which may provide stringent limits on the time variation of fundamental constants.

  3. Direct CW - NMR observation of forbidden transitions at double larmor frequency in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.; Sebek, J.; Safrata, R. S.

    1990-08-01

    By means of the classical transverse continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) the forbidden transitions at double Larmor frequency for hydrogen have been observed. The NMR spectra have been measured directly by scanning the external magnetic field up to 10 mT at temperatures about 30 mK. The intensity of the forbidden transition at double Larmor frequency I 2 is of the same order of magnitude as the intensity I 1 of the main Larmor line under these conditions. The intensity ratio I 1/I 2 depends on the external magnetic field in accordance with Cheng theory and NMR-SQUID measurements of Kohl and coworkers.

  4. Direct observation of voids in the vacancy excess region of ion bombarded silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. S.; Conway, M. J.; Williams, B. C.; Wong-Leung, J.

    2001-05-01

    The results reported in this letter indicate that the spatial separation of the vacancy and interstitial excesses which result from ion bombardment gives rise to stable voids upon annealing at 850 °C even for implants where the projected ion range is only of the order of a few thousand Ångstrom. Such voids have been observed directly by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in cases where both voids and interstitial-based defects are present at different depths, it is found that Au has a strong preference for decorating void surfaces and hence Au can, indeed, be used as a selective detector of open volume defects in Si.

  5. Direct Observation of the Injection Dynamics of a Laser Wakefield Accelerator Using Few-Femtosecond Shadowgraphy.

    PubMed

    Sävert, A; Mangles, S P D; Schnell, M; Siminos, E; Cole, J M; Leier, M; Reuter, M; Schwab, M B; Möller, M; Poder, K; Jäckel, O; Paulus, G G; Spielmann, C; Skupin, S; Najmudin, Z; Kaluza, M C

    2015-07-31

    We present few-femtosecond shadowgraphic snapshots taken during the nonlinear evolution of the plasma wave in a laser wakefield accelerator with transverse synchronized few-cycle probe pulses. These snapshots can be directly associated with the electron density distribution within the plasma wave and give quantitative information about its size and shape. Our results show that self-injection of electrons into the first plasma-wave period is induced by a lengthening of the first plasma period. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support our observations. PMID:26274425

  6. Direct Observation of the Injection Dynamics of a Laser Wakefield Accelerator Using Few-Femtosecond Shadowgraphy.

    PubMed

    Sävert, A; Mangles, S P D; Schnell, M; Siminos, E; Cole, J M; Leier, M; Reuter, M; Schwab, M B; Möller, M; Poder, K; Jäckel, O; Paulus, G G; Spielmann, C; Skupin, S; Najmudin, Z; Kaluza, M C

    2015-07-31

    We present few-femtosecond shadowgraphic snapshots taken during the nonlinear evolution of the plasma wave in a laser wakefield accelerator with transverse synchronized few-cycle probe pulses. These snapshots can be directly associated with the electron density distribution within the plasma wave and give quantitative information about its size and shape. Our results show that self-injection of electrons into the first plasma-wave period is induced by a lengthening of the first plasma period. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support our observations.

  7. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process-a search state and a recognition state-facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state.

  8. Direct Observation of a Gas Molecule (H2, Ar) Swallowed by C60

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, H.; Kakiuchi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Murata, Y.; Murata, M.; Komatsu, K.; Yakigaya, K.; Takagi, H.; Dragoe, N.

    2007-01-19

    Various types of endohedral fullerene complexes are known to date. The well known metallofullerenes are generally produced by arc-discharge method, but the use of such extremely drastic conditions is apparently not suitable for encapsulation of unstable molecules or gases. We recently succeeded in incorporation of a H2 molecule or an Ar atom in 100% into a C60. In order to observe the endohedral gas molecule directly, the X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation were carried out. We observed a gas molecule encapsulated in each fullerene cage using structure analysis and the maximum entropy method. These gas molecules are floating inside of the hollow cavities and are completely isolated from the outside.

  9. Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, S; Kukreja, R; Chen, Z; Macià, F; Hernàndez, J M; Eklund, A; Backes, D; Frisch, J; Katine, J; Malm, G; Urazhdin, S; Kent, A D; Stöhr, J; Ohldag, H; Dürr, H A

    2015-01-01

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices. PMID:26567699

  10. Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bonetti, S.; Kukreja, R.; Chen, Z.; Macià, F.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Eklund, A.; Backes, D.; Frisch, J.; Katine, J.; Malm, G.; et al

    2015-11-16

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Moreover, micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetrymore » of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices.« less

  11. Direct self-repairing control for a helicopter via quantum multi-model and disturbance observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fuyang; Cai, Ling; Jiang, Bin; Tao, Gang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new direct self-repairing control scheme is developed for a helicopter flight control system with unknown actuator faults and external disturbance. The design of multi-model-based adaptive control is used to accommodate the faulty system under different fault conditions. By appropriate switching based on quantum information technique, the system can be converted to the best model and the corresponding controller. Asymptotic model following performance and system stability is guaranteed. A disturbance observer is introduced to observe the disturbance of the system, which can produce corresponding control signals according to the disturbance. The results including a numerical simulation and a semi-physical verification demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed self-repairing control approach for the helicopter flight control system.

  12. Direct coupling of photonic modes and surface plasmon polaritons observed in 2-photon PEEM.

    PubMed

    Word, Robert C; Fitzgerald, Joseph P S; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2013-12-16

    We report the direct microscopic observation of optical energy transfer from guided photonic modes in an indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film to surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at the surfaces of a single crystalline gold platelet. The photonic and SPP modes appear as an interference pattern in the photoelectron emission yield across the surface of the specimen. We explore the momentum match between the photonic and SPP modes in terms of simple waveguide theory and the three-layer slab model for bound SPP modes of thin metal films. We show that because the gold is thin (30-40 nm), two SPP modes exist and that momentum of the spatially confined asymmetric field mode coincides with the dominant mode of the ITO waveguide. The results demonstrate that photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) can be an important tool for the observation of photonic to SPP interactions in the study of integrated photonic circuits. PMID:24514628

  13. Direct observation of frictional contacts: New insights for state-dependent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rocks and many other materials display a rather complicated, but characteristic, dependence of friction on sliding history. These effects are well-described by empirical rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulations which have been utilized for analysis of fault slip and earthquake processes. We present a procedure for direct quantitative microscopic observation of frictional contacts during slip. The observations reveal that frictional state dependence represents an increase of contact area with contact age. Transient changes of sliding resistance correlate with changes in contact area and arise from shifts of contact population age. Displacement-dependent replacement of contact populations is shown to cause the diagnostic evolution of friction over a characteristic sliding distance that occurs whenever slip begins or sliding conditions change. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  14. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    PubMed

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  15. Direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Becker, A.; Lemke, R. W.; Cochrane, K. R.; Savage, M. E.; Bliss, D. E.; Mattsson, T. R.; Redmer, R.

    2015-06-01

    Eighty years ago, it was proposed that solid hydrogen would become metallic at sufficiently high density. Despite numerous investigations, this transition has not yet been experimentally observed. More recently, there has been much interest in the analog of this predicted metallic transition in the dense liquid, due to its relevance to planetary science. Here, we show direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium. Experimental determination of the location of this transition provides a much-needed benchmark for theory and may constrain the region of hydrogen-helium immiscibility and the boundary-layer pressure in standard models of the internal structure of gas-giant planets.

  16. Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, S.; Kukreja, R.; Chen, Z.; Macià, F.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Eklund, A.; Backes, D.; Frisch, J.; Katine, J.; Malm, G.; Urazhdin, S.; Kent, A. D.; Stöhr, J.; Ohldag, H.; Dürr, H. A.

    2015-11-16

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Moreover, micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices.

  17. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process—a search state and a recognition state—facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state. PMID:26027871

  18. Direct observation of transition paths during the folding of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Krishna; Foster, Daniel A N; Dee, Derek R; Yu, Hao; Wang, Feng; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Transition paths, the fleeting trajectories through the transition states that dominate the dynamics of biomolecular folding reactions, encapsulate the critical information about how structure forms. Owing to their brief duration, however, they have not previously been observed directly. We measured transition paths for both nucleic acid and protein folding, using optical tweezers to observe the microscopic diffusive motion of single molecules traversing energy barriers. The average transit times and the shapes of the transit-time distributions agreed well with theoretical expectations for motion over the one-dimensional energy landscapes reconstructed for the same molecules, validating the physical theory of folding reactions. These measurements provide a first look at the critical microscopic events that occur during folding, opening exciting new avenues for investigating folding phenomena. PMID:27124461

  19. Direct observation of stochastic domain-wall depinning in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2008-11-01

    The stochastic field-driven depinning of a domain wall pinned at a notch in a magnetic nanowire is directly observed using magnetic X-ray microscopy with high lateral resolution down to 15 nm. The depinning-field distribution in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanowires considerably depends on the wire width and the notch depth. The difference in the multiplicity of domain-wall types generated in the vicinity of a notch is responsible for the observed dependence of the stochastic nature of the domain wall depinning field on the wire width and the notch depth. Thus the random nature of the domain wall depinning process is controllable by an appropriate design of the nanowire.

  20. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2015-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process--a search state and a recognition state--facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state.

  1. Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, S.; Kukreja, R.; Chen, Z.; Macià, F.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Eklund, A.; Backes, D.; Frisch, J.; Katine, J.; Malm, G.; Urazhdin, S.; Kent, A. D.; Stöhr, J.; Ohldag, H.; Dürr, H. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices.

  2. Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, S.; Kukreja, R.; Chen, Z.; Macià, F.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Eklund, A.; Backes, D.; Frisch, J.; Katine, J.; Malm, G.; Urazhdin, S.; Kent, A. D.; Stöhr, J.; Ohldag, H.; Dürr, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices. PMID:26567699

  3. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  4. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Three TEM movies, additional TEM data corresponding to movies, calculated models, and lifetime results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05913e

  5. Performing Gram stain directly on catheter tips: assessment of the quality of the observation process.

    PubMed

    Guembe, M; Pérez-Granda, M J; Rivera, M L; Martín-Rabadán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-06-01

    A previous study performed in our institution showed that catheter tip (CT) staining by combining acridine orange and Gram stain (GS) before culture anticipated catheter colonization with exhaustive and careful observation by a highly trained technician. Our objective was to assess the validity values of GS without acridine orange on an external smear of CT for predicting catheter colonization and catheter-related bloodstream infection (C-RBSI). We compared different periods of observation and the results of two technicians with different levels of professional experience. Over a 5-month period, the roll-plate technique was preceded by direct GS of all CTs sent to the microbiology laboratory. The reading was taken at ×100 by two observers with different skill levels. Each observer performed a routine examination (3 min along three longitudinal lines) and an exhaustive examination (5 min along five longitudinal lines). The presence of at least one cell was considered positive. All slides were read before culture results were known. We included a total of 271 CTs from 209 patients. The prevalence of catheter colonization and C-RBSI was 16.2 % and 5.1 %, respectively. Routine and exhaustive examinations revealed only 29.5 % and 40.9 % of colonized catheters, respectively (p < 0.001). In contrast, they revealed high negative predictive values for C-RBSI (96.5 % and 96.3 %, respectively). Our study shows that the yield of GS performed directly on CTs is greater when staining is performed exhaustively. However, the decision to implement this approach in daily routine will depend on the prevalence rate of catheter colonization at each institution.

  6. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    PubMed Central

    Wotman, Stephen; Demko, Catherine A; Victoroff, Kristin; Sudano, Joseph J; Lalumandier, James A

    2010-01-01

    This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction. PMID:23662080

  7. Influence of atmospheric relative humidity on ultraviolet flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Chen, Ling; Chen, Huizhong; Luo, Xuyu; Deng, Tao

    2016-08-01

    The atmospheric aerosols can absorb moisture from the environment due to their hydrophilicity and thus affect atmospheric radiation fluxes. In this article, the ultraviolet radiation and relative humidity (RH) data from ground observations and a radiative transfer model were used to examine the influence of RH on ultraviolet radiation flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing under the clear-sky conditions. The results show that RH has a significant influence on ultraviolet radiation because of aerosol hygroscopicity. The relationship between attenuation rate and RH can be fitted logarithmically and all of the R2 of the 4 sets of samples are high, i.e. 0.87, 0.96, 0.9, and 0.9, respectively. When the RH is 60%, 70%, 80% and 90%, the mean aerosol direct radiative forcing in ultraviolet is -4.22W m-2, -4.5W m-2, -4.82W m-2 and -5.4W m-2, respectively. For the selected polluted air samples the growth factor for computing aerosol direct radiative forcing in the ultraviolet for the RH of 80% varies from 1.19 to 1.53, with an average of 1.31.

  8. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Makkonen, U.; Kerminen, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) originating from the emissions of volatile organic compounds from terrestrial vegetation constitutes an important part of the natural aerosol system. According to large-scale model simulations, the direct and indirect radiative effects of the BSOA are potentially large, yet poorly quantified. We used more than 5 years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97±66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63±40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the "dry" aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of this direct radiative feedback is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  9. Cortical kinematic processing of executed and observed goal-directed hand actions.

    PubMed

    Marty, Brice; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Goldman, Serge; Hari, Riitta; De Tiège, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Motor information conveyed by viewing the kinematics of an agent's action helps to predict how the action will unfold. Still, how observed movement kinematics is processed in the brain remains to be clarified. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine at which frequency and where in the brain, the neural activity is coupled with the kinematics of executed and observed motor actions. Whole-scalp MEG signals were recorded from 11 right-handed healthy adults while they were executing (Self) or observing (Other) similar goal-directed hand actions performed by an actor placed in front of them. Actions consisted of pinching with the right hand green foam-made pieces mixed in a heap with pieces of other colors placed on a table, and put them in a plastic pot on the right side of the heap. Subjects' and actor's forefinger movements were monitored with an accelerometer. The coherence between movement acceleration and MEG signals was computed at the sensor level. Then, cortical sources coherent with movement acceleration were identified with Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources. Statistically significant sensor-level coherence peaked at the movement frequency (F0) and its first harmonic (F1) in both movement conditions. Apart from visual cortices, statistically significant local maxima of coherence were observed in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (F0), bilateral superior parietal lobule (F0 or F1) and primary sensorimotor cortex (F0 or F1) in both movement conditions. These results suggest that observing others' actions engages the viewer's brain in a similar kinematic-related manner as during own action execution. These findings bring new insights into how human brain activity covaries with essential features of observed movements of others. PMID:26123380

  10. Cortical kinematic processing of executed and observed goal-directed hand actions.

    PubMed

    Marty, Brice; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Goldman, Serge; Hari, Riitta; De Tiège, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Motor information conveyed by viewing the kinematics of an agent's action helps to predict how the action will unfold. Still, how observed movement kinematics is processed in the brain remains to be clarified. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine at which frequency and where in the brain, the neural activity is coupled with the kinematics of executed and observed motor actions. Whole-scalp MEG signals were recorded from 11 right-handed healthy adults while they were executing (Self) or observing (Other) similar goal-directed hand actions performed by an actor placed in front of them. Actions consisted of pinching with the right hand green foam-made pieces mixed in a heap with pieces of other colors placed on a table, and put them in a plastic pot on the right side of the heap. Subjects' and actor's forefinger movements were monitored with an accelerometer. The coherence between movement acceleration and MEG signals was computed at the sensor level. Then, cortical sources coherent with movement acceleration were identified with Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources. Statistically significant sensor-level coherence peaked at the movement frequency (F0) and its first harmonic (F1) in both movement conditions. Apart from visual cortices, statistically significant local maxima of coherence were observed in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (F0), bilateral superior parietal lobule (F0 or F1) and primary sensorimotor cortex (F0 or F1) in both movement conditions. These results suggest that observing others' actions engages the viewer's brain in a similar kinematic-related manner as during own action execution. These findings bring new insights into how human brain activity covaries with essential features of observed movements of others.

  11. Direct estimation of QBO-related gravity wave drag from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Ploeger, Felix; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. The QBO is driven by atmospheric waves. Both global scale waves and mesoscale gravity waves (GWs) contribute. It has been proposed that the driving of the QBO by GWs is more important than that of the global scale waves. The relative importance of GWs is however still highly uncertain, and a direct estimation of the QBO driving by GWs from global observations is still missing. We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and GW drag from three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and from 11 years of Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite data. These observations are compared with the drag that is still missing in the tropical momentum budget of the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) reanalysis after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global-scale waves. The meteorological fields of ERAI are quite realistic because ERAI is strongly constrained by data assimilation. Therefore this missing drag can be attributed to GWs not resolved by the model. We find good qualitative agreement between observed GW drag and the missing drag in ERAI. During eastward QBO wind shear even the magnitude of observed and ERAI missing drag are in good agreement. During westward shear, however, observed drag is much lower than the ERAI missing drag. This asymmetry might hint at uncertainties in the advection terms of ERAI. Further, observed GW spectra indicate that QBO-related GW dissipation is mainly due to critical level filtering.

  12. Direct Observation of Photoinduced Charge Separation in Ruthenium Complex/Ni(OH)2 Nanoparticle Hybrid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, Yu; Pattengale, Brian A.; Ludwig, John M.; Atifi, Abderrahman; Zinovev, Alexander V.; Dong, Bin; Kong, Qingyu; Zuo, Xiaobing; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Huang, Jier

    2015-12-17

    We report that Ni(OH)2 have emerged as important functional materials for solar fuel conversion because of their potential as cost-effective bifunctional catalysts for both hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. However, their roles as photocatalysts in the photoinduced charge separation (CS) reactions remain unexplored. In this paper, we investigate the CS dynamics of a newly designed hybrid catalyst by integrating a Ru complex with Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles (NPs). Using time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XTA), we directly observed the formation of the reduced Ni metal site (~60 ps), unambiguously demonstrating CS process in the hybrid through ultrafast electron transfer from Ru complexmore » to Ni(OH)2 NPs. Compared to the ultrafast CS process, the charge recombination in the hybrid is ultraslow (>>50 ns). These results not only suggest the possibility of developing Ni(OH)2 as solar fuel catalysts, but also represent the first time direct observation of efficient CS in a hybrid catalyst using XTA.« less

  13. The Exozodiacal Dust Problem for Direct Observations of ExoEarths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki; Chen, Christine H.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Absil, Olivier; Kuchner, Marc J.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Debris dust in the habitable zones of stars otherwise known as exozodiacal dust comes from extrasolar asteroids and comets and is thus an expected part of a planetary system. Background flux from the Solar Systems zodiacal dust and the exozodiacal dust in the target system is likely to be the largest source of astrophysical noise in direct observations of terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. Furthermore, dust structures like clumps, thought to be produced by dynamical interactions with exoplanets, are a possible source of confusion. In this paper, we qualitatively assess the primary impact of exozodical dust on high-contrast direct imaging at optical wavelengths, such as would be performed with a coronagraph. Then we present the sensitivity of previous, current, and near-term facilities to thermal emission from debris dust at all distances from nearby solar-type stars, as well as our current knowledge of dust levels from recent surveys. Finally, we address the other method of detecting debris dust, through high-contrast imaging in scattered light. This method is currently far less sensitive than thermal emission observations, but provides high spatial resolution for studying dust structures. This paper represents the first report of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG).

  14. Direct observation of the superfluid phase transition in ultracold Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Zwierlein, Martin W; Schunck, Christian H; Schirotzek, André; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-07-01

    Phase transitions are dramatic phenomena: water freezes into ice, atomic spins spontaneously align in a magnet, and liquid helium becomes superfluid. Sometimes, such a drastic change in behaviour is accompanied by a visible change in appearance. The hallmark of Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity in trapped, weakly interacting Bose gases is the sudden formation of a dense central core inside a thermal cloud. However, in strongly interacting gases--such as the recently observed fermionic superfluids--there is no longer a clear separation between the superfluid and the normal parts of the cloud. The detection of fermion pair condensates has required magnetic field sweeps into the weakly interacting regime, and the quantitative description of these sweeps presents a major theoretical challenge. Here we report the direct observation of the superfluid phase transition in a strongly interacting gas of 6Li fermions, through sudden changes in the shape of the clouds--in complete analogy to the case of weakly interacting Bose gases. By preparing unequal mixtures of the two spin components involved in the pairing, we greatly enhance the contrast between the superfluid core and the normal component. Furthermore, the distribution of non-interacting excess atoms serves as a direct and reliable thermometer. Even in the normal state, strong interactions significantly deform the density profile of the majority spin component. We show that it is these interactions that drive the normal-to-superfluid transition at the critical population imbalance of 70 +/- 5 per cent (ref. 12).

  15. Direct TEM observations of growth mechanisms of two-dimensional MoS2 flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Linfeng; Lei, Shuijin; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Lu, Wei; Lin, Ziyuan; Lam, Chi Hang; Chai, Yang; Wang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic understanding of the growth mechanism of two-dimensional materials is of particular importance for controllable synthesis of functional nanostructures. Because of the lack of direct and insightful observations, how to control the orientation and the size of two-dimensional material grains is still under debate. Here we discern distinct formation stages for MoS2 flakes from the thermolysis of ammonium thiomolybdates using in situ transmission electron microscopy. In the initial stage (400 °C), vertically aligned MoS2 structures grow in a layer-by-layer mode. With the increasing temperature of up to 780 °C, the orientation of MoS2 structures becomes horizontal. When the growth temperature reaches 850 °C, the crystalline size of MoS2 increases by merging adjacent flakes. Our study shows direct observations of MoS2 growth as the temperature evolves, and sheds light on the controllable orientation and grain size of two-dimensional materials.

  16. Direct estimation of tidally induced Earth rotation variations observed by VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englich, S.; Heinkelmann, R.; BOHM, J.; Schuh, H.

    2009-09-01

    The subject of our study is the investigation of periodical variations induced by solid Earth tides and ocean tides in Earth rotation parameters (ERP: polar motion, UT1)observed by VLBI. There are two strategies to determine the amplitudes and phases of Earth rotation variations from observations of space geodetic techniques. The common way is to derive time series of Earth rotation parameters first and to estimate amplitudes and phases in a second step. Results obtained by this means were shown in previous studies for zonal tidal variations (Englich et al.; 2008a) and variations caused by ocean tides (Englich et al.; 2008b). The alternative method is to estimate the tidal parameters directly within the VLBI data analysis procedure together with other parameters such as station coordinates, tropospheric delays, clocks etc. The purpose of this work was the application of this direct method to a combined VLBI data analysis using the software packages OCCAM (Version 6.1, Gauss-Markov-Model) and DOGSCS (Gerstl et al.; 2001). The theoretical basis and the preparatory steps for the implementation of this approach are presented here.

  17. The Exozodiacal Dust Problem for Direct Observations of Exo-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, Aki; Chen, Christine H.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Absil, Olivier; Kuchner, Marc J.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2012-08-01

    Debris dust in the habitable zones of stars—otherwise known as exozodiacal dust—comes from extrasolar asteroids and comets and is thus an expected part of a planetary system. Background flux from the solar system's zodiacal dust and the exozodiacal dust in the target system is likely to be the largest source of astrophysical noise in direct observations of terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. Furthermore, dust structures like clumps, thought to be produced by dynamical interactions with exoplanets, are a possible source of confusion. In this article, we qualitatively assess the primary impact of exozodiacal dust on high-contrast direct imaging at optical wavelengths, such as would be performed with a coronagraph. Then we present the sensitivity of previous, current, and near-term facilities to thermal emission from debris dust at all distances from nearby solar-type stars, as well as our current knowledge of dust levels from recent surveys. Finally, we address the other method of detecting debris dust, through high-contrast imaging in scattered light. This method is currently far less sensitive than thermal emission observations, but provides high spatial resolution for studying dust structures. This article represents the first report of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG).

  18. Direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogenlike donor state in insulating SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Salman, Z; Prokscha, T; Amato, A; Morenzoni, E; Scheuermann, R; Sedlak, K; Suter, A

    2014-10-10

    We present a direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogenlike muonium state in SrTiO(3) which confirms the theoretical prediction that interstitial hydrogen may act as a shallow donor in this material. The formation of this muonium state is temperature dependent and appears below ∼ 70K. From the temperature dependence we estimate an activation energy of ∼ 50 meV in the bulk and ∼ 23 meV near the free surface. The field and directional dependence of the muonium precession frequencies further supports the shallow impurity state with a rare example of a fully anisotropic hyperfine tensor. From these measurements we determine the strength of the hyperfine interaction and propose that the muon occupies an interstitial site near the face of the oxygen octahedron in SrTiO(3). The observed shallow donor state provides new insight for tailoring the electronic and optical properties of SrTiO(3)-based oxide interface systems. PMID:25375730

  19. Direct TEM observations of growth mechanisms of two-dimensional MoS2 flakes

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Linfeng; Lei, Shuijin; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Lu, Wei; Lin, Ziyuan; Lam, Chi Hang; Chai, Yang; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A microscopic understanding of the growth mechanism of two-dimensional materials is of particular importance for controllable synthesis of functional nanostructures. Because of the lack of direct and insightful observations, how to control the orientation and the size of two-dimensional material grains is still under debate. Here we discern distinct formation stages for MoS2 flakes from the thermolysis of ammonium thiomolybdates using in situ transmission electron microscopy. In the initial stage (400 °C), vertically aligned MoS2 structures grow in a layer-by-layer mode. With the increasing temperature of up to 780 °C, the orientation of MoS2 structures becomes horizontal. When the growth temperature reaches 850 °C, the crystalline size of MoS2 increases by merging adjacent flakes. Our study shows direct observations of MoS2 growth as the temperature evolves, and sheds light on the controllable orientation and grain size of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27412892

  20. Direct Observation of Enzymes Replicating DNA Using a Single-molecule DNA Stretching Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Richardson, Charles C.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for observing real time replication of individual DNA molecules mediated by proteins of the bacteriophage replication system. Linearized λ DNA is modified to have a biotin on the end of one strand, and a digoxigenin moiety on the other end of the same strand. The biotinylated end is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and the digoxigeninated end to a small bead. The assembly of these DNA-bead tethers on the surface of a flow cell allows a laminar flow to be applied to exert a drag force on the bead. As a result, the DNA is stretched close to and parallel to the surface of the coverslip at a force that is determined by the flow rate (Figure 1). The length of the DNA is measured by monitoring the position of the bead. Length differences between single- and double-stranded DNA are utilized to obtain real-time information on the activity of the replication proteins at the fork. Measuring the position of the bead allows precise determination of the rates and processivities of DNA unwinding and polymerization (Figure 2). PMID:20332766

  1. Not seeing or feeling is still believing: conscious and non-conscious pain modulation after direct and observational learning

    PubMed Central

    Egorova, Natalia; Park, Joel; Orr, Scott P.; Kirsch, Irving; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Our experience with the world is shaped not only directly through personal exposure but also indirectly through observing others and learning from their experiences. Using a conditioning paradigm, we investigated how directly and observationally learned information can affect pain perception, both consciously and non-consciously. Differences between direct and observed cues were manifest in higher pain ratings and larger skin conductance responses to directly experienced cues. However, the pain modulation effects produced by conditioning were of comparable magnitude for direct and observational learning. These results suggest that social observation can induce positive and negative pain modulation. Importantly, the fact that cues learned by observation and activated non-consciously still produced a robust conditioning effect that withstood extinction highlights the role of indirect exposure in placebo and nocebo effects. PMID:26578164

  2. Not seeing or feeling is still believing: conscious and non-conscious pain modulation after direct and observational learning.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Natalia; Park, Joel; Orr, Scott P; Kirsch, Irving; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2015-11-18

    Our experience with the world is shaped not only directly through personal exposure but also indirectly through observing others and learning from their experiences. Using a conditioning paradigm, we investigated how directly and observationally learned information can affect pain perception, both consciously and non-consciously. Differences between direct and observed cues were manifest in higher pain ratings and larger skin conductance responses to directly experienced cues. However, the pain modulation effects produced by conditioning were of comparable magnitude for direct and observational learning. These results suggest that social observation can induce positive and negative pain modulation. Importantly, the fact that cues learned by observation and activated non-consciously still produced a robust conditioning effect that withstood extinction highlights the role of indirect exposure in placebo and nocebo effects.

