Science.gov

Sample records for alloy oxidation behavior

  1. Oxidation Behavior of Binary Niobium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Corey, James L.

    1960-01-01

    This investigation concludes a study to determine the effects of up to 25 atomic percent of 55 alloying additions on the oxidation characteristics of niobium. The alloys were evaluated by oxidizing in an air atmosphere for 4 hours at 1000 C and 2 hours at 1200 C. Titanium and chromium improved oxidation resistance at both evaluation conditions. Vanadium and aluminum improved oxidation resistance at 1000 C, even though the V scale tended to liquefy and the Al specimens became brittle and the scale powdery. Copper, cobalt, iron, and iridium improved oxidation resistance at 1200 C. Other investigations report tungsten and molybdenum are protective up to about 1000 C, and tantalum at 1100 C. The most important factor influencing the rate of oxidation was the ion size of the alloy additions. Ions slightly smaller than the Nb(5+) ion are soluble in the oxide lattice and tend to lower the compressive stresses in the bulk scale that lead to cracking. The solubility of the alloying addition also depends on the valence to some extent. All of the elements mentioned that improve the oxidation resistance of Nb fit this size criterion with the possible exception of Al, whose extremely small size in large concentrations would probably lead to the formation of a powdery scale. Maintenance of a crack-free bulk scale for as long as possible may contribute to the formation of a dark subscale that ultimately is rate- controlling in the oxidation process. The platinum-group metals, especially Ir, appear to protect by entrapment of the finely dispersed alloying element by the incoming Nb2O5 metal-oxide interface. This inert metallic Ir when alloyed in a sufficient amount with Yb appears to give a ductile phase dispersed in the brittle oxide. This scale would then flow more easily to relieve the large compressive stresses to delay cracking. Complex oxide formation (which both Ti and Zr tend to initiate) and valence effects, which probably change the vacancy concentration in the scale

  2. Oxidation behaviors of porous Haynes 214 alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Yong; Tang, Huiping; Li, Weijie

    2015-09-15

    The oxidation behaviors of porous Haynes 214 alloy at temperatures from 850 to 1000 °C were investigated. The porous alloys before and after the oxidation were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxidation kinetics of the porous alloy approximately follows a parabolic rate law and exhibits two stages controlled by different oxidation courses. Complex oxide scales composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed on the oxidized porous alloys, and the formation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on its outer layer is promoted with the oxidation proceeding. The rough surface as well as the micropores in the microstructures of the porous alloy caused by the manufacturing process provides fast diffusion paths for oxygen so as to affect the formation of the oxide layers. Both the maximum pore size and the permeability of the porous alloys decrease with the increase of oxidation temperature and exposure time, which may limit its applications. - Highlights: • Two-stage oxidation kinetics controlled by different oxidation courses is showed. • Oxide scale mainly consists of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Rough surface and micropores lead to the formation of uneven oxide structure. • Content of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the outer layer of the scale increases with time at 1000 °C. • Maximum pore size and permeability decrease with increasing temperature and time.

  3. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of some Molybdenum based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Pratik Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The advent of Ni based superalloys revolutionized the high temperature alloy industry. These materials are capable of operating in extremely harsh environments, comprising of temperatures around 1050 C, under oxidative conditions. Demands for increased fuel efficiency, however, has highlighted the need for materials that can be used under oxidative conditions at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. The Ni based superalloys are restricted to lower temperatures due to the presence of a number of low melting phases that melt in the 1250 - 1450 C, resulting in softening of the alloys above 1000 C. Therefore, recent research directions have been skewed towards exploring and developing newer alloy systems. This thesis comprises a part of such an effort. Techniques for rapid thermodynamic assessments were developed and applied to two different systems - Mo-Si alloys with transition metal substitutions (and this forms the first part of the thesis) and Ni-Al alloys with added components for providing high temperature strength and ductility. A hierarchical approach towards alloy design indicated the Mo-Ni-Al system as a prospective candidate for high temperature applications. Investigations on microstructures and oxidation behavior, under both isothermal and cyclic conditions, of these alloys constitute the second part of this thesis. It was seen that refractory metal systems show a marked microstructure dependence of oxidation.

  4. The oxidation behavior of Co-15 wt % Cr alloy containing dispersed oxides formed by internal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P.Y.; Shui, Z.R. ); Stringer, J. )

    1991-12-01

    Internal oxidation pretreatments of Co-15wt%Cr and Co-15wt%Cr-1wt%Ti were carried out using a Rhines pack in quartz, in mullite and in alumina. A dispersion of titanium oxide particles formed in the Ti-containing alloy as a result of the internal oxidation. However, silicon also diffused into all treated specimens when the pretreatments were carried out in quartz or in mullite. The effect of various pretreatments on the subsequent oxidation of these alloys was studied at 1000{degree}C, and compared with that of Co-15wt%Cr-1wt%Si alloy. The main purpose of this study was to determine the relative effectiveness of the dispersed oxide particles and the contaminated silicon on the selective oxidation of chromium. It was found that the oxidation behavior of both treated alloys were strongly affected by the degree of silicon contamination. Selective oxidation of chromium to form a nearly continuous protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale was achieved with greater than 0.4wt% silicon. The presence of dispersed particles reduced initial oxidation rate, but was ineffective in promoting Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formation.

  5. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Iridium-Rhenium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    The life-limiting mechanism for radiation-cooled rockets made from iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) is the diffusion of Re into the Ir layer and the subsequent oxidation of the resulting Ir-Re alloy from the inner surface. In a previous study, a life model for Ir/Re rockets was developed. It incorporated Ir-Re diffusion and oxidation data to predict chamber lifetimes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Oxidation testing at 1540 deg C suggested that a 20-wt percent Re concentration at the inner wall surface should be established as the failure criterion. The present study was performed to better define Ir-oxidation behavior as a function of Re concentration and to supplement the data base for the life model. Samples ranging from pure Ir to Ir-40 wt percent Re (Ir-40Re) were tested at 1500 deg C, in two different oxygen environments. There were indications that the oxidation rate of the Ir-Re alloy increased significantly when it went from a single-phase solid solution to a two-phase mixture, as was suggested in previous work. However, because of testing anomalies in this study, there were not enough dependable oxidation data to definitively raise the Ir/Re rocket failure criterion from 20-wt percent Re to a Re concentration corresponding to entry into the two-phase region.

  6. Effect of oxidation on tensile behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the oxygen uptake behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the exposure environment, (b) examine the microstructural characteristics of oxide scales and oxygen entrapped at the grain boundaries in the substrate alloy, (c) evaluate the influence of oxygen uptake on the tensile properties of the alloy at room and elevated temperatures, (d) evaluate oxidation kinetics of the alloy with the aluminum-enriched surface layers, and (e) determine the effect of oxygen uptake on tensile behavior of the alloy.

  7. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bingtao

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  8. Oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr steels alloyed with titanium at 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Asep Ridwan; Artono, Tri Juni

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the oxidation behavior of Fe-20 wt%Cr steels alloyed with different titanium contents: 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% are studied as a function of time in air atmosphere. The samples were isothermally oxidized at 1073 K for 86.4, 172.8, and 345.6 ks in a muffle furnace. The mass of specimen were recorded before and after oxidation. After the oxidation, phases in the oxide were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy observation on the chromium base alloys show that the microstructure consist only ferritic phases. The addition of titanium in the Fe-20Cr alloys does not alter the microstructure significantly. The oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr, Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti were followed the classical parabolic relationship with time. XRD analysis indicated that the oxide scales developed on the Fe-20Cr alloys surface during oxidation tests consisted mainly of Cr2O3. On the other hand, the oxide scales developed on the surface of Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti alloys comprised of Cr2O3 and TiO2 oxide. The formation of TiO2 oxide in the Ti-containing alloys consequently increases the mass gain of the alloys during oxidation compared to that of Fe-20Cr alloys.

  9. Isothermal oxidation behavior of ternary Zr-Nb-Y alloys at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Soepriyanto, Syoni; Basuki, Eddy Agus; Wiryolukito, Slameto

    2014-03-24

    The effect of yttrium content on isothermal oxidation behavior of Zr-2,5%Nb-0,5%Y, Zr-2,5%Nb-1%Y Zr-2,5%Nb-1,5%Y alloy at high temperature has been studied. High temperature oxidation carried out at tube furnace in air at 600,700 and 800°C for 1 hour. Optical microscope is used for microstructure characterization of the alloy. Oxidized and un oxidized specimen was characterized by x-ray diffraction. In this study, kinetic oxidation of Zr-2,5%Nb with different Y content at high temperature has also been studied. Characterization by optical microscope showed that microstructure of Zr-Nb-Y alloys relatively unchanged and showed equiaxed microstructure. X-ray diffraction of the alloys depicted that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of zirconium alloys is monoclinic ZrO2 while unoxidised alloy showed two phase α and β phase. SEM-EDS examination shows that depletion of Zr composition took place under the oxide layer. Kinetic rate of oxidation of zirconium alloy showed that increasing oxidation temperature will increase oxidation rate but increasing yttrium content in the alloys will decrease oxidation rate.

  10. Air Oxidation Behavior of Two Ti-Base Alloys Synthesized by HIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Guo, Q. Q.; Liu, L. L.; Xu, L.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn and Ti-6Al-4V produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been studied at 650-850°C in air for 24 h. The oxidation kinetics of both alloys followed the parabolic law with good approximation, except for Ti-5Al-2.5Sn oxidized at 850°C. Multi-layered scales formed on both alloys at 750°C and 850°C. Ternary additions of Sn and V accounted for the different morphology of the scales formed on these two alloys. In addition, the oxidation behavior of HIP alloys is compared with that of the corresponding cast alloys and the scaling mechanism is discussed.

  11. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Behrani, Vikas

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb5Si3 composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  12. In vitro corrosion behavior and cellular response of thermally oxidized Zr-3Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F. Y.; Wang, B. L.; Qiu, K. J.; Li, H. F.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y. F.; Han, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, ZrSn alloy was thermally oxidized at 600 °C for 3 h and its morphological and structural characteristics, corrosion behavior, ion release and in vitro cytocompatibility were studied to evaluate the feasibility of applying it as dental implant. After oxidation, a dense black oxide layer formed on ZrSn alloy surface, which consisted of predominant monoclinic zirconia and a few non-stoichiometric oxides. The scratching and water contact angle test results demonstrated that the oxide layer exhibited good adhesion strength and similar hydrophilicity to zirconia. The oxidized ZrSn alloy showed higher corrosion resistance, as indicated by far lower corrosion current density and passive current density compared to pure Ti and untreated ZrSn alloy in artificial saliva with and without H2O2. The amount of ions released from the oxidized ZrSn alloy was much lower than that dissolved from pure Ti in simulated corrosive oral mediums. Moreover, the oxidized ZrSn alloy did not present any significant toxic effect to both osteoblast-like cells and fibroblast cells, and osteoblast-like cells could adhere well onto the surface and exhibited a good proliferative pattern. The combination of improved surface properties, superior corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility made the oxidized ZrSn alloy promising for oral implantology application.

  13. Oxidation Behavior of GRCop-84 Copper Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's goal of safe, affordable space transportation calls for increased reliability and lifetimes of launch vehicles, and significant reductions of launch costs. The areas targeted for enhanced performance in the next generation of reusable launch vehicles include combustion chambers and nozzle ramps; therefore, the search is on for suitable liner materials for these components. GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb), an advanced copper alloy developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in conjunction with Case Western Reserve University, is a candidate. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine is another copper alloy, NARloy-Z (Cu-3Ag-0.1Zr). It provides a benchmark against which to compare the properties of candidate successors. The thermomechanical properties of GRCop-84 have been shown to be superior, and its physical properties comparable, to those of NARloy-Z. However, environmental durability issues control longevity in this application: because copper oxide scales are not highly protective, most copper alloys are quickly consumed in oxygen environments at elevated temperatures. In consequence, NARloy-Z and most other copper alloys are prone to blanching, a degradation process that occurs through cycles of oxidation-reduction as the oxide is repeatedly formed and removed because of microscale fluctuations in the oxygen-hydrogen fuel systems of rocket engines. The Space Shuttle Main Engine lining typically degraded by blanching-induced hot spots that lead to surface roughening, pore formation, and coolant leakage. Therefore, resistance to oxidation and blanching are key requirements for second-generation reusable launch vehicle liners. The rocket engine ambient includes H2 (fuel) and H2O (combustion product) and is, hence, under reduced oxygen partial pressures. Accordingly, our studies were expanded to include oxygen partial pressures as low as 322 parts per million (ppm) at the temperatures likely to be experienced in service. A comparison of 10-hr weight gains of

  14. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-02-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  15. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-03-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  16. Dynamic oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr alloy with different surface pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Tenney, D. R.; Herring, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation tests of TD-NiCr alloy with different surface pretreatments were conducted in a Mach-5 arc-jet at 1200 C and 0.002 lb/sec flowing air environment. The mechanisms responsible for the observed oxidation behavior are examined. The presence of atomic oxygen in the air stream plays a significant role in determining the oxidation characteristic of the alloy. The rate of Cr2O3 vaporization by formation of volatile CrO3 is greatly enhanced by the flowing conditions. The typical microstructure of oxides formed in the dynamic tests consists of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom-type morphology, an intermediate layer of NiO and Cr2O3 oxide mixture, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the Cr-depleted alloy substrate. Three basic processes underlying the formation of mushroom-type NiO are identified and discussed. The oxidation rate is determined by the rate of vaporization of NiO. Surface pretreatment has a significant effect on the oxidation behavior of the alloy in the early stage of oxidation, but becomes less important as exposure time increases. Mechanical polishing induces surface recrystallization, but promotes the concurrence of external growth of NiO and internal oxidation of the alloy in the dynamic atmosphere.

  17. Effect of different alloyed layers on the high temperature oxidation behavior of newly developed Ti 2AlNb-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongyan; Zhang, Pingze; Zhao, Haofeng; Wang, Ling; Xie, Aigen

    2011-01-01

    The application of titanium aluminide orthorhombic alloys (O-phase alloys) as potential materials in aircraft and jet engines was limited by their poor oxidation resistance at high temperature. The Ti 2AlNb-based alloys were chromised (Cr), chromium-tungstened (Cr-W) and nickel-chromised (Ni-Cr) by the double glow plasma surface alloying process to improve their high temperature oxidation resistance. The discontinuous oxidative behavior of Cr, Cr-W and Ni-Cr alloyed layers on Ti 2AlNb-based alloy at 1093 K was explored in this study. After exposing at 1093 K, the TiO 2 layer was formed on the bare alloy and accompanied by the occurrence of crack, which promoted oxidation rate. The oxidation behavior of Ti 2AlNb-based alloys was improved by surface alloying due to the formation of protective Al 2O 3 scale or continuous and dense NiCr 2O 4 film. The Ni-Cr alloyed layer presented the best high-temperature oxidation resistance among three alloyed layers.

  18. The effect of yttrium and thorium on the oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Nasrallah, M.; Douglass, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of quaternary additions of 0.5% Y, 0.5 and 1.0% Th to a base alloy of Ni-10CR-5Al on the oxidation behavior and mechanism was studied during oxidation in air over the range of 1000 to 1200 C. The presence of yttrium decreased the oxidation kinetics slightly, whereas, the addition of thorium caused a slight increase. Oxide scale adherence was markedly improved by the addition of the quaternary elements. Although a number of oxides formed on yttrium containing alloys, quantitative X-ray diffraction clearly showed that the rate-controlling step was the diffusion of aluminum through short circuit paths in a thin layer of alumina that formed parabolically with time. Although the scale adherence of the yttrium containing alloy was considerably better than the base alloys, spalling did occur that was attributed to the formation of the voluminous YAG particles which grew in a mushroom-like manner, lifting the protective scale off the subrate locally. The YAG particles formed primarily at grain boundaries in the substrate in which the yttrium originally existed as YNi9.

  19. Oxidation behavior in reaction-bonded aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, S.H.

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of producing low-shrinkage mullite/alumina composites by applying the reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) process to an aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina system. Mirostructural and compositional changes during heat treatment were studied by removing samples from the furnace at different steps in the heating schedule and then using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS and XRD to characterize the powder compacts. Results suggest that the oxidation behavior of the alloy compact is different from the model proposed for the pure Al/alumina system.

  20. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  1. Oxidation behavior of cubic phases formed by alloying Al3Ti with Cr and Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, L. J.; Nic, J. P.; Mikkola, D. E.; Smialek, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric, SEM, and XRD data are presented which document the significant improvement obtainable in the oxidation resistance of Al3Ti-containing alloys through additions of Cr. The L1(2) Al(67)Cr(8)Ti25 alloy exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance at 1473 K, with the primary oxide formed being the ideally protective alpha-Al2O3. The Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(25) alloy also tested for comparison exhibited poor cyclic oxidation resistance, with substantial occurrence of TiO2 in the protective scales. Catastrophic oxidation was also encountered in the quaternary alloy Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(22)V(3).

  2. The effect of yttrium and thorium on the oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Douglass, D. L.; Nasrallah, M.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation reported included a determination of the optimum composition of a Ni-Cr-Al ternary alloy with respect to oxidation resistance and minimum film-spalling tendencies. Yttrium and thorium in small amounts were added to the ternary alloy and an investigation of the oxidation mechanism and the oxide scale adherence was conducted. It was found that the oxidation mechanism of Ni-Cr-Al ternary alloys depends upon the composition of the alloy as well as the time, oxygen pressure, and temperature of oxidation.

  3. Oxidation behaviors of the aluminide coated TZM alloy via pack cementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, S.; Park, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    TZM is a traditional alloy for high temperature applications, in which (Ti, Zr)C particles are dispersed in a Mo matrix. However, due to easy formation of an oxide layer on the TZM alloy under ambient atmosphere, an oxidation protective coating is needed for any high temperature structural applications of TZM. In this study, aluminium pack cementation coatings have been carried out on TZM alloys, resulting in the formation of Al8Mo3 layer on the surface of TZM alloys. In order to examine the oxidation stability, the TZM alloy was exposed in an aerobic atmosphere. For the aluminide coated TZM alloys, an alumina layer was produced at the outer surface layer. The alminide coated TZM alloys showed excellent oxidation resistance. The coating layer kinetics and the corresponding oxidation stability are also discussed in terms of microstructural observations.

  4. Comparison of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of twenty-five commercial sheet alloys at 1150 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The cyclic and isothermal oxidation resistance of 25 high-temperature Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base sheet alloys after 100 hours in air at 1150 C was compared. The alloys were evaluated in terms of their oxidation, scaling, and vaporization rates and their tendency for scale spallation. These values were used to develop an oxidation rating parameter based on effective thickness change, as calculated from a mass balance. The calculated thicknesses generally agreed with the measured values, including grain boundary oxidation, to within a factor of 3. Oxidation behavior was related to composition, particularly Cr and Al content.

  5. Subtask 12E2: Effect of oxidation on tensile behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the oxygen uptake of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the exposure environment, (b) examine the microstructural characteristics of oxide scales and oxygen entrapped at the grain boundaries in the substrate alloy, (c) evaluate the influence of oxygen uptake on the tensile properties of the alloy at room and elevated temperatures, (d) evaluate oxidation kinetics of the alloy with aluminum-enriched surface layers, and (e) determine the effect of oxygen uptake on the tensile behavior of the alloy. Oxidation studies were conducted on V-5Cr-5Ti alloy specimens at 500{degrees}C in an air environment. The oxidation rates calculated from measurements of thermogravimetric testing are 10, 17, and 25 {mu}m/y at 400, 450 and 500{degrees}C, respectively. Uniaxial tensile specimens were oxidized for several time periods in air at 500{degrees}C and subsequently tensile-tested at 500{degrees}C in air. The hardened layer in each of these oxidized specimens was confined to 75 gm after 1000 h exposure at 500{degrees}C. The influence of the 1000-h oxidation is to increase the ultimate tensile strength of the alloy by {approx}10% while decreasing the tensile rupture strain from 0.23 to 0.14. 4 figs.

  6. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of P91, P92 and E911 Alloy Steels in Dry andWet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, Palanivel; Khanna, Anand Sawroop

    2011-04-01

    The oxidation behavior has been studied under both dry and wet oxidation atmosphere at 873 K to 1073 K. In dry atmosphere the oxidation resistance of these alloys has been described by the formation of a protective oxide FeCr2O4 at 873 K to 973 K. At 1073 K, the kinetics are parabolic with fast growing oxide leading to spalling of oxide for P92 alloy. Oxide scale formed in air was protective with a chromium rich scale at 873-973 K, while double layered oxides were formed at 1073 K with iron oxide an outer layer and inner Cr-rich spinel FeCr2O4. In wet atmosphere oxide scale was reasonably different. The oxide layer showed porous in wet atmospheres where as dense oxide layer formed during dry oxidation. The oxidation rate of P92 alloy is about 3, 2 and 1 orders of magnitude higher than the P9, P91 and E911 alloys in wet atmospheres.

  7. Preparation and high-temperature oxidation behavior of plasma Cr-Ni alloying on Ti6Al4V alloy based on double glow plasma surface metallurgy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong-Bo; Zhang, Ping-Ze; Yao, Zheng-Jun; Wei, Xiang-Fei; Zhou, Jin-Tang; Chen, Xiao-Hu

    2016-12-01

    To improve the oxidation resistance of Ti6Al4V alloy, it was coated with a Cr-Ni alloy with 20, 40, 60, and 80 at.% Ni content using the double-glow plasma surface metallurgy technology. The coatings were dense, uniform, and compact, including a complete structure of deposited layer, interdiffusion layer, and sputtering-affected zone. The effect of Ni content on the isothermal oxidation behavior of coating was investigated at 750, 850, and 950 °C. The results show that the oxide scale consisted of NiO and Cr2O3. The morphology and distribution of NiO in oxide scale were affected by oxidation temperature and Ni content. When the Ni content was ≤40 at.%, the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Ni alloy coating was enhanced.

  8. Investigation of the oxidation behavior of dispersion stabilized alloys when exposed to a dynamic high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr and TD-NiCrAlY alloys have been studied at 2000 and 2200 F in static and high speed flowing air environments. The TD-NiCrAlY alloys preoxidized to produce an Al2O3 scale on the surface showed good oxidation resistance in both types of environments. The TD-NiCr alloy which had a Cr2O3 oxide scale after preoxidation was found to oxidize more than an order of magnitude faster under the dynamic test conditions than at comparable static test conditions. Although Cr2O3 normally provides good oxidation protection, it was rapidly lost due to formation of volatile CrO3 when exposed to the high speed air stream. The preferred oxide arrangement for the dynamic test consisted of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom type morphology, an intermediate duplex layer of NiO and Cr2O3, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the alloy substrate. An oxidation model has been developed to explain the observed microstructure and overall oxidation behavior of all alloys.

  9. Cyclic oxidation behavior of beta+gamma overlay coatings on gamma and gamma+gamma-prime alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Pilsner, B. H.; Carol, L. A.; Heckel, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the cyclic oxidation behavior of low-pressure plasma sprayed beta+gamma coasting on gamma-phase Ni-Cr-Al alloys have shown the correlation of weight change, oxide type, and Cr and Al concentration-distance profiles as a function of oxidation time. Of special interest was the transition to breakway oxidation due to the loss of the Al flux to the oxide and the failure of the coated alloy to form an Al2O3-rich oxide scale. The experimental results on beta+gamma/gamma coating systems were used as the basis of a numerical model (ternary, semi-infinite, finite-difference analysis) which accurately predicted changes in Cr and Al concentration-distance profiles. The model was used to study parameters critical to enhancing the life of coatings which fail by a combination of Al loss in forming the oxide scale and Al loss via interdiffusion with the substrate alloy. Comparisons of beta+gamma/gamma coating behavior are made to the oxidation of coated gamma+gamma-prime substrates, both ternary Ni-Cr-Al alloys and Mar-M 247-type alloys.

  10. Characterization of phase equilibria and oxidation behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys by electron, ion, and neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron-depth profiling (NDP) were used, in a complementary way, for the characterization of the Li distribution in Al-Li alloys in order to study their phase equilibria and oxidation behavior. SIMS compositional imaging of alloys containing T{sub 1} (Al{sub 2}LiCu), T{sub 2} (Al{sub 6}Li{sub 3}Cu), and T{sub B} (Al{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 4}Li) showed a lack of equilibrium between these phases and a non-uniform Cu distribution. Observation regarding some trace-element distributions were also made. The second-phase particles were identified by electron diffraction and x-ray microanalysis as Al{sub 3}Fe and these particles contained no Li. Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys at high temperature produced a characteristic nodular oxide morphology. Examination of the oxide/alloy interface indicated preferential nucleation of the oxide at the grain boundaries followed by initial lateral growth. The oxide layer also exhibited surface facets due to surface reconstruction during the reaction. Oxidation of Al-Li-Mg alloys led to depletion of both Li and Mg to nearly equal extent. From these depletion profiles, the interdiffusion coefficients for the Al-Li-Mg-(Cu) alloys were calculated.

  11. The role of Zr and Nb in oxidation/sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K. ); Baxter, D.J. INCO Alloy Ltd., Hereford, England )

    1990-11-01

    05Structural Fe-Cr-Ni alloys may undergo rapid degradation at elevated temperatures unless protective surface oxide scales are formed and maintained. The ability of alloys to resist rapid degradation strongly depends on their Cr content and the chemistry of the exposure environment. Normally, 20 wt % Cr is required for service at temperatures up to 1000{degree}C; the presence of sulfur, however, inhibits formation of a protective surface oxide scale. The oxidation and sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys is examined over a wide temperature range (650 to 1000{degree}C), with particular emphasis on the effects of alloy Cr content and the radiation of reactive elements such as Nb and Zr. Both Nb and Zr are shown to promote protective oxidation behavior on the 12 wt % Cr alloy in oxidizing environments and to suppress sulfidation in mixed oxygen/sulfur environments. Additions of Nb and Zr at 3 wt % level resulted in stabilization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale and led to a barrier layer of Nb- or Zr-rich oxide at the scale/metal interface, which acted to minimize the transport of base metal cations across the scale. Oxide scales were preformed in sulfur-free environments and subsequently exposed to oxygen/sulfur mixed-gas atmospheres. Preformed scales were found to delay the onset of breakaway corrosion. Corrosions test results obtained under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions are presented. 58 refs., 55 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Effect of Y2O3 Addition on Oxidation Behavior of W-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telu, Suresh; Mitra, Rahul; Pabi, Shyamal Kumar

    2015-12-01

    A study has been carried out on non-isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of the W1- x Cr x -3 wt pct Y2O3 ( x = 0.3 or 0.5) composite samples, and the results have been compared with those of binary W-Cr alloys. The microstructures of the sintered samples showed the presence of W-rich (β1) + Cr-rich (β2) regions and more or less uniformly distributed Y2O3 particles. Protection against high-temperature oxidation is possible due to the formation of a stable mixed oxide scale containing both Cr2WO6 and Y2W3O12 at the oxide-air interface. Melting of the eutectic composition of Y2W3O12 and WO3 leads to the formation of a liquid phase, which helps in closure of pores by sintering and viscoplastic flow of the oxide scale, thereby enhancing its resistance to spallation and further oxidation.

  13. A Study on the Oxidation Behavior of Nb Alloy (Nb-1 pct Zr-0.1 pct C) and Silicide-Coated Nb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanadh, B.; Naina, R. H.; Majumdar, S.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    In the current work, silicide coatings were produced on the Nb alloy (Nb-1 pct Zr-0.1 pct C) using the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique. Coating parameters (temperature and time) were optimized to produce a two-layer (Nb5Si3 and NbSi2) coating on the Nb alloy. Subsequently, the oxidation behavior of the Nb alloy (Nb-1 pct Zr-0.1 pct C) and silicide-coated Nb alloy was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and isothermal weight gain oxidation experiments. Phase identification and morphological examinations were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. TGA showed that the Nb alloy started undergoing accelerated oxidation at and above 773 K (500 °C). Isothermal weight gain experiments carried out on the Nb alloy under air environment at 873 K (600 °C) up to a time period of 16 hours exhibited a linear growth rate law of oxidation. In the case of silicide-based coatings, TGA showed that oxidation resistance of silicide coatings was retained up to 1473 K (1200 °C). Isothermal weight gain experiments on the silicide coatings carried out at 1273 K (1000 °C) in air showed that initially up to 8 hours, the weight of the sample increased, and beyond 8 hours the weight of the sample remained constant. The oxide phases formed on the bare samples and on the coated samples during oxidation were found to be Nb2O5 and a mixture of SiO2 and Nb2O5 phases, respectively. SEM showed the formation of nonprotective oxide layer on the bare Nb alloy and a protective (adherent, nonporous) oxide layer on silicide-coated samples. The formation of protective SiO2 layer on the silicide-coated samples greatly improved the oxidation resistance at higher temperatures.

  14. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Cr-W Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.

    2007-02-01

    Cr alloys containing 0-30%W by weight were investigated for use in elevated temperature applications. The alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A pseudocyclic oxidation test was employed to study scale formation at 1000ºC in dry air. The scale was predominantly chromia and spalled upon cooling. Alloying with aluminum up to 8 weight percent reduced the spalling drastically. Furthermore, aluminizing the surface of the Cr-W alloys completely stopped the spalling.

  15. Effect of niobium alloying level on the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminides at 850°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banu, Alexandra; Marcu, Maria; Petrescu, Simona; Ionescu, Nicolae; Paraschiv, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the alloying of titanium aluminides used in aircraft engine applications and automobiles. The oxidation resistance behavior of two titanium aluminides of α2 + γ(Ti3Al + TiAl) and orthorhombic Ti2NbAl, recognized as candidates for high-temperature applications, was investigated by exposure of the alloys for 100 h in air. Thus, oxidation resistance was expressed as the mass gain rate, whereas surface aspects were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the type of oxidation products was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic Ti2NbAl alloy was embrittled, and pores and microcracks were formed as a result of oxygen diffusion through the external oxide layer formed during thermal oxidation for 100 h.

  16. The long-term, cyclic-oxidation behavior of selected chromia-forming alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, B.; Harper, M.A.

    1998-04-01

    Long-term, cyclic-oxidation testing in still air for about 2 years (720 days) at 982 C and 1 year (360 days) at 1093, 1149, and 1204 C has been conducted on the commercial, high-temperature chromia-forming HR-120, HR-160, and 230 alloys (all trademarks of Haynes International, Inc.). Each thermal cycle consisted of 30 days at temperature followed by about 4 hr at ambient. The results demonstrated the significant effects of alloy composition on long-term, cyclic-oxidation resistance. Each of the alloys exhibited scale spallation; however, the manner by which spallation occurred varied between the alloys. The 230 alloy, which contains 0.02 wt.% La, exhibited partial scale spallation, thus allowing for the easier formation of a protective or semiprotective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich scale during subsequent oxidation. The HR-160 alloy exhibited complete spallation owing largely to its relatively high silicon content (2.75 wt.%). However, the silicon was also beneficial in promoting protective or semiprotective scale formation when the exposed alloy was subsequently oxidized. The HR-120 alloy showed the poorest cyclic-oxidation resistance, due in part to poor scale adhesion and the tendency of the iron in this alloy (33 wt.%) to eventually oxidize and result in the formation of a less-protective scale. All of the alloys underwent internal attack in the form of internal oxidation and void formation. In most cases, the extent of internal attack was significantly greater than that of metal loss.

  17. Oxidation behavior of iron-chromium alloys at elevated temperatures: A reactive-element effect

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Natesan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Oxidation tests were conducted on samples of Fe-25Cr, Fe-25Cr,-0.3-1.0Y, and Fe-25Cr-1Ce at temperatures of 700 to 1000{degrees}C and oxygen partial pressures of 1 to 20 atm for time periods of 19 to 160 h. In some tests, oxidized samples were quenched from test temperature to room temperature in {approximately}20 min to examine characteristics of the spallation scales. The results showed that the scales, even though of the same composition, spalled totally when developed on Fe-25Cr alloy, while those on Ce- and Y-containing alloys exhibited good scale adherence and no spallation. After removal of the spalled scales, specimens of Fe-25Cr alloy were reoxidized to gain insight into development and morphology of thermally grown scales and their spallation characteristics. The reoxidized samples formed complex scale layers that had iron oxide phase at the gas side of the interface; the scale layer was adherent and no spallation was noted. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the roles of alloy grain size and grain growth rate in development and spallation of oxide scales. Results showed that excessive alloy grain growth is the primary cause of spallation of thermally grown scales. Additions of reactive elements such as Y and Ce minimize alloy grain growth and thus improve the adhesion of scales to the substrate and virtually eliminate spallation.

  18. Influence of alloy content and a cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can be significantly reduced by using interconnects made from ferritic stainless steels. In fact, several alloys have been developed specifically for this application (Crofer 22APU and Hitachi ZMG323). However, these steels lack environmental stability in SOFC environments, and as a result, degrade the performance of the SOFC. A steel interconnect can contribute to performance degradation through: (i) Cr poisoning of electrochemically active sites within the cathode; (ii) formation of non-conductive oxides, such as SiO2 or Al2O3 from residual or minor alloying elements, at the base metal-oxide scale interface; and/or (iii) excessive oxide scale growth, which may also retard electrical conductivity. Consequently, there has been considerable attention on developing coatings to protect steel interconnects in SOFC environments and controlling trace elements during alloy production. Recently, we have reported on the development of a Cerium surface treatment that improves the oxidation behavior of a variety alloys, including Crofer 22APU [1-5]. Initial results indicated that the treatment may improve the performance of Crofer 22APU for SOFC application by: (i) retarding scale growth resulting in a thinner oxide scale; and (ii) suppressing the formation of a deleterious continuous SiO2 layer that can form at the metal-oxide scale interface in materials with high residual Si content [5]. Crofer 22 APU contains Fe-22Cr-0.5Mn-0.1Ti (weight percent). Depending on current market prices and the purity of raw materials utilized for ingot production, Cr can contribute upwards of 90 percent of the raw materials cost. The present research was undertaken to determine the influence of Cr content and minor element additions, especially Ti, on the effectiveness of the Ce surface treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of low Cr alloys.

  19. Effects of Wet Air and Synthetic Combustion Gas Atmospheres on the Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M.J.; Thom, A.J.; Mandal, P.; Behrani, V.; Akinc, M.

    2003-04-24

    Continuing our work on understanding the oxidation behavior of multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system, we investigated three alloys in the Mo-Si-B system, designated as A1, A2, and A3. The nominal phase assemblages of these alloys are: A1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB, A2 = T1-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)-Mo{sub 3}Si, and A3 = Mo-T2-Mo{sub 3}Si. Our previous work showed that for exposures to 1100 C, all alloys formed a protective oxide scale in dry air. Exposures to wet air containing about 150 Torr water promoted the formation of a multiphase layer near the scale/alloy interface composed of Mo and MoO{sub 2}. Interrupted mass loss measurements indicated a near zero mass change. In the present study, isothermal mass measurements were conducted in order to quantitatively determine the oxidation rate constants at 1000 C in both dry and wet air. These measurements are critical for understanding the nature of scale development during the initial exposure, as well as the nature of scale stability during the long-term exposure. Isothermal measurements were also conducted at 1600 C in dry air to make an initial determination of alloy stability with respect to Vision 21 goals. We also conducted alloy oxidation testing in a synthetic oxidizing combustion atmosphere. Alloys were exposed up to 300 hours at 1100 C to a gas mixture having an approximate gas composition of N{sub 2} - 13 CO{sub 2} - 10 H{sub 2}O - 4 O{sub 2}. This gas composition simulates oxidizing flue gas, but does not contain a sulfidizing agent that would also be present in flue gas. The oxidized samples were carefully analyzed by SEM/EDS. This analysis will be discussed to provide an understanding of the role of water vapor and the synthetic combustion atmosphere on the oxidative stability of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  20. Oxidation Behavior of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications (Technical Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J.; Humphrey, Donald H.; Barrett, Charles A.; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie (Technical Monitor); Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A rocket engine's combustion chamber is lined with material that is highly conductive to heat in order to dissipate the huge thermal load (evident in a white-hot exhaust plume). Because of its thermal conductivity copper is the best choice of liner material. However, the mechanical properties of pure copper are inadequate to withstand the high stresses, hence, copper alloys are needed in this application. But copper and its alloys are prone to oxidation and related damage, especially "blanching" (an oxidation-reduction mode of degradation). The space shuttle main engine combustion chamber is lined with a Cu-Ag-Zr alloy, "NARloy-Z", which exhibits blanching. A superior liner is being sought for the next generation of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) It should have improved mechanical properties and higher resistance to oxidation and blanching, but without substantial penalty in thermal conductivity. GRCop84, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy (Cr2Nb in Cu matrix), developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Case Western Reserve University, is a prime contender for RLV liner material. In this study, the oxidation resistance of GRCop-84 and other related/candidate copper alloys are investigated and compared

  1. Corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytically oxidized gamma titanium aluminide alloy in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Lara Rodriguez, L; Sundaram, P A

    2016-09-15

    Plasma electrolytic oxidized (PEO) γTiAl alloy samples were electrochemically characterized by open circuit potential (OCP), cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to evaluate their corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid (SBF) in order to gauge their potential for biomedical applications. Experimental results through OCP and cyclic polarization studies demonstrated the protective nature and the beneficial effect of the PEO coatings on γTiAl. The PEO surface increased corrosion resistance of these surface modified alloys. EIS data indicated the presence of an underlying compact oxide layer with surface pores represented by two domes in the Nyquist plots. Electrical equivalent circuits to describe the EIS results are proposed.

  2. Mechanical Properties and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Ti-Al Coating Reinforced by Nitrides on Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jingjie; Yu, Huijun; Zhu, Jiyun; Weng, Fei; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2016-05-01

    Ti-Al alloyed coating reinforced by nitrides was fabricated by laser surface alloying technique to improve mechanical properties and high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Microstructures, mechanical properties and high temperature oxidation behavior of the alloyed coating were analyzed. The results show that the alloyed coating consisted of Ti3Al, TiAl2, TiN and Ti2AlN phases. Nitrides with different morphologies were dispersed in the alloyed coating. The maximum microhardness of the alloyed coating was 906HV. The friction coefficients of the alloyed coating at room temperature and high temperature were both one-fourth of the substrate. Mass gain of the alloyed coating oxidized at 800∘C for 1000h in static air was 5.16×10-3mg/mm2, which was 1/35th of the substrate. No obvious spallation was observed for the alloyed coating after oxidation. The alloyed coating exhibited excellent mechanical properties and long-term high temperature oxidation resistance, which improved surface properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy significantly.

  3. Effects of sealing treatment on corrosion resistance and degradation behavior of micro-arc oxidized magnesium alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. L.; Han, X.; Xue, F.; Bai, J.; Chu, P. K.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of three different sealing treatments on micro-arc oxidized (MAO) medical magnesium alloy wires using boiling water, zirconia sol-gel, and organic gelatin-hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on the surface morphology, corrosion resistance, and degradation behavior in simulated body fluid (SBF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) are investigated. The treatments involving boiling water or gelatin-HA coating can effectively seal the discharge channels making the surface pores less and smaller. The treatments also improve the corrosion resistance of the MAO magnesium alloy wires, especially the samples with the gelatin-HA coatings which also exhibit reduced degradation in both simulated physiological environments.

  4. Oxidation effects on the fatigue crack growth behavior of alloy 718 at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Molins, R.; Hochstetter, G.; Chassaigne, J.C.; Andrieu, E.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate oxidation assisted crack growth phenomena encountered in nickel-based alloys at high temperatures. Fatigue crack growth tests conducted at 650 C and under a range of oxygen partial pressures revealed the existence of a transition pressure. This pressure is in no way correlated to the loading conditions, but rather it varies with the chromium content in the alloy, and is furthermore directly linked to the oxidation mechanisms which were identified by using analytical TEM. By means of specific mechanical tests, superimposing a square wave oxygen pressure cycle to a fatigue or creep-fatigue mechanical cycle, various fundamental aspects of the local interaction between oxidation and deformation at the crack tip were investigated. Embrittlement is due partly to the nickel oxide nucleation and partly to the stress relaxation ability of the material. Chemical and microstructural modifications are recommended in order to improve the cracking resistance.

  5. Study of Coating Growth Behavior During the Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of Magnesium Alloy ZK60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhaozhong; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Yushen; Qu, Yunfei; Wu, Xiaohong

    2015-04-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation technique was used to coat ZK60 magnesium alloy in a silicate-based electrolyte. Effects of oxidation time on the morphology, phase structure, and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The main components of the inner and the outer coating layers were MgO and Mg2SiO4, respectively. It was also found that the oxidation time has a significant impact on the corrosion resistance properties of the coatings. The coating obtained within the oxidation time of 360 s exhibited a corrosion current of 7.6 × 10-8 A/cm2 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, which decreased significantly when comparing with the pristine magnesium alloy.

  6. Oxidation and corrosion behavior of modified-composition, low-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of substituting less strategic elements than Cr on the oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of at least 33%. Two alloys containing 12% Cr and 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified as most promising for more detailed evaluation.

  7. Nonequilibrium synthesis of NbAl3 and Nb-Al-V alloys by laser cladding. II - Oxidation behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haasch, R. T.; Tewari, S. K.; Sircar, S.; Loxton, C. M.; Mazumder, J.

    1992-01-01

    Isothermal oxidation behaviors of NbAl3 alloy synthesized by laser cladding were investigated at temperatures between 800 and 1400 C, and the effect of vanadium microalloying on the oxidation of the laser-clad alloy was examined. The oxidation kinetics of the two alloys were monitored using thermal gravimetric weight gain data, and the bulk and surface chemistries were analyzed using XRD and XPS, respectively. It was found that NbAl3 did not form an exclusive layer of protective Al2O3. The oxidation products at 800 C were found to be a mixture of Nb2O5 and Al2O3. At 1200 C, a mixture of NbAlO4, Nb2O5, and Al2O3 formed; and at 1400 C, a mixture of NbAlO4, Al2O3, NbO2, NbO(2.432), and Nb2O5 formed. The addition of V led to a dramatic increase of the oxidation rate, which may be related to the formation of (Nb, V)2O5 and VO2, which grows in preference to protective Al2O3.

  8. Corrosion behavior of iron and nickel base alloys under solid oxide fuel cell exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.

    2006-03-01

    Topography and phase composition of the scales formed on commercial ferritic stainless steels and experimental low CTE nickel-based alloys were studied in atmospheres simulating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) environments. The materials were studied under dual environment conditions with air on one side of the sample and carbon monoxide on the other side at 750°C. Surface characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used in this study.

  9. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  10. Oxidation behavior of V-Cr-Ti alloys in low-partial-pressure oxygen environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Uz, M.

    1998-09-01

    A test program is in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the effect of pO{sub 2} in the exposure environment on oxygen uptake, scaling kinetics, and scale microstructure in V-Cr-Ti alloys. The data indicate that the oxidation process follows parabolic kinetics in all of the environments used in the present study. From the weight change data, parabolic rate constants were evaluated as a function of temperature and exposure environment. The temperature dependence of the parabolic rate constants was described by an Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy for the oxidation process was fairly constant in the oxygen pressure range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} torr for both the alloys. The activation energy for oxidation in air was significantly lower than in low-pO{sub 2} environments, and for oxidation in pure O{sub 2} at 760 torr was much lower than in low-pO{sub 2} environments. X-ray diffraction analysis of the specimens showed that VO{sub 2} was the dominant phase in low-pO{sub 2} environments, while V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was dominant in air and in pure oxygen at 76f0 torr.

  11. Initial Oxidation Behavior in Air of TiAl-2Nb and TiAl-8Nb Alloys Produced by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terner, M.; Biamino, S.; Baudana, G.; Penna, A.; Fino, P.; Pavese, M.; Ugues, D.; Badini, C.

    2015-10-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys are good candidates for structural applications thanks to their low density and good balance of properties up to relatively high temperatures. However, their application is still limited by significant oxidation. Four γ-TiAl alloys with different content of aluminum and niobium were produced by electron beam melting: Ti-45Al-2Cr-2Nb, Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb, Ti-45Al-2Cr-8Nb, and Ti-46Al-2Cr-8Nb. The behavior of these alloys in response to oxidation in air during constant heating up to 1000 °C and isothermal oxidation for 10 h at 850 and 950 °C were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The mass gain due to oxidation of the low Nb-containing alloys was always at least twice that of the high Nb-containing alloys. Both low and high Nb-containing alloys exhibited on their surface oxidation products of the same nature: oxides TiO2 and Al2O3, and nitrides TiN and Ti2AlN. Niobium addition up to 8 at.% did not suppress the growth of rutile and promote the formation of a protective alumina layer. However, it efficiently reduced the formation of rutile, mainly responsible for the mass gain due to oxidation of γ-TiAl alloys and with tendency to spallation.

  12. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  13. Wear behavior of the plasma and thermal oxidized Ti-15Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacisalioglu, I.; Yildiz, F.; Alsaran, A.; Purcek, G.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium and its alloys widely used in load bearing applications. Titanium alloys are capable of providing lower elastic modulus and better corrosion resistance with alloying processes. In spite of the modified mechanical properties, the surface degradation is still the main critical defect. Ti-15Mo alloy is one of the alpa+beta titanium alloys with acceptable mechanical and chemical superiority. Recent researches in literature show that the wear performance of base Ti-15Mo is relatively low as compared to Ti-6Al-4V, using in high performance applications. Plasma oxidized surfaces increase the tribological and chemical performance of titanium alloys. In this study the Ti-15Mo alloy and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were compared in terms of wear performance. To obtain alloys with similar microstructure they were solution treated at 800°C 1H and then air-cooled. The plasma and thermal oxidations were applied at 650°C for 1 hour. Wear performance of oxidized surfaces investigated in dry conditions. Oxidized surface characterized with XRD, SEM, 3D profilometer and hardness measurements. Wear volume calculated with 3D profilometer. Results show that oxidizing increased the surface roughness and improved the wear performance of Ti15Mo alloy. The plasma and thermal oxidized Ti-15Mo showed a remarkable increase in wear resistance.

  14. Comparison of the Oxidation Rates of Some New Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper alloys were studied for oxidation resistance and mechanisms between 550 and 700 C, in reduced-oxygen environments expected in rocket engines, and their oxidation behaviors compared to that of pure copper. They included two dispersion-strengthened alloys (precipitation-strengthened and oxide-dispersion strengthened, respectively) and one solution-strengthened alloy. In all cases the main reaction was oxidation of Cu into Cu2O and CuO. The dispersion-strengthened alloys were superior to both Cu and the solution-strengthened alloy in oxidation resistance. However, factors retarding oxidation rates seemed to be different for the two dispersion-strengthened alloys.

  15. Corrosion behavior of Ni-Base alloys in a hot lithium molten salt under an oxidizing atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng; Cho, Il-Je; You, Gil-Sung; Yoon, Ji-Sup; Park, Seong-Won

    2007-08-01

    The electrolytic reduction of a spent oxide fuel involves the liberation of the oxygen in molten LiCl electrolyte, which is a chemically aggressive environment that is excessively corrosive for typical structural materials. Accordingly, it is essential to choose the optimum material for the processing equipment that handles the molten salt. In this study, the corrosion behaviors of Haynes 263, Haynes 75, Inconel 718 and Inconel X-750 in a molten LiCl-Li2O salt under an oxidizing atmosphere were investigated at 650°C for 72 to 216 hrs. The Haynes 263 alloy showed the best corrosion resistance among the examined alloys. The corrosion products of Haynes 263 were Li(Ni,Co)O2 and LiTiO2; those of Haynes 75 were Cr2O3, NiFe2O4, LiNiO2 and Li2FiFe2O4; while Cr2O3, NiFe2O4 and CrNbO4 were identified as the corrosion products of Inconel 718. Inconel X-750 produced Cr2O3, NiFe2O4 and (Cr, Nb, Ti)O2 as its corrosion products. Haynes 263 showed a localized corrosion behavior while Haynes 75, Inconel 718 and Inconel X-750 showed a uniform corrosion behavior.

  16. 10,000-Hour Cyclic Oxidation Behavior at 982 C (1800 F) of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Sixty-eight high temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-base alloys were tested for 10-one thousand hour cycles in static air at 982 C (1800 F). The oxidation behavior of the test samples was evaluated by specific weight change/time data, x-ray diffraction of the post-test samples, and their final appearance. The gravimetric and appearance data were combined into a single modified oxidation parameter, KB4 to rank the cyclic oxidation resistance from excellent to catastrophic. The alloys showing the 'best' resistance with no significant oxidation attack were the alumina/aluminate spinel forming Ni-base turbine alloys: U-700, NASA-VIA and B-1900; the Fe-base ferritic alloys with Al: TRW-Valve, HOS-875, NASA-18T, Thermenol and 18SR; and the Ni-base superalloy IN-702.

  17. Oxidation Behavior of a Refractory NbCrMo0.5Ta0.5TiZr Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    better combination of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance than commercial Nb alloys and earlier reported developmental Nb–Si–Al–Ti and Nb...The alloy has a better combination of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance than com- mercial Nb alloys and earlier reported developmental Nb...have the best combina- tion of required properties, such as creep resistance , tem- perature capability, environmental resistance , and damage tolerance

  18. The 100,000-hour cyclic oxidation behavior at 815C (1500 F) of 33 high-temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Commercial high-temperature Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys were oxidized in air at 815 deg C for ten 1000-hour cycles. Specific weight change versus time curves were derived and the 10,000-hour surface oxides were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The alloys were ranked by a combination of appearance and metal loss estimates derived from gravimetric data.

