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Sample records for alloy shrinkage factors

  1. Prediction of ALLOY SHRINKAGE FACTORS FOR THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of alloy shrinkage factors (SFs) related to the investment casting process. The dimensions of the A356 aluminum alloy casting were determined from the numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and deformation phenomena. The investment casting process was carried out using wax patterns of unfilled wax and shell molds that were made of fused silica with a zircon prime coat. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured, in order to determine the actual tooling allowances. Several numerical simulations were carried out, to assess the level of accuracy for the casting shrinkage. The solid fraction threshold, at which the transition from the fluid dynamics to the solid dynamics occurs, was found to be important in predicting shrinkage factors (SFs). It was found that accurate predictions were obtained for all measued dimensions when the shell mold was considered a deformable material.

  2. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  3. Alloy Shrinkage Factors for the Investment Casting of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Porter, Wallace D.

    2008-04-01

    In this study, alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made, in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed a different evolution on heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation was performed with thermal expansion obtained on heating, and another one was performed with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from the numerical simulation results of the solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly overpredicted.

  4. Method to determine factors contributing to thermoplastic sheet shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensch, Greg J.; Frye, Brad A.

    A test method is presented for the determination of shrinkage behavior in vacuum-formed thermoplastic resin sheeting, as presently simulated for various resin lots, sheet-gage thicknesses, sheet orientations, and mold profiles. The thermoforming machine and vacuum-forming mold characteristics are discussed. It is established that the four variable factors exert statistically significant effects on the shrinkage response of three Declar resin lots, but that these are of no real practical significance for either engineering or manufacturing operations.

  5. A Pore-Centric Model for Combined Shrinkage and Gas Porosity in Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajzadeh, Vahid; Carlson, Kent D.; Backman, Daniel G.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    A unified model has been developed for combined gas- and shrinkage-induced pore formation during solidification of metal alloys. The model is based on a pore-centric approach, in which the temporal evolution of the pore radius is calculated as a function of cooling rate, thermal gradient, gas diffusion, and shrinkage. It accounts for the effect of porosity formation on the liquid velocity within the mushy zone. Simulations for an aluminum alloy show that the porosity transitions smoothly from shrinkage-induced to gas-induced as the Niyama value is increased. A Blake (cavitation) instability is observed to occur when the porosity is both gas- and shrinkage-driven. A revised dimensionless Niyama curve for pure shrinkage is presented. The experimentally observed gas porosity trend that the pore volume decreases with increasing cooling rate is well predicted. The pore-centric formulation allows the present model to be solved locally, at any point in a casting, during a regular casting simulation.

  6. A Pore-Centric Model for Combined Shrinkage and Gas Porosity in Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajzadeh, Vahid; Carlson, Kent D.; Backman, Daniel G.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A unified model has been developed for combined gas- and shrinkage-induced pore formation during solidification of metal alloys. The model is based on a pore-centric approach, in which the temporal evolution of the pore radius is calculated as a function of cooling rate, thermal gradient, gas diffusion, and shrinkage. It accounts for the effect of porosity formation on the liquid velocity within the mushy zone. Simulations for an aluminum alloy show that the porosity transitions smoothly from shrinkage-induced to gas-induced as the Niyama value is increased. A Blake (cavitation) instability is observed to occur when the porosity is both gas- and shrinkage-driven. A revised dimensionless Niyama curve for pure shrinkage is presented. The experimentally observed gas porosity trend that the pore volume decreases with increasing cooling rate is well predicted. The pore-centric formulation allows the present model to be solved locally, at any point in a casting, during a regular casting simulation.

  7. Effect of Shrinkage on Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing during Binary Al-Si Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongda; Hamed, Mohamed S.; Shankar, Sumanth