  3. Direct Observations of the Composition of Sub-20 Nanometer Ambient Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. F.; Smith, J. N.; Eisele, F. L.; McMurry, P. H.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding new particle formation in the atmosphere depends upon many factors including detailed knowledge of their chemical composition. The chemical composition of sub-20 nanometer ambient aerosol particles, however, is typically inferred from observations of the aerosol behavior when subjected to varying conditions during sampling. Direct observations of aerosol chemical composition are usually limited to or dominated by larger particles of higher mass. Recently a new instrument has been developed - the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) - which can directly measure the chemical composition of sub-20 nanometer aerosol particles. Briefly, the front end of the TDCIMS functions as an electrostatic precipitator using a strong electric field to collect charged aerosol particles onto a sample wire. After volatilization by heating, the component species of the collected particles are subjected to chemical ionization prior to introduction into the mass spectrometer for analysis. Detection limits on the order of picograms permit sample collection periods as small as five minutes for ambient aerosol concentrations providing near "real-time" resolution. For selected periods from April through June 2002, we used the TDCIMS to measure the chemical composition of ambient aerosol for the first time. We investigated both the positive and negative ion spectrums produced by sub-20 nanometer ambient aerosol particles at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. Principal species identified include ammonium, sulfate and nitrate although additional peaks consistent with particle-phase origin were readily observed. Diurnal concentration profiles appear to be present and the relative proportion of sulfate and nitrate to each other can vary appreciably over several hours and between days. Validation of the TDCIMS' performance and the interpretation of its results will also be discussed.

  4. Direct in situ observation of synergism between cellulolytic enzymes during the biodegradation of crystalline cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingpeng; Quirk, Amanda; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John R; Clarke, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to image the real-time in situ degradation of crystalline by three types of T. reesei cellulolytic enzymes-TrCel6A, TrCel7A, and TrCel7B-and their mixtures. TrCel6A and TrCel7A are exo-acting cellobiohydrolases processing cellulose fibers from the nonreducing and reducing ends, respectively. TrCel7B is an endoglucanase that hydrolyzes amorphous cellulose within fibers. When acting alone on native cellulose fibers, each of the three enzymes is incapable of significant degradation. However, mixtures of two enzymes exhibited synergistic effects. The degradation effects of this synergism depended on the order in which the enzymes were added. Faster hydrolysis rates were observed when TrCel7A (exo) was added to fibers pretreated first with TrCel7B (endo) than when adding the enzymes in the opposite order. Endo-acting TrCel7B removed amorphous cellulose, softened and swelled the fibers, and exposed single microfibrils, facilitating the attack by the exo-acting enzymes. AFM images revealed that exo-acting enzymes processed the TrCel7B-pretreated fibers preferentially from one specific end (reducing or nonreducing). The most efficient (almost 100%) hydrolysis was observed with the mixture of the three enzymes. In this mixture, TrCel7B softened the fiber and TrCel6A and TrCel7A were directly observed to process it from the two opposing ends. This study provides high-resolution direct visualization of the nature of the synergistic relation between T. reesei exo- and endo-acting enzymes digesting native crystalline cellulose.

  5. Toward the Direct Measurement of Coronal Magnetic Fields: An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar magnetic field enables the heating of the corona and provides its underlying structure. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. Therefore, direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, a proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are four forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 2 and 4 μm. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer, and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. The project incorporates several optical engineering challenges, centered around maintaining adequate spectral and spatial resolution in a compact and inexpensive package and on a moving platform. Design studies are currently underway to examine the tradeoffs between various optical geometries and control strategies for the pointing/stabilization system. The results will be presented and interpreted in terms of the consequences for the scientific questions. In addition, results from a laboratory prototype and simulations of the final system will be presented.

  6. Direct observations of the influence of solution composition on magnesite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Helen E.; Putnis, Christine V.

    2013-05-01

    In situ observations during atomic force microscopy experiments and ex situ observations after static and flow-through experiments were used to explore the effect of three different electrolytes on magnesite (MgCO3) dissolution at pH 2. The experiments showed that the magnesite dissolution rate varied in the order NO3->Cl>SO42- when these anions were present in solution. Under the experimental conditions magnesite dissolution occurred via the removal of successive single surface layers, where changes in magnesite reactivity in the presence of different electrolytes could be observed as variations in the cycle length for the removal of one unit cell layer. The cycles began with the formation of sporadically distributed etch pits followed by the nucleation of homogeneously distributed etch pits. Coalescence of the etch pits formed isolated sections of the remnant surface, which then dissolved away. The timing of sporadic and homogeneous etch pit nucleation was constant despite the presence of different anions. However, the cycles in surface roughness and etch pit spreading rates indicate that the different anions affect step retreat rates and hence dissolution rates. Differences in magnesite reactivity can be attributed to the direct interaction of sulphate with the magnesite surface and the indirect effects of chloride and nitrate on the magnesite surface hydration and hydration of the Mg2+ ion in solution. In all experiments during the dissolution process evidence for the precipitation of a new phase was observed, either directly as precipitates forming on the magnesite surface in the AFM and after the experiments, seen in SEM analysis, or as changes in the Mg outlet concentration during flow-through experiments. EDX and Raman spectroscopy were used to analyse the composition of the precipitate and although it could not be definitively identified, considering previous observations the precipitate is most likely a hydrated Mg-carbonate phase with a MgCO3·xH2O

  7. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    PubMed Central

    Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1–0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4–20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate. PMID:27551086

  8. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions.

    PubMed

    Gilardoni, Stefania; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the "brown" carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1-0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4-20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate. PMID:27551086

  9. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Follett, R K; Edgell, D H; Henchen, R J; Hu, S X; Katz, J; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Shaw, J; Froula, D H

    2015-03-01

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability.

  10. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, R. K.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-03-26

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability.

  11. Direct Observation of a Majorana Quasiparticle Heat Capacity in 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Y. M.

    2014-04-01

    The Majorana fermion, which acts as its own antiparticle, was suggested by Majorana in 1937 (Nuovo Cimento 14:171). While no stable particle with Majorana properties has yet been observed, Majorana quasiparticles (QP) may exist at the boundaries of topological insulators. Here we report the preliminary results of direct observation of Majorana QPs by a precise measurements of superfluid 3He heat capacity. The bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity falls exponentially with cooling at the temperatures significantly below the energy gap. Owing to the zero energy gap mode the Majorana heat capacity falls in a power law. The Majorana heat capacity can be larger than bulk one at some temperature, which depends on surface to volume ratio of the experimental cell. Some times ago we developed the Dark matter particles detector (DMD) on a basis of superfluid 3He which is working at the frontier of extremely low temperatures (Winkelmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 559:384-386, 2006). Here we report the observation of zero gap mode of Majorana, follows from the new analyses of DMD heat capacity, published early. We have found a 10 % deviation from the bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity at the temperature of 135 μK. This deviation corresponds well to the theoretical value for Majorana heat capacity at such low temperature. (Note, there were no fitting parameters).

  12. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardoni, Stefania; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Chiara Pietrogrande, Maria; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1-0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4-20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate.

  13. Direct observation by using Brewster angle microscopy of the diacetylene polimerization in mixed Langmuir film.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Carmona, Luisa; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Mixed Langmuir monolayers of 10,12-Pentacosadiynoic acid (DA) and amphiphilic hemicyanine (HSP) have been fabricated at the air-water interface. The mixed monolayer has been proved to be completely homogeneous. The DA molecules are arranged in a single monolayer within the mixed Langmuir monolayer, as opposed to the typical trilayer architecture for the pure DA film. Brewster angle microscopy has been used to reveal the mesoscopic structure of the mixed Langmuir monolayer. Flower shape domains with internal anisotropy due the ordered alignment of hemicyanine groups have been observed. Given the absorption features of the hemicyanine groups at the wavelength used in the BAM experiments, the enhancement of reflection provoked by the absorption process leads to the observed anisotropy. The ordering of such groups is promoted by their strong self-aggregation tendency. Under UV irradiation at the air-water interface, polydiacetylene (PDA) has been fabricated. In spite a significant increase in the domains reflectivity has been observed owing to the modification in the mentioned enhanced reflection, the texture of the domains remains equal. The PDA polymer chain therefore grows in the same direction in which the HSP molecules are aligned. This study is expected to enrich the understanding and design of fabrication of PDA at interfaces. PMID:26263495

  14. Deformation Twinning in Zirconium: Direct Experimental Observations and Polycrystal Plasticity Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaiveer; Mahesh, Sivasambu; Kumar, Gulshan; Pant, Prita; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.; Samajdar, I.

    2015-11-01

    Deformation twinning was directly observed in three commercial zirconium alloy samples during split channel die plane-strain compression. One pair of samples had similar starting texture but different grain size distributions, while another pair had similar grain size distribution but different starting textures. Extension twinning was found to be more sensitive to the starting texture than to the grain size distribution. Also, regions of intense deformation near grain boundaries were observed. A hierarchical binary tree-based polycrystal plasticity model, implementing the Chin-Hosford-Mendorf twinning criterion, captured the experimentally observed twinning grains' lattice orientation distribution, and the twin volume fraction evolution, provided the critical resolved shear stress for extension twinning, τ0 , was assumed much larger than any of the values reported in the literature, based on the viscoplastic self-consistent model. A comparison of the models suggests that τ0 obtained using the present model and the viscoplastic self-consistent models physically correspond to the critical stress required for twin nucleation, and twin growth, respectively.

  15. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Follett, R K; Edgell, D H; Henchen, R J; Hu, S X; Katz, J; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Shaw, J; Froula, D H

    2015-03-01

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability. PMID:25871046

  16. Direct observation by using Brewster angle microscopy of the diacetylene polimerization in mixed Langmuir film.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Carmona, Luisa; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Mixed Langmuir monolayers of 10,12-Pentacosadiynoic acid (DA) and amphiphilic hemicyanine (HSP) have been fabricated at the air-water interface. The mixed monolayer has been proved to be completely homogeneous. The DA molecules are arranged in a single monolayer within the mixed Langmuir monolayer, as opposed to the typical trilayer architecture for the pure DA film. Brewster angle microscopy has been used to reveal the mesoscopic structure of the mixed Langmuir monolayer. Flower shape domains with internal anisotropy due the ordered alignment of hemicyanine groups have been observed. Given the absorption features of the hemicyanine groups at the wavelength used in the BAM experiments, the enhancement of reflection provoked by the absorption process leads to the observed anisotropy. The ordering of such groups is promoted by their strong self-aggregation tendency. Under UV irradiation at the air-water interface, polydiacetylene (PDA) has been fabricated. In spite a significant increase in the domains reflectivity has been observed owing to the modification in the mentioned enhanced reflection, the texture of the domains remains equal. The PDA polymer chain therefore grows in the same direction in which the HSP molecules are aligned. This study is expected to enrich the understanding and design of fabrication of PDA at interfaces.

  17. Chemotaxis study using optical tweezers to observe the strength and directionality of forces of Leishmania amazonensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Ayres, Diana C.; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The displacements of a dielectric microspheres trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences. This system can measure forces on the 50 femto Newtons to 200 pico Newtons range, of the same order of magnitude of a typical forces induced by flagellar motion. The process in which living microorganisms search for food and run away from poison chemicals is known is chemotaxy. Optical tweezers can be used to obtain a better understanding of chemotaxy by observing the force response of the microorganism when placed in a gradient of attractors and or repelling chemicals. This report shows such observations for the protozoa Leishmania amazomenzis, responsible for the leishmaniasis, a serious tropical disease. We used a quadrant detector to monitor the movement of the protozoa for different chemicals gradient. This way we have been able to observe both the force strength and its directionality. The characterization of the chemotaxis of these parasites can help to understand the infection mechanics and improve the diagnosis and the treatments employed for this disease.

  18. Direct observation of graphene growth and associated copper substrate dynamics by in situ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Weinberg, Gisela; Zhang, Qiang; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Kurnatowska, Michalina; Plodinec, Milivoj; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng; Schloegl, R; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2015-02-24

    This work highlights the importance of in situ experiments for an improved understanding of graphene growth on copper via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene growth inside the chamber of a modified environmental scanning electron microscope under relevant low-pressure CVD conditions allows visualizing structural dynamics of the active catalyst simultaneously with graphene nucleation and growth in an unparalleled way. It enables the observation of a complete CVD process from substrate annealing through graphene nucleation and growth and, finally, substrate cooling in real time and nanometer-scale resolution without the need of sample transfer. A strong dependence of surface dynamics such as sublimation and surface premelting on grain orientation is demonstrated, and the influence of substrate dynamics on graphene nucleation and growth is presented. Insights on the growth mechanism are provided by a simultaneous observation of the growth front propagation and nucleation rate. Furthermore, the role of trace amounts of oxygen during growth is discussed and related to graphene-induced surface reconstructions during cooling. Above all, this work demonstrates the potential of the method for in situ studies of surface dynamics on active metal catalysts. PMID:25584770

  19. Social communication with virtual agents: The effects of body and gaze direction on attention and emotional responding in human observers.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Linda; Pannasch, Sebastian; Schulz, Johannes; Graupner, Sven-Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In social communication, the gaze direction of other persons provides important information to perceive and interpret their emotional response. Previous research investigated the influence of gaze by manipulating mutual eye contact. Therefore, gaze and body direction have been changed as a whole, resulting in only congruent gaze and body directions (averted or directed) of another person. Here, we aimed to disentangle these effects by using short animated sequences of virtual agents posing with either direct or averted body or gaze. Attention allocation by means of eye movements, facial muscle response, and emotional experience to agents of different gender and facial expressions were investigated. Eye movement data revealed longer fixation durations, i.e., a stronger allocation of attention, when gaze and body direction were not congruent with each other or when both were directed towards the observer. This suggests that direct interaction as well as incongruous signals increase the demands of attentional resources in the observer. For the facial muscle response, only the reaction of muscle zygomaticus major revealed an effect of body direction, expressed by stronger activity in response to happy expressions for direct compared to averted gaze when the virtual character's body was directed towards the observer. Finally, body direction also influenced the emotional experience ratings towards happy expressions. While earlier findings suggested that mutual eye contact is the main source for increased emotional responding and attentional allocation, the present results indicate that direction of the virtual agent's body and head also plays a minor but significant role. PMID:26004021

  20. Direct Observation of Morphological Tranformation from Twisted Ribbons into Helical Ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Pashuck, E.Thomas; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the direct observation of a nanostructural transformation from a twisted ribbon to a helical ribbon in supramolecular assemblies of peptide amphiphiles. Using cryogenic electron microscopy, a peptide amphiphile molecule containing aromatic residues was found to first assemble into short twisted ribbons in the time range of seconds, which then elongate in the time scale of minutes, and finally transform into helical ribbons over the course of weeks. By synthesizing an analogous molecule without the aromatic side groups, it was found that a cylindrical nanostructure is formed that does not undergo any transitions during the same time period. The study of metastable states in peptide aggregation can contribute to our understanding of amyloid-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Direct Observation of Single DNA Structural Alterations at Low Forces with Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Satish; Raj, Saurabh; Cossins, Benjamin; Marro, Monica; Guallar, Victor; Petrov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    DNA experiences numerous mechanical events, necessitating single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to provide insight into DNA mechanics as a whole system. Inherent Brownian motion limits current force spectroscopy methods from observing possible bond level structural changes. We combine optical trapping and surface-enhanced Raman scattering to establish a direct relationship between DNA’s extension and structure in the low force, entropic regime. A DNA molecule is trapped close to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate to facilitate a detectable Raman signal. DNA Raman modes shift in response to applied force, indicating phosphodiester mechanical alterations. Molecular dynamic simulations confirm the local structural alterations and the Raman sensitive band identified experimentally. The combined Raman and force spectroscopy technique, to our knowledge, is a novel methodology that can be generalized to all single-molecule studies. PMID:23332068

  2. Direct observations of American eels migrating across the continental shelf to the Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Shan, Shiliang; Benchetrit, José; Dodson, Julian J

    2015-10-27

    Since inferring spawning areas from larval distributions in the Sargasso Sea a century ago, the oceanic migration of adult American eels has remained a mystery. No adult eel has ever been observed migrating in the open ocean or in the spawning area. Here, we track movements of maturing eels equipped with pop-up satellite archival tags from the Scotian Shelf (Canada) into the open ocean, with one individual migrating 2,400 km to the northern limit of the spawning site in the Sargasso Sea. The reconstructed routes suggest a migration in two phases: one over the continental shelf and along its edge in shallow waters; the second in deeper waters straight south towards the spawning area. This study is the first direct evidence of adult Anguilla migrating to the Sargasso Sea and represents an important step forward in the understanding of routes and migratory cues.

  3. Preliminary findings of an intervention integrating modified directly observed therapy and risk reduction counseling.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C G; Freels, S; Creticos, C M; Oltean, A; Douglas, R

    2007-04-01

    Various interventions have been proposed to address these ongoing needs of HIV-positive patients as they encounter challenges with medication adherence and risk reduction. This report presents the findings of a study that pilots 'DAART+', an intervention that integrates modified directly observed therapy (MDOT), and risk reduction counseling for a population of marginally housed, substance-using persons. The pilot study intended to assess the feasibility of the intervention and to obtain data to assess the intervention's potential effectiveness. The preliminary data reveal that 83% of participants who completed the intervention (n=18) had undetectable viral load (VL) (VL< or =400 copies/mL) which represents a 2.15 log(10) decrease from baseline. Risk behaviors also changed modestly with self-reported increases in condom usage.

  4. Direct observations of American eels migrating across the continental shelf to the Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Shan, Shiliang; Benchetrit, José; Dodson, Julian J.

    2015-01-01

    Since inferring spawning areas from larval distributions in the Sargasso Sea a century ago, the oceanic migration of adult American eels has remained a mystery. No adult eel has ever been observed migrating in the open ocean or in the spawning area. Here, we track movements of maturing eels equipped with pop-up satellite archival tags from the Scotian Shelf (Canada) into the open ocean, with one individual migrating 2,400 km to the northern limit of the spawning site in the Sargasso Sea. The reconstructed routes suggest a migration in two phases: one over the continental shelf and along its edge in shallow waters; the second in deeper waters straight south towards the spawning area. This study is the first direct evidence of adult Anguilla migrating to the Sargasso Sea and represents an important step forward in the understanding of routes and migratory cues. PMID:26505325

  5. Direct observation of half-metallicity in the Heusler compound Co2MnSi.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, M; Minár, J; Braun, J; Kronenberg, A; Chadov, S; Balke, B; Gloskovskii, A; Kolbe, M; Elmers, H J; Schönhense, G; Ebert, H; Felser, C; Kläui, M

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic thin films of Heusler compounds are highly relevant for spintronic applications owing to their predicted half-metallicity, that is, 100% spin polarization at the Fermi energy. However, experimental evidence for this property is scarce. Here we investigate epitaxial thin films of the compound Co2MnSi in situ by ultraviolet-photoemission spectroscopy, taking advantage of a novel multi-channel spin filter. By this surface sensitive method, an exceptionally large spin polarization of (93(-11)(+7)) % at room temperature is observed directly. As a more bulk sensitive method, additional ex situ spin-integrated high energy X-ray photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed. All experimental results are compared with advanced band structure and photoemission calculations which include surface effects. Excellent agreement is obtained with calculations, which show a highly spin polarized bulk-like surface resonance ingrained in a half metallic bulk band structure.

  6. Build a better mouse: directly-observed issues in computer use for adults with SMI.

    PubMed

    Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Schensul, Jean J; Bowen, Anne M; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-03-01

    Integrating information technology into healthcare has the potential to bring treatment to hard-to-reach people. Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), however, may derive limited benefit from these advances in care because of lack of computer ownership and experience. To date, conclusions about the computer skills and attitudes of adults with SMI have been based primarily on self-report. In the current study, 28 psychiatric outpatients with co-occurring cocaine use were interviewed about their computer use and opinions, and 25 were then directly observed using task analysis and think aloud methods as they navigated a multi-component health informational website. Participants reported low rates of computer ownership and use, and negative attitudes towards computers. Self-reported computer skills were higher than demonstrated in the task analysis. However, some participants spontaneously expressed more positive attitudes and greater computer self-efficacy after navigating the website. Implications for increasing access to computer-based health information are discussed.

  7. Direct observation of Kramers-Kronig self-phasing in coherently combined fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Leger, James R; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayanta

    2013-10-15

    A highly stable coherent beam-combining system has been designed to measure self-phasing in fiber lasers due to nonlinear effects. Whereas self-phasing in previous coherent combination experiments has been principally attributed to wavelength shifting, these wavelength effects have been efficiently suppressed in our experiment by using a dual-core fiber with closely balanced optical path lengths. The self-phasing from nonlinear effects could then be measured independently and directly by common-path interferometry with a probe laser. The Kramers-Kronig effect in the fiber gain media was observed to induce a phase shift that effectively canceled the applied path length errors, resulting in efficient lasing under all phase conditions. This process was demonstrated to result in robust lasing over a large range of pump conditions.

  8. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  9. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  10. Direct observation of magnetization dynamics generated by nanocontact spin-torque vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keatley, P. S.; Sani, S. R.; Hrkac, G.; Mohseni, S. M.; Dürrenfeld, P.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Åkerman, J.; Hicken, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy has been used to directly image the magnetization dynamics of nanocontact (NC) spin-torque vortex oscillators (STVOs) when phase locked to an injected microwave (rf) current. The Kerr images reveal free-layer magnetization dynamics that extend outside the NC footprint, where they cannot be detected electrically, but which are crucial to phase-lock STVOs that share common magnetic layers. For a single NC, dynamics were observed not only when the STVO frequency was fully locked to that of the rf current, but also for a partially locked state characterized by periodic changes in the core trajectory at the rf frequency. For a pair of NCs, we explore the correlation between the spatial character of injection-locked dynamics and the free-running spectra. Insight gained from these images may improve understanding of the conditions required for mutual phase locking of multiple STVOs, and hence enhanced microwave power emission.

  11. Cardiac-induced physiologic noise in tissue is a direct observation of cardiac-induced fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Pallab K; Lowe, Mark J

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in certain cases, cardiac and respiratory rate fluctuations in BOLD-weighted MRI time courses may be an artifact unique to rapid sampled acquisitions and may not be present in longer repetition-time acquisitions. The implication of this is that, in these cases, cardiac and respiratory rate fluctuations are not aliased into data that undersample these effects and do not affect the resulting time course measurements. In this study, we show that these cases are specific to regions of large cerebrospinal fluid content and are not generally true for gray matter regions of the brain. We demonstrate that in many brain regions of interest, these fluctuations are directly observed as BOLD fluctuations and thus will affect measurements that undersample these effects.

  12. A novel approach to directly observed therapy for tuberculosis in an HIV-endemic area.

    PubMed Central

    Desvarieux, M; Hyppolite, P R; Johnson, W D; Pape, J W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated a novel approach to the delivery of directly observed therapy (DOT) for tuberculosis in Haiti. METHODS: A total of 194 patients (152 HIV seropositive, 42 HIV seronegative) received daily unsupervised triple-drug therapy for 4 to 8 weeks, followed by twice-weekly 2-drug therapy for the remainder of the 6-month period. DOT was deferred until initiation of the twice-weekly phase. RESULTS: A total of 169 of 194 patients (87.1%) completed the 6-month course. The program of deferred DOT had an effectiveness of 85%. Overall cost was reduced by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS: Flexible approaches to DOT, integrating behavioral knowledge, cost considerations, and practicality may improve completion rates and program effectiveness. PMID:11189809

  13. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  14. Copernicus observations of interstellar matter in the direction of HR 1099

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Weiler, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for high-resolution Copernicus U1 and V2 scans of the bright RS CVn spectroscopic binary HR 1099. The observations reveal strong UV emission lines at L-alpha and Mg II h and k from the stars as well as interstellar H I and D I L-alpha absorption lines and interstellar Mg II h and k absorption in the direction of the binary system. Column densities, bulk velocities, and temperatures are derived for the interstellar features. A comparison of the derived number density of interstellar H I with data for the nearby star Epsilon Eri indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of interstellar hydrogen along the line of sight. The range of values obtained for the D/H ratio is shown to be consistent with results of other studies. A depletion factor of at least 5 with respect to the solar abundance is estimated for the interstellar magnesium.

  15. Copernicus observations of neutral hydrogen and deuterium in the direction of HR 1099

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Weiler, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    High-resolution Copernicus U1 scans were obtained of the bright RS CVn binary HR 1099 (d = 33 pc, galactic longitude = 185 deg, galactic latitude = -41 deg) in October 1977. Strong emission at L-alpha was detected. The interstellar L-alpha absorption features of H I and D I were also observed. Analyses of these interstellar lines are reported in this paper. The average density of neutral H in the direction of this system is found to be 0.006-0.012 per cu cm, which, because the local density is higher, requires a marked inhomogeneity along this line of sight. This result, when combined with other recent studies of the local interstellar medium, suggests the sun is located within a moderate-density H I region.