  19. The oxidation behavior of tungsten and germanium alloyed molybdenum disilicide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Wang, Ge; Rapp, R.A.; Courtright, E.L.; Kircher, T.

    1991-11-01

    A two-step coating process was used to produce a (Mo,W)(Si,Ge){sub 2} coating on niobium. After exposure to high temperatures, a lower silicide layer forms underneath and is effective in arresting cracks. The oxidation weight-gain kinetics are parabolic following an initial transient period. Test coupons coated with (Mo,W)(Si,Ge){sub 2} passed 200 one-hour cycles at 1370{degree}C and 60 one-hour cycles at 1540{degree}C. These results, along with evidence of a thick protective glass layer, suggest that the germanium additions help cyclic oxidation resistance. The beneficial effects of the tungsten include the formation of microvoids, which provides a lower effective elastic modulus, and mechanical strengthening. No accelerated low temperature or ``pest`` oxidation was observed in the temperature range between 500--700{degree}C. Thus, a (Mo,W)(Si,Ge) multicomponent silicide coating offers significant promise for the protection of Nb-base alloys exposed to cyclic oxidizing environments over a broad range of temperatures.

  20. The oxidation behavior of tungsten and germanium alloyed molybdenum disilicide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Wang, Ge; Rapp, R.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Courtright, E.L. ); Kircher, T. . Aerospace Materials Div.)

    1991-11-01

    A two-step coating process was used to produce a (Mo,W)(Si,Ge){sub 2} coating on niobium. After exposure to high temperatures, a lower silicide layer forms underneath and is effective in arresting cracks. The oxidation weight-gain kinetics are parabolic following an initial transient period. Test coupons coated with (Mo,W)(Si,Ge){sub 2} passed 200 one-hour cycles at 1370{degree}C and 60 one-hour cycles at 1540{degree}C. These results, along with evidence of a thick protective glass layer, suggest that the germanium additions help cyclic oxidation resistance. The beneficial effects of the tungsten include the formation of microvoids, which provides a lower effective elastic modulus, and mechanical strengthening. No accelerated low temperature or pest'' oxidation was observed in the temperature range between 500--700{degree}C. Thus, a (Mo,W)(Si,Ge) multicomponent silicide coating offers significant promise for the protection of Nb-base alloys exposed to cyclic oxidizing environments over a broad range of temperatures.

  1. 10 000-hr Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni- Base Alloys Evaluated at 982 deg. C (1800 deg. F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 815 to 982 C (1500 to 1800 F) frequently require alloys that can operate for long times at these temperatures. A critical requirement is that these alloys have adequate oxidation resistance. The alloys used in these power systems require thousands of hours of operating life with intermittent shutdown to room temperature. Intermittent power plant shutdowns, however, offer the possibility that the protective scale will tend to spall (i.e., crack and flake off) upon cooling, increasing the rate of oxidative attack in subsequent heating cycles. Thus, it is critical that candidate alloys be evaluated for cyclic oxidation behavior. It was determined that exposing test alloys to ten 1000-hr cycles in static air at 982 10 000-hr Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-Base Alloys Evaluated at 982 C (1800 F) could give a reasonable simulation of long-time power plant operation. Iron- (Fe-), nickel- (Ni-), and cobalt- (Co-) based high-temperature alloys with sufficient chromium (Cr) and/or aluminum (Al) content can exhibit excellent oxidation resistance. The protective oxides formed by these classes of alloys are typically Cr2O3 and/or Al2O3, and are usually influenced by their Cr, or Cr and Al, content. Sixty-eight Co-, Fe-, and Ni-base high-temperature alloys, typical of those used at this temperature or higher, were used in this study. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, the alloys were tested and compared on the basis of their weight change as a function of time, x-ray diffraction of the protective scale composition, and the physical appearance of the exposed samples. Although final appearance and x-ray diffraction of the final scale products were two factors used to evaluate the oxidation resistance of each alloy, the main criterion was the oxidation kinetics inferred from the specific weight change versus time data. These data indicated a range of oxidation behavior including parabolic

  2. Oxidation and interdiffusion behavior of a germanium-modified silicide coating on an Nb-Si-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-long; Wang, Wan; Zhou, Chun-gen

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the interdiffusion behavior of Ge-modified silicide coatings on an Nb-Si-based alloy substrate, the coating was oxidized at 1250°C for 5, 10, 20, 50, or 100 h. The interfacial diffusion between the (Nb,X)(Si,Ge)2 (X = Ti, Cr, Hf) coating and the Nb-Si based alloy was also examined. The transitional layer is composed of (Ti,Nb)5(Si,Ge)4 and a small amount of (Nb,X)5(Si,Ge)3. With increasing oxidation time, the thickness of the transitional layer increases because of the diffusion of Si from the outer layer to the substrate, which obeys a parabolic rate law. The parabolic growth rate constant of the transitional layer under oxidation conditions is 2.018 μm·h-1/2. Moreover, the interdiffusion coefficients of Si in the transitional layer were determined from the interdiffusion fluxes calculated directly from experimental concentration profiles.

  3. Effects of dissolved hydrogen on general corrosion behavior and oxide films of alloy 690TT in PWR primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Lee, Eun-Hee; Hur, Do Haeng

    2017-03-01

    The effect of dissolved hydrogen (DH) on the general corrosion behavior and oxide films of Alloy 690TT is investigated in simulated primary water at 330 °C. With increasing DH, the structure of oxide film significantly changed and the corrosion rate decreased. At DH = 5 cm3/kg H2O, the oxide layer was thick, and consisted of outer Ni oxide layer and inner Cr2O3 layer. Under the conditions of DH = 35 and 100 cm3/kg H2O, the oxide films grew thinner and composed of outer polyhedral spinel oxide particles such as NiCr2O4 or NiCrFeO4 and an intermediate metallic Ni-rich layer, with inner Cr2O3 layer. The general corrosion rate significantly decreased by about 72% as DH concentration increased from 5 to 35 cm3/kg H2O. In the range of 35-65 cm3/kg H2O, the corrosion rate slightly decreased with increasing DH concentration. However, no further changes were observed in the range of 65-100 cm3/kg H2O.

  4. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  5. The effect of microstructure and temperature on the oxidation behavior of two-phase Cr-Cr{sub 2}X (X = Nb, Ta) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1998-11-01

    The oxidation behavior of Cr(X) solid solution (Cr{sub ss}) and Cr{sub 2}X Laves phases (X = Nb, Ta) was studied individually and in combination at 950--1,100 C in air. The Cr{sub ss} phase was significantly more oxidation resistant than the Cr{sub 2}X Laves phase. At 950 C, two-phase alloys of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta exhibited in-situ internal oxidation, in which remnants of the Cr{sub 2}X Laves phase were incorporated into a growing chromia scale. At 1,100 C, the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys continued to exhibit in-situ internal oxidation, which resulted in extensive O/N penetration into the alloy ahead of the alloy-scale interface and catastrophic failure during cyclic oxidation. IN contrast, the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta alloys exhibited a transition to selective Cr oxidation and the formation of a continuous chromia scale. The oxidation mechanism is interpreted in terms of multiphase oxidation theory.

  6. Microstructure of a complex Nb-Si-based alloy and its behavior during high-temperature oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, L. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Chumarev, V. M.; Gulyaeva, R. I.; Pankratov, A. A.; Sel'menskikh, N. I.; Zhidovinova, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    A in-situ composite Nb-Si-Ti-Hf-Cr-Mo-Al composite material alloyed with yttrium and zirconium is studied. The evolution of the structure-phase state of the alloy during oxidation under dynamic and isothermal conditions is considered on samples prepared by vacuum remelting and directional solidification. The phase composition and the microstructure of the alloy are examined by the methods of physico-chemical analysis, and the distribution of alloying elements in initial samples and the products of oxidation is estimated. Thermogravimetric experiments are performed on powders and compacted samples during continuous (in the range 25-1400°C) and isothermal (at 900 and 1100°C) heating in air. The directional solidification of an Nb-Si-Ti-Al-Hf-Cr-Mo-Zr-Y is found to cause the formation of an ultradispersed eutectic consisting of α-Nb ss and γ-Nb5Si3 ss cells. The as-cast sample prepared by vacuum remelting has a dendritic structure and contains Nb3Si apart from these phases. Oxidation leads to the formation of a double oxide layer and an inner oxidation zone, which retain the two-phase microstructure and the ratio of alloying elements that are characteristic of the initial alloy. Diffusion redistribution is only detected for molybdenum. The cyclicity of heating at the initial stage of oxidation weakly influences the oxidation resistance of the alloy.

  7. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  8. The oxidation behavior of several Ti-Al alloys at 900 C in air

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz-Niederau, M.

    1999-10-01

    Ti-23Al, Ti-50Al and Ti-50Al-2Nb (at.%) were oxidized in air at 900 C for times up to 1130 hr. The resulting oxide scale structures were analyzed in great detail by metallographic and microprobe investigations and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structures in the complex oxide scales were correlated with the course of the thermogravimetric curves. It appears that in order to achieve long-term protective behavior of the scale, it is necessary to stimulate the formation of a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier at the scale-metal interface and not at a position in the outer part of the scale. The Nb effect seems to be mostly due to this stimulation of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the interface.

  9. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  10. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  11. Influence of a Cerium Surface Treatment on the Oxidation Behavior of Cr2O3-Forming Alloys (title on slides varies: Oxidation Behavior of Cerium Surface Treated Chromia Forming Alloys)

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, G.R.; Adler, T.A.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This temperature will require the construction of boiler and turbine components from austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys. Many of the alloys being considered for use are primarily Cr2O3 forming alloys [1-4]. It is well known that the addition of a small amount of reactive elements, such as the rare earths elements Ce, La, and Y, can significantly improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of both iron- and nickel- base alloys. A list of the benefits of the reactive element effect include: (i) slowing scale growth, (ii) enhancing scale adhesion; and (iii) stabilizing Cr2O3 formation at lower Cr levels. The incorporation of the reactive element can be made in the melt or through a surface infusion or surface coating. Surface modifications allow for the concentration of the reactive element at the surface where it can provide the most benefit. This paper will detail a Ce surface treatment developed at NETL that improves the high temperature oxidation resistance of Cr2O3 forming alloys. The treatment consists of painting, dip coating, or spraying the alloy surface with a slurry containing CeO2 and a halide activator followed by a thermal treatment in a mild (x10-3 Torr) vacuum. During treatment the CeO2 reacts with the alloy to for a thin CrCeO3-type scale on the alloy surface. Upon subsequent oxidation, scale growth occurs at a reduced rate on alloys in the surface treated condition compared to those in the untreated condition.

  12. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  13. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  14. Understanding corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys from subcutaneous mouse model: effect of Zn element concentration and plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Xu, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongyun; Collins, Boyce; Yun, Yeoheung; Sankar, Jagannathan

    2015-03-01

    Mg-Zn-Ca alloys are considered as suitable biodegradable metallic implants because of their biocompatibility and proper physical properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of Zn concentration of Mg-xZn-0.3Ca (x=1, 3 and 5wt.%) alloys and surface modification by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on corrosion behavior in in vivo environment in terms of microstructure, corrosion rate, types of corrosion, and corrosion product formation. Microstructure analysis of alloys and morphological characterization of corrosion products were conducted using x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elemental composition and crystal structure of corrosion products were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that 1) as-cast Mg-xZn-0.3Ca alloys are composed of Mg matrix and a secondary phase of Ca2Mg6Zn3 formed along grain boundaries, 2) the corrosion rate of Mg-xZn-0.3Ca alloys increases with increasing concentration of Zn in the alloy, 3) corrosion rates of alloys treated by PEO sample are decreased in in vivo environment, and 4) the corrosion products of these alloys after in vivo tests are identified as brucite (Mg(OH)2), hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), and magnesite (MgCO3·3H2O).

  15. Influence of niobium additions on high-temperature-oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 3}Al alloys and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gauer, L.; Alperine, S.; Vassel, A.; Steinmetz, P.

    1994-08-01

    In this study, the oxidation properties of Ti{sub 3}Al + Nb bulk alloys, as well as IMI 829 alloy, coated with a Ti{sub 3}Al + Nb layer, have been considered. Model alloys have been prepared, with 5-25 at.% niobium contents; 50-{mu}m-thick Ti{sub 3}Al + 10 at.% Nb coatings have also been deposited on IMI 829 by triode sputtering. Bulk alloys and coated substrates have been exposed to cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air between 700 and 800{degrees}C. Niobium additions generally caused the oxidation rate of Ti{sub 3}Al to decrease significantly. In all cases rutile is the main oxide formed. It is believed that the ability of niobium to dissolve in the rutile lattice, and therefore to lower the oxygen diffusion rate through the oxide layer, is a contribution to the observed oxidation resistance enhancement. The formation of niobium oxide has also been envisaged for this matter.

  16. Comparison of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of twenty-five commercial sheet alloys at 1150 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-five commercial nickel-, iron-, and cobalt-base sheet alloys incorporating chromium or chromium and aluminum additions for oxidation resistance were tested at 1150 C in air for 100 hr in both isothermal and 1-hr cyclic furnace exposures. The alloys were evaluated by sample specific weight change, by type of scale formed, by amount and type of spall, and by sample thickness change and microstructure.-

  17. Oxidation Behavior and Electrical Properties of NiO- and Cr2O3- Forming Alloys for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Lu, Z G; Zhu, Jiahong; Milliken, C; kreidler, E; Miller, Leslie S; Armstrong, Timothy R.; Walker, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine if NiO-forming alloys are a viable alternative to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloys for solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) metallic interconnects. The oxide-scale growth kinetics and electrical properties of a series of Li- and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-alloyed, NiO-forming Ni-base alloys and La-, Mn-, and Ti-alloyed Fe-18Cr-9W and Fe-25Cr base ferritic Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloys were evaluated. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Li reduced the NiO scale growth rate and increased its electrical conductivity. The area-specific-resistance (ASR) values were comparable to those of the best (lowest ASR) ferritic alloys examined. Oxidation of the ferritic alloys at 800 C in air and air+10% H{sub 2}O (water vapor) indicated that Mn additions resulted in faster oxidation kinetics/thicker oxide scales, but also lower oxide scale ASRs. Relative in-cell performance in model SOFC stacks operated at 850 C indicated a 60-80% reduction in ASR by Ni+Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni+Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li, and Fe-25Cr+La,Mn,Ti interconnects over those made from a baseline, commercial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloy. Collectively, these results indicate that NiO-forming alloys show potential for use as metallic interconnects.

  18. Oxidation Behavior of a Refractory NbCrMo0.5Ta0.5TiZr Alloy (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    occurred during oxidation. The alloy has a better combination of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance than commercial Nb alloys and earlier...properties and oxidation resistance than commercial Nb alloys and earlier reported developmental Nb-Si-Al-Ti and Nb-Si-Mo alloys. Keywords: Refractory...made from Ni-based superalloys, as these alloys have the best combination of required properties, such as creep resistance , temperature capability

  19. Effect of Nano-crystalline Ceramic Coats Produced by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on Corrosion Behavior of AA5083 Aluminum Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Thayananth, T.; Muthupandi, V.; Rao, S. R. Koteswara

    2010-10-04

    High specific strength offered by aluminum and magnesium alloys makes them desirable in modern transportation industries. Often the restrictions imposed on the usage of these alloys are due to their poor tribological and corrosion properties. However, their corrosion properties can be further enhanced by synthesizing ceramic coating on the substrate through Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process. In this study, nano-crystalline alumina coatings were formed on the surface of AA5083 aluminum alloy test coupons using PEO process in aqueous alkali-silicate electrolyte with and without addition of sodium aluminate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the crystallite size varied between 38 and 46 nm and {alpha}- and {gamma}- alumina were the dominant phases present in the coatings. Corrosion studies by potentiodynamic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl revealed that the electrolyte composition has an influence on the corrosion resistance of nano-crystalline oxide layer formed.

  20. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  1. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  2. Oxidation Behavior of Molten Cu-Be Binary and Cu-Be- X ( X = Ca or Zr) Ternary Alloys at 1423 K (1150 °C) Under Controlled Oxygen Partial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanahashi, Mitsuru; Miura, Jutaro; Iwadachi, Takaharu; Nojiri, Keigo; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Yamauchi, Chikabumi

    2017-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of molten Cu-Be binary and Cu-Be- X (Ca or Zr) ternary alloys was investigated by exposing these molten alloy systems to various Ar-O2 atmospheres to control the oxygen partial pressure from 10 to 105 Pa at 1423 K (1150 °C). The experimental results clarified that the oxygen partial pressure in gas phase affects the morphology of the oxide formed on the surface of the alloy and the oxidation rate of beryllium. At lower oxygen partial pressure, a molten Cu-Be alloy is covered with a homogeneous and compact internal layer of BeO, which leads to a minimization of the beryllium oxidation rate. By adding a small amount of calcium or zirconium into the molten Cu-0.5 mass pct Be alloy, a protective BeO layer is formed even at higher oxygen partial pressure, resulting in achievement of a significant reduction in the beryllium oxidation rate.

  3. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  4. The oxidation behavior of a model molybdenum/tungsten-containing alloy in air alone and in air with trace levels of NaCl(g)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeggil, J. G.; Bornstein, N. S.

    1983-01-01

    Thermogravimetric, metallographic, and X-ray studies of a model alloy, Ni-(17 a/o)Al-(10 a/o)Mo+W, oxidized in dry air at 600-1200 C and in air with 10 ppm NaCl gas at 900 C, are reported. The alloy was melted under Ar and pretreated in flowing H2 for 24 h at 1300 C. Polished 1.3 x 1.3 x 0.2-cm specimens were washed and degreased prior to oxidation in a quartz tube within a furnace for up to 120 hr. The oxidation activation energy of the alloy is determined to be about 30 kcal/mole. The specimens oxidized at 900 C and hotter exhibited oxidized and nitrided phases covered by complex NiMoO4, NiWO4, and NiAl2O4 scales and a porous, nonprotective outer layer of NiO. The oxidation behavior is found to be determined by the formation and growth of the scale, especially the (Mo,W)O2 component. Al2O3 scale layers were not formed, and further runs with pure O2 or Ar-(20 percent)O2 ruled out an explanation of this phenomenon based on aluminum nitride formation. The oxidation was accelerated by the addition of NaCl gas, a finding attributed to the reaction of NaCl with external locally protective Al2O3 scales and with the internal(Mo, W)O2 layers.

  5. The oxidation performance of modern high-temperature alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, V. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2009-07-01

    The high-temperature oxidation resistance of an alloy is a key design criterion for components in a variety of industrial applications, such as advanced gas turbines, industrial heating, automotive, waste incineration, power generation and energy conversion, chemical and petrochemical processing, and metals and minerals processing. The importance of correctly assessing the long-term oxidation behavior of high-temperature alloys is illustrated. As applications move to higher temperatures, new alloys are needed. In this paper, the oxidation performance of three newly developed alloys, an alumina-forming Ni-Fe-Cr-Al alloy, a γ'-strengthened Ni-Cr-Co-Mo-(Al+Ti) alloy, and a nitride-strengthened Co-Cr-Fe-Ni-(Ti+Nb) alloy is presented.

  6. The oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al-2ThO2 alloys at 1093 and 1204 C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wilcox, B. A.; Stringer, J.

    1972-01-01

    A pack diffusion process has been developed which permits the introduction of nearly 6 wt % Al into solid solution in the near surface region of TDNiCr (Ni-20 wt % Cr-2 vol % ThO2) and Ni-20Cr. Alumina scales, adherent under cyclic heating and cooling conditions, were produced on TDNiCr-5.86Al upon exposure to an environment of 1330 N/sq m (10 torr) or 101,000 N/sq m (760 torr) air at temperatures of 1093 and 1204 C. While the same oxidation kinetics were observed in isothermal tests for Ni-14.6Cr-5.86Al as were obtained for the TDNiCr-5.86Al, the dispersion-strengthened alloy exhibited superior oxide scale adhesion during cyclic testing. At 1204 C, continuous weight gains were observed under all test conditions for TDNiCr-5.86Al, in contrast to the weight loss with time which occurred several hours after exposure of TDNiCr to an oxidizing environment. TDNiCr with an initial aluminum surface concentration of 4.95 wt % has nearly comparable oxidation resistance to the TDNiCr-5.86Al alloy.

  7. Effect of oxide layer modification of CoCr stent alloys on blood activation and endothelial behavior.

    PubMed

    Milleret, Vincent; Ziogas, Algirdas; Buzzi, Stefano; Heuberger, Roman; Zucker, Arik; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-04-01

    CoCr alloys, in particular MP35N and L605, are extensively used in biomedical implants, for example for coronary stents. In practice, these alloys present a moderately hydrophobic surface which leads to significant platelet adhesion and consequently to risk of early thrombosis or in-stent restenosis. Surface modification of biomedical implants is known to alter their biological performances. In this study we focused on the alteration of in vitro biological responses of human cells contacting CoCr surfaces with engineered oxide layers. XPS analysis was performed to determine the composition of the oxide layer of differently treated CoCr while the bulk properties were not modified. An extensive characterization of the surfaces was performed looking at surface roughness, wettability and charge. After static exposure to blood, strongly reduced platelet and increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion were observed on treated versus untreated surfaces. Comparisons of treated and untreated samples provide evidence for wettability being an important player for platelet adhesion, although multiple factors including surface oxide chemistry and charge might control polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion. The differently treated surfaces were shown to be equally suitable for endothelial cell proliferation. We herein present a novel approach to steer biological properties of CoCr alloys. By adjusting their oxide layer composition, substrates were generated which are suitable for endothelial cell growth and at the same time show an altered (reduced) blood contact activation. Such treatments are expected to lead to stents of highly reproducible quality with minimal thrombogenicity and in-stent restenosis, while maintaining rapid re-endothelialization after coronary angioplasty.

  8. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  9. Understanding materials behavior from atomistic simulations: Case study of al-containing high entropy alloys and thermally grown aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yinkai Lei

    Atomistic simulation refers to a set of simulation methods that model the materials on the atomistic scale. These simulation methods are faster and cheaper alternative approaches to investigate thermodynamics and kinetics of materials compared to experiments. In this dissertation, atomistic simulation methods have been used to study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of two material systems, i.e. the entropy of Al-containing high entropy alloys (HEAs) and the vacancy migration energy of thermally grown aluminum oxide. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  10. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al Alloys and Coatings Modified with Pt and Reactive Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Nan

    2007-12-01

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000 C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455 C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain β-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used {beta}-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt + Hf-modified γ-Ni + γ-Ni3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase γ-Ni and γ'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both γ-Ni and γ'Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower

  11. Microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and hot deformation behavior of an oxide-dispersion strengthened UFG Al6063 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Asgharzadeh, H.; Kim, H.S.; Simchi, A.

    2013-01-15

    An ultrafine-grained Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.8 vol.%, 25 nm) nanocomposite was prepared via powder metallurgy route through reactive mechanical alloying and hot powder extrusion. Scanning electron microcopy, transmission electron microscopy, and back scattered electron diffraction analysis showed that the grain structure of the nanocomposite is trimodal and composed of nano-size grains (< 0.1 {mu}m), ultrafine grains (0.1-1 {mu}m), and micron-size grains (> 1 {mu}m) with random orientations. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite based on the strengthening-mechanism models revealed that the yield strength of the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite is mainly controlled by the high-angle grain boundaries rather than nanometric alumina particles. Hot deformation behavior of the material at different temperatures and strain rates was studied by compression test and compared to coarse-grained Al6063 alloy. The activation energy of the hot deformation process for the nanocomposite was determined to be 291 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is about 64% higher than that of the coarse-grained alloy. Detailed microstructural analysis revealed that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the observed deformation softening in the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening mechanisms of Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hot deformation activation energy was determined using consecutive models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The restoration mechanisms and microstructural changes are presented.

  12. THE BEHAVIOR OF SUPERALLOY OXIDE FILMS IN MOLTEN SALTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NICKEL ALLOYS , CORROSION), (*FILMS, OXIDES), CORROSION RESISTANT ALLOYS , SALTS, CORROSIVE LIQUIDS, HIGH TEMPERATURE, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, SODIUM...COMPOUNDS, SULFATES, CHLORIDES, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS , MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , ALUMINUM ALLOYS , TITANIUM ALLOYS , IRON ALLOYS , NICKEL, OXIDATION

  13. Corrosion behavior and cytocompatibility of fluoride-incorporated plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Peng; Peng, Feng; Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xuanyong

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride-incorporated plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating was fabricated on biodegradable AZ31 alloy. The surface morphologies and phases were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effect of fluoride incorporation in coatings on corrosion behaviour was investigated in simulated body fluid and in vitro cytocompatibility of the coatings was also studied by evaluating cytotoxicity, adhesion, proliferation and live–dead stain of osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1). Furthermore, the corrosion morphologies in vivo were examined. The results showed that the fluoride could be incorporated into the coating to form MgF2 phase. In vitro and in vivo degradation tests revealed that the corrosion resistance of the coating could be improved by the incorporation of fluoride, which may attribute to the chemical stability of MgF2 phase. Moreover, good cytocompatibility of fluoride-incorporated coating was confirmed with no obvious cytotoxicity, enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation. However, when the fluoride content was high, a slight inhibition of cell growth was observed. The results indicate that although fluoride incorporation can enhance the corrosion resistance of the coatings, thus resulting a more suitable environment for cells, the high content of fluoride in the coating also kill cells ascribed to the high released of fluorine. If the content of fluoride is well controlled, the PEO coating with MgF2 phase is a promising surface modification of Mg alloys. PMID:28149524

  14. Corrosion behavior and cytocompatibility of fluoride-incorporated plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Peng, Feng; Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xuanyong

    2017-02-01

    Fluoride-incorporated plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating was fabricated on biodegradable AZ31 alloy. The surface morphologies and phases were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effect of fluoride incorporation in coatings on corrosion behaviour was investigated in simulated body fluid and in vitro cytocompatibility of the coatings was also studied by evaluating cytotoxicity, adhesion, proliferation and live-dead stain of osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1). Furthermore, the corrosion morphologies in vivo were examined. The results showed that the fluoride could be incorporated into the coating to form MgF2 phase. In vitro and in vivo degradation tests revealed that the corrosion resistance of the coating could be improved by the incorporation of fluoride, which may attribute to the chemical stability of MgF2 phase. Moreover, good cytocompatibility of fluoride-incorporated coating was confirmed with no obvious cytotoxicity, enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation. However, when the fluoride content was high, a slight inhibition of cell growth was observed. The results indicate that although fluoride incorporation can enhance the corrosion resistance of the coatings, thus resulting a more suitable environment for cells, the high content of fluoride in the coating also kill cells ascribed to the high released of fluorine. If the content of fluoride is well controlled, the PEO coating with MgF2 phase is a promising surface modification of Mg alloys.

  15. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  16. Dynamic oxidation behavior at 1000 and 1100 C of four nickel-base cast alloys, NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The superalloys NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X were tested cyclically and isothermally for resistance to oxidation in high velocity gas streams for 100 hours at specimen temperatures of 1000 C and 1100 C. Alloys VIA and B-1900, which were the most oxidation resistant, displayed slight and very similar weight changes and metal losses. Alloy 713C also sustained only slight metal losses, but it exhibited some tendency to spall. Alloy 738X was found to be the most susceptible to cyclic oxidation; this resulted in heavy spalling, which in turn caused high weight losses and high metal losses. Oxidation test results are related to the amounts of chromium aluminum, and the refractory metals in the alloys investigated.

  17. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation behavior of two nickel-aluminum alloys (Ni3AL and NiAl) with additions of chromium, silicon, and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Santoro, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The alloys Ni3Al and NiAl with and without 1 and 3 atomic percent chromium, silicon, and titanium replacing the aluminum were cyclically oxidized at 1200 C for times to 200 hours, and the results were compared with those obtained with the alloy B-1900 subjected to the same oxidation process. The evaluation was based on metal recession, specific weight change, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al was improved by Si, unaffected by Ti, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of NiAl was slightly improved by Ti, unaffected by Si, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al with 1 atomic percent Si was nearly equal to that of NiAl. Alloy B-1900 exhibited oxidation resistance comparable to that of Ni3Al + Cr compositions.

  18. Comparison in the Oxidation and Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum and Alumina-Reinforced Ni/Ni-Co Alloy Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Meenu; Balaraju, J. N.; Ravisankar, B.; Grips, V. K. William

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a comparison in the oxidation and corrosion behavior of Ni/Ni-Co aluminum and alumina-reinforced electrodeposited composites has been made. The developed coatings were characterized for the morphology, structure, microhardness, oxidation, and corrosion resistance. It was found that the incorporation of Al particles in NiCo matrix is higher (9 wt pct) compared to Ni matrix (1 wt pct). In the case of aluminum oxide particles, about 5 and 7 wt pct had been obtained in Ni and NiCo matrices respectively. The difference in the surface morphology was observed with respect to metallic (Al) and inert ceramic (Al2O3) particle incorporation. X-ray diffraction studies showed the presence of predominant Ni (200) reflection in the coatings. Also, peaks corresponding to Al and Al2O3 particles were present. The Ni/NiCo-Al coatings exhibited higher microhardness values at 1273 K (1000 °C) compared to alumina-reinforced coatings, indicating better thermal stability of the former coatings. The NiAl coating showed one and two orders of magnitude improved oxidation resistance compared to NiCoAl and Ni/NiCo-Al2O3 coatings, respectively. It was observed that the Ni-Al composite coating exhibited poor corrosion resistance in 3.5 pct NaCl solution compared to the other coatings studied.

  19. Oxidation characteristics of Ti-14Al-21Nb ingot alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Sankara N.; Clark, Ronald K.; Unnam, Jalaiah; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1990-01-01

    Static oxidation kinetics of Ti14Al21Nb (wt pct) ingot alloy were studied in air over the temperature interval of 649 to 1093 C in a thermogravimetric apparatus. The oxidation products were characterized by x ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Cross-sections of the oxidized samples were also examined using light and scanning electron microscopy. The oxidation rate was substantially lower than the conventional alloys of titanium, but the kinetics displayed a complex behavior involving two or more oxidation rates depending on the temperature and duration of exposure. The primary oxide formed was TiO2, but this oxide was doped with Nb. Small amounts of Al2O3 and TiN were also present in the scale. Diffusion of oxygen into the alloy was observed and the diffusivity seemed to be dependent on the microstructure of the metal. A model was presented to explain the oxidation behavior of the alloy in terms of the reduction in the oxygen diffusivity in the oxide caused by the modification of the defect structure of TiO2 by Nb ions.

  20. The oxidation of metals and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheil, Erich

    1952-01-01

    This paper reviews the various types of oxidation processes occurring with pure metals and gives explanations for the varying time-temperature-oxidation rate relations that exist for copper, tungsten, zinc, cadmium, and tantalum. The effect of shape and crystal structure on oxidation is discussed. Principles derived are applied to the oxidation of alloys.

  1. Wear Behavior of Nanostructured Hypoeutectic Fe-B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Licai; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Lingping; Liu, Weimin

    The wear behavior of nanostructured hypoeutectic Fe94.3B5.7 alloy was investigated in comparison with coarse grained counterpart. The friction coefficient of the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy changed slightly with grain size. While the wear rate decreased as the grain size decreased to nano scale. Both Fe2O3 and Fe2SiO4 oxides were found on the worn surfaces in the nanostructured Fe94.3B5.7 alloy, but only a few oxide films were observed for the coarse grained counterpart. These results suggested that the nanostructured eutectic was conducive to forming oxide films on the worn surface of the Fe94.3B5.7 alloy, and improved the wear resistance.

  2. Systematic understanding of corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31 magnesium alloy using a mouse model of subcutaneous implant.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Tan, Zongqing; Jurey, Chris; Collins, Boyce; Badve, Aditya; Dong, Zhongyun; Park, Chanhee; Kim, Cheol Sang; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the differences between corrosion rates, corrosion types, and corrosion products in different physiological environments for AZ31 magnesium alloy and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated AZ31 magnesium alloy. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and mice for 12 weeks, respectively. The corrosion rates of both AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy were calculated based on DC polarization curves, volume of hydrogen evolution, and the thickness of corrosion products formed on the surface. Micro X-ray computed tomography (Micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze morphological and chemical characterizations of corrosion products. The results show that there is more severe localized corrosion after in vitro test in HBSS; however, the thicknesses of corrosion products formed on the surface for AZ31 magnesium alloy and PEO treated AZ31 magnesium alloy in vivo were about 40% thicker than the thickness of corrosion products generated in vitro. The ratio of Ca and P (Ca/P) in the corrosion products also differed. The Ca deficient region and higher content of Al in corrosion product than AZ31 magnesium alloy were identified after in vivo test in contrast with the result of in vitro test.

  3. Rapidly Solidified Oxidation Resistant Niobium Base Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    107 Figure 4.25 Graph showing the weight change / area versus time for Nb-Ti alioys, commercial Nb alloys and Rene ’ 41 during the 800’C...properties with better oxidation resistance than Nb alloys ............................. J09 Figure 4.29 Cross sectional optical micrographs of Rene ’ 41 ...186 Figure 5.58 Optical cross sectional micrographs of etched Rene ’ 41 after 760*C cyclic oxidation and hardness testing. A

  4. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium.

  5. Transient oxidation of multiphase Ni-Cr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, G.; Meraner, M.; Farrell, P.

    1988-06-01

    Four commercially available Ni-Cr-based alloys used with porcelain enamels were studied. Major alloying elements were Al, Be, Si, B, Nb, and Mo. All alloys were multiphase. During heat treatments simulating enameling conditions, phase changes occurred in most alloys and were detected using hardness testing, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and microscopy. Oxidation of these alloys at 1000/degrees/C for 10 min produced an oxide layer consisting principally of chromium oxide, but the oxide morphology varied with each alloy depending on the alloy microstructure. Controlling alloy microstructure while keeping the overall composition unchanged may be a means of preventing wrinkled poorly adherent scales from forming.

  6. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  7. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  8. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co/sub 71/ /sub 4/Fe/sub 4/ /sub 6/Si/sub 9/ /sub 6/B/sub 14/ /sub 4/ were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400/sup 0/C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400/sup 0/C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation.

  9. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. Themore » most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.« less

  10. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Massey, Caleb P.

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. The most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.

  11. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  12. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  13. The effect of alloy composition on the localized corrosion behavior of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Fariaty

    increasing the Mo content. Chromium affects the metastable pits during the repassivation process where higher Cr content produces faster repassivation rates. The last part of the study addressed the role of alloying additions on the repassivation behavior of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. Alloys with similar Mo content but higher Cr or higher Ni contents exhibited higher repassivation potentials. Higher Mo-containing alloys were shown to be very corrosion resistant since they did not experience any localized corrosion after rigorous polarization tests given that enough Cr was present. The repassivation potential was determined by the surface overpotential and thermodynamic contribution. XPS analysis found evidence of Cr(III) oxide as the main passivating agent. Molybdenum species primarily Mo(VI) and Cr(III) hydroxide were detected on the crevice attack area and on layer of films that formed from transpassive dissolution of higher Cr or higher Mo-containing alloys.

  14. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of calcium phosphate-base composite layer on titanium and its alloys via plasma electrolytic oxidation: A review paper.

    PubMed

    Rafieerad, A R; Ashra, M R; Mahmoodian, R; Bushroa, A R

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, calcium phosphate-base composites, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and carbonate apatite (CA) have been considered desirable and biocompatible coating layers in clinical and biomedical applications such as implants because of the high resistance of the composites. This review focuses on the effects of voltage, time and electrolytes on a calcium phosphate-base composite layer in case of pure titanium and other biomedical grade titanium alloys via the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. Remarkably, these parameters changed the structure, morphology, pH, thickness and crystallinity of the obtained coating for various engineering and biomedical applications. Hence, the structured layer caused improvement of the biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and assignment of extra benefits for Osseo integration. The fabricated layer with a thickness range of 10 to 20 μm was evaluated for physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological characteristics via XRD, FESEM, EDS, EIS and corrosion analysis respectively, to determine the effects of the applied parameters and various electrolytes on morphology and phase transition. Moreover, it was observed that during PEO, the concentration of calcium, phosphor and titanium shifts upward, which leads to an enhanced bioactivity by altering the thickness. The results confirm that the crystallinity, thickness and contents of composite layer can be changed by applying thermal treatments. The corrosion behavior was investigated via the potentiodynamic polarization test in a body-simulated environment. Here, the optimum corrosion resistance was obtained for the coating process condition at 500 V for 15 min in Ringer solution. This review has been summarized, aiming at the further development of PEO by producing more adequate titanium-base implants along with desired mechanical and biomedical features.

  15. Oxidation and corrosion resistance of candidate Stirling engine heater-head-tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen candidate iron base Stirling engine heater head tube alloys are evaluated in a diesel fuel fired simulator materials test rig to determine their oxidation and corrosion resistance. Sheet specimens are tested at 820 C for 3500 hr in 5 hr heating cycles. Specific weight change data and an attack parameter are used to categorize the alloys into four groups; 10 alloys show excellent for good oxidation and corrosion resistance and six alloys exhibit poor or catastrophic resistance. Metallographic, X-ray, and electron microprobe analyses aid in further characterizing the oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. Alloy compositions, expecially the reactive elements aluminum, titanium, and chromium, play a major role in the excellent oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. The best oxidation resistance is associated with the formation of an iron nickel aluminum outer oxide scale, an intermediate oxide scale rich in chromium and titanium, and an aluminum outer oxide scale adjacent to the metallic substrate, which exhibits a zone of internal oxidation of aluminum and to some extent titanium.

  16. Effect of thermal oxidation on the surface characteristics and corrosion behavior of a Ta-implanted Ti-50.6Ni shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-nan; Li, Yan; Zhao, Ting-ting

    2012-12-01

    A NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) modified by Ta ion implantation was subjected to oxidation treatment in air at 723 and 873 K. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) measurements were conducted to investigate the surface characteristics, including surface topography, elemental depth profiles, and surface phase structures. The surface roughness of the Ta-implanted NiTi increases after oxidation, and the higher the oxidation temperature is, the larger the value is. The surface of the Ta-implanted NiTi oxidized at 723 K is a nanolayer mainly composed of TiO2/Ta2O5 and TiO with depressed Ni content. The Ta-implanted NiTi oxidized at 873 K is mainly covered by rutile TiO2 in several micrometers of thickness. Potentiodynamic polarization tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of the Ta-implanted NiTi was improved after thermal oxidation at 723 K, but a negative impact was found for the Ta-implanted NiTi oxidized at 873 K.

  17. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, Jr., R. William

    2000-01-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (a) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (b) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (c) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (d) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (e) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (f) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method. A preferred Mo--Re-ODS alloy contains 7-14 weight % rhenium and 2-4 volume % lanthanum oxide.

  18. Alloy design with oxide dispersoids and precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of particle-strengthened alloys is reviewed. On the basis of this knowledge, it is concluded that second-phase particles, coherent or incoherent, can enhance the flow strength, creep resistance, and stress-rupture life of alloys. Unfortunately, particles are usually not beneficial alloy-design elements if enhanced uniaxial ductility, plane-strain ductility, stress-rupture ductility, and toughness are called for. Such properties as fatigue-crack propagation resistance appear to require, for example, both high strength and high ductility, a situation which can come to pass only when the perennial conflict between strength and ductility is resolved in particle-strengthened systems in particular and in any other material system in general. Wherever possible, the role of coherent and incoherent particles in alloy design is distinguished.

  19. Diffusional transport during the cyclic oxidation of. gamma. +. beta. , Ni-Cr-Al(Y, Zr) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, J.A.; Heckel, R.W. )

    1988-02-01

    The cyclic oxidation behavior of several cast {gamma} + {beta}, Ni-Cr-Al(Y, Zr) alloys and one LPPS {gamma} + {beta}, Ni-Co-Cr-Al(Y) alloy was examined ({gamma}, fcc; {beta}, NiAl structure). Cyclic oxidation was performed by cycling between 1200{degree}C and approximately 70{degree}C. Oxide morphologies and microstructural changes during cyclic oxidation were noted. Recession of the high-Al {beta} phase was nonparabolic with time. Kirkendall porosity resulting from diffusional transport within the alloy was observed in the near-surface {gamma}-phase layer of one alloy. Concentration profiles for Ni, Cr, and Al were measured in the {gamma}-phase layer after various cyclic oxidation exposures. It was observed that cyclic oxidation results in a decreasing Al concentration at the oxide-metal interface due to a high demand for Al (a high rate of Al consumption) associated with oxide scale cracking and spalling. In addition, diffusion paths plotted on the ternary phase diagram shifted to higher Ni concentrations with increasing cyclic oxidation exposures. The alloy with the highest rate of Al consumption, and highest Al content, underwent breakway oxidation after 500 1-hr cycles at 1200{degree}C. Breakaway oxidation occurred when the Al concentration at the oxide-metal interface approached zero. The relationship between the Al transport in the alloy and breakaway oxidation is discussed.

  20. Deposition and cyclic oxidation behavior of a protective (Mo,W)(Si,Ge) [sub 2] coating on Nb-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Wang, G. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Rapp, R.A. )

    1992-05-01

    A multicomponent diffusion coating has been developed to protect Nb-base alloys from high-temperature environmental attach. A solid solution of molybdenum and tungsten disilicide (Mo, W)Si[sub 2], constituted the primary coating layer which supported a slow-growing protective silica scale in service. Germanium additions were made during the coating process to improve the cyclic oxidation resistance by increasing the thermal expansion coefficient of the vitreous silica film formed and to avoid pesting by decreasing the viscosity of the protective film. In this paper, the development of the halide-activated pack cementation coating process to produce this (Mo,W)(Si,Ge)[sub 2] coating on Nb-base alloys is described. The results of cyclic oxidation for coupons coated under different conditions in air at 1370[degrees]C are presented. Many coupons have successfully passed 200 1 h cyclic oxidation tests at 1370[degrees]C with weight-gain values in the range of 1.2 to 1.6 mg/cm[sup 2].

  1. Corrosion Behavior of SiC Reinforced Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-25

    observed for AA- 7075 -T6. Microscopic examination of the sur- faces showed that pitting behavior was nearly identical to that observed for the 6061...of the MMC was a dark grey which may indicate that the surface oxide was thicker. The anodic behavior of SiC/AA- 7075 -T6 and AA- 7075 -T6 sug- gested...m-- - osION BEHAVIOR OF SIC REINFORCED ALUMINUM ALLOYS (N) 0 BY J. F. MulNTYRE A. H. LE . GOLLEDGE R. CONRAD RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 25

  2. Structure and corrosion behavior of sputter deposited cerium oxide based coatings with various thickness on Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiamu; Claypool, James B.; Castano, Carlos E.; O'Keefe, Matthew J.

    2015-11-01

    Cerium oxide based coatings from ∼100 to ∼1400 nm in thickness were deposited onto Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates by magnetron sputtering of a 99.99% pure CeO2 target. The crystallite size of CeO2 coatings increased from 15 nm to 46 nm as the coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼1400 nm. The inhomogeneous lattice strain increased from 0.36% to 0.91% for the ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm thick coatings and slightly decreased to 0.89% for the ∼1400 nm thick coating. The highest adhesion strength to Al alloy substrates was for the ∼210 nm thick coating, due to a continuous film coverage and low internal stress. Electrochemical measurements indicated that sputter deposited crystalline CeO2 coatings acted as physical barriers that provide good cathodic inhibition for Al alloys in saline solution. The ∼900 nm thick CeO2 coated sample had the best corrosion performance that increased the corrosion resistance by two orders magnitude and lowered the cathodic current density 30 times compared to bare Al 2024-T3 substrates. The reduced defects and exposed surface, along with suppressed charge mobility, likely accounts for the improved corrosion performance as coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm. The corrosion performance decreased for ∼1400 nm thick coatings due in part to an increase in coating defects and porosity along with a decrease in adhesion strength.

  3. Creep and stress rupture of oxide dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed Inconel alloy MA 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Stulga, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of the mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy MA 754 was studied at 760, 982 and 1093 C. Tensile specimens with a fine, highly elongated grain structure, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal grain direction were tested at various stresses in air under constant load. It was found that the apparent stress dependence was large, with power law exponents ranging from 19 to 33 over the temperature range studied. The creep activation energy, after correction for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, was close to but slightly larger than the activation energy for self diffusion. Rupture was intergranular and the rupture ductility as measured by percentage elongation was generally low, with values ranging from 0.5 to 16 pct. The creep properties are rationalized by describing the creep rates in terms of an effective stress which is the applied stress minus a resisting stress consistent with the alloy microstructure. Values of the resisting stress obtained through a curve fitting procedure are found to be close to the values of the particle by-pass stress for this oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, as calculated from the measured oxide particle distribution.

  4. [Composition and morphology of oxides on porcelain fused to Ni-Cr alloys. Be containing alloys].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T

    1989-06-01

    Bonding strength between porcelain and Ni-Cr alloy for the porcelain fused-to metal crown in which Be is contained in the alloy is known to be higher than those in which Be is not contained. Since, bonding between porcelain and alloy is the reaction of oxides and porcelain, the bonding is thought to be influenced by the quality the oxides film which forms on the alloy surface. The purpose of this study was to determine the composition and morphology of the oxides formed on both Be containing and non-Be contained Ni-Cr alloys. The oxides analysis was done using an EPMA and Auger analysis. Also, the Porcelain/Ni-Cr alloy interface was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The following results are indicated from this investigation: 1. The oxides from the alloys not containing Be are corundum type Cr2O3 and spinel type NiCr2O4. These oxide layers are uniform, thick and porous and the adhesion to alloy is poor. 2. The oxides from alloy containing Be is BeO only. The BeO is uniform, thin and condensed. The adhesion to the alloy is good. 3. The oxide layer formed when the porcelain is fused to alloy containing Be is thin (1 micron average) and has good adhesion to alloy. 4. Be is selectively oxidized and controlled the form of Cr2O3 and NiO.

  5. Constitutive Behavior and Modeling of Al-Cu Alloy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    annealing to refine the grain structure. All alloys were melted from high purity components by induction heating, and casted into a steel mold. Alloys...summary of the tested alloys with their individual strengthening mechanisms and their processing procedure...containing Mg element were melted in an argon atmosphere to minimize oxidation . Precipitation hardenable alloys additionally aged at a low

  6. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  7. HIGH-TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR VANADIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , THIN FILM STORAGE DEVICES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, VAPOR PLATING, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZINC ALLOYS, ZINC COATINGS ....ANTIOXIDANTS, *METAL COATINGS , *REFRACTORY COATINGS , *VANADIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, CERAMIC COATINGS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS, CLADDING, FLAME SPRAYING...HIGH TEMPERATURE, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, IODINE COMPOUNDS, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OXIDES

  8. Oxidation performance of platinum-clad Mo-47Re alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1994-01-01

    The alloy Mo-47Re has favorable mechanical properties at temperatures above 1400 C, but it undergoes severe oxidation when used in air with no protective coating. To shield the alloy from oxidation, platinum cladding has been evaluated. The unprotected alloy undergoes catastrophic oxidation under static and dynamic oxidation conditions. The platinum cladding provides good protection from static and dynamic oxidation for moderate times at 1260 C. Samples tested for longer times under static oxidation conditions experienced severe oxidation. The data suggest that oxidation results from the transport of oxygen through the grain boundaries and through the pinhole defects of the platinum cladding.

  9. The effect of post-heat treatment on the ion dissolution behavior of nanotubular titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, Viswanathan S.; Choe, Han Cheol

    2011-04-01

    Recently, nanoscale tubular oxide layers on titanium alloys have attracted considerable research interest due to their potential application in various fields such as implant engineering, solar energy conversion, etc. In the present study, we have investigated the ion dissolution behavior of titanium alloys coated with a layer of nanotubular oxide in Ringer's solution as a function of post-heat treatment temperature. The results of the study showed that post-heat treatment had significant influence on the ion dissolution behavior of nanotubular titanium alloys.

  10. Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics study on the oxidation mechanism of binary and ternary alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shi-Yu; Liu, Shiyang; Li, De-Jun; Wang, Sanwu; Guo, Jing; Shen, Yaogen

    2015-02-14

    Utilizing a combination of ab initio density-functional theory and thermodynamics formalism, we have established the microscopic mechanisms for oxidation of the binary and ternary alloy surfaces and provided a clear explanation for the experimental results of the oxidation. We construct three-dimensional surface phase diagrams (SPDs) for oxygen adsorption on three different Nb-X(110) (X = Ti, Al or Si) binary alloy surfaces. On the basis of the obtained SPDs, we conclude a general microscopic mechanism for the thermodynamic oxidation, that is, under O-rich conditions, a uniform single-phase SPD (type I) and a nonuniform double-phase SPD (type II) correspond to the sustained complete selective oxidation and the non-sustained partial selective oxidation by adding the X element, respectively. Furthermore, by revealing the framework of thermodynamics for the oxidation mechanism of ternary alloys through the comparison of the surface energies of two separated binary alloys, we provide an understanding for the selective oxidation behavior of the Nb ternary alloy surfaces. Using these general microscopic mechanisms, one could predict the oxidation behavior of any binary and multi-component alloy surfaces based on thermodynamics considerations.

  11. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, William R. Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (1) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (2) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (3) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (4) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (5) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (6) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method.