    2011-08-01

    Upward and downward directional solidification of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys were numerically simulated inside a cylindrical container. Undercooling of the liquidus temperature prior to the solidification event was introduced in the numerical model. The finite-volume method was used to solve the energy, concentration, momentum, and continuity equations. Temperature and liquid concentrations inside the mushy zone were coupled with local equilibrium assumptions. An energy equation was applied to determine the liquid fraction inside the mushy zone while considering the temperature undercooling at the solidifying dendrite/liquid interface. Momentum and continuity equations were coupled by the SIMPLE algorithm. Flow velocity distribution at various times, G, R, λ 1, and solidification time at mushy zone/liquid interface during solidification were predicted. The effect of shrinkage during solidification on these solidification parameters was quantified. Transient temperature distribution, solidification time for the mushy zone/liquid interface, and λ 1 were validated by laboratory experiments. It was found that better agreement could be achieved when the fluid flow due to solidification shrinkage was considered. Considering shrinkage in upward solidification was found to only have a marginal effect on solidification parameters, such as G, R, and λ 1; whereas, in the downward solidification, fluid flow due to shrinkage had a significant effect on these solidification parameters. Considering shrinkage during downward solidification resulted in a smaller R, stronger fluid flow, and increased solidification time at the mushy zone/liquid interface. Further, the flow pattern was significantly altered when solidification shrinkage was considered in the simulation. The effect of shrinkage on G and λ 1 strongly depended on the instantaneous location of the mushy zone/liquid interface in the computational domain. The numerical results could be validated by experimental data

  8. Factors affecting the shrinkage of fly ash geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridtirud, Charoenchai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2011-02-01

    The shrinkage of fly ash geopolymers was studied in the present study. Fly ash was used as the source material for making the geopolymers. The effects of the concentration of NaOH, sodium silicate-to-NaOH ratio, liquid-to-ash ratio, curing temperature, and curing time on shrinkage were investigated. The geopolymers were cured at 25, 40, and 60°C, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of geopolymers is strongly dependent on curing temperature and liquid-to-ash ratio. The increase in shrinkage is associated with the low strength development of geopolymers. It is also found that NaOH concentration and sodium silicate-to-NaOH ratio also affect the shrinkage of geopolymers but to a lesser extent.

  9. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  10. Osmotic Shrinkage as a Factor in Freezing Injury in Plant Tissue Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Towill, Leigh E.; Mazur, Peter

    1976-01-01

    Haplopappus gracilis and Acer saccharum tissue culture cells are extremely sensitive to freezing injury, and exhibit a decrease in survival from 98% at −1 C to 4% at −3 C (Haplopappus) and 92% at −3 C to 13% at −5 C (Acer) when suspended in distilled H2O, seeded at −1 C, and then cooled by 0.1 C/minute. Similar results are obtained when cells are suspended in growth medium. The extent of shrinkage of cells during freezing can be duplicated by exposure of the cells to plasmolyzing solutions of nonpenetrating substances (Δ Tf = 1.86 φvm). Solutions of sucrose and glycerol that produce extensive plasmolysis cause a decrease in survival within 3 to 5 minutes at room temperature, and the higher the molality to which the cell is exposed the greater the injury. Also, the rate of rehydration of the plasmolyzed cell and of the frozen cell affects its survival, with the slower rate being more beneficial. The close correlation between the decrease in survival at subzero temperatures and the decrease in survival when cells are placed in solutions having osmolalities, which could produce the same extent of shrinkage as these killing temperatures, suggests that this shrinkage is related to freezing injury in tissue culture cells. PMID:16659469

  11. Impact of quantity of resin, C-factor, and geometry on resin composite polymerization shrinkage stress in Class V restorations.

    PubMed

    Borges, A L S; Borges, A B; Xavier, T A; Bottino, M C; Platt, J A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of quantity of resin composite, C-factor, and geometry in Class V restorations on shrinkage stress after bulk fill insertion of resin using two-dimensional finite element analysis. An image of a buccolingual longitudinal plane in the middle of an upper first premolar and supporting tissues was used for modeling 10 groups: cylindrical cavity, erosion, and abfraction lesions with the same C-factor (1.57), a second cylindrical cavity and abfraction lesion with the same quantity of resin (QR) as the erosion lesion, and then all repeated with a bevel on the occlusal cavosurface angle. The 10 groups were imported into Ansys 13.0 for two-dimensional finite element analysis. The mesh was built with 30,000 triangle and square elements of 0.1 mm in length for all the models. All materials were considered isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, and linear, and the resin composite shrinkage was simulated by thermal analogy. The maximum principal (MPS) and von Mises stresses (VMS) were analyzed for comparing the behavior of the groups. Different values of angles for the cavosurface margin in enamel and dentin were obtained for all groups and the higher the angle, the lower the stress concentration. When the groups with the same C-factor and QR were compared, the erosion shape cavity showed the highest MPS and VMS values, and abfraction shape, the lowest. A cavosurface bevel decreased the stress values on the occlusal margin. The geometry factor overcame the effects of C-factor and QR in some situations. Within the limitations of the current methodology, it is possible to conclude that the combination of all variables studied influences the stress, but the geometry is the most important factor to be considered by the operator.