  16. Direct observations of American eels migrating across the continental shelf to the Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Shan, Shiliang; Benchetrit, José; Dodson, Julian J

    2015-01-01

    Since inferring spawning areas from larval distributions in the Sargasso Sea a century ago, the oceanic migration of adult American eels has remained a mystery. No adult eel has ever been observed migrating in the open ocean or in the spawning area. Here, we track movements of maturing eels equipped with pop-up satellite archival tags from the Scotian Shelf (Canada) into the open ocean, with one individual migrating 2,400 km to the northern limit of the spawning site in the Sargasso Sea. The reconstructed routes suggest a migration in two phases: one over the continental shelf and along its edge in shallow waters; the second in deeper waters straight south towards the spawning area. This study is the first direct evidence of adult Anguilla migrating to the Sargasso Sea and represents an important step forward in the understanding of routes and migratory cues. PMID:26505325

  17. Direct observation of hierarchical nucleation of martensite and size-dependent superelasticity in shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Ding, Xiangdong; Li, Ju; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun

    2014-02-21

    Martensitic transformation usually creates hierarchical internal structures beyond mere change of the atomic crystal structure. Multi-stage nucleation is thus required, where nucleation (level-1) of the underlying atomic crystal lattice does not have to be immediately followed by the nucleation of higher-order superstructures (level-2 and above), such as polysynthetic laths. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we directly observe the nucleation of the level-2 superstructure in a Cu-Al-Ni single crystal under compression, with critical super-nuclei size L2c around 500 nm. When the sample size D decreases below L2c, the superelasticity behavior changes from a flat stress plateau to a continuously rising stress-strain curve. Such size dependence definitely would impact the application of shape memory alloys in miniaturized MEMS/NEMS devices.

  18. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Estrada, David; Wood, Joshua D.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Eres, Gyula; Lyding, Joseph W; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with 50 nm spatial and 0.2K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8 150 X lm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  19. Direct observation of hierarchical nucleation of martensite and size-dependent superelasticity in shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Ding, Xiangdong; Li, Ju; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun

    2014-02-21

    Martensitic transformation usually creates hierarchical internal structures beyond mere change of the atomic crystal structure. Multi-stage nucleation is thus required, where nucleation (level-1) of the underlying atomic crystal lattice does not have to be immediately followed by the nucleation of higher-order superstructures (level-2 and above), such as polysynthetic laths. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we directly observe the nucleation of the level-2 superstructure in a Cu-Al-Ni single crystal under compression, with critical super-nuclei size L2c around 500 nm. When the sample size D decreases below L2c, the superelasticity behavior changes from a flat stress plateau to a continuously rising stress-strain curve. Such size dependence definitely would impact the application of shape memory alloys in miniaturized MEMS/NEMS devices. PMID:24384687

  20. Direct observations of gas-hydrate formation in natural porous media on the micro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouachi, M.; Sell, K.; Falenty, A.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.; Pinzer, B.; Saenger, E. H.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Gas hydrates (GH) are crystalline, inclusion compounds consisting of hydrogen-bonded water network encaging small gas molecules such as methane, ethane, CO2, etc (Sloan and Koh 2008). Natural gas hydrates are found worldwide in marine sediments and permafrost regions as a result of a reaction of biogenic or thermogenic gas with water under elevated pressure. Although a large amount of research on GH has been carried out over the years, the micro-structural aspects of GH growth, and in particular the contacts with the sedimentary matrix as well as the details of the distribution remain largely speculative. The present study was undertaken to shed light onto the well-established but not fully understood seismic anomalies, in particular the unusual attenuation of seismic waves in GH-bearing sediments, which may well be linked to micro-structural features. Observations of in-situ GH growth have been performed in a custom-build pressure cell (operating pressures up to several bar) mounted at the TOMCAT beam line of SLS/ PSI. In order to provide sufficient absorption contrast between phases and reduce pressure requirements for the cell we have used Xe instead of CH4. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first direct observation of GH growth in natural porous media with sub-micron spatial resolution and gives insight into the nucleation location and growth process of GH. The progress of the formation of sI Xe-hydrate in natural quartz sand was observed with a time-resolution of several minutes; the runs were conducted with an excess of a free-gas phase and show that the nucleation starts at the gas-water interface. Initially, a GH film is formed at this interface with a typical thickness of several μm; this film may well be permeable to gas as suggested in the past - which would explain the rapid transport of gas molecules for further conversion of water to hydrate, completed in less than 20 min. Clearly, initially the growth is directed mainly into the

  1. The Analysis of Optical, Direct Detection Communication Systems with Point Process Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, David Paul

    1990-01-01

    The central theme of this work is the analysis of direct-detection optical communication channels based on point process observations. For example, we consider an optical DPSK receiver which is based on a binary hypothesis test with conditionally Poisson count observations. The error probability is influenced by the transmitting laser phase noise as well as the statistical nature of light, and decreases to the quantum limit as the transmitting laser linewidth vanishes. We bound the bit error rate by bounding the conditional photon arrival rates, and were shown to converge as the laser linewidth decreases. We also derive the exact error rate of a noncoherent, optical, asynchronous, CDMA system. The receiver utilizes fiber optic tap delay lines to create and correlate the signature sequence with the received point process, and compares an electron count to a threshold to decide for the data of the user of interest. The optical intensity on a surface illuminated by several phase-coherent signals is determined, and it is shown that the approximation of noncoherent addition in the fiber optic tap delay line is justified. The bit error rate is found for arbitrary photomultipliers and signature sequence sets, adheres fully to the semi-classical model of light, and does not depend on approximations for large user groups, strong received optical fields, or chip synchronism. The capacity of a direct-detection photon counting channel is addressed in this work. The limiting form of the capacity is found as the signal and noise energies increase proportionally, and it is shown that the capacity grows logarithmically with the signal energy constraint. When the noise energy increases polynomially with the signal energy, the limiting capacity coincides with that of a Gaussian channel with a positivity and variance constraint. Bounds on the capacity are considered for small and moderate energies by restricting attention to binary inputs. These bounds are arbitrarily tight, and are

  2. The breakup of large tabular icebergs - direct observations and theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, P.

    2013-12-01

    Peter Wadhams and Till Wagner Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP), University of Cambridge. We review the factors governing the stability, dynamics and decay of icebergs and describe areas where current models are inadequate. These include questions such as draft changes in capsizing icebergs; iceberg trajectory modelling; the melt rate of the ice underside and ways of reducing it; and wave-induced flexure and its role in the break-up of tabular icebergs. In July 2012 the authors worked on a very large (42 sq km) tabular iceberg in Baffin Bay, which had calved from the Petermann Glacier in NW Greenland. We measured incoming swell spectrum and the iceberg response; also the role of buoyancy forces due to erosion of a waterline wave cut and the creation of an underwater ram. The iceberg broke up while we were on it, allowing an instrumental measurement of the calving event. The experiments were included in the BBC-2 film 'Operation Iceberg' shown on Nov 1 2012 and repeated on Nov 18. We conclude that two processes interacted in the break-up event: increased bending stress due to buoyancy of underwater rams; and direct flexural strain due to incidence of ocean swell. Implications for icebergs in the open sea are estimated.

  3. Direct single-molecule observation of calcium-dependent misfolding in human neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    PubMed

    Heidarsson, Pétur O; Naqvi, Mohsin M; Otazo, Mariela R; Mossa, Alessandro; Kragelund, Birthe B; Cecconi, Ciro

    2014-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are strongly linked to protein misfolding, and crucial to their explication is a detailed understanding of the underlying structural rearrangements and pathways that govern the formation of misfolded states. Here we use single-molecule optical tweezers to monitor misfolding reactions of the human neuronal calcium sensor-1, a multispecific EF-hand protein involved in neurotransmitter release and linked to severe neurological diseases. We directly observed two misfolding trajectories leading to distinct kinetically trapped misfolded conformations. Both trajectories originate from an on-pathway intermediate state and compete with native folding in a calcium-dependent manner. The relative probability of the different trajectories could be affected by modulating the relaxation rate of applied force, demonstrating an unprecedented real-time control over the free-energy landscape of a protein. Constant-force experiments in combination with hidden Markov analysis revealed the free-energy landscape of the misfolding transitions under both physiological and pathological calcium concentrations. Remarkably for a calcium sensor, we found that higher calcium concentrations increased the lifetimes of the misfolded conformations, slowing productive folding to the native state. We propose a rugged, multidimensional energy landscape for neuronal calcium sensor-1 and speculate on a direct link between protein misfolding and calcium dysregulation that could play a role in neurodegeneration. PMID:25157171

  4. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, Heikki; Asmi, Eija; Aaltonen, Veijo; Makkonen, Ulla; Kerminen, Veli-Matti

    2015-10-01

    We used more than five years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback parameter associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback parameter during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97 ± 66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63 ± 40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the ‘dry’ aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of the direct radiative feedback associated with BSOA is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  5. Direct single-molecule observation of calcium-dependent misfolding in human neuronal calcium sensor-1

    PubMed Central

    Heidarsson, Pétur O.; Naqvi, Mohsin M.; Otazo, Mariela R.; Mossa, Alessandro; Kragelund, Birthe B.; Cecconi, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are strongly linked to protein misfolding, and crucial to their explication is a detailed understanding of the underlying structural rearrangements and pathways that govern the formation of misfolded states. Here we use single-molecule optical tweezers to monitor misfolding reactions of the human neuronal calcium sensor-1, a multispecific EF-hand protein involved in neurotransmitter release and linked to severe neurological diseases. We directly observed two misfolding trajectories leading to distinct kinetically trapped misfolded conformations. Both trajectories originate from an on-pathway intermediate state and compete with native folding in a calcium-dependent manner. The relative probability of the different trajectories could be affected by modulating the relaxation rate of applied force, demonstrating an unprecedented real-time control over the free-energy landscape of a protein. Constant-force experiments in combination with hidden Markov analysis revealed the free-energy landscape of the misfolding transitions under both physiological and pathological calcium concentrations. Remarkably for a calcium sensor, we found that higher calcium concentrations increased the lifetimes of the misfolded conformations, slowing productive folding to the native state. We propose a rugged, multidimensional energy landscape for neuronal calcium sensor-1 and speculate on a direct link between protein misfolding and calcium dysregulation that could play a role in neurodegeneration. PMID:25157171

  6. Direct observation of Landau levels of massless and massive Dirac fermions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohong; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2007-03-01

    The low energy quasiparticles in graphene resemble massless relativistic particles (Dirac fermions): they have a linear energy-momentum spectrum and possess internal degrees of freedom arising from the crystal symmetry of the honeycomb lattice, leading to particle anti-particle pairs. When two layers of graphene are coupled together, the quasiparticles acquire a band-mass and are transformed into chiral massive fermions. Both types of quasiparticles develop unusual Landau levels in a magnetic field which profoundly alter the magneto-transport properties. We will report the direct observation of the Landau levels associated with these quasiparticles using a low temperature STM in fields up to 12 Tesla. The experiments reveal two independent sequences of Landau levels that provide evidence for the coexistence of massless and massive Dirac fermions. The energy levels of the former exhibit a square-root dependence on both field and Landau-level index n, while the latter are linear in field with a Landau-level index dependence of [n(n+1)]^1/2. Both sequences exhibit a zero energy Landau level which is a unique and direct consequence of the quantum-relativistic nature of these quasiparticles.

  7. Direct Observation of α-Synuclein Amyloid Aggregates in Endocytic Vesicles of Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Vinod; Canters, Gerard W.; Schmidt, Thomas; Aartsma, Thijs J.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein has been linked to both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Recent studies suggest that α-synuclein aggregates may spread from cell to cell and raise questions about the propagation of neurodegeneration. While continuous progress has been made characterizing α-synuclein aggregates in vitro, there is a lack of information regarding the structure of these species inside the cells. Here, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy in combination with direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, to investigate α-synuclein uptake when added exogenously to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and to probe in situ morphological features of α-synuclein aggregates with near nanometer resolution. We demonstrate that using dSTORM, it is possible to follow noninvasively the uptake of extracellularly added α-synuclein aggregates by the cells. Once the aggregates are internalized, they move through the endosomal pathway and accumulate in lysosomes to be degraded. Our dSTORM data show that α-synuclein aggregates remain assembled after internalization and they are shortened as they move through the endosomal pathway. No further aggregation was observed inside the lysosomes as speculated in the literature, nor in the cytoplasm of the cells. Our study thus highlights the super-resolution capability of dSTORM to follow directly the endocytotic uptake of extracellularly added amyloid aggregates and to probe the morphology of in situ protein aggregates even when they accumulate in small vesicular compartments. PMID:27105068

  8. Low Frequency Radio Observations of Bi-directional Electron Beams in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, E.; Reid, H.; Vilmer, N.; Gallagher, P.

    2015-12-01

    The radio signature of a shock travelling through the solar corona is known as a type II solar radio burst. In rare cases, these bursts can exhibit a fine structure known as 'herringbones' which are a direct indicator of particle acceleration occurring at the shock front. However, few studies have been performed on herringbones and the details of the underlying particle acceleration processes are unknown. Here, we use an image processing technique known as the Hough transform to statistically analyse the herringbone fine structure in a radio burst at 20-90MHz observed from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory on 2011 September 22. We identify 188 individual bursts which are signatures of bi-directional electron beams continuously accelerated to speeds of 0.16 c. This occurs at a shock acceleration site initially at a constant altitude of 0.6 Rsun in the corona, followed by a shift to 0.5 Rsun. The anti-sunward beams travel a distance of 170 Mm (and possibly further) away from the acceleration site, while those travelling toward the sun come to a stop sooner, reaching a smaller distance of 112 Mm. We show that the stopping distance for the sunward beams may depend on the total number density and the velocity of the beam. Our study concludes that a detailed statistical analysis of herringbone fine structure can provide information on the physical properties of the corona which lead to these relatively rare radio bursts.

  9. Ultrasound Open Channel Flow-Speed Measurement Based on the Lateral Directional Echo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Ishigamori, Mitsuhide; Yamada, Akira

    2012-07-01

    Conventional ultrasonic flowmeters have a problem in measuring the small open channel fluid flow. To solve this problem, a lateral observation technique using a single transmitter/receiver transducer attached at the bottom of the pipe was proposed. Pulse echo signals scattered from the particles in the medium were repetitively recorded with a constant time interval. From the slope of the correlation peak amplitude with the variation in pulse echo excitation time, the flow speed of the medium was estimated. The method has an advantage in that the variation in flow speed in the vertical depth direction is directly measured with a minimum measurement space. Moreover, the fluctuations caused by the turbulent water can be avoided compared with the case of a conventional method based on the time estimation method. Bubbles were generated by an aspirator and flour powder was mixed with water as scatterers in the imitated drainage water. The flow speed of water was measured with respect to the inflowing fluid volume. Moreover, vertical flow speed profiles were measured and compared with fluid flow simulation results. The results showed that the precision of the measured flow speed was satisfactory and tolerant against the turbulence of the water flow medium.

  10. Direct observation of slow intersystem crossing in an aromatic ketone, fluorenone.

    PubMed

    Soep, Benoît; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel; Briant, Marc; Gaveau, Marc-André; Poisson, Lionel

    2016-08-17

    Direct measurements of Single vibronic Level InterSystem Crossing (SLISC) have been performed on the fluorenone molecule in the gas phase, by time resolved photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy. Vibronic transitions above the S1 nπ* origin were excited in the 432-420 nm region and the decay of S1 and growth of T1(3)ππ* could be observed within a 10 ns time domain. The ionization potential is measured as 8.33 ± 0.04 eV. The energy of the first excited triplet state of fluorenone, T1 has been characterized directly at 18 640 ± 250 cm(-1). The internal conversion of S1 to S0 is found to amount to ∼15% of the population decay, thus ISC is the dominant electronic relaxation process. ISC, although favored by the S1(1)nπ*-T1(3)ππ* coupling scheme, is 3 orders of magnitude less efficient than in the similar molecule benzophenone. Thus, the planarity of the fluorenone molecule disfavors the exploration of the configuration space where surface crossings would create high ISC probability, which occurs in benzophenone through surface crossings. The time evolution of S1 fluorenone is well accounted for by the statistical decay of individual levels into a quasi-continuum of T1 vibronic levels. PMID:27485671

  11. Direct observation of macrostructure formation of hierarchically structured meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with 3D interconnectivity by optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Arnaud; Rooke, Joanna Claire; Chen, Li-Hua; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-03-15

    Hierarchically structured spongy meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminum content were synthesized from a mixture of single molecular alkoxide precursor, (sec-BuO)2-Al-O-Si(OEt)3, already containing Si-O-Al bonds, and a silica coreactant, tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). The spontaneous byproduct templated macroporous structure formation has been directly visualized using in situ high-resolution optical microscopy (OM), allowing the crucial observation of a microbubble dispersion which is directly correlated to the macrostructure observed by electronic microscopies (SEM and TEM). This discovery leads to a comparative study with meso-macroporous pure metal oxide and to a proposal of the formation mechanism of meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with 3D interconnectivity. The aluminosilicate phase/microbubbles emulsion is produced by a phase separation process occurring between the aluminosilicate nanoparticles and the liquid hydrolysis-condensation reaction byproducts (water, methanol, ethanol, and butanol). The use of alkoxysilane improves the heterocondensation rates between the highly reactive aluminum alkoxide part of the single precursor and added silica species but, above all, leads to the spontaneous generation of an unusual meso-macroporosity in alkaline media. The particles obtained at pH = 13.0 featured regular micrometer-sized macrospheres separated by very thin mesoporous walls and connected by submicrometric openings, providing a 3D interconnectivity. The slight increase in pH value to 13.5 induced significant modifications in morphology and textural properties due to the slower gelification process of the aluminosilicate phase, resulting in the formation of an aluminosilicate material constituted of 1-2 µm large independent hollow mesoporous spheres.

  12. Direct Observation of Controlled Melting and Resolidification of Succinonitrile Mixtures in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    In support of the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) direct observation of experiments on the controlled melting and subsequent resolidification of succinonitrile were conducted in the glovebox facility (GBX) of the International Space Station (ISS). Samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) and SCN-Water mixtures under 450 millibar of nitrogen. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Sample temperatures are monitored by six in situ thermocouples. Real time visualization during melt back revealed bubbles of different sizes initiating at the solid/liquid interface, their release, interactions, and movement into the temperature field ahead of them. Subsequent re-solidification examined planar interface breakdown and the transition to steady-state dendritic growth. A preliminary analysis of the observed phenomena and its implication to future microgravity experiments is presented and discussed.

  13. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season. PMID:25279921

  14. Direct reconstruction of dynamical dark energy from observational Hubble parameter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-E.; Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Tang, Yan-Ke

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing the evolution history of the dark energy equation of state parameter w(z) directly from observational data is highly valuable in cosmology, since it contains substantial clues in understanding the nature of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Many works have focused on reconstructing w(z) using Type Ia supernova data, however, only a few studies pay attention to Hubble parameter data. In the present work, we explore the merit of Hubble parameter data and make an attempt to reconstruct w(z) from them through the principle component analysis approach. We find that current Hubble parameter data perform well in reconstructing w(z) ; though, when compared to supernova data, the data are scant and their quality is worse. Both ΛCDM and evolving w(z) models can be constrained within 10 % at redshifts z ≲ 1.5 and even 5 % at redshifts 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 1 by using simulated H(z) data of observational quality.

  15. Incorporating a disturbance observer with direct velocity feedback for control of human-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyawako, Donald; Reynolds, Paul; Hudson, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Feedback control strategies are desirable for disturbance rejection of human-induced vibrations in civil engineering structures as human walking forces cannot easily be measured. In relation to human-induced vibration control studies, most past researches have focused on floors and footbridges and the widely used linear controller implemented in the trials has been the direct velocity feedback (DVF) scheme. With appropriate compensation to enhance its robustness, it has been shown to be effective at damping out the problematic modes of vibration of the structures in which the active vibration control systems have been implemented. The work presented here introduces a disturbance observer (DOB) that is used with an outer-loop DVF controller. Results of analytical studies presented in this work based on the dynamic properties of a walkway bridge structure demonstrate the potential of this approach for enhancing the vibration mitigation performance offered by a purely DVF controller. For example, estimates of controlled frequency response functions indicate improved attenuation of vibration around the dominant frequency of the walkway bridge structure as well as at higher resonant frequencies. Controlled responses from three synthesized walking excitation forces on a walkway bridge structure model show that the inclusion of the disturbance observer with an outer loop DVF has potential to improve on the vibration mitigation performance by about 3.5% at resonance and 6-10% off-resonance. These are realised with hard constraints being imposed on the low frequency actuator displacements.

  16. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.

  17. Direct observation and control of supported lipid bilayer formation with interferometric scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Andrecka, Joanna; Spillane, Katelyn M; Ortega-Arroyo, Jaime; Kukura, Philipp

    2013-12-23

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLB) are frequently used to study processes associated with or mediated by lipid membranes. The mechanism by which SLBs form is a matter of debate, largely due to the experimental difficulty associated with observing the adsorption and rupture of individual vesicles. Here, we used interferometric scattering microscopy (iSCAT) to directly visualize membrane formation from nanoscopic vesicles in real time. We observed a number of previously proposed phenomena such as vesicle adsorption, rupture, movement, and a wave-like bilayer spreading. By varying the vesicle size and the lipid-surface interaction strength, we rationalized and tuned the relative contributions of these phenomena to bilayer formation. Our results support a model where the interplay between bilayer edge tension and the overall interaction energy with the surface determine the mechanism of SLB formation. The unique combination of sensitivity, speed, and label-free imaging capability of iSCAT provides exciting prospects not only for investigations of SLB formation, but also for studies of assembly and disassembly processes on the nanoscale with previously unattainable accuracy and sensitivity.

  18. Direct observation of interfacial Au atoms on TiO₂ in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenpei; Sivaramakrishnan, Shankar; Wen, Jianguo; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2015-04-01

    Interfacial atoms, which result from interactions between the metal nanoparticles and support, have a large impact on the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles. However, they are difficult to observe; the lack of knowledge has been a major obstacle toward unraveling their role in chemical transformations. Here we report conclusive evidence of interfacial Au atoms formed on the rutile (TiO2) (110) surfaces by activation using high-temperature (∼500 °C) annealing in air. Three-dimensional imaging was performed using depth-sectioning enabled by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the interface between Au nanocrystals and TiO2 (110) surfaces consists of a single atomic layer with Au atoms embedded inside Ti-O. The number of interfacial Au atoms is estimated from ∼1-8 in an interfacial atomic column. Direct impact of interfacial Au atoms is observed on an enhanced Au-TiO2 interaction and the reduction of surface TiO2; both are critical to Au catalysis.

  19. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  20. Direct observation of lipid hydroperoxides in phospholipid vesicles by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spickett, C M; Pitt, A R; Brown, A J

    1998-09-01

    Positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to obtain a lipid profile of vesicles prepared from egg yolk lethicin and enriched with arachidonylstearoyl phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine. The vesicles were oxidized by treatment with tert-butylhydroperoxide and iron (II) sulfate, and the formation of hydroperoxides of the polyunsaturated lipid arachidonylstearoyl phosphatidylcholine was observed. The native lipid signal at 832 a.m.u. decreased and new signals appeared at 864, 896, and 928 a.m.u., corresponding to the addition of one (+32), two (+64), and three (+96) molecules of dioxygen. The dihydroperoxide was found to be the most favourable peroxide product, but it appeared that a degradation of the hydroperoxides was occurring concomitant with their formation, and only their net formation was observed. The rate of depletion of the polyunsaturated lipid and the rate of accumulation of the hydroperoxides was found to increase with the Fe2+ concentration between 10 microM and 2 mM, and was also dependent on the tert-butylhydroperoxide concentration. This is the first report of analysis of lipid hydroperoxides by electrospray mass spectrometry, showing that technique offers a sensitive, direct, and informative approach to the study of oxidative damage to biological membranes. PMID:9741599

  1. Direct observations of the photoinduced change in dimerization in K-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Hosoda, Ryosuke; Okimoto, Yoichi; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Onda, Ken; Koshihara, Shinya; Kumai, Reiji

    2016-05-01

    The photoinduced dynamics of a potassium-tetracyanoquinodimethane (K-TCNQ) single crystal in the generalized Peierls phase are evaluated via time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy. The transient reflectivity spectrum of the photoinduced state in the mid-IR range shows a decrease in the height and width of the reflectivity band because of the electron-molecular-vibration-coupled CN stretching mode at approximately 2180 cm-1. This spectral change suggests that the photoexcitation of the charge transfer in TCNQ molecules induces melting of the dimerization of the molecules. From detailed analysis of the spectral evolution, the relaxation time constant from the photoinduced state to the dimerized state is estimated to be approximately 0.6 ps. Even after the recovery of the dimerization, a fluctuation is still observed, probably because of a domain-wall soliton. The fluctuation gradually dissipates with a time constant of approximately 2.3 ps. Direct observation of the dimerization process reveals the true dynamics of the photoinduced cooperative phenomenon within this system.

  2. Determination of miscibility pressure by direct-observation method. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct laboratory tests to: (1) develop a method for determining miscibility pressure (MMP) through direct observation using a high pressure cell; and (2) determine feasibility of in-situ foam generation by visual observation and microphotographic technique. The project is organized and carried out in three major tasks, i.e., (1) MMP test; (2) high pressure sampling and chemical analysis; and (3) foam study and displacement test. The MMP test was 100% completed. The summary and results were presented in the last quarterly report. Chemical analysis using the HP5880-A was continued for SACROC crude oil at 76/sup 0/F and 150/sup 0/F and was also conducted for Rock Creek crude oil at 78/sup 0/F and 120/sup 0/F. Generally speaking, the changes of crude oil composition caused by CO/sub 2/ extraction are similar for both crude oils. During this reporting period, 29 displacements were performed for SACROC and Rock Creek crude soils. Results are discussed. 5 figures, 1 table.

  3. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  4. An instrument for direct observations of seismic and normal-mode rotational oscillations of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Cowsik, R

    2007-04-24

    The rotations around the vertical axis associated with the normal mode oscillations of the Earth and those induced by the seismic and other disturbances have been very difficult to observe directly. Such observations will provide additional information for 3D modeling of the Earth and for understanding earthquakes and other underground explosions. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrument capable of measuring the rotational motions associated with the seismic oscillations of the Earth, including the lowest frequency normal mode at nu approximately 3.7 x 10(-4) Hz. The instrument consists of a torsion balance with a natural frequency of nu(0) approximately 1.6 x 10(-4) Hz, which is observed by an autocollimating optical lever of high angular resolution and dynamic range. Thermal noise limits the sensitivity of the apparatus to amplitudes of approximately 1.5 x 10(-9) rad at the lowest frequency normal mode and the sensitivity improves as nu(-3/2) with increasing frequency. Further improvements in sensitivity by about two orders of magnitude may be achieved by operating the balance at cryogenic temperatures. Alternatively, the instrument can be made more robust with a reduced sensitivity by increasing nu(0) to approximately 10(-2) Hz. This instrument thus complements the ongoing effort by Igel and others to study rotational motions using ring laser gyroscopes and constitutes a positive response to the clarion call for developments in rotation seismology by Igel, Lee, and Todorovska [H. Igel, W.H.K. Lee and M.I. Todorovska, AGU Fall Meeting 2006, Rotational Seismology Sessions: S22A,S23B, Inauguration of the International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS)].