  12. Observation of Oxide Formation for Molten Fe-Cr-C Alloy at a High Carbon Region by Oxygen Top Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Ryosuke; Gao, Xu; Kaneko, Shigeru; Kim, Sunjoong; Ueda, Shigeru; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Seok, Min Oh; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-04-01

    The oxide formation behavior during decarburization by top blowing for molten Fe-Cr-C alloy was directly observed. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1673 K to 1723 K (1400 °C to 1450 °C), as well as for 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1623 K to 1673 K (1350 °C to 1400 °C), oxide particles always formed within several minutes after decarburization started. Also, unstable oxide film followed by stable oxide film formed after C content was decreased to certain levels. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1773 K (1500 °C) and 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), only the oxide particle and stable oxide film were observed. For 18 mass pct Cr-5 mass pct C alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), stable oxide film formed twice. By comparing the critical C and Cr contents of alloy when oxides started to form with the equilibrium relation, the formation of the oxide particle and unstable oxide film was found to be under a nonequilibrium condition, whereas the stable oxide film that formed was near an equilibrium condition. For 11 and 14 mass pct Cr alloy, the decarburization rate stayed constant and was not affected by the formation of the oxide particle or unstable oxide film, but it started to decrease after the formation of the stable oxide film.

  13. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  14. New creep resistant cast alloys with improved oxidation resistance in water vapor at 650-800°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce; Maziasz, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt.%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700ºC in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with respectively 21wt%Cr-15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr-17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behavior in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. At 650 and 700ºC, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layer over time. At 750ºC, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr-15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800ºC, but that was not the case for the 22Cr-17.5Ni alloy. Therefore, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of respectively 50 and 100ºC in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.

  15. New Creep-Resistant Cast Alloys with Improved Oxidation Resistance in Water Vapor at 650–800°C

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2015-08-13

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700 C in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with, respectively, 21wt%Cr 15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr 17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behaviors in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. Also, at 650 C and 700 C, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layer over time. At 750 C, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr 15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800 C, but that was not the case for the 22Cr 17.5Ni alloy. Thus, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of, respectively, 50 C and 100 C in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.

  16. New Creep-Resistant Cast Alloys with Improved Oxidation Resistance in Water Vapor at 650–800°C

    DOE PAGES

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2015-08-13

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700 C in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with, respectively, 21wt%Cr 15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr 17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behaviors in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. Also, at 650 C and 700 C, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layermore » over time. At 750 C, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr 15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800 C, but that was not the case for the 22Cr 17.5Ni alloy. Thus, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of, respectively, 50 C and 100 C in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.« less

  17. Scale formation on Ni-based alloys in simulated solid oxide fuel cell interconnect environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Singh, P.; Windisch, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Schaeffer, C.

    2004-11-01

    Recent publications suggest that the environment on the fuel side of the bi-polar stainless steel SOFC interconnects changes the oxidation behavior and morphology of the scale formed on the air side. The U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center (ARC), has examined the role of such exposure conditions on advanced nickel base alloys. Alloy formulations developed at ARC and commercial alloys were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical property of oxide scales formed on selected alloys was determined in terms of areaspecific resistance (ASR). The corrosion behavior of ARC nickel-based alloys exposed to a dual environment of air/ H2 were compared to those of Crofer 22APU and Haynes 230.

  18. Oxidation of Inconel alloy MA754 at low oxidation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.; Goodell, P.D.; Cathcart, J.V.; Kane, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    It has been known for some time that the addition of small oxide particles to an 80 Ni-20 Cr alloy not only increases its elevated-temperature strength, but also markedly improves its resistance to oxidation. The mechanism by which the oxide dispersoid enhances the oxidation resistance was studied. Initial experiments were performed using inconel alloy MA754, which is nominally: 78 Ni, 20 Cr, 0.05 C, 0.3 Al, 0.5 Ti, 1.0 Fe, and 0.6 Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (wt %). Small disks (3 mm diam x 0.38 mm thick) were cut from MA754 plate stock and prepared with two different surface conditions. The first was prepared by mechanically polishing one side of a disk through 0.5 ..mu..m diamond on a syntron polisher while the second used an additional sulfuric acid-methanol electropolishing treatment to remove the cold-worked surface layer. Disks having both surface treatments were oxidized in a radiantly heated furnace for 30 s at 1000/sup 0/C. Three different environments were investigated: hydrogen with nominal dew points of 0/sup 0/C, -25/sup 0/C, and -55/sup 0/C. The oxide particles and films were examined in TEM by using extraction replicas (carbon) and by backpolishing to the oxide/metal interface. The particles were analyzed by EDS and SAD. Preliminary results are given.

  19. Challenges in Developing Oxidation-Resistant Chromium-Based Alloys for Applications Above 900°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorcheh, Ali S.; Galetz, Mathias C.

    2016-11-01

    Chromium-based alloys are potential candidates for high-temperature structural applications. This article reviews the challenges of chromium and Cr-alloys used at temperatures higher than 900°C with the focus on their oxidation behavior. First, latest findings on the key environmental factors affecting the oxidation resistance such as volatilization and the impact of nitrogen in air are summarized. Oxidation resistance is addressed with regards to the effects of major alloying elements and reactive elements as well as its correlation with microstructure in multi-phase alloys. Secondly, the existing challenges to develop chromium alloys with enhanced high-temperature oxidation resistance are discussed. It is shown that volatilization and nitridation, the two major obstacles for the use of chromium alloys in air, can be significantly improved by alloy design.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions Containing Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-04

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel based alloy containing alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. It is highly corrosion resistant both under reducing and under oxidizing conditions. Electrochemical studies such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. Tests were also carried out in NaCl solutions containing oxalic acid or acetic acid. It is shown that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was higher in a solution containing oxalic acid than in a solution of the same pH acidified with HCl. Acetic acid was not corrosive to Alloy 22. The corrosivity of oxalic acid was attributed to its capacity to form stable complex species with metallic cations from Alloy 22.

  1. Solid solution alloy nanoparticles of immiscible Pd and Ru elements neighboring on Rh: changeover of the thermodynamic behavior for hydrogen storage and enhanced CO-oxidizing ability.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Sumi, Naoya; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-02-05

    Pd(x)Ru(1-x) solid solution alloy nanoparticles were successfully synthesized over the whole composition range through a chemical reduction method, although Ru and Pd are immiscible at the atomic level in the bulk state. From the XRD measurement, it was found that the dominant structure of Pd(x)Ru(1-x) changes from fcc to hcp with increasing Ru content. The structures of Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles in the Pd composition range of 30-70% consisted of both solid solution fcc and hcp structures, and both phases coexist in a single particle. In addition, the reaction of hydrogen with the Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles changed from exothermic to endothermic as the Ru content increased. Furthermore, the prepared Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles demonstrated enhanced CO-oxidizing catalytic activity; Pd0.5Ru0.5 nanoparticles exhibit the highest catalytic activity. This activity is much higher than that of the practically used CO-oxidizing catalyst Ru and that of the neighboring Rh, between Ru and Pd.

  2. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  3. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, W.N. )

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of three aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys was investigated in aerated 0.5 M sodium sulfate (Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]), deaerated 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl), and aerated 3.5% NaCl. Corrosion behavior of the Aluminum Association (AA) alloys 2090-T8E41 (UNS A92090, sheet), AA 8090-T851 (UNS A98090, sheet), and AA 8090-T82551 (UNS A98090, bar) was compared to behavior of the conventional AA 7075-T6 (UNS A97075, sheet). Uniform corrosion was the predominant form of attack in aerated Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and deaerated NaCl, although some localized attack resulted from corrosion of intermetallics on specimen surfaces. Pitting was the main form of attack in aerated NaCl. In all three media, the sheet materials corroded at a similar rate, but the bar form of AA 8090 corroded at a lower rate. Pretreatment of the alloys by immersion in a cerium (Ce) solution inhibited pitting in aerated NaCl but only for a short period.

  4. Investigation of the voltage and time effects on the formation of hydroxyapatite-containing titania prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation on Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its corrosion behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, M.; Dehghanian, C.; Shokouhfar, M.; Baradaran, A.

    2011-06-01

    Producing titania and hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating on titanium alloys increases corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of these alloys. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of the effective techniques for producing this type of coating. This method produces coatings with enough thickness and appropriate adhesion. In this study, titania and HA were directly produced on Ti-6Al-4V by applying PEO process in a Ca- and P-containing electrolyte by changing voltage and time parameters. Morphology and cross section, chemical composition and elements of coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. Corrosion behavior of the samples was also examined by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that the formation of HA phase with titania needs a minimum voltage below which HA is not formed. By increasing the operation time, the amount of the formed HA increased. Also, the sample coated at 500 V and 15 min showed the best corrosion behavior in Ringer's solution.

  5. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  6. Inhomogeneity of anodic oxide films of Al and Al alloys characterized by scanning electron microscopy observation and analysis of frequency response behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Majima, Teiji

    1999-02-01

    Inhomogeneity of anodic oxide films of pure Al, Al-0.42 at. % Ta, Al-1.1 at. % Ta, Al-0.5 at. % Ti, and Al-1.0 wt % Si formed in various electrolyte solutions has been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy observation of their cross sections revealed their structural inhomogeneity: they consist of an inner layer element with a smooth texture and an outer layer element distinguished by its textural properties such as roughness and macroscopic voids. An imaginary part of the impedance for those oxides revealed their electrical inhomogeneity: their impedance spectra were fitted by the summation of characteristic Debye functions, PC, PV1, and PV2, in the frequency regime where direct current conduction predominated. This indicates that three differing processes of charge transport coexist. Only PC which had the shortest conductivity relaxation time was manifested for the oxide, where a smooth texture was observed. PV1 which had the second shortest relaxation time was predominantly manifested for the oxide, where a rough texture indicating the existence of minute voids was observed. PV2 which had the longest relaxation time was predominantly manifested for the oxide, where macroscopic voids were observed. Based on the close correlation between the texture and the impedance spectra, PC, PV1, and PV2 were attributed to the traps induced at the microvoids, minute voids, and macroscopic voids. The temperature dependence of the conductivities, as derived from the Debye peaks, showed that oxides had a well-defined trap level 2.0±0.2 eV below the conduction band edge. The trap density was least for the oxide with a smooth texture and it was higher by more than an order of magnitude for the oxide with a rough texture. As regards the anodization behavior, it was shown that the oxidizing reactants migrating toward the matrix metal was OH- and that the reaction to produce H2 near the oxide-matrix metal interface was suppressed by the predominant reaction to form an Si-H bond

  7. Transformation of bulk alloys to oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Danni; Benson, Jim; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2017-01-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer prospects for enhancing the electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a broad range of functional materials and composites, but their synthesis methods are typically elaborate and expensive. We demonstrate a direct transformation of bulk materials into nanowires under ambient conditions without the use of catalysts or any external stimuli. The nanowires form via minimization of strain energy at the boundary of a chemical reaction front. We show the transformation of multimicrometer-sized particles of aluminum or magnesium alloys into alkoxide nanowires of tunable dimensions, which are converted into oxide nanowires upon heating in air. Fabricated separators based on aluminum oxide nanowires enhanced the safety and rate capabilities of lithium-ion batteries. The reported approach allows ultralow-cost scalable synthesis of 1D materials and membranes.

  8. Creep behavior of niobium alloy PWC-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Moore, T. J.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The high vacuum creep and creep-rupture behavior of a Nb-1Zr-.1C alloy (PWC 11) was investigated at 1350 and 1400 K with an applied stress of 40 MPa. The material was tested in the following four conditions: annealed (1 hr 1755 K/2 hr 1475 K); annealed plus EB welded; annealed plus aged for 1000 hr at 1350 or 1400 K; and annealed, welded, and aged. It was found that the material in the annealed state was the most creep-resistant condition tested, and that aging the alloy for 1000 hr without an applied stress greatly reduced that strength; however, it was still approximately three times as creep resistant as Nb-1Zr. Additionally, the EB weld region was stronger than the base metal in each condition tested, and phase extraction of the dispersed precipitate revealed the presence of a 70%ZrC-30%NbC cubic monocarbide phase.

  9. On the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of palladium-based dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Desheng

    Palladium-based alloys have been used as dental restorative materials for about two decades with good clinical history. But there have been clinical case reports showing possible allergy effects from these alloys. The aim of this study was to characterize the corrosion behavior and mechanisms of several palladium-based dental alloys by potentiodynamic polarization methods, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy/atomic force microscopy (SKPFM/AFM), and to evaluate their biocompatibility by a cell culture technique and an animal model. Using SKPFM/AFM and scanning electron microscopy, the Ru-enriched phase from the use of ruthenium as a grain-refining element was identified as being slightly more noble than the palladium solid solution matrix in a high-palladium alloy. Other secondary precipitates that exist in the microstructures of these high-palladium alloys have minimal differences in Volta potential compared to the matrix. For high-palladium alloys, corrosion is generally uniform due to the predominant palladium content in the different phases. Potentiodynamic polarization and EIS have shown that representative palladium-silver alloys have low corrosion tendency and high corrosion resistance, which are equivalent to a well-known high-noble gold-palladium alloy in simulated body fluid and oral environments. The palladium-silver alloys tested are resistant to chloride ion corrosion. Passivation and dealloying have been identified for all of the tested palladium-silver alloys. The great similarity in corrosion behavior among the palladium-silver alloys is attributed to their similar chemical compositions. The variation in microstructures of palladium-silver alloys tested does not cause significant difference in corrosion behavior. The corrosion resistance of these palladium-silver alloys at elevated potentials relevant to oral environment is still satisfactory. The release of elements from representative dental

  10. Advanced oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloys for improved combustor durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henricks, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Burner design modifications that will take advantage of the improved creep and cyclic oxidation resistance of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys while accommodating the reduced fatigue properties of these materials were evaluated based on preliminary analysis and life predictions, on construction and repair feasibility, and on maintenance and direct operating costs. Two designs - the film cooled, segmented louver and the transpiration cooled, segmented twin Wall - were selected for low cycle fatigue (LCF) component testing. Detailed thermal and structural analysis of these designs established the strain range and temprature at critical locations resulting in predicted lives of 10,000 cycles for MA 956 alloy. The ODs alloys, MA 956 and HDA 8077, demonstrated a 167 C (300 F) temperature advantage over Hastelloy X alloy in creep strength and oxidation resistance. The MA 956 alloy was selected for mechanical property and component test evaluations. The MA 956 alloy was superior to Hastelloy X in LCF component testing of the film cooled, segmented louver design.

  11. Evolution of oxide scale on a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy at 900 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Ul-Hamid, A. . E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Mohammed, A.I.; Al-Jaroudi, S.S.; Tawancy, H.M.; Abbas, N.M.

    2007-01-15

    The cyclic oxidation behavior of a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy was studied in air at 900 deg. C for exposure periods of up to 1000 h. The morphology, microstructure and composition of the oxide scale was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Oxidation kinetics was determined by weight gain measurements. The results show that steady state oxidation was achieved within 1 h of exposure. During transient oxidation, the alloy grain boundaries intersecting the alloy surface became depleted in Ni and enriched in Mo and Cr. The scale initially formed at the surface was NiO which grew outwardly. However, a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer developed, rapidly retarding the rate of oxidation. Formation of NiMoO{sub 4} was also observed. The presence of Mo in the alloy facilitated the formation of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at an early stage of oxidation. The alloy exhibited considerable oxide spalling during prolonged exposure.

  12. Oxidative Recession, Sulfur Release, and Al203 Spallation for Y-Doped Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Second-order spallation phenomena have been noted for Y-doped Rene'N5 after long term oxidation at 1150 degrees C. The reason for this behavior has not been conclusively identified. A mass equivalence analysis has shown that the surface recession resulting from oxidation has the potential of releasing about 0.15 monolayer of sulfur for every 1 mg/sq cm of oxygen reacted for an alloy containing 5 ppmw of sulfur. This amount is significant in comparison to levels that have been shown to result in first-order spallation behavior for undoped alloys. Oxidative recession is therefore speculated to be a contributing source of sulfur and second-order spallation for Y-doped alloys.

  13. The oxidation behavior and protection of niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.A.; Meier, G.H. Pittsburgh Univ., PA )

    1990-08-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for efforts to develop oxidation-resistant Nb-base alloys and intermetallics. Despite 30 years of intensive research, a ductile, high-strength Nb alloy system capable of forming protective oxide scales against the penetration of oxygen and nitrogen on exposure to combustive atmospheres has yet to be discovered; a silicide coating has instead been formulated to reliably render such oxidative barriers. The high solubility and diffusivity of oxygen in Nb preclude a selective oxidation of low alloyed Al contents to form protective scales. 23 refs.

  14. Corrosion behavior of vanadium alloys in flowing lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Corrosion data are presented for several vanadium alloys exposed to flowing lithium at 427, 482, and 538/sup 0/C. The corrosion behavior is evaluated by weight change measurements. Metallographic results and data on the nonmetallic element transfer in lithium-exposed specimens are also presented. The influence of alloy composition and exposure conditions on the corrosion behavior of vanadium alloys is discussed. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  16. Corrosion behavior of alloy 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni) in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Yang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The effect of testing conditions (temperature, time, and oxygen content) and material's microstructure (the as-received and the grain boundary engineered conditions) on the corrosion behavior of alloy 800H in high-temperature pressurized water was studied using a variety of characterization techniques. Oxidation was observed as the primary corrosion behavior on the samples. Oxide exfoliation was significantly mitigated on the grain boundary engineered samples compared to the as-received ones. The oxide formation, including some 'mushroom-shaped oxidation', is predicted via a combination of thermodynamics and kinetics influenced by the preferential diffusion of specific species using short-cut diffusion paths.

  17. Oxidation-Reduction Resistance of Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.; Humphrey, D. L.; Setlock, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to oxidation and blanching is a key issue for advanced copper alloys under development for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Candidate alloys, including dispersion-strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb, solution-strengthened Cu-Ag-Zr, and ODS Cu-Al2O3, are being evaluated for oxidation resistance by static TGA exposures in low-p(O2) and cyclic oxidation in air, and by cyclic oxidation-reduction exposures (using air for oxidation and CO/CO2 or H2/Ar for reduction) to simulate expected service environments. The test protocol and results are presented.

  18. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened turbine blade alloy by mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, H. F.; Curwick, L. R. R.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    There were three nickel-base alloys containing up to 18 wt. % of refractory metal examined initially for oxide dispersion strengthening. To provide greater processing freedom, however, a leaner alloy was finally selected. This base alloy, alloy D, contained 0.05C/15Cr / 2Mo/4W/2Ta/4.5Al/2.Ti/015Zr/0.01-B/Bal. Ni. Following alloy selection, the effect of extrusion, heat treatment, and oxide volume fraction and size on microstructure and properties were examined. The optimum structure was achieved in zone annealed alloy D which contained 2.5 vol. % of 35 mm Y2O3 and which was extruded 16:1 at 1038 C.

  19. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L. Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a plate-like structure with 1.2–1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  20. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  1. The Influence of Fabrication Process on the Initial Stages of Steam Oxidation Performed on Haynes® 282® Alloy at 760 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boron, L.; Homa, M.; Nowak, R.; Horton, N.; Sheppard, R.; Purgert, R. M.; Siewiorek, A.; Sobczak, N.; Sobczak, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents results observed after the first 5 h of oxidation of Haynes® 282® alloy. The steam oxidation tests have been carried out in pure water at 760 °C for 1, 2 and 5 h, respectively, using an accurate thermogravimetric balance technique. The alloy used for comparison in this work was fabricated using three different methods. The initial steam oxidation performance of the commercially wrought alloy Haynes® 282® was compared with a fabricated cast alloy and a HIP/PM alloy. The results show that in terms of corrosion resistance, fabrication techniques appear to have little impact on steam oxidation performance and behavior. The exposed Ni-based alloys all developed the oxide scales consisting mainly of Cr2O3 phase mixed with some TiO2, while internal Al and Ti precipitations along the grain boundaries were observed both in Haynes® 282® wrought and HIP/PM alloy.

  2. The Influence of Fabrication Process on the Initial Stages of Steam Oxidation Performed on Haynes® 282® Alloy at 760 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boron, L.; Homa, M.; Nowak, R.; Horton, N.; Sheppard, R.; Purgert, R. M.; Siewiorek, A.; Sobczak, N.; Sobczak, J. J.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents results observed after the first 5 h of oxidation of Haynes® 282® alloy. The steam oxidation tests have been carried out in pure water at 760 °C for 1, 2 and 5 h, respectively, using an accurate thermogravimetric balance technique. The alloy used for comparison in this work was fabricated using three different methods. The initial steam oxidation performance of the commercially wrought alloy Haynes® 282® was compared with a fabricated cast alloy and a HIP/PM alloy. The results show that in terms of corrosion resistance, fabrication techniques appear to have little impact on steam oxidation performance and behavior. The exposed Ni-based alloys all developed the oxide scales consisting mainly of Cr2O3 phase mixed with some TiO2, while internal Al and Ti precipitations along the grain boundaries were observed both in Haynes® 282® wrought and HIP/PM alloy.

  3. Assessment of a High-Throughput Methodology for the Study of Alloy Oxidation using AlxFeyNi1-x-y Composition Gradient Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Payne, Matthew A; Miller, James B; Oliveros, Martin E; Perez, Geronimo; Gouvea, Cristol P; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Achete, Carlos A; Gellman, Andrew J

    2016-07-11

    The high-temperature oxidation of multicomponent metal alloys exhibits complex dependencies on composition, which are not fully understood for many systems. Combinatorial screening of the oxidation of many different compositions of a given alloy offers an ideal means for gaining fundamental insights into such systems. We have previously developed a high-throughput methodology for studying AlxFeyNi1-x-y alloy oxidation using ∼100 nm thick composition spread alloy films (CSAFs). In this work, we critically assess two aspects of this methodology: the sensitivity of CSAF oxidation behavior to variations in AlxFeyNi1-x-y composition and the differences between the oxidation behavior of ∼100 nm thick CSAFs and that of bulk AlxFeyNi1-x-y alloys. This was done by focusing specifically on AlxFe1-x and AlxNi1-x oxidation in dry air at 427 °C. Transitions between phenomenologically distinguishable types of oxidation behavior are found to occur over CSAF compositional ranges of <2 at. %. The oxidation of AlxFe1-x CSAFs is found to be very similar to that of bulk AlxFe1-x alloys, but some minor differences between CSAF and bulk behavior are observed for AlxNi1-x oxidation. On the basis of our assessment, high-throughput studies of CSAF oxidation appear to be an effective method for gaining fundamental insights into the composition dependence of the oxidation of bulk alloys.

  4. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route.

  5. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  6. Oxidation behavior of FeAl+Hf,Zr,B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Doychak, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-40Al-1Hf, Fe-40Al-1Hf-0.4B, and Fe-40Al-0.1Zr-0.4B (at. percent) alloys was characterized after 900, 1000, and 100 C exposures. Isothermal tests revealed parabolic kinetics after a period of transitional theta-alumina scale growth. The parabolic growth rates for the subsequent alpha-alumina scales were about five times higher than those for NiAl+0.1Zr alloys. The isothermally grown scales showed a propensity toward massive scale spallation due to both extensive rumpling from growth stresses and to an inner layer of HfO2. Cyclic oxidation for 200 1-hr cycles produced little degradation at 900 or 1000 C, but caused significant spallation at 1100 C in the form of small segments of the outer scale. The major difference in the cyclic oxidation of the three FeAl alloys was increased initial spallation for FeAl+Zr,B. Although these FeAl alloys showed many similarities to NiAl alloys, they were generally less oxidation resistant. It is believed that this resulted from nonoptimal levels of dopants and larger thermal expansion mismatch stresses.

  7. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan; Singh, Prabhakar; Sikka, Vinod Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  8. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-01-13

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-II reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  9. Structural Analysis, Electrochemical Behavior, and Biocompatibility of Novel Quaternary Titanium Alloy with near β Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Monica; Calderon Moreno, Jose Maria; Vasilescu, Cora; Drob, Silviu Iulian; Neacsu, Elena Ionela; Coer, Andrej; Hmeljak, Julija; Zerjav, Gregor; Milošev, Ingrid

    2014-06-01

    This article analyses the microstructure, electrochemical behavior, and biocompatibility of a novel Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy with low Young's modulus (59 GPa) much closer to that of bone, between 10 and 30 GPa, than Ti and other Ti alloys used as implant biomaterial. XRD and SEM measurements revealed a near β crystalline microstructure containing β phase matrix and secondary α phase, with a typical grain size of around 200 μm. The corrosion behavior in neutral Ringer solution evidenced: self-passivation behavior characterizing a very resistant passive film; an easy passivation as a result of favorable influence of the alloying elements Nb, Zr, and Ta that participate with their passive oxides to the formation of the alloy passive film; low corrosion and ion release rates corresponding with very low toxicity. In MEM solution, the novel alloy demonstrated very high corrosion resistance and no susceptibility to localized corrosion. Biocompatibility was evaluated on in vitro human osteoblast-like and human immortalized pulmonary fibroblast cell (Wi-38) lines and the new Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy exhibited no cytotoxicity. The new Ti-20Nb-10Zr5Ta alloy is a promising material for implants due to combined properties of low elastic modulus, very low corrosion rate, and good biocompatibility.

  10. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model at experimentally relevant length scales is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2 - 1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  11. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  12. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  13. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  14. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical properties of titanium alloy after thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Yingjie; Ma, Lianhua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic compressive properties of thermally oxidized TC4 (Ti-6Al-4V) titanium alloys were studied with split Hopkinson pressure bar. The dynamic tests were conducted under multiple strain rates from 400 to 2000 s-1 and different testing temperatures from 25 to 200 °C. Data for the true stress-strain curves of thermally oxidized TC4 titanium alloy are presented. They show that the thermal oxidation increases both the dynamic compressive strength of TC4 titanium and the rate of strain hardening. Higher compressive strengths of the material were obtained by applying higher strain rates. Under a strain rate of 2000 s-1, the stress-strain curves of TC4 titanium alloys exhibit both strain-rate-hardening behavior and thermal softening behavior. The oxidation temperature has little effect on dynamic properties of TC4 titanium alloy, but choosing different holding time for oxidation could greatly affect the initiation of plastic deformation and thus might potentially improve the ductility of the treated material. Furthermore, the data show that the increase in the testing temperature results in much lower yield stresses of the treated material.

  15. Superplastic behavior in a commercial 5083 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrano, J.S.; Lavender, C.A.; Smith, M.T.; Bruemmer, S.M. ); Hamilton, C.H. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    When considering the forming and post-forming properties required of a superplastic material, attractive candidates are commercial Al-Mg-Mn weldable alloys such as AA5083. There have been several investigations of hot deformation of 5083-type alloys in the literature. Only two studies evaluated commercial-purity 5083 and they achieved tensile elongations of 150% and 200%. Alloy modification has produced improved behavior in three 5083-type alloys developed specifically for SPF. Two were deemed high-purity 5083 (low Fe and Si) and achieved elongations of 450% and 630%. Engineering strains up to 700% were measured by Watanabe et al. in a 5083-based alloy with the addition of 0.6% Cu as a grain refiner. These results suggest that alloy modifications such as reduced Fe and Si contents or Cu additions may be required to improve superplastic response. Unfortunately, specific SPF-grade 5083 alloys are substantially more expensive than the commercial grade, and the addition of Cu decreases the corrosion resistance of the base material. The purpose of this work is to examine the effect of prior degrees of cold work on the SPF behavior of a standard-grade 5083 alloy. Superplastic behavior of this material at 510[degree]C is assessed and compared to published results for the SPF-grade alloys.

  16. Alloying element's substitution in titanium alloy with improved oxidation resistance and enhanced magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ang-Yang; Wei, Hua; Hu, Qing-Miao; Yang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    First-principles method is used to characterize segregation and magnetic properties of alloyed Ti/TiO2interface. We calculate the segregation energy of the doped Ti/TiO2 interface to investigate alloying atom's distribution. The oxidation resistance of Ti/TiO2 interface is enhanced by elements Fe and Ni but reduced by element Co. Magnetism could be produced by alloying elements such as Co, Fe and Ni in the bulk of titanium and the surface of Ti at Ti/TiO2 interface. The presence of these alloying elements could transform the non-magnetic titanium alloys into magnetic systems. We have also calculated the temperature dependence of magnetic permeability for the doped and pure Ti/TiO2 interfaces. Alloying effects on the Curie temperature of the Ti/TiO2 interface have been elaborated.

  17. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  18. Microstructure and Fracture Behavior of Tungsten Heavy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A

    2003-06-01

    The 93% W-5.6% Ni-1.4% Fe and 93.1% W-4.7% Ni-2.2% Co alloys (WHA) provided by Army Research Laboratory (ARL), Aberdeen are characterized to determine the effects of matrix alloying and swaging on the microstructure and fracture behavior. The W particles are oblong with respect to the swaging direction. The microstructure of the W-Ni-Fe alloy reveals good cohesive bonding between W particles, but there is W-matrix interface separation and matrix alloy cracking. The microstructure of the W-Ni-Co alloy reveals regions of good cohesive bonding between W particles, but also regions where some wetting has not occurred by the liquid. No evidence was observed of matrix alloy cracking. The fracture characteristic of WHA is dominantly cleavage of W particles.

  19. Thermogravimetric study of reduction of oxides present in oxidized nickel-base alloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon, hydrogen, and hydrogen plus carbon reduction of three oxidized nickel-base alloy powders (a solid solution strengthened alloy both with and without the gamma prime formers aluminum and titanium and the solid solution strengthened alloy NiCrAlY) were evaluated by thermogravimetry. Hydrogen and hydrogen plus carbon were completely effective in reducing an alloy containing chromium, columbium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. However, with aluminum and titanium present the reduction was limited to a weight loss of about 81 percent. Carbon alone was not effective in reducing any of the alloys, and none of the reducing conditions were effective for use with NiCrAlY.

  20. Constitutive behavior of tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuh Rong; Gray, George T.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of strain rate, temperature, and tungsten alloying on the yield stress and the strainhardening behavior of tantalum were investigated. The yield and flow stresses of unalloyed Ta and tantalum-tungsten alloys were found to exhibit very high rate sensitivities, while the hardening rates in Ta and Ta-W alloys were found to be insensitive to strain rate and temperature at lower temperatures or at higher strain rates. This behavior is consistent with the observation that overcoming the intrinsic Peierls stress is shown to be the rate-controlling mechanism in these materials at low temperatures. The dependence of yield stress on temperature and strain rate was found to decrease, while the strain-hardening rate increased with tungsten alloying content. The mechanical threshold stress (MTS) model was adopted to model the stress-strain behavior of unalloyed Ta and the Ta-W alloys. Parameters for the constitutive relations for Ta and the Ta-W alloys were derived for the MTS model, the Johnson—Cook (JC), and the Zerilli-Armstrong (ZA) models. The results of this study substantiate the applicability of these models for describing the high strain-rate deformation of Ta and Ta-W alloys. The JC and ZA models, however, due to their use of a power strain-hardening law, were found to yield constitutive relations for Ta and Ta-W alloys that are strongly dependent on the range of strains for which the models were optimized.

  1. Processability and High Temperature Behavior of Emerging Aerospace Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    I F opy IOSR-Th. 8-O0 970 - SC5459.AR - c Copy No. 4 0i Q PROCESSABILITY AND HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF EMERGING AEROSPACE ALLOYS ANNUAL REPORT NO...NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. b0’ 2306 A\\ 11. TITLE finclude Security Classficationi PROCESSABILITY AND HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF EMERGING AEROSPACE ALLOYS...conducted. Progress of microstruc - turel refinement and changes in misorientation between subgrains are determined to delineate the path for optimum

  2. Deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of wrought magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouren; Song, Linghui; Kang, Sukbong; Cho, Jaehyung; Wang, Yingzi

    2013-05-01

    There are many researches on the deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys, such as AZ31, AZ80, AZ91, and ZK60 magnesium alloys at different temperatures and strain rates, but few of them focuses on the deformation behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys, especially under the twin-roll casting (TRC) state. Meanwhile, the existing researches only focus on the grain refinement law of the magnesium alloys under deformation conditions, the deformation mechanism has not been revealed yet. The hot compression behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M magnesium alloys under the temperature and strain rate ranges of 250-400 °C and 0.001-1 s-1 are studied by thermal simulation methods using Gleeble 1500 machine and virtual simulation using finite element analysis software. Simulation results show that sine hyperbolic law is the most suitable flow stress model for wider deformation conditions. The most reasonable selected deformation conditions of ZK60M alloy is 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/1 s-1 for conventional casting (CC), while AZ41M alloy is 300 °C/0.01 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for CC. Deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanism of them are analyzed at the same deformation conditions. The microstructures of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys are observed at different deformed conditions by optical microscopy (OM) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and it reveals the flow behavior and deformation mechanism of them. Working harden and work soften contribute to the activation of basal, non-basal slip systems which promote DRX. The proposed research reveals the deformation behavior and mechanism of the AZ41M and ZK 60M magnesium alloys and concludes their optimized deformation parameters and processes and provides a theory basis for their manufacturing and application.

  3. Effect of oxide layer formation on deformation of aluminum alloys under fire conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Vigil, Francisco M.; Tolendino, Greg; ...

    2015-05-14

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural behavior of aluminum alloys used in the aerospace industry when exposed to conditions similar to those of an accident scenario, such as a fuel fire. This study focuses on the role that the aluminum oxide layer plays in the deformation and the strength of the alloy above melting temperature. To replicate some of the thermal and atmospheric conditions that the alloys might experience in an accident scenario, aluminum rod specimens were subjected to temperatures near to or above their melting temperature in air, nitrogen, and vacuum environments. The characteristics ofmore » their deformation, such as geometry and rate of deformation, were observed. Tests were conducted by suspending aluminum rods vertically from an enclosure. This type of experiment was performed in two different environments: air and nitrogen. The change in environments allowed the effects of the oxide layer on the material strength to be analyzed by inhibiting the growth of the oxide layer. Observations were reported from imaging taken during the experiment showing creep behavior of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures and time to failure. In addition, an example of tensile load–displacement data obtained in air and vacuum was reported to understand the effect of oxide layer on aluminum deformation and strength.« less

  4. Effect of oxide layer formation on deformation of aluminum alloys under fire conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Vigil, Francisco M.; Tolendino, Greg; Gill, Walt; Donaldson, A. Burl

    2015-05-14

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural behavior of aluminum alloys used in the aerospace industry when exposed to conditions similar to those of an accident scenario, such as a fuel fire. This study focuses on the role that the aluminum oxide layer plays in the deformation and the strength of the alloy above melting temperature. To replicate some of the thermal and atmospheric conditions that the alloys might experience in an accident scenario, aluminum rod specimens were subjected to temperatures near to or above their melting temperature in air, nitrogen, and vacuum environments. The characteristics of their deformation, such as geometry and rate of deformation, were observed. Tests were conducted by suspending aluminum rods vertically from an enclosure. This type of experiment was performed in two different environments: air and nitrogen. The change in environments allowed the effects of the oxide layer on the material strength to be analyzed by inhibiting the growth of the oxide layer. Observations were reported from imaging taken during the experiment showing creep behavior of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures and time to failure. In addition, an example of tensile load–displacement data obtained in air and vacuum was reported to understand the effect of oxide layer on aluminum deformation and strength.

  5. COMPARATIVE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF TWO PALLADIUM CONTAINING TITANIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lian, T. Yashiki, T. Nakayama, T. Nakanishi, R. B. Rebak

    2006-07-23

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a small amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.

  6. Comparative Corrosion Behavior of Two Palladium Containing Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Yashiki, T; Nakayama, T; Nakanishi, T; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a small amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.

  7. Oxide dispersion strengthening of alloys. (Latest citations from the Metals Abstracts/Alloys Index database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning oxide dispersion strengthening and hardening of alloys. The citations include methods of alloy preparation, and mechanical and physical properties. The high temperature characteristics of such dispersion hardening allows use of the alloys in gas turbines as turbine blades and combustor components, and in boilers, as refractories and combustors. Applications of oxide dispersion hardening include noble metals, steels, aluminum, superalloys, and powder metallurgy for many nonferrous alloys. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Fatigue properties of MA 6000E, a gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ni-base alloy for gas turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Merrick, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    MA 6000E is a corrosion resistant, gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy under development for advanced turbine blade applications. The high temperature, 1093 C, rupture strength is superior to conventional nickel-base alloys. This paper addresses the fatigue behavior of the alloy. Excellent properties are exhibited in low and high cycle fatigue and also thermal fatigue. This is attributed to a unique combination of microstructural features, i.e., a fine distribution of dispersed oxides and other nonmetallics, and the highly elongated grain structure which advantageously modify the deformation characteristics and crack initiation and propagation modes from that characteristic of conventional gamma-prime hardened superalloys.

  9. Cyclic Oxidation of Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Barrett, Charles A.; Darolia, Ram

    1999-01-01

    Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (X = Hf, Ti, Cr, Ga) were cyclically oxidized at 1000 C for up to 1000 1-hr cycles. The alloys all showed protective, adherent alpha-Al2O3 scale formation with positive weight change behavior throughout the test. There was no clear correlation between the composition of the various alloys and the specific weight gain although the ranking by weight change was relatively consistent for two duplicate series of samples. The presence of Hf (0.5 - 0.8 at.%) resulted in the internal formation of Al2O3/HfO2 "stringers." Diffusion of Hf to the growing oxide stringers resulted in the development of a near-surface layer depleted of these precipitates.

  10. HIGH-TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR VANADIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , TENSILE PROPERTIES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS....CERAMIC COATINGS , *METAL COATINGS , *VANADIUM ALLOYS, ALLOYS, ANTIOXIDANTS, BORON COMPOUNDS, COATINGS , DEFORMATION, ELECTRODEPOSITION, FLAME SPRAYING...HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HIGH TEMPERATURE, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, NICKEL, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OXIDES, PLATING

  11. Oxidation- and Creep-Enhanced Fatigue of Haynes 188 Alloy-Oxide Scale System Under Simulated Pulse Detonation Engine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of the pulse detonation engine (PDE) requires robust design of the engine components that are capable of enduring harsh detonation environments. In this study, a high cycle thermal fatigue test rig was developed for evaluating candidate PDE combustor materials using a CO2 laser. The high cycle thermal fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 alloy was investigated under an enhanced pulsed laser test condition of 30 Hz cycle frequency (33 ms pulse period, and 10 ms pulse width including 0.2 ms pulse spike). The temperature swings generated by the laser pulses near the specimen surface were characterized by using one-dimensional finite difference modeling combined with experimental measurements. The temperature swings resulted in significant thermal cyclic stresses in the oxide scale/alloy system, and induced extensive surface cracking. Striations of various sizes were observed at the cracked surfaces and oxide/alloy interfaces under the cyclic stresses. The test results indicated that oxidation and creep-enhanced fatigue at the oxide scale/alloy interface was an important mechanism for the surface crack initiation and propagation under the simulated PDE condition.

  12. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken; Baxter, David J.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  13. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  14. Formation of multilayered scale during the oxidation of NiAl–Mo alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P K; Akinc, M; Kramer, M J

    2014-05-01

    We have studied the oxidation behavior of a hypereutectic NiAl-Mo alloy. This alloy showed an initial rapid mass loss followed by a relatively steady state behavior. The oxide scale formed during the oxidation process was seen to have a multilayered structure comprising of NiO, NiAl2O4, NiMoO4 and Al2O3 with minor amounts of MoO2 in the sub-scale region. The oxidation behavior is influenced significantly by the formation and stability of the constituent oxides, especially NiMoO4. Hence the decomposition behavior of NiMoO4 in the 1100-1200 degrees C was studied as well. The thermal decomposition of the NiMoO4 was slow at 1100 degrees C, but accelerated at 1200 degrees C, resulting in the formation of NiO, which remained in the oxide scale, and MoO3, which volatilized away. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Liu, Chain T; Hoelzer, David T; Mills, Michael J.; Sarosi, P. M.; Hayashi, Taisuke; Wendt, Ullrich; Heyse, Hartmut

    2007-01-01

    The development of porosity at 1000 C in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing ultra-fine oxide particles with diameters on the order of a few nm is investigated. A comparison with an alloy fabricated by internal oxidation demonstrates that the porosity formation is associated with mechanical alloying with Y2O3 in argon. The pores grow in spite of a sub-micron grain size suggesting that the grain boundaries are not effective paths for removing entrapped gas from the pores.

  16. Recrystallization characteristics of oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotzler, R. K.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopy was employed to study the process of recrystallization in two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) mechanically alloyed nickel-base alloys, MA 754 and MA 6000E. MA 754 contained both fine, uniformly dispersed particles and coarser oxides aligned along the working direction. Hot rolled MA 754 had a grain size of 0.5 microns and high dislocation densities. After partial primary recrystallization, the fine grains transformed to large elongated grains via secondary (or abnormal) grain growth. Extruded and rolled MA 6000E contained equiaxed grains of 0.2 micron diameter. Primary recrystallization occurring during working eliminated virtually all dislocations. Conversion from fine to coarse grains was triggered by gamma prime dissolution; this was also a process of secondary or abnormal grain growth. Comparisons were made to conventional and oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys.

  17. On The Creep Behavior Of Niobium-Modified Zirconium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Charit, I.; Murty, K.L.

    2006-07-01

    Zr alloys remain the main cladding materials in most water reactors. Historically, a series of Zircaloys were developed, and two versions, Zircaloy-2 and -4, are still employed in many reactors. The recent trend is to use the Nb-modified zirconium alloys where it has been shown that Nb addition improves cladding performance in various ways, most significant being superior long-term corrosion resistance. Hence, new alloys with Nb additions have recently been developed, such as Zirlo{sup TM(i)} and M5TM{sup (ii)}. Although it is known that creep properties improve, there have been very few data available to precisely evaluate the creep characteristics of new commercial alloys. However, the creep behavior of many Nb-modified zirconium alloys has been studied in several occasions. In this study, we have collected the creep data of these Nb-modified alloys from the open literature as well as our own study over a wide range of stresses and temperatures. The data have been compared with those of conventional Zr and Zircaloys to determine the exact role Nb plays. It has been argued that Nb-modified zirconium alloys would behave as a Class-A alloy (stress exponent of 3) with the Nb atoms forming solute atmospheres around dislocations and thus, impeding dislocation glide under suitable conditions. On the other hand, zirconium and Zircaloys behave as Class-M alloys with a stress exponent of {>=} 4, attesting to the dislocation climb-controlled deformation mode. (authors)

  18. oxide and FeNi alloy: product dependence on the reduction ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jungang; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Minglun; Zhao, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun

    2014-12-01

    Based on the sol-gel combustion method, stoichiometric Fe3+, Mn2+, Ni2+ ions and citric acid were chosen as the initial reactants for the preparation of magnetic particles. Due to the different reduction ability of metal ions, completely different magnetic products (MnFe2O4 oxide and FeNi alloy) were obtained by heating the flakes at 600 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. MnFe2O4 particles exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, and martensitic phase transformation is observed magnetically at 125 K for FeNi alloy particles.

  19. Model for nonprotective oxidation of Al-Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zayan, M.H. )

    1990-12-01

    The oxidation of Al-5Mg alloy has been studied at 550 C in dry air. Morphological details of the MgO layers which develop on this alloy during high-temperature oxidation have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A localized detachment of the protective, adherent MgO layer was found, which is caused by voids formed by vacancy condensation at the metal-oxide interface. The source of these vacancies was the outward diffusion of Mg though the oxide layer. Continuing growth of these voids was responsible for cracking of oxide ridges and nodules, as well as the growth of new MgO having a cauliflower morphology. A model describing the process of the outward diffusion is given.

  20. Oxidation rates of niobium and tantalum alloys at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Hendricks, J.W. )

    1994-06-01

    Niobium and tantalum alloys have excellent properties for use in high-temperature, space-power applications, but must be protected from oxidation that would result from exposure to air in ground-evaluation tests. The oxygen-uptake/oxidation rates of three alloys, Nb-1Zr, PWC-11, and ASTAR-811C were measured at oxygen partial pressure of 10[sup [minus]6] and 10[sup [minus]7] torr at temperatures up to 1350 K. No visible oxide film was observed, and the oxidation rate was found to be linearly proportional to pressure and exponentially proportional to temperature. A thin molybdenum coating on Nb-1Zr was a barrier to low-pressure oxidation at 773 K. 13 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Schottky barrier height behavior of Pt-Ru alloy contacts on single-crystal n-ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, T.; Haemori, M.; Hayakawa, R.; Yoshitake, M.; Chikyow, T.; Volk, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S.; Kobayashi, K.

    2010-05-15

    We investigated the Schottky barrier height (SBH) behavior of binary alloy Schottky contacts on n-type zinc oxide (n-ZnO) single crystals. Pt-Ru alloy electrodes were deposited on the Zn-polar and O-polar faces of ZnO substrates by combinatorial ion-beam deposition under identical conditions. The crystal structures of the Pt-Ru alloy film changed from the Pt phase (cubic structure) to the Ru phase (hexagonal structure) in the Pt-Ru alloy phase diagram with decreasing Pt content. The SBH, determined from current-voltage measurements, decreased with decreasing Pt content, indicating that the SBH behavior also followed the Pt-Ru alloy phase diagram. The alloy electrodes on the Zn-polar face showed better Schottky properties than those on the O-polar face. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a difference in the interface oxidization of the Pt-Ru alloy: the interface of the O-polar face and Pt-Ru mixed phase with poor crystallinity had a more oxidized layer than that of the Zn-polar face. As a result of this oxidization, the O-polar face, Pt-Ru mixed, and Ru phases showed poor Schottky properties.

  2. Characterization of AZ31 magnesium alloy by duplex process combining laser surface melting and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cancan; Liang, Jun; Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Lingqian

    2016-09-01

    Top ceramic coatings were fabricated on the laser surface melting (LSM) modified AZ31 alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in a phosphate electrolyte. The effect of LSM treatment on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of the bare and PEO treated AZ31 alloy was evaluated. Results showed that LSM treatment produced a homogeneous modified layer with redistributed intermetallic compounds, resulting in enhanced corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy. The LSM treatment had no obvious influence on the surface and cross-sectional microstructures of the PEO coatings on AZ31 alloy. Besides, MgO was the main constituent for PEO coatings, regardless of LSM pretreatment. However, the long-term corrosion properties of the PEO coated AZ31 alloy with LSM pretreatment revealed large enhancement. Based on the analysis of microstructure and corrosion property, the corrosion mechanisms of the PEO and LSM-PEO coated AZ31 alloy were proposed.

  3. Oxidation of Palladium-Chromium Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Jih-Fen, Lei; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    An alloy consisting of Pd with 13 wt % Cr is a promising material for high temperature applications. High temperature performance is degraded by the oxidation of the material, which is more severe in the fine wires and thin films used for sensor applications than in the bulk. The present study was undertaken to improve our understanding of the physical and chemical changes occurring at these temperatures and to identify approaches to limit oxidation of the alloy. The alloy was studied in both ribbon and wire forms. Ribbon samples were chosen to examine the role of grain boundaries in the oxidation process because of the convenience of handling for the oxidation studies. Wire samples 25 microns in diameter which are used in resistance strain gages were studied to correlate chemical properties with observed electrical, physical, and structural properties. Overcoating the material with a metallic Cr film did prevent the segregation of Pd to the surface; however, it did not eliminate the oxidation of the alloy.

  4. Creep crack growth behavior of several structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Shahinian, P.

    1983-07-01

    Creep crack growth behavior of several high temperature alloys, Inconel 600, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Hastelloy X, Nimonic PE-16, Incoloy 800, and Haynes 25 (HS-25) was examined at 540, 650, 760, and 870 °C. Crack growth rates were analyzed in terms of both linear elastic stress intensity factor and J*-integral parameter. Among the alloys Inconel 600 and Hastelloy X did not show any observable crack growth. Instead, they deformed at a rapid rate resulting in severe blunting of the crack tip. The other alloys, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Incoloy 800, HS-25, and PE-16 showed crack growth at one or two temperatures and deformed continuously at other temperatures. Crack growth rates of the above alloys in terms ofJ* parameter were compared with the growth rates of other alloys published in the literature. Alloys such as Inconel X-750, Alloy 718, and IN-100 show very high growth rates as a result of their sensitivity to an air environment. Based on detailed fracture surface analysis, it is proposed that creep crack growth occurs by the nucleation and growth of wedge-type cracks at triple point junctions due to grain boundary sliding or by the formation and growth of cavities at the boundaries. Crack growth in the above alloys occurs only in some critical range of strain rates or temperatures. Since the service conditions for these alloys usually fall within this critical range, knowledge and understanding of creep crack growth behavior of the structural alloys are important.

  5. Recrystallization behavior of a supersaturated Al Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Liu, W C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of concurrent precipitation on recrystallization behavior during the isothermal annealing of a supersaturated and deformed Al-Mn alloy was investigated. It is found that concurrent precipitation strongly affects the recrystallization behavior of this alloy. At low temperatures, concurrent precipitation retards recrystallization and results in large flat grains. The size of recrystallized grains decreases significantly with increasing temperature. The kinetics of recrystallization was determined by measurements of hardness. The JMAK exponent decreases from 3.0 to 0.8 as the annealing temperature increases from 371 C to 427 C. The activation energy for recrystallization of the alloy is about 456 kJ/mol. Concurrent precipitation enhances the activation energy for recrystallization of aluminum alloys.