  12. Many-Body Effects on Bandgap Shrinkage, Effective Masses, and Alpha Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many-body Coulomb effects influence the operation of quantum-well (QW) laser diode (LD) strongly. In the present work, we study a two-band electron-hole plasma (EHP) within the Hatree-Fock approximation and the single plasmon pole approximation for static screening. Full inclusion of momentum dependence in the many-body effects is considered. An empirical expression for carrier density dependence of the bandgap renormalization (BGR) in an 8 nm GaAs/Al(0.3)G(4.7)As single QW will be given, which demonstrates a non-universal scaling behavior for quasi-two-dimension structures, due to size-dependent efficiency of screening. In addition, effective mass renormalization (EMR) due to momentum-dependent self-energy many-body correction, for both electrons and holes is studied and serves as another manifestation of the many-body effects. Finally, the effects on carrier density dependence of the alpha factor is evaluated to assess the sensitivity of the full inclusion of momentum dependence.

  13. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  14. Shrinkage Behavior of Polystyrene-based Foam Molded Parts Depending on Volatile Matter Content and Other Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafafian, Carineh

    Polymer foam materials play a large role in the modern world. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) bead foam is a lightweight, low density, and good thermal and acoustic insulating material whose properties make it attractive for a number of applications, especially as building insulation. However, EPS also experiences post-molding shrinkage; it shrinks dimensionally from its molded size after processing. This means parts must be stored in warehouses until they are considered stable by the industry standard, DIN EN 1603. This often takes 11--18 weeks and is thus very timely and expensive. This study aims to decrease the post-molding shrinkage time of EPS foam by understanding the mechanisms of shrinkage behavior. Samples were split into two groups based on their amount of initial volatile matter content and storage conditions, then compared to a control group. Based on thermogravimetric analysis and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, the volatile matter content and composition was found to not be the sole contributor to EPS foam dimensional stability. Residual stress testing was done with the hole drilling method and Raman spectroscopy. As this type of testing has not been done with polymer foams before, the aim was to see if either method could reliably produce residual stress values. Both methods measured residual stress values with unknown accuracy. All samples stored at a higher temperature (60°C) reached dimensional stability by the end of this study. Thus, air diffusion into EPS foam, encouraged by the high temperature storage, was found to play a significant role in post-molding shrinkage.

  15. Accounting for PDMS shrinkage when replicating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannibal Madsen, Morten; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj A.; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Garnæs, Jørgen; Dirscherl, Kai

    2014-12-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used material for fabrication of microfluidic devices and for replication of micro- and nanotextured surfaces. Shrinkage of PDMS in the fabrication process can lead to leaking devices and poor alignment of layers. However, corrections to the mold master are seldom applied to counteract the shrinkage of PDMS. Also, to perform metrological measurements using replica techniques one has to take the shrinkage into account. Thus we report a study of the shrinkage of PDMS with several different mixing ratios and curing temperatures. The shrinkage factor, with its associated uncertainty, for PDMS in the range 40 to 120 °C is provided. By applying this correction factor, it is possible to replicate structures with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.2% in lateral dimensions using typical curing temperatures and PDMS mixing ratios in the range 1:6 to 1:20 (agent:base).

  16. Rough titanium alloys regulate osteoblast production of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Gittens, Rolando A; Schneider, Jennifer M; Haithcock, David A; Ullrich, Peter F; Slosar, Paul J; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2013-11-01

    Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and titanium-aluminum-vanadium (titanium alloy) are used frequently in lumbar spine interbody fusion. Osteoblasts cultured on microstructured titanium generate an environment characterized by increased angiogenic factors and factors that inhibit osteoclast activity mediated by integrin α2β1 signaling. It is not known if this is also true of osteoblasts on titanium alloy or PEEK. The purpose of this study was to determine if osteoblasts generate an environment that supports angiogenesis and reduces osteoclastic activity when grown on smooth titanium alloy, rough titanium alloy, or PEEK. This in vitro study compared angiogenic factor production and integrin gene expression of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells cultured on PEEK or titanium-aluminum-vanadium (titanium alloy). MG63 cells were grown on PEEK, smooth titanium alloy, or rough titanium alloy. Osteogenic microenvironment was characterized by secretion of osteoprotegerin and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), which inhibit osteoclast activity and angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), and angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1). Expression of integrins, transmembrane extracellular matrix recognition proteins, was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Culture on titanium alloy stimulated osteoprotegerin, TGF-β1, VEGF-A, FGF-2, and angiopoietin-1 production, and levels were greater on rough titanium alloy than on smooth titanium alloy. All factors measured were significantly lower on PEEK than on smooth or rough titanium alloy. Culture on titanium alloy stimulated expression of messenger RNA for integrins that recognize Type I collagen in comparison with PEEK. Rough titanium alloy stimulated cells to create an osteogenic-angiogenic microenvironment. The osteogenic-angiogenic responses to titanium alloy were greater than PEEK and greater on rough titanium alloy than on smooth titanium alloy. Surface

  17. Effect of configuration factor on gap formation in hybrid composite resin, low-shrinkage composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer.

    PubMed

    Boroujeni, Parvin M; Mousavinasab, Sayyed M; Hasanli, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the important factors in creation of gap between dental structure and composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on gap formation in a hybrid composite resin, a low shrinkage composite resin and a resin modified glass ionomer restorative material. Cylindrical dentin cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 99 human molars and the cavities assigned into three groups (each of 33). Each group contained three subgroups depend on the different depths and then cavities restored using resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC Improved) and two type composite resins (Filtek P90 and Filtek Z250). Then the restorations were cut into two sections in a mesiodistal direction in the middle of restorations. Gaps were measured on mesial, distal and pulpal floor of the cavities, using a stereomicroscope. Data analyses using Kruskal-Wallist and Mann-Whitney tests. Increasing C-factor from 1.8 to 3.4 had no effect on the gap formation in two type composite resins, but Fuji II LC Improved showed significant effect of increasing C-factor on gap formation. Taken together, when C-factor increased from 1.8 up to 3.4 had no significant effect on gap formation in two tested resin composites. Although, Filtek P90 restorations showed smaller gap formation in cavities walls compared to Filtek Z250 restorations. High C-factor values generated the largest gap formation. Silorane-based composite was more efficient for cavity sealing than methacrylate-based composites and resin modified glass ionomer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Prediction of Shrinkage Pore Volume Fraction Using a Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to use a dimensionless form of the well-known Niyama criterion to directly predict the amount of shrinkage porosity that forms during solidification of metal alloy castings. The main advancement offered by this method is that it avoids the need to know the threshold Niyama value below which shrinkage porosity forms; such threshold values are generally unknown and alloy dependent. The dimensionless criterion accounts for both the local thermal conditions (as in the original Niyama criterion) and the properties and solidification characteristics of the alloy. Once a dimensionless Niyama criterion value is obtained from casting simulation results, the corresponding shrinkage pore volume fraction can be determined knowing only the solid fraction-temperature curve and the total solidification shrinkage of the alloy. Curves providing the shrinkage pore volume percentage as a function of the dimensionless Niyama criterion are given for WCB steel, aluminum alloy A356, and magnesium alloy AZ91D. The present method is used in a general-purpose casting simulation software package to predict shrinkage porosity in three-dimensional (3-D) castings. Comparisons between simulated and experimental shrinkage porosity results for a WCB steel plate casting demonstrate that this method can reasonably predict shrinkage. Additional simulations for magnesium alloy AZ91D illustrate that this method is applicable to a wide variety of alloys and casting conditions.

  19. Cure shrinkage of thermoset composites

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The shrinkage of thermoset composites during cure was studied using a volumetric dilatometer. The material systems studied were AS4 carbon fiber/Hercules' 3501-6 epoxy, IM7 carbon fiber/Hercules 8551-7A toughened epoxy and IM7 carbon fiber/BASF's 5250-4 bismaleimide. Shrinkage of the samples due to both polymerization and thermal expansion effects was seen. The volume changes of the materials during cure were then compared to results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dielectric cure monitoring. Maximums in volume corresponded to minimums in storage and loss modulus from DMA and maximums in the dielectric loss factor. Resin shrinkage during the 177 deg C (350 F) hold corresponded to the onset of polymerization seen by the rapid increase in the storage modulus and the decrease in the dielectric loss factor response due to reduced ion mobility. These results show that volumetric dilatometry can be an effective tool in the development of materials processing strategies and can be useful in studying residual stresses in composites. 9 refs.