  5. Direct Observation of Formation Behavior of Metal Emulsion in Sn/Salt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hironori; Liu, Jiang; Kim, Sun-Joong; Gao, Xu; Ueda, Shigeru; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Ono, Shinpei; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-08-01

    Using two systems with different interfacial tensions, the behavior of metal emulsions during bottom blowing was observed directly with a high-speed camera. The interfacial tension between molten salt (KCl-LiCl-NaCl) and molten Sn was measured by a pendant drop method, and it decreased to about 100 mN/m when the Te content in Sn increased from 0 to 0.5 pct. In both systems, two types of metal emulsion behaviors were observed. In Mode A, fine metal droplets were formed after the metal film ruptured at the interface. In Mode B, the formation of coarse droplets was observed after the disintegration of the column generated by the rising bubble, and the number of droplets increased with the gas flow rate compared to that in Mode A. The generating frequency of each mode revealed that Mode B became dominant with increasing gas flow rate. In the pure Sn/salt system, the numbers of droplets of Mode B showed a local maximum at high gas flow rates, but the numbers of droplets in Sn-0.5 pctTe/salt increased continuously even in the same flow range. Regarding the size distribution, the percentage of coarse metal droplets in the Sn-0.5 pctTe alloy/salt was larger than that in the pure Sn/salt. Furthermore, the effect of interfacial tension on the variation in surface area and volume of the droplets showed a similar tendency for the column height. Therefore, a decrement of the interfacial tension led to an increment of the column height when Mode B occurred and finally resulted in a higher interfacial area.

  6. An instrument for direct observations of seismic and normal-mode rotational oscillations of the Earth

    PubMed Central

    Cowsik, R.

    2007-01-01

    The rotations around the vertical axis associated with the normal mode oscillations of the Earth and those induced by the seismic and other disturbances have been very difficult to observe directly. Such observations will provide additional information for 3D modeling of the Earth and for understanding earthquakes and other underground explosions. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrument capable of measuring the rotational motions associated with the seismic oscillations of the Earth, including the lowest frequency normal mode at ν ≈ 3.7 × 10−4 Hz. The instrument consists of a torsion balance with a natural frequency of ν0 ≈ 1.6 × 10−4 Hz, which is observed by an autocollimating optical lever of high angular resolution and dynamic range. Thermal noise limits the sensitivity of the apparatus to amplitudes of ≈ 1.5 × 10−9 rad at the lowest frequency normal mode and the sensitivity improves as ν−3/2 with increasing frequency. Further improvements in sensitivity by about two orders of magnitude may be achieved by operating the balance at cryogenic temperatures. Alternatively, the instrument can be made more robust with a reduced sensitivity by increasing ν0 to ≈10−2 Hz. This instrument thus complements the ongoing effort by Igel and others to study rotational motions using ring laser gyroscopes and constitutes a positive response to the clarion call for developments in rotation seismology by Igel, Lee, and Todorovska [H. Igel, W.H.K. Lee and M.I. Todorovska, AGU Fall Meeting 2006, Rotational Seismology Sessions: S22A,S23B, Inauguration of the International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS)]. PMID:17438268

  7. Direct Observation of Photoinduced Tautomerization in Single Molecules at a Metal Surface.

    PubMed

    Böckmann, H; Liu, S; Mielke, J; Gawinkowski, S; Waluk, J; Grill, L; Wolf, M; Kumagai, T

    2016-02-10

    Molecular switches are of fundamental importance in nature, and light is an important stimulus to selectively drive the switching process. However, the local dynamics of a conformational change in these molecules remain far from being completely understood at the single-molecule level. Here, we report the direct observation of photoinduced tautomerization in single porphycene molecules on a Cu(111) surface by using a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and laser excitation in the near-infrared to ultraviolet regime. It is found that the thermodynamically stable trans configuration of porphycene can be converted to the metastable cis configuration in a unidirectional fashion by photoirradiation. The wavelength dependence of the tautomerization cross section exhibits a steep increase around 2 eV and demonstrates that excitation of the Cu d-band electrons and the resulting hot carriers play a dominant role in the photochemical process. Additionally, a pronounced isotope effect in the cross section (∼100) is observed when the transferred hydrogen atoms are substituted with deuterium, indicating a significant contribution of zero-point energy in the reaction. Combined with the study of inelastic tunneling electron-induced tautomerization with the STM, we propose that tautomerization occurs via excitation of molecular vibrations after photoexcitation. Interestingly, the observed cross section of ∼10(-19) cm(2) in the visible-ultraviolet region is much higher than that of previously studied molecular switches on a metal surface, for example, azobenzene derivatives (10(-23)-10(-22) cm(2)). Furthermore, we examined a local environmental impact on the photoinduced tautomerization by varying molecular density on the surface and find substantial changes in the cross section and quenching of the process due to the intermolecular interaction at high density. PMID:26796945

  8. Measuring Learning Styles with Questionnaires versus Direct Observation of Preferential Choice Behavior in Authentic Learning Situations: The Visualizer/Verbalizer Behavior Observation Scale (VV-BOS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leutner, Detlev; Plass, Jan L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of the VV-BOS (Visualizer/Verbalizer Behavior Observation Scale), a computer-based instrument for direct observation of students' preferences for visual or verbal learning material. Results of a study with second-language learners indicated a high degree of reliability as an alternative to conventional questionnaires.…

  9. Direct video and hydrophone observations of submarine explosive eruptions at NW Rota-1 volcano, Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Cashman, K. V.; Embley, R. W.; Matsumoto, H.; Dziak, R. P.; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Lau, T. K.; Deardorff, N. D.; Merle, S. G.

    2008-08-01

    Extraordinary video and hydrophone observations of a submarine explosive eruption were made with a remotely operated vehicle in April 2006 at a depth of 550-560 m on NW Rota-1 volcano in the Mariana arc. The observed eruption evolved from effusive to explosive, while the eruption rate increased from near zero to 10-100 m3/h. During the peak in activity, cyclic explosive bursts 2-6 min long were separated by shorter non-eruptive pauses lasting 10-100 s. The size of the ejecta increased with the vigor of the explosions. A portable hydrophone deployed near the vent recorded sounds correlated with the explosive bursts; the highest amplitudes were ˜50 dB higher than ambient noise at frequencies between 10 and 50 Hz. The acoustic data allow us to quantify the durations, amplitudes, and evolution of the eruptive events over time. The low eruption rate, high gas/lava ratio, and rhythmic eruptive behavior at NW Rota-1 are most consistent with a Strombolian eruptive style. We interpret that the eruption was primarily driven by the venting of magmatic gases, which was also the primary source of the sound recorded during the explosive bursts. The rhythmic nature of the bursts can be explained by partial gas segregation in the conduit and upward migration in a transitional regime between bubbly flow and fully developed slug flow. The strongest explosive bursts were accompanied by flashes of red glow and oscillating eruption plumes in the vent, apparently caused by magma-seawater interaction and rapid steam formation and condensation. This is the first time submarine explosive eruptions have been witnessed with simultaneous near-field acoustic recordings.

  10. Melt electrospinning of poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds: phenomenological observations associated with collection and direct writing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Toby D; Edin, Fredrik; Detta, Nicola; Skelton, Anthony D; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Dalton, Paul D

    2014-12-01

    Melt electrospinning and its additive manufacturing analogue, melt electrospinning writing (MEW), are two processes which can produce porous materials for applications where solvent toxicity and accumulation in solution electrospinning are problematic. This study explores the melt electrospinning of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds, specifically for applications in tissue engineering. The research described here aims to inform researchers interested in melt electrospinning about technical aspects of the process. This includes rapid fiber characterization using glass microscope slides, allowing influential processing parameters on fiber morphology to be assessed, as well as observed fiber collection phenomena on different collector substrates. The distribution and alignment of melt electrospun PCL fibers can be controlled to a certain degree using patterned collectors to create large numbers of scaffolds with shaped macroporous architectures. However, the buildup of residual charge in the collected fibers limits the achievable thickness of the porous template through such scaffolds. One challenge identified for MEW is the ability to control charge buildup so that fibers can be placed accurately in close proximity, and in many centimeter heights. The scale and size of scaffolds produced using MEW, however, indicate that this emerging process will fill a technological niche in biofabrication.

  11. Low frequency radio observations of bi-directional electron beams in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Reid, Hamish; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2015-09-01

    The radio signature of a shock travelling through the solar corona is known as a type II solar radio burst. In rare cases these bursts can exhibit a fine structure known as "herringbones", which are a direct indicator of particle acceleration occurring at the shock front. However, few studies have been performed on herringbones and the details of the underlying particle acceleration processes are unknown. Here, we use an image processing technique known as the Hough transform to statistically analyse the herringbone fine structure in a radio burst at ~20-90 MHz observed from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory on 2011 September 22. We identify 188 individual bursts which are signatures of bi-directional electron beams continuously accelerated to speeds of 0.16-0.10+0.11 c. This occurs at a shock acceleration site initially at a constant altitude of ~0.6 R⊙ in the corona, followed by a shift to ~0.5 R⊙. The anti-sunward beams travel a distance of 170-97+174 Mm (and possibly further) away from the acceleration site, while those travelling toward the Sun come to a stop sooner, reaching a smaller distance of 112-76+84 Mm. We show that the stopping distance for the sunward beams may depend on the total number density and the velocity of the beam. Our study concludes that a detailed statistical analysis of herringbone fine structure can provide information on the physical properties of the corona which lead to these relatively rare radio bursts.

  12. Effects of the observation method (direct v. from video) and of the presence of an observer on behavioural results in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Leruste, H; Bokkers, E A M; Sergent, O; Wolthuis-Fillerup, M; van Reenen, C G; Lensink, B J

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effect of the observation method (direct or from video) and the effect of the presence of an observer on the behavioural results in veal calves kept on a commercial farm. To evaluate the effect of the observation method, 20 pens (four to five calves per pen) were observed by an observer for 60 min (two observation sessions of 30 min) and video-recorded at the same time. To evaluate the effect of the presence of the observer in front of the pen, 24 pens were video-recorded on 4 consecutive days and an observer was present in front of each pen for 60 min (two observation sessions of 30 min) on the third day. Behaviour was recorded using instantaneous scan sampling. For the study of the observer's effect, the analysis was limited to the posture, abnormal oral behaviour and manipulation of substrates. The two observation methods gave similar results for the time spent standing, but different results for all other behaviours. The presence of an observer did not affect the behaviour of calves at day level; however, their behaviour was affected when the observer was actually present in front of the pens. A higher percentage of calves were standing and were manipulating substrate in the presence of the observer, but there was no effect on abnormal oral behaviour. In conclusion, direct observations are a more suitable observation method than observations from video recordings for detailed behaviours in veal calves. The presence of an observer has a short-term effect on certain behaviours of calves that will have to be taken into consideration when monitoring these behaviours.

  13. CAN-DOO: The Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B.; Sherman, J. P.; Perry, L. B.; Markham, J.; Kelly, G.

    2011-12-01

    The urgency of climate change demands a greater understanding of our climate system, not only by the leaders of today, but by the scientists, policy makers, and citizens of tomorrow. Unfortunately, a large segment of the population currently possesses inadequate knowledge of climate science. In direct response to a need for greater scientific literacy with respect to climate science, researchers from Appalachian State University's Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) group, with support from NASA, have developed CAN-DOO: the Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach. CAN-DOO addresses climate science literacy by 1) Developing the infrastructure for sustaining and expanding public outreach through long-term climate measurements capable of complementing existing NASA measurements, 2) Enhancing public awareness of climate science and NASA's role in advancing our understanding of the Earth System, and 3) Introducing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics principles to homeschooled, public school, and Appalachian State University students through applied climate science activities. Project partners include the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation, Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, and local elementary schools. In partnership with Grandfather Mountain, climate science awareness is promoted through citizen science activities, interactive public displays, and staff training. CAN-DOO engages students by involving them in the entire scientific investigative process as applied to climate science. We introduce local elementary and middle school students, homeschooled students throughout North Carolina, and undergraduate students in a new Global Climate Change course and select other courses at Appalachian State University to instrument assembly, measurement techniques, data collection, hypothesis testing, and drawing conclusions. Results are placed in the proper context via comparisons with other student

  14. Direct Observation (DO) for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Do We Really DO?

    PubMed Central

    Benbaba, Stella; Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Jadhav, Sonakshi; Reid, Tony; Furin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Directly-observed therapy (DOT) is recommended for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) patients during their entire treatment duration. However, there is limited published evidence on implementation of direct observation (DO) in the field. This study aims to detail whether DO was followed with DR-TB patients in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tuberculosis program in Mumbai, India. Methods This was a cross-sectional, mixed-methods study. Existing qualitative data from a purposively-selected subset of 12 patients, 5 DOT-providers and 5 family members, were assessed in order to determine how DO was implemented. A questionnaire-based survey of DR-TB patients, their DOT-providers and MSF staff was completed between June and August 2014. Patients were defined as”following Strict DO” and “following DO” if a DOT-provider had seen the patient swallow his/her medications “every day” or “most of the days” respectively. If DO was not followed, reasons were also recorded. The qualitative data were analysed for theme and content and used to supplement the questionnaire-based data. Results A total of 70 DR-TB patients, 65 DOT-providers and 21 MSF health staff were included. Fifty-five per cent of the patients were HIV-co-infected and 41% had multidrug-resistant-TB plus additional resistance to a fluoroquinolone. Among all patients, only 14% (10/70) and 20% (14/70) self-reported “following Strict DO” and “following DO” respectively. Among DOT-providers, 46% (30/65) reported that their patients “followed DO”. MSF health staff reported none of the patients “followed DO”. Reasons for not implementing DO included the unavailability of DOT-provider, time spent, stigma and treatment adverse events. The qualitative data also revealed that “Strict DO” was rarely followed and noted the same reasons for lack of implementation. Conclusion This mixed-methods study has found that a majority of patients with DR-TB in Mumbai did not follow DO

  15. Determination of miscibility pressure by direct observation method. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct laboratory tests to: (1) develop a method for determining MMP through direct observation using a high pressure cell; (2) determine feasibility of in-situ foam generation by visual observation and microphotographic technique. The project is presently organized and carried out in three major fronts: (1) MMP test; (2) high pressure sampling and chemical analysis; and (3) foam study and displacement test. The technical progress in each of these areas is discussed. The effects of temperature on MMP and appearance of CO/sub 2/-rich phase for four crude oils tested are plotted. The MMP is the pressure at which the CO/sub 2/-rich phase becomes miscible with CO/sub 2/ vapor. The results of gas chromatographic analysis for the four crude oils tested are presented. As previously stated the richness of C/sub 5/ to C/sub 20/ components is the key factor for determining the quality and stability of the miscible transition zone. The surfactant/CO/sub 2/ ratio relative to foam quality and foam quantity are presented in a table and also plotted. The plotted figures show: (1) the foam qualities increased as the surfactant rates are decreased; (2) at 75/sup 0/F, the foam quality increases as the pressure is decreased whereas the reverse is true for temperature at 120/sup 0/F; (3) foam generating rate increased with increasing surfactant/CO/sub 2/ ratio; (4) high temperatures tend to lower the rate and high pressures tend to increase the rate at 120/sup 0/F but to decrease at 75/sup 0/F; (5) foam quality was found to be affected more by surfactant/CO/sub 2/ ratio, and to a lesser degree by pressure and temperature. (ATT)

  16. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  17. Implications of directly observed therapy in tuberculosis control measures among IDUs.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, R; Friedman, S R; Neaigus, A; Jose, B; Goldstein, M; Des Jarlais, D C

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a rapidly growing problem among injecting drug users (IDU), especially those infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The authors review IDUs' responses to current TB control strategies and discuss the implications of their findings for the proposed implementation of directly observed therapy (DOT), a method for ensuring that patients take prescribed medication. Field workers carried out 210 ethnographic interviews with 68 IDUs in a Brooklyn, NY, community during 1990-93. Case studies suggested that many IDUs are uninformed about TB and often misinformed about their personal TB status. Ethnographic interviews and observations indicated that the threat of TB-related involuntary detainment may lead IDUs to avoid TB diagnostic procedures, treatment for TB, or drug abuse treatment, and to avoid AIDS outreach workers and other health-related services. IDUs who tested positive for the purified protein derivative (PPD) of TB sometimes have left hospitals before definitive diagnoses were made, because of a perceived lack of respectful treatment, fear of detention, or lack of adequate methadone therapy to relieve the symptoms of withdrawal from drugs. Current TB diagnosis and treatment systems are, at best, inadequate. The threat of TB-related detention discourages some IDUs from seeking any type of health care. There is an urgent need to educate IDUs about TB and to educate and sensitize health care providers about the lifestyles of IDUs. DOT may help in servicing this difficult-to-serve population, particularly if techniques are incorporated that have been developed for other successful public health interventions for IDUs. PMID:8190855

  18. Directly observing the motion of DNA molecules near solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Ando, Genki; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-27

    We investigate the diffusion and the drift motion of λ DNA molecules near solid-state nanopores prior to their translocation through the nanopores using fluorescence microscopy. The radial dependence of the electric field near a nanopore generated by an applied voltage in ionic solution can be estimated quantitatively in 3D by analyzing the motion of negatively charged DNA molecules. We find that the electric field is approximately spherically symmetric around the nanopore under the conditions investigated. In addition, DNA clogging at the nanopore was directly observed. Surprisingly, the probability of the clogging event increases with increasing external bias voltage. We also find that DNA molecules clogging the nanopore reduce the electric field amplitude at the nanopore membrane surface. To better understand these experimental results, analytical method with Ohm's law and computer simulation with Poisson and Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations are used to calculate the electric field near the nanopore. These results are of great interest in both experimental and theoretical considerations of the motion of DNA molecules near voltage-biased nanopores. These findings will also contribute to the development of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sensing devices.

  19. Reliability of the direct observation of procedural skills assessment tool for ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chuan, A; Thillainathan, S; Graham, P L; Jolly, B; Wong, D M; Smith, N; Barrington, M J

    2016-03-01

    The Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) form is used as a workplace-based assessment tool in the current Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists curriculum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of DOPS when used to score trainees performing ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia. Reliability of an assessment tool is defined as the reproducibility of scores given by different assessors viewing the same trainee. Forty-nine anaesthetists were recruited to score two scripted videos of trainees performing a popliteal sciatic nerve block and an axillary brachial plexus block. Reliability, as measured by intraclass correlation coefficients, was -0.01 to 0.43 for the individual items in DOPS, and 0.15 for the 'Overall Performance for this Procedure' item. Assessors demonstrated consistency of scoring within DOPS, with significant correlation of sum of individual item scores with the 'Overall Performance for this Procedure' item (r=0.78 to 0.80, P<0.001), and with yes versus no responses to the 'Was the procedure completed satisfactorily?' item (W=24, P=0.0004, Video 1, and W=65, P=0.003, Video 2). While DOPS demonstrated a good degree of internal consistency in this setting, inter-rater reliability did not reach levels generally recommended for formative assessment tools. Feasibility of the form could be improved by removing the 'Was the procedure completed satisfactorily?' item without loss of information.

  20. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  1. Directly observed treatment, short-course strategy and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: are any modifications required?

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, I.; Rigouts, L.; Van Deun, A.; Portaels, F.

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) should be defined as tuberculosis with resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin because these drugs are the cornerstone of short-course chemotherapy, and combined isoniazid and rifampicin resistance requires prolonged treatment with second-line agents. Short-course chemotherapy is a key ingredient in the tuberculosis control strategy known as directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). For populations in which multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is endemic, the outcome of the standard short-course chemotherapy regimen remains uncertain. Unacceptable failure rates have been reported and resistance to additional agents may be induced. As a consequence there have been calls for well-functioning DOTS programmes to provide additional services in areas with high rates of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. These "DOTS-plus for MDRTB programmes" may need to modify all five elements of the DOTS strategy: the treatment may need to be individualized rather than standardized; laboratory services may need to provide facilities for on-site culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing; reliable supplies of a wide range of expensive second-line agents would have to be supplied; operational studies would be required to determine the indications for and format of the expanded programmes; financial and technical support from international organizations and Western governments would be needed in addition to that obtained from local governments. PMID:10743297

  2. Treatment Outcomes of Patients Placed on Treatment Under Directly Observed Therapy Short-Course (Dots)

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Goel, N.K.; Kumar, Dinesh; Janmeja, A.K.; Swami, H.M.; Kalia, Meenu

    2008-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis continues to be a pressing health problem in India. The Revised National Tuberculosis Programme (RNTCP), an application of Directly Observed Treatment Short-course (DOTS) in India, launched in 1997 needs continuous evaluation. Objective: To study the outcomes of treatment among the patients put on DOTS under RNTCP in Chandigarh, UT. Material & Methods: A Longitudinal study was conducted during 2004-2005 in 13 Microscopic centres (MC's) spread over 2 Tuberculosis Units (TU's) under District Tuberculosis Centre (DTC) in Union Territory (UT), Chandigarh. A sample of 265 respondents, selected by two-stage stratified random sampling technique, was recruited in the study cohort. Data analysis was done using SPSS-10 statistical software package. Results: For Category I and Category II patients, the Success rate was 98.6% and 90.4% respectively. The overall default rate was 1.1% and failure rate was 2.6%. For re-treatment cases, failure rate was higher i.e. 5.8%. The sputum conversion rate among the new smear positive cases was 93.8% at 3 months of treatment. For the re-treatment cases, spu-tum conversion rate at 3 months was 94.1%. Conclusion: The study concludes that RNTCP is running successfully in UT Chandigarh, having high success rate and low default rate. The reasons for high failure rate should be explored in depth. PMID:20165654

  3. Direct nuclear magnetic resonance observation of odorant binding to mouse odorant receptor MOR244-3.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jessica L; Jeerage, Kavita M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Mammals are able to perceive and differentiate a great number of structurally diverse odorants through the odorant's interaction with odorant receptors (ORs), proteins found within the cell membrane of olfactory sensory neurons. The natural gas industry has used human olfactory sensitivity to sulfur compounds (thiols, sulfides, etc.) to increase the safety of fuel gas transport, storage, and use through the odorization of this product. In the United States, mixtures of sulfur compounds are used, but the major constituent of odorant packages is 2-methylpropane-2-thiol, also known as tert-butyl mercaptan. It has been fundamentally challenging to understand olfaction and odorization due to the low affinity of odorous ligands to the ORs and the difficulty in expressing a sufficient number of OR proteins. Here, we directly observed the binding of tert-butyl mercaptan and another odiferous compound, cis-cyclooctene, to mouse OR MOR244-3 on living cells by saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This effort lays the groundwork for resolving molecular mechanisms responsible for ligand binding and resulting signaling, which in turn will lead to a clearer understanding of odorant recognition and competition.

  4. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke; Korhonen, Johanna; Yasuyuki Aono,

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  5. Direct Observation of a Carbon Filament in Water-Resistant Organic Memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Hagyoul; Seong, Hyejeong; Lee, Dong-Il; Park, Hongkeun; Choi, Young Joo; Im, Sung-Gap; Kim, Sang Ouk; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-07-28

    The memory for the Internet of Things (IoT) requires versatile characteristics such as flexibility, wearability, and stability in outdoor environments. Resistive random access memory (RRAM) to harness a simple structure and organic material with good flexibility can be an attractive candidate for IoT memory. However, its solution-oriented process and unclear switching mechanism are critical problems. Here we demonstrate iCVD polymer-intercalated RRAM (i-RRAM). i-RRAM exhibits robust flexibility and versatile wearability on any substrate. Stable operation of i-RRAM, even in water, is demonstrated, which is the first experimental presentation of water-resistant organic memory without any waterproof protection package. Moreover, the direct observation of a carbon filament is also reported for the first time using transmission electron microscopy, which puts an end to the controversy surrounding the switching mechanism. Therefore, reproducibility is feasible through comprehensive modeling. Furthermore, a carbon filament is superior to a metal filament in terms of the design window and selection of the electrode material. These results suggest an alternative to solve the critical issues of organic RRAM and an optimized memory type suitable for the IoT era.

  6. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn 3 MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials. PMID:26066096

  7. Direct observation of Thermal contact resistance of a Carbon Nanotube heat spreader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain Baloch, Kamal; Voskanian, Norvik; Cumings, John

    2010-03-01

    For less than two decades the extraordinary thermal properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated much interest in the scientific community. Even though they are a new material with one of the highest of thermal conductivities, the amount of heat CNTs can transport is limited by their thermal contact resistance. Several experiments have been performed to date to experimentally extract the thermal contact resistance of the CNTs. Thus far, all values reported in literature are extracted indirectly through models with assumptions about an uncharacterized heat source, typically Joule heating from within the nanotube itself. Values in the literature vary by more than an order of magnitude, suggesting fundamental uncertainties in the system. We report for the first time a direct in-situ observation of the thermal contact resistance of CNTs using Electron Thermal Microscopy, and we show that the strength of this thermal contact resistance can be manipulated through orders of magnitude. This study opens doors for using CNTs as effective nanoscale thermal transport devices in which the contact resistance of the CNTs could be controlled by design. Experimental results, simulations along with review of the experimental technique will be presented in this talk.