  6. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an elongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15Cr-2Mo-2Ta-4W-4.5Al-2.5Ti-0.15Zr 0.05C-0.01B-1.1Y2O3. It exhibits the strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high cycle, low cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy microstructure and properties is discussed.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Sears, John S.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion, usually of equal atomic percent, they have high configurational entropy, and thus, they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and alloy stability. The present study investigates the mechanical behavior, fracture characteristics, and microstructure of two single-phase FCC HEAs CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn with some detailed attention given to melting, homogenization, and thermo-mechanical processing. Ingots approaching 8 kg in mass were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent to small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was given to both alloys in order to eliminate any solidification segregation. The alloys were then fabricated in the usual way (forging, followed by hot rolling) with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters employed. Transmission electron microscopy was subsequently used to assess the single-phase nature of the alloys prior to mechanical testing. Tensile specimens (ASTM E8) were prepared with tensile mechanical properties obtained from room temperature through 800 °C. Material from the gage section of selected tensile specimens was extracted to document room and elevated temperature deformation within the HEAs. Fracture surfaces were also examined to note fracture failure modes. The tensile behavior and selected tensile properties were compared with results in the literature for similar alloys.

  8. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE-BASED ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    A. MISRA; A. SHARIF; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the mechanical behavior of the following single-phase polycrystalline alloys with the MoSi{sub 2} body-center tetragonal structure: MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with {approximately}2.5 at.% Re, MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 2 at.% Al, MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 1 at.% Nb, and MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 1 at.% Re and 2 at.% Al. Several anomalies in the mechanical behavior of alloyed materials were observed. For example, (1) addition of only {approximately}2.5 at. % Re results in an order of magnitude increase in compressive strength at 1600 C, (2) additions of Nb and Al cause solution softening at near-ambient temperatures, and (3) quaternary MoSi{sub 2}-Re-Al alloys show strengthening at elevated temperatures and reduction in flow stress with enhanced plasticity at near-ambient temperatures in compression. The mechanisms of anomalous solution hardening and softening are discussed.

  9. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  10. Evidence of alloy formation during reduction of platinized tin oxide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Steven D.; Hoflund, Gar B.; Davidson, Mark R.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    Ion scattering spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis have been used to examine a platinized tin oxide catalyst surface before, during, and after reduction by annealing under vacuum at 250 to 450 C. These techniques were then used to examine the reduced surface after a room-temperature, low-pressure oxygen exposure. The spectral results and the behavior of the reduced surface toward oxygen exposure both indicate that a Pt/Sn alloy is produced during reduction.

  11. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  12. Effects of point defect concentrations of the reactive element oxides on the oxidation kinetics of pure Ni and Ni-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruey-Fong

    The addition of some reactive element oxides, e.g. Ysb2Osb3 or ZrOsb2, has significant effects, e.g. improvement in scale adhesion and reduction in oxidation rate, on the oxidation behavior of chromia and alumina scale forming alloys at high temperatures. However, there is little agreement about how a small addition of an oxygen-active element can cause such profound effects. It was the goal of this project to study the growth kinetics of an oxide scale when different reactive-element oxides were added to pure Ni and Ni-Cr alloys and, consequently, to aid in clarifying the mechanism of reactive element effects. The oxidation kinetics were measured using a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) method and the material characterization of oxide scale was conducted. The relationship between point defect structures and oxidation kinetics was discussed. The results in this research showed that Ysb2Osb3 and ZrOsb2 exhibited the reactive element effects on the oxidation behaviors of Ni and Ni-Cr alloys. In addition, the point defect concentrations of the reactive element oxide, Ysb2Osb3, were changed by doping of different valent oxides. The modification of point defect concentrations of the reactive element oxide dispersed phases did change the oxidation kinetics of the pure Ni and Ni-Cr alloys containing Ysb2Osb3. These results indicate that the transport properties of the reactive element oxide dispersed phases are one of the important factors in determining the growth rate of an oxide scale.

  13. Oxide evolution on Alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzi, Silvia; Göransson, Kenneth; Rahman, Seikh M. H.; Eriksson, Sten G.; Liu, Fang; Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna

    2016-12-01

    In order to simulate the environment experienced by spacer grids in a boiling water reactor (BWR), specimens of the Ni-based Alloy X-750 were exposed to a water jet in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar. The oxide microstructure of specimens exposed for 2 h, 24 h, 168 h and 840 h has been investigated mainly using electron microscopy. The specimens suffer mass loss due to dissolution during exposure. At the same time a complex layered oxide develops. After the longest exposure the oxide consists of two outer spinel layers consisting of blocky crystals, one intermediate layer of nickel oxide interspersed with Ti-rich oxide needles, and an inner layer of oxidized base metal. The evolution of the oxide leading up to this structure is discussed and a model is presented.

  14. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  15. Thermomechanical and Thermochemical Behavior of a Hafnium-20 Percent Tantalum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the thermomechanical and thermochemical behavior of a high temperature, oxidation resistant, hafnium-20 percent tantalum alloy. The elastic and shear moduli of this alloy were determined in air up to 1000 C and in vacuum up to 2000 C using a mechanical resonance technique. The internal friction of the alloy was measured up to temperatures greater than 1400 C. Room temperature stress-strain behavior of the oxidized and unoxidized alloy was established. The effect of annealing on the elastic and shear moduli of the extruded rod material was investigated. The martensitic-type phase transformation occurring in the alloy was studied using hot stage metallography and electron microscopy. Static oxidation tests were conducted on the alloy at temperatures from 1000 C to 1700 C with weight gain measurements made as a function of time and temperatures. Surface morphology studies were conducted on the oxide coatings formed at the different temperatures using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  16. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  17. Casting behavior of titanium alloys in a centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Miyakawa, O; Takada, Y; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2003-05-01

    Since dental casting requires replication of complex shapes with great accuracy, this study examined how well some commercial titanium alloys and experimental titanium-copper alloys filled a mold cavity. The metals examined were three types of commercial dental titanium [commercially pure titanium (hereinafter noted as CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V (T64) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (T67)], and experimental titanium-copper alloys [3%, 5% and 10% Cu (mass %)]. The volume percentage filling the cavity was evaluated in castings prepared in a very thin perforated sheet pattern and cast in a centrifugal casting machine. The flow behavior of the molten metal was also examined using a so-called "tracer element technique." The amounts of CP-Ti and all the Ti-Cu alloys filling the cavity were similar; less T64 and T67 filled the cavity. However, the Ti-Cu alloys failed to reach the end of the cavities due to a lower fluidity compared to the other metals. A mold prepared with specially designed perforated sheets was effective at differentiating the flow behavior of the metals tested. The present technique also revealed that the more viscous Ti-Cu alloys with a wide freezing range failed to sequentially flow to the end of the cavity.

  18. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  19. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Wojcik, C. )

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys have been used for many years in rocket propulsion systems and afterburner sections of gas turbine engines. In these applications, adequate oxidation resistance is provided by protective silicide coatings. By utilizing these coatings and niobium powder metallurgy to produce porous wicks, it has been demonstrated that niobium alloy heat pipes can comfortably operate in flame temperatures exceeding 3000 K. Results of lithium corrosion tests on C-103 (Nb-10%Hf-1%Ti) up to 1477 K will be presented along with thermal performance data for specific heat pipe designs.

  20. Solid-particle erosion behavior of cast alloys used in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atapek, Ş. Hakan; Fidan, Sinan

    2015-12-01

    The erosive-wear response of five commercial ferrous-based cast alloys used for crushing was examined in this study. The microstructures of the alloys were modified to elucidate the effect of microstructural features on wear. Erosion tests were conducted using aluminum oxide particles (90-125 μm) at 70 m/s and a normal impact angle (90°). The worn surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and 3D non-contact laser profilometry. It is found that (i) a pearlitic structure exhibiting a greater plastic deformation than both bainitic and martensitic structures shows the greatest resistance to erosive wear at normal impact and (ii) the fracture characteristics of carbide and graphite particles plays an important role in determining the erosion wear behavior of the cast alloy matrices.

  1. Creep and residual mechanical properties of cast superalloys and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile, stress-rupture, creep, and residual tensile properties after creep testing were determined for two typical cast superalloys and four advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. The superalloys examined included the nickel-base alloy B-1900 and the cobalt-base alloy MAR-M509. The nickel-base ODS MA-757 (Ni-16CR-4Al-0.6Y2O3 and the iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 (Fe-20Cr-5Al-0.8Y2O3) were extensively studied, while limited testing was conducted on the ODS nickel-base alloys STCA (Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-2Y2O3) with a without Ta and YD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-5Al-2Y2O3). Elevated temperature testing was conducted from 114 to 1477 K except for STCA and YD-NiCrAl alloys, which were only tested at 1366 K. The residual tensile properties of B-1900 and MAR-M509 are not reduced by prior creep testing (strains at least up to 1 percent), while the room temperature tensile properties of ODS nickel-base alloys can be reduced by small amounts of prior creep strain (less than 0.5 percent). The iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 does not appear to be susceptible to creep degradation at least up to strains of about 0.25 percent. However, MA-956 exhibits unusual creep behavior which apparently involves crack nucleation and growth.

  2. Long-term high-velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of several NiCrAl and FeCrAl base oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys have been tested for cyclic, long-term, high gas-velocity resistance to oxidation at 1100 C and hot corrosion at 900 C. Both nominally Ni-16Cr-4Al and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al ODS alloys were subjected up to about 2500 cycles, where each cycle consisted of 1 hr in a hot, Mach 0.3 combusted gas stream followed by a 3-min quench in an ambient temperature, Mach 0.3 air blast. For comparison to existing technology, a coated superalloy was simultaneously tested. The ODS iron alloy exhibited clearly superior behavior, surviving 3800 oxidation and 2300 hot corrosion cycles essentially unscathed. While the ODS nickel alloys exhibited adequate oxidation resistance, the long-term hot corrosion resistance could be marginal, since the best life for such alloys under these conditions was only about 1100 cycles. However, the hot corrosion resistance of the ODS Ni-base alloys is excellent in comparison to that of traditional superalloys.

  3. Oxidation and Volatilization of TZM Alloy in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

    1999-10-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal base alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases, and molybdenum alloys are susceptible to losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide (MoOsub3) species. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of MoO3 during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. We have experimentally measured the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800°C. Calculations using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures over pure MoOsub3 and a vaporization mass transfer model correlate well with experimental data between 600 and 800°C. Partial saturation of (MoOsub3) gas species account for influences of flow rate at 700°C. Some anomalies in oxidation rate below 650°C, suggesting that other phases, e.g., MoOsub2 or other non-stoichiometric oxides may influence oxidation and volatilization processes under some limited conditions.

  4. Oxidation and volatilization of TZM alloy in air

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Smolik; D.A. Petti; S.T. Schuetz

    1999-10-10

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal base alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases, and molybdenum alloys are susceptible to losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) species. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of MoO{sub 3} during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. The authors have experimentally measured the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800 C. Calculations using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures over pure MoO{sub 3} and a vaporization mass transfer model correlate well with experimental data between 600 and 800 C. Partial saturation of MoO{sub 3} gas species account for influences of flow rate at 700 C. Some anomalies in oxidation rate below 650 C, suggesting that other phases, e.g., MoO{sub 2} or other non-stoichiometric oxides may influence oxidation and volatilization processes under some limited conditions.

  5. Oxidation and volatilization of TZM alloy in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolik, G. R.; Petti, D. A.; Schuetz, S. T.

    2000-12-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal-base alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases, and molybdenum alloys are susceptible to losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3) species. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration and re-deposition of MoO 3 during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. We have experimentally measured the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400°C and 800°C. Calculations using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures over pure MoO 3 and a vaporization mass transfer model correlate well with the experimental data between 600°C and 800°C. Partial saturation of (MoO 3) gas species accounts for influences of flow rate at 700°C. Some anomalies in oxidation rate below 650°C suggest that other phases, e.g., MoO 2 or other non-stoichiometric oxides may influence oxidation and volatilization processes under some limited conditions.

  6. The influence of Si content on the oxidation behavior of Type 430 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    Trace “alloying” elements can significantly affect alloy performance. One example is the effect of residual Si content on the oxidation behavior of stainless steels. Small amounts of Si can form a continuous SiO2 layer at the metal-oxide scale interface. This is beneficial for enhancing oxidation resistance; however it is detrimental for fuel cell interconnect application, as SiO2 is an electrical insulator. In order to assess the effect of SiO2 on the performance of Type 430 ferritic steel, a potential interconnect alloy, a series of custom 430 alloys were melted and reduced to sheet with controlled Si contents (ranging from <0.01 to 0.1 wt% Si). Oxidation tests were conducted at 800oC in moist air. The behavior was compared to a commercial Type 430 alloy (with 0.4 wt%Si) and Crofer 22APU. It was found that for the 430 alloys, the oxidation rate increased with decreasing Si content. However, after 4000 hour of exposure, the mass gain for the low Si 430 alloys was comparable to Crofer 22APU.

  7. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  8. Solidification behavior and structure of Al-Cu alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.A.; Li, M.; Yang, N.C.Y.

    1997-09-01

    The microsegregation behavior of electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds of Al-Cu alloys covering a range from 0.19 to 7.74 wt% Cu were characterized for dendrite core concentrations and fraction eutectic solidification. Although a single weld speed of 12.7 mm/sec was used, some differences were observed in the segregation behavior of the two weld types. The microsegregation behavior was also modeled using a finite differences technique considering dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling and solid state diffusion. Fairly good agreement was observed between measured and calculated segregation behavior although differences between the two weld types could not be completely accounted for. The concept of dendrite tip undercooling was used to explain the formation of a single through thickness centerline grain in the higher alloy content GTA welds.

  9. Corrosion behavior and microstructures of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

    2004-06-01

    Anodic polarization was performed in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions to characterize the relationship between the corrosion behavior and microstructures of cast Ti-Au (5-40%) alloys. An abrupt increase in the current density occurred at approximately 0.6 V vs. SCE for the 30% and 40% Au alloys in the 0.9% NaCl solution. The microstructures after corrosion testing indicated that this breakdown may have been caused by the preferential dissolution of the Ti3Au. However, the potential for preferential dissolution was higher than the breakdown potential of stainless steel or Co-Cr alloy, which meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was superior. In 1% lactic acid solution, the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was excellent, with no breakdown at any composition. In the present test solutions, the Ti-Au alloys up to 20% Au had good corrosion resistance comparable to that for pure titanium.

  10. Creep degradation in oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are studied for creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and three types of advanced ODS-NiCrAl alloys. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, the appearance of dispersoid-free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and internal oxidation in the microstructure were interpreted as creep degradation effects. This work showed that many ODS alloys are subject to creep damage. Degradation of tensile properties occurred after very small amounts of creep strain, ductility being the most sensitive property. All the ODS alloys which were creep damaged possessed a large grain size. Creep damage appears to have been due to diffusional creep which produced dispersoid-free bands around boundaries acting as vacancy sources. Low angle and possibly twin boundaries acted as vacancy sources.

  11. Biaxial Fatigue Behavior of Niti Shape Memory Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    M06 Abstract Nitinol is a shape memory alloy (SMA) capable of martensite-to-austenite phase transformations enabling shape-memory behavior. Shape...memory properties make Nitinol a strong candidate material for use in aircraft applications such as actuators. Structural integrity and reliability...torsion fatigue behavior of Nitinol at room temperature. Monotonic tests in tension and torsion were conducted to typify uni-directional stress-strain

  12. The Austenitizing Behavior of a Low Alloy Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    to differences in melting and solidification between the two types of steels ; ESR exhibiting a more uniform dendritic grain structure and possibly...AD-AoVtS^ MCHNICAi; LIBRARY AD TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR-80013 TIE AUSIENITIZING BEHAVIOR OF A LDW ALLDY STEEL P, A. Thornton May 1980 US...Behavior of a Low Alloy Steel 5. TYPE OF REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHORf*; 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERf*) Peter A

  13. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  14. Effect of recasting on the oxidation layer of a palladium-silver porcelain alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.M.; Razzoog, M.E.; Lang, B.R.

    1988-04-01

    The oxidation zone of a commercial palladium-silver porcelain alloy was compared after repeated casting with and without the addition of new alloy. The intensity of palladium, silver, tin, indium, and O K-alpha near the oxidation zone was analyzed with XMA. The intensity curves of tin, silver, and oxygen increased progressively through each generation despite the addition of new alloy. The thickness of the oxidation zone and the microporosities at the internal oxidation zone increased through each generation without the addition of new alloy. Although the findings indicated that the oxidation zone was favorably formed by adding new alloy, 50% by weight, for four generations, the silver and metallic oxides of the oxidation zone increased through each generation. The reuse of the palladium-silver porcelain alloy remains questionable.

  15. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A series of fourteen (14) novel high-strength molybdenum alloy compositions containing a dispersion of very fine (< 1 {mu}m diameter) oxide particles were consolidated using two proprietary powder metallurgy techniques. The developmental compositions were evaluated to determine the microstructural stability and mechanical properties from cryogenic (-148{degrees}F) to elevated temperatures (4000{degrees}F) for material in the as-swaged (>98% cold work) condition and for as-swaged material in the heat treated condition. Extremely fine oxide particle sizes (<1000 {Angstrom}) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for a number of the experimental compositions in the as-swaged condition. A one hour recrystallization temperature as high as 3990{degrees}F was measured and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as low as {approximately}58{degrees}F for material in the recrystallized condition was determined. The preliminary results support the alloy design concept feasibility.

  16. An Oxidation-Resistant Coating Alloy for Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P.; Smialek, James L.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the g-phase (TiAl) offer the potential for component weight savings of up to 50 percent over conventional superalloys in 600 to 850 C aerospace applications. Extensive development efforts over the past 10 years have led to the identification of "engineering" gamma-alloys, which offer a balance of room-temperature mechanical properties and high-temperature strength retention. The gamma class of titanium aluminides also offers oxidation and interstitial (oxygen and nitrogen) embrittlement resistance superior to that of the alpha(sub 2) (Ti3Al) and orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb) classes of titanium aluminides. However, environmental durability is still a concern, especially at temperatures above 750 to 800 C. Recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center led to the development of an oxidation-resistant coating alloy that shows great promise for the protection of gamma titanium aluminides.

  17. Aluminum Alloying Effects on Lattice Types, Microstructures, and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhi; Gao, Michael C.; Diao, Haoyan; Yang, Tengfei; Liu, Junpeng; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Zhaoping; Cheng, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yanwen; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.; Egami, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    The crystal lattice type is one of the dominant factors for controlling the mechanical behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs). For example, the yield strength at room temperature varies from 300 MPa for the face-centered-cubic (fcc) structured alloys, such as the CoCrCuFeNiTi x system, to about 3,000 MPa for the body-centered-cubic (bcc) structured alloys, such as the AlCoCrFeNiTi x system. The values of Vickers hardness range from 100 to 900, depending on lattice types and microstructures. As in conventional alloys with one or two principal elements, the addition of minor alloying elements to HEAs can further alter their mechanical properties, such as strength, plasticity, hardness, etc. Excessive alloying may even result in the change of lattice types of HEAs. In this report, we first review alloying effects on lattice types and properties of HEAs in five Al-containing HEA systems: Al x CoCrCuFeNi, Al x CoCrFeNi, Al x CrFe1.5MnNi0.5, Al x CoCrFeNiTi, and Al x CrCuFeNi2. It is found that Al acts as a strong bcc stabilizer, and its addition enhances the strength of the alloy at the cost of reduced ductility. The origins of such effects are then qualitatively discussed from the viewpoints of lattice-strain energies and electronic bonds. Quantification of the interaction between Al and 3 d transition metals in fcc, bcc, and intermetallic compounds is illustrated in the thermodynamic modeling using the CALculation of PHAse Diagram method.

  18. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    Iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. All the weld overlays showed good oxidation/sulfidation behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc deposit with only 21 at.% Al. A rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initially grown scales spalled and the subsequent rate of reaction was not controlled by the formation of slowly growing aluminum oxides. Higher starting aluminum concentrations (>{approximately}25 at.%) are needed to assure adequate oxidation/sulfidation lifetimes of the weld overlays. A variety of stable oxides was added to a base Fe-28 at.% Al-2 % Cr alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition, but wasn`t as effective as it is in other alumina-forming alloys. Preliminary data for powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr exposed to the H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar gas at 800{degrees}C showed that the oxidation/sulfidation rate was similar to that of many Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced by ingot metallurgy routes.

  19. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  20. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation at 1000 and 1100 deg C of four nickel-base alloys: NASA-TRW VIA, B-1900, 713C, and 738X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Santoro, G. J.; Lowell, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation resistance of four cast Ni-base gamma + gamma prime alloys, NASA-TRW Via, B-1900, 713C, and 738X, was determined in still air at 1000 and 1100 C. The oxidation process was evaluated by specific sample weight change with time, sample thickness change, X-ray diffraction of the scales, and sample metallography. The behavior is discussed in terms of the Cr, Al, and refractory metal contents of the alloys.

  1. The effect of substrate texture and oxidation temperature on oxide texture development in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, A.; Frankel, P.; Partezana, J.; Preuss, M.

    2017-02-01

    During corrosion of zirconium alloys a highly textured oxide is formed, the degree of this preferred orientation has previously been shown to be an important factor in determining the corrosion behaviour of these alloys. Two distinct experiments were designed in order to investigate the origin of this oxide texture development on two commercial alloys. Firstly, sheet samples of Zircaloy-4 were oxidised between 500 and 800 °C in air. The resulting monoclinic oxide texture strength was observed to decrease with increasing oxidation temperature. In a second experiment, orthogonal faces of Low Tin ZIRLO™ were oxidised in 360 °C water, providing different substrate textures but identical microstructures. The substrate texture was observed to have a negligible effect on the corrosion performance whilst the major orientation of both oxide phases was found to be independent of substrate orientation. It is concluded that the main driving force for oxide texture development in single-phase zirconium alloys is the compressive stress caused by the Zrsbnd ZrO2 transformation.

  2. A review of the effects of dissolved ozone on the corrosion behavior of metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.E.; Duquette, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone is currently being considered as a possible replacement for chlorine based compounds as a biocide. Yet, a review of current literature related to the corrosion behavior of metals and alloys exposed to ozonated solutions indicates that there is considerable confusion concerning the effects of this strong oxidant. Some studies indicate that dissolved ozone will increase the corrosion rates of alloys such as carbon steel or brasses when compared to aerated solutions. Others indicate a beneficial effect of ozone, while still others indicate a neutral effect. Virtually all of these reports are for fresh waters, few relate to localized corrosion behavior, and most are anecdotal in that they report observations from service conditions with poorly defined variables. This review attempts to summarize the various corrosion rates reported in the literature, as well as present data obtained in laboratory studies of metals exposed to ozone in chloride containing environments, including artificial sea water. 28 refs.

  3. Stress relaxation behavior of nanocluster-strengthened ferritic alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeoung H; Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T

    2012-01-01

    Stress relaxation behavior was investigated for the nanoclusters/dispersoids-strengthened steels including the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10), oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer97, and commercial ODS steel PM2000. The stress relaxation tests were carried out at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 1000 degrees C. Overall, the relaxation rates of 14YWT and ODS-Eurofer97 were lower than that of PM2000. To analyze the strain rate sensitivity of the alloys, the load drop-time curves were converted to the stress-strain rate curves. In the log-log plots of these curves, no significant change in slope was observed in the strain rate range of 2 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-3)s(-1). At 600 degrees C, 14YWT and ODS-Eurofer97 have similar activation values of similar to 50b(3) while PM2000 has similar to 100b(3). Above 700 degrees C, the differences of the activation energy among alloys become more noticeable with increasing temperature. The activation energies of the three alloys were derived and compared. The rate-controlling mechanisms in the stress relaxation of the three nanoclusters/dispersoids-hardened alloys include dislocation glide and climb, and further study is necessary to clarify detailed contributing mechanisms.

  4. Structure and recalescence behavior of undercooled nickel-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yanzhong; Piccone, Thomas J.; Shiohara, Yuh; Flemings, Merton C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of undercooling on the thermal behavior and structure of Ni-Sn alloys are investigated. Hypoeutectic (Ni-25 wt pct Sn) and eutectic (Ni-32.5 wt pct Sn) compositions of the Ni-Sn alloy were undercooled using a levitation melting with glass encasement technique, and the recalescence of these alloys was measured using a high speed temperature sensing device and a digital oscilloscope. It is observed that in both samples the total solidification and recalescence times decrease with increasing undercooling; the volume fraction of normal lamellar eutectic decreases with increasing undercooling; and in the hypoeutectic sample, the morphology of the primary phase changes from dendritic to spherical with increasing undercooling.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Alloys in Molten Fluoride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu

    The molten fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor (FHR) has been proposed as a candidate Generation IV nuclear reactor. This reactor combines the latest nuclear technology with the use of molten fluoride salt as coolant to significantly enhance safety and efficiency. However, an important challenge in FHR development is the corrosion of structural materials in high-temperature molten fluoride salt. The structural alloys' degradation, particularly in terms of chromium depletion, and the molten salt chemistry are key factors that impact the lifetime of nuclear reactors and the development of future FHR designs. In support of materials development for the FHR, the nickel base alloy of Hastelloy N and iron-chromium base alloy 316 stainless steel are being actively considered as critical structural alloys. Enriched 27LiF-BeF2 (named as FLiBe) is a promising coolant for the FHR because of its neutronic properties and heat transfer characteristics while operating at atmospheric pressure. In this study, the corrosion behavior of Ni-5Cr and Ni-20Cr binary model alloys, and Hastelloy N and 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe with and without graphite were investigated through various microstructural analyses. Based on the understanding of the corrosion behavior and data of above four alloys in molten FLiBe, a long-term corrosion prediction model has been developed that is applicable specifically for these four materials in FLiBe at 700ºC. The model uses Cr concentration profile C(x, t) as a function of corrosion distance in the materials and duration fundamentally derived from the Fick's diffusion laws. This model was validated with reasonable accuracy for the four alloys by fitting the calculated profiles with experimental data and can be applied to evaluate corrosion attack depth over the long-term. The critical constant of the overall diffusion coefficient (Deff) in this model can be quickly calculated from the experimental measurement of alloys' weight

  6. Oxidation Kinetics of a NiPtTi High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    A high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA), Ni30Pt50Ti, with an M(sub s) near 600 C, was isothermally oxidized in air for 100 hr over the temperature range of 500 to 900 C. Parabolic kinetics were confirmed by log-log and parabolic plots and showed no indication of fast transient oxidation. The overall behavior could be best described by the Arrhenius relationship: k(sub p) = 1.64 x 10(exp 12)[(-250 kJ/mole)/RT] mg(sup 2)/cm(sup 4)hr. This is about a factor of 4 reduction compared to values measured here for a binary Ni47Ti commercial SMA. The activation energy agreed with most literature values for TiO2 scale growth measured for elemental Ti and other NiTi alloys. Assuming uniform alloy depletion of a 20 mil (0.5 mm) dia. HTSMA wire, approx. 1 percent Ti reduction is predicted after 20,000 hr oxidation at 500 C, but becomes much more serious at higher temperatures.

  7. Electrochemical corrosion behavior and elasticity properties of Ti-6Al-xFe alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinwen; Zhao, Yongqing; Niu, Hongzhi; Zhang, Yusheng; Du, Yuzhou; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Wangtu

    2016-05-01

    The present study is to investigate the microstructural characteristics, electrochemical corrosion behavior and elasticity properties of Ti-6Al-xFe alloys with Fe addition for biomedical application, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy with two-phase (α+β) microstructure is also studied as a comparison. Microstructural characterization reveals that the phase and crystal structure are sensitive to the Fe content. Ti-6Al alloy displays feather-like hexagonal α phase, and Ti-6Al-1Fe exhibits coarse lath structure of hexagonal α phase and a small amount of β phase. Ti-6Al-2Fe and Ti-6Al-4Fe alloys are dominated by elongated, equiaxed α phase and retained β phase, but the size of α phase particle in Ti-6Al-4Fe alloy is much smaller than that in Ti-6Al-2Fe alloy. The corrosion resistance of these alloys is determined in SBF solution at 37 °C. It is found that the alloys spontaneously form a passive oxide film on their surface after immersion for 500 s, and then they are stable for polarizations up to 0 VSCE. In comparison with Ti-6Al and Ti-6Al-4V alloys, Ti-6Al-xFe alloys exhibit better corrosion resistance with lower anodic current densities, larger polarization resistances and higher open-circuit potentials. The passive layers show stable characteristics, and the wide frequency ranges displaying capacitive characteristics occur for high iron contents. Elasticity experiments are performed to evaluate the elasticity property at room temperature. Ti-6Al-4Fe alloy has the lowest Young's modulus (112 GPa) and exhibits the highest strength/modulus ratios as large as 8.6, which is similar to that of c.p. Ti (8.5). These characteristics of Ti-6Al-xFe alloys form the basis of a great potential to be used as biomedical implantation materials.

  8. Characteristic Exoemission From Oxide Covered Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    sharp end mill . Sn all cuts wcr’ taken to present exeessise defornia. ~don. Aft~t riachining, the edges of she tensile specim ens were —carefully de...end Himmel 5268 - 1 in addition, the peak position is a function of oxide thickness (Fig. 12). Above 500 A , the peak position A FSOM A~ NOTT AND SAM...traditional dogbone shape from 20 mil (0.013 cm) thick production stock. A slow milling process was used to avoid unnecessary stresses and temperature

  9. Low cost fabrication development for oxide dispersion strengthened alloy vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bailey, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    Viable processes were developed for secondary working of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys to near-net shapes (NNS) for aircraft turbine vanes. These processes were shown capable of producing required microstructure and properties for vane applications. Material cost savings of 40 to 50% are projected for the NNS process over the current procedures which involve machining from rectangular bar. Additional machining cost savings are projected. Of three secondary working processes evaluated, directional forging and plate bending were determined to be viable NNS processes for ODS vanes. Directional forging was deemed most applicable to high pressure turbine (HPT) vanes with their large thickness variations while plate bending was determined to be most cost effective for low pressure turbine (LPT) vanes because of their limited thickness variations. Since the F101 LPT vane was selected for study in this program, development of plate bending was carried through to establishment of a preliminary process. Preparation of ODS alloy plate for bending was found to be a straight forward process using currently available bar stock, providing that the capability for reheating between roll passes is available. Advanced ODS-NiCrAl and ODS-FeCrAl alloys were utilized on this program. Workability of all alloys was adequate for directional forging and plate bending, but only the ODS-FeCrAl had adequate workability for shaped preform extrustion.

  10. Cavitation erosion resistance of microarc oxidation coating on aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun; Liang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Two ceramic coatings are prepared on 2124 aluminum alloy by microarc oxidation (MAO) technology. To explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the MAO coating, cavitation tests were performed by using a rotating-disk test rig. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the samples after cavitation tests were examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the MAO coatings can extend the incubation period of aluminum alloy, and thus enhance the cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated aluminum alloy samples. After duration of 63 h cavitation test, a lot of erosion pits and the particles in various shapes can be observed on the surfaces of the aluminum alloy samples, while only a few erosion pits are observed on the MAO coatings. Moreover, the mean depths of erosion on the MAO coatings are lower in the first 30 h and are independent on erosion time. The results show that the cavitation erosion of MAO coating is governed by water mechanical impaction, resulting from the effects of brittle fracture of the MAO coating.

  11. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data for alloy/braze combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained for 62 brazed specimens of 3 iron-, 3 nickel-, and 1 cobalt-base alloy. Fluidized bed thermal cycling was conducted over the range 740/25 C employing 10 cm long single-edge wedge specimens. Immersion time was always 4 minutes in each bed. Types of test specimens employed in the program include those with brazed overlays on the specimen radius, those butt brazed at midspan and those with a brazed foil overlay on the specimen radius. Of the 18 braze overlay specimens, 5 generated fatigue cracks by 7000 cycles. Thermal cracking of butt brazed specimens occurred exclusively through the butt braze. Of the 23 butt brazed specimens, 7 survived 11,000 thermal cycles without cracking. Only 2 of the 21 foil overlaid specimens exhibiting cracking in 7,000 cycles. Blistering of the foil did occur for 2 alloys by 500 cycles. Oxidation of the alloy/braze combination was limited at the test maximum test temperature of 740 C.

  12. Effects of Sn addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Ti–Nb–Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, Paulo E.L.; Contieri, Rodrigo J.; Lopes, Eder S.N.; Robin, Alain; Caram, Rubens

    2014-10-15

    Ti and Ti alloys are widely used in restorative surgery because of their good biocompatibility, enhanced mechanical behavior and high corrosion resistance in physiological media. The corrosion resistance of Ti-based materials is due to the spontaneous formation of the TiO{sub 2} oxide film on their surface, which exhibits elevated stability in biological fluids. Ti–Nb alloys, depending on the composition and the processing routes to which the alloys are subjected, have high mechanical strength combined with low elastic modulus. The addition of Sn to Ti–Nb alloys allows the phase transformations to be controlled, particularly the precipitation of ω phase. The aim of this study is to discuss the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of cast Ti–Nb alloys to which Sn has been added. Samples were centrifugally cast in a copper mold, and the microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical behavior evaluation was performed using Berkovich nanoindentation, Vickers hardness and compression tests. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in Ringer's solution at room temperature using electrochemical techniques. The results obtained suggested that the physical, mechanical and chemical behaviors of the Ti–Nb–Sn alloys are directly dependent on the Sn content. - Graphical abstract: Effects of Sn addition to the Ti–30Nb alloy on the elastic modulus. - Highlights: • Sn addition causes reduction of the ω phase precipitation. • Minimum Vickers hardness and elastic modulus occurred for 6 wt.% Sn content. • Addition of 6 wt.% Sn resulted in maximum ductility and minimum compression strength. • All Ti–30Nb–XSn (X = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%) alloys are passive in Ringer's solution. • Highest corrosion resistance was observed for 6 wt.% Sn content.

  13. Evaluation of Cyclic Behavior of Aircraft Turbine Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, V.; Popp, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An evaluation of the cyclic behavior of three aircraft engine turbine disk materials was conducted to compare their relative crack initiation and crack propagation resistance. The disk alloys investigated were Inconel 718, hot isostatically pressed and forged powder metallurgy Rene '95, and as-hot-isostatically pressed Rene '95. The objective was to compare the hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy alloy forms with conventionally processed superalloys as represented by Inconel 718. Cyclic behavior was evaluated at 650 C both under continuously cycling and a fifteen minute tensile hold time cycle to simulate engine conditions. Analysis of the test data were made to evaluate the strain range partitioning and energy exhaustion concepts for predicting hold time effects on low cycle fatigue.

  14. Corrosive wear behavior of 2014 and 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, S. K.; Andrews, S.; Vasquez, G.

    1999-02-01

    Alloys of 2014 and 6061 aluminum reinforced with 0.1 volume fraction of alumina particles (VFAP) were subjected to impact scratching during a corrosive wear process. The transient currents generated due to the impact were measured in the two composites as well as in their respective monoliths. The effect of solutionizing time on the transient currents was correlated to the near surface microstructures, scratch morphology, concentration of quenched-in vacancies, and changes in grain sizes. It was observed that the transient current values increase with an increase in solutionizing time, indicating that the corrosive wear behavior is not strongly affected by the grain boundaries. However, a combination of pitting and the galvanic corrosion may account for the typical corrosive wear behavior exhibited by the alloys and the composites of this study.

  15. Nucleation and growth of oxide islands during the initial-stage oxidation of (100)Cu-Pt alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Langli; Zhou, Guangwen; Kang, Yihong; Yang, Judith C.

    2015-02-14

    The initial-stage oxidation of (100) Cu-Pt alloys has been examined by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the oxidation proceeds via the nucleation and growth of Cu{sub 2}O islands that show dependence on the alloy composition and oxidation temperature. The kinetic measurements on the oxide nucleation reveal that both the nucleation density and surface coverage of Cu{sub 2}O islands can be promoted by alloying more Pt in the Cu-Pt alloys. Increasing the oxidation temperature above 700 °C results in the growth of large Cu{sub 2}O islands that transits to a dendritic growth morphology. The ex situ AFM studies reveal that the nucleation of oxide islands can occur on surface terraces and the subsequent oxide growth depletes local terrace Cu atoms that results in the formation of surface pits.

  16. Fabrication technological development of the oxide dispersion strengthened alloy MA957 for fast reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; GD Johnson; WF Brown; MM Paxton; RJ Puigh; CR Eiholzer; C Martinez; MA Blotter

    2000-03-27

    A significant amount of effort has been devoted to determining the properties and understanding the behavior of the alloy MA957 to define its potential usefulness as a cladding material, in the fast breeder reactor program. The numerous characterization and fabrication studies that were conducted are documented in this report. The alloy is a ferritic stainless steel developed by International Nickel Company specifically for structural reactor applications. It is strengthened by a very fine, uniformly distributed yttria dispersoid. Its fabrication involves a mechanical alloying process and subsequent extrusion, which ultimately results in a highly elongated grain structure. While the presence of the dispersoid produces a material with excellent strength, the body centered cubic structure inherent to the material coupled with the high aspect ratio that results from processing operations produces some difficulties with ductility. The alloy is very sensitive to variations in a number of processing parameters, and if the high strength is once lost during fabrication, it cannot be recovered. The microstructural evolution of the alloy under irradiation falls into two regimes. Below about 550 C, dislocation development, {alpha}{prime} precipitation and void evolution in the matrix are observed, while above about 550 C damage appears to be restricted to cavity formation within oxide particles. The thermal expansion of the alloy is very similar to that of HT9 up to the temperature where HT9 undergoes a phase transition to austenitic. Pulse magnetic welding of end caps onto MA957 tubing can be accomplished in a manner similar to that in which it is performed on HT9, although the welding parameters appear to be very sensitive to variations in the tubing that result from small changes in fabrication conditions. The tensile and stress rupture behavior of the alloy are acceptable in the unirradiated condition, being comparable to HT9 below about 700 C and exceeding those of HT9

  17. Issues Concerning the Oxidation of Ni(Pt)Ti Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of the Ni-30Pt-50Ti high temperature shape memory alloy is compared to that of conventional NiTi nitinol SMAs. The oxidation rates were 1/4 those of NiTi under identical conditions. Ni-Ti-X SMAs are dominated by TiO2 scales, but, in some cases, the activation energy diverges for unexplained reasons. Typically, islands of metallic Ni or Pt(Ni) particles are embedded in lower scale layers due to rapid selective growth of TiO2 and low oxygen potential within the scale. The blocking effect of Pt-rich particles and lower diffusivity of Pt-rich depletion zones are proposed to account for the reduction in oxidation rates.

  18. Preparation of Si-containing oxide coating and biomimetic apatite induction on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huijun; Dong, Qing; Dou, Jinhe; Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are recently found important in the field of bone repairing for their ideal mechanical performance and excellent biocompatibility. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) is a simple, controllable and efficient electrochemistry method that can prepare protective ceramic coatings on magnesium alloys. The properties of the MAO coating, such as thickness, microstructure, roughness and composition, can easily be controlled by adjusting the voltage, current density, duration or the electrolyte concentration. In this work, MAO coatings are prepared on ZK61 magnesium alloy at different voltages. The structure characteristics and element distributions of the coating are investigated by XRD, TEM, SEM and EPMA. The MAO samples are immersed in SBF for 7, 14 and 28 days respectively. The corrosion behaviors of the samples in SBF were also investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curves. The corrosion products were characterized by EDS and FT-IR. The MAO coated ZK61 alloy samples showed excellent corrosion resistance and bioactivity. The MAO method demonstrates a great potential in the preparation of degradable and bioactive orthopedic magnesium-based implants.

  19. Oxidation/vaporization of silicide coated columbium base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Mass spectrometric and target collection experiments were made at 1600 K to elucidate the mode of oxidative vaporization of two columbium alloys, fused-slurry-coated with a complex silicide former (Si-20Cr-Fe). At oxygen pressures up to 0.0005 torr the major vapor component detected by mass spectrometry for oxidized samples was gaseous silicon monoxide. Analysis of condensates collected at oxygen pressures of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 torr revealed that chromium-, silicon-, iron- and tungsten- containing species were the major products of vaporization. Equilibrium thermochemical diagrams were constructed for the metal-oxygen system corresponding to each constituent metal in both the coating and base alloy. The major vaporizing species are expected to be the gaseous oxides of chromium, silicon, iron and tungsten. Plots of vapor phase composition and maximum vaporization rate versus oxygen pressure were calculated for each coating constituent. The major contribution to weight loss by vaporization at oxygen pressures above 1 torr was shown to be the chromium-containing species.

  20. The effects of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yanar, N. M.; Lutz, B. S.; Garcia-Fresnillo, L.; ...

    2015-08-19

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of three alumina forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels with varying composition was studied at 650 and 800 °C in dry air and gases which contained water vapor. The AFA alloys exhibited better oxidation resistance than a “good chromia former” at 650 °C, particularly in H2O-containing atmospheres by virtue of alumina-scale formation. Although the AFA alloys were more resistant than chromia formers, their oxidation resistance was degraded at 650 °C in the presence of water vapor. In dry air the AFA alloys formed, thin continuous alumina scales, whereas in Ar–4%H2–3%H2O the areas of continuous alumina were reducedmore » and Fe oxide-rich nodules and regions of Cr, Mn-rich oxides formed. In some regions internal oxidation of the aluminum occurred in the H2O-containing gas. The alloy OC8 had slightly better resistance than OC4 or OC5 in this atmosphere. The alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys decreases with increasing temperature and, at 800 °C, they are borderline alumina formers, even in dry air. The oxidation resistance of all three alloys was degraded at 800 °C in atmospheres, which contained water vapor (Air–10%H2O, Ar–3%H2O and Ar–4%H2–3%H2O). The areas, which formed continuous alumina, were reduced in these atmospheres and areas of internal oxidation occurred. However, as a result of the borderline alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys it was not possible to determine which of the H2O-containing atmospheres was more severe or to rank the alloys in terms of their performance. The experimental results indicate that the initial microstructure of the AFA alloys also plays a role in their oxidation performance. Less protective oxides formed at 800 °C when alloy OC8 was equilibrated before exposure rather than being exposed in the as-processed condition. As a result, the reason for this is the presence of different phases in the bulk of the two specimens.« less

  1. The effects of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yanar, N. M.; Lutz, B. S.; Garcia-Fresnillo, L.; Brady, Michael P.; Meier, G. H.

    2015-08-19

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of three alumina forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels with varying composition was studied at 650 and 800 °C in dry air and gases which contained water vapor. The AFA alloys exhibited better oxidation resistance than a “good chromia former” at 650 °C, particularly in H2O-containing atmospheres by virtue of alumina-scale formation. Although the AFA alloys were more resistant than chromia formers, their oxidation resistance was degraded at 650 °C in the presence of water vapor. In dry air the AFA alloys formed, thin continuous alumina scales, whereas in Ar–4%H2–3%H2O the areas of continuous alumina were reduced and Fe oxide-rich nodules and regions of Cr, Mn-rich oxides formed. In some regions internal oxidation of the aluminum occurred in the H2O-containing gas. The alloy OC8 had slightly better resistance than OC4 or OC5 in this atmosphere. The alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys decreases with increasing temperature and, at 800 °C, they are borderline alumina formers, even in dry air. The oxidation resistance of all three alloys was degraded at 800 °C in atmospheres, which contained water vapor (Air–10%H2O, Ar–3%H2O and Ar–4%H2–3%H2O). The areas, which formed continuous alumina, were reduced in these atmospheres and areas of internal oxidation occurred. However, as a result of the borderline alumina-forming capability of the AFA alloys it was not possible to determine which of the H2O-containing atmospheres was more severe or to rank the alloys in terms of their performance. The experimental results indicate that the initial microstructure of the AFA alloys also plays a role in their oxidation performance. Less protective oxides formed at 800 °C when alloy OC8 was equilibrated before exposure rather than being exposed in the as-processed condition. As a result, the reason for this is the presence of different

  2. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Alloy 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Methods to improve the high temperature, dwell crack growth resistance of Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, were studied. Two approaches, heat treat variations and composition modifications, were investigated. Under the heat treat approach, solution temperature, cooling rates, and stabilization, were studied. It was found that higher solution temperatures, which promote coarser grain sizes, coupled with a 1550 F stabilization treatment were found to significantly reduce dwell crack growth rates at 1300 F Changes in the niobium and tantalum content were found to have a much smaller impact on crack growth behavior. Lowering the niobium:tantalum ratio did improve crack growth resistance and this effect was most pronounced for coarse grain microstructures. Based on these findings, a coarse grain microstructure for Alloy 10 appears to be the best option for improving dwell crack growth resistance, especially in the rim of a disk where temperatures can reach or exceed 1300 T. Further, the use of advanced processing technologies, which can produce a coarse grain rim and fine grain bore, would be the preferred option for Alloy 10 to obtain the optimal balance between tensile, creep, and crack growth requirements for small gas turbine engines.

  3. Deformation behavior of aluminum alloy 6111-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Carol

    2000-10-01

    Although aluminum alloys have found increasing usage in the automotive industry, their lower tensile elongations as compared with the low carbon steels they replace has raised concern about their lower formability. Lower formability imposes design and economic constraints on the automakers. The cause behind this lower elongation is the primary focus of this research. The specific alloy studied is 6111-T4 (Al-0.76Si-0.61Mg-0.82Cu in w/o), which is used in automobile outer body panels. In order to determine the factors that are limiting the elongation, it is critical to understand the deformation behavior of this alloy. To investigate the deformation behavior of this alloy, uniaxial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures (300K, 77K and 4.2K), strain rates (10-4, 5 x 10-4 , 10-3, 10-2, 10 -1/s) and specimen geometries. The work hardening and deformation behavior were examined both qualitatively and quantitatively. Ex-situ and in-situ observations were made on the tensile samples by using videography and optical microscopy. Several important findings resulted from this study. First, oscillations in the work hardening are due to the formation and propagation of deformation islands and deformation bands. Deformation islands are areas of localized deformation that occur in a cluster of grains. Second, the microstructural feature dominating the formation and propagation of the islands are the clustering of similarly oriented grains and the clustering of large sized grains. Third, the sharp drop in work hardening near the diffuse necking criterion for the 300K, 10-4 is test samples is due to the inhomogeneous deformation arising from these clusters. Finally, diffuse and local necks form before the theoretical predictions. The inhomogeneous microstructures causing the deformation islands and bands to form and propagate, thus leading to strain localization and eventual premature failure.

  4. Temperature and Strain-Rate Effects on Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Schiffers, H.; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of strain rate (4 x 10(exp -6) to 4 x 10(exp -3)/s) and temperature on the Low-Cycle Fatigue (LCF) behavior of alloy 800H have been evaluated in the range 750 C to 950 C. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests were conducted in air at a strain amplitude of +/- 0.30 pct. LCF life decreased with decreasing strain rate and increasing temperature. The cyclic stress response behavior showed a marked variation with temperature and strain rate. The time- and temperature- dependent processes which influence the cyclic stress response and life have been identified and their relative importance assessed. Dynamic strain aging, time-dependent deformation, precipitation of parallel platelets of M(23)C6 on grain boundaries and incoherent ledges of twins, and oxidation were found to operate depending on the test conditions. The largest effect on life was shown by oxidation processes.

  5. Oxidation and microstrucure of V-Cr-Ti alloys exposed to oxygen-containing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Uz, M.; Ulie, T.

    1997-08-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the oxygen uptake of several V-Cr-Ti alloys as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the exposure environment, (b) examine the microstructural characteristics of oxide scales and oxygen trapped at the grain boundaries in the substrate alloys, and (c) evaluate the influence of alloy composition on oxygen uptake and develop correlation(s) between alloy composition, exposure environment, and temperature.

  6. Ni-Zr alloys: relationship between surface characteristics and electrocatalytic behavior

    PubMed

    Angelini; Antonione; Baricco; Daolio; Fabrizio; Rosalbino

    2000-01-01

    A relationship between electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction and the surface composition of the electrode was established for Ni-Zr crystalline and amorphous alloys by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Electrocatalytic activity was tested by means of cathodic polarization in 1 M KOH at 25 degrees C and the resulting exchange current density has been taken as a measure of catalytic efficiency. Surface activation treatment involved chemical etching in HF solutions; the consequent morphological and compositional surface changes were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical behavior of the pure elements (Ni and Zr) was also considered for comparison. All samples submitted to chemical etching in HF solutions showed an increase in electrocatalytic activity, particularly the alloy with the highest Ni content. The beneficial effect of chemical etching is due to dissolution of the zirconium oxide layer and to the formation of nanocrystalline Ni on the surfaces.

  7. Diffusional transport and predicting oxidative failure during cyclic oxidation of beta-NiAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Vinarcik, E. J.; Barrett, C. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    Nickel aluminides (NiAl) containing 40-50 at. percent Al and up to 0.1 at. percent Zr have been studied following cyclic oxidation at 1200, 1300, 1350 and 1400 C. The selective oxidation of aluminum resulted in the formation of protective Al2O3 scales on each alloy composition at each temperature. However, repeated cycling eventually resulted in the gradual formation of less protective NiAl2O4. The appearance of the NiAl2O4, signaling the end of the protective scale-forming capability of the alloy, was related to the presence of gamma-prime-(Ni3Al) which formed as a result of the loss of aluminum from the sample. A simple methodology is presented to predict the protective life of beta-NiAl alloys. This method predicts the oxidative lifetime due to aluminum depletion when the aluminum concentration decreases to a critical concentration. The time interval preceding NiAl2O4 formation (i.e., the lifetime based on protective Al2O3 formation) and predicted lifetimes are compared and discussed. Use of the method to predict the maximum use temperature for NiAl-Zr alloys is also discussed.