  20. Kinetics of corneal thermal shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Lee, William E.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of temperature and heating duration on the kinetics of thermal shrinkage in corneal strips using a custom-made shrinkage device. Methods: Thermal shrinkage was induced and measured in corneal strips under a constant load placed while bathed in 25% Dextran irrigation solution. A study was performed on 57 Florida Lions Eye Bank donated human cadaver eyes to determine the effect of temperature on the amount and rate of thermal shrinkage. Further experiments were performed on 20 human cadaver eyes to determine the effects of heating duration on permanent shrinkage. Data analysis was performed to determine the effects of temperature, heating duration, and age on the amount and kinetics of shrinkage. Results: Shrinkage consisted of two phases: a shrinkage phase during heating and a regression phase after heating. Permanent shrinkage increased with temperature and duration. The shrinkage and regression time constants followed Arrhenius type temperature dependence. The shrinkage time constants where calculated to be 67, 84, 121, 560 and 1112 (s) at 80, 75, 70, 65, and 60°C respectively. At 65°C the permanent shrinkage time constant was calculated to be 945s. Conclusion: These results show that shrinkage treatments need to raise the temperature of the tissue above 75°C for several seconds in order to prevent regression of the shrinkage effect immediately after treatment and to induce the maximum amount of permanent irreversible shrinkage.

  1. Roof System EPDM Shrinkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betker, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Looks at Ethylene Propylene Diene Terpolymer rubber roof membranes and the potential problems associated with this material's shrinkage. Discusses how long such a roof should perform and issues affecting repair or replacement. Recommends that a building's function be considered in any roofing decision. (RJM)

  2. Roof System EPDM Shrinkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betker, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Looks at Ethylene Propylene Diene Terpolymer rubber roof membranes and the potential problems associated with this material's shrinkage. Discusses how long such a roof should perform and issues affecting repair or replacement. Recommends that a building's function be considered in any roofing decision. (RJM)

  3. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  4. Factors Affecting the Crevice Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2004-11-24

    The susceptibility or Alloy 22 (N06022) to crevice corrosion may depend on environmental or external factors and metallurgical or internal factors. Some of the most important environmental factors are chloride concentration, inhibitors, temperature and potential. The presence of a weld seam or second phase precipitation in the alloy are classified as internal factors. The localized corrosion resistance of Alloy 22 has been extensively investigated in the last five years, however not all affecting factors were considered in the studies. This paper discusses the current findings regarding the effect of many of these variables on the susceptibility (or resistance) of Alloy 22 to crevice corrosion. The effect of variables such as temperature, chloride concentration and nitrate are rather well understood. However there are only limited or no data regarding effect of other factors such as pH, other inhibitive or deleterious species and type of crevicing material and crevice geometry. There are contradictory results regarding the effect of metallurgical factors such as solution heat treatment.

  5. Measuring polymerization shrinkage of photo-activated restorative materials by a water-filled dilatometer.

    PubMed

    Lai, J H; Johnson, A E

    1993-03-01

    A water-filled dilatometer specifically designed for determining the polymerization shrinkage of photo-activated composite restorative materials was used to measure the polymerization shrinkage of three visible light-activated composites. Polymerization shrinkage values ranged from 1.82% for P-50 to 2.15% and 2.19% for Herculite XRV and Prisma APH, respectively. Shrinkage data obtained in this investigation were compared with the published data, and the factors which affect shrinkage measurements were reviewed. It was concluded that maintaining a constant temperature environment (+ or - 0.02 degrees C) for the dilatometer during the shrinkage test was the most critical factor for successful application of the dilatometer.