  8. Direct Observation of Intermediates Involved in the Interruption of the Bischler–Napieralski Reaction

    PubMed Central

    White, Kolby L.; Mewald, Marius; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The first mechanistic investigation of electrophilic amide activation of α,α-disubstituted tertiary lactams and the direct observation of key intermediates by in situ FTIR, 1H, 13C, and 19F NMR in our interrupted Bischler–Napieralski based synthetic strategy to the aspidosperma alkaloids, including a complex tetracyclic diiminium ion, is discussed. The reactivity of a wide range of pyridines with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was systematically examined, and characteristic IR absorption bands for the corresponding N-trifluoromethanesulfonylated pyridinium trifluoromethanesulfonates were assigned. The reversible formation of diiminium ether intermediates was studied, providing insight into divergent mechanistic pathways as a function of the steric environment of the amide substrate and stoichiometry of reagents. Importantly, when considering base additives during electrophilic amide activation, more hindered α-quaternary tertiary lactams require the use of non-nucleophilic pyridine additives in order to avoid deactivation via a competing desulfonylation reaction. The isolation and full characterization of a tetracyclic iminium trifluoromethanesulfonate provided additional correlation between in situ characterization of sensitive intermediates and isolable compounds involved in this synthetic transformation. PMID:26166404

  9. A FAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONAL TEST OF THE DIRECTIONAL DEPENDENCE IN RADIATIVE GRAIN ALIGNMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Vaillancourt, John E.; Andersson, B.-G. E-mail: bg@sofia.usra.edu

    2015-10-10

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains with magnetic fields provides a key method for measuring the strength and morphology of the fields. In turn, this provides a means to study the role of magnetic fields from diffuse gas to dense star-forming regions. The physical mechanism for aligning the grains has been a long-term subject of study and debate. The theory of radiative torques, in which an anisotropic radiation field imparts sufficient torques to align the grains while simultaneously spinning them to high rotational velocities, has passed a number of observational tests. Here we use archival polarization data in dense regions of the Orion molecular cloud (OMC-1) at 100, 350, and 850 μm to test the prediction that the alignment efficiency is dependent upon the relative orientations of the magnetic field and radiation anisotropy. We find that the expected polarization signal, with a 180-degree period, exists at all wavelengths out to radii of 1.5 arcmin centered on the Becklin–Neugebauer Kleinmann-Low (BNKL) object in OMC-1. The probabilities that these signals would occur due to random noise are low (≲1%), and are lowest toward BNKL compared to the rest of the cloud. Additionally, the relative magnetic field to radiation anisotropy directions accord with theoretical predictions in that they agree to better than 15° at 100 μm and 4° at 350 μm.

  10. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  11. Direct observation of crystal growth from solution using optical investigation of a growing crystal face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, Ravindra

    1994-01-01

    The first technical report for the period 1 Jan. 1993 till 31 Dec. 1993 for the research entitled, 'Direct observation of crystal growth from solution using Optical Investigation of a growing crystal Face' is presented. The work on the project did not start till 1 June 1993 due to the non-availability of the required personnel. The progress of the work during the period 1 June 1993 till the end of 1993 is described. Significant progress was made for testing various optical diagnostic techniques for monitoring crystal solution. Some of the techniques that are being tested are: heterodyne detection technique, in which changes in phase are measured as a interferometric function of time/crystal growth; a conventional technique, in which a fringe brightness is measured as a function of crystal growth/time; and a Mach-Zehnder interferometric technique in which a fringe brightness is measured as a function of time to obtain information on concentration changes. During the second year it will be decided to incorporate the best interferometric technique along with the ellipsometric technique, to obtain real time in-situ growth rate measurements. A laboratory mock-up of the first two techniques were made and tested.

  12. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-06-12

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn6Mg3Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn6Mg3Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn3MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials.

  13. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke A; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  14. Direct observation of unstable reaction intermediates by acid-base complex formation.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2013-06-01

    The structures of several unstable or metastable reaction intermediates that were photoproduced in crystals were analyzed by using X-ray techniques. The presence of enough void space around the reactive group(s) is an essential factor for the reaction to occur with retention of the single-crystal form. To expand the void space, an acid group (COOH) was substituted onto the reactant molecule and acid-base complex crystals were prepared with several amines, such as dibenzylamine and dicyclohexylamine. Following the formation of such acid-base complexes in crystals, the metastable structures of nitrenes and red species of photochromic salicylideneanilines have been successfully analyzed by using X-ray techniques. Moreover, the structure of a Pt complex anion in the excited state has been analyzed, which formed acid-base complex crystals with various alkylammonium cations. The formation of acid-base complexes will be a powerful tool for directly observing the structure of unstable or metastable reaction intermediates by using X-ray techniques.

  15. Direct Observation of Spin- and Charge-Density Waves in a Luttinger Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chenglin; Marcum, Andrew; Mawardi Ismail, Arif; Fonta, Francisco; O'Hara, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    At low energy, interacting fermions in one dimension (e.g. electrons in quantum wires or fermionic atoms in 1D waveguides) should behave as Luttinger liquids. In stark contrast to Fermi liquids, the low-energy elementary excitations in Luttinger liquids are collective sound-like modes that propagate independently as spin-density and/or charge-density (i.e. particle-density) waves with generally unequal, and interaction-dependent, velocities. Here we aim to unambiguously confirm this hallmark feature of the Luttinger liquid - the phenomenon of spin-charge separation - by directly observing in real space the dynamics of spin-density and ``charge''-density waves excited in an ultracold gas of spin-1/2 fermions confined in an array of 1D optical waveguides. Starting from a two-component mixture of 6 Li atoms harmonically confined along each of the 1D waveguides, we excite low lying normal modes of the trapped system - namely the spin dipole and density dipole and quadrupole modes - and measure their frequency as a function of interaction strength. Luttinger liquid theory predicts that the spin dipole frequency is strongly dependent on interaction strength whereas the density dipole and quadrupole mode frequencies are relatively insensitive. We will also discuss extending our approach to exciting localized spin density and particle density wavepackets which should propagate at different velocities. Supported by AFOSR and NSF.

  16. The Age of the Directly Imaged Planet Host Star κ Andromedae Determined from Interferometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; White, R. J.; Quinn, S.; Ireland, M.; Boyajian, T.; Schaefer, G.; Baines, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    κ Andromedae, an early-type star that hosts a directly imaged low-mass companion, is expected to be oblate due to its rapid rotational velocity (v sin i = ˜162 km s‑1). We observed the star with the CHARA Array’s optical beam combiner, PAVO, measuring its size at multiple orientations and determining its oblateness. The interferometric measurements, combined with photometry and this v sin i value are used to constrain an oblate star model that yields the fundamental properties of the star and finds a rotation speed that is ˜85% of the critical rate and a low inclination of ˜30°. Three modeled properties (the average radius, bolometric luminosity, and equatorial velocity) are compared to MESA evolution models to determine an age and mass for the star. In doing so, we determine an age for the system of {47}-40+27 Myr. Based on this age and previous measurements of the companion’s temperature, the BHAC15 evolution models imply a mass for the companion of {22}-9+8 M J.

  17. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke A; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  18. Direct Observation of a Carbon Filament in Water-Resistant Organic Memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Hagyoul; Seong, Hyejeong; Lee, Dong-Il; Park, Hongkeun; Choi, Young Joo; Im, Sung-Gap; Kim, Sang Ouk; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-07-28

    The memory for the Internet of Things (IoT) requires versatile characteristics such as flexibility, wearability, and stability in outdoor environments. Resistive random access memory (RRAM) to harness a simple structure and organic material with good flexibility can be an attractive candidate for IoT memory. However, its solution-oriented process and unclear switching mechanism are critical problems. Here we demonstrate iCVD polymer-intercalated RRAM (i-RRAM). i-RRAM exhibits robust flexibility and versatile wearability on any substrate. Stable operation of i-RRAM, even in water, is demonstrated, which is the first experimental presentation of water-resistant organic memory without any waterproof protection package. Moreover, the direct observation of a carbon filament is also reported for the first time using transmission electron microscopy, which puts an end to the controversy surrounding the switching mechanism. Therefore, reproducibility is feasible through comprehensive modeling. Furthermore, a carbon filament is superior to a metal filament in terms of the design window and selection of the electrode material. These results suggest an alternative to solve the critical issues of organic RRAM and an optimized memory type suitable for the IoT era. PMID:26056735

  19. Direct observation of stick-slip movements of water nanodroplets induced by an electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Zheng, Haimei; Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Casana, Yosune; Matsudaira, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of the first few nanometers of water at the interface are encountered in a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. A simple but critical question is whether interfacial forces at these nanoscale dimensions affect an externally induced movement of a water droplet on a surface. At the bulk-scale water droplets spread on a hydrophilic surface and slip on a nonwetting, hydrophobic surface. Here we report the experimental description of the electron beam-induced dynamics of nanoscale water droplets by direct imaging the translocation of 10- to 80-nm-diameter water nanodroplets by transmission electron microscopy. These nanodroplets move on a hydrophilic surface not by a smooth flow but by a series of stick-slip steps. We observe that each step is preceded by a unique characteristic deformation of the nanodroplet into a toroidal shape induced by the electron beam. We propose that this beam-induced change in shape increases the surface free energy of the nanodroplet that drives its transition from stick to slip state. PMID:22517747

  20. Direct observation of stick-slip movements of water nanodroplets induced by an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Mirsaidov, Utkur M; Zheng, Haimei; Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Casana, Yosune; Matsudaira, Paul

    2012-05-01

    Dynamics of the first few nanometers of water at the interface are encountered in a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. A simple but critical question is whether interfacial forces at these nanoscale dimensions affect an externally induced movement of a water droplet on a surface. At the bulk-scale water droplets spread on a hydrophilic surface and slip on a nonwetting, hydrophobic surface. Here we report the experimental description of the electron beam-induced dynamics of nanoscale water droplets by direct imaging the translocation of 10- to 80-nm-diameter water nanodroplets by transmission electron microscopy. These nanodroplets move on a hydrophilic surface not by a smooth flow but by a series of stick-slip steps. We observe that each step is preceded by a unique characteristic deformation of the nanodroplet into a toroidal shape induced by the electron beam. We propose that this beam-induced change in shape increases the surface free energy of the nanodroplet that drives its transition from stick to slip state.

  1. Direct observation of epitaxial organic film growth: temperature-dependent growth mechanisms and metastability.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Helder; Schmidt, Thomas; Groh, Ullrich; Maier, Florian C; Lévesque, Pierre L; Fink, Rainer H; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Umbach, Eberhard

    2015-11-21

    The growth of the first ten layers of organic thin films on a smooth metallic substrate has been investigated in real-time using the model system PTCDA on Ag(111). The complex behaviour is comprehensively studied by electron microscopy, spectroscopy and diffraction in a combined PEEM/LEEM instrument revealing several new phenomena and yielding a consistent picture of this layer growth. PTCDA grows above room temperature in a Stranski-Krastanov mode, forming three-dimensional islands on a stable bi-layer, in competition with metastable 3rd and 4th layers. Around room temperature this growth mode changes into a quasi layer-by-layer growth, while at temperatures below about 250 K a Vollmer-Weber-like behaviour is observed. By means of laterally resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy the orientation of all adsorbed molecules is found to be homogeneously flat lying on the surface, even during the growth process. The films grow epitaxially, showing long-range order with rotational domains. For the monolayer these domains could be directly analysed, showing an average size of several micrometers extending over substrate steps.

  2. Direct observation of epitaxial organic film growth: temperature-dependent growth mechanisms and metastability.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Helder; Schmidt, Thomas; Groh, Ullrich; Maier, Florian C; Lévesque, Pierre L; Fink, Rainer H; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Umbach, Eberhard

    2015-11-21

    The growth of the first ten layers of organic thin films on a smooth metallic substrate has been investigated in real-time using the model system PTCDA on Ag(111). The complex behaviour is comprehensively studied by electron microscopy, spectroscopy and diffraction in a combined PEEM/LEEM instrument revealing several new phenomena and yielding a consistent picture of this layer growth. PTCDA grows above room temperature in a Stranski-Krastanov mode, forming three-dimensional islands on a stable bi-layer, in competition with metastable 3rd and 4th layers. Around room temperature this growth mode changes into a quasi layer-by-layer growth, while at temperatures below about 250 K a Vollmer-Weber-like behaviour is observed. By means of laterally resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy the orientation of all adsorbed molecules is found to be homogeneously flat lying on the surface, even during the growth process. The films grow epitaxially, showing long-range order with rotational domains. For the monolayer these domains could be directly analysed, showing an average size of several micrometers extending over substrate steps. PMID:26462749

  3. Direct spectroscopic observation of ion deceleration accompanying laser plasma-wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, O.; Krouský, E.; Liska, R.; Šmíd, M.; Larroche, O.; Dalimier, E.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2010-08-01

    Interactions of plasma jets with solid surfaces are extensively studied in context with development of future fusion devices. In experiments carried out on the iodine laser system PALS, the energetic ions were produced at double-foil Al/Mg targets irradiated by one or two counter-propagating laser beams. The plasma jets from the rear surface of the laser-exploded Al foil streamed towards the Mg target representing the wall preheated by the action of the high-energy photons, particle and/or laser beams. Instead of being trapped by the cold secondary-target material, the forward-accelerated Al ions collided with the counter-propagating matter ejected from the wall. The environmental conditions in near-wall plasmas were analyzed with the high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy and temporally-resolved x-ray imaging. The deceleration of the incident Al ions in the near-wall region was directly observed and quantitatively characterized via Doppler shifts of the J-satellite from the Al Lya spectral group. The interaction scenario was modelled using the 2D arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrocode PALE and the multifluid code MULTIF.

  4. Direct Pore-Level Observation of Permeability Increase by Seismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, I. A.; Gaul, W.; Vigil, D.

    2011-12-01

    Increases in permeability of natural reservoirs and aquifers by passing seismic waves have been well documented. If the physical causes of this phenomenon can be understood, technological applications would be possible for controlling the flow in hydrologic systems or enhancing production from oil reservoirs. The explanation of the dynamically increased mobility of underground fluids lies at the pore level. The natural fluids can be viewed as two-phase systems, composed of water as the wetting phase and of dispersed non-wetting globules of gas or organic fluids flowing through tortuous constricted channels. Capillary forces prevent the free motion of the suspended non-wetting droplets, which tend to become immobilized in capillary constrictions. The capillary entrapment significantly reduces macroscopic permeability. In a controlled experiment with a constricted capillary channel, we immobilize the suspended ganglia and test the model of capillary entrapment: it agrees precisely with the experiment. We then demonstrate by direct optical pore-level observation that the vibrations applied to the wall of the channel liberate the trapped ganglia if a certain critical acceleration is reached. When the droplet begins to progressively advance, the permeability is restored. The mobilizing acceleration in the elastic wave, needed to "unplug" an immobile flow, is theoretically predicted within a factor of 1-5 of the experimental value. Overcoming the capillary entrapment in porous channels is hypothesized to be one of the principal mechanisms by which natural permeabilities are enhanced by the passage of seismic waves.

  5. Direct pore-level observation of permeability increase in two-phase flow by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, Igor; Gaul, William; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2011-10-01

    Increases in permeability of natural reservoirs and aquifers by passing seismic waves have been well documented. If the physical causes of this phenomenon can be understood, technological applications would be possible for controlling the flow in hydrologic systems or enhancing production from oil reservoirs. The explanation of the dynamically increased mobility of underground fluids must lie at the pore level. The natural fluids can be viewed as two-phase systems, composed of water as the wetting phase and of dispersed non-wetting globules of gas or organic fluids, flowing through tortuous constricted channels. Capillary forces prevent free motion of the suspended non-wetting droplets, which tend to become immobilized in capillary constrictions. The capillary entrapment significantly reduces macroscopic permeability. In a controlled experiment with a constricted capillary channel, we immobilize the suspended ganglia and test the model of capillary entrapment: it agrees precisely with the experiment. We then demonstrate by direct optical pore-level observation that the vibrations applied to the wall of the channel liberate the trapped ganglia if a predictable critical acceleration is reached. When the droplet begins to progressively advance, the permeability is restored. The mobilizing acceleration in the elastic wave, needed to “unplug” an immobile flow, is theoretically calculated within a factor of 1-5 of the experimental value. Overcoming the capillary entrapment in porous channels is hypothesized to be one of the principal pore-scale mechanisms by which natural permeabilities are enhanced by the passage of elastic waves.

  6. Direct real-space observation of nearly stochastic behavior in magnetization reversal process on a nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Im, M.-Y.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, K.-D.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    We report a non-deterministic nature in the magnetization reversal of nanograins of CoCrPt alloy film. Magnetization reversal process of CoCrPt alloy film is investigated using high resolution soft X-ray microscopy which provides real space images with a spatial resolution of 15 nm. Domain nucleation sites mostly appear stochastically distributed within repeated hysteretic cycles, where the correlation increases as the strength of the applied magnetic field increases in the descending and ascending branches of the major hysteresis loop. In addition, domain configuration is mostly asymmetric with inversion of an applied magnetic field in the hysteretic cycle. Nanomagnetic simulation considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the nearly stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film. With the bit size in high-density magnetic recording media approaching nanometer length scale, one of the fundamental and crucial issues is whether the domain nucleation during magnetization reversal process exhibits a deterministic behavior. Repeatability of local domain nucleation and deterministic switching behavior are basic and essential factors for achieving high performance in high-density magnetic recording [1-3]. Most experimental studies on this issue reported so far have been mainly performed by indirect probes through macroscopic hysteresis loop and Barkhausen pattern measurements, which provide the ensemble-average magnetization. Thus, they are inadequate to gain insight into the domain-nucleation behavior on a nanometer length scale during the magnetization reversal process [4-6]. Very recently, coherent X-ray speckle metrology, where the speckle pattern observed in reciprocal space acts as a fingerprint of the domain configurations, was adopted to investigate stochastic behavior in the magnetization reversal of a Co/Pt multilayer film [7,8]. However, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of

  7. Direct observation of ferroelectric domain switching in varying electric field regimes using in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Winkler, C R; Damodaran, A R; Karthik, J; Martin, L W; Taheri, M L

    2012-11-01

    In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques can potentially fill in gaps in the current understanding interfacial phenomena in complex oxides. Select multiferroic oxide materials, such as BiFeO(3) (BFO), exhibit ferroelectric and magnetic order, and the two order parameters are coupled through a quantum-mechanical exchange interaction. The magneto-electric coupling in BFO allows control of the ferroelectric and magnetic domain structures via applied electric fields. Because of these unique properties, BFO and other magneto-electric multiferroics constitute a promising class of materials for incorporation into devices such as high-density ferroelectric and magnetoresistive memories, spin valves, and magnetic field sensors. The magneto-electric coupling in BFO is mediated by volatile ferroelastically switched domains that make it difficult to incorporate this material into devices. To facilitate device integration, an understanding of the microstructural factors that affect ferroelastic relaxation and ferroelectric domain switching must be developed. In this article, a method of viewing ferroelectric (and ferroelastic) domain dynamics using in situ biasing in TEM is presented. The evolution of ferroelastically switched ferroelectric domains in BFO thin films during many switching cycles is investigated. Evidence of partial domain nucleation, propagation, and switching even at applied electric fields below the estimated coercive field is revealed. Our observations indicate that the occurrence of ferroelastic relaxation in switched domains and the stability of these domains is influenced the applied field as well as the BFO microstructure. These biasing experiments provide a real time view of the complex dynamics of domain switching and complement scanning probe techniques. Quantitative information about domain switching under bias in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials can be extracted from in situ TEM to provide a predictive tool for future device

  8. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... other specimen. (g) As the collector, you must ensure that the observer is the same gender as the employee. You must never permit an opposite gender person to act as the observer. The observer can be a... else is to observe the collection (e.g., in order to ensure a same gender observer), you must...

  9. Direct Observations of Rapid Diffusion of Cu in Au Thin Films using In-Situ X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2005-11-28

    In-situ x-ray diffraction was performed while annealing thin-film Au/Cu binary diffusion couples to directly observe diffusion at elevated temperatures. The temperature dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient was determined from isothermal measurements at 700 C, 800 C, and 900 C, where Cu and Au form a disordered continuous face centered cubic solid solution. Large differences in the lattice parameters of Au and Cu allowed the initial diffraction peaks to be easily identified, and later tracked as they merged into one diffraction peak with increased diffusion time. Initial diffusion kinetics were studied by measuring the time required for the Cu to diffuse through the Au thin film of known thickness. The activation energy for interdiffusion was measured to be 65.4 kJ/mole during this initial stage, which is approximately 0.4x that for bulk diffusion and 0.8x that for grain boundary diffusion. The low activation energy is attributed to the high density of columnar grain boundaries combined with other defects in the sputter deposited thin film coatings. As interdiffusion continues, the two layers homogenize with an activation energy of 111 kJ/mole during the latter stages of diffusion. This higher activation energy falls between the reported values for grain boundary and bulk diffusion, and may be related to grain growth occurring at these temperatures which accounts for the decreasing importance of grain boundaries on diffusion.

  10. Direct observation of extrasolar planets and the development of the gemini planet imager integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, Jeffrey Kaplan

    This thesis is focused on the development and testing of a new instrument capable of finding and characterizing recently-formed Jupiter-sized planets orbiting other stars. To observe these planets, I present the design, construction and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). GPI is a facility class instrument for the Gemini Observatory with the primary goal of directly detecting young Jovian planets. The GPI IFS utilizes an infrared transmissive lenslet array to sample a rectangular 2.7 x 2.7 arcsecond field of view and provide low-resolution spectra across five bands between 1 and 2.5 mum. The dispersing element can be replaced with a Wollaston prism to provide broadband polarimetry across the same five filter bands. The IFS construction was based at the University of California, Los Angeles in collaboration with the Universite de Montreal, Immervision and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I will present performance results, from in-lab testing, of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The IFS is a large, complex, cryogenic, optical system requiring several years of development and testing. I will present the design and integration of the mechanical and optical performance of the spectrograph optics. The IFS passed its pre-ship review in 2011 and was shipped to University of California, Santa Cruz for integration with the remaining sub-systems of GPI. The UCLA built GPI IFS was integrated with the rest of GPI and is delivering high quality spectral datacubes of GPI's coronagraphic field. Using the NIRC2 instrument located at the Keck Observatory, my collaborators and I observed the planetary companion to beta Pictoris in L' (3.5--4.1mum). Observations taken in the fall of 2009 and 2012 are used to find the location and inclination of the planet relative to the massive debris disk orbiting beta Pictoris. We find that the planet's orbit has a position angle on the sky of 211

  11. In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Lucas R.; Robinson, David B.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Hartnett, Ryan J.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Arslan, Ilke

    2014-02-11

    The prevalent approach to developing new nanomaterials is a trial and error process of iteratively altering synthesis procedures and then characterizing the resulting nanostructures. This is fundamentally limited in that the growth processes that occur during synthesis can only be inferred from the final synthetic structure. Directly observing real-time nanomaterial growth provides unprecedented insight into the relationship between synthesis conditions and product evolution, and facilitates a mechanistic approach to nanomaterial development. Here we use in situ liquid stage scanning transmission electron microscopy to observe the growth of mesoporous palladium in a solvated block copolymer (BCP) template under various synthesis conditions, and ultimately determine a refined synthesis procedure that yields ordered pores. We find that at low organic solvent (tetrahydrofuran, THF) content, the BCP assembles into a rigid, cylindrical micelle array with a high degree of short-range order, but poor long-range order. Upon slowing the THF evaporation rate using a solvent-vapor anneal step, the long-range order is greatly improved. The electron beam induces nucleation of small particles in the aqueous phase around the micelles. The small particles then flocculate and grow into denser structures that surround the micelles, forming an ordered mesoporous structure. The microscope observations revealed that template disorder can be addressed prior to reaction, and is not invariably induced by the growth process itself, allowing us to more quickly optimize the synthetic method. This work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. This research

  12. Video Allows Young Scientists New Ways to Be Seen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Science is frequently a visual endeavor, dependent on direct or indirect observations. Teachers have long employed motion pictures in the science classroom to allow students to make indirect observations, but the capabilities of digital video offer opportunities to engage students in active science learning. Not only can watching a digital video…

  13. The Photochemical Reflectance Index from Directional Cornfield Reflectances: Observations and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Qingyuan; Corp, Lawrence A.; Dandois, Jonathan; Kustas, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The two-layer Markov chain Analytical Canopy Reflectance Model (ACRM) was linked with in situ hyperspectral leaf optical properties to simulate the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) for a corn crop canopy at three different growth stages. This is an extended study after a successful demonstration of PRI simulations for a cornfield previously conducted at an early vegetative growth stage. Consistent with previous in situ studies, sunlit leaves exhibited lower PRI values than shaded leaves. Since sunlit (shaded) foliage dominates the canopy in the reflectance hotspot (coldspot), the canopy PRI derived from field hyperspectral observations displayed sensitivity to both view zenith angle and relative azimuth angle at all growth stages. Consequently, sunlit and shaded canopy sectors were most differentiated when viewed along the azimuth matching the solar principal plane. These directional PRI responses associated with sunlit/shaded foliage were successfully reproduced by the ACRM. As before, the simulated PRI values from the current study were closer to in situ values when both sunlit and shaded leaves were utilized as model input data in a two-layer mode, instead of a one-layer mode with sunlit leaves only. Model performance as judged by correlation between in situ and simulated values was strongest for the mature corn crop (r = 0.87, RMSE = 0.0048), followed by the early vegetative stage (r = 0.78; RMSE = 0.0051) and the early senescent stage (r = 0.65; RMSE = 0.0104). Since the benefit of including shaded leaves in the scheme varied across different growth stages, a further analysis was conducted to investigate how variable fractions of sunlit/shaded leaves affect the canopy PRI values expected for a cornfield, with implications for 20 remote sensing monitoring options. Simulations of the sunlit to shaded canopy ratio near 50/50 +/- 10 (e.g., 60/40) matching field observations at all growth stages were examined. Our results suggest in the importance of the

  14. Direct Observation, Molecular Structure, and Location of Oxidation Debris on Graphene Oxide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-08-16

    The presence of oxidation debris (OD) complicates the structures and properties of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets, thereby impacting their potential applications. However, the origin of OD is still in dispute. Moreover, characterizing the structure and location of supposed OD on nanosheets of GO produced during the oxidation process is difficult. Herein, the attached state and size of OD on graphene oxide nanosheets were directly observed using HRTEM, the molecular structure of OD was initially proposed based on the spectroscopic characterization and Q-TOF mass spectrometry, and the locations of OD on the GO nanosheets were detected through the adsorption of probe molecules onto as-prepared GO (a-GO) and base-washed GO (bw-GO). The results indicated that OD possesses a highly crystalline structure and can be defined as several nanometre-sized polyaromatic molecules with a considerable number of oxygen-containing functional groups attached on the edges. The dark nanodot seated on a-GO was clearly observed in the HRTEM images, whereas it appeared as a clean nanosheet in the image of bw-GO, indicating that OD is removed by base-washing treatment. Following the base-washing treatment, the contents of carboxyl groups on bw-GO unexpectedly increased and subsequently contributed to the desorption of OD from a-GO due to the electrostatic repulsion being stronger than primary π-π interactions. Compared with a-GO, the adsorption of phenanthrene, as an aromatic probe, onto bw-GO increased by 6-fold via π-π stacking interactions, whereas the increase in the adsorption of m-dinitrobenzene, as a defect probe, was not as remarkable as that of phenanthrene. Reasonably, the OD nanoparticles were primarily located at the sp(2) structures on the GO nanosheets through π-π interactions rather than attached on defects/edges. The insights regarding the existence, molecular structures and attached sites of OD nanoparticles on GO nanosheets provide a theoretical basis for preparing

  15. Direct observation of phase transitions: in situ diffraction measurements at the crystal scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, J. V.; Barton, N. R.; Farber, D.; Wenk, H.; Kunz, M.; Lienert, U.