  8. Mechanical behavior of aluminum-bearing ferritic alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guria, Ankan

    Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of electrical power worldwide. Nuclear reactors generating this power traditionally use Zirconium (Zr) based alloys as the fuel cladding material. Exothermic reaction of Zr with steam under accident conditions may lead to production of hydrogen with the possibility of catastrophic consequences. Following the Fukushima-Daiichi incident, the exploration of accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials accelerated. Aluminum-rich (around 5 wt. %) ferritic steels such as Fecralloy, APMT(TM) and APM(TM) are considered as potential materials for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications. These materials create an aluminum-based oxide scale protecting the alloy at elevated temperatures. Tensile deformation behavior of the above alloys was studied at different temperatures (25-500 °C) at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and correlated with microstructural characteristics. Higher strength and decent ductility of APMT(TM) led to further investigation of the alloy at various combination of strain rates and temperatures followed by fractography and detailed microscopic analyses. Serrations appeared in the stress-strain curves of APMT(TM) and Fecralloy steel tested in a limited temperature range (250-400 °C). The appearance of serrations is explained on the basis of dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect due to solute-dislocation interactions. The research in this study is being performed using the funds received from the US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP).

  9. The Electrochemical Behavior of Mo-Ta Alloy in Phosphoric Acid Solution for TFT-LCD Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Kim, Byoung O; Seo, Jong Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Molybdenum-tantalum alloy thin film is a suitable material for the higher corrosion resistance and low resistivity for gate and data metal lines. In this study, Mo-Ta alloy thin films were prepared by using a DC magnetron co-sputtering system on a glass substrate. An abrupt increase in the etching rates of low Mo-Ta alloys was observed. From the observed impedance analysis, the defect densities in the MoTa oxide films increased from 5.4 x 10(21) (cm(-3)) to 8.02 x 10(21) (cm(-3)) up to the 6 at% of tantalum level; and above the 6 at% of tantalum level, the defect densities decreased. This electrochemical behavior is explained by the mechanical instability of the MoTa oxide film.

  10. Effect of Microstructure on Creep Crack Growth Behavior of a Near- α Titanium Alloy IMI-834

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, D. V. V.; Omprakash, C. M.; Sridhar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of microstructure ( i.e., α + β and transformed β) on creep crack growth (CCG) behavior of a near-alpha (IMI 834) titanium alloy has been explored at temperatures 550 °C and 600 °C. For characterizing the CCG behavior of the alloy, both stress intensity factor ( K) and energy integral parameter ( C t ) were used in the present investigation. The use of stress intensity factor ( K) as crack-tip parameter is not appropriate in the present study as no unique correlation between crack growth rate and K could be obtained from the observed trend due to transients in the creep crack rate data. On the other hand, C t parameter for both microstructural conditions consolidates CCG data into a single trend. The alloy with fully transformed β microstructure exhibits better CCG resistance as compared to bimodal ( α + β) microstructure. This is consistent with the fact that the transformed β structure offers superior creep resistance as compared to α + β microstructure. Microstructural examination has revealed that CCG for both microstructural conditions is accompanied by formation of damage zone in the form of numerous environmental-assisted secondary surface cracks (perpendicular to the stress axis) ahead of the main crack tip. For α + β microstructure of the alloy, the surface creep cracks were formed by growth and coalescence of microcracks nucleated by fracture of primary α particles. While in the interior of the specimens, CCG occurred by growth and coalescence of microvoids nucleated at primary α/transformed β (matrix) interfaces. For β microstructure of the alloy, while the surface creep cracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids nucleated at titanium enriched surface oxide particles, in the interior CCG occurred by nucleation of intergranular cavities.

  11. Static and dynamic cyclic oxidation of 12 nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base high-temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Johnston, J. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve typical high-temperature nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base alloys were tested by 1 hr cyclic exposures at 1038, 1093, and 1149 C and 0.05 hr exposures at 1093 C. The alloys were tested in both a dynamic burner rig at Mach 0.3 gas flow and in static air furnace for times up to 100 hr. The alloys were evaluated in terms of specific weight loss as a function of time, and X-ray diffraction analysis and metallographic examination of the posttest specimens. A method previously developed was used to estimate specific metal weight loss from the specific weight change of the sample. The alloys were then ranked on this basis. The burner-rig test was more severe than a comparable furnace test and resulted in an increased tendency for oxide spalling due to volatility of Cr in the protective scale and the more drastic cooling due to the air-blast quench of the samples. Increased cycle frequency also increased the tendency to spall for a given test exposure. The behavior of the alloys in both types of tests was related to their composition and their tendency to form scales. The alloys with the best overall behavior formed alpha-Al2O3 aluminate spinels.

  12. Overview of the M5{sup R} Alloy behavior under RIA and LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mardon, J.P.; Dunn, B.

    2007-07-01

    Experience from irradiation in PWRs has confirmed the M5{sup R} possesses all the properties required for upgraded operation including new fuel management approaches and high duty reactor operation. In this paper accident behavior is demonstrated through a comparison of M5{sup R} and Zircaloy-4 cladding behavior under RIA (Reactivity Insertion Accident) and LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) conditions. AREVA NP supports a significant experimental program of analytical and full -scale tests along with comprehensive analyses on both M5{sup R} and SRA low-tin Zircaloy-4. A key presumption in the conduct of such tests is that, for all Zirconium alloys, the primary effects of high burn-up on cladding thermal-mechanical properties arise from the accumulation of hydrogen within the cladding during operation. This hypothesis is supported through a summarisation of the results of the main RIA and LOCA tests performed on virgin, pre-hydrided, and irradiated M5{sup R} and SRA low-tin Zircaloy-4 cladding. The first part of the paper presents the results of recent Room Temperature (RT) and High Temperature High Pressure (HTHP) integral RIA tests, mainly from the NSRR and CABRI programs, and separate effects mechanical properties tests on high burn-up M5{sup R} and Zircaloy- 4 irradiated claddings. In the second part of this paper, studies of cladding performance under LOCA conditions are presented.. The discussion includes high temperature oxidation kinetics, quench behaviour and post quenched mechanical behaviour of virgin, pre-hydrided and irradiated M5{sup R} and Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes after oxidation at LOCA temperatures and various quenching scenarios. The hydrogen concentrations studied are alloy dependent. Included are mechanical tests and in-depth metallurgical investigations developed to understand the failure mechanisms with the differing alloys and hydrogen concentrations. The result is a confirmation that the effect of hydrogen uptake dominates on the RIA and LOCA

  13. Oxidation, Creep and Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Phillip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. In addition to cyclic oxidation testing in dry and humid air at 800°C, creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. The coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives, as long as the specimens were annealed according to the 31V standard heat treatment before testing. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bare alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  14. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  15. Features of Intermetallic Alloy TNM-B1 High-Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyslov, A. M.; Bybin, A. A.; Dautov, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    Features of intermetallic alloy based on titanium aluminide high-temperature oxidation at 800 - 850°C are studied. A mathematical dependence is obtained for oxidation rate on test duration. The structure and composition of an oxide layer formed during high-temperature oxidation are studied. It is shown that under operating conditions at the maximum working temperatures the intermetallic alloy exhibits low heat resistance.

  16. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-06-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  17. Influence of Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded Joints on Growth and Properties of Microarc Oxidation Coatings on AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingfang; Li, Yongliang; Xue, Wenbin; Yang, Chaolin; Qu, Yao; Hua, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic coatings on friction stir welded (FSW) joints of AZ31B magnesium alloy were fabricated by microarc oxidation (MAO) method in silicate electrolyte. Microstructure, phase constituents, microhardness and electrochemical corrosion behaviors of bare and coated magnesium alloys at different zones of FSW joints for different oxidation time were investigated. The influence of microstructure at different zones on the growth of MAO coatings was analyzed. The results show that the MAO coatings on FSW joints are uniform, and they have almost the same morphology, phase constituents, hardness and corrosion resistance at base metal, stir zone and heat-affected zone. The properties of MAO coatings are independent on the microstructures of AZ31B alloy. In addition, the microstructures of magnesium alloy near the coating/alloy interface at different zones of FSW joint was not changed by microarc discharge process.

  18. Effect of minor addition of Zr on the oxidation behavior of Ti-Cu metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Hyun; Lim, Ka Ram; Na, Min Young; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation behavior of (TiCu)100-XZrX (x=3, 5, 7 at%) amorphous alloy during continuous heating up to 1073 K has been investigated. The weight-gain due to oxidation occurs in a two-step mode. The first-step oxidation (630 730 K) is associated with supercooled liquid region. The oxidation layer consists of intermixed TiO2 + ZrO2 layer at outer side and amorphous oxide layer at inner side. The oxidation rate at the second-step above 880 K becomes significantly different depending on the Zr content. In x=3 alloy, the oxidation layer consists of TiO2 layer at outer side, intermixed TiO2 + ZrO2 layer, and Ti3Cu3O layer at inner side. As the fraction of ZrO2 increases in x=5 and 7 alloys, the growth of oxide layer is accelerated due to provision of easier diffusion path in the intermixed oxide layer, forming intermixed multi-phase (TiO2 + ZrO2 + Ti3Cu3O + Cu51Zr14) oxide layer.

  19. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Modeling the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline alloy with hierarchical microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxi; Zhou, Jianqiu; Zhao, Yonghao

    2016-02-01

    A mechanism-based plasticity model based on dislocation theory is developed to describe the mechanical behavior of the hierarchical nanocrystalline alloys. The stress-strain relationship is derived by invoking the impeding effect of the intra-granular solute clusters and the inter-granular nanostructures on the dislocation movements along the sliding path. We found that the interaction between dislocations and the hierarchical microstructures contributes to the strain hardening property and greatly influence the ductility of nanocrystalline metals. The analysis indicates that the proposed model can successfully describe the enhanced strength of the nanocrystalline hierarchical alloy. Moreover, the strain hardening rate is sensitive to the volume fraction of the hierarchical microstructures. The present model provides a new perspective to design the microstructures for optimizing the mechanical properties in nanostructural metals.

  1. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  2. Effect of Sn addition on the corrosion behavior of Ti-7Cu-Sn cast alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tsao, L C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Sn content on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ti7CuXSn (x=0-5 wt.%) samples. The corrosion tests were carried out in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution at 25 °C. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of the Ti7CuXSn alloy samples was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and equivalent circuit analysis. The resulting impedance parameters and polarization curves showed that adding Sn improved the electrochemical corrosion behavior of the Ti7CuXSn alloy. The Ti7CuXSn alloy samples were composed of a dual-layer oxide consisting of an inner barrier layer and an outer porous layer.

  3. Oxidation resistance of aluminum-coated Fe-20Cr alloys containing rare earths or yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sigler, D.R. )

    1993-10-01

    Aluminum-coated Fe-20Cr (rare earth or yttrium) alloy foils were developed with oxidation resistance equivalent or superior to Fe-20Cr-5Al (rare earth or yttrium) alloy foils. The coated foils were made by dipping Fe-20Cr sheet into a salt-covered aluminum bath and then rolling the sheet to foil. Oxidation resistance of the coated foil was enhanced by adding rare earths or yttrium to the Fe-20Cr substrate alloys to insure oxide adherence. Test results indicate that only sufficient addition to tie up sulfur as a stable sulfide is needed in the Fe-20Cr alloy. Aluminum-coated foils show lower oxide growth rates than similar Fe-Cr-Al alloys, most likely the result of fewer impurities (particularly Fe) is the coated foils' growing oxide scale. 31 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Surface oxide net charge of a titanium alloy: comparison between effects of treatment with heat or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Daniel E; Rapuano, Bruce E; Schniepp, Hannes C

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we have compared the effects of heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) treatment of a Ti6Al4V alloy on the physico-chemical properties of the alloy's surface oxide. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were passivated alone, heated to 600 °C, or RFGD plasma treated in pure oxygen. RFGD treatment did not alter the roughness, topography, elemental composition or thickness of the alloy's surface oxide layer. In contrast, heat treatment altered oxide topography by creating a pattern of oxide elevations approximately 50-100 nm in diameter. These nanostructures exhibited a three-fold increase in roughness compared to untreated surfaces when RMS roughness was calculated after applying a spatial high-pass filter with a 200 nm-cutoff wavelength. Heat treatment also produced a surface enrichment in aluminum and vanadium oxides. Both RFGD and heat treatment produced similar increases in oxide wettability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of metal surface oxide net charge signified by a long-range force of attraction to or repulsion from a (negatively charged) silicon nitride AFM probe were also obtained for all three experimental groups. Force measurements showed that the RFGD-treated Ti6Al4V samples demonstrated a higher net positive surface charge at pH values below 6 and a higher net negative surface charge at physiological pH (pH values between 7 and 8) compared to control and heat-treated samples. These findings suggest that RFGD treatment of metallic implant materials can be used to study the role of negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in protein bioactivity, osteogenic cell behavior and osseointegration independently of oxide topography.

  5. Microstructure, Surface Characterization, and Electrochemical Behavior of New Ti-Zr-Ta-Ag Alloy in Simulated Human Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilescu, Cora; Drob, Silviu Iulian; Osiceanu, Petre; Moreno, Jose Maria Calderon; Prodana, Mariana; Ionita, Daniela; Demetrescu, Ioana; Marcu, Maria; Popovici, Ion Alexandru; Vasilescu, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    A new Ti-20Zr-5Ta-2Ag alloy was elaborated and characterized regarding its microstructure, its native passive film composition and thickness, its surface wettability, its electrochemical behavior in Ringer solution of different pH values, and its ion release. The new alloy has a bi-phase, α + β, acicular, homogeneous microstructure (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)). Its native passive film (12-nm thicknesses) consists of the protective TiO2, ZrO2, and Ta2O5 oxides, Ti and Ta suboxides, and metallic Ag (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data). The alloy possesses high hydrophilic properties. The main electrochemical parameters of the new alloy are superior to those of Ti as a result of the beneficial influence of Zr, Ta, and Ag alloying elements, which reinforce its native passive film. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra in Ringer solutions for the new alloy displayed better values of impedances and phase angles, proving a more insulate passive film than that on the Ti surface. The main corrosion parameters for the new Ti-20Zr-5Ta-2Ag alloy are more favorable by about 25 to 38 times than those of Ti, confirming extremely resistant passive film. The new Ti-20Zr-5Ta-2Ag alloy releases into Ringer solution low quantities of Ti4+, Zr4+ metallic ions (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS)). The Ag+ ions are released in low quantity, conferring to this alloy's low antibacterial activity. All experimental results show that the new Ti-20Zr-5Ta-2Ag alloy fulfills the requirements for biocompatibility, corrosion resistance, and antibacterial protection.

  6. Effect of microtextured surface topography on the wetting behavior of eutectic gallium-indium alloys.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Rebecca K; Boley, J William; Stone, Howard A; Weaver, James C; Wood, Robert J

    2014-01-21

    Liquid-embedded elastomer electronics have recently attracted much attention as key elements of highly deformable and "soft" electromechanical systems. Many of these fluid-elastomer composites utilize liquid metal alloys because of their high conductivities and inherent compliance. Understanding how these alloys interface with surfaces of various composition and texture is critical to the development of parallel processing technology, which is needed to create more complex and low-cost systems. In this work, we explore the wetting behaviors between droplets of gallium-indium alloys and thin metal films, with an emphasis on tin and indium substrates. We find that metallic droplets reactively wet thin metal foils, but the wettability of the foils may be tuned by the surface texture (produced by sputtering). The effects of both composition and texture of the substrate on wetting dynamics are quantified by measuring contact angle and droplet contact diameter as a function of time. Finally, we apply the Cassie-Baxter model to the sputtered and native substrates to gain insight into the behavior of liquid metals and the role of the oxide formation during interfacial processes.

  7. Polarization-corrosion behavior of commercial gold- and silver-base casting alloys in Fusayama solution.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L; Rinne, V W; Bleich, L L

    1983-12-01

    Based on polarization measurements, high Au alloys are highly corrosion-resistant and exhibit the lowest corrosion rates; intermediate Au, Ag, and Pd alloys with Cu are passive but exhibit higher corrosion rates. Twenty weight percent (w/o) In-Ag alloys exhibit active corrosion behavior at potentials only 100 mV noble to the corrosion potential.

  8. Study on hemocompatibility and corrosion behavior of ion implanted TiNi shape memory alloy and Co-based alloys.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenghao; Huang, Naibao

    2007-10-01

    Biomedical TiNi shape memory alloy and Co-based alloys were ion implanted, and corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of these had been investigated with electrochemical method, dynamic clotting time, and hemolysis rate tests. The results indicated that the electrochemical stability and anodic polarization behavior of the materials were improved significantly after ion implantation. When TiNi, Co-based alloys were implanted Mo + C and Ti + C, respectively, the corrosion potentials were enhanced more than 200 mV, passive current densities decreased, and passive ranges were broadened. Dynamic clotting time of the ion implanted substances was prolonged and hemolysis rate decreased. All the results pointed out that corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of the alloys were improved by ion implantation, and effects of dual implantation was better than that of C single implantation. X-ray diffraction analysis of the alloys after dual implantation revealed that TiC, Mo(2)C, Mo(9)Ti(4), and Mo appeared on the surface of TiNi alloy, and CoC(x), Co(3)Ti, TiC, and TiO on the surface of Co-based alloys. These phases dispersing on the alloy surface formed amorphous film, prevented dissolving of alloy elements and improved the corrosion resistance and hemocompatibility of the alloys.

  9. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling heater head tube alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schuon, S R; Misencik, J A

    1981-01-01

    High pressure hydrogen has been selected as the working fluid for the developmental automotive Stirling engine. Containment of the working fluid during operation of the engine at high temperatures and at high hydrogen gas pressures is essential for the acceptance of the Stirling engine as an alternative to the internal combustion engine. Most commercial alloys are extremely permeable to pure hydrogen at high temperatures. A program was undertaken at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to reduce hydrogen permeability in the Stirling engine heater head tubes by doping the hydrogen working fluid with CO or CO/sub 2/. Small additions of these gases were shown to form an oxide on the inside tube wall and thus reduce hydrogen permeability. A study of the effects of dopant concentration, alloy composition, and effects of surface oxides on hydrogen permeability in candidate heater head tube alloys is summarized. Results showed that hydrogen permeability was similar for iron-base alloys (N-155, A286, IN800, 19-9DL, and Nitronic 40), cobalt-base alloys (HS-188) and nickel-base alloys (IN718). In general, the permeability of the alloys decreased with increasing concentration of CO or CO/sub 2/ dopant, with increasing oxide thickness, and decreasing oxide porosity. At high levels of dopants, highly permeable liquid oxides formed on those alloys with greater than 50% Fe content. Furthermore, highly reactive minor alloying elements (Ti, Al, Nb, and La) had a strong influence on reducing hydrogen permeability.

  10. Comparative behavior of Alloys 600, 690 and 800 in caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vaillant, F.; Buisine, D.; Prieux, B.

    1995-12-31

    Since 1991, secondary side cracking has become a major concern in EDF steam generators. At 350 C, IGSCC of Alloy 600 was found in pure NaOH solutions from 4 to 500 g/l, with a maximum at 100 g/l. From the present results and available data, IGSCC of Alloy 690 occurred in pure NaOH solutions from 40 to 500 g/l, but the greatest sensitivity was observed at 100 g/l. TG/IGSCC of Alloy 800 became more severe with increasing NaOH solutions, from 10 to 500 g/l. On the whole, the ranking for SCC-resistance was Alloy 600 < Alloy 800 < Alloy 690. A significant improvement was still obtained with 690TT with intergranular carbides (industrial tubes) and perhaps with Alloy 800 NG (nuclear grade), but both alloys cracked at the highest stresses. IGSCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 MA was higher for the tubes with the lowest values of the yield stress. The depth of IGA in the case of Alloy 600 was higher than for Alloy 690; for this alloy, it appeared to be general oxidation. Lead was found to significantly increase both IGA and SCC of these alloys in caustic solutions in the range 300-350 C. For tests performed at high stresses, and so for short durations, IGSCC (Alloy 600 MA) or TGSCC (Alloys 690 and 800) were the main cause of failure. At low stresses and for long durations, failure occurred predominantly by IGA (and also IG/TGSCC for Alloy 600TT). The worst SCC-resistance was observed on Alloy 800. Resistance was better for Alloys 600 MA land 690 TT. Alloy 600 TT exhibited the best resistance.

  11. Controllable galvanic synthesis of triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes for efficient electrocatalytic methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Luo, Zhimin; Fan, Zhanxi; Yu, Sijia; Chen, Junze; Liao, Yusen; Xue, Can

    2015-06-08

    Triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes were successfully synthesized through galvanic replacement by using Ag nanoprisms as sacrificial templates. The ridge thickness of the Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes could be readily tuned by adjusting the amount of the Pd source during the reaction. These obtained triangular Ag-Pd alloy nanoframes exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity for the methanol oxidation reaction as compared with the commercial Pd/C catalyst due to the alloyed Ag-Pd composition as well as the hollow-framed structures. This work would be highly impactful in the rational design of future bimetallic alloy nanostructures with high catalytic activity for fuel cell systems.

  12. Corrosion-wear behavior of nanocrystalline Fe88Si12 alloy in acid and alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-cai; Qin, Wen; Yang, Jun; Liu, Wei-min; Zhou, Ling-ping

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion-wear behavior of a nanocrystalline Fe88Si12 alloy disc coupled with a Si3N4 ball was investigated in acid (pH 3) and alkaline (pH 9) aqueous solutions. The dry wear was also measured for reference. The average friction coefficient of Fe88Si12 alloy in the pH 9 solution was approximately 0.2, which was lower than those observed for Fe88Si12 alloy in the pH 3 solution and in the case of dry wear. The fluctuation of the friction coefficient of samples subjected to the pH 9 solution also showed similar characteristics. The wear rate in the pH 9 solution slightly increased with increasing applied load. The wear rate was approximately one order of magnitude less than that in the pH 3 solution and was far lower than that in the case of dry wear, especially at high applied load. The wear traces of Fe88Si12 alloy under different wear conditions were examined and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the tribo-chemical reactions that involve oxidation of the worn surface and hydrolysis of the Si3N4 ball in the acid solution were restricted in the pH 9 aqueous solution. Thus, water lubrication can effectively improve the wear resistance of nanocrystalline Fe88Si12 alloy in the pH 9 aqueous solution.

  13. Oxide dispersion strengthening of alloys. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning oxide dispersion strengthening and hardening of alloys. The citations include methods of alloy preparation, and mechanical and physical properties. The high temperature characteristics of such dispersion hardening allows use of the alloys in gas turbines as turbine blades and combustor components, and boilers, as refractories and combustors. Oxide dispersion hardening is applied to noble metals, steels, aluminum, superalloys, and powder metallurgy for many nonferrous alloys. (Contains a minimum of 166 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Preventing Oxide Adhesion of Liquid Metal Alloys to Enable Actuation in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Ishan; Johnson, Alexander; Ayers, Hudson; Dickey, Michael

    This work explores the wetting behavior of an oxide-coated liquid metal, eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (`EGaIn'), which remains a liquid at room temperature. Liquid metals uniquely combine fluidity with metallic properties. Combined, these properties enable soft, stretchable, and shape reconfigurable electronics with `softer than skin' interfaces. Ga forms spontaneously a thin surface oxide that alters its wetting behavior and makes it difficult to move across surfaces without leaving residue behind. We examine the effects of surface roughness (i.e., Cassie-Baxter state) and lubrication to minimize adhesion of Ga oxide to surfaces. Lubricated surfaces create a `slip-layer' of liquid between the metal and surface that also inhibits wetting. This slip layer allows the metal to move reversibly through microchannels by preventing adhesion of the oxide. The metal may be pumped or moved by using low voltages or pneumatic actuation. Optical microscopy confirms the importance of the slip-layer, which enables non-stick motion of the metal through capillaries. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterizes the electrohydrodynanic motion of EGaIn in capillary systems.

  15. Effect of irradiation on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Kearns, J.J.; Hoffman, R.C.; Korinko, J.J.; Luther, R.F.; Sykes, G.B.

    1993-10-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded precracked and as-notched compact tension specimens was performed in 360{degrees}C water to determine effect of irradiation on SCC of Condition HTH and Condition BH Alloy X-750 and age-hardened Alloy 625. Variables were stress intensity factor (K{sub I}) level, fluence, grade of HTH material, prestraining and material chemistry. Effects of irradiation on high temperature SCC and the rapid cracking that occurs during cooldown below 150{degrees}C were characterized. Significant degradation in the in-reactor SCC resistance of HTH material was observed at initial K{sub I} levels above 30 MPa{radical}m and fluences greater than 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). A small degradation in SCC resistance of HTH material was observed at low fluences (<10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}). As-notched specimens displayed less degradation in SCC resistance than precracked specimens. Prestraining greatly improved in-flux and out-of-flux SCC resistance of HTH material, as little or no SCC was observed in precracked specimens prestrained 20 to 30%, whereas extensive cracking was observed in nonprestrained specimens. Condition HTH heats with low boron (10 ppM or less) had improved in-reactor SCC resistance compared to heats with high and intermediate boron (>20 ppM). Age-hardened Alloy 625 exhibited superior in-reactor SCC behavior compared to HTH material as no crack extension occurred in any of the precracked Alloy 625 specimens tested at initial K{sub I} levels up to 80 MPa{radical}m.

  16. In vivo degradation and tissue compatibility of ZK60 magnesium alloy with micro-arc oxidation coating in a transcortical model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Tan, Lili; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guangdao; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium alloys were studied extensively as a class of biodegradable metallic materials for medical applications. In the present study, ZK60 magnesium alloy was considered as a candidate and the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment was adopted in order to reduce the degradation rate of the alloy. The in vivo degradation behaviors and biological compatibilities of ZK60 alloys with and without MAO treatment were studied with a transcortical model in rabbits. The implant and the surrounding bone tissues were characterized by CT, SEM and histological methods at 2, 4 and 12 weeks after the implantation. The results demonstrated that both the bare and MAO-coated ZK60 alloys completely degraded within 12 weeks in this animal model. The MAO coating decreased the degradation rate of ZK60 alloy and enhanced the response of the surrounding tissues within the first 2 weeks. After then, an acceleration of the degradation of the MAO-coated ZK60 alloy was observed. It was found that the alloy could be degraded before the complete degradation of the MAO coating, leading to the local peeling off of the coating. An in vivo degradation mechanism of the MAO-coated ZK60 alloy was proposed based on the experimental results. The severe localized degradation caused by the peeling off of the MAO coating was the main reason for the acceleration of the degradation of the MAO-coated ZK60 alloy.

  17. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part I Microstructural investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Piotrowska, Kamila; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    The surface treatment of aluminium alloys under steam containing KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in the formation of an oxide layer having a thickness of up to 825 nm. The use of KMnO4 and HNO3 in the steam resulted in incorporation of the respective chemical species into the oxide layer. Steam treatment with solution containing HNO3 caused dissolution of Cu and Si from the intermetallic particles in the aluminium substrate. The growth rate of oxide layer was observed to be a function of MnO4- and NO3- ions present in the aqueous solution. The NO3- ions exhibit higher affinity towards the intermetallic particles resulting in poor coverage by the steam generated oxide layer compared to the coating formed using MnO4- ions. Further, increase in the concentration of NO3- ions in the solution retards precipitation of the steam generated aluminium hydroxide layer.

  18. Surface structure and properties of biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy after Fenton's oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chu, C L; Hu, T; Wu, S L; Dong, Y S; Yin, L H; Pu, Y P; Lin, P H; Chung, C Y; Yeung, K W K; Chu, Paul K

    2007-09-01

    Fenton's oxidation is traditionally used to remove inorganic and organic pollutants from water in waster water treatment. It is an advanced oxidation process in which H2O2 is catalytically decomposed by ferrous irons into hydroxyl radicals (*OH) which have a higher oxidation potential (2.8V) than H2O2. In the work reported here, we for the first time use Fenton's oxidation to modify the surface of biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA). The influences of Fenton's oxidation on the surface microstructure, blood compatibility, leaching of harmful Ni ions and corrosion resistance in simulated body fluids is assessed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, electrochemical tests, hemolysis analysis and the blood platelet adhesion test. The mechanical stability of the surface titania film produced by Fenton's oxidation as well as their effects on the shape memory behavior of the SMA are studied by bending tests. Our results show that Fenton's oxidation produces a novel nanostructured titania gel film with a graded structure on the NiTi substrate without an intermediate Ni-rich layer that is typical of high-temperature oxidation. Moreover, there is a clear Ni-free zone near the top surface of the titania film. The surface structural changes introduced by Fenton's oxidation improve the electrochemical corrosion resistance and mitigate Ni release. The latter effects are comparable to those observed after oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation reported previously and better than those of high-temperature oxidation. Aging in boiling water improves the crystallinity of the titania film and further reduces Ni leaching. Blood platelet adhesion is remarkably reduced after Fenton's oxidation, suggesting that the treated SMA has improved thrombo resistance. Enhancement of blood compatibility is believed to stem from the improved hemolysis resistance, the surface wettability and the

  19. Capacitive behavior of highly-oxidized graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Mianowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Capacitive behavior of a highly-oxidized graphite is presented in this paper. The graphite oxide was synthesized using an oxidizing mixture of potassium chlorate and concentrated fuming nitric acid. As-oxidized graphite was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed with respect to the oxygen content and the species of oxygen-containing groups. Electrochemical measurements were performed in a two-electrode symmetric cell using KOH electrolyte. It was shown that prolonged oxidation causes an increase in the oxygen content while the interlayer distance remains constant. Specific capacitance increased with oxygen content in the electrode as a result of pseudo-capacitive effects, from 0.47 to 0.54 F/g for a scan rate of 20 mV/s and 0.67 to 1.15 F/g for a scan rate of 5 mV/s. Better cyclability was observed for the electrode with a higher oxygen amount.

  20. Oxidation Behaviors of Inconel 740H in Air and Dynamic Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jintao; Yang, Zhen; Xu, Songqian; Zhao, Haiping; Gu, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Inconel 740H alloy is a candidate material for 700°C advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal-fired power plants application as superheater/reheater tube. In this work, oxidation behavior of Inconel 740H alloy was studied in static air at 750°C and 850°C, and in dynamic pure steam at 750°C, respectively. The alloy was oxidized approximately following a parabolic law in three test environment. In the static air, the oxidation rate at 850°C was about 50 times of that at the 750°C. More NiCrMn spinal and TiO2 were detected after oxidation at 850°C. Cr2O3, however, was the main oxidation product at 750°C. In the pure steam, Cr2O3 was still the main oxidation product. The oxidation rate was about 2.6 times of that in static air, but the surface roughness was much smaller and edges of oxide particles were more blurred. There was no evidence of cracks or spallation in three test environments.

  1. Crack Initiation and Growth Behavior at Corrosion Pit in 7075-T6 High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    CRACK INITIATION AND GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT CORROSION PIT IN 7075-T6 HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOY THESIS Eric M. Hunt, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENY...7075-T6 HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOY THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aerospace and Astronautical Engineering Graduate School of Engineering...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENY-13-J-01 CRACK INITIATION AND GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT CORROSION PIT IN 7075-T6 HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOY Eric M

  2. Microstructural characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-12Cr-0.5Y2O3 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsudin, Farha Mizana; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, Yusof; Hamid, Nasri A.

    2016-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy containing 12wt% Cr and 0.5wt% Y2O3 was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) method and then compacted into bulk shape. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was performed to characterize the microstructure of milled alloy powder. The fragments and nanoclusters of Y2O3 were observed in this alloy powder. FESEM-EDS mapping on the milled alloy powder reveal the uniformity of the element distribution achieved by the alloy. The Y element is finely dispersed into the alloy matrix and the O element is observed indicating the presence of oxides throughout the alloy sample. The compacted alloy was then heat treated at 1050°C and analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The formations of nano-scale Y2O3 were observed after the heat treatment process of alloy indicating the dispersion and incorporation of Y2O3 nanoparticles into the alloy matrix.

  3. Preliminary study of oxide-dispersion-strengthened B-1900 prepared by mechanical alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Quatinetz, M.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy based on the B-1900 composition was produced by the mechanical alloying process. Without optimization of the processing for the alloy or the alloy for the processing, recrystallization of the extruded product to large elongated grains was achieved. Materials having grain length-width ratios of 3 and 5.5 were tested in tension and stress-rupture. The ODS B-1900 exhibited tensile strength similar to that of cast B-1900. Its stress-rupture life was lower than that of cast B-1900 at 760 C. At 1095 C the ODS B-1900 with the higher grain length-width ratio (5.5) had stress-rupture life superior to that of cast B-1900. It was concluded that, with optimization, oxide dispersion strengthening of B-1900 and other complex cast nickel-base alloys has potential for improving high temperature properties over those of the cast alloy counterparts.

  4. Microstructure and magnetic behavior of Cu-Co-Si ternary alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying and isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabri, Sumit; Bera, S.; Mondal, B. N.; Basumallick, A.; Chattopadhyay, P. P.

    2017-03-01

    Microstructure and magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline 50Cu-40Co-10Si (at%) alloy prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent isothermal annealing in the temperature range of 450-650 °C have been studied. Phase evolution during mechanical alloying and isothermal annealing is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analyzer (DTA), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and magnetic measurement. Addition of Si has been found to facilitate the metastable alloying of Co in Cu resulting into the formation of single phase solid solution having average grain size of 9 nm after ball milling for 50 h duration. Annealing of the ball milled alloy improves the magnetic properties significantly and best combination of magnetic properties has been obtained after annealing at 550 °C for 1 h duration.

  5. Resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys to cyclic oxidation at 1100 C and 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-rich alloys in the Ni-Cr-Al system were evaluated for cyclic oxidation resistance in still air at 1,100 and 1,200 C. A first approximation oxidation attack parameter Ka was derived from specific weight change data involving both a scaling growth constant and a spalling constant. An estimating equation was derived with Ka as a function of the Cr and Al content by multiple linear regression and translated into countour ternary diagrams showing regions of minimum attack. An additional factor inferred from the regression analysis was that alloys melted in zirconia crucibles had significantly greater oxidation resistance than comparable alloys melted otherwise.

  6. Corrosion behavior of titanium alloy Beta-21S coated with diamond like carbon in Hank's solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, L.; Anandan, C.; Grips, V. K. William

    2012-06-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings posses high hardness and low friction coefficient and also biocompatible, hence, they are of interest for enhancing the wear and corrosion resistance of bio-implant materials. Beta stabilized titanium alloys are attractive for biomedical applications because of their high specific strength and low modulus. In this work Beta-21S alloy (Ti-15Mo-3Nb-3Al-0.2Si) was implanted with carbon ions by plasma immersion ion implantation using methane and hydrogen gas mixture followed by DLC deposition by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The implanted layers enabled deposition of adherent diamond-like carbon coatings on the titanium alloy which was otherwise not possible. The corrosion behavior of the treated and untreated samples was investigated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization studies in simulated body fluid (Hank's solution). XPS, micro Raman and EDAX investigation of the samples showed the formation of a thin oxide layer on the treated samples after corrosion experiments. Corrosion resistance of the DLC coated sample is comparable with that of the untreated samples. Electrochemical impedance data of the substrate and implanted samples were fitted with two time constant equivalent circuits and that of DLC coated samples with two-layer model.

  7. Fatigue behavior of copper and selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leedy, K.D.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of standard and subsize specimens was examined for five copper alloys: OFHC Cu, two CuNiBe alloys, a CuCrZr alloy, and a Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy. Fatigue tests were run in strain control to failure. In addition to establishing failure lives, the stress amplitudes were monitored as a function of numbers of accrued cycles. The results indicate that the alloys with high initial yield strengths provide the best fatigue response over the range of failure lives examined in the present study: N{sub f} = 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6}. In fact, the fatigue performance of the best alloys is dominated by the elastic portion of the strain range, as would be expected from the correlation of performance with yield properties. The alumina strengthened alloy and the two CuNiBe alloys show the best overall performance of the group examined here.

  8. Microstructures and Abrasive Properties of the Oxide Coatings on Al6061 Alloys Prepared by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in Different Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Byun, Sangsik; Lee, Chan Gyu; Koo, Bon Heun; Wang, Yi Qi; Song, Jung Il

    Al2O3 coatings were prepared on T6-tempered Al6061 alloys substrate under a hybrid voltage (AC 200 V-60 Hz and DC 260 V value) by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in 30 min. The effects of different electrolytes on the abrasive behaviors of the coatings were studied by conducting dry ball-on-disk wear tests. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the coating microstructure. XRD analysis results show that the coatings mainly consist of α- and γ-Al2O3, and some mullite and AlPO4 phase in Na2SiO3 and Na3PO4 containing electrolytes, respectively. The wear test results show that the coatings which were PEO-treated in Na3PO4 containing electrolyte presented the most excellent abrasive resistance property.

  9. Fabrication, strength and oxidation of molybdenum-silicon-boron alloys from reaction synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemas, Michael Robert

    location of all three phases and to measure the volume fractions and grain size distributions. Microstructural quantification techniques including two-point correlation functions were used to quantify microstructural features and correlate the BN powder size and morphology to the distribution of the intermetallic phases. High-temperature tensile tests were conducted and yield strengths of 580MPa at 1100°C and 480MPa at 1200°C were measured for the Mo-2Si-1B wt.% alloy. The yield strength of the Mo-3Si-1B wt.% alloy was 680MPa at 1100°C and 420MPa at 1300°C. A review of the pertinent literature reveals that these are among the highest yield strengths measured for these compositions. The oxidation resistance in air at 1000 and 1100°C was found to be comparable to the best values reported in the literature. The protective borosilicate surface layer was formed quickly due to the close spacing of intermetallic particles and pre-oxidation treatment was developed to further limit the transient oxidation behavior. An oxidation model was developed which factors in the different stages of oxidation to predict compositions which minimize the total metal recession due to oxidation.

  10. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17 Percent Cr and Cu-17 Percent Cr-5 Percent Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu-17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9+/-9.5 kJ/mol. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr-5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR-5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  11. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj. Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu- 17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9 +/- 9.5 kJ/mol. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr- 5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR- 5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  12. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj. Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu- 17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9 9.5 kJ mol-1. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr- 5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR- 5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  13. Oxidation of High-temperature Alloy Wires in Dry Oxygen and Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Lorincz, Jonathan A.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    Small diameter wires (150 to 250 microns) of the high temperature alloys Haynes 188, Haynes 230, Haynes 230, Haynes 214, Kanthal Al and PM2000 were oxidized at 1204 C in dry oxygen or 50% H2O /50% O2 for 70 Hours. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using a thermogravimetric technique. Oxide phase composition and morphology of the oxidized wires were determined by X-ray diffraction,field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The alumina-forming alloys, Kanthal Al and PM2000, out-performed the chromia-forming alloys under this conditions. PM2000 was recommended as the most promising candidate for advanced hybrid seal applications for space reentry control surface seals or hypersonic propulsion system seals. This study also demonstrated that thermogravimetric analysis of small diameter wires is a powerful technique for the study of oxide volatility, oxide adherence, and breakaway oxidation.

  14. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  15. THE EFFECT OF CO ON HYDROGEN PERMEATION THROUGH PD AND INTERNALLY OXIDIZED AND UN-OXIDIZED PD ALLOY MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.; Flanagan, T.; Wang, D.

    2010-10-20

    The H permeation of internally oxidized Pd alloy membranes such as Pd-Al and Pd-Fe, but not Pd-Y alloys, is shown to be more resistant to inhibition by CO(g) as compared to Pd or un-oxidized Pd alloy membranes. The increased resistance to CO is found to be greater at 423 K than at 473 K or 523 K. In these experiments CO was pre-adsorbed onto the membranes and then CO-free H{sub 2} was introduced to initiate the H permeation.

  16. Thermogravimetric study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the oxidation of Pd-13 weight percent Cr, a candidate alloy for high-temperature strain gages, was investigated by thermogravimetry. Although the bulk alloy exhibits linear electrical resistivity versus temperature and stable resistivity at elevated temperatures, problems attributed to oxidation occur when this material is fabricated into strain gages. In this work, isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) was used to study the oxidation kinetics. Results indicate that the oxidation of Pd-13 weight percent Cr was approximately parabolic in time at 600 C but exhibited greater passivation from 700 to 900 C. At 1100 C, the oxidation rate again increased.

  17. Synthesis of high T.sub.C superconducting coatings and patterns by melt writing and oxidation of metallic precursor alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Wei; Vander Sande, John B.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for fabrication of superconducting oxides and superconducting oxide composites and for joining superconductors to other materials. A coating of a molten alloy containing the metallic elements of the oxide is applied to a substrate surface and oxidized to form the superconducting oxide. A material can be contacted to the molten alloy which is subsequently oxidized joining the material to the resulting superconducting oxide coating. Substrates of varied composition and shape can be coated or joined by this method.

  18. Compressive creep behavior of alloys based on B2 FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantravadi, N.; Vedula, K.; Gaydosh, D.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Alloys based on FeAl are attractive alternate materials for environmental resistance at intermediate temperatures. Addition of small amounts of Nb, Hf, Ta, Mo, Zr, and B were shown to improve the compressive creep of this alloy at 1100 K. Boron, in particular, was found to have a synergistic effect along with Zr in providing properties substantially better than the binary alloy. This improvement seems to be related to the higher activation energy found for this alloy, suggesting a modification in the diffusion behavior due to the alloying additions.

  19. Compressive creep behavior of alloys based on B2 FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantravadi, N.; Vedula, K.; Gaydosh, D.; Titran, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    Alloys based on FeAl are attractive alternative materials for environmental resistance at intermediate temperatures. Addition of small amounts of Nb, Hf, Ta, Mo, Zr, and B were shown to improve the compressive creep of this alloy at 1100 K. Boron, in particular, was found to have a synergistic effect along with Zr in providing properties substantially better than the binary alloy. This improvement seems to be related to the higher activation energy found for this alloy, suggesting a modification in the diffusion behavior due to the alloying additions.

  20. Oxidation of TiAl3 and L12 Coatings on Ti-45Al-5Nb Alloy at 1173K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Takumi; Kitajima, Yuri; Hayashi, Shigenari; Narita, Toshio

    Oxidation behavior of TiAl3 and L12 coated Ti-45at%Al-5at%Nb alloys at 1173K in air was investigated using mass gain measurement, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-probe microanalysis, glow discharge optical electron spectroscopy, and glancing angle X-ray diffraction analysis. The TiAl3 formed meta-stable alumina θ-Al2O3, while the oxide scale on the L12 consisted of a duplex structure with an outer rutile TiO2 and an inner α-Al2O3. During the very initial stages of oxidation both Ti and Al in the L12 coating could be oxidized, and then the faster diffusing Ti goes out to form an outer, continuous Ti-rich oxide which covers the slow growing Al2O3. In case of the TiAl3 an outer, continuous TiO2 layer was not observed because of the smaller amount of Ti in the TiAl3. It could be concluded that the outer, Ti-rich oxide enhanced a phase transformation of Al2O3 from θ to α. To elucidate the Ti effect, Ti-vapor treated TiAl3 and Ni-50at%Al were oxidized at 1173K in air, and showed formation of an α-Al2O3, in contrast to θ-Al2O3 on their bare alloys.

  1. Development of Advanced Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloy for Penetrator Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    preparation, sintering, cyclic heat-treatment, swaging , and annealing processes, on microstructures and static/dynamic mechanical properties of ODS tungsten ... tungsten / tungsten contiguity. The swaging and annealing processes of ODS tungsten heavy alloy increase the tensile strength with decreasing the...Final Report for 2nd Year Contract of AOARD 034032 Development of Advanced Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloy for

  2. Electrodeposition of PdCu alloy and its application in methanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Wei; Whang, Thou-Jen

    2013-04-01

    This study demonstrates a simple electrodeposition method to fabricate the palladium-copper alloy on an ITO coated glass (PdCu/ITO) and its application in methanol electro-oxidation. Our approaches involve the co-reduction of Pd and Cu using triethanolamine (TEA) as a complexing agent in the electroplating bath and a Pd redox replacement of Cu on the surface of the as-prepared PdCu alloy. The phase structures, alloy compositions and morphologies of catalysts are determined by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometer and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. X-ray diffraction shows that the particle size of PdCu deposits shrink when the alloy is deposited in a TEA-contained solution. The electrocatalytic properties of PdCu alloys and Pd redox replacement modified PdCu alloys for methanol oxidation have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The PdCu alloy with atomic ratio of 20.5% Cu exhibits higher catalytic activity toward methanol oxidation compared with a pure Pd catalyst. PdCu alloys with smaller particle sizes associated with TEA agent and the surface confined Pd replacement are found to have enhanced catalytic performance in the electro-oxidation of methanol.

  3. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  4. Oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr in a dynamic high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Young, C. T.; Herring, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr has been studied in static and high-speed flowing air environments at 1100 and 1200 C. It has been found that the stable oxide morphologies formed on the specimens exposed to the static and dynamic environments were markedly different. The faceted crystal morphology characteristic of static oxidation was found to be unstable under high-temperature, high-speed flow conditions and was quickly replaced by a porous NiO 'mushroom' type structure. Also, it was found that the rate of formation of CrO3 from Cr2O3 was greatly enhanced by high gas velocity conditions. The stability of Cr2-O3 was found to be greatly improved by the presence of an outer NiO layer, even though the NiO layer was very porous. An oxidation model is proposed to explain the observed microstructures and overall oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr alloys.

  5. Oxidation protection of Ti-aluminide orthorhombic alloys: An engineered multilayer approach

    SciTech Connect

    Warrier, S.G.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Smith, P.R.

    1998-04-01

    The lack of high-temperature environmental resistance is a major issue in the application of orthorhombic-based titanium aluminide alloys (O alloys) and their composites. Improvement in environmental capability can be achieved by applying diffusion barrier coatings to the surface of the orthorhombic matrix alloy. However, since thin coatings are prone to foreign-object damage, an approach based on thicker multilayer materials may be more prudent for fracture-critical applications. In the present study, foils of the orthorhombic alloy were diffusion bonded on either side with a {gamma} alloy, the latter used in an attempt to provide environmental protection. Mechanical tests suggested that the {gamma} alloy was successful in preventing degradation of the O alloy due to oxidation and interstitial embrittlement under thermal cycling conditions. Processing below the {beta} transus of the O alloy provided an improvement in the stress and strain to failure of the joined material compared to materials processed above the transus. However, in either case, the strengths of the joined materials were significantly lower than that of the uncoated O alloy with similar microstructures. Results suggest that the low strength of the joined materials may be due to cracking of the {gamma} alloy, resulting in premature failure of the O alloy. Finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to understand the stress distribution in the joined material and to investigate approaches for reducing the residual stress. Several approaches for improving the stress and strain to failure of the joined material are presented.

  6. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  7. Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at 850°C

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a significant contributor to the potential factors that limit the useful life of the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) nuclear system.[1] The IHX of a high temperature gas reactor will be subjected to a limited number of transient cycles due to start-up and shut-down operations imparting high local stresses on the component. This cycling introduces a creep-fatigue type of interaction as dwell times occur intermittently. The leading candidate alloy for the IHX is a nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, which must safely operate near the expected reactor outlet temperature of up to 950 °C.[1] This solid solution strengthened nickel-base alloy provides an interesting creep-fatigue deformation case study because it has characteristics of two different alloy systems for which the cyclic behavior has been extensively investigated. Compositionally, it resembles nickel-base superalloys, such as Waspalloy, IN100, and IN718, with the exception of its lower levels of Al. At temperatures above 800 °C, the microstructure of Alloy 617, however, does not contain the ordered ?’ or ?’’ phases. Thus microstructurally, it is more similar to an austenitic stainless steel, such as 316 or 304, or Alloy 800H comprised of a predominantly solid solution strengthened matrix phase with a dispersion of inter- and intragranular carbides. Previous studies of the creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 at 950 °C indicate that the fatigue life is reduced when a constant strain dwell is added at peak tensile strain.[2-5] This results from the combination of faster crack initiation occurring at surface-connected grain boundaries due to oxidation from the air environment along with faster, and intergranular, crack propagation resulting from the linking of extensive interior grain boundary cracking.[3] Saturation, defined as the point at which further increases in the strain

  8. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings.

  9. Growth of nanotubular oxide layer on Ti-Ni alloys with different Ni contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Su; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Anodization of near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloys was performed in an ethylene glycol based electrolyte under various conditions in order to investigate the effects of crystal structure and chemical composition of the Ti-Ni alloy on the morphology of the resulting oxide layers. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that Ti-Ni substrates with Ni content lower than 50.0 at.% were in the martensitic phase, while substrates with Ni content higher than 50.0 at.% were in the austenitic phase. Oxide layers formed at 20 or 35 V for 5 min exhibited no distinct nanotubular structures; however, at 50 V, nanotubular oxide layers were formed. After anodization at 50 V for 20 min, the growth of an irregular-shaped porous layer underneath the nanotubular oxide layer was observed for Ti-Ni alloys with Ni content lower than 52.2 at.%, whereas the oxide layer consisted of only irregular-shaped porous structures for the Ti-52.5 at.% Ni alloy. Further anodization resulted in the formation of irregular-shaped porous oxide layers on all Ti-Ni alloys examined. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that this morphological transition is related to Ni accumulation in the vicinity of the interface between the bottoms of the oxide layers and the surfaces of the substrate alloys. Therefore, nanotubular oxide layers cannot be grown, and instead irregular-shaped porous oxide layers are formed underneath the nanotubular layers. These results indicate that the morphology of anodic oxide layers formed on the near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloys is not affected by their crystal structure, but by Ni content and anodization time.