  6. Store Security: Internal Shrinkage Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhardt, Richard M.

    The document presents a 10-week training program designed to provide helpful and proven methods for controlling internal shrinkage in retail stores. Shrinkage includes the three problems of shoplifting, employee theft, and errors, each of which is addressed by the course. Ohio's laws are also discussed. The format for the course content section is…

  7. A Model for Prediction of Shrinkage Defects in Long and Short Freezing Range Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A.; Duarte, J. F.; Santos, A. D.; Magalhaes, A. B.; Houbaert, Y.

    2007-05-17

    The aim of the model presented in this paper is to capture the difference in solidification behaviour of long and short freezing materials. The shrinkage defects in short freezing materials tends to be internal, as porosity, while in long freezing materials these defects tend to be external in the form of surface depressions. To achieve this, a pressure drop based 3-D feeding flow model has been developed to evaluate shrinkage defects for casting alloys. A continuum formulation is used to describe the transport of mass, energy and momentum. It is assumed that during solidification the driving force for flow is shrinkage. A Darcy type source term has been included in the momentum equation to account for flow resistance in the mushy zone. A VOF free surface model has been used to describe shrinkage defects, i.e., external surface depressions and internal shrinkage porosities, while ensuring mass conservation. The model is used to calculate the shrinkage in a simple casting. The results shows internal and outside shrinkage defects depending on the freezing range of the metal. Short freezing range results mainly in internal shrinkage whereas the long freezing range results in external shrinkage. The expected shrinkage features are well described by the present model.

  8. A Model for Prediction of Shrinkage Defects in Long and Short Freezing Range Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, A.; Xu, Zhi an; Duarte, J. F.; Santos, A. D.; Houbaert, Y.; Magalhães, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    The aim of the model presented in this paper is to capture the difference in solidification behaviour of long and short freezing materials. The shrinkage defects in short freezing materials tends to be internal, as porosity, while in long freezing materials these defects tend to be external in the form of surface depressions. To achieve this, a pressure drop based 3-D feeding flow model has been developed to evaluate shrinkage defects for casting alloys. A continuum formulation is used to describe the transport of mass, energy and momentum. It is assumed that during solidification the driving force for flow is shrinkage. A Darcy type source term has been included in the momentum equation to account for flow resistance in the mushy zone. A VOF free surface model has been used to describe shrinkage defects, i.e., external surface depressions and internal shrinkage porosities, while ensuring mass conservation. The model is used to calculate the shrinkage in a simple casting. The results shows internal and outside shrinkage defects depending on the freezing range of the metal. Short freezing range results mainly in internal shrinkage whereas the long freezing range results in external shrinkage. The expected shrinkage features are well described by the present model.

  9. [Comparative study of polymerization shrinkage and related properties of flowable composites and an unfilled resin].

    PubMed

    Bukovinszky, Katalin; Molnár, Lilla; Bakó, József; Szalóki, Melinda; Hegedus, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    The polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of dental composites are in the center of the interest of researchers and manufacturers. It is a great challenge to minimize this important property as low as possible. Many factors are related and are in complicated correlation with each other affecting the polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage stress degree of conversion and elasticity has high importance from this aspect. Our aim was to study the polymerization shrinkage and related properties (modulus of elasticity, degree of conversion, shrinkage stress) of three flowable composite (Charisma Opal Flow, SDR, Filtek Ultimate) and an unfilled composite resin. Modulus of elasticity was measured using three point flexure tests on universal testing machine. The polymerization shrinkage stress was determined using bonded-disc technique. The degree of conversion measurements were performed by FT-IR spectroscopy. And the volumetric shrinkage was investigated using Archimedes principle and was measured on analytical balance with special additional equipment. The unfilled resin generally showed higher shrinkage (8,26%), shrinkage stress (0,8 MPa) and degree of conversion (38%), and presented the lowest modulus of elasticity (3047,02MPa). Highest values of unfilled resin correspond to the literature. The lack of fillers enlarges the shrinkage, and the shrinkage stress, but gives the higher flexibility and higher degree of conversion. Further investigations needs to be done to understand and reveal the differences between the composites.

  10. Partial structure factors reveal atomic dynamics in metallic alloy melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, B.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Voigtmann, Th.; Kordel, T.; Hansen, T. C.; Meyer, A.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamical decoupling of the diffusion coefficients of the different components in a metallic alloy melt, using a combination of neutron diffraction, isotopic substitution, and electrostatic levitation in Zr-Ni melts. We show that excess Ni atoms can diffuse more freely in a background of saturated chemical interaction, causing their dynamics to become much faster and thus decoupled than anticipated from the interparticle interactions. Based on the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition, the averaged structure as given by the partial static structure factors is able to explain the observed dynamical behavior.