    2012-12-01

    Phase transitions often display determinate crystallographic orientation relationships between parent and symmetrically degenerate daughter domains. Preferred variant selection and orientation memory under the influence of deviatoric stress are the 'fingerprints' of the transformation mechanism, driving force, and microstructure. For the α-ɛ transition in iron - significant to the structure and anisotropy of the Earth's inner core - these have been studied primarily by texture analysis of polycrystalline powders; the convoluted nature of these data, however, render it essentially impossible to examine variant selection, and even precise orientation relationships themselves. Recently developed X-ray diffraction techniques have made it possible to answer these questions. Results from two measurements are presented. First, heterogeneous variant selection was observed and the specific α/ɛ orientation relationship was determined under quasi-static loading using High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at beamline 1-ID of APS-ANL. Second, the spatial heterogeneity and mutual exclusivity among ɛ variants was observed at the incipient transition using the Laue μ-diffraction technique at beamline 12.3.2. of ALS-LBNL. In both cases, a 60x25μm single crystal of iron was pressurized in a DAC and measured before and after the α-ɛ transition at 13GPa. In the HEDM experiment, spatial resolution is sacrificed for domain-averaged orientation and strain resoltuion, making it possible to quantify the magnitude of the applied deviatoric stress in situ. In the Laue μ-Diffraction technique, the local lattice orientations are mapped with 1μm resolution, displaying marked spatial variation. These pilot experiments open new possibilities for investigating high pressure/high temperature transformations in situ. By mapping both orientations and lattice strains, the nature of the mechanisms and driving forces can be illuminated. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  16. Rates of ingestion and their variability between individual calanoid copepods: Direct observations

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Lewis, K.D.; Bundy, M.H. |; Metz, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goals of this study were to determine rates of ingestion and fecal pellet release, and their variability, for individual planktonic copepods over extended periods of time (>20 min). Ingestions and rejections of individual cells of the diatom Thalassiosira eccentrica by a adult females of the calanoid Paracalanus aculeatus were directly quantified by observing individual copepods continuously at cell concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.2 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Average ingestion rates increased with increasing food concentration, but were not significantly different between 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1} (9.8 and 32.7 {mu}g Cl{sup {minus}1}) of T.eccentrica. Rates of cell rejections were low and similar at 0.1 and 0.3. but were significantly higher at 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. The coefficients of variation for average ingestion rates of individual copepods hardly differed between food concentrations, ranging from 17 to 22%, and were close to those for average fecal pellet release intervals which ranged from 15 to 21%. A comparison between individuals at each food concentration found no significant differences at 1.0; at 0.1 and 0.3 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}, respectively, ingestion rates of four out of five females did not differ significantly from each other. Average intervals between fecal pellet releases were similar at 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Fecal pellet release intervals between individuals were significantly different at each food concentration; these significant differences were attributed to rather narrow ranges of pellet release intervals of each individual female. Potential sources/causes of variability in the sizes and rates of copepods in the ocean are evaluated.

  17. Major outcomes of patients with tuberculous meningitis on directly observed thrice a week regime

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Thomas; Pillai, Ayyappan Kunjukrishna; Cherian, Ajith; Nujum, Zinia T.; Pushpa, Chithra; Dae, Dalus; Krishnapillai, Vijayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) of Government of India provides intermittent thrice-a-week directly observed treatment short course (RNTCP regimen). Objective: Assessments of all-cause mortality and nine-month morbidity outcomes of patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) on RNTCP regimen. Materials and Methods: We prospectively followed up patients registered with RNTCP center, with a diagnosis of TBM from January 1st, 2010 to December 31st, 2011. Morbidity was assessed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Results: We had 43 patients with median duration for follow-up of 396 days and that of survivors of 425 days. Two patients defaulted. Fourteen patients (32.5%) had mRS score of 4 to 6 and 29 had mRS of 0 to 3 after 9-month treatment. Severe disability was not related to any factor on logistic regression. Severe disability was seen in one patient (6.66%) among the 15 patients with stage 1, nine (37.5%) out of 24 patients with stage 2 and three (75%) out of 4 patients with stage 3 disease. Eight patients died (18.6%) of whom 4 died during the intensive phase and 4 during the continuation phase of RNTCP regimen. Mortality was independently related to treatment failure with adjusted Hazard ratio of 8.29 (CI: 1.38-49.78) (P = 0.02). One patient (6.66%) died out of the 15 patients with stage 1 disease, 5 (20.8%) out of 24 patients with stage 2 disease and 2 (50%) out of the 4 with stage 3 disease. Discussion and Conclusion: RNTCP regimen was associated with good compliance, comparable mortality and morbidity. PMID:25221396

  18. Gulf Stream Power Characteristics near Cape Hatteras; Regional Model vs. Direct Current Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowcher, C.; Bane, J.; Gong, Y.; He, R.; Muglia, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf Stream has current velocities reaching approximately 2 meters per second, which distinguish it as a potential source of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy. The upper continental slope off Cape Hatteras is a desirable area for development of offshore renewable energy because of the closeness of the Gulf Stream to the shelf edge and its minimal meanderings there. Using data from a moored 150-kHz ADCP and from the Mid-Atlantic Bight and South Atlantic Bight (MABSAB) ocean circulation model, MHK power characteristics have been computed for this area. These calculations quantify the Gulf Stream power resource and its temporal and spatial variations. During August 2013 - April 2014 at the moored ADCP site 30 meters below the surface and within the Stream's cyclonic shear zone, a comparison of the ADCP and MABSAB model reveals that the average current speeds from the two sources are nearly identical and have a magnitude of 1.15 m/s. A comparison for the same time period was made for Betz power, which yielded an observed average of 0.8 kW/m2 and a model average of 0.7 kW/m2, a difference of about 13%. The model has shown to be more conservative than the ADCP in its computation of current speed and Betz power, and it shows somewhat less variability than the ADCP in directionality of the Stream. Additionally, model data have been used to calculate annual average vector velocities and yearly Betz power averages for a number of years, and at various locations over the NC continental slope. These results depict the variation of the Stream's position along the NC coastline over the most recent years, and show that yearly averaged Betz power at a given location has significant inter-annual variations, with average power during one year being nearly four times greater than in another year.

  19. Direct Observation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (SOAaq) in Simulation Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussin, J. F.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Gratien, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many reactions in the atmosphere and form a wide range of oxidised and water-soluble compounds. These compounds can partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and/or less volatile compounds which can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation and thus increase the organic aerosol mass (Ervens et al., 2011; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this hypothesis is frequently discussed in the literature, so far, almost no direct observations of such a process have been provided.The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles.The experiments were performed during the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere), in the CESAM simulation chamber located at LISA. CESAM is a 4.2 m3 stainless steel chamber equipped with realistic irradiation sources and temperature and relative humidity (RH) controls (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene was allowed to oxidize during several hours in the presence on nitrogen oxides under dry conditions. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation was monitored on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, which allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light.In all experiments, we observed that during cloud formation, water-soluble gas-phase oxidation products (e.g., methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) readily partitioned into cloud

  20. Carboxylic monolayer formation for observation of intracellular structures in HeLa cells with direct electron beam excitation-assisted fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yuriko; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular structures of HeLa cells are observed using a direct electron beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this microscope, a silicon nitride membrane is used as a culture plate, which typically has a low biocompatibility between the sample and the silicon nitride surface to prevent the HeLa cells from adhering strongly to the surface. In this work, the surface of silicon nitride is modified to allow strong cell attachment, which enables high-resolution observation of intracellular structures and an increased signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the penetration depth of the electron beam is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. We can conclude from the results of the observations and simulations that the surface modification technique is promising for the observation of intracellular structures using the D-EXA microscope. PMID:26309772

  1. Increase in family allowances.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    In July 1989 the family allowance structure in Australia was changed from a 4-rate to a 2-rate structure. The new rates were increased to $A9 a week for the 1st 3 children and $A12 for each additional child. The Family Allowance Supplment rate for children 13-15 years old was raised from $A31 to $A34.10/week. PMID:12344544

  2. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  3. Direct observation of subtropical mode water circulation in the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratantoni, David M.; Kwon, Young-Oh; Hodges, Benjamin A.

    2013-07-01

    Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is the dominant subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre and is hypothesized as an interannual reservoir of anomalous heat, nutrients and CO2. Although isolated beneath the stratified upper-ocean at the end of each winter, EDW may re-emerge in subsequent years to influence mixed layer properties and consequently air-sea interaction and primary productivity. Here we report on recent quasi-Lagrangian measurements of EDW circulation and stratification in the western subtropical gyre using an array of acoustically-tracked, isotherm-following, bobbing profiling floats programmed to track and intensively sample the vertically homogenized EDW layer and directly measure velocity on the 18.5 °C isothermal surface. The majority of the CLIVAR Mode Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE) bobbers drifted within the subtropical gyre for 2.5-3.5 years, many exhibiting complex looping patterns indicative of an energetic eddy field. Bobber-derived Lagrangian integral time and length scales (3 days, 68 km) associated with motion on 18.5 °C were consistent with previous measurements in the Gulf Stream extension region and fall between previous estimates at the ocean surface and thermocline depth. Several bobbers provided evidence of long-lived submesoscale coherent vortices associated with substantial EDW thickness. While the relative importance of such vortices remains to be determined, our observations indicate that these features can have a profound effect on EDW distribution. EDW thickness (defined using a vertical temperature gradient criterion) exhibits seasonal changes in opposition to a layer bounded by the 17 °C and 19 °C isotherms. In particular, EDW thickness is generally greatest in winter (as a result of buoyancy-forced convection), while the 17°-19 °C layer is thickest in summer consistent with seasonal Ekman pumping. Contrary to previous hypotheses, the bobber data suggest that a substantial fraction of subducted EDW

  4. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.67 When and how is a... other specimen. (g) As the collector, you must ensure that the observer is the same gender as the employee. You must never permit an opposite gender person to act as the observer. The observer can be...

  5. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.67 When and how is a... other specimen. (g) As the collector, you must ensure that the observer is the same gender as the employee. You must never permit an opposite gender person to act as the observer. The observer can be...

  6. The Biasing Effects of Labels on Direct Observation by Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, R. Allan; Duhon, Gary J.; Blackburn-Ellis, Sarah; Van Dycke, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Observational bias can significantly affect results attained through observation. This study focused on 122 preservice teacher educators who conducted a structured observation, using momentary time sampling procedures with 10-second intervals, to measure student on-task and off-task behaviors. The experimental variable altered was the…

  7. A Direct Observation the Asteroid's Structure from Deep Interior to Regolith: Why and How do it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, A.

    2015-01-01

    The NEA internal structure has never been measured directly. Radar operating from a spacecraft is the only technique to characterize structure and heterogeneity from submetric to global scale for science, planetary defence and exploration benefit.

  8. Numerical observation of preferred directionality in ion ejection from stretched rectilinear ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaveni, A.; Kumar Verma, Neeraj; Menon, A. G.; Mohanty, Atanu K.

    2008-08-01

    We report on numerical investigations of directionality of ion ejection in stretched rectilinear ion traps (RIT). Three 4-electrode trap geometries have been investigated. In all cases, one pair of electrodes has slits at their center and the other pair has no slits. The studied traps include the RIT-S, in which the mass analyzer electrodes are symmetrically positioned around the central axis; the RIT-X, in which the mass analyzer has a stretch in the direction of the electrodes which have slits (labeled as x-direction); and the RIT-Y, in which the mass analyzer has a stretch in the direction of the electrodes which have no slits (labeled as y-direction). Our analysis has been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) fields at the centre of an infinitely long mass analyzer. The boundary element method (BEM) has been used for field computations. The trajectory of ion motion has been generated using Runge Kutta fourth order integration. Three sets of simulations have been carried out on each of the RIT-S, the RIT-X and the RIT-Y to check for directionality of ion ejection. In the first, we numerically obtain the stability region on the potential (Udc- Vrf) axes. In the second we generate an escape velocity plot with UdcD0 for different values of Vrf. In the third, we simulate the mass selective boundary ejection experiment on a single ion. In the symmetric RIT-S, as expected, all three simulations show that there is an equal probability of ion reaching the trap boundary in either of the x- or y-directions. For the stretched traps, however, the results are dramatically different. For the RIT-X, all three simulations suggest that ion destabilization at the stability boundary occurs in the x-directionE Similarly, for the RIT-Y, ions preferentially get destabilized in the y-direction. That is, ions reaching the trap boundary overwhelmingly prefer the stretch direction.

  9. A method for direct variational data assimilation from various observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penenko, Vladimir V.

    2015-11-01

    A new method for the joint use of mathematical models and heterogeneous data from various monitoring systems for ground and space based assets, including the sequence of images, is presented. The method is based on variational principles with weak constraints. The algorithm for its implementation allows us to use images in the problems of prediction and reconstruction of multidimensional fields of the state functions.

  10. Isolating observer-based reference directions in human spatial memory: Head, body, and the self-to-array axis

    PubMed Central

    Waller, David; Lippa, Yvonne; Richardson, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of research have suggested the importance of egocentric reference systems for determining how the spatial properties of one’s environment are mentally organized. Yet relatively little is known about the bases for egocentric reference systems in human spatial memory. In three experiments, we examine the relative importance of observer-based reference directions in human memory by controlling the orientation of head and body during acquisition. Experiment 1 suggests that spatial memory is organized by a head-aligned reference direction; however, Experiment 2 shows that a body-aligned reference direction can be more influential than a head-aligned direction when the axis defined by the relative positions of the observer and the learned environment (the “self-to-array” axis) is properly controlled. A third experiment shows that the self-to-array axis is distinct from – and can dominate – retina, head, and body-based egocentric reference systems. PMID:17316594

  11. Development of a cryo-SEM system enabling direct observation of the cross sections of an emulsion adhesive in a moist state during the drying process.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshiko; Ranner, Robert; Mimietz-Oeckler, Saskia; Nishino, Yuri; Miyazawa, Atsuo

    2015-12-01

    In order to analyse the internal structures of multi-component fluid materials such as emulsions (including the inter-particle spacing) by cryo-electron microscopy, it is necessary to observe their smooth cross-sectional surfaces over wide areas. We have developed a system that involves the following steps: preservation of the structure of an emulsion adhesive using freeze fixation in its normal (moist) state and during the drying process after being coated, preparation of cross sections of the internal structure using a cryo-ultramicrotome and then transferral of the cross sections into a cryo-scanning electron microscope for observation via a cryo-transfer system. This system allows the direct observation of the cross sections of emulsions and of several fluid materials.

  12. Direct observation of large quantum interference effect in anthraquinone solid-state junctions.

    PubMed

    Rabache, Vincent; Chaste, Julien; Petit, Philippe; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; McCreery, Richard L; Lafarge, Philippe

    2013-07-17

    Quantum interference in cross-conjugated molecules embedded in solid-state devices was investigated by direct current-voltage and differential conductance transport measurements of anthraquinone (AQ)-based large area planar junctions. A thin film of AQ was grafted covalently on the junction base electrode by diazonium electroreduction, while the counter electrode was directly evaporated on top of the molecular layer. Our technique provides direct evidence of a large quantum interference effect in multiple CMOS compatible planar junctions. The quantum interference is manifested by a pronounced dip in the differential conductance close to zero voltage bias. The experimental signature is well developed at low temperature (4 K), showing a large amplitude dip with a minimum >2 orders of magnitude lower than the conductance at higher bias and is still clearly evident at room temperature. A temperature analysis of the conductance curves revealed that electron-phonon coupling is the principal decoherence mechanism causing large conductance oscillations at low temperature.

  13. Direct observation of glycogen synthesis in human muscle with sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, G.I.; Tavitian, B.A.; DeFronzo, R.A.; Shulman, R.G. )

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of previous indirect measurements, skeletal muscle has been implicated as the major site of glucose uptake and it has been suggested that muscle glycogen formation is the dominant pathway. However, direct measurements of the rates of glycogen synthesis have not been possible by previous techniques. The authors have developed {sup 13}C NMR methods to measure directly the rate of human muscle glycogen formation from infused, isotopically labeled (1-{sup 13}C)glucose. They show that under conditions of imposed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, a majority of the infused glucose was converted to muscle glycogen in a normal man. This directly shows that muscle is the major site of glucose disposal under these conditions, and provides quantitation of the glucose flux to muscle glycogen.

  14. Direct Observation Of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Interactions Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-12-01

    Interactions of anionic silica nanoparticles with anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants have directly been studied by contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements are performed on 1 wt% of both silica nanoparticles and surfactants of anionic sodium dodecyle sulphate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene 10 lauryl ether (C12E10) in aqueous solution. We show that there is no direct interaction in the case of SDS with silica particles, whereas strong interaction for DTAB leads to the aggregation of silica particles. The interaction of C12E10 is found through the micelles adsorbed on the silica particles.

  15. Assessing the Accuracy of Classwide Direct Observation Methods: Two Analyses Using Simulated and Naturalistic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dart, Evan H.; Radley, Keith C.; Briesch, Amy M.; Furlow, Christopher M.; Cavell, Hannah J.; Briesch, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Two studies investigated the accuracy of eight different interval-based group observation methods that are commonly used to assess the effects of classwide interventions. In Study 1, a Microsoft Visual Basic program was created to simulate a large set of observational data. Binary data were randomly generated at the student level to represent…

  16. Nano-aquarium for dynamic observation of aquatic microorganisms fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing of photostructurable glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Y.; Sugioka, K.; Kawano, H.; Ishikawa, I.; Miyawaki, A.; Midorikawa, K.

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of three-dimensional (3-D) hollow microstructures embedded in photostructurable glass by a femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing. Fs laser direct writing followed by annealing and successive wet etching in dilute hydrofluoric (HF) acid solution resulted in the rapid manufacturing of microchips with 3-D hollow microstructures for the dynamic observation of living microorganisms in fresh water. The embedded microchannel structure enables us to analyze the continuous motion of Euglena gracilis. A microchamber with a movable microneedle demonstrates its ability for the elucidation of the information transmission process in Pleurosira laevis. Such microchips, referred to as nano-aquariums realize the efficient and highly functional observation of microorganisms.

  17. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being 𝜀𝑦 =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  18. An observation of direct-gap electroluminescence in GaAs structures with Ge quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dikareva, N. V.; Dubinov, A. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Nekorkin, S. M.

    2015-02-15

    A light-emitting diode structure based on GaAs with eight narrow Ge quantum wells is grown by laser sputtering. An electroluminescence line polarized predominately in the plane parallel to the constituent layers of the structure is revealed. The line corresponds to the direct optical transitions in momentum space in the Ge quantum wells.

  19. The underlying magnetic field direction in Ulysses observations of the southern polar heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, R.J.; Balogh, A.; Smith, E.J.; Murphy, N.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-07-01

    Magnetic field data provided by the Ulysses spacecraft between May 1993 and January 1995 are presented for the south latitudes 30-80 dg. The deflections of the magnetic field direction are attributed to the intense Alfven waves. {copyright} {bold 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Direct Behavior Rating (DBR): Generalizability and Dependability across Raters and Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Theodore J.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Boice, Christina H.

    2010-01-01

    Generalizability theory was used to examine the generalizability and dependability of outcomes from two single-item Direct Behavior Rating (DBR) scales: DBR of actively manipulating and DBR of visually distracted. DBR is a behavioral assessment tool with specific instrumentation and procedures that can be used by a variety of service delivery…

  1. Anna Freud: the Hampstead War Nurseries and the role of the direct observation of children for psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Nick

    2007-08-01

    The psychoanalytic tradition of direct observation of children has a long history, going back to the early 20th century, when psychoanalysis and the emerging field of 'child studies' came into fruitful contact in Freud's Vienna. As a leading figure in the attempted integration of direct observation with the new psychoanalytic knowledge emerging from the consulting room, Anna Freud played a crucial role in the emergence of this field. But her major contribution to the theory and practice of observing children came during the Second World War, when she founded the Hampstead War Nurseries. The author describes in detail this important period of Anna Freud's career, and discusses the impact it had on later work. He explores the theoretical contribution that Anna Freud made in the post-war years to the debate about the place of direct observation in psychoanalysis, and concludes that Anna Freud's 'double approach' (direct observation plus analytic reconstruction) still has a great deal to offer as a method of both psychoanalytic research and education.

  2. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  3. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DISTORTION DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO A STRUCTURED SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Savani, N. P.; Owens, M. J.; Forsyth, R. J.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davies, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first observational evidence of the near-Sun distortion of the leading edge of a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the ambient solar wind into a concave structure. On 2007 November 14, a CME was observed by coronagraphs onboard the STEREO-B spacecraft, possessing a circular cross section. Subsequently the CME passed through the field of view of the STEREO-B Heliospheric Imagers where the leading edge was observed to distort into an increasingly concave structure. The CME observations are compared to an analytical flux rope model constrained by a magnetohydrodynamic solar wind solution. The resultant bimodal speed profile is used to kinematically distort a circular structure that replicates the initial shape of the CME. The CME morphology is found to change rapidly over a relatively short distance. This indicates an approximate radial distance in the heliosphere where the solar wind forces begin to dominate over the magnetic forces of the CME influencing the shape of the CME.

  4. Direct estimation and correction of bias from temporally variable non-stationary noise in a channelized Hotelling model observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Favazza, Christopher P.

    2016-08-01

    Channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) methods were developed to assess performance of an x-ray angiography system. The analytical methods included correction for known bias error due to finite sampling. Detectability indices ({{d}\\prime} ) corresponding to disk-shaped objects with diameters in the range 0.5–4 mm were calculated. Application of the CHO for variable detector target dose (DTD) in the range 6–240 nGy frame‑1 resulted in {{d}\\prime} estimates which were as much as 2.9×  greater than expected of a quantum limited system. Over-estimation of {{d}\\prime}<∼ 3.0 was presumed to be a result of bias error due to temporally variable non-stationary noise. Statistical theory which allows for independent contributions of ‘signal’ from a test object (o) and temporally variable non-stationary noise (ns) was developed. The theory demonstrates that the biased dβ\\prime is the sum of the detectability indices associated with the test object ≤ft(d\\text{o}\\prime\\right) and non-stationary noise (d\\text{ns}\\prime ). Given the nature of the imaging system and the experimental methods, d\\text{o}\\prime cannot be directly determined independent of d\\text{ns}\\prime . However, methods to estimate d\\text{ns}\\prime independent of d\\text{o}\\prime were developed. In accordance with the theory, d\\text{ns}\\prime was subtracted from experimental estimates of dβ\\prime , providing an unbiased estimate of d\\text{o}\\prime . Estimates of d\\text{o}\\prime exhibited trends consistent with expectations of an angiography system that is quantum limited for high DTD and compromised by detector electronic readout noise for low DTD conditions. Results suggest that these methods provide d\\text{o}\\prime estimates which are accurate and precise for d\\text{o}\\prime~≥slant ∼ 1.0 . Further, results demonstrated that the source of bias was detector electronic readout noise. In summary, this work presents theory and methods to test for the presence

  5. Direct estimation and correction of bias from temporally variable non-stationary noise in a channelized Hotelling model observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Favazza, Christopher P.

    2016-08-01

    Channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) methods were developed to assess performance of an x-ray angiography system. The analytical methods included correction for known bias error due to finite sampling. Detectability indices ({{d}\\prime} ) corresponding to disk-shaped objects with diameters in the range 0.5-4 mm were calculated. Application of the CHO for variable detector target dose (DTD) in the range 6-240 nGy frame-1 resulted in {{d}\\prime} estimates which were as much as 2.9×  greater than expected of a quantum limited system. Over-estimation of {{d}\\prime}<˜ 3.0 was presumed to be a result of bias error due to temporally variable non-stationary noise. Statistical theory which allows for independent contributions of ‘signal’ from a test object (o) and temporally variable non-stationary noise (ns) was developed. The theory demonstrates that the biased dβ\\prime is the sum of the detectability indices associated with the test object ≤ft(d\\text{o}\\prime\\right) and non-stationary noise (d\\text{ns}\\prime ). Given the nature of the imaging system and the experimental methods, d\\text{o}\\prime cannot be directly determined independent of d\\text{ns}\\prime . However, methods to estimate d\\text{ns}\\prime independent of d\\text{o}\\prime were developed. In accordance with the theory, d\\text{ns}\\prime was subtracted from experimental estimates of dβ\\prime , providing an unbiased estimate of d\\text{o}\\prime . Estimates of d\\text{o}\\prime exhibited trends consistent with expectations of an angiography system that is quantum limited for high DTD and compromised by detector electronic readout noise for low DTD conditions. Results suggest that these methods provide d\\text{o}\\prime estimates which are accurate and precise for d\\text{o}\\prime~≥slant ˜ 1.0 . Further, results demonstrated that the source of bias was detector electronic readout noise. In summary, this work presents theory and methods to test for the presence of bias

  6. Direct estimation and correction of bias from temporally variable non-stationary noise in a channelized Hotelling model observer.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, Kenneth A; Favazza, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) methods were developed to assess performance of an x-ray angiography system. The analytical methods included correction for known bias error due to finite sampling. Detectability indices ([Formula: see text]) corresponding to disk-shaped objects with diameters in the range 0.5-4 mm were calculated. Application of the CHO for variable detector target dose (DTD) in the range 6-240 nGy frame(-1) resulted in [Formula: see text] estimates which were as much as 2.9×  greater than expected of a quantum limited system. Over-estimation of [Formula: see text] was presumed to be a result of bias error due to temporally variable non-stationary noise. Statistical theory which allows for independent contributions of 'signal' from a test object (o) and temporally variable non-stationary noise (ns) was developed. The theory demonstrates that the biased [Formula: see text] is the sum of the detectability indices associated with the test object [Formula: see text] and non-stationary noise ([Formula: see text]). Given the nature of the imaging system and the experimental methods, [Formula: see text] cannot be directly determined independent of [Formula: see text]. However, methods to estimate [Formula: see text] independent of [Formula: see text] were developed. In accordance with the theory, [Formula: see text] was subtracted from experimental estimates of [Formula: see text], providing an unbiased estimate of [Formula: see text]. Estimates of [Formula: see text] exhibited trends consistent with expectations of an angiography system that is quantum limited for high DTD and compromised by detector electronic readout noise for low DTD conditions. Results suggest that these methods provide [Formula: see text] estimates which are accurate and precise for [Formula: see text]. Further, results demonstrated that the source of bias was detector electronic readout noise. In summary, this work presents theory and methods to test for the

  7. Direct /TEM/ observation of the catalytic oxidation of amorphous carbon by Pd particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, R. D.; Poppa, H.; Heinemann, K.