  10. Purification of uranium alloys by differential solubility of oxides and production of purified fuel precursors

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

    1997-12-16

    A method is described for purifying metallic alloys of uranium for use as nuclear reactor fuels in which the metal alloy is first converted to an oxide and then dissolved in nitric acid. Initial removal of metal oxide impurities not soluble in nitric acid is accomplished by filtration or other physical means. Further purification can be accomplished by carbonate leaching of uranyl ions from the partially purified solution or using traditional methods such as solvent extraction. 3 figs.

  11. Purification of uranium alloys by differential solubility of oxides and production of purified fuel precursors

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Miller, Philip E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for purifying metallic alloys of uranium for use as nuclear reactor fuels in which the metal alloy is first converted to an oxide and then dissolved in nitric acid. Initial removal of metal oxide impurities not soluble in nitric acid is accomplished by filtration or other physical means. Further purification can be accomplished by carbonate leaching of uranyl ions from the partially purified solution or using traditional methods such as solvent extraction.

  12. Threshold Stress Creep Behavior of Alloy 617 at Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Benz; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Wright; R.N. Wright; T. Lillo

    2014-06-01

    Creep of Alloy 617, a solid solution Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, was studied in the temperature range of 1023 K to 1273 K (750 °C to 1000 °C). Typical power-law creep behavior with a stress exponent of approximately 5 is observed at temperatures from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C). Creep at 1023 K (750 °C), however, exhibits threshold stress behavior coinciding with the temperature at which a low volume fraction of ordered coherent y' precipitates forms. The threshold stress is determined experimentally to be around 70 MPa at 1023 K (750 °C) and is verified to be near zero at 1173 K (900 °C)—temperatures directly correlating to the formation and dissolution of y' precipitates, respectively. The y' precipitates provide an obstacle to continued dislocation motion and result in the presence of a threshold stress. TEM analysis of specimens crept at 1023 K (750 °C) to various strains, and modeling of stresses necessary for y' precipitate dislocation bypass, suggests that the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates is the controlling factor for continued deformation at the end of primary creep and into the tertiary creep regime. As creep deformation proceeds at an applied stress of 121 MPa and the precipitates coarsen, the stress required for Orowan bowing is reached and this mechanism becomes active. At the minimum creep rate at an applied stress of 145 MPa, the finer precipitate size results in higher Orowan bowing stresses and the creep deformation is dominated by the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates.

  13. Abnormal magnetization behaviors in Sm-Ni-Fe-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Zhao, H.; Chen, G. F.; Zhang, Y.; Du, H. L.; Liu, S. Q.; Wang, C. S.; Han, J. Z.; Yang, Y. C.; Yang, J. B.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetization behaviors in Sm-Ni-Fe-Cu alloys at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that the hysteresis loops show wasp-waisted character at low temperatures, which has been proved to be related to the existence of multi-phases, the Fe/Ni soft magnetic phases and the CaCu5-type hard magnetic phase. A smooth-jump behavior of the magnetization is observed at T>5 K, whereas a step-like magnetization process appears at T<5 K. The CaCu5-type phase is responsible for such abnormal magnetization behavior. The magnetic moment reversal model with thermal activation is used to explain the relation of the critical magnetic field (Hcm) to the temperature (T>5 K). The reversal of the moment direction has to cross over an energy barrier of about 6.6×10-15 erg. The step-like jumps of the magnetization below 5 K is proposed to be resulted from a sharp increase of the sample temperature under the heat released by the irreversible domain wall motion.

  14. Electro-mechanical behavior of a shape memory alloy actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausley, Matthew E.; Furst, Stephen J.; Talla, Vamsi; Seelecke, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents experimental study and numerical simulation of the electro-thermo-mechanical behavior of a commercially available Flexinol shape memory alloy (SMA) wire [1]. Recently, a novel driver device has been presented [2], which simultaneously controls electric power and measures resistance of an SMA wire actuator. This application of a single wire as both actuator and sensor will fully exploit the multifunctional nature of SMA materials and minimize system complexity by avoiding extra sensors. Though the subject is not new [3-6], comprehensive resistance data under controlled conditions for time-resolved and hysteresis-based experiments is not readily available from the literature. A simple experimental setup consisting of a Flexinol wire mounted in series with the tip of a compliant cantilever beam is used to systematically study the SMA behavior. A Labview-based data acquisition system measures actuator displacement and SMA wire stress and resistance and controls the power passed through the SMA actuator wire. The experimental setup is carefully insulated from ambient conditions, as the thermal response of a 50-micron diameter Flexinol wire is extremely sensitive to temperature fluctuation due to convective heat transfer. Actuator performance is reported for a range of actuation frequencies and input power levels. The effect of varying actuator pre-stress is reported as well. All of the experimental data is compared with simulated behavior that is derived from a numerical model for SMA material [7-10].

  15. Compression behavior of Fe-Si-H alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, S.; Ohta, K.; Hirose, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Although the light elements in the Earth's core are still enigmatic, hydrogen has recently been receiving much attention. Planetary formation theory suggested that a large amount of water, much more than is in the oceans, could have been brought to the Earth during its accretion. Hydrogen is a strong siderophile element and could be incorporated into the core as a consequence of a reaction between water and molten iron in a magma ocean [Okuchi, 1997 Science]. Nevertheless, the effect of hydrogen on the property of iron is not well known so far. Here, we have experimentally examined the compression behavior of hcp Fe0.88Si0.12Hx (6.5 wt.% Si) at two different hydrogen concentrations (x = 0.7 and 0.9). Fe0.88Si0.12 foil was loaded into a diamond-anvil cell, and then liquid hydrogen was introduced to a sample chamber below 20 K. Hydrogenation occurred upon thermal annealing below 1500 K at 25-62 GPa, and hcp Fe0.88Si0.12Hx was obtained as a single phase. Unlike the Fe-H alloy, hydrogen did not fully occupy the octahedral sites even under hydrogen-saturated conditions. Two compression curves, one from 25 to 136 GPa, and the other from 62 to 128 GPa, were obtained at room temperature. While the effect of hydrogen on the compressibility of iron has been controversial in earlier experimental studies [Hirao et al., 2004 GRL; Pépin et al., 2014 PRL], our data indicate that the compressibility of Fe0.88Si0.12Hx alloy does not change with changing hydrogen content from x = 0 to 0.9. Such compression behavior observed is consistent with the recent ab initio calculations for hcp Fe-H alloys by Caracas[2015 GRL]. The extrapolation of present data to the outer core pressure and temperature range, assuming thermal expansivity is the same as that for iron and there is no density difference between solid and liquid, shows that the density of Fe0.88Si0.12H0.3 matches the PREM in the whole outer core within 1%.

  16. Effect of micro-arc oxidation surface modification on the properties of the NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Xu, J L; Zhong, Z C; Yu, D Z; Liu, F; Luo, J M

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of micro-arc oxidation (MAO) surface modification (alumina coatings) on the phase transformation behavior, shape memory characteristics, in vitro haemocopatibility and cytocompatibility of the biomedical NiTi alloy were investigated respectively by differential scanning calorimetry, bending test, hemolysis ratio test, dynamic blood clotting test, platelet adhesion test and cytotoxicity testing by human osteoblasts (Hobs). The results showed that there were no obvious changes of the phase transformation temperatures and shape memory characteristics of the NiTi alloy after the MAO surface modification and the coating could withstand the thermal shock and volume change caused by martensite-austenite phase transformation. Compared to the uncoated NiTi alloys, the MAO surface modification could effectively improve the haemocopatibility of the coated NiTi alloys by the reduced hemolysis ratio, the prolonged dynamic clotting time and the decreased number of platelet adhesion; and the rough and porous alumina coatings could obviously promote the adherence, spread and proliferation of the Hobs with the significant increase of proliferation number of Hobs adhered on the surface of the coated NiTi alloys (P < 0.05).

  17. Fatigue behavior of Long and Short Cracks in Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    deposits ,37 40 irregular fracture morphologies coupled with crack tip shear displacements, 4 1 4 3 and fluid-induced pressure44 in addition to...Associated Auger measurements of the extent of crack surface corrosion deposits are shown in Fig. 4.6. In marked contrast to behavior in lower...6 8 10 12 CRACK LENGTH MEASURED FROM NOTCH (mm) Fig. 4.6: Scanning Auger spectroscopic measurements of excess crack surface oxide deposits as a

  18. PILOT EVALUATION OF VANADIUM ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARCS, SHEETS, ROLLING(METALLURGY), HIGH TEMPERATURE, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, DUCTILITY, CREEP, OXIDATION, COATINGS , SILICIDES , HARDNESS, WELDING, EXTRUSION, TANTALUM ALLOYS, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS....VANADIUM ALLOYS, * NIOBIUM ALLOYS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS, CARBON ALLOYS, MELTING, ELECTRIC

  19. Fatigue Behavior of Long and Short Cracks in Wrought and Powder Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    6 mm aluminum alloy 7075 and, unlike behavior in cycle -l) near the fatigue threshold stress in- steels (4-61, were not consistent with lower tensity...NO. ACCESSION NO. ____ _.-__’__ ____ ___ ____ ___ _ _ __2306 Al I 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF LONG AND SHORT...amplitude loading; Fatigue in aluminum alloys; Fatigue behavior of lon and short cracks; Fatigue cracks: crack closure . ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if

  20. Tribocorrosion behavior of beta titanium biomedical alloys in phosphate buffer saline solution.

    PubMed

    Pina, V Guiñón; Dalmau, A; Devesa, F; Amigó, V; Muñoz, A Igual

    2015-06-01

    The tribo-electrochemical behavior of different β titanium alloys for biomedical applications sintered by powder metallurgy has been investigated. Different mechanical, electrochemical and optical techniques were used to study the influence of the chemical composition, Sn content, and the electrochemical conditions on the tribocorrosion behavior of those alloys Ti30NbxSn alloys (where "x" is the weight percentage of Sn content, 2% and 4%). Sn content increases the active and passive dissolution rate of the titanium alloys, thus increasing the mechanically activated corrosion under tribocorrosion conditions. It also increases the mechanical wear of the alloy. Prevailing electrochemical conditions between -1 and 2V influences the wear accelerated corrosion by increasing it with the applied potential and slightly increases the mechanical wear of Ti30Nb4Sn. Wear accelerated corrosion can be predicted by existing models as a function of electrochemical and mechanical parameters of the titanium alloys.

  1. Kinetics and Properties of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings Deposited on Commercial Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, L. Rama; Purnima, A. Sudha; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Sundararajan, G.

    2007-02-01

    The micro arc oxidation (MAO) technique is being increasingly recognized as a novel and ecofriendly means of depositing dense ceramic oxide coatings on Al and its alloys. In the present study, the deposition kinetics, surface roughness, morphology, phase distribution and the microhardness of the MAO coatings deposited on ten different commercially available Al substrates having widely differing chemical composition has been investigated. Further, the tribological properties of the coatings obtained on different Al alloys in comparison with the bare substrates have also been evaluated using dry sand abrasion, solid-particle erosion and pin-on-disc dry sliding wear tests. The results clearly demonstrate that the alloying elements added to the Al substrate substantially influence the MAO coating deposition kinetics and coating properties. In the case of Al-Si alloys, the coating deposition kinetics is non-linear and the Al6Si2O13 (mullite) is observed to form. With increasing Si content, the corresponding mullite phase also increases. Increasing mullite content in the coating adversely affects the tribological performance. Excepting Al-Si alloys, all other alloys investigated including commercial purity Al exhibit linear coating deposition kinetics. Of all the alloys investigated, Al-Li alloy exhibits the highest coating deposition rate and the 6061 T6 Al alloy exhibits the best coating properties.

  2. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Pint, Bruce A.; Chen, Xiang

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  3. Effects of composition and testing conditions on oxidation behavior of four cast commercial nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Four cast nickel-base superalloys were oxidized at 1000 and 1100 C for times up to 100 hr in static air and a Mach 1 gas stream. The oxidation resistance was judged by weight change, metal thickness loss, depletion-zone formation, and oxide formation and morphology. The alloys which formed mostly nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) (B-1900, VIA, and to a lesser extent 713C) were more oxidation resistant. Poorer oxidation resistance was associated with the appearance of chromium sesquioxide (Cr2O3) and chromite spinel (738X). Refractory metal content had little effect on oxidation resistance. Refractory metals appeared in the scale as tapiolite (NiM2O6, where M represents the refractory metal). Thermal cycling in static air appeared to supply sufficient data for the evaluation of oxidation resistance, especially for alloys which form oxides of low volatility. For alloys of higher chromium levels with high propensities toward forming a chromium-bearing scale of higher volatility, testing under conditions of high gas velocity is necessary to assess fully the behavior of the alloy.

  4. Acoustic emission analysis on tensile failure of steam-side oxide scales formed on T22 alloy superheater tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jun-Lin; Zhou, Ke-Yi Xu, Jian-Qun; Wang, Xin-Meng; Tu, Yi-You

    2014-07-28

    Failure of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes can seriously influence the safety of coal-fired power plants. Uniaxial tensile tests employing acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were performed, in this work, to investigate the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on T22 alloy boiler superheater tubes. The characteristic frequency spectra of the captured AE signals were obtained by performing fast Fourier transform. Three distinct peak frequency bands, 100-170, 175-250, and 280-390 kHz, encountered in different testing stages were identified in the frequency spectra, which were confirmed to, respectively, correspond to substrate plastic deformation, oxide vertical cracking, and oxide spalling with the aid of scanning electronic microscopy observations, and can thus be used for distinguishing different oxide failure mechanisms. Finally, the critical cracking strain of the oxide scale and the interfacial shear strength of the oxide/substrate interface were estimated, which are the critical parameters urgently desired for modeling the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes of coal-fired power plants.

  5. Acoustic emission analysis on tensile failure of steam-side oxide scales formed on T22 alloy superheater tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun-Lin; Zhou, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xin-Meng; Tu, Yi-You; Xu, Jian-Qun

    2014-07-01

    Failure of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes can seriously influence the safety of coal-fired power plants. Uniaxial tensile tests employing acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were performed, in this work, to investigate the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on T22 alloy boiler superheater tubes. The characteristic frequency spectra of the captured AE signals were obtained by performing fast Fourier transform. Three distinct peak frequency bands, 100-170, 175-250, and 280-390 kHz, encountered in different testing stages were identified in the frequency spectra, which were confirmed to, respectively, correspond to substrate plastic deformation, oxide vertical cracking, and oxide spalling with the aid of scanning electronic microscopy observations, and can thus be used for distinguishing different oxide failure mechanisms. Finally, the critical cracking strain of the oxide scale and the interfacial shear strength of the oxide/substrate interface were estimated, which are the critical parameters urgently desired for modeling the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes of coal-fired power plants.

  6. An oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-W-Al alloy with superior high temperature strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys based on the WAZ-20 nickel-base alloy were prepared by the mechanical alloying process described by Benjamin (1973), and evaluated. The results of microstructural examinations and mechanical property determinations are discussed. It is shown that WAZ-20, a high gamma-prime fraction alloy having a high gamma-prime solvus temperature, can be effectively dispersion strengthened. The strengths obtained were outstanding, especially at 1150 and 1205 C. The strength is attributed to a combination of highly alloyed matrix, elongated grain structure, and hard phase dispersion. Tensile ductility can be improved by post-recrystallization heat treatment. The new alloy shows some potential for low stress post-extrusion forming.

  7. Electrical resistivity behaviors of liquid Pb-Sn binary alloy in the presence of ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Haoyu; Le, Qichi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wenyi; Bao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Electrical resistivity behaviors of liquid Pb-Sn alloys have been investigated in the presence of ultrasonic field. The process demonstrated significantly that electrical resistivity could reveal the precise influence caused by ultrasound. Details revealed by applying the resistivity measuring approach to the liquid Pb-Sn alloy show that the short ordered structures in the liquid could be modified by ultrasonic irradiation, and the resistivity approach could have application value in the ultrasonic irradiation process on the specific liquid metals and alloys.

  8. STEAM-SIDE OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION BEHAVIOR IN SUPERHEATERS AND REHEATERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Shingledecker, John P.; Wright, Ian G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in materials for power plants include not only new materials with higher-temperature capabilities, but also the use of current materials at increasingly higher temperatures. This latter activity builds on extensive experience of the performance of the various alloys, and provides a basis for identifying changes in alloy behavior with increasing temperature as well as understanding the factors that ultimately determine the maximum use temperatures of the different alloy classes. This paper presents results from an effort to model the exfoliation processes of steam-side oxide scales in a manner that describes as accurately as possible the evolution of strains in oxides growing inside small-diameter tubes subjected to large thermal gradients and to thermal transients typical of normal steam boiler operation. One way of portraying the results of such calculations is by plotting the evolving strains in a given oxide scale on an Exfoliation Diagram (of the type pioneered by Manning et al. of the British Central Electricity Research Laboratory) to determine the earliest time at which the trajectory of these strains intersects a criterion for scale failure. Understanding of how such strain trajectories differ among different alloys and are affected by the major variables associated with boiler operation has the potential to suggest boiler operating strategies to manage scale exfoliation, as well as to highlight the mode of scale failure and the limitations of each alloy. Preliminary results are presented of the strain trajectories calculated for alloys T22, T91, and TP347 subjected to the conditions experienced by superheaters under assumed boiler operating scenarios. For all three alloys the earliest predicted scale failures were associated with the increased strains developed during a boiler shut-down event; indeed, in the cases considered it appeared unlikely that scale failure would occur in any practically meaningful time due to strains accumulated during

  9. Solubility Behavior and Phase Stability of Transition Metal Oxides in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2000-05-18

    The solubility behavior of transition metal oxides in high temperature water is interpreted by recognizing three types of chemical reaction equilibria: metal oxide hydration/dehydration, metal oxide dissolution and metal ion hydroxocomplex formation. The equilibria are quantified using thermodynamic concepts and the thermochemical properties of the metal oxides/ions representative of the most common constituents of construction metal alloys, i.e., element shaving atomic numbers between Z = 22 (Ti) and Z = 30 (Zn), are summarized on the basis of metal oxide solubility studies conducted in the laboratory. Particular attention is devoted to the uncharged metal ion hydrocomplex, M{sup Z}(OH){sub Z}(aq), since its thermochemical properties define minimum solubilities of the metal oxide at a given temperature. Experimentally-extracted values of standard partial molal entropy (S{sup 0}) for the transition metal ion neutral hydroxocomplex are shown to be influenced by ligand field stabilization energies and complex symmetry.

  10. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases,more » Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.« less

  11. Evaluation of tribological behavior of Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni high entropy alloy using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    High-entropy alloys have been studied extensively for their excellent properties and performance, including outstanding strength and resistance to oxidation at high temperatures. This study employed molecular dynamics simulation to produce a high-entropy alloy containing an equal molar ratio of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, and Ni and investigated the tribological behavior of the material using a diamond tool in a vacuum environment. We also simulated a AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy cooled from a high temperature molten state to 300 K in a high-speed quenching process to produce an amorphous microstructure. In a simulation of nanoscratching, the cutting force-distance curve of high-entropy alloys was used to evaluate work hardening and stick-slip. An increase in temperature was shown to reduce the scratching force and scratching resistance. Nanoscratching the high-entropy alloy at elevated temperatures provided evidence of work hardening; however, the degree of work hardening decreased with an increase in temperature. And it can also be found that when the temperature is higher, the fluctuation of the cutting force curve is greater.

  12. MRI-compatible Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy for vascular stents: Electrochemical corrosion behavior in simulated plasma solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Zhe; Zhao, Xu; Xu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Using revised simulated body fluid (r-SBF), the electrochemical corrosion behavior of an Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy for MRI compatible vascular stents was characterized in vitro. As indicated by XPS analysis, the surface passive oxide film of approximately 1.3nm thickness was identified as a mixture of Nb2O5, Ta2O5 and ZrO2 after immersion in the r-SBF. The Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy manifests a low corrosion rate and high polarization resistance similar to pure Nb and Ta, as shown by the potentiodynamic polarization curves and EIS. Unlike 316L stainless steel and the L605 Co-Cr alloy, no localized corrosion has been detected. Semiconducting property of passive film on the Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy was identified as the n-type, with growth mechanism of high-field controlled growth. The excellent corrosion resistance in simulated human blood enviroment renders the Nb-60Ta-2Zr alloy promising as stent candidate material.

  13. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  14. Oxidation of Fe-W Alloy Electrodeposits for Application to Anodes as Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Changwei; Ye, Mengchao; Zhon, Linxing; Hou, Jianping; Li, Junmin; Guo, Junming

    2016-12-01

    A citrate-ammonia bath was selected to electrodeposit Fe-W alloys, which exhibit a crystalline structure even if the content of W in the Fe-W alloy is up to 37.8wt%. Those alloys could be oxidized partly at 700∘C. Resultant oxides were composed of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and amorphous products. The composite oxides presented better electrochemical properties than those of the Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 composite formed by oxidation of Fe deposits. For instance, such an electrode demonstrates the reversible capacity of up to 2438.3mAhg-1 (in terms of incremental oxygen) after 100 charge-discharge cycles, while the electrodes of Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 composites formed by oxidation of Fe deposits were of only 667.5mAhg-1.

  15. Osteoblast response to thermally oxidized Ti6Al4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, L; Vilaboa, N; Vallés, G; González-Cabrero, J; Munuera, L

    2005-04-01

    We have recently reported that thermal oxidation treatments of Ti6Al4V at 500 degrees and 700 degrees C for 1 h result in the formation of an outer "ceramic" layer of rutile that do not decrease the high in vitro corrosion resistance of the alloy. In the present work, surface roughness was measured and found marginally increased as a consequence of oxidation of the alloy at 700 degrees C, but not at 500 degrees C. We have evaluated the biocompatibility of the oxidized surfaces, by assessing cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of primary cultures of human osteoblastic cells. Compared with polished alloy, both thermal treatments increased osteoblast adhesion measured as cell attachment, beta1 integrin and FAK-Y397 expression, as well as cytoskeletal reorganization. Compared with treatment at 500 degrees C, thermal oxidation at 700 degrees C enhanced cell adhesion. Treatment at 700 degrees C transiently impaired cell proliferation and viability, which were not altered in alloys oxidized at 500 degrees C. Several markers of osteoblastic differentiation such as procollagen I peptide, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and mineralized nodule formation were found either unaffected or differentially increased by alloys treated either at 500 degrees or 700 degrees C. In addition, thermal oxidation at 700 degrees C also increased osteoprotegerin secretion. Taken together, our results indicate that thermal oxidation treatments at 500 degrees or 700 degrees C for 1 h improve the in vitro biocompatibility of Ti6Al4V.

  16. Influence of oxide films on primary water stress corrosion cracking initiation of alloy 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panter, J.; Viguier, B.; Cloué, J.-M.; Foucault, M.; Combrade, P.; Andrieu, E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study alloy 600 was tested in simulated pressurised water reactor (PWR) primary water, at 360 °C, under an hydrogen partial pressure of 30 kPa. These testing conditions correspond to the maximum sensitivity of alloy 600 to crack initiation. The resulting oxidised structures (corrosion scale and underlying metal) were characterised. A chromium rich oxide layer was revealed, the underlying metal being chromium depleted. In addition, analysis of the chemical composition of the metal close to the oxide scale had allowed to detect oxygen under the oxide scale and particularly in a triple grain boundary. Implication of such a finding on the crack initiation of alloy 600 is discussed. Significant diminution of the crack initiation time was observed for sample oxidised before stress corrosion tests. In view of these results, a mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water was proposed.

  17. Electrochemical study on the adsorption of carbon oxides and oxidation of their adsorption products on platinum group metals and alloys.

    PubMed

    Siwek, Hanna; Lukaszewski, Mariusz; Czerwiński, Andrzej

    2008-07-07

    CO(2) reduction and CO adsorption on noble metals (Pt, Rh, Pd) and their alloys (Pt-Rh, Pd-Pt, Pd-Rh, Pd-Pt-Rh) prepared as thin rough deposits have been studied by chronoamperometry (CA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The influence of alloy surface composition on the values of surface coverage, eps (electron per site) and potential of the oxidation of CO(2) reduction and CO adsorption products is shown. The oxidation of the adsorbate on Pt-Rh alloys proceeds more easily (at lower potentials) than on pure metals. On the other hand, in the case of Pd-Pt and Pd-Rh alloys the adsorbate oxidation is more difficult and requires higher potentials than on Pt or Rh. The analysis of the EQCM signal is presented for the case of adsorption and oxidation of carbon oxide adsorption products on the electrodes studied. The comparison of adsorption parameters and the EQCM response obtained for platinum group metals and alloys leads to the conclusion that reduced CO(2) cannot be totally identified with adsorbed CO.

  18. Recycling of Magnesium Alloy Employing Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter A.; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-04-01

    Pure magnesium was recycled from partially oxidized 50.5 wt pct Mg-Al scrap alloy and AZ91 Mg alloy (9 wt pct Al, 1 wt pct Zn). Refining experiments were performed using a eutectic mixture of MgF2-CaF2 molten salt (flux). During the experiments, potentiodynamic scans were performed to determine the electrorefining potentials for magnesium dissolution and magnesium bubble nucleation in the flux. The measured electrorefining potential for magnesium bubble nucleation increased over time as the magnesium content inside the magnesium alloy decreased. Potentiostatic holds and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to measure the electronic and ionic resistances of the flux. The electronic resistivity of the flux varied inversely with the magnesium solubility. Up to 100 pct of the magnesium was refined from the Mg-Al scrap alloy by dissolving magnesium and its oxide into the flux followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. Solid oxide membrane electrolysis was also employed in the system to enable additional magnesium recovery from magnesium oxide in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. In an experiment employing AZ91 Mg alloy, only the refining step was carried out. The calculated refining yield of magnesium from the AZ91 alloy was near 100 pct.

  19. Predicting the oxidative lifetime of beta NiAl-Zr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Vinarcik, E. J.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel aluminides containing 40 to 50 at. pct Al and 0.1 at. pct Zr were studied following cyclic oxidation at 1400 C. The selective oxidation of Al resulted in the formation of protective Al2O3 scales on each alloy composition. However, repeated cycling eventually resulted in the gradual formation of less-protective NiAl2O4, first appearing on the 40Al alloys followed at longer times on the 45Al alloys. The appearance of the NiAl2O4, signaling the end of the protective scale-forming capability of the alloy, was related to the presence of gamma-prime (Ni3Al) which formed as a result of the loss of Al from the sample. A diffusion model, based on finite-difference techniques, was developed to predict the protective life of beta Ni-Al alloys. This model predicts Ni and Al concentration profiles after various oxidation exposures. The model can predict the oxidative lifetime due to Al depletion when the Al concentration decreases to a critical concentration. Measured Al concentration profiles on two alloys after various oxidation exposures are compared to those predicted by the diffusion model. The time to the appearance of the NiAl2O4 and that predicted by the diffusion model are compared and discussed.

  20. The effect of zirconium on the isothermal oxidation of nominal Ni-14Cr-24Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, A. S.; Lowell, C. E.; Barrett, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation of Ni-14Cr-24Al-xZr-type alloys was performed in still air at 1100, 1150, and 1200 C for times up to 200 hr. The zirconium content of the alloys varied from 0-0.63 atom percent (a/o). The oxidized surfaces were studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The base alloy was an alumina former with the zirconium-containing alloys also developing some ZrO2. The addition of zirconium above 0.066 a/o increased the rate of weight gain relative to the base alloy. Due to oxide penetratio, the weight gain increased with Zr content; however, the scale thickness did not increase. The Zr did increase the adherence of the oxide, particularly at 1200 C. The delta W/A vs. time data fit the parabolic model of oxidation. The specific diffusion mechanism operative could not be identified by analysis of the calculated activation energies. Measurements of the Al2O3 scale lattice constants yielded the same values for all alloys.

  1. The effect of metallic oxide deposition on the electrochemical behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg-Sn alloy in natural tropical seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din Yati, M. S.; Nazree Derman, Mohd; Isa, M. C.; Y Ahmad, M.; Yusoff, N. H. N.; Muhammad, M. M.; Nain, H.

    2014-06-01

    The potential of aluminium alloys as anode materials in cathodic protection system has been explored and a significant improvement has been achieved. However, for marine application, it is quite difficult to maintain continuous activation process due to passivation behavior of aluminum alloys. Therefore, to choose the best activation mechanism for aluminium alloy in marine environment, it has to be considered from various points such as alloy composition and surface treatment. This paper report the effect of metallic ruthenium oxide (RuO2) deposition on the surface of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Sn alloy and to study the effect of its presence on the electrochemical behavior using direct current (DC) electrochemical polarization and current capacity measurement. The morphology and topography of corroded surface were studied by the aid of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) respectively. Results from this study showed that the presence of intermetallic compound (Mg2Sn) and also mixed metal oxide compound (Al2O3 and RuO2) on the alloy surface has been very useful in improving electrochemical reaction and charge transfer activities in chloride containing solution. This study also showed that RuO2 catalytic coating applied on the surface of Al-Zn-Mg-Sn alloy has slightly increased the corrosion current density compared to Al-Zn-Mg-Sn without RuO2. The corrosion morphology and topography of corroded surface of Al-Zn-Mg-Sn alloy deposited with RuO2 was found more uniform corrosion attack with the formation of porous and fibrous mud-like crack on outer layer. Based on surface morphology and 3D topographic studies, these features were believed to facilitate ionic species adsorption and diffusion through corrosion product layer at solution-alloy interface. Deposited RuO2 films also was found to increase of current efficiency by more than 10%.

  2. Modeling of ferroelastic behavior of shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tadashige

    2005-05-01

    A simple yet accurate model of shape memory alloys (SMAs) is proposed, which can consider asymmetric tension-compression ferroelastic behavior. Features of this model are (1) energy-based transformation criterion, (2) partial transformation rule based on the micromechanical viewpoint, (3) required transformation energy in the form of a sum of two exponential functions in terms of phase volume fraction, and (4) energy balance equation including thermoelastic effect and dissipated energy due to interaction between the phases. In this ferroelastic model, three phases are considered, namely, an austenitic phase, a tensile stress induced martensitic phase, and a compressive stress induced martensitic phase. The tension-compression asymmetry is expressed by using different required transformation energy functions in different transformation directions and by using different intrinsic strains and Young's moduli in different phases. Stress-strain hysteresis loops for a SMA bar under tensile-compressive cyclic loading are simulated. The obtained result shows that the proposed model can well capture the asymmetric stress-strain loops for tension and compression, minor loops, and effects of temperature and strain rate. This indicates that this model would be a useful tool for understanding the mechanism of SMA behavior and designing smart structures with SMA elements.

  3. The effect of oxide film properties on the corrosion behavior of SiC/Al metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Golledge, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxide growth on pure aluminum, aluminum alloy 6061, and the aluminum-based metal matrix composite SiC/AA6061 was studied, and the properties of the oxides related to the pit-initiation behavior of the materials. The objectives of the work were to identify the effect of alloying elements and SiC reinforcement on the oxide film, and to better understand how the oxide properties control pit initiation behavior. To this end, electrochemical and optical studies of the materials were carried out in a buffered sodium/boric acid solution at pH values of 8.4 and 7.2. The alloy and metal-matrix composite showed a slightly lesser tendency to pit than pure aluminum, as measured by the pitting potential. The oxide on the composite was less resistant to pit initiation, and was found to exhibit slower repassivation rates than the other materials. The repassivation behavior and resistance to pit initiation were quite similar in the case of the alloy and the pure aluminum. Induction times for pit initiation were consistent with the predictions of Heusler's model for the breakdown of passivity.

  4. Isothermal oxidation behavior and microstructure of plasma surface Ta coating on γ-TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jian; Zhang, Ping-Ze Wei, Dong-Bo; Wei, Xiang-Fei; Wang, Ya

    2014-12-15

    The oxidation behavior of γ-TiAl with Ta surface coating fabricated by double glow plasma surface alloying technology was investigated by thermogravimetric method. Oxidation experiments were carried out at 750 °C and 850 °C in air for 100 h. The modification layer was comprised of deposition layer and diffusion layer, which metallurgically adhered to the substrate. Tantalum element decreased with the case depth. The oxidation morphology was studied by a scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The results highlighted that in the oxidizing process of the oxidation, the phase containing Ta-richer may restrain diffusing outward of the element Al in the matrix. Ti diffused outward, and formed the TiO{sub 2} scales, while the middle layer was rich in Al, and formed the continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales after oxidation, which was effective to prevent further infiltration of oxygen atoms, and as a result the oxidation resistance increased immensely. - Highlights: • A Ta modified coating was prepared on γ-TiAl using DGP surface alloying technology. • The modification layer metallurgically adhered to the substrate. • The bonding force is about 60 N, satisfying the demands of practical use. • The oxidation resistance increased immensely at 750 °C and 850 °C.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

    2004-11-02

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

  6. Evaluation of bonding behavior of silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy to adhesive luting cements.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Kawaguchi, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2010-12-01

    The bond strengths of a silver-tin-zinc-indium alloy used with adhesive luting cements were investigated. The metal surfaces were primed with two metal conditioners designed for noble metal alloys or base metal alloys, or prepared using a Rocatec tribochemical coating unit. Two adhesive luting cements (Super-Bond C&B and Panavia F 2.0) were applied. It can be concluded that airborne-particle abrasion with alumina was effective, but the effects on the bond durability of both the metal conditioners and the tribochemical silica coating method were not clear Such bonding behavior seems to be particular to this kind of silver-rich dental casting alloy.

  7. Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Fine-Grain Nickel-Based Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Constant-Kmax fatigue crack growth tests were performed on two finegrain nickel-base alloys Inconel 718 (DA) and Ren 95 to determine if these alloys exhibit near-threshold time-dependent crack growth behavior observed for fine-grain aluminum alloys in room-temperature laboratory air. Test results showed that increases in K(sub max) values resulted in increased crack growth rates, but no evidence of time-dependent crack growth was observed for either nickel-base alloy at room temperature.

  8. EFFECTS OF LASER SHOCK PEENING ON SCC BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 600

    SciTech Connect

    Abhishek Telang; Amrinder Gill; S.R.Mannava; Vijay K. Vasudevan; Dong Qian; Sebastien P. Teysseyre

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the effects of laser shock peening (LSP) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 600 in tetrathionate solution were investigated. The degree of sensitization was quantified using double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR) tests. The sensitized Alloy 600 was demonstrated to be susceptible to intergranular SCC in tetrathionate solution. Following LSP, residual stresses and the amount of plastic strain introduced in Alloy 600 were characterized. The effects of LSP on SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in tetrathionate solution were evaluated by slow strain rate tests and constant load tests. Results indicate a significant increase in resistance to crack initiation and decreased susceptibility to SCC after LSP.

  9. Exploration of alloy 441 chemistry for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application

    SciTech Connect

    Paul D. Jablonski; Christopher J. Cowen; John S. Sears

    2010-02-01

    Alloy 441 stainless steel (UNS S 44100) is being considered for application as an SOFC interconnect material. There are several advantages to the selection of this alloy over other iron-based or nickel-based alloys: first and foremost alloy 441ss is a production alloy which is both low in cost and readily available. Second, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) more closely matches the CTE of the adjoining ceramic components of the fuel cell. Third, this alloy forms the Laves phase at typical SOFC operating temperatures of 600–800 °C. It is thought that the Laves phase preferentially consumes the Si present in the alloy microstructure. As a result it has been postulated that the long-term area specific resistance (ASR) performance degradation often seen with other ferritic stainless steels, which is associated with the formation of electrically resistive Si-rich oxide subscales, may be avoidable with alloy 441ss. In this paper we explore the physical metallurgy of alloy 441, combining computational thermodynamics with experimental verification, and discuss the results with regards to Laves phase formation under SOFC operating conditions. We show that the incorporation of the Laves phase into the microstructure cannot in itself remove sufficient Si from the ferritic matrix in order to completely avoid the formation of Si-rich oxide subscales. However, the thickness, morphology, and continuity of the Si-rich subscale that forms in this alloy is modified in comparison to non-Laves forming ferritic stainless steel alloys and therefore may not be as detrimental to long-term SOFC performance.

  10. Exploration of alloy 441 chemistry for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Sears, John S.

    2010-02-01

    Alloy 441 stainless steel (UNS S 44100) is being considered for application as an SOFC interconnect material. There are several advantages to the selection of this alloy over other iron-based or nickel-based alloys: first and foremost alloy 441ss is a production alloy which is both low in cost and readily available. Second, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) more closely matches the CTE of the adjoining ceramic components of the fuel cell. Third, this alloy forms the Laves phase at typical SOFC operating temperatures of 600–800 °C. It is thought that the Laves phase preferentially consumes the Si present in the alloy microstructure. As a result it has been postulated that the long-term area specific resistance (ASR) performance degradation often seen with other ferritic stainless steels, which is associated with the formation of electrically resistive Si-rich oxide subscales, may be avoidable with alloy 441ss. In this paper we explore the physical metallurgy of alloy 441, combining computational thermodynamics with experimental verification, and discuss the results with regards to Laves phase formation under SOFC operating conditions. We show that the incorporation of the Laves phase into the microstructure cannot in itself remove sufficient Si from the ferritic matrix in order to completely avoid the formation of Si-rich oxide subscales. Finally, however, the thickness, morphology, and continuity of the Si-rich subscale that forms in this alloy is modified in comparison to non-Laves forming ferritic stainless steel alloys and therefore may not be as detrimental to long-term SOFC performance.

  11. Microstructural effects on the tensile and fracture behavior of aluminum casting alloys A356/357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. G.

    2003-12-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of cast aluminum alloys A356 and A357 strongly depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), Mg content, and, in particular, the size and shape of eutectic silicon particles and Fe-rich intermetallics. In the unmodified alloys, increasing the cooling rate during solidification refines both the dendrites and eutectic particles and increases ductility. Strontium modification reduces the size and aspect ratio of the eutectic silicon particles, leading to a fairly constant particle size and aspect ratio over the range of SDAS studied. In comparison with the unmodified alloys, the Sr-modified alloys show higher ductility, particularly the A356 alloy, but slightly lower yield strength. In the microstructures with large SDAS (>50 µm), the ductility of the Sr-modified alloys does not continuously decrease with SDAS as it does in the unmodified alloy. Increasing Mg content increases both the matrix strength and eutectic particle size. This decreases ductility in both the Sr-modified and unmodified alloys. The A356/357 alloys with large and elongated particles show higher strain hardening and, thus, have a higher damage accumulation rate by particle cracking. Compared to A356, the increased volume fraction and size of the Fe-rich intermetallics ( π phase) in the A357 alloy are responsible for the lower ductility, especially in the Sr-modified alloy. In alloys with large SDAS (>50 µm), final fracture occurs along the cell boundaries, and the fracture mode is transgranular. In the small SDAS (<30 µm) alloys, final fracture tends to concentrate along grain boundaries. The transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture mode is accompanied by an increase in the ductility of the alloys.

  12. High temperature oxidation resistance of Ni-(5˜13)Co-(10˜16)Cr-(5˜9)W-5Al-(1˜1.5)Ti-(3˜6)Ta alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Soo; Park, Si-Jun; Seo, Seong-Moon; Yoo, Young-Soo; Jeong, Hi-Won; Jang, HeeJin

    2016-09-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ni-based superalloys was examined by cyclic oxidation tests at 850 and 1000 °C. The present study focused on the investigation of two newly developed and three commercial alloys (GTD-111, IN738LC, and CM247LC). The oxidation resistance of the superalloys were evaluated by the oxidation rate constants and the mass gains. The oxidation scales mainly consisted of outer Cr2O3 and inner Al2O3 layers at both temperatures, as well as oxides of minor elements such as TiO2, NiCr2O4, CrTaO4, HfO2, and TaO. The oxidation resistance of the alloys containing larger amounts of Al, W, and Ta and lower Mo and Ti concentrations was higher than those of the other alloys. The ranking of oxidation resistance for the alloys corresponded to the statistical prediction drawn from a response surface analysis. Furthermore, these alloys contained more Ta oxides, such as CrTaO4 and TaO, suggesting that Ta oxides had an active role in improving the oxidation resistance.

  13. Oxidation kinetics and microstructure of V-(4-5) Wt.%Cr-(4-5) Wt.%Ti alloys exposed to air at 300-650{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Uz, M.

    1996-10-01

    A systematic study was conducted to determine the effects of time and temperature of air exposure on the oxidation behavior and microstructure of V-4Cr-4Ti (44) and V-5Cr-5Ti (55) alloys. All samples were from 1-mm-thick cold-rolled sheets, and each was annealed in vacuum at 1050{degrees}C for 1 h prior to high-temperature exposure. Different samples from each alloy were heated in ambient air at 500{degrees}C for times ranging from 24 to {approx}2000 h, and in a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus at 300 to 650{degrees}C. Models describing the oxidation kinetics, the oxide type and its thickness, alloy grain size, and the depth of oxygen diffusion in the substrate alloy were determined for the two alloys and compared. The results showed that the oxide layers that formed on the surfaces of both alloys in air in the temperature range of 300-650{degrees}C are protective, and that the 55 alloy is slightly more oxidation-resistant than the 44 alloy.

  14. Construction of layered structures on valve metal alloys by microplasma oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, T. A.; Chubenko, A. K.; Mamaev, A. I.; Mamaeva, V. A.; Kovalskaya, Ya B.

    2016-11-01

    Process of layered structure materials creation based on aluminum alloys is presented. Microplasma texturing method, microplasma oxidation method and chemical metallization method were used to create these structures. Non-conductive nonmetallic inorganic coatings were produced by microplasma oxidation method. Obtained structures showed high durability under thermal stress loads due to substrate metal - non-conductive nonmetallic inorganic coating phase boundary texturing.

  15. Growth Stresses in Thermally Grown Oxides on Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Luke H.; Laux, Britta; He, Ming Y.; Hovis, David; Heuer, Arthur H.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2016-03-01

    Growth stresses that develop in α-Al2O3 scale that form during isothermal oxidation of three Ni-based single crystal alloys have been studied to elucidate their role in coating and substrate degradation at elevated temperatures. Piezospectroscopy measurements at room temperature indicate large room temperature compressive stresses in the oxides formed at 1255 K or 1366 K (982 °C or 1093 °C) on the alloys, ranging from a high of 4.8 GPa for René N4 at 1366 K (1093 °C) to a low of 3.8 GPa for René N5 at 1255 K (982 °C). Finite element modeling of each of these systems to account for differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of the oxide and substrate indicates growth strains in the range from 0.21 to 0.44 pct at the oxidation temperature, which is an order of magnitude higher than the growth strains measured in the oxides on intermetallic coatings that are typically applied to these superalloys. The magnitudes of the growth strains do not scale with the parabolic oxidation rate constants measured for the alloys. Significant spatial inhomogeneities in the growth stresses were observed, due to (i) the presence of dendritic segregation and (ii) large carbides in the material that locally disrupts the structure of the oxide scale. The implications of these observations for failure during cyclic oxidation, fatigue cycling, and alloy design are considered.

  16. Solute transport during the cyclic oxidation of Ni-Cr-Al alloys. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Important requirements for protective coatings of Ni-Cr-Al alloys for gas turbine superalloys are resistance to oxidation accompanied by thermal cycling, resistance to thermal fatigue cracking. The resistance to oxidation accompanied by thermal cycling is discussed. The resistance to thermal fatigue cracking is also considered.

  17. High-temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 2: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  18. High temperature cyclic oxidation data. Part 1: Turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Garlick, Ralph G.; Lowell, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    Specific-weight-change-versus-time data and x ray diffraction results are presented derived from high temperature cyclic tests on high temperature, high strength nickel-base gamma/gamma prime and cobalt-base turbine alloys. Each page of data summarizes a complete test on a given alloy sample.

  19. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  20. Niobium-aluminum base alloys having improved, high temperature oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G. (Inventor); Stephens, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A niobium-aluminum base alloy having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 48%-52% niobium, 36%-42% aluminum, 4%-10% chromium, 0%-2%, more preferably 1%-2%, silicon and/or tungsten with tungsten being preferred, and 0.1%-2.0% of a rare earth selected from the group consisting of yttrium, ytterbium and erbium. Parabolic oxidation rates, k.sub.p, at 1200.degree. C. range from about 0.006 to 0.032 (mg/cm.sup.2).sup.2 /hr. The new alloys also exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance.

  1. Study on Microstructure and Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of PEO Coatings Formed on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N.; Song, R. G.; Li, H.; Wang, C.; Mao, Q. Z.; Xiong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) treated 6063 aluminum alloy was applied in a silicate- and borate-based alkaline solution. The microstructure and electrochemical corrosion behavior were studied by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The results showed that the silicate-based PEO coating was of a denser structure compared with that of borate-based PEO coating. In addition, the silicate-based PEO coating was composed of more phased (Al9Si) than borate-based PEO coating. The results of corrosion test indicated that the silicate-based PEO coating provided a superior protection to 6063 aluminum alloy substrate, while borate-based PEO coating with a porous structure showed an inferior conservancy against corrosive electrolyte. Furthermore, the EIS tests proved that both coatings were capable to resist the aggressive erosion in 0.5 M NaCl solution after 72 h of immersion. However, the borate-based PEO coating could not provide sufficient protection to the substrate after 72-h immersion in 1 M NaCl solution.

  2. Microstructure, mechanical property, corrosion behavior, and in vitro biocompatibility of Zr-Mo alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhou, F Y; Wang, B L; Qiu, K J; Li, L; Lin, J P; Li, H F; Zheng, Y F

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, and in vitro biocompatibility of Zr-Mo alloys as a function of Mo content after solution treatment were systemically investigated to assess their potential use in biomedical application. The experimental results indicated that Zr-1Mo alloy mainly consisted of an acicular structure of α' phase, while ω phase formed in Zr-3Mo alloy. In Zr-5Mo alloy, retained β phase and a small amount of precipitated α phase were observed. Only the retained β phase was obtained in Zr-10Mo alloy. Zr-1Mo alloy exhibited the greatest hardness, bending strength, and modulus among all experimental Zr-Mo alloys, while β phase Zr-10Mo alloy had a low modulus. The results of electrochemical corrosion indicated that adding Mo into Zr improved its corrosion resistance which resulted in increasing the thermodynamic stability and passivity of zirconium. The cytotoxicity test suggested that the extracts of the studied Zr-Mo alloys produced no significant deleterious effect to fibroblast cells (L-929) and osteoblast cells (MG 63), indicating an excellent in vitro biocompatibility. Based on these facts, certain Zr-Mo alloys potentially suitable for different biomedical applications were proposed.

  3. Effects of neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of nickel-base fastener alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Burke, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture behavior and deformation microstructure of high-strength nickel-base alloy fastener materials, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition, and Alloy 625 in the direct aged condition were irradiated to a fluence of 2.4x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} at 264 C in the Advanced Test Reactor. Deformation structures at low strains were examined. It was previously shown that Alloy X-750 undergoes hardening, a significant degradation in ductility and an increase in intergranular fracture. In contrast, Alloy 625 had shown softening with a concomitant increase in ductility and transgranular failure after irradiation. The deformation microstructures of the two alloys were also different. Alloy X-750 deformed by a planar slip mechanism with fine microcracks forming at the intersections of slip bands with grain boundaries. Alloy 625 showed much more homogeneous deformation with fine, closely spaced slip bands and an absence of microcracks. The mechanism(s) of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are discussed.

  4. [The electrochemical behavior of TiTa30 and TiNb30 alloys for implantology].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, H F; Ralison, A; Traisnel, M; Breme, J

    1997-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior in artificial saliva of TiNb30 and TiTa30 alloys were compared with that of commercial pure titanium. The anodic potential, the current density, the passivation potential and the galvanic corrosion vs. Au were determined. Both alloys have a similar behavior to that of pure titanium. Crevace corrosion, which is very weak in pure Ti, is completely inhibited by the addition of Nb or Ta.

  5. Fracture Behavior of a Uranium and a Tungsten Alloy in a Notched Component with Inertia Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    34AD up’., TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCS-TR-83043 FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF A URANIUM AND A TUNGSTEN ALLOY* iN A. NOTCHED COMPONENT WITH INERIrA LOADING J. H...andCutitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF A URANIUM AND A TUNGSTEN Final ALLOY IN A NOTCHED COMPONENT WITH INERTIA LOADTIG s...34M Report) Il. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at Sixteenth National Symposium on Fracture Mechanics, ASTM, Columbus, Ohio, 15-18 August 1983

  6. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  7. ANODIC BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 22 IN HIGH NITRATE BRINES AT TEMPERATURES HIGHER THAN 100C

    SciTech Connect

    G.O. LLEVBARE; J.C. ESTILL; A. YILMAZ; R.A. ETIEN; G.A. HUST M.L. STUART

    2006-04-20

    Alloy 22 (N06022) may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Nitrate acts as an inhibitor to crevice corrosion. Several papers have been published regarding the effect of nitrate on the corrosion resistance of Alloy 22 at temperatures 100 C and lower. However, very little is known about the behavior of this alloy in highly concentrated brines at temperatures above 100 C. In the current work, electrochemical tests have been carried out to explore the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in high chloride high nitrate electrolytes at temperatures as high as 160 C at ambient atmospheres. Even though Alloy 22 may adopt corrosion potentials in the order of +0.5 V (in the saturated silver chloride scale), it does not suffer crevice corrosion if there is high nitrate in the solution. That is, the inhibitive effect of nitrate on crevice corrosion is active for temperatures higher than 100 C.