    1980-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of amorphous carbon substrates by Pd particles is observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Various modes of selective attack of the carbon substrate in the immediate neighborhood of Pd particles are observed, which can be correlated with different degrees of particle mobility. Using amorphous substrates we have been able to demonstrate that the particle-substrate interaction is influenced by the structure of the particle. This has not previously been noted.

  8. Direct experimental observation of weakly-bound character of the attached electron in europium anion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Castleman, A W

    2015-01-01

    Direct experimental determination of precise electron affinities (EAs) of lanthanides is a longstanding challenge to experimentalists. Considerable debate exists in previous experiment and theory, hindering the complete understanding about the properties of the atomic anions. Herein, we report the first precise photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of europium (Eu), with the aim of eliminating prior contradictions. The measured EA (0.116 ± 0.013 eV) of Eu is in excellent agreement with recently reported theoretical predictions, providing direct spectroscopic evidence that the additional electron is weakly attached. Additionally, a new experimental strategy is proposed that can significantly increase the yield of the lanthanide anions, opening up the best opportunity to complete the periodic table of the atomic anions. The present findings not only serve to resolve previous discrepancy but also will help in improving the depth and accuracy of our understanding about the fundamental properties of the atomic anions. PMID:26198741

  9. Direct time-domain observation of attosecond final-state lifetimes in photoemission from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng; Chen, Cong; Szilvási, Tibor; Keller, Mark; Mavrikakis, Manos; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    Attosecond spectroscopic techniques have made it possible to measure differences in transport times for photoelectrons from localized core levels and delocalized valence bands in solids. We report the application of attosecond pulse trains to directly and unambiguously measure the difference in lifetimes between photoelectrons born into free electron–like states and those excited into unoccupied excited states in the band structure of nickel (111). An enormous increase in lifetime of 212 ± 30 attoseconds occurs when the final state coincides with a short-lived excited state. Moreover, a strong dependence of this lifetime on emission angle is directly related to the final-state band dispersion as a function of electron transverse momentum. This finding underscores the importance of the material band structure in determining photoelectron lifetimes and corresponding electron escape depths.

  10. Direct experimental observation of weakly-bound character of the attached electron in europium anion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Castleman, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Direct experimental determination of precise electron affinities (EAs) of lanthanides is a longstanding challenge to experimentalists. Considerable debate exists in previous experiment and theory, hindering the complete understanding about the properties of the atomic anions. Herein, we report the first precise photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of europium (Eu), with the aim of eliminating prior contradictions. The measured EA (0.116 ± 0.013 eV) of Eu is in excellent agreement with recently reported theoretical predictions, providing direct spectroscopic evidence that the additional electron is weakly attached. Additionally, a new experimental strategy is proposed that can significantly increase the yield of the lanthanide anions, opening up the best opportunity to complete the periodic table of the atomic anions. The present findings not only serve to resolve previous discrepancy but also will help in improving the depth and accuracy of our understanding about the fundamental properties of the atomic anions. PMID:26198741

  11. Direct Observation of an Anomalous Spinel-to-Layered Phase Transition Mediated by Crystal Water Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangryun; Nam, Kwan Woo; Lee, Soyeon; Cho, Woosuk; Kim, Joo-Seong; Kim, Byung Gon; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Kim, Ju-Sik; Doo, Seok-Gwang; Chang, Hyuk; Aurbach, Doron; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition of layered manganese oxides to spinel phases is a well-known phenomenon in rechargeable batteries and is the main origin of the capacity fading in these materials. This spontaneous phase transition is associated with the intrinsic properties of manganese, such as its size, preferred crystal positions, and reaction characteristics, and it is therefore very difficult to avoid. The introduction of crystal water by an electrochemical process enables the inverse phase transition from spinel to a layered Birnessite structure. Scanning transmission electron microscopy can be used to directly visualize the rearrangement of lattice atoms, the simultaneous insertion of crystal water, the formation of a transient structure at the phase boundary, and layer-by-layer progression of the phase transition from the edge. This research indicates that crystal water intercalation can reverse phase transformation with thermodynamically favored directionality.

  12. Direct Observation of Reversible Magnesium Ion Intercalation into a Spinel Oxide Host

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chunjoong; Phillips, Patrick J.; Key, Baris; Yi, Tanghong; Nordlund, Dennis; Yu, Young-Sang; Bayliss, Ryan D.; Han, Sang-Don; He, Meinan; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K.; Klie, Robert F.; Cabana, Jordi

    2015-04-17

    Direct evidence of Mg2+ intercalation into a spinel-type Mn2O4 is provided. By com­bining tools with different sensitivities, from atomic-resolution X-ray spectro­scopy to bulk X-ray diffraction, it is demonstrated that Mg2+ reversibly occupies the tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure through the reduction of Mn when the electrochemical reaction is performed.

  13. Direct observations of freeze-etching processes of ice-embedded biomembranes by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Tani, Koji; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    We have fabricated a cryogenic atomic force microscope that is designed for structural investigation of freeze-fractured biological specimens. The apparatus is operated in liquid nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure. Freeze-fracturing, freeze-etching and subsequent imaging are carried out in the same chamber, so that the surface topography of a fractured plane is easily visualized without ice contamination. A controlled superficial sublimation of volatile molecules allows us to obtain three-dimensional views of ultrastructures of biological membranes. PMID:12694853

  14. Direct ECC Bypass Phenomena During LBLOCA Reflood Phase Observed in the MIDAS Test: Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, B.J.; Kwon, T.S.; Euh, D.J.; Chu, I.C.; Song, C.H.; Park, J.K.

    2002-07-01

    One of the advanced design features of the APR-1400, direct vessel injection (DVI) system is being considered instead of conventional cold leg injection (CLI) system. It is known that the DVI system greatly enhances the reliability of the emergency core cooling (ECC) system. However, there is still a dispute on its performance in terms of water delivery to the reactor core during the reflood phase of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Thus, experimental validation is in progress. In this paper, test results of a direct ECC bypass performed in the steam-water test facility called MIDAS (Multi-dimensional Investigation in Downcomer Annulus Simulation) is presented. The test condition is determined, based on the preliminary analysis of TRAC code, by applying the 'modified linear scaling method' with the 1/4.93 length scale. From the tests, ECC direct bypass fraction, steam condensation rate and information on the flow distribution in the upper annulus downcomer region is obtained. (authors)

  15. Direct observations of plasma upflows and condensation in a catastrophically cooling solar transition region loop

    SciTech Connect

    Orange, N. B.; Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Hesterly, K.; Patel, M.; Champey, P.

    2013-12-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we observe fast upflows (v {sub λ} ≤ –10 km s{sup –1}) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8 ≤log T ≤ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop (log T ≤ 6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of +5 km s{sup –1} and –60 km s{sup –1} are observed at footpoint sites. These flows, speeds, and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at the site of upflows only) derived from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic Magnetic Imager's line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30% mass influx at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic cooling event, with subsequent plasma evaporation indicating that the TR is the heating site. From the magnetic flux evolution, we conclude that magnetic reconnection between the footpoint and background field is responsible for the observed fast TR plasma upflows.

  16. Instructions for observing air temperature, humidity, and direction and force of wind

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1892-01-01

    Description of instruments.-The temperature and humidity of the air are obtained from the simultaneous observation of a pair of mercurial thermometers termed the dry and the wet bulb. The air temperature is given by the dry-bulb thermometer, and the humidity is obtained from the combined readings of both. The wet-bulb thermometer differs from the dry-bulb thermometer only in having its bulb covered with thin muslin, which is wetted in pure water at each observation.The two thermometers are fastened in a light metal 'or wooden frame. To this frame is to be attached a stout cord for the whirling of the thermometers, which is an essential part of every observation.

  17. Direct observations of sigma phase growth and dissolution in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.A.; Elmer, J.W.; Babu, S.S.; Specht, E.D.

    2007-10-10

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  18. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Growth and Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S; Specht, E

    2005-06-14

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  19. Direct observation of coherent population trapping in a superconducting artificial atom.

    PubMed

    Kelly, William R; Dutton, Zachary; Schlafer, John; Mookerji, Bhaskar; Ohki, Thomas A; Kline, Jeffrey S; Pappas, David P

    2010-04-23

    The phenomenon of coherent population trapping (CPT) of an atom (or solid state "artificial atom"), and the associated effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), are clear demonstrations of quantum interference due to coherence in multilevel quantum systems. We report observation of CPT in a superconducting phase qubit by simultaneously driving two coherent transitions in a Lambda-type configuration, utilizing the three lowest lying levels of a local minimum of a phase qubit. We observe 60(+/-7)% suppression of the excited state population under conditions of CPT resonance. We present data and matching theoretical simulations showing the development of CPT in time. Finally, we used the observed time dependence of the excited state population to characterize quantum dephasing times of the system. PMID:20482047

  20. Direct observation of closed magnetic flux trapped in the high-latitude magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Fear, R C; Milan, S E; Maggiolo, R; Fazakerley, A N; Dandouras, I; Mende, S B

    2014-12-19

    The structure of Earth's magnetosphere is poorly understood when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward. Under this condition, uncharacteristically energetic plasma is observed in the magnetotail lobes, which is not expected in the textbook model of the magnetosphere. Using satellite observations, we show that these lobe plasma signatures occur on high-latitude magnetic field lines that have been closed by the fundamental plasma process of magnetic reconnection. Previously, it has been suggested that closed flux can become trapped in the lobe and that this plasma-trapping process could explain another poorly understood phenomenon: the presence of auroras at extremely high latitudes, called transpolar arcs. Observations of the aurora at the same time as the lobe plasma signatures reveal the presence of a transpolar arc. The excellent correspondence between the transpolar arc and the trapped closed flux at high altitudes provides very strong evidence of the trapping mechanism as the cause of transpolar arcs. PMID:25525244

  1. Direct observation of closed magnetic flux trapped in the high-latitude magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Fear, R C; Milan, S E; Maggiolo, R; Fazakerley, A N; Dandouras, I; Mende, S B

    2014-12-19

    The structure of Earth's magnetosphere is poorly understood when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward. Under this condition, uncharacteristically energetic plasma is observed in the magnetotail lobes, which is not expected in the textbook model of the magnetosphere. Using satellite observations, we show that these lobe plasma signatures occur on high-latitude magnetic field lines that have been closed by the fundamental plasma process of magnetic reconnection. Previously, it has been suggested that closed flux can become trapped in the lobe and that this plasma-trapping process could explain another poorly understood phenomenon: the presence of auroras at extremely high latitudes, called transpolar arcs. Observations of the aurora at the same time as the lobe plasma signatures reveal the presence of a transpolar arc. The excellent correspondence between the transpolar arc and the trapped closed flux at high altitudes provides very strong evidence of the trapping mechanism as the cause of transpolar arcs.

  2. Commentary: What You See Is What You Get--A Commentary on School-Based Direct Observation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Steven; Swerdlik, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    Direct observation is the hallmark example of broader behavior assessment. As such, it involves a systematic process in which behaviors, settings, and their reciprocal relationship are studied. As a process, behavior assessment relies on multiple methods and repeated measurement. Each component in the behavior assessment battery makes a unique…

  3. Establishing the Feasibility of Direct Observation in the Assessment of Tics in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himle, Michael B.; Chang, Susanna; Woods, Douglas W.; Pearlman, Amanda; Buzzella, Brian; Bunaciu, Liviu; Piacentini, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Behavior analysis has been at the forefront in establishing effective treatments for children and adults with chronic tic disorders. As is customary in behavior analysis, the efficacy of these treatments has been established using direct-observation assessment methods. Although behavior-analytic treatments have enjoyed acceptance and integration…

  4. Notes From the Field: Direct Observation Versus Rating by Videos for the Assessment of Central Venous Catheterization Skills.

    PubMed

    Ma, Irene W Y; Zalunardo, Nadia; Brindle, Mary E; Hatala, Rose; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Blinded assessments of technical skills using video-recordings may offer more objective assessments than direct observations. This study seeks to compare these two modalities. Two trained assessors independently assessed 18 central venous catheterization performances by direct observation and video-recorded assessments using two tools. Although sound quality was deemed adequate in all videos, portions of the video for wire handling and drape handling were frequently out of view (n = 13, 72% for wire-handling; n = 17, 94% for drape-handling). There were no differences in summary global rating scores, checklist scores, or pass/fail decisions for either modality (p > 0.05). Inter-rater reliability was acceptable for both modalities. Of the 26 discrepancies identified between direct observation and video-recorded assessments, three discrepancies (12%) were due to inattention during video review, while one (4%) discrepancy was due to inattention during direct observation. In conclusion, although scores did not differ between the two assessment modalities, techniques of video-recording may significantly impact individual items of assessments.

  5. Wave normal direction and spectral properties of whistler mode hiss observed on the DE 1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonwalkar, Vikas S.; Inan, Umran S.

    1988-01-01

    Hiss is represented by a field distribution function in order to investigate magnetospheric hiss as a spatially and temporally enduring phenomenon. The study takes into account the whistler mode relationships and the linear and spin motion of the satellite. Hiss signals received on September 23, 1983 by the DE-1 electric and magnetic field antennas are analyzed. A wave normal angle of 60 + or - 5 deg with respect to the local geomagnetic field is found near the geomagnetic equator, and wave normal directions from 30-80 deg with respect to the local geomagnetic field are found away from the equator.

  6. Azimuthal instability of the interface in a shear banded flow by direct visual observation.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Bécu, L; Greffier, O; Fazel, N

    2010-12-17

    The stability of the shear banded flow of a Maxwellian fluid is studied from an experimental point of view using rheology and flow visualization with polarized light. We show that the one-layer homogeneous flow cannot sustain shear rates corresponding to the end of the stress plateau. The high shear rate branch is not found and the shear stress oscillates at the end of the plateau. An azimuthal instability appears: the shear induced band becomes unstable and the interface between the two bands undulates in time and space with a period τ, a wavelength λ and a wave vector k parallel to the direction of the tangential velocity.

  7. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jie Jiang, Weiman; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jing; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-08-24

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  8. Observations of bi-directional leader development in a triggered lightning flash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laroche, P.; Idone, V.; Eybert-Berard, A.; Barret, L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of a modified form of rocket triggered lightning are described. A flash triggered during the summer of 1989 is studied as part of an effort to model bidirectional discharge. It is suggested that the altitude triggering technique provides a realistic means of studying the attachment process.

  9. Direct observation of laser speckles for real-time analysis of lateral motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikram, C. S.; Vedam, K.

    1981-11-01

    A method for real-time observation of speckle movement for the analysis of lateral motions is suggested. The method involves significant magnification using lenses and a TV-camera monitor system. This approach has the advantages of conventional speckle photography without the need for any chemical processing.

  10. Directly Observed Physical Activity among 3-Year-Olds in Finnish Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Anne; Villberg, Jari; Sääkslahti, Arja; Gubbels, Jessica; Mehtälä, Anette; Kettunen, Tarja; Poskiparta, Marita

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to determine 3-year-olds' physical activity levels and how these vary across season, gender, time of day, location, and the physical and social environment in childcare settings in Finland. A modified version of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool (OSRAC-P) was used…

  11. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.67 When and how is a... specimen a notation to this effect (e.g., collection 1 of 2, or 2 of 2) and the specimen ID number of the... employee's body into the collection container. (k) As the observer but not the collector, you must not...

  12. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    energy cascade is clearly observed consistently with previous measurements. A large amount of data permits us to use higher order statistical tools to investigate directly the resonant interactions. We observe a strong presence of triadic interactions in our system, confirming the foundations of the weak wave turbulence theory. A significant part of these interactions are non-local and enable coupling between capillary and gravity waves. We also emphasize the role of approximate resonances that are made possible by the nonlinear spectral widening. The quasi-resonances increase significantly the number of wave interactions and in particular open the possibility of observing 3-wave coupling among gravity waves although 3-wave exact resonances are prohibited. These effects are being currently investigated in a larger size experiment using a 13m in diameter wave flume. Our observation raise the question of the importance of these approximate resonances of gravity waves in energy transfers both in the theory and in the ocean.

  13. Direct Observation of Optical Field Phase Carving in the Vicinity of Plasmonic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Dagens, B; Février, M; Gogol, P; Blaize, S; Apuzzo, A; Magno, G; Mégy, R; Lerondel, G

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic surfaces are mainly used for their optical intensity concentration properties that allow for enhancement of physical interaction like in nonlinear optics, optical sensors, or tweezers. Phase response in plasmonic resonances can also play a major role, especially in a periodic assembly of plasmonic resonators like metasurfaces. Here we show that localized surface plasmons collectively excited by a guided mode in a metallic nanostructure periodic chain present nonmonotonous phase variation along the 1D metasurface, resulting from both selective Bloch mode coupling and dipolar coupling. As shown by near-field measurements, the phase profile of the highly concentrated optical field is carved out in the vicinity of the metallic metasurface, paving the way to unusual local optical functions.

  14. Direct observation of dynamic modes excited in a magnetic insulator by pure spin current

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V. E.; Evelt, M.; Bessonov, V.; Demokritov, S. O.; Prieto, J. L.; Muñoz, M.; Ben Youssef, J.; Naletov, V. V.; de Loubens, G.; Klein, O.; Collet, M.; Bortolotti, P.; Cros, V.; Anane, A.

    2016-01-01

    Excitation of magnetization dynamics by pure spin currents has been recently recognized as an enabling mechanism for spintronics and magnonics, which allows implementation of spin-torque devices based on low-damping insulating magnetic materials. Here we report the first spatially-resolved study of the dynamic modes excited by pure spin current in nanometer-thick microscopic insulating Yttrium Iron Garnet disks. We show that these modes exhibit nonlinear self-broadening preventing the formation of the self-localized magnetic bullet, which plays a crucial role in the stabilization of the single-mode magnetization oscillations in all-metallic systems. This peculiarity associated with the efficient nonlinear mode coupling in low-damping materials can be among the main factors governing the interaction of pure spin currents with the dynamic magnetization in high-quality magnetic insulators. PMID:27608533

  15. Direct observation of dynamic modes excited in a magnetic insulator by pure spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. E.; Evelt, M.; Bessonov, V.; Demokritov, S. O.; Prieto, J. L.; Muñoz, M.; Ben Youssef, J.; Naletov, V. V.; de Loubens, G.; Klein, O.; Collet, M.; Bortolotti, P.; Cros, V.; Anane, A.

    2016-09-01

    Excitation of magnetization dynamics by pure spin currents has been recently recognized as an enabling mechanism for spintronics and magnonics, which allows implementation of spin-torque devices based on low-damping insulating magnetic materials. Here we report the first spatially-resolved study of the dynamic modes excited by pure spin current in nanometer-thick microscopic insulating Yttrium Iron Garnet disks. We show that these modes exhibit nonlinear self-broadening preventing the formation of the self-localized magnetic bullet, which plays a crucial role in the stabilization of the single-mode magnetization oscillations in all-metallic systems. This peculiarity associated with the efficient nonlinear mode coupling in low-damping materials can be among the main factors governing the interaction of pure spin currents with the dynamic magnetization in high-quality magnetic insulators.

  16. Direct observation of hydrogen atom dynamics and interactions by ultrahigh resolution neutron protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Julian C-H; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, S Zoë; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y

    2012-09-18

    The 1.1 Å, ultrahigh resolution neutron structure of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanged crambin is reported. Two hundred ninety-nine out of 315, or 94.9%, of the hydrogen atom positions in the protein have been experimentally derived and resolved through nuclear density maps. A number of unconventional interactions are clearly defined, including a potential O─H…π interaction between a water molecule and the aromatic ring of residue Y44, as well as a number of potential C─H…O hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bonding networks that are ambiguous in the 0.85 Å ultrahigh resolution X-ray structure can be resolved by accurate orientation of water molecules. Furthermore, the high resolution of the reported structure has allowed for the anisotropic description of 36 deuterium atoms in the protein. The visibility of hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the nuclear density maps is discussed in relation to the resolution of the neutron data.

  17. Direct observation of dynamic modes excited in a magnetic insulator by pure spin current.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V E; Evelt, M; Bessonov, V; Demokritov, S O; Prieto, J L; Muñoz, M; Ben Youssef, J; Naletov, V V; de Loubens, G; Klein, O; Collet, M; Bortolotti, P; Cros, V; Anane, A

    2016-01-01

    Excitation of magnetization dynamics by pure spin currents has been recently recognized as an enabling mechanism for spintronics and magnonics, which allows implementation of spin-torque devices based on low-damping insulating magnetic materials. Here we report the first spatially-resolved study of the dynamic modes excited by pure spin current in nanometer-thick microscopic insulating Yttrium Iron Garnet disks. We show that these modes exhibit nonlinear self-broadening preventing the formation of the self-localized magnetic bullet, which plays a crucial role in the stabilization of the single-mode magnetization oscillations in all-metallic systems. This peculiarity associated with the efficient nonlinear mode coupling in low-damping materials can be among the main factors governing the interaction of pure spin currents with the dynamic magnetization in high-quality magnetic insulators. PMID:27608533

  18. Direct Observation of Optical Field Phase Carving in the Vicinity of Plasmonic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Dagens, B; Février, M; Gogol, P; Blaize, S; Apuzzo, A; Magno, G; Mégy, R; Lerondel, G

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic surfaces are mainly used for their optical intensity concentration properties that allow for enhancement of physical interaction like in nonlinear optics, optical sensors, or tweezers. Phase response in plasmonic resonances can also play a major role, especially in a periodic assembly of plasmonic resonators like metasurfaces. Here we show that localized surface plasmons collectively excited by a guided mode in a metallic nanostructure periodic chain present nonmonotonous phase variation along the 1D metasurface, resulting from both selective Bloch mode coupling and dipolar coupling. As shown by near-field measurements, the phase profile of the highly concentrated optical field is carved out in the vicinity of the metallic metasurface, paving the way to unusual local optical functions. PMID:27172348

  19. Direct observations of welding-induced solid-state phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Waide, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    A new diagnostic tool that uses time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) for in-situ, spatially resolved, phase identification around a weld is presented for the purpose of mapping the location of phase fields during welding. In this investigation, TRXRD experiments were conducted at the Stanford Sychrotron Radiation Laboratory where a high-intensity tunable synchrotron x-ray `probe` was available. The high spatial resolution of the x-ray probe (1mm) allowed precise mapping of specific phase fields around the weld, while the high intensity of the beam (10{sup 11} photons/s) yielded high signal-to-noise ratio of the diffracted x-rays. These characteristics enabled the crystal structure to be characterized during a 1-s x-ray integration time, thus providing real-time data to be gathered about welding-induced phase transformations. Experiments were performed on unalloyed Grade 4 titanium (Ti, 0.28%Fe, 0.38%O), which has an allotropic phase transition that occurs at 922{degrees}C, where the low temperature hcp phase transforms to the high temperature bcc phase. Welds were made using a semi-automatic tungsten inert gas procedure to establish a quasisteady-state thermal profile on 4.5 in. diameter titanium bar, which was rotated at a speed of 0.5 rpm beneath a 3.5 kW arc. Characteristic hcp, bcc, and liquid diffraction peaks were measured along x-ray probe scans traveling from the base metal through the heat-affected zone and into the weld pool, respectively. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the feasibility of using TRXRD for in-situ investigations of welding-induced phase transformations, thus allowing verification of welding models, the creation of transformation diagrams during rapid thermal cycling of materials, and the ability for real-time investigations of the nucleation and growth behavior of solid-state phase transformations.

  20. A DTN-ready application for the real-time dissemination of Earth Observation data received by Direct Readout stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronis, Dimitris; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Diamantopoulos, Sotirios; Tsaoussidis, Vassilis; Tsigkanos, Antonis; Ghita, Bogdan; Evans, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The majority of Earth observation satellites operate in low Earth sun-synchronous orbit and transmit data captured by a variety of sensors. The effective dissemination of satellite data in real-time is a crucial parameter for disaster monitoring in particular. Generally, a spacecraft collects data and then stores it on-board until it passes over dedicated ground stations to transmit the data. Additionally, some satellites (e.g. Terra, Aqua, Suomi-NPP, NOAA series satellites) have the so-called Direct Broadcast (DB) capability, which is based on a real-time data transmission sub-system. Compatible Direct Readout (DR) stations in direct line of sight are able to receive these transmissions. To date data exchange between DR stations have not been fully exploited for real-time data dissemination. Stations around the world store data locally, which is then disseminated on demand via Internet gateways based on the standard TCP-IP protocols. On the other hand, Delay Tolerant Networks (DTNs), which deliver data by enabling store-and-forward transmission in order to cope with link failures, service disruptions and network congestion, could prove as an alternative/complementary transmission mechanism for the efficient dissemination of data. The DTN architecture allows for efficient utilization of the network, using in-network storage and taking advantage of the network availability among the interconnected nodes. Although DTNs were originally developed for high-propagation delay, challenged connectivity environments such as deep space, the broader research community has investigated possible architectural enhancements for various emerging applications (e.g., terrestrial infrastructure, ground-to-air communications, content retrieval and dissemination). In this paper, a scheme for the effective dissemination of DB data is conceptualized, designed and implemented based on store-and-forward transmission capabilities provided by DTNs. For demonstration purposes, a set-up has

  1. Analytic Bounds on Causal Risk Differences in Directed Acyclic Graphs Involving Three Observed Binary Variables

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Sol; Kaufman, Jay S.; MacLehose, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We apply a linear programming approach which uses the causal risk difference (RDC) as the objective function and provides minimum and maximum values that RDC can achieve under any set of linear constraints on the potential response type distribution. We consider two scenarios involving binary exposure X, covariate Z and outcome Y. In the first, Z is not affected by X, and is a potential confounder of the causal effect of X on Y. In the second, Z is affected by X and intermediate in the causal pathway between X and Y. For each scenario we consider various linear constraints corresponding to the presence or absence of arcs in the associated directed acyclic graph (DAG), monotonicity assumptions, and presence or absence of additive-scale interactions. We also estimate Z-stratum-specific bounds when Z is a potential effect measure modifier and bounds for both controlled and natural direct effects when Z is affected by X. In the absence of any additional constraints deriving from background knowledge, the well-known bounds on RDc are duplicated: −Pr(Y≠X) ≤ RDC ≤ Pr(Y=X). These bounds have unit width, but can be narrowed by background knowledge-based assumptions. We provide and compare bounds and bound widths for various combinations of assumptions in the two scenarios and apply these bounds to real data from two studies. PMID:20161106

  2. Direct observation of titanium-centered octahedra in titanium-antimony-tellurium phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xiaosong; Xia, Mengjiao; Li, Wei; Ding, Keyuan; Feng, Xuefei; Zhu, Min; Feng, Songlin

    2015-11-27

    Phase-change memory based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material has one order of magnitude faster Set speed and as low as one-fifth of the Reset energy compared with the conventional Ge2Sb2Te5 based device. However, the phase-transition mechanism of the Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here we report a direct atom-by-atom chemical identification of titanium-centered octahedra in crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material with a state-of-the-art atomic mapping technology. Further, by using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density function theory simulations, we identify in amorphous Ti0.4Sb2Te3 the titanium atoms preferably maintain the octahedral configuration. Our work may pave the way to more thorough understanding and tailoring of the nature of the Ti-Sb-Te material, for promoting the development of dynamic random access memory-like phase-change memory as an emerging storage-class memory to reform current memory hierarchy.

  3. Direct electrical observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-based two-dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, W.; Zhu, M.; Yue, Y.; Song, B.; Encomendero, J.; Xing, H.; Fay, P.; Sensale-Rodriguez, B.

    2014-10-27

    In this work, signatures of plasma waves in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors were observed by direct electrical measurement at room temperature. Periodic grating-gate device structures were fabricated and characterized by on-wafer G-band (140–220 GHz) s-parameter measurements as a function of gate bias voltage and device geometry. A physics-based equivalent circuit model was used to assist in interpreting the measured s-parameters. The kinetic inductance extracted from the measurement data matches well with theoretical predictions, consistent with direct observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-channel devices at room temperature. This observation of electrically significant room-temperature plasma-wave effects in GaN-channel devices may have implications for future millimeter-wave and THz device concepts and designs.

  4. Direct observation of thermionic emission pattern of hemispherical single-crystal LaB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, R.; Onoda, H.; Hagiwara, H.; Ishii, S.

    1981-10-01

    Thermionic emission pattern from a hemispherical LaB6 cathode of <110> orientation was made using an experimental setup similar to Martin's experiment. The emission pattern from a clean surface has clearly indicated that the bright region consists of (100) spot surrounded by four (210) spots. This suggests that the bright spots (except for the center spot in the cross-over images observed for <100>, <110>, and <111> LaB6 cathodes correspond to (210) spots as deduced by Oshima et al. Emission patterns at different vacuum conditions are also observed to find that a specific emission pattern appears with good reproducibility corresponding to the change of vacuum condition, leading to existence of enhanced thermionic emission.

  5. Direct Observation of Strain-Induced Change in Surface Electronic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiba, Daiichiro; Nakatsuji, Kan; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Komori, Fumio

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a novel modification of a surface state due to a local strain field induced by a nanopattern formation. N adsorption on the Cu(100) surface induces a nanoscale grid pattern, where the clean Cu regions remain periodically. The lattice is contracted on the clean region by adjacent c(2×2)N domains, which have a larger lattice constant. On this patterned surface, we have investigated the Tamm-type surface state at M¯ by means of angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The binding energy of the Tamm state shifts toward the Fermi level continuously with increasing N coverage, i.e., the intensity of the strain field. This behavior due to the strain field is completely different from that caused by electron confinement observed on vicinal surfaces. The Brillouin zone extension corresponding to the lattice contraction was also detected.

  6. Direct and remote sensing observations of the effects of ships on clouds.

    PubMed

    Radke, L F; Coakley, J A; King, M D

    1989-12-01

    Under certain conditions ships can affect the structure of shallow layer clouds. Simultaneous observations of two ship track signatures in stratus clouds from a satellite and in situ from an aircraft show that in the ship tracks the droplet sizes were reduced and total concentrations of both droplets and particles were substantially increased from those in adjacent clouds. In situ measurements of the upwelling radiance within the ship tracks was significantly enhanced at visible wavelengths, whereas radiance at 2.2 micrometers was significantly reduced. Cloud reflectivity along the tracks was enhanced at 0.63 and 3.7 micrometers. These observations support the contention that ship track signatures in clouds are produced primarily by particles emitted from ships.

  7. Direct observation of prefreezing at the interface melt–solid in polymer crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Löhmann, Ann-Kristin; Henze, Thomas; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization is almost always initiated at an interface to a solid. This observation is classically explained by the assumption of a reduced barrier for crystal nucleation at the interface. However, an interface can also induce crystallization by prefreezing (i.e., the formation of a crystalline layer that is already stable above the bulk melting temperature). We present an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based in situ observation of a prefreezing process at the interface of a polymeric model system and a crystalline solid. Explicitly, we show an interfacial ordered layer that forms well above the bulk melting temperature with thickness that increases on approaching melt–solid coexistence. Below the melting temperature, the ordered layer initiates crystal growth into the bulk, leading to an oriented, homogeneous semicrystalline structure. PMID:25422447

  8. Observation of dust torus with poloidal rotation in direct current glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manjit; Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Sharma, Devendra; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2015-03-01

    Observation of dust cloud rotation in parallel-plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported here. The experiments are carried out at high pressures (˜130 Pa) with a metallic ring placed on the lower electrode (cathode). The dust cloud rotates poloidally in the vertical plane near the cathode surface. This structure is continuous toroidally. Absence of magnetic field rules out the possibility of E × B induced ion flow as the cause of dust rotation. The dust rotational structures exist even with water cooled cathode. Therefore, temperature gradient driven mechanisms, such as thermophoretic force, thermal creep flow, and free convection cannot be causing the observed dust rotation. Langmuir probe measurement reveals the existence of a sharp density gradient near the location of the rotating dust cloud. The gradient in the density, giving rise to a gradient in the ion drag force, has been identified as the principal cause behind the rotation of dust particles.

  9. Direct Observation of Interstitial Dislocation Loop Coarsening in α-Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, S.; Jourdan, T.; Lefaix-Jeuland, H.

    2013-07-01

    Interstitial loop coarsening by Ostwald ripening can provide insight into single point defects but is very difficult to observe in α-iron and many other metals where nanoscale vacancy clusters dissociate and annihilate loops. We show that by implanting helium in the samples at a carefully chosen energy, it is possible to observe Ostwald ripening of loops by transmission electron microscopy during in situ isochronal annealings. This coarsening of loops results in a sharp increase of the mean loop radius at around 850 K. Using cluster dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that loops evolve due to vacancy emission and that such experiments give a robust estimation of the sum of the formation and migration free energies of vacancies. In particular, our results are in good agreement with self-diffusion experiments and confirm that entropic contributions are large for the vacancy in α-iron.

  10. Observation of dust torus with poloidal rotation in direct current glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manjit Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K. Sharma, Devendra; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2015-03-15

    Observation of dust cloud rotation in parallel-plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported here. The experiments are carried out at high pressures (∼130 Pa) with a metallic ring placed on the lower electrode (cathode). The dust cloud rotates poloidally in the vertical plane near the cathode surface. This structure is continuous toroidally. Absence of magnetic field rules out the possibility of E × B induced ion flow as the cause of dust rotation. The dust rotational structures exist even with water cooled cathode. Therefore, temperature gradient driven mechanisms, such as thermophoretic force, thermal creep flow, and free convection cannot be causing the observed dust rotation. Langmuir probe measurement reveals the existence of a sharp density gradient near the location of the rotating dust cloud. The gradient in the density, giving rise to a gradient in the ion drag force, has been identified as the principal cause behind the rotation of dust particles.

  11. Ultrafast imaging of electronic relaxation in n-propylbenzene: Direct observation of intermediate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Gerber, Thomas; Radi, Peter; Knopp, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of the second singlet electronically excited state (S2) in n-propylbenzene has been investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging coupled with photofragmentation spectroscopy. The intermediate state for the deactivation of the S2 state is observed by transient photoelectron kinetic energy distributions and photoelectron angular distributions. An ultrafast electronic relaxation process on timescale of the fitted ∼50 fs was observed in the S2 state by time-resolved photoelectron imaging and it is attributed to the S1 ← S2 internal conversion (IC). The time constant of 1.23 (±0.2) ps is determined for the further deactivation of the intermediate S1 state.

  12. Direct observation of an attosecond electron wave packet in a nitrogen molecule

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Tomoya; Furukawa, Yusuke; Nabekawa, Yasuo; Miyabe, Shungo; Amani Eilanlou, A.; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Capturing electron motion in a molecule is the basis of understanding or steering chemical reactions. Nonlinear Fourier transform spectroscopy using an attosecond-pump/attosecond-probe technique is used to observe an attosecond electron wave packet in a nitrogen molecule in real time. The 500-as electronic motion between two bound electronic states in a nitrogen molecule is captured by measuring the fragment ions with the same kinetic energy generated in sequential two-photon dissociative ionization processes. The temporal evolution of electronic coherence originating from various electronic states is visualized via the fragment ions appearing after irradiation of the probe pulse. This observation of an attosecond molecular electron wave packet is a critical step in understanding coupled nuclear and electron motion in polyatomic and biological molecules to explore attochemistry. PMID:26601262

  13. Observation of directly interacting coherent two-level systems in an amorphous material

    PubMed Central

    Lisenfeld, Jürgen; Grabovskij, Grigorij J.; Müller, Clemens; Cole, Jared H.; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic two-level tunnelling systems originating from structural material defects affect the functionality of various microfabricated devices by acting as a source of noise. In particular, superconducting quantum bits may be sensitive to even single defects when these reside in the tunnel barrier of the qubit’s Josephson junctions, and this can be exploited to observe and manipulate the quantum states of individual tunnelling systems. Here, we detect and fully characterize a system of two strongly interacting defects using a novel technique for high-resolution spectroscopy. Mutual defect coupling has been conjectured to explain various anomalies of glasses, and was recently suggested as the origin of low-frequency noise in superconducting devices. Our study provides conclusive evidence of defect interactions with full access to the individual constituents, demonstrating the potential of superconducting qubits for studying material defects. All our observations are consistent with the assumption that defects are generated by atomic tunnelling. PMID:25652611

  14. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2014-11-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp(2) carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations.

  15. Direct Observation of the Collision of Single Pt Nanoparticles onto Single-Crystalline Gold Nanowire Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Changhwan; Bae, Hyeonhu; Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo; Kwon, Seong Jung

    2016-08-01

    We observed the collision of single Pt nanoparticles (NPs) onto an Au nanowire (NW) electrode by using electrocatalytic amplification. Previously, such observations had typically been performed by using a microscale disk-type ultramicroelectrode (UME). The use of a NW electrode decreased the background noise current and provided a shielding effect, owing to adsorption of the NPs onto the insulating sheath. Therefore, the transient current signal that was caused by the collision of single NPs could be more clearly distinguished from the background current by using a NW electrode instead of a UME. Furthermore, the use of a NW electrode increased the collisional frequency and the magnitude of the transient current signal. The experimental data were analyzed by using a theoretical model and a random walk simulation model. PMID:27305586

  16. Direct observation of spin-like reaction fronts in planar energetic multilayer foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Jones, Eric D., Jr.; McDonald, Joel Patrick

    2008-10-01

    Propagating reactions in initially planar cobalt/aluminum exothermic multilayer foils have been investigated using high-speed digital photography. Real-time observations of reactions indicate that unsteady (spinlike) reaction propagation leads to the formation of highly periodic surface morphologies with length scales ranging from 1 {micro}m to 1 mm. The characteristics of propagating spinlike reactions and corresponding reacted foil morphologies depend on the bilayer thickness of multilayer foils.

  17. Direct observation of the birth of a nanocrystalline nucleus in an amorphous matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Ijaz A.

    2008-10-06

    Nucleation of crystals within an amorphous phase can be induced using electron beam irradiation in an electron microscope. In contrast to generally believed two-step phase transformation involving nucleation and growth, we observe a three-step transformation: a two-step nucleation stage followed by the growth process. The two steps in the nucleation stage are: the formation of a basic crystalline skeleton followed by the diffusion of excess defects to the periphery of the crystalline skeleton.

  18. Direct observation of electrically induced Pauli paramagnetism in single-layer graphene using ESR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Sakurai, Yuki; Kawahara, Kenji; Ago, Hiroki; Takenobu, Taishi; Marumoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Graphene has been actively investigated as an electronic material owing to many excellent physical properties, such as high charge mobility and quantum Hall effect, due to the characteristics of a linear band structure and an ideal two-dimensional electron system. However, the correlations between the transport characteristics and the spin states of charge carriers or atomic vacancies in graphene have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we show the spin states of single-layer graphene to clarify the correlations using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy as a function of accumulated charge density using transistor structures. Two different electrically induced ESR signals were observed. One is originated from a Fermi-degenerate two-dimensional electron system, demonstrating the first observation of electrically induced Pauli paramagnetism from a microscopic viewpoint, showing a clear contrast to no ESR observation of Pauli paramagnetism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to a one-dimensional electron system. The other is originated from the electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments due to atomic vacancies in graphene, showing a universal phenomenon for carbon materials including CNTs. The degenerate electron system with the ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute to high charge mobility due to the decrease in spin scatterings in graphene.

  19. Direct observation of electrically induced Pauli paramagnetism in single-layer graphene using ESR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Sakurai, Yuki; Kawahara, Kenji; Ago, Hiroki; Takenobu, Taishi; Marumoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has been actively investigated as an electronic material owing to many excellent physical properties, such as high charge mobility and quantum Hall effect, due to the characteristics of a linear band structure and an ideal two-dimensional electron system. However, the correlations between the transport characteristics and the spin states of charge carriers or atomic vacancies in graphene have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we show the spin states of single-layer graphene to clarify the correlations using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy as a function of accumulated charge density using transistor structures. Two different electrically induced ESR signals were observed. One is originated from a Fermi-degenerate two-dimensional electron system, demonstrating the first observation of electrically induced Pauli paramagnetism from a microscopic viewpoint, showing a clear contrast to no ESR observation of Pauli paramagnetism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to a one-dimensional electron system. The other is originated from the electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments due to atomic vacancies in graphene, showing a universal phenomenon for carbon materials including CNTs. The degenerate electron system with the ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute to high charge mobility due to the decrease in spin scatterings in graphene. PMID:27731338

  20. Direct Observations of NO in South Pole Snowpack During ISCAT 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, M.; Davis, D.; Lombardi, K.; Lefer, B.; Shetter, R.; Huey, G.; Tanner, D.; McConnell, J.; Dibb, J.

    2001-12-01

    Based on the ISCAT 1998 field study, it was concluded that the abnormally high levels of NO observed at South Pole were due to large natural emissions of NO from the snow. The latter process was believed to be the result of photolysis of nitrate ions in the snowpack. During ISCAT 1998, however, no snowpack measurements were available. Reported here are the first snowpack observations of NO, NO2, and NOx. These measurements were made using two different chemiluminescent instruments. The measurements themselves were recorded at two different locations at South Pole, the first was approximately 100 meters from the Atmospheric Research Observatory (ARO) building, the second was 5 meters from the ARO. Measurements were recorded at snowpack depths ranging from 1 to 100cm. The time period covered by these observations was from December 10, 2000 to March 24, 2001. Details concerning measured NO and its relationship to snowpack measured levels of NO2, NOx, O3, and NO3- will be presented.

  1. Direct observation of a "devil's staircase" in wave-particle interaction.

    PubMed

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves

    2006-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase" in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a "devil's staircase" behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

  2. Direct observation of a ``devil's staircase'' in wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves

    2006-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of a "devil's staircase" in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a "devil's staircase" behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

  3. Direct observation of a 'devil's staircase' in wave-particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves

    2006-09-15

    We report the experimental observation of a 'devil's staircase' in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave.

  4. Direct Observations of Explosive Eruptive Activity at a Submarine Volcano, NW Rota-1, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; de Ronde, C. E.; Deardorff, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Cashman, K. V.; Dziak, R. P.; Merle, S. G.

    2006-12-01

    In April 2006, a series of extraordinary observations of a deep-sea volcanic eruption were made at NW Rota-1, located at 14^{circ}36'N in the Mariana arc, western Pacific. This is a conical, basaltic-andesite submarine volcano with a summit depth of 517 m. Explosive eruptive activity at NW Rota-1 was discovered in 2004 and was witnessed again in 2005, but the activity in 2006 was especially vigorous and well documented. During six dives with the remotely operated vehicle Jason II over a period of 7 days, video observations made at close range documented a diverse and increasingly energetic range of volcanic activity that culminated in explosive bursts with flashes of glowing red lava propelled by violently expanding gases. Other notable activity included discreet degassing events, extrusion of sluggish lava flows, explosions that formed dilute density currents and/or expelled rocks and ash tens of meters from the vent, and rapid pressure oscillations apparently caused by the repeated formation and condensation of steam. During the last dive when the highest extrusion rates were observed, quasi-periodic bursts from the vent, each lasting 1-10 minutes, were separated by pauses lasting 10 seconds to a few minutes. Each burst started as a plug of crusted-over lava rose in the vent and was blown apart by expanding gases, producing large lava bombs with distinctly flat, disc-like shapes. A remarkable aspect of these observations was how close Jason II could be to the vent during the eruptions. This was because the pressure of the overlying seawater dampened the energy of the explosions and slowed the velocity of volcanic ejecta. Also, lava degassing could be visualized with great clarity underwater as either clear bubbles (CO2) or opaque yellow clouds (dominated by SO2 and H2S). A portable hydrophone with a 30-hour recording capacity was deployed twice by Jason II at the summit of NW Rota-1 during the 2006 dive series. The hydrophone data extends the visual observations

  5. Observation of strong direct-like oscillator strength in the photoluminescence of Si nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A.; Yamani, Z. H.; Roberts, N.; Turner, J.; Habbal, S. R.; Granick, S.; Nayfeh, M. H.

    2005-11-01

    We have performed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on suspensions of silicon nanoparticles using near-infrared two-photon femtosecond excitation. Our results for 1 nm particles show wide bandwidth but indicate full conversion to directlike behavior, with a few nanosecond time characteristic, corresponding to oscillator strength comparable to those in direct semiconductors. In addition to fast nanosecond decay, the photoluminescence from 2.85 nm nanoparticle suspension exhibits considerably slower decay, consistent with a transition regime to directlike behavior. The quantum yield is measured to be ˜0.48 , 0.82, and 0.56 for excitation at 254, 310 and 365 nm, respectively, for the blue 1 nm particles, and ˜0.22 , 0.36, and 0.50 for the red 2.85 nm particles. The directlike characteristics are discussed in terms of localization on radiative deep molecularlike Si-Si traps with size-dependent depth.

  6. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkina, D.; Aycock, L. M.; Stuhl, B. K.; Lu, H.-I.; Williams, R. A.; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B 0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing SNR on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  7. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkina, Dina; Aycock, Lauren; Stuhl, Benjamin; Lu, Hsin-I.; Williams, Ross; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40 K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B 0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing SNR on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  8. Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer-fullerene heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencher, Françoise; Bérubé, Nicolas; Parker, Anthony W.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Hellmann, Christoph; Côté, Michel; Stingelin, Natalie; Silva, Carlos; Hayes, Sophia C.

    2014-07-01

    In polymeric semiconductors, charge carriers are polarons, which means that the excess charge deforms the molecular structure of the polymer chain that hosts it. This results in distinctive signatures in the vibrational modes of the polymer. Here, we probe polaron photogeneration dynamics at polymer:fullerene heterojunctions by monitoring its time-resolved resonance-Raman spectrum following ultrafast photoexcitation. We conclude that polarons emerge within 300 fs. Surprisingly, further structural evolution on ≲50-ps timescales is modest, indicating that the polymer conformation hosting nascent polarons is not significantly different from that near equilibrium. We interpret this as suggestive that charges are free from their mutual Coulomb potential because we would expect rich vibrational dynamics associated with charge-pair relaxation. We address current debates on the photocarrier generation mechanism at molecular heterojunctions, and our work is, to our knowledge, the first direct probe of molecular conformation dynamics during this fundamentally important process in these materials.

  9. Direct atomic-scale observation of layer-by-layer oxide growth during magnesium oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, He; Wu, Shujing; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhao, Dongshan E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale oxide growth dynamics are directly revealed by in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy during the oxidation of Mg surface. The oxidation process is characterized by the layer-by-layer growth of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanocrystal via the adatom process. Consistently, the nucleated MgO crystals exhibit faceted surface morphology as enclosed by (200) lattice planes. It is believed that the relatively lower surface energies of (200) lattice planes should play important roles, governing the growth mechanism. These results facilitate the understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth mechanism that will have an important impact on the development of magnesium or magnesium alloys with improved resistance to oxidation.

  10. Direct observation of multiferroic vortex domains in YMnO3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tan, Guotai; Gu, Lin; Yao, Yuan; Jin, Changqing; Wang, Yanguo; Duan, Xiaofeng; Yu, Richeng

    2013-01-01

    Topological vortices with swirling ferroelectric, magnetic and structural anti-phase relationship in hexagonal RMnO3 (R = Ho to Lu, Y, and Sc) have attracted much attention because of their intriguing behaviors. Herein, we report the structure of multiferroic vortex domains in YMnO3 at atomic scale using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Two types of displacements were identified among six domain walls (DWs); six translation-ferroelectric domains denoted by α+, γ-, β+, α-, γ+ and β-, respectively, were recognized, demonstrating the interlocking nature of the anti-vortex domain. We found that the anti-vortex core is about four unit cells wide. In addition, we reconstructed the vortex model with three swirling pairs of DWs along the [001] direction. These results are very critical for the understanding of topological behaviors and unusual properties of the multiferroic vortex.

  11. Direct observation of charge re-distribution in a MgB2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng Yun; Shih, Po-Hsun; Ji, Jhong-Yi; Chan, Ting-Shan; Yang, Chun Chuen

    2016-04-01

    To study the origin of negative thermal expansion effects near the superconducting transition temperature TC in MgB2, low-temperature high-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction was used to probe the charge redistribution near the boron atoms. Our results reveal that the in-plane hole-distribution of B- hops through the direct orbital overlap of Mg2+ along the c-axis at 50 K and is re-distributed out-of-plane. This study shows that the out-of-plane π-hole distribution plays a dominant role in the possible origin of superconductivity and negative thermal effects in MgB2.

  12. Direct observation of two-step crystallization in nanoparticle superlattice formation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Lee, Won Chul; Geissler, Phillip L.; Rabani, Eran; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-10-06

    Direct imaging of nanoparticle solutions by liquid phase transmission electron microscopy has enabled unique in-situ studies of nanoparticle motion and growth. In the present work, we report on real-time formation of two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays in the very low diffusive limit, where nanoparticles are mainly driven by capillary forces and solvent fluctuations. We find that superlattice formation appears to be segregated into multiple regimes. Initially, the solvent front drags the nanoparticles, condensing them into an amorphous agglomerate. Subsequently, the nanoparticle crystallization into an array is driven by local fluctuations. Following the crystallization event, superlattice growth can also occur via the addition of individual nanoparticles drawn from outlying regions by different solvent fronts. The dragging mechanism is consistent with simulations based on a coarse-grained lattice gas model at the same limit.

  13. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-12-07

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  14. Paul trapping of radioactive 6He+ ions and direct observation of their beta decay.

    PubMed

    Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Méry, A; Rodríguez, D; Ban, G; Durand, D; Duval, F; Herbane, M; Labalme, M; Mauger, F; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Thomas, J C; Velten, Ph

    2008-11-21

    We demonstrate that abundant quantities of short-lived beta unstable ions can be trapped in a novel transparent Paul trap and that their decay products can directly be detected in coincidence. Low energy 6He+ (807 ms half-life) ions were extracted from the SPIRAL source at GANIL, then decelerated, cooled, and bunched by means of the buffer gas cooling technique. More than 10(8) ions have been stored over a measuring period of six days, and about 10(5) decay coincidences between the beta particles and the 6Li++ recoiling ions have been recorded. The technique can be extended to other short-lived species, opening new possibilities for trap assisted decay experiments.

  15. Direct observation of ClO from chlorine nitrate photolysis. [as mechanism of polar ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Moore, Teresa A.; Okumura, Mitchio

    1992-01-01

    Chlorine nitrate photolysis has been investigated with the use of a molecular beam technique. Excitation at both 248 and 193 nanometers led to photodissociation by two pathways, ClONO2 yields ClO + NO2 and ClONO2 yields Cl + NO3, with comparable yields. This experiment provides a direct measurement of the ClO product channel and consequently raises the possibility of an analogous channel in ClO dimer photolysis. Photodissociation of the ClO dimer is a critical step in the catalytic cycle that is presumed to dominate polar stratospheric ozone destruction. A substantial yield of ClO would reduce the efficiency of this cycle.

  16. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR 13.22. Exceptions to those policies as allowed in 44 CFR 13.4 and 13.6 are explained below. (a) Eligible direct... accordance with 44 CFR part 207. (b)...

  17. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44 CFR... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs....

  18. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  19. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  20. Microsatellite evolutionary rate and pattern in Schistocerca gregaria inferred from direct observation of germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, M-P; Plantamp, C; Streiff, R; Blondin, L; Piou, C

    2015-12-01

    Unravelling variation among taxonomic orders regarding the rate of evolution in microsatellites is crucial for evolutionary biology and population genetics research. The mean mutation rate of microsatellites tends to be lower in arthropods than in vertebrates, but data are scarce and mostly concern accumulation of mutations in model species. Based on parent-offspring segregations and a hierarchical Bayesian model, the mean rate of mutation in the orthopteran insect Schistocerca gregaria was estimated at 2.1e(-4) per generation per untranscribed dinucleotide locus. This is close to vertebrate estimates and one order of magnitude higher than estimates from species of other arthropod orders, such as Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia pulex. We also found evidence of a directional bias towards expansions even for long alleles and exceptionally large ranges of allele sizes. Finally, at transcribed microsatellites, the mean rate of mutation was half the rate found at untranscribed loci and the mutational model deviated from that usually considered, with most mutations involving multistep changes that avoid disrupting the reading frame. Our direct estimates of mutation rate were discussed in the light of peculiar biological and genomic features of S. gregaria, including specificities in mismatch repair and the dependence of its activity to allele length. Shedding new light on the mutational dynamics of grasshopper microsatellites is of critical importance for a number of research fields. As an illustration, we showed how our findings improve microsatellite application in population genetics, by obtaining a more precise estimation of S. gregaria effective population size from a published data set based on the same microsatellites. PMID:26562076