  8. Microstructure development and hydrogen gas interaction of oxidized Zr65Pd35 and Zr60Pd35Ce5 amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Masakuni; Kato, Shiro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Yogo, Toshinobu; Yamamura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of composites derived from amorphous Zr65Pd35 and Zr65Pd35Ce5 alloys was studied. X-ray diffractograms, Raman spectroscopy profiles and scanning electron micrographs indicated that the mixtures containing ZrO2, metallic Pd, and PdO were formed for both amorphous alloys after heat treatment in air. The amorphous Zr60Pd35Ce5 alloy at temperatures of 280-400 °C changed to the composites in which very small Pd precipitates with a diameter less than 100 nm were embedded in a ZrO2 matrix. The hydrogen-temperature-programmed reduction was applied to study the reactivity of hydrogen gas with the oxidized Zr60Pd35Ce5 material. A rapid hydrogen absorption and release behavior was observed on the composite derived from the amorphous alloy.

  9. Helium-3 behavior in some nickel-based amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unlu, K.; Vincent, D.H. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, helium trapping and release are studied for the nickel-rich amorphous alloys Ni{sub 75.1}Cr{sub 14.0}P{sub 10.1}C{sub 0.08}, Ni{sub 63.5}Zr{sub 36.5}, and Ni{sub 87.7}P{sub 12.3}. Helium-3 is introduced into the samples by implantation at 150-kev energy. The depth distribution of the implanted helium is observed by neutron depth profiling employing he reaction {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H. Two implantation doses are used: 1 {times} 10{sup 16} and 5 {times} 10{sup 16} {sup 3}He/cm{sup 2}. Both implantation doses were chosen to be low enough to avoid blistering or flaking of the surface of the samples. The helium release behavior of the samples is studied by taking depth profiles after each annealing stage. At the same time, electron diffraction is used on parallel samples to observe the microstructure of the samples as a function of annealing. The annealing sequence for each material is broken off when electron diffraction indicated the existence of relatively large crystals in a sample. Only a small fraction of the implanted helium is released in most cases, and a clear correlation between helium release and recrystallization can be found in only one case.

  10. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1,more » the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.« less

  11. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1, the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.

  12. Anodic Behavior of Specimens Prepared from a Full-Diameter Alloy 22 Fabricated Container

    SciTech Connect

    King, K J; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2005-02-05

    Alloy 22 (N06022) has been extensively tested for general and localized corrosion behavior both in the wrought and annealed condition and in the as-welded condition. The specimens for testing were mostly prepared from flat plates of material. It was important to determine if the process of fabricating a full diameter Alloy 22 container will affect the corrosion performance of the alloy. Specimens were prepared directly from a fabricated container and tested for corrosion resistance. Results show that both the anodic corrosion behavior and the localized corrosion resistance of specimens prepared from a welded fabricated container was the same as from flat welded plates.

  13. Kinetics and Microstructural Investigation of High-Temperature Oxidation of IN-738LC Super Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, S.; Rahimipour, M. R.; Eshraghi, M. J.; Hadavi, S. M. M.; Esfahani, H.

    2016-12-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the kinetics and the surface chemistry of the oxide layers formed on the IN-738LC super alloy during high-temperature oxidation at 950 °C in air from 1 to 260 h. Oxidation kinetics were studied by mass gain measurement. The oxide layers were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope, elemental distribution map, energy-dispersive spectroscopy as well as x-ray diffractometry (XRD). The oxidation kinetics followed the parabolic law. The XRD analysis revealed that the oxide scale contained mainly NiO, Ni (Cr, Al)2O4, Al2O3, TiO2 and Cr2O3. The oxide structure, from the top surface down to the substrate, was clarified by elemental map distribution studies as Ni-Ti oxides, Cr-Ti oxides, Cr2O3 oxide band, Ni-Co-Cr-W oxide and finally a blocky Al2O3 region. The oxidation scales were composed of three distinct layers of the outer and mid layers enriched by TiO2 and Cr2O3, NiCr2O4 oxide, respectively, and the innermost layer was composed of Al2O3 and matrix alloy. The depleted gamma prime layer was formed under the oxidation scales due to the impoverishment of Al and Ti which were induced by the formation of Al2O3 and TiO2.

  14. Kinetics and Microstructural Investigation of High-Temperature Oxidation of IN-738LC Super Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, S.; Rahimipour, M. R.; Eshraghi, M. J.; Hadavi, S. M. M.; Esfahani, H.

    2017-02-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the kinetics and the surface chemistry of the oxide layers formed on the IN-738LC super alloy during high-temperature oxidation at 950 °C in air from 1 to 260 h. Oxidation kinetics were studied by mass gain measurement. The oxide layers were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope, elemental distribution map, energy-dispersive spectroscopy as well as x-ray diffractometry (XRD). The oxidation kinetics followed the parabolic law. The XRD analysis revealed that the oxide scale contained mainly NiO, Ni (Cr, Al)2O4, Al2O3, TiO2 and Cr2O3. The oxide structure, from the top surface down to the substrate, was clarified by elemental map distribution studies as Ni-Ti oxides, Cr-Ti oxides, Cr2O3 oxide band, Ni-Co-Cr-W oxide and finally a blocky Al2O3 region. The oxidation scales were composed of three distinct layers of the outer and mid layers enriched by TiO2 and Cr2O3, NiCr2O4 oxide, respectively, and the innermost layer was composed of Al2O3 and matrix alloy. The depleted gamma prime layer was formed under the oxidation scales due to the impoverishment of Al and Ti which were induced by the formation of Al2O3 and TiO2.

  15. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) Coatings on an A356 Alloy for Improved Corrosion and Wear Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhijing

    Plasma electrolytic oxidizing (PEO) is an advanced technique that has been used to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on aluminium (Al) alloys. This work was however to use the PEO process to produce thin ceramic oxide coatings on an A356 Al alloy for improving corrosion and wear resistance of the alloy. Effects of current density and treatment time on surface morphologies and thickness of the PEO coatings were investigated. The improvement of galvanic corrosion properties of the coated A356 alloy vs. steel and carbon fibre were evaluated in E85 fuel or NaCl environments. Tribological properties of the coatings were studied with comparison to the uncoated A356 substrate and other commercially-used engine bore materials. The research results indicated that the PEO coatings could have excellent tribological and corrosion properties for aluminium engine applications.

  16. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data of TAZ-8A and M22 alloys and variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained on 36 specimens, representing 18 distinct variations (including the base systems) of TAZ-8A and M22 alloys. Double-edge wedge specimens for these systems were cycled between fluidized beds maintained at 1088 C and 316 C with a 180 s immersion in each bed. The systems included alloys TAZ-8A, M22, and 16 variations of these alloys. Each alloy variation consisted of a unique composition with an alternation in the percentage of carbon (C1 and C2), molydenum (M1 and M2), tungsten (W1 and W2), columbium (CB1, CB2, and CB3), tantalium (T1, T2, and T3), or boron (B1, B2, and B3) present. All of the alloys showed little weight change due to oxidation compared with other alloys previously tested in fluidized beds. Only both C1 alloy variation specimens survived 3500 cycles without cracking in the small radius, although substantial cracks were present, emanating from the end notches which were used for holding the specimens.

  17. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  18. The effect of zirconium on the cyclic oxidation of NiCrAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Khan, A. S.; Lowell, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines results with cyclic oxidation tests of Ni(9-20) Cr(15-30) Al-(x)Zr alloys carried out at 1100 C and 1200 C in static air. The concentration of zirconium varies from 0 to 0.63 atomic percent. Significant aluminum penetration is found in metallographic and electron microscopic examination of oxidized surfaces. Small amounts of zirconium lead to minimal penetration, and with increased zirconium content pronounced oxide penetration is observed.

  19. Microstructural effects on the creep and crack propagation behaviors of {gamma}-Ti aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lupinc, V.; Onofrio, G.; Nazmy, M.; Staubli, M.

    1999-07-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides class of materials possess several unique physical and mechanical properties. These characteristics can be attractive for specific industrial applications. By applying different heat treatment schedules one can change the microstructural features of this class of materials. In the present investigation, two heat treatment schedules were used to produce two different microstructures, duplex (D) and nearly lamellar (NL) in the cast and HIP'ed Ti-47Al-2W-0.5Si alloy. The tensile strength and creep behavior, in the 700--850 C temperature range, of this alloy have been determined and correlated to the corresponding microstructures. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation behavior in this alloy has been studied at different temperatures. The results on the creep behavior showed that the alloy with nearly lamellar microstructure has a strongly improved creep strength as compared with that of the duplex microstructure.

  20. The borohydride oxidation reaction on La-Ni-based hydrogen-storage alloys.

    PubMed

    Paschoalino, Waldemir J; Thompson, Stephen J; Russell, Andrea E; Ticianelli, Edson A

    2014-07-21

    This work provides insights into the processes involved in the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in alkaline media on metal hydride alloys formed by LaNi(4.7)Sn(0.2)Cu(0.1) and LaNi(4.78)Al(0.22) with and without deposited Pt, Pd, and Au. The results confirm the occurrence of hydrolysis of the borohydride ions when the materials are exposed to BH(4)(-) and a continuous hydriding of the alloys during BH(4)(-) oxidation measurements at low current densities. The activity for the direct BOR is low in both bare metal hydride alloys, but the rate of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis and the hydrogen-storage capacity are higher, while the rate of H diffusion is slower for bare LaNi(4.78) Al(0.22). The addition of Pt and Pd to both alloys results in an increase of the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis, but the H(2) formed is rapidly oxidized at the Pt-modified catalysts. In the case of Au modification, a small increase in the BH(4)(-) hydrolysis is observed as compared to the bare alloys. The presence of Au and Pd also leads to a reduction of the rates of alloy hydriding/de-hydriding.

  1. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of NiCoP alloy nanoparticles decorated on reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Weichun; Fu, Jiajia; Wang, Qin; Wang, Chunming; Xue, Desheng

    2015-12-01

    NiCoP alloy nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide (NiCoP/RGO) are synthesized by in situ co-reduction of Ni2+, Co2+ and graphene oxide (GO) with sodium hypophosphite in a one-pot reaction. This synthesis route is simple and can be used for industrial preparation. The different molar ratios of Ni/Co can be obtained by changing the molar ratio of their salts in the reaction bath. The effect of annealing temperature on the crystal structure of NiCoP alloys has been further investigated. After 500 °C annealing, NiCoP alloys exhibit good crystallinity. The as-prepared NiCoP/RGO composites demonstrate high dielectric constant and magnetic loss in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz due to the conductive and ferromagnetic behavior. Also, their coercivity and magnetization strength are decreased from magnetic measurement with the increase of Ni content. As the molar ratio of Ni/Co is 3:1, the maximum value of the reflection loss reaches to -17.84 dB. Furthermore, the NiCoP/RGO composites have better corrosion resistance than traditional iron series magnetic nanoparticles. It is expected that the composites with the thin, light-weighted and broadband absorbing and good anti-corrosion properties will have a great potential for electromagnetic wave absorption applications.

  2. Ternary ceramic alloys of Zr-Ce-Hf oxides

    DOEpatents

    Becher, P.F.; Funkenbusch, E.F.

    1990-11-20

    A ternary ceramic alloy is described which produces toughening of zirconia and zirconia composites through the stress transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase. This alloy, having the general formula Ce[sub x]Hf[sub y]Zr[sub 1[minus]x[minus]y]O[sub 2], is produced through the addition of appropriate amounts of ceria and hafnia to the zirconia. Typically, improved toughness is achieved with about 5 to about 15 mol % ceria and up to about 40 mol % hafnia. The preparation of alloys of these compositions are given together with data as to the densities, tetragonal phase content, hardness and fracture toughness. The alloys are useful in preparing zirconia bodies as well as reinforcing ceramic composites. 1 fig.

  3. Ternary ceramic alloys of ZR-CE-HF oxides

    DOEpatents

    Becher, Paul F.; Funkenbusch, Eric F.

    1990-01-01

    A ternary ceramic alloy which produces toughening of zirconia and zirconia composites through the stress transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase. This alloy, having the general formula Ce.sub.x Hf.sub.y Zn.sub.1-x-y O.sub.2, is produced through the addition of appropriate amounts of ceria and hafnia to the zirconia. Typically, improved toughness is achieved with about 5 to about 15 mol % ceria and up to about 40 mol % hafnia. The preparation of alloys of these compositions are given together with data as to the densities, tetragonal phase content, hardness and fracture toughness. The alloys are useful in preparing zirconia bodies as well as reinforcing ceramic composites.

  4. Influence of homogenization and artificial aging heat treatments on corrosion behavior of Mg-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Beldjoudi, T.; Fiaud, C.; Robbiola, L. . Lab. d'Etudes de la Corrosion)

    1993-09-01

    The influence of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of magnesium-aluminum (Mg-9Al) alloys was investigated by studying the electrochemical properties of Mg-9Al in the solution-treated (T4) and artificially aged (T6) conditions. The alloys' properties were compared to those of pure Mg, the intermetallic Mg[sub 17]Al[sub 12] phase, and different Mg-Al-based alloys (Mg-3Al, AZ91). The Mg-9Al alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in the T6 condition than in the T4 condition because of the intermetallic Mg[sub 17]Al[sub 12] precipitates present n the T6 alloy. The mechanism responsible for this behavior was attributed to a more protective porous film on the T6 matrix alloy than on the T4 alloy. Addition of zinc did not modify these results. Localized corrosion testing showed the Mg-Al alloys were attacked preferentially in relation to magnesium silicide (Mg[sub 2]Si) precipitates which were characterized clearly using metallurgical examinations.

  5. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Molybdenum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    containing 4 parts concentrated sulfuric acid and 1 part distilled water using a Type 304 stainless steel cathode and a direct current accelerating...Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature ( DBTT ): The following mechanical properties were measured from the ODS molybdenum alloy rods: (a) 0.2...and to determine the DBTT . Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests: Elevated temperature tensile specimens of each as- swaged alloy were equilibrated

  6. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  7. Effects of CH3OH Addition on Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of AZ31 Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongyi; Chen, Li; Yan, Zongcheng; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-09-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) films on AZ31 magnesium alloys were prepared in alkaline silicate electrolytes (base electrolyte) with the addition of different volume concentrations of CH3OH, which was used to adjust the thickness of the vapor sheath. The compositions, morphologies, and thicknesses of ceramic layers formed with different CH3OH concentrations were determined via X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behavior of the oxide films was evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. PEO coatings mainly comprised Mg, MgO, and Mg2SiO4. The addition of CH3OH in base electrolytes affected the thickness, pores diameter, and Mg2SiO4 content in the films. The films formed in the electrolyte containing 12% CH3OH exhibited the highest thickness. The coatings formed in the electrolyte containing different concentrations of CH3OH exhibited similar corrosion resistance. The energy consumption of PEO markedly decreased upon the addition of CH3OH to the electrolytes. The result is helpful for energy saving in the PEO process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21376088), the Project of Production, Education and Research, Guangdong Province and Ministry of Education (Nos. 2012B09100063, 2012A090300015), and Guangzhou Science and Technology Plan Projects of China (No. 2014Y2-00042)

  8. Sodium corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.; Yagi, T.; Ikenaga, Y.

    1986-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of six austenitic alloys and reference Type 316 stainless steel (SS) has been examined in a flowing sodium environment at 700°C for up to about 4000 h. The alloys with a range of nickel content between ~ 15 and 43 wt% were designed and manufactured with an expectation of improved swelling resistance during fast neutron irradiation, compared to reference Type 316 SS. The corrosion loss of the alloys at zero downstream position and the concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron in the surface region were determined as a function of corrosion time. The selective dissolution of nickel and chromium played an important role in sodium corrosion of the alloys. During the initial period, accelerated corrosion took place and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel proceeded at a rapid rate. During the subsequent period, the overall corrosion rate and depletion of chromium and nickel decreased with increasing time until the corrosion rate and the surface concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron, which depended on composition of the alloys, reached the steady-state after about 2000 h. Also, the corrosion rate increased with increasing original nickel content of the alloys. Microstructural examination revealed surface attack of the alloys with higher nickel contents, in particular for the two precipitation strengthened Fe-Ni alloys. The alloys showed a trend of increasing carbon and nitrogen contents.

  9. Corrosion behavior of Pd-Cu and Pd-Co alloys in synthetic saliva.

    PubMed

    Goehlich, V; Marek, M

    1990-04-01

    Pd-based alloys are major alternatives to gold-based alloys for PFM applications. In electrolytes simulating oral fluids, these alloys exhibit electrode behavior similar to passivity of active metals, i.e., a potential region of almost constant current density up to a critical potential, above which the current increases. The objective of this study was to correlate the electrode behavior with the results of solution analyses and changes in the surface composition of the alloys. Binary alloys Pd-15 wt% Cu and Pd-19 wt% Co, as well as the pure components, were examined. Corrosion potentials vs. time, potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves, polarization resistances vs. time, and potentiostatic anodic charges were measured with synthetic saliva used as the electrolyte. The concentrations of Pd, Cu, and Co in the solution after various exposures were determined by atomic absorption. The surfaces of the alloys were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after the exposures. The results show that selective dissolution of the less-noble components occurred on the surfaces of both alloys for all the exposures, leaving the surfaces highly enriched in Pd. This enrichment contributed to the potential changes and the passive-type behavior. Copper dissolved more than cobalt at longer exposures and higher potentials, in spite of its higher nobility. Dissolution of cobalt seemed to be limited by the formation of a surface film, which may be related to the transition character of this element.

  10. Phase transformation of oxide film in zirconium alloy in high temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-23

    The effect of the variation of the dissolved hydrogen concentration on the oxide phase transformation under high-temperature hydrogenated water conditions was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum in 50 cm(3)/kg of dissolved hydrogen concentration indicated the formation of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconium oxide at the water-substrate interface. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration decreased to 30 cm(3)/kg, the Raman peaks corresponding to the zirconium oxide phase changed, indicating an oxide phase transformation. And, the results of SEM and TEM analyses were compared with those of in situ analyses obtained for the oxide structure formed on the zirconium alloy.

  11. Universal Behavior of a Cyclic Oxidation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model has been generated to represent the iterative, discrete growth and spallation processes associated with cyclic oxidation. Parabolic growth kinetics (k(sub p)) over and a constant spall area (F(sub A)) were assumed, with spalling occurring interfacially at the thickest regions of the scale. Although most models require numerical techniques, the regularity and simplicity of this progression permitted an approximation by algebraic expressions. Normalization could now be performed to reflect all parametric effects, and a universal cyclic oxidation response was generated: W(sub u) = 1/2 {3J(sub u)(sup 1/2)+ J(sub u)(sup 3/2)} where W, is weight change normalized by the maximum and J(sub u) is the cycle number normalized by the number to reach maximum. Similarly, the total amount of metal consumed was represented by a single normalized curve. The factor [(S(sub c)-l)(raised dot)sqrt(F(sub A)k(sub p)DELTAt)] was identified as a general figure of merit, where S(sub c) is the mass ratio of oxide to oxygen and DELTAt is the cycle duration. A cyclic oxidation failure map was constructed, in normalized k(sub p)-F(sub A) space, as defined by the locus of points corresponding to a critical amount of metal consumption in a given time. All three constructions describe behavior for every value of growth rate, spall fraction, and cycle duration by means of single curves, but with two branches corresponding to the times before and after steady state is achieved.

  12. Galvanic corrosion behavior of titanium implants coupled to dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Cortada, M; Giner, L; Costa, S; Gil, F J; Rodríguez, D; Planell, J A

    2000-05-01

    The corrosion of five materials for implant suprastructures (cast-titanium, machined-titanium, gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy and chromium-nickel alloy), was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium implant. Various electrochemical parameters E(CORR), i(CORR) Evans diagrams, polarization resistance and Tafel slopes) were analyzed. The microstructure of the different dental materials was observed before and after corrosion processes by optical and electron microscopy. Besides, the metallic ions released in the saliva environment were quantified during the corrosion process by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique (ICP-MS). The cast and machined titanium had the most passive current density at a given potential and chromium-nickel alloy had the most active critical current density values. The high gold content alloys have excellent resistance corrosion, although this decreases when the gold content is lower in the alloy. The palladium alloy had a low critical current density due to the presence of gallium in this composition but a selective dissolution of copper-rich phases was observed through energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  13. The compression behavior of niobium alloyed {gamma}-titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1998-02-13

    The underlying mechanisms behind the reported high strength of titanium aluminide alloys containing a large addition of niobium has been investigated by determining the flow stresses and activation parameters of plastic deformation. It has been found that alloys such as Ti-45Al-10Nb (at.%) and Ti-45Al-5Nb have 1.25% flow stress values in compression of > 800 MPa at room temperature and > 500 MPa at 1,173 K. When compared with values from a more conventional alloy, Ti-47Al-2Cr-0.2Si, they represent a considerable increase in strength. However, the activation volumes after 1.25% deformation are very similar to those of conventional alloys, particularly up to 973 K. This suggests that athermal dislocation mechanisms are responsible for the increased flow stress of the niobium containing alloys. By comparing the properties of the niobium containing alloys with different binary alloys it has been shown that the high strength is solely a result of the reduced aluminum content and that niobium plays no role in strengthening or work hardening.

  14. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires.

  15. Predicting minimum Al concentrations for protective scale fromation on Ni-base alloys. I - Isothermal oxidation. II - Cyclic oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Criteria proposed to predict the minimum bulk Al concentration for the formation of protective Al2O3 scales on Ni-based alloys during isothermal oxidation (two criteria proposed by Wagner, 1952 and 1959) and cyclic oxidation (the criteria proposed by Wahl, 1983, and Whittle, 1972/Wahl, 1983) were applied to Ni-Al and Ni-Cr-Al(Zr) alloys, respectively. It is shown that the first Wagner (1952) criterion underpredicted, by a factor of 3, the experimentally observed minimum Al concentration for the formation of an external Al2O3 scale on Ni-Al alloys at 1200 C; the second Wagner criterion predicted a transition from internal oxidation to continuous Al2O3 formation in good agreement with experimentally observed concentrations. It was also found that the two criteria for an Al2O3 scale formation during cyclic oxidation of Ni-Cr-Al(Zr) alloys were inadequate to predict the minimum Al concentration necessary for repeated formation of an Al2O3 scale, regardless of the adherence of the scale.

  16. Plastic Behavior of Al-Li-X Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    Microstructure,"T.H. Sanders, Jr., and E.A. Starke, Jr., ASM International Conference on Advanced Aluminum and Magnesium Alloys, i Amsterdam, The Netherlands, June...intense shear bands in an Al-Li binary alloy. 2-5 U Al-Li-Mg: The effect of magnesium additions on the phase equilibria of Al-Li alloys has been...reported by a number of investigators (6,19,20). Magnesium decreases the solubility of lithium in aluminum at all temperatures below about 4250C (21

  17. Comparison of the Fatigue Behavior of Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Ellis, David

    2006-01-01

    This presentation is about the development of advanced copper alloys with high thermal conductivity, good creep strength, and adequate fatigue strength for rocket engine applications. It also focuses on the commercial availability of the advanced alloy-GRCop-84 developed at NASA-GRC. The presentation's conclusions are that GRCop-84 has equivalent or better isothermal fatigue lives compared to other commercially available copper alloys, that GRCop-84 can be fabricated in various forms with minimal change in the fatigue lives, that it is equivalent in sothermal, fatigue to AMZIRC at moderate temperatures, and that Narloy-Z is equivalent in fatigue capabilities to GRCop-84 at 400C and below.

  18. Electrochemical investigation of chromium oxide-coated Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloy substrates.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Viswanathan; Zeng, Haitong; Lawrynowicz, Daniel; Zhang, Zongtao; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2011-08-01

    Hard coatings for articulating surfaces of total joint replacements may improve the overall wear resistance. However, any coating approach must take account of changes in corrosion behavior. This preliminary assessment analyzes the corrosion kinetics, impedance and mechanical-electrochemical stability of 100 μm thick plasma sprayed chromium oxide (Cr₂O₃) coatings on bearing surfaces in comparison to the native alloy oxide films on Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-6V. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and mechanical abrasion under potentiostatic conditions were performed on coated and substrate surfaces in physiological saline. SEM analysis characterized the coating morphology. The results showed that the corrosion current density values of chromium oxide coatings (0.4-1.2 μA/cm²) were of the same order of magnitude as Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Mechanical abrasion did not increase corrosion rates of chromium oxide coatings but did for uncoated Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V. The impedance response of chromium oxide coatings was very different than Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V native oxides characterized by a defected coating model. More of a frequency-independent purely resistive response was seen in mid-frequency range for the coatings (CPE(coat) : 40-280 nF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α: 0.67-0.83) whereas a more capacitive character is seen for Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V (CPE(ox) around 20 μF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α around 0.9). Pores, interparticle gaps and incomplete fusion typical for thermal spray coatings were present in these oxides which could have influenced corrosion resistance. The coating microstructure could have allowed some fluid penetration. Overall, these coatings appear to have suitable corrosion properties for wear surfaces.

  19. Development of multilayer oxidation resistant coatings on Cr-50Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haizhong; Xiong, Lingling; Luo, Qinhao; Lu, Shiqiang

    2015-12-01

    To protect Cr-50Nb alloys from high-temperature oxidation, the Al2O3/Si-Al multilayer coatings were produced by pack cementation process, followed by sol-gel process and hot pressing. The results indicate that the multilayer coating is dense and exhibits good adherence to the substrate, which consists of a compact Al2O3 outer layer and an inner layer composed of Si, Al, Cr, Nb. Uncoated Cr-50Nb alloy occurs catastrophic oxidation at the initial oxidation stage at 1200 °C. However, the scale spalling resistance of the multilayer coating is improved significantly, and the multilayer coating exhibits good resistance to oxidation. During cyclic oxidation in air at 1200 °C for 100 h, the weight loss is 0.13 mg/cm2 and the mass gain is 3.38 mg/cm2.

  20. The high temperature creep behavior of oxides and oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Linda E.; Tressler, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature was conducted on the high-temperature creep behavior of single and polycrystalline oxides which potentially could serve as fiber reinforcements in ceramics or metal matrix applications. Sapphire when oriented with the basal plane perpendicular to the fiber axis (c-axis oriented) is highly creep resistant at temperatures in excess of 1600 C and applied loads of 100 MPa and higher. Pyramidal slip is preferentially activated in sapphire under these conditions and steady-state creep rates in the range of 10(exp -7) to 10 (exp -8)/s were reported. Data on the creep resistance of polycrystalline beryllia suggest that C-axiz oriented single crystal beryllia may be a viable candidate as a fiber reinforcement material; however, the issure of fabricability and moisture sensitivity must be addressed for this material. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) also appears to be a fiber candidate material having a high resistance to creep which is due to it's complex crystal structure and high Peierl resistance. The high creep resistance of garnet suggests that there may be other complex ternary oxides such as single crystal mullite which may also be candidate materials for fiber reinforcements. Finally, CVD and single crystal SiC, although not oxides, do possess a high resistance to creep in the temperature range between 1550 and 1850 C and under stresses of 110 to 220 MPa. From a review of the literature, it appears that for high creep resistant applications sapphire, silicon carbide, yttrium aluminum garnet, mullite, and beryllia are desirable candidate materials which require further investigation.

  1. Fluoride ions as modifiers of the oxide layer produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanski, Barbara; Kossenko, Alexey; Zinigrad, Michael; Lugovskoy, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a powerful technique allowing hardening and corrosion protection of valve metals due to formation of an oxide layer on the metal surface. PEO produces much thicker oxide layers as compared to anodizing, which is of critical importance for many technological applications. The present research investigated the influence of the fluoride ion concentration on the composition, structure and morphology of PEO layers on the magnesium alloy AZ91D. The obtained oxide layers were characterized with XRD, SEM, EDS and tested for corrosion resistance by linear sweep voltammetry in 3.5% NaCl medium. During this investigation it was found that KF addition produces significant changes in the structure and properties of the oxide layers. Fluorine was detected as an amorphous phase in the vicinity of the base metal for both alloys and plausible mechanism was suggested to explain these phenomena. Fluoride ions have pronounced catalytic activity and their presence considerably increases the thickness of the oxide layer. Depending on the process parameters, significant improvement of the corrosion stability of AZ91D alloy is achieved by the use of PEO.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Nickel Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2004-02-06

    Hydrofluoric acid is a water solution of hydrogen fluoride (HF). Hydrofluoric acid is used widely in diverse types of industrial applications; traditionally, it is used in pickling solutions in the metal industry, in the fabrication of chlorofluorocarbon compounds, as an alkylation agent for gasoline and as an etching agent in the industry of glass. In recent years, hydrofluoric acid has extensively been used in the manufacture of semiconductors and microelectronics during the wet chemical cleaning of silicon wafers. Hydrofluoric acid can be considered a reducing acid and although it is chemically classified as weaker than, for example, sulfuric or hydrochloric acids, it is extremely corrosive. This acid is also particularly toxic and poses greater health hazard than most other acids. The corrosion behavior of metals in hydrofluoric acid has not been as systematic studied in the laboratory as for other common inorganic acids. This is largely because tests using hydrofluoric acid cannot be run in standard equipment and because of the toxic nature of this acid. Moreover, short-term weight loss laboratory corrosion tests in hydrofluoric acid can be frustrating since the results are not as highly reproducible as in the case of other acids such as sulfuric or hydrochloric. One of the reasons is because hydrofluoric acid commonly attacks the coupons used for testing in a non-uniform manner. That is, the corrosive power of this acid is not aimed to uniform thinning but mostly to localized penetration below the skin of the metal in the form of thin cracks, voids, pits, trenches and sometimes intergranular attack. Figure 1 shows the cross section of a coupon of Alloy 600 (N06600) exposed for 336 h to the vapor phase of a solution of 20% HF at 93 C. In cases where internal penetration occurs such as in Figure 1, it may not be recommended to use corrosion rates based on weight loss for material selection.

  3. Low temperature passivation of Si1-xGex alloys by dry high pressure oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragianis, C.; Shigesato, Y.; Paine, D. C.

    1994-09-01

    Thermal passivation of Si1-xGex using high pressure (70 MPa) oxidation was studied for potential use in MOS-device applications. Alloys of CVD-grown Si1-xGex (x = 10 and 15 at.%, 200 and 150 nm thick, respectively), were oxidized at 500 and 550°C using high purity dry oxygen at a pressure of 70 MPa. For comparative purposes, a second set of alloys were oxidized using conventional wet atmospheric pressure oxidation at 800°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and metal-oxide semiconductor capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements were used to characterize the as-grown oxides. Chemical analysis by XPS confirmed that under high pressure conditions compositionally congruent oxides are grown from these alloys. High resolution TEM and Raman spectroscopy show that the as-grown oxide/semiconductor interface is planar and free of Ge enrichment on a scale of 1-2 monolayers. A midgap interface state density for both the 10 and 15 at.% samples of 1 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 was estimated based on 1 MHz C-V measurement.

  4. Corrosion of pre-oxidized nickel alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzi, Silvia; Lai, Haiping; Göransson, Kenneth; Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna

    2017-04-01

    Samples of pre-oxidized Alloy X-750 were exposed to a simulated boiling water reactor environment in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar for four weeks. The effect of alloy iron content on corrosion was investigated by comparing samples with 5 and 8 wt% Fe, respectively. In addition, the effect of two different surface pre-treatments was investigated. The microstructure of the formed oxide scales was studied using mainly electron microscopy. The results showed positive effects of an increased Fe content and of removing the deformed surface layer by pickling. After four weeks of exposure the oxide scale consists of oxides formed in three different ways. The oxide formed during pre-oxidization at 700 °C, mainly consisting of chromia, is partly still present. There is also an outer oxide consisting of NiFe2O4 crystals, reaching a maximum size of 3 μm, which has formed by precipitation of dissolved metal ions. Finally, there is an inner nanocrystalline and porous oxide, with a metallic content reflecting the alloy composition, which has formed by corrosion.

  5. Solid-Solution Alloying of Immiscible Ru and Cu with Enhanced CO Oxidation Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Nishida, Yoshihide; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-03-24

    We report on novel solid-solution alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of Ru and Cu that are completely immiscible even above melting point in bulk phase. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray measurements demonstrated that Ru and Cu atoms were homogeneously distributed in the alloy NPs. Ru0.5Cu0.5 NPs demonstrated higher CO oxidation activity than fcc-Ru NPs, which are known as one of the best monometallic CO oxidation catalysts.

  6. High-Speed Behavior of Some Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bragov, Anatoly M.; Lomunov, Andrey K.; Sergeichev, Ivan V.

    2006-07-28

    The results of dynamic tests of shape memory alloys Ti-Ni and Cu-Al-Ni are given. Compressive tests of Ti-Ni alloy were carried out at temperatures 293-573K. Considerable influence of temperature on module of elasticity prior to the dislocation plastic flow and dislocation yield limit has been mentioned in temperature interval of reverse martensitic transformation. For Cu-Al-Ni alloy a strain rate influence on phase yield limit, module of elasticity prior to the phase unelastic flow, module of elasticity prior to the dislocation plastic flow was negligible. The method of determination of duration of reverse martensitic transformation has been realized by the example of Cu-Al-Ni alloy.

  7. Viscoelastic Behavior of High-Copper Dental Amalgam Alloys,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-24

    Apprv.-. . - 17. DISTRIWUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered in Block 20, If dliffern Item Roiport) • . y-",.-,D T IC 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES...MAUG 1 3 1980 A * 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on recerse aide if necea2wry and Identify by block number) ? i Amalgam alloys; high-copper amalgam alloys...viscoelastic properties andstress relaxation. C 2 LJJ 20. ABSTRACT (Con"nue on reverse side , f #ncoary and Identify by block numbe) Stress relaxation of

  8. Summary of Prior Work on Joining of Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Ian G; Tatlock, Gordon J; Badairy, H.; Chen, C-L.

    2009-08-01

    There is a range of joining techniques available for use with ODS alloys, but care should be exercised in matching the technique to the final duty requirements of the joint. The goal for joining ODS alloys is a joint with no local disruption of the distribution of the oxide dispersion, and no significant change in the size and orientation of the alloy microstructure. Not surprisingly, the fusion welding processes typically employed with wrought alloys produce the least satisfactory results with ODS alloys, but some versions, such as fusion spot welding, and the laser and electron-beam welding technologies, have demonstrated potential for producing sound joints. Welds made using solid-state spot welding reportedly have exhibited parent metal properties. Thus, it is possible to employ processes that result in significant disruption of the alloy microstructure, as long as the processing parameters are adjustment to minimize the extent of or influence of the changes in the alloy microstructure. Selection among these joining approaches largely depends on the particular application and component configuration, and an understanding of the relationships among processing, alloy microstructure, and final properties is key. Recent developments have resulted in friction welding evolving to be a prime method for joining ODS sheet products, and variants of brazing/diffusion bonding have shown excellent promise for use with tubes and pipes. The techniques that come closest to the goal defined above involve solid-state diffusion bonding and, in particular, it has been found that secondary recrystallization of joints made by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion can produce the desired, continuous, large alloy grain structure through the joint. Such joints have exhibited creep rupture failure at >82% of the load needed to fail the monolithic parent alloy at 1000 C.

  9. Synthesis of high {Tc} superconducting coatings and patterns by melt writing and oxidation of metallic precursor alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

    1998-07-28

    A method is provided for fabrication of superconducting oxides and superconducting oxide composites and for joining superconductors to other materials. A coating of a molten alloy containing the metallic elements of the oxide is applied to a substrate surface and oxidized to form the superconducting oxide. A material can be contacted to the molten alloy which is subsequently oxidized joining the material to the resulting superconducting oxide coating. Substrates of varied composition and shape can be coated or joined by this method. 5 figs.

  10. Fatigue Behavior of P/M 7091 and I/M 7475 Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    properties, fatigue behavior , microstruc - ture, and fractograph. TENSILE PROPERTIES Tensile test results of P/M 7091-T7E69 and l/M 7475-T7351...REPORT NO. NADC-89090-60 •1! <-.< (_ FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF P/M 7091 AND l/M 7475 ALUMINUM ALLOYS A PA -221 79® ( Eun U. Lee . Air Vehicle and... Behavior of P/M 7091 and I/M 7475 Aluminum Alloys 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Eun U. Lee 13a. TYPE OF REPORT Phase 13b. TIME COVERED FROM TO 14. DATE

  11. Degradation behaviors of surface modified magnesium alloy wires in different simulated physiological environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Shi, Chao; Bai, Jing; Guo, Chao; Xue, Feng; Lin, Ping-Hua; Chu, Cheng-Lin

    2014-09-01

    The degradation behaviors of the novel high-strength AZ31B magnesium alloy wires after surface modification using micro-arc-oxidization (MAO) and subsequently sealing with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) in different simulated physiological environments were investigated. The results show the surface MAO micropores could be physically sealed by PLLA, thus forming an effective protection to corrosion resistance for the wires. In simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at a low pH value (1.5 or 2.5), the treated wires have a high degradation rate with a rapid decrease of mass, diameter, mechanical properties and a significant increase of pH value of the immersion fluid. However, surface modification could effectively reduce the degradation rate of the treated wires in SGF with a pH value above 4.0. For the treated wires in simulated intestinal fluid at pH = 8.5, their strength retention ability is higher than that in strong acidic SGF. And the loss rate of mass is faster than that of diameter, while the pH value of the immersion fluid decreases. It should be noted that the modified wires in simulated body environment have the best strength retention ability. The wires show the different degradation behaviors indicating their different degradation mechanisms, which are also proposed in this work.

  12. Direct In-situ TEM Observation Of Modification Of Oxidation By The Injected Vacancies For Ni-4Al Alloy Using A Microfabricated Nanopost

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Baer, Donald R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-07-17

    Vacancy injection and selective oxidation of one specie in bimetallic alloy at high temperature is a well-known phenomenon. However, detailed understanding of the behavior of the injected vacancies and consequently their behavior and effect on oxidation remains elusive. The current research examines the oxidation of high-purity Ni doped with 4.1 at% Al using in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Experiments are performed on nanoposts fabricated from solution-annealed bulk material that are essentially single crystal samples. Initial oxidation is observed to occur by multi-site oxide nucleation, formation of an oxide shell followed by cavity nucleation and growth at the metal/oxide interface. One of the most interesting in-situ TEM observations is the formation of a cavity that leads to the faceting of the metal on (111) surface and subsequent oxidation occurring by an atomic ledge migration mechanism on the faceted metal surface. Further, it is directly observed that metal atoms diffuse through the oxide layer to combine with oxygen at the outer surface of the oxide. The present work indicates that injection of vacancies and formation of cavity will lead to a situation where the oxidation rate is essentially controlled by the low surface energy plane of the metal, rather than by the initial terminating plane at the metal surface exposed to the oxidizing environment.

  13. Oxidation of CoCrFeMnNi High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Tylczak, Joseph; Carney, Casey

    2015-06-01

    Eight model high entropy alloys (HEAs) in the CoCrFeMnNi family (including one alloy each in the CoCrFeNi and CoFeMnNi subfamilies) were made, prepared, and exposed to laboratory air for 1100 h at 650°C and 750°C. Two commercial alloys, nickel-base superalloy 230 (N06230) and austenitic stainless steel 304H (S30409), were simultaneously exposed for comparison. Mass change oxidation kinetics were measured and cross-sections of exposed samples were observed. Seven of these HEAs contained much more Mn (12-24 wt.%) than is found in commercial heat-resistant stainless steels and superalloys. The oxidation resistance of CoCrFeNi was excellent and comparable to 304H at 650°C and only slightly worse at 750°C. The thin oxide scale on CoCrFeNi was primarily Cr oxide (presumably Cr2O3) with some Mn oxide at the outer part of the scale. The CoCrFeMnNi HEAs all experienced more rapid oxidation than CoCrFeNi and, especially at 750°C, experienced oxide scale spallation. The addition of Y in the alloy to lower S improved the oxidation resistance of these HEAs. Alloy CoFeMnNi, without Cr, experienced much higher oxidation rates and scale spallation than the Cr-containing alloys. A linear regression analysis of the log of the parabolic rate constant, log(kp), as functions of wt.% Cr and Mn found a good correlation for the compositional dependence of the oxidation rate constant, especially at 650°C. Mn was found to be more detrimental increasing log(k p) than Cr was helpful reducing log(k p). If CoCrFeMnNi HEAs are to be used in high temperature oxidizing environments, then examining lower levels of Mn, while maintaining Cr levels, should be pursued.

  14. Corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with Cu.

    PubMed

    Koike, Marie; Cai, Zhuo; Oda, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Toru

    2005-05-01

    It has recently been found that alloying with copper improved the inherently poor grindability and wear resistance of titanium. This study characterized the corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with copper. Alloys (0.9 or 3.5 mass % Cu) were cast with the use of a magnesia-based investment in a centrifugal casting machine. Three specimen surfaces were tested: ground, sandblasted, and as cast. Commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V served as controls. Open-circuit potential measurement, linear polarization, and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed in aerated (air + 10% CO(2)) modified Tani-Zucchi synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization was conducted in the same medium deaerated by N(2) + 10% CO(2). Polarization resistance (R(p)), Tafel slopes, and corrosion current density (I(corr)) were determined. A passive region occurred for the alloy specimens with ground and sandblasted surfaces, as for CP Ti. However, no passivation was observed on the as-cast alloys or on CP Ti. There were significant differences among all metals tested for R(p) and I(corr) and significantly higher R(p) and lower I(corr) values for CP Ti compared to Ti-6Al-4V or the alloys with Cu. Alloying up to 3.5 mass % Cu to Ti-6Al-4V did not change the corrosion behavior. Specimens with ground or sandblasted surfaces were superior to specimens with as-cast surfaces.

  15. Effect of Aging Treatments on the Mechanical and Corrosive Behaviors of Spray-Formed 7075 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui-ming; Qu, Ying-dong; Li, Rong-de

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical properties, microstructure, exfoliation corrosion (EXCO), and intergranular corrosion (IGC) behaviors of the spray-formed 7075 aluminum alloy after T6, T73, retrogression (R), and re-aging (RRA) treatment, respectively, were studied by using tensile tester, transmission electron microscope, and scanning electron microscope. The results show that the T6 process can increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 760 MPa, while it decreases the elongation, the EXCO, and the IGC resistance of the alloy. The T73 process can improve elongation, the EXCO, and the IGC resistance of the alloy. The corrosion resistance of the alloy can also be improved by R and RRA processes with retrogression times increase. The tiny precipitated phases distributed homogeneously in the matrix can increase the UTS. The close-connected discrete grain boundary phases (GBP) and the narrow precipitate free zones (PFZ) will lower the elongation, the EXCO, and the IGC resistance of the alloy. Contrarily, the discrete GBP and wide PFZ can improve the elongation, the EXCO, and the IGC resistance of the alloy. The EXCO and the IGC behaviors for the spray-formed 7075 alloy after different aging treatments have been established according to the standards of ASTM G34-2001 (2007) and ASTM G110-1992 (2009).

  16. Oxidation Characteristics of Fe–18Cr–18Mn-Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James

    2010-10-01

    Air oxidation studies of Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steels were conducted at 525°C, 625°C, and 725°C. Alloys were evaluated with respect to changes in oxidation properties as a result of interstitial additions of nitrogen and carbon and of minor solute additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel. Interstitial concentrations possibly had a small, positive effect on oxidation resistance. Minor solute additions significantly improved oxidation resistance but could also reduce interstitial solubility resulting in formation of chromium carbides. Loss of solute chromium resulted in a slight reduction in oxidation protection. Oxidation lasting over 500 hours produced a manganese rich, duplex oxide structure: an outer sesquioxide and an inner spinel oxide.

  17. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases, Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.

  18. Transient Oxidation of a γ-Ni-28Cr-11Al Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, L; Hovis, D B; Heuer, A H

    2012-04-02

    γ-NiCrAl alloys with relatively low Al contents tend to form a layered oxide scale during the early stages of oxidation, rather than an exclusive α-Al2O3 scale, the so-called 'thermally grown oxide' (TGO). A layered oxide scale was established on a model γ-Ni-28Cr-11Al (at.%) alloy after isothermal oxidation for several minutes at 1100 °C. The layered scale consisted of an NiO layer at the oxide/gas interface, an inner Cr2O3 layer, and an α-Al2O3 layer at the oxide/alloy interface. The evolution of such an NiO/Cr2O3/Al2O3 layered structure on this alloy differs from that proposed in earlier work. During heating, a Cr2O3 outer layer and a discontinuous inner layer of Al2O3 initially formed, with metallic Ni particles dispersed between the two layers. A rapid transformation occurred in the scale shortly after the sample reached maximum temperature (1100°C), when two (possibly coupled) phenomena occurred: (i) the inner transition alumina transformed to α-Al2O3, and (ii) Ni particles oxidized to form the outer NiO layer. Subsequently, NiO reacted with Cr2O3 and Al2O3 to form spinel. Continued growth of the oxide scale and development of the TGO was dominated by growth of the inner α-Al2O3 layer.

  19. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  20. Corrosion behavior of pure titanium and titanium alloys in fluoride-containing solutions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Matsuya, S; Udoh, K

    2001-12-01

    The effects of fluoride concentrations and pH on the corrosion behavior of pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys and a new Ti alloy adding palladium, which is expected to promote a repassivation of Ti were examined by anodic polarization and corrosion potential measurements. The amount of dissolved Ti was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The surface of the specimen was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after the measurement. Pure Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys were easily corroded even in a low fluoride concentration in an acidic environment. The corrosion resistance of Ti-0.2Pd alloy was greater than those of pure Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys in the wide range of pH and fluoride concentrations. The high corrosion resistance of Ti-0.2Pd alloy was caused by the surface enrichment of Pd promoting a repassivation of Ti. The Ti-0.2Pd alloy is expected to be useful as a new Ti alloy with high corrosion resistance in dental use.

  1. Age hardening characteristics and mechanical behavior of Al-Cu-Li-Zr-In alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the age-hardening response and cryogenic mechanical properties of superplastic Al-Cu-Li-Zr-In alloys. Two alloys with compositions Al-2.65Cu-2.17Li-O.13Zr (baseline) and Al-2.60Cu-2.34Li-0.16Zr-0.17In were scaled-up from 30 lb permanent mold ingots to 350 lb DC (direct chill) ingots and thermomechanically processed to 3.2 mm thick sheet. The microstructure of material which contained the indium addition was partially recrystallized compared to the baseline suggesting that indium may influence recrystallization behavior. The indium-modified alloy exhibited superior hardness and strength compared to the baseline alloy when solution-heat-treated at 555 C and aged at 160 C or 190 C. For each alloy, strength increased and toughness was unchanged or decreased when tested at - 185 C compared to ambient temperature. By using optimized heat treatments, the indium-modified alloy exhibited strength levels approaching those of the baseline alloy without deformation prior to aging. The increase in strength of these alloys in the T6 condition make them particularly attractive for superplastic forming applications where post-SPF parts cannot be cold deformed to increase strength.

  2. Preparation of PdCu Alloy Nanocatalysts for Nitrate Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Fan; Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Mott, Derrick; Chen, Bing H.; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-06-30

    Alloying Pd with Cu is important for catalytic reactions such as denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction, but understanding of the catalyst preparation and its correlation with the catalyst’s activity and selectivity remains elusive. Herein, we report the results of investigations of the preparation of PdCu alloy nanocatalysts using different methods and the catalytic properties of the catalysts in catalytic denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction. PdCu alloy nanocatalysts were prepared by conventional dry impregnation method and ligand-capping based wet chemical synthesis method, and subsequent thermochemical activation as well. The alloying characteristics depend on the bimetallic composition. PdCu/Al2O3 with a Pd/Cu ratio of 50:50 was shown to exhibit an optimized hydrogenation activity for the catalytic denitrification reaction. The catalytic activity of the PdCu catalysts was shown to be highly dependent on the support, as evidenced by the observation of an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation reaction using TiO2 and CeO2 supports with high oxygen storage capacity. Lastly, we discussed the implications of the results to the refinement of the preparation of the alloy nanocatalysts.

  3. Preparation of PdCu Alloy Nanocatalysts for Nitrate Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Fan; Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; ...

    2016-06-30

    Alloying Pd with Cu is important for catalytic reactions such as denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction, but understanding of the catalyst preparation and its correlation with the catalyst’s activity and selectivity remains elusive. Herein, we report the results of investigations of the preparation of PdCu alloy nanocatalysts using different methods and the catalytic properties of the catalysts in catalytic denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction. PdCu alloy nanocatalysts were prepared by conventional dry impregnation method and ligand-capping based wet chemical synthesis method, and subsequent thermochemical activation as well. The alloying characteristics depend on the bimetallic composition. PdCu/Al2O3 with amore » Pd/Cu ratio of 50:50 was shown to exhibit an optimized hydrogenation activity for the catalytic denitrification reaction. The catalytic activity of the PdCu catalysts was shown to be highly dependent on the support, as evidenced by the observation of an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation reaction using TiO2 and CeO2 supports with high oxygen storage capacity. Lastly, we discussed the implications of the results to the refinement of the preparation of the alloy nanocatalysts.« less

  4. Nickel-silver alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxidation in an alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Tang, Maureen H; Hahn, Christopher; Klobuchar, Aidan J; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Wellendorff, Jess; Bligaard, Thomas; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2014-09-28

    The development of improved catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in basic electrolytes remains a major technical obstacle to improved fuel cells, water electrolyzers, and other devices for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Based on the free energy of adsorbed hydrogen intermediates, theory predicts that alloys of nickel and silver are active for these reactions. In this work, we synthesize binary nickel-silver bulk alloys across a range of compositions and show that nickel-silver alloys are indeed more active than pure nickel for hydrogen evolution and, possibly, hydrogen oxidation. To overcome the mutual insolubility of silver and nickel, we employ electron-beam physical vapor codeposition, a low-temperature synthetic route to metastable alloys. This method also produces flat and uniform films that facilitate the measurement of intrinsic catalytic activity with minimal variations in the surface area, ohmic contact, and pore transport. Rotating-disk-electrode measurements demonstrate that the hydrogen evolution activity per geometric area of the most active catalyst in this study, Ni0.75Ag0.25, is approximately twice that of pure nickel and has comparable stability and hydrogen oxidation activity. Our experimental results are supported by density functional theory calculations, which show that bulk alloying of Ni and Ag creates a variety of adsorption sites, some of which have near-optimal hydrogen binding energy.

  5. Effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior of Mo-containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. B.; Kim, C. M.; Yang, H. R.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior in Fe-Mo-C steels has been investigated by means of the successive alloying additions of Cr, Co, and Ni. The Cr additions promote M3C cementite formation. The Ni additions destabilize the cementite formation, while the Co additions retard dislocation recovery and present the necessary sites for M2C formation which provides the secondary hardening.

  6. Osseointegration improvement by plasma electrolytic oxidation of modified titanium alloys surfaces.

    PubMed

    Echeverry-Rendón, Mónica; Galvis, Oscar; Quintero Giraldo, David; Pavón, Juan; López-Lacomba, José Luis; Jiménez-Piqué, Emilio; Anglada, Marc; Robledo, Sara M; Castaño, Juan G; Echeverría, Félix

    2015-02-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a material frequently used in orthopedic applications, due to its good mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. However, formation of a non-adherent fibrous tissue between material and bone drastically could affect the osseointegration process and, therefore, the mechanical stability of the implant. Modifications of topography and configuration of the tissue/material interface is one of the mechanisms to improve that process by manipulating parameters such as morphology and roughness. There are different techniques that can be used to modify the titanium surface; plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of those alternatives, which consists of obtaining porous anodic coatings by controlling parameters such as voltage, current, anodizing solution and time of the reaction. From all of the above factors, and based on previous studies that demonstrated that bone cells sense substrates features to grow new tissue, in this work commercially pure Ti (c.p Ti) and Ti6Al4V alloy samples were modified at their surface by PEO in different anodizing solutions composed of H2SO4 and H3PO4 mixtures. Treated surfaces were characterized and used as platforms to grow osteoblasts; subsequently, cell behavior parameters like adhesion, proliferation and differentiation were also studied. Although the results showed no significant differences in proliferation, differentiation and cell biological activity, overall results showed an important influence of topography of the modified surfaces compared with polished untreated surfaces. Finally, this study offers an alternative protocol to modify surfaces of Ti and their alloys in a controlled and reproducible way in which biocompatibility of the material is not compromised and osseointegration would be improved.

  7. Oxidation behavior of molybdenum silicides and their composites

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Deevi, S. C.

    2000-04-03

    A key materials issue associated with the future of high-temperature structural silicides is the resistance of these materials to oxidation at low temperatures. Oxidation tests were conducted on Mo-based silicides over a wide temperature range to evaluate the effects of alloy composition and temperature on the protective scaling characteristics and testing regime for the materials. The study included Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} alloys that contained several concentrations of B. In addition, oxidation characteristics of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites that contained 20--80 vol.% Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were evaluated at 500--1,400 C.

  8. The effect of plasma electrolytic oxidation on the mean stress sensitivity of the fatigue life of the 6082 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, L.; Morgenstern, R.; Hockauf, K.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the mean stress influence on the high cycle fatigue behavior of the plasma electrolytic oxidized (PEO) 6082 aluminum alloy (AlSi1MgMn) is investigated. The present study is focused on the fatigue life time and the susceptibility of fatigue-induced cracking of the oxide coating and their dependence on the applied mean stress. Systematic work is done comparing conditions with and without PEO treatment, which have been tested using three different load ratios. For the uncoated substrate the cycles to failure show a significant dependence on the mean stress, which is typical for aluminum alloys. With increased load ratio and therefore increased mean stress, the fatigue strength decreases. The investigation confirms the well-known effect of PEO treatment on the fatigue life: The fatigue strength is significantly reduced by the PEO process, compared to the uncoated substrate. However, also the mean stress sensitivity of the fatigue performance is reduced. The fatigue limit is not influenced by an increasing mean stress for the PEO treated conditions. This effect is firstly shown in these findings and no explanation for this effect can be found in literature. Supposedly the internal compressive stresses and the micro-cracks in the oxide film have a direct influence on the crack initiation and growth from the oxide film through the interface and in the substrate. Contrary to these findings, the susceptibility of fatigue-induced cracking of the oxide coating is influenced by the load ratio. At tension-tension loading a large number of cracks, which grow partially just in the aluminum substrate, are present. With decreasing load ratio to alternating tension-compression stresses, the crack number and length increases and shattering of the oxide film is more pronounced due to the additional effective compressive part of the load cycle.

  9. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling engine heater head tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S. R.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of oxide films developed in situ from CO/CO2 doped hydrogen on high pressure hydrogen permeability at 820 C was studied on N-155, A-286, IN 800, 19-9DL, Nitronic 40, HS-188, and IN 718 tubing in a Stirling materials simulator. The hydrogen permeability decreased with increasing dopant levels of CO or CO2 and corresponding decreases in oxide porosity. Minor reactive alloying elements strongly influenced permeability. At high levels of CO or CO2, a liquid oxide formed on alloys with greater than 50 percent Fe. This caused increased permeability. The oxides formed on the inside tube walls were analyzed and their effective permeabilities were calculated.

  10. High-temperature steam oxidation kinetics of the E110G cladding alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Márton; Kulacsy, Katalin; Hózer, Zoltán; Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Novotny, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    In the course of recent years, several experiments were performed at MTA EK (Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences) on the isothermal high-temperature oxidation of the improved Russian cladding alloy E110G in steam/argon atmosphere. Using these data and designing additional supporting experiments, the oxidation kinetics of the E110G alloy was investigated in a wide temperature range, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. For short durations (below 500 s) or high temperatures (above 1065 °C) the oxidation kinetics was found to follow a square-root-of-time dependence, while for longer durations and in the intermediate temperature range (800-1000 °C) it was found to approach a cube-root-of-time dependence rather than a square-root one. Based on the results a new best-estimate and a conservative oxidation kinetics model were created.

  11. Facile synthesis of PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high activity for formic acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    We report the facile synthesis of carbon supported PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high electrocatalytic activity as the anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). PtAu alloy nanopaticles are synthesized by co-reducing HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate and then the nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72R carbon support (PtAu/C). The obtained catalysts are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), which reveal PtAu alloy formation with an average diameter of 4.6 nm. PtAu/C exhibits 8 times higher catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation than Pt/C. The enhanced activity of PtAu/C catalyst is attributed to noncontinuous Pt sites formed in the presence of the neighbored Au sites, which promotes direct oxidation of formic acid by avoiding poison CO.

  12. Nuclear Applications of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened and Nano-Featured Alloys: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-12-01

    The Nuclear Materials Committee of TMS is sponsoring the current topic in JOM, which is dedicated to a newer generation of materials called oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys and nano-featured alloys (NFA). These newer materials are fabricated by using powder stock materials and processing them through high energy attrition followed by either extrusion or forging. The presence of nano-sized oxides throughout the matrix makes the recrystallized alloy have grains that are smaller than 1 µm diameter. The nano-features in the matrix of ODS or NFA materials make them highly resistant to degradation by irradiation such as void swelling. There are four papers dedicated to ODS and NFA materials, including fabrication, joining and testing.

  13. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  14. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M.; Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K.

    2013-07-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection.

  15. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950°C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050°C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and

  16. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Soboyejo, W.; Rapp, R.A.

    1999-06-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb{sub 3}Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to {approximately}750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings.

  17. Oxidation behaviour of zirconium alloys and their precipitates - A mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proff, C.; Abolhassani, S.; Lemaignan, C.

    2013-01-01

    The precipitate oxidation behaviour of binary zirconium alloys containing 1 wt.% Fe, Ni, Cr or 0.6 wt.% Nb was characterised in TEM on FIB prepared transverse sections of the oxide and reported in previous studies [1,2]. In the present study the following alloys: Zr1%Cu, Zr0.5%Cu0.5%Mo and pure Zr are analysed to add to the available information. In all cases, the observed precipitate oxidation behaviour in the oxide close to the metal-oxide interface could be described either with delayed oxidation with respect to the matrix or simultaneous oxidation as the surrounding zirconium matrix. Attempt was made to explain these observations, with different parameters such as precipitate size and structure, composition and thermodynamic properties. It was concluded that the thermodynamics with the new approach presented could explain most precisely their behaviour, considering the precipitate stoichiometry and the free energy of oxidation of the constituting elements. The surface topography of the oxidised materials, as well as the microstructure of the oxide presenting microcracks have been examined. A systematic presence of microcracks above the precipitates exhibiting delayed oxidation has been found; the height of these crack calculated using the Pilling-Bedworth ratios of different phases present, can explain their origin. The protrusions at the surface in the case of materials containing large precipitates can be unambiguously correlated to the presence of these latter, and the height can be correlated to the Pilling-Bedworth ratios of the phases present as well as the diffusion of the alloying elements to the surface and their subsequent oxidation. This latter behaviour was much more considerable in the case of Fe and Cu with Fe showing systematically diffusion to the outer surface.

  18. Principal Methods and Apparatus for Investigating Oxidation Processes in Metal and Alloys. USSR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-09-14

    stage is characterized by direct interaction of the metal with the oxidizing reagent and actually represents chemical adsorbtion (or, more exactly...physical adsorbtion , changing rapidly to chemical adsorbtlon). For almost all metals and alloys this stage proceeds very rapidly even at room temperature...process in this stage has little significance (by comparison with the heat of formation of the oxide). An indirect confirmation of th.ei;s contention is the

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  20. Corrosion behavior of novel Ti-24Nb-4Zr-7.9Sn alloy for dental implant applications in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yicheng; Hu, Jiang; Zhang, Chunbao; Wang, Zhongyi; Hao, Yulin; Gao, Bo

    2013-02-01

    Ti-24Nb-4Zr-7.9Sn (TNZS) alloy is a newly developed β-titanium alloy considered suitable for dental implant applications due to its low elastic modulus and high strength. The aim of this study was to investigate the corrosion behavior of TNZS alloy through a static immersion test in various simulated physiological solutions, namely, artificial saliva, lactic acid solution, fluoridated saliva, and fluoridated acidified saliva for 7 days. The corrosion behavior of commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy were also examined for comparison. The elemental release was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, and the changes of alloy surface were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The test results showed that the quantity of each metal element released from TNZS alloy into fluoridated solutions was much higher than the solutions without fluoride ions. It was highest in fluoridated acidified saliva and lowest in artificial saliva (p < 0.01). The total elemental release from TNZS alloy was lower than commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the same solution (p < 0.01). SEM micrographs indicated that TNZS alloy possessed better corrosion resistant performance. It can be concluded that fluoridated solutions have a negative influence on the corrosion behavior of TNZS alloy. Compared with commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, TNZS alloy demonstrates better corrosion resistance in various simulated physiological solutions, so it has greater potential for dental implant applications.

  1. The catalytic behavior of precisely synthesized Pt–Pd bimetallic catalysts for use as diesel oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Andrew P.; Kyriakidou, Eleni A.; Toops, Todd J.; Regalbuto, John R.

    2016-04-17

    The demands of stricter diesel engine emission regulations have created challenges for current exhaust systems. With advances in low-temperature internal combustion engines and their operations, advances must also be made in vehicle exhaust catalysts. Most current diesel oxidation catalysts use heavy amounts of precious group metals (PGMs) for hydrocarbon (HC), CO, and NO oxidation. These catalysts are expensive and are most often synthesized with poor bimetallic interaction and dispersion. In this paper, the goal was to study the effect of aging on diesel emission abatement of Pt–Pd bimetallic nanoparticles precisely prepared with different morphologies: well dispersed core–shell vs. well dispersed homogeneously alloyed vs. poorly dispersed, poorly alloyed particles. Alumina and silica supports were studied. Particle morphology and dispersion were analyzed before and after hydrothermal treatments by XRD, EDX, and STEM. Reactivity as a function of aging was measured in simulated diesel engine exhaust. While carefully controlled bimetallic catalyst nanoparticle structure has a profound influence on initial or low temperature catalytic activity, the differences in behavior disappear with higher temperature aging as thermodynamic equilibrium is achieved. The metallic character of Pt-rich alumina-supported catalysts is such that behavior rather closely follows the Pt–Pd metal phase diagram. Nanoparticles disparately composed as well-dispersed core–shell (via seq-SEA), well-dispersed homogeneously alloyed (via co-SEA), and poorly dispersed, poorly alloyed (via co-DI) end up as well alloyed, large particles of almost the same size and activity. With Pd-rich systems, the oxidation of Pd also figures into the equilibrium, such that Pd-rich oxide phases appear in the high temperature forms along with alloyed metal cores. Finally, the small differences in activity after high temperature aging can be attributed to the synthesis methods, sequential SEA and co-DI which

  2. The catalytic behavior of precisely synthesized Pt–Pd bimetallic catalysts for use as diesel oxidation catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Andrew P.; Kyriakidou, Eleni A.; Toops, Todd J.; ...

    2016-04-17

    The demands of stricter diesel engine emission regulations have created challenges for current exhaust systems. With advances in low-temperature internal combustion engines and their operations, advances must also be made in vehicle exhaust catalysts. Most current diesel oxidation catalysts use heavy amounts of precious group metals (PGMs) for hydrocarbon (HC), CO, and NO oxidation. These catalysts are expensive and are most often synthesized with poor bimetallic interaction and dispersion. In this paper, the goal was to study the effect of aging on diesel emission abatement of Pt–Pd bimetallic nanoparticles precisely prepared with different morphologies: well dispersed core–shell vs. well dispersedmore » homogeneously alloyed vs. poorly dispersed, poorly alloyed particles. Alumina and silica supports were studied. Particle morphology and dispersion were analyzed before and after hydrothermal treatments by XRD, EDX, and STEM. Reactivity as a function of aging was measured in simulated diesel engine exhaust. While carefully controlled bimetallic catalyst nanoparticle structure has a profound influence on initial or low temperature catalytic activity, the differences in behavior disappear with higher temperature aging as thermodynamic equilibrium is achieved. The metallic character of Pt-rich alumina-supported catalysts is such that behavior rather closely follows the Pt–Pd metal phase diagram. Nanoparticles disparately composed as well-dispersed core–shell (via seq-SEA), well-dispersed homogeneously alloyed (via co-SEA), and poorly dispersed, poorly alloyed (via co-DI) end up as well alloyed, large particles of almost the same size and activity. With Pd-rich systems, the oxidation of Pd also figures into the equilibrium, such that Pd-rich oxide phases appear in the high temperature forms along with alloyed metal cores. Finally, the small differences in activity after high temperature aging can be attributed to the synthesis methods, sequential SEA and co

  3. Laser forming of structures of zinc oxide on a surface of products from copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, D. V.; Gorudko, T. N.; Koblov, A. N.; Nogtev, D. S.; Novikova, O. A.

    Laser formation of a protective zinc oxide layer on a surface of products from copper alloys is present. This layer is formed with using of carbon nanotubes. Destructions of the basic material are avoided or minimized at laser nanostructuring of product surfaces. Such laser processing can be made repeatedly. Offered covering have self-clearing and water-repellent properties.

  4. Strategies to Suppress Cation Vacancies in Metal Oxide Alloys: Consequences for Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-09-01

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are promising alternative materials for inexpensive and efficient solar energy conversion. However, their conversion efficiency can be deleteriously affected by material imperfections, such as atomic vacancies. In this work, we provide examples showing that in some iron-containing TMOs, iron cation vacancy formation can be suppressed via alloying. We calculate within density functional theory+U theory the iron vacancy formation energy in binary rock-salt oxide alloys that contain iron, manganese, nickel, zinc, and/or magnesium. We demonstrate that formation of iron vacancies is less favorable if we choose to alloy iron(II) oxide with metals that cannot readily accept vacancy-generated holes, e.g., magnesium, manganese, nickel, or zinc. Since there are less available sites for holes and the holes are forced to reside on iron cations, the driving force for iron vacancy formation decreases. These results are consistent with an experiment observing a sharp drop in cation vacancy concentration upon alloying iron(II) oxide with manganese.

  5. Microstructural Effects on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloys and Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-30

    high Cr content such as austenitic stainless steel 316, a greater Cr enrichment in the inner oxide scale and subsequently a quicker formation of a...protective layer of Cr-rich oxide can easily form. A beneficial effect of nano-scale grains was observed on oxidation of Austenitic 304 stainless steel ...contrary, pronounced internal oxidation along grain boundaries and a higher oxidation rate can occur on steels with a low Cr content such as ferritic

  6. Corrosion Behavior and Surface Modification of Mg-Zn Implant Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayad, I. M.; Maamoun, M. A.; Metwally, W. A.; El-Baradie, Z. M.; Abdel-Azim, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, Mg-Zn alloys (1-4 wt.% Zn) were fabricated with high-purity raw materials using a clean melting process (fluxless method) and a protective atmosphere of CO2 + 0.4 SF6. The as-cast microstructures of the investigated alloys were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopes, EDS and XRD. Corrosion properties of the prepared alloys were examined in simulated body fluid by electrochemical techniques and immersion test (hydrogen evolution method). Surface modification of the prepared alloys was performed using micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Microstructure observation revealed that Zn was completely dissolved in the α-Mg matrix up to 2 wt.%. Higher Zn content led to a reduction in the grain size and the development of a second phase (MgZn2). Corrosion testing results revealed that Mg-1,2,3 wt.% Zn have almost the same degradation rate, whereas Mg-4Zn has the highest degradation rate. HA coating on MAO-treated magnesium alloys formed a dense and compact layer on the alloy surface, which had largely improved surface properties and enhanced corrosion resistance of the prepared alloys.

  7. The Role of Entrained Surface Oxides in RS-PM Aluminum Alloys on Resultant Structures and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The RS-PM aluminum alloys which show less than anticipated toughness properties were studied. After eliminating negative variables such as sodium and potassium in lithium containing alloys, hydrogen in all Al alloys, and trapped impurities from the atomization processing the data pointed to fine oxides, as the primary cause of poor toughness properties. The oxide content of aluminum powders increases with: decreasing powder size, deviations from spherical powder shapes, exposure to moist atmospheres either during atomization or in subsequent powder handling, and alloy compositions which contain significant amounts of lithium, magnesium, cerium, and other reactive elements.

  8. Wetting Behavior and Reactivity Between AlTi6 Alloy and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, M.; Sobczak, N.; Sobczak, J. J.; Morgiel, J.; Seal, S.; Nowak, R.; Bruzda, G.

    2016-08-01

    Wetting behavior between molten AlTi6 alloy and nanoporous carbon substrate (carbon nanotubes paper) was investigated by a sessile drop method in vacuum at 800, 900, and 1000 °C. In order to avoid the effect of native oxide film on metal sample, an advanced capillary purification technique coupled with non-contact heating was applied. The AlTi6 drop did not wet the MWCNT paper immediately after deposition on the substrate at 800 °C, forming a contact angle of θ = 153°. The increase in temperature up to 900 °C and holding the system for 15 min also did not affect the contact angle (θ = 153 ± 1). Further heating above 930 °C at a rate of 5 °C/min caused a gradual lowering of contact angle down to ~130° and after about 10-min interaction at 1000 °C, it reached the final value of 123°. Structural investigations of solidified sessile drop AlTi6/MWCNT couple by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that high-temperature interaction between MWCNTs and molten AlTi6 alloy is accompanied with liquid metal infiltration of MWCNT substrate, fragmentation of MWCNTs, and formation of TiC in the form of rod-like crystallites and fine particles uniformly distributed in the metal matrix. The mechanism of MWCNT → TiC transformation in the AlTi6/MWCNT system by high-temperature liquid-assisted process is discussed.

  9. Evaluation of Pt Alloys as Electrocatalysts for Oxalic Acid Oxidation: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    DOE PAGES

    Perry, Albert; Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; ...

    2016-07-14

    Here in this study we combined experimental approaches and density functional theory to evaluate novel platinum-based materials as electrocatalysts for oxalic acid oxidation. Several Pt alloys, PtSn (1:1), PtSn (19:1), PtRu (1:4), PtRuSn (5:4:1), and PtRhSn (3:1:4), were synthetized using sacrificial support method and tested for oxidation of oxalic acid at pH 4. It was shown that PtSn (1:1) and PtRu (1:4) have higher mass activity relative to Pt. These two materials along with Pt and one of the least active alloys, PtSn (19:1), were further analyzed for the oxidation of oxalic acid at different pHs. The results show thatmore » all samples tested followed an identical trend of decreased onset potential with increased pH and increased catalytic activity with decreased pH. Density functional theory was further utilized to gain a fundamental knowledge about the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt, PtSn (1:1), and PtRu (1:4). In conclusion, the results of the calculations along with the experimentally observed dependence of generated currents on the oxalic acid concentration indicate that the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt proceeds without the participation of surface oxidizing species, while on Pt alloys it involves their participation.« less

  10. Evaluation of Pt Alloys as Electrocatalysts for Oxalic Acid Oxidation: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Albert; Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Neumman, Anica; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-07-14

    Here in this study we combined experimental approaches and density functional theory to evaluate novel platinum-based materials as electrocatalysts for oxalic acid oxidation. Several Pt alloys, PtSn (1:1), PtSn (19:1), PtRu (1:4), PtRuSn (5:4:1), and PtRhSn (3:1:4), were synthetized using sacrificial support method and tested for oxidation of oxalic acid at pH 4. It was shown that PtSn (1:1) and PtRu (1:4) have higher mass activity relative to Pt. These two materials along with Pt and one of the least active alloys, PtSn (19:1), were further analyzed for the oxidation of oxalic acid at different pHs. The results show that all samples tested followed an identical trend of decreased onset potential with increased pH and increased catalytic activity with decreased pH. Density functional theory was further utilized to gain a fundamental knowledge about the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt, PtSn (1:1), and PtRu (1:4). In conclusion, the results of the calculations along with the experimentally observed dependence of generated currents on the oxalic acid concentration indicate that the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt proceeds without the participation of surface oxidizing species, while on Pt alloys it involves their participation.

  11. Roles of texture in controlling oxidation, hydrogen ingress and hydride formation in Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Qin, Wen; Li, Hualong; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.

    2012-08-01

    This review article attempts to provide an overall description for the texture related issues of degradation of Zr alloys. Experimental observations show that the oxide formed on Zr alloys is strongly textured. The texture and grain-boundary characteristics of oxide are dependent on the texture of metal substrate. Computer simulation and thermodynamic modeling were used to explain the influence of metal substrate on structure of oxide film, and intrinsic factors affecting the oxide microstructure. Models of diffusion process of hydrogen atoms and oxygen diffusion through oxide are presented. Both intragranular and intergranular hydrides were found following (0 0 0 1)α-Zr||{1 1 1}δ-ZrH1.5 relationship under no load, but different relationships were observed under stress. The through-thickness texture inhomogeneity in fuel cladding tubes, the effects of hoop stress on the hydride orientation and the formation of interlinked hydride structure were studied. A thermodynamic model was developed to analyze the nucleation and the stress-induced reorientation of intergranular hydrides. These works provide a framework for understanding the effects of texture on the oxidation, the hydrogen ingress and the hydride formation in Zr alloys.

  12. Hydrogen transport behavior of Timetal-21S alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Sankara N.; Hermann, Rebecca K.; Clark, Ronald K.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Use is made of the thermogravimetric-analysis method to ascertain the hydrogen-transport characteristics of the Timetal-21S beta-Ti alloy, at pressures of up to 50 torr over the 400-800 C temperature range. Hydrogen solubility is found to be high; the equilibrium hydrogen concentration is noted to deviate from Sievert's law at higher pressures. These deviations are likely associated with hydrogen-induced microstructural changes in the alloy, and the kinetics of hydrogen uptake reflect these changes.

  13. Anodic oxidation of a Co–Ni–Cr–Mo alloy and its inhibitory effect on platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Akiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Nozaki, Kosuke; Wada, Norio; Katayama, Keiichi; Hanawa, Takao; Yamashit, Kimihiro

    2014-05-01

    In this study, surface treatment of a Co–Ni–Cr–Mo alloy (MP35N) was attempted to attain biocompatibility using an anodic oxidation technique. To determine the optimal condition of the anodic oxidation treatment for stent applications, anodic polarization of the alloy was first conducted. After anodic oxidation, the surface topology and wettability were examined, and the composition and chemical states of the surface oxide were characterized. For biocompatibility, stent surfaces must have both cell adhesion and antithrombogenic properties. Therefore, the anodically oxidized surface was assessed with an endothelial cell attachment test and an in vitro platelet adhesion test. The results indicated that the topography, wettability, and composition of the surface oxide film on the alloy were changed by anodic oxidation at a voltage near the passive and transpassive region. The surface roughness and wettability increased after anodic oxidation. The major content of the oxide layer after anodic oxidation was Cr containing a small amount of Mo, and Ni and Co were almost eliminated from the layer. Platelet activation of the alloy decreased significantly after anodic oxidation at an optimal potential, whereas the cytocompatibility remained constant. Therefore, the anodic oxidation is an effective process for treating this alloy for stent applications.

  14. The effect of pre-existing corrosion on the fatigue cracking behavior of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerdorn, E.L.; Koch, G.H.

    1996-10-01

    In order to assess the effect of preexisting corrosion on the fatigue crack behavior of aluminum alloys 2024-T3 and 7074-T6 crack initiation and growth data were obtained using fracture mechanics specimens. These specimens incorporated mechanically thinned areas and areas that had been preexposed to environments which produced various degrees of pitting or exfoliation corrosion. The data obtained from these laboratory experiments indicate that specific corrosive was most pronounced in the fatigue cracking behavior of aluminum alloys. The effect of preexisting corrosion was most pronounced in the fatigue crack initiation stage. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that the effect of preexisting corrosion on the fatigue cracking behavior of both aluminum alloys 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 is a combination of stress concentrations as a result of material loss, and altered material properties, possible as a result of hydrogen entry into the lattice.

  15. Elemental Solubility Tendency for the Phases of Uranium by Classical Models Used to Predict Alloy Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blackwood; Travis Koenig; Saleem Drera; Brajenda Mishra; Davis Olson; Doug Porter; Robert Mariani

    2012-03-01

    Traditional alloy theory models, specifically Darken-Gurry and Miedema’s analyses, that characterize solutes in solid solvents relative to physical properties of the elements have been used to assist in predicting alloy behavior. These models will be applied relative to the three solid phases of uranium: alpha (orthorhombic), beta (tetragonal), and gamma (bcc). These phases have different solubilities for specific alloy additions as a function of temperature. The Darken-Gurry and Miedema models, with modifications based on concepts of Waber, Gschneider, and Brewer will be used to predict the behavior of four types of solutes: 1) Transition metals that are used for various purposes associated with the containment as alloy additions in the uranium fuel 2) Transuranic elements in the uranium 3) Rare earth fission products (lanthanides) 4) Transition metals and other fission products Using these solute map criteria, elemental behavior will be predicted as highly soluble, marginally soluble, or immiscible (compound formers) and will be used to compare solute effects during uranium phase transformations. The overlapping of these solute maps are convenient first approximation tools for predicting alloy behavior.

  16. The cyclic oxidation resistance at 1200 C of beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl alloys with selected third element additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds Beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl were tested in cyclic oxidation with selected third element alloy additions. Tests in static air for 200 1-hr cycles at 1200 C indicated by specific weight change/time data and x-ray diffraction analysis that the 5 at percent alloy additions did not significantly improve the oxidation resistance over the alumina forming baseline alloys without the additions. Many of the alloy additions were actually deleterious. Ta and Nb were the only alloy additions that actually altered the nature of the oxide(s) formed and still maintained the oxidation resistance of the protective alumina scale.

  17. The electrochemical and mechanical behavior of passivated and TiN/AlN-coated CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V alloys.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Jay R; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2004-02-01

    The mechanical and electrochemical behavior of the surface oxides of CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V alloys during fracture and repassivation play an important role in the corrosion of the taper interfaces of modular hip implants. This behavior was investigated in one group of CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V alloy samples passivated with nitric acid and another group coated with a novel TiN/AlN coating. The effects of mechanical load and sample potential on peak currents and time constants resulting from fracture of the surface oxide or coating, and the effects of mechanical load on scratch depth were investigated to determine the mechanical and electrochemical properties of the oxides or coating. The polarization behavior of the samples after fracture of the oxide or coating was also investigated. CoCrMo had a stronger surface oxide and higher interfacial adhesion strength, making it more resistant to fracture than Ti6Al4V. If undisturbed, the oxide on the surface of Ti6Al4V significantly reduced dissolution currents at a wider range of potentials than CoCrMo, making Ti6Al4V more resistant to corrosion. The TiN/AlN coating had a higher hardness and modulus of elasticity than CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V. It was much less susceptible to fracture, had a higher interfacial adhesion strength, and was a better barrier to ionic diffusion than the surface oxides on CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V. The coating provided increased corrosion and fretting resistance to the substrate alloys.

  18. Response of human endothelial cells to oxidative stress on Ti6Al4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Tsaryk, Roman; Kalbacova, Marie; Hempel, Ute; Scharnweber, Dieter; Unger, Ronald E; Dieter, Peter; Kirkpatrick, C James; Peters, Kirsten

    2007-02-01

    Titanium and its alloys are amongst the most frequently used materials in bone and dental implantology. The good biocompatibility of titanium(-alloys) is attributed to the formation of a titanium oxide layer on the implant surface. However, implant failures do occur and this appears to be due to titanium corrosion. Thus, cells participating in the wound healing processes around an implanted material, among them endothelial cells, might be subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed by electrochemical processes during titanium corrosion. Therefore, we studied the response of endothelial cells grown on Ti6Al4V alloy to H(2)O(2) and compared this with the response of endothelial cells grown on cell culture polystyrene (PS). We could show that although the cell number was the same on both surfaces, metabolic activity of endothelial cells grown on Ti6Al4V alloy was reduced compared to the cells on PS and further decreased following prototypic oxidative stress (H(2)O(2)-treatment). The analysis of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress showed a higher ROS formation in endothelial cells on Ti6Al4V than on PS. This correlated with the depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) in endothelial cells grown on Ti6Al4V surfaces and indicated permanent oxidative stress. Thus, endothelial cells in direct contact with Ti6Al4V showed signs of oxidative stress and higher impairment of cell vitality after an additional oxidative stress. However, the exact nature of the agent of oxidative stress generated from Ti6Al4V remains unclear and requires further investigation.

  19. Strainrange partitioning behavior of an automotive turbine alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, C. G.; Vanwanderham, M. C.; Wallace, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    This report addresses Strainrange Partitioning, an advanced life prediction analysis procedure, as applied to CA-101 (cast IN 792 + Hf), an alloy proposed for turbine disks in automotive gas turbine engines. The methodology was successful in predicting specimen life under thermal-mechanical cycling, to within a factor of + or - 2.

  20. Fracture behavior of nickel-based alloys in water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-08-01

    The cracking resistance of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds, EN82H and EN52, was characterized by conducting J{sub IC} tests in air and hydrogenated water. All test materials displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, but Alloy 690 and the two welds were severely embrittled in low temperature water. In 54 C water with 150 cc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O, J{sub IC} values were typically 70% to 95% lower than their air counterparts. The toughness degradation was associated with a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to intergranular fracture. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that susceptibility to low temperature cracking is due to hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The effects of water temperature, hydrogen content and loading rate on low temperature crack propagation were studied. In addition, testing of specimens containing natural weld defects and as-machined notches was performed to determine if low temperature cracking can initiate at these features. Unlike the other materials, Alloy 600 is not susceptible to low temperature cracking as the toughness in 54 C water remained high and a microvoid coalescence mechanism was operative in both air and water.

  1. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  2. In vitro degradation behavior and cytocompatibility of Mg–Zn–Zr alloys

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Z. G.; Leeflang, M. A.; Fratila-Apachitei, L. E.; Duszczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc and zirconium were selected as the alloying elements in biodegradable magnesium alloys, considering their strengthening effect and good biocompatibility. The degradation rate, hydrogen evolution, ion release, surface layer and in vitro cytotoxicity of two Mg–Zn–Zr alloys, i.e. ZK30 and ZK60, and a WE-type alloy (Mg–Y–RE–Zr) were investigated by means of long-term static immersion testing in Hank’s solution, non-static immersion testing in Hank’s solution and cell-material interaction analysis. It was found that, among these three magnesium alloys, ZK30 had the lowest degradation rate and the least hydrogen evolution. A magnesium calcium phosphate layer was formed on the surface of ZK30 sample during non-static immersion and its degradation caused minute changes in the ion concentrations and pH value of Hank’s solution. In addition, the ZK30 alloy showed insignificant cytotoxicity against bone marrow stromal cells as compared with biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HA) and the WE-type alloy. After prolonged incubation for 7 days, a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation was observed. The results of the present study suggested that ZK30 could be a promising material for biodegradable orthopedic implants and worth further investigation to evaluate its in vitro and in vivo degradation behavior. PMID:20532960

  3. Impact Behavior of A356 Foundry Alloys in the Presence of Trace Elements Ni and V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casari, Daniele; Ludwig, Thomas H.; Merlin, Mattia; Arnberg, Lars; Garagnani, Gian Luca

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the impact behavior of unmodified A356 alloys with the addition of Ni or V in as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions was assessed. Charpy V-notched specimens obtained from sand and permanent mold casting showed low total absorbed energy average values ( W t < 2 J). SEM analysis of fracture profiles and surfaces indicated a Si-driven crack propagation with a predominant transgranular fracture mode. Occasionally, intergranular contributions to fracture were detected in the permanent mold cast alloys due to the locally finer microstructure. Concurrent mechanisms related to the chemical composition, solidification conditions and heat treatment were found to control the impact properties of the alloys. While the trace element Ni exerted only minor effects on the impact toughness of the A356 alloy, V had a strong influence: (i) V-containing sand cast alloys absorbed slightly higher impact energies compared to the corresponding A356 base alloys; (ii) in the permanent mold cast alloys, V in solid solution led to a considerable loss of ductility, which in turn decreased the total absorbed energy.

  4. First-principles investigation on mechanical behaviors of W-Cr/Ti binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuming; Han, Quan-Fu; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Yue-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles simulation, we have performed the study on the mechanical behaviors of body-centered-cubic W1-xCr(Ti)x binary alloys (0 < x < 0.1) as a function of Cr (Ti) composition. The lattice constants, elastic constants, Young's moduli, and shear moduli are investigated for single crystal W1-xCr(Ti)x binary alloys. Cr and Ti can, respectively, shrink and enlarge the lattice structure of W due to their different atomic radius. The influence of alloying on C11 is larger than that on C12 and C44 with the increase of Cr/Ti concentration. For polycrystalline W-based alloys, bulk modulus B, Young's modulus E, shear modulus G, Poisson's ratio v, Zener anisotropy factor A, Debye temperature ΘD, and B/G have been also calculated. All these quantities display regular change trend with increasing Cr/Ti concentration. Cr and Ti exhibit the opposite alloying effect on the thermodynamic stability of alloy. W1-xCr(Ti)x is energetically unstable (stable) with random Cr (Ti) concentration at any temperature considered in the current study. This result well approves the experiment on that the alloying element Ti can enhance the mechanical properties at ambient and intermediate temperatures.

  5. An investigation of wear behaviors of different Monel alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esgin, U.; Özyürek, D.; Kaya, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, wear behaviors of Monel 400, Monel 404, Monel R-405 and Monel K-500 alloys produced by Powder Metallurgy (P/M) method were investigated. These compounds prepared from elemental powders were cold-pressed (600 MPa) and then, sintered at 1150°C for 2 hours and cooled down to the room temperature in furnace environment. Monel alloys produced by the P/M method were characterized through scanning electron microscope (SEM+EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness and density measurements. In wear tests, standard pin-on-disk type device was used. Specimens produced within four different Monel Alloys were tested under 1ms-1 sliding speed, under three different loads (20N, 30N and 40N) and five different sliding distances (400-2000 m). The results show that Monel Alloys have γ matrix and that Al0,9Ni4,22 intermetallic phase was formed in the structure. Also, the highest hardness value was measured with the Monel K-500 alloy. In wear tests, the maximum weight loss according to the sliding distance, was observed in Monel 400 and Monel 404 alloys while the minimum weight loss was achieved by the Monel K-500 alloy.

  6. Assessment of precipitation behavior in dental castings of a Co-Cr-Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated solute portioning and precipitation in dental castings of a Co-Cr-Mo alloy and discussed their effects on alloy performance, in particular, the mechanical properties. Samples of a commercial Co-29Cr-6Mo (mass%) alloy were prepared using a dental-casting machine. The precipitates formed owing to the partitioning behaviors of the alloying elements were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction analysis, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The prepared samples exhibited a very coarse face-centered-cubic γ-phase dendritic structure with an average grain size of a few millimeters. A large number of precipitates, which decomposed further into complex interdendritic constituents (σ- and M23C6 carbide phases) were observed in the interdendritic regions rich in Cr, Mo, Si, and C. A reaction between the σ-phase and carbon is probably responsible for the carbide M23C6; however, this reaction did not occur to completion in the current case in spite of slow cooling (i.e., long exposure to elevated temperatures) in dental casting. While these precipitates result in high strength (hardness) and/or brittleness, the properties can be improved further by optimizing the alloy composition and the manufacturing process. The results of this study shed light on the significance of precipitation control in dental castings of Co-Cr-Mo alloys and should aid in the design of novel biomedical Co-Cr-based dental alloys that exhibit better performances.

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Oxalic Acid and Sodium Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-06-24

    Nickel based Alloy 22 (NO6022) is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solution and to compare its behavior to sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solutions increased rapidly as the temperature and the acid concentration increased. Extrapolation studies show that even at a concentration of 10{sup -4}M oxalic acid, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 would be higher in oxalic acid than in 1 M NaCl solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in oxalic acid solutions. Cyclic polarization tests in 1 M NaCl showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C but was not susceptible at 60 C.

  8. Corrosion behavior of high-nickel and chromium alloys in natural Baltic seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Janik-Czachor, M.; Wolowik, A.; Szummer, A.

    1999-10-01

    Effect of Cl{sup {minus}} ion concentration (O M sodium chloride [NaCl] to 2 M NaCl) and temperature (25 C to 75 C) on stability of the passive state of high-Ni and Cr alloys: NI-1 ({approximately} 16% Mo), CR-2 ({approximately} 6.2% Mo), and NI-3 (3.5% Mo) were investigated in acidic and neutral electrolytes in strictly controlled electrochemical conditions. The anodic behavior of the alloys appeared to depend mostly upon Mo content in the alloy. Thus, the NI-1 was the most stable alloy under the applied experimental conditions. The other alloys were also quite resistant, undergoing pitting only at elevated temperatures, at high anodic potentials, and at a chloride concentration not lower than 1 M. In natural Baltic seawater, these alloys did not exhibit any tendency to pitting, in qualitative agreement with the accelerated electrochemical tests. Complementary microscopic and surface analytical (AES) investigations were carried out to correlate the anodic and corrosion behavior of these materials with their composition and structure, and the composition of the passivating films formed at their surfaces.

  9. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  10. Influence of Be and Al on the magnetostrictive behavior of FeGa alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mungsantisuk, Pinai; Corson, Robert P.; Guruswamy, Sivaraman

    2005-12-15

    The rare-earth-free body-centered-cubic FeGa-based alloys have an attractive combination of large low-field magnetostriction at room temperature, good mechanical properties, low hysteresis, and relatively low cost for use in sensor and actuator devices. This paper examines the influence of partially substituting Ga in FeGa alloys with Be and Al on their magnetostrictive behavior. Magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of the various ternary FeGaAl and FeGaBe alloys prepared by directional growth process are presented. It is shown that substitution of Ga with Al and Be can be made in FeGa alloys in certain composition ranges without a significant reduction in magnetostriction. Minimal reductions in magnetostriction when Ga is partially substituted by smaller Be or larger Al atoms in certain composition ranges indicate that local electronic environments are more important and that the effects of Ga and Be are additive.

  11. Influence of Be and Al on the magnetostrictive behavior of FeGa alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungsantisuk, Pinai; Corson, Robert P.; Guruswamy, Sivaraman

    2005-12-01

    The rare-earth-free body-centered-cubic FeGa-based alloys have an attractive combination of large low-field magnetostriction at room temperature, good mechanical properties, low hysteresis, and relatively low cost for use in sensor and actuator devices. This paper examines the influence of partially substituting Ga in FeGa alloys with Be and Al on their magnetostrictive behavior. Magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of the various ternary FeGaAl and FeGaBe alloys prepared by directional growth process are presented. It is shown that substitution of Ga with Al and Be can be made in FeGa alloys in certain composition ranges without a significant reduction in magnetostriction. Minimal reductions in magnetostriction when Ga is partially substituted by smaller Be or larger Al atoms in certain composition ranges indicate that local electronic environments are more important and that the effects of Ga and Be are additive.

  12. Finite element analysis of the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation during oxidation of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, P.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2014-11-01

    Corrosion is a key limiting factor in the degradation of zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process offers a route towards improving safety and efficiency as demand increases for higher burn-up of fuel. Oxides formed on zirconium alloys are composed of both monoclinic and meta-stable tetragonal phases, and are subject to a number of potential mechanical degradation mechanisms. The work presented investigates the link between the tetragonal to monoclinic oxide phase transformation and degradation of the protective character of the oxide layer. To achieve this, Abaqus finite element analysis of the oxide phase transformation has been carried out. Study of the change in transformation strain energy shows how relaxation of oxidation induced stress and fast fracture at the metal-oxide interface could destabilise the tetragonal phase. Central to this is the identification of the transformation variant most likely to form, and understanding why twinning of the transformed grain is likely to occur. Development of transformation strain tensors and analysis of the strain components allows some separation of dilatation and shear effects. Maximum principal stress is used as an indication of fracture in the surrounding oxide layer. Study of the stress distributions shows the way oxide fracture is likely to occur and the differing effects of dilatation and shape change. Comparison with literature provides qualitative validation of the finite element simulations.

  13. Oxide-Nanoparticle Containing Coatings for High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose objective is to examine the feasibility of using Electromagnetic Stirring (EMS) techniques in dispersing the oxide nanoparticles uniformly within the liquid steel.

  14. Effect of nano-oxide particle size on radiation resistance of iron-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu; Valdez, James A.; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation resistance of Fe-14Cr alloys under 200 keV He irradiation at 500 °C was systematically investigated with varying sizes of nano oxide Zr, Hf and Cr particles. It is found that these nano oxide particles acted as effective sites for He bubble formation. By statistically analyzing 700-1500 He bubbles at the depth of about 150-700 nm from a series of HRTEM images for each sample, we established the variation of average He bubble size, He bubble density, and swelling percentage along the depth, and found them to be consistent with the He concentration profile calculated from the SIRM program. Oxide particles with sizes less than 3.5-4 nm are found most effective for enhancing radiation resistance in the studied alloy systems.

  15. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  16. Arc Welding of Mg Alloys: Oxide Films, Irregular Weld Shape and Liquation Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiao

    The use of Mg alloys for vehicle weight reduction has been increasing rapidly worldwide. Gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) has the potential for mass-production welding of Mg alloys. Recently, the University of Wisconsin demonstrated in bead-on-plate GMAW of Mg alloys that severe spatter can be eliminated by using controlled short circuiting (CSC), and severe hydrogen porosity can be eliminated by removing Mg(OH)2. The present study aimed at actual butt and lap welding of Mg alloys by CSC-GMAW and susceptibility of Mg alloys to weld-edge cracking using the circular-patch welding test. Sound welds were made without spatter and hydrogen porosity butt and lap welding of AZ 31 Mg using CSC-GMAW , with butt welds approaching 100% of the base-metal strength. However, three new significant issues were found to occur easily and degrade the weld quality significantly: 1. formation of oxide films inside butt welds, 2. formation of high crowns on butt welds, and 3. formation of fingers from lap welds. The mechanisms of their formation were established, and the methods for their elimination or reduction were demonstrated. Circular-patch welds were made on most widely used Mg casting alloy AZ91, the most widely used Mg wrought alloy AZ31 with three different Mg filler wires AZ31, AZ61 and AZ92. The susceptibility to cracking along the weld edge was predicted and compared against the experimental results. Such a prediction has not been made for welds of Mg alloys before.

  17. Comparison of methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation by alloy and Core-Shell platinum based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Peled, E.

    2011-10-01

    Two Core-Shell, RuCore-PtShell and IrNiCore-PtRuShell, XC72-supported catalyst were synthesized in a two-step deposition process with NaBH4 as reducing agent. The structure and composition of the Core-Shell catalysts were determined by EDS, XPS and XRD. Electrochemical characterization was performed with the use of cyclic voltammetry. Methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation activities of the Core-Shell catalysts (in terms of surface and mass activities) were studied at 80 °C and compared to those of a commercial Pt-Ru alloy catalyst. The surface activity of the alloy based catalyst, in the case of methanol oxidation, was found to be superior as a result of optimized surface Pt:Ru composition. However, the mass activity of the PtRu/IrNi/XC72 was higher than that of the alloy based catalyst by ∼50%. Regarding ethylene glycol oxidation, while the surface activity of the alloy based catalyst was slightly higher than that of the Pt/Ru/XC72 catalyst, the latter showed ∼66% higher activities in terms of A g-1 of Pt. These results show the potential of Core-Shell catalysts for reducing the cost of catalysts for DMFC and DEGFC.

  18. Enhancement of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoush, Walid Mohamed Rashad; Elsayed, Ayman Hamada Abdelhady; Kady, Omayma Abdel Gawad El; Sayed, Mohamed Abdallah; Dawood, Osama Monier

    2016-05-01

    Oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) tungsten heavy alloys are well known for their excellent mechanical properties which make them useful for a wide range of high-temperature applications. In this investigation, microstructural, magnetic, and mechanical properties of W-5 wt pct Ni alloys reinforced with 2 wt pct Y2O3, ZrO2 or TiO2 particles were investigated. Cold-pressed samples were sintered under vacuum at 1773 K (1500 °C) for 1 hour. The results show that, among three kinds of oxides, Y2O3 is the most efficient oxide to consolidate W powder by sintering. W-Ni-Y2O3 alloys form relatively uniform interconnected structure and also show higher density and compressive strength than those of W-Ni-ZrO2 and W-Ni-TiO2. On the other hand, W-Ni-TiO2 and W-Ni-ZrO2 alloys have non-homogeneous microstructure due to the formation of Ni globules in some areas in the matrix and almost nickel-free zones in other areas causing the appearance of pores. The Vickers hardness values for W-Ni-TiO2 alloys are slightly higher than those of W-Ni-ZrO2 and Ni-W-Y2O3 due to the smaller particle size of TiO2 than the other oxides. At room temperature, the investigated alloys have very weak magnetic properties. This is due to the combination of the ferromagnetic nickel metal binder with the non-magnetic tungsten forming the weak magnetic W-Ni solid solution. Moreover, the measured (mass) magnetizations had small values of the power of 10-3 emu/g. Additionally, the values of coercivity ( H C) and remanence ( M r) for the W-Ni-TiO2 alloy were higher than that of the W-Ni-Y2O3 and W-Ni-ZrO2 alloys due to the particle size effect of TiO2 nanoparticles.

  19. Influence of recrystallization on phase separation kinetics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe Cr Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different starting microstructures on the kinetics of Fe-rich ({alpha}) and Cr-rich ({alpha}') phase separation during aging of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys has been analyzed with a combination of atom probe tomography and thermoelectric power measurements. The results revealed that the high recrystallization temperature necessary to produce a coarse grained microstructure in Fe-base ODS alloys affects the randomness of Cr-atom distributions and defect density, which consequently affect the phase separation kinetics at low annealing temperatures.

  20. Mechanical behavior of tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys: texture gradients and macro/micro-response

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Schwartz, A.J.; LeBlanc, M.M.; Wright, S.I.

    1996-11-30

    We have examined the mechanical response of unalloyed Ta and Ta-W alloy annealed plates over a wide range of loadings. It was observed in general that Ta exhibits nonuniform mechanical behavior, for example, hourglassing of compression samples and multiple instabilities during tensile deformation. In contrast, the Ta-W alloys do not exhibit any unusual nonuniform behavior. This work presents data revealing the spatial distribution of texture in Ta and Ta-W alloys. Significant variations in texture both through the thickness and from one area of the plate to another were found to be characteristic of Ta. The dominant feature of the texture variations was found to be enhanced <111> crystal direction fractions at the center of the plate, with a decreasing fraction near the surface. We find that the variation in texture in the Ta-W alloys is substantially less than that seen in Ta with primarily a <100> cube texture throughout. This study suggest that the texture gradients are responsible for the nonuniform mechanical response of Ta and that the uniform behavior of the Ta-W alloys is a consequence of the absence of texture gradients.