  11. Regional Brain Shrinkage and Change in Cognitive Performance over Two Years: The Bidirectional Influences of the Brain and Cognitive Reserve Factors

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Ninni; Ghisletta, Paolo; Dahle, Cheryl L.; Bender, Andrew R.; Yang, Yiqin; Yuan, Peng; Daugherty, Ana M.; Raz, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    We examined relationships between regional brain shrinkage and changes in cognitive performance, while taking into account the influence of age, vascular risk, Apolipoprotein E variant and socioeconomic status. Regional brain volumes and cognitive performance were assessed in 167 healthy adults (age 19-79 at baseline), 90 of whom returned for the follow-up after two years. Brain volumes were measured in six regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC), and cognitive performance was evaluated in three domains: episodic memory (EM), fluid intelligence (Gf), and vocabulary (V). Average volume loss was observed in Hc, PhG and CbH, but reliable individual differences were noted in all examined ROIs. Average positive change was observed in EM and V performance but not in Gf scores, yet only the last evidenced individual differences in change. We observed reciprocal influences among neuroanatomical and cognitive variables. Larger brain volumes at baseline predicted greater individual gains in Gf, but differences in LPFC volume change were in part explained by baseline level of cognitive performance. In one region (PFw), individual change in volume was coupled with change in Gf. Larger initial brain volumes did not predict slower shrinkage. The results underscore the complex role of brain maintenance and cognitive reserve in adult development. PMID:26584866

  12. Regional brain shrinkage and change in cognitive performance over two years: The bidirectional influences of the brain and cognitive reserve factors.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ninni; Ghisletta, Paolo; Dahle, Cheryl L; Bender, Andrew R; Yang, Yiqin; Yuan, Peng; Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-02-01

    We examined relationships between regional brain shrinkage and changes in cognitive performance, while taking into account the influence of chronological age, vascular risk, Apolipoprotein E variant and socioeconomic status. Regional brain volumes and cognitive performance were assessed in 167 healthy adults (age 19-79 at baseline), 90 of whom returned for the follow-up after two years. Brain volumes were measured in six regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC), and cognitive performance was evaluated in three domains: episodic memory (EM), fluid intelligence (Gf), and vocabulary (V). Average volume loss was observed in Hc, PhG and CbH, but reliable individual differences were noted in all examined ROIs. Average positive change was observed in EM and V performance but not in Gf scores, yet only the last evidenced individual differences in change. We observed reciprocal influences among neuroanatomical and cognitive variables. Larger brain volumes at baseline predicted greater individual gains in Gf, but differences in LPFC volume change were in part explained by baseline level of cognitive performance. In one region (PFw), individual change in volume was coupled with change in Gf. Larger initial brain volumes did not predict slower shrinkage. The results underscore the complex role of brain maintenance and cognitive reserve in adult development.

  13. The measurement of polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Guo Biao

    2008-09-01

    In the current study, we used the method of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to measure polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. Standardized cavities were prepared and placed into the ESPI apparatus before the cavities were filled with composites (n=2) .The ESPI apparatus was constructed to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the resins surface during the polymerization. Experiments demonstrated that the ESPI technique was a viable method to measure the deformation of composite resins. It was responsive and sensitive to dimensional changes. We found that cavity shape, size and C- factor influenced the date of resins shrinkage. And the tooth deformation in response to polymerization of resins was measured by the ESPI too. We concluded that ESPI was a feasible method for assessing resins deformation induced by its polymerization shrinkage when it was bonded in tooth cavities. And the results were greatly influenced by the dimensions of cavities , or interface adhesive and so on. It could also measure the tooth deformation induced by shrinkage of bonded composite resins. We found that resins polymerization shrinkage date may overestimate shrinkage-induced tooth deformation.

  14. Modeling of NTD resist shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülders, Thomas; Stock, Hans-Jürgen; Küchler, Bernd; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Recent chemically amplified resists used for Negative Tone Development (NTD) processes exhibit a significant amount of resist shrinkage during post-exposure-bake (PEB). Some NTD resists show up to 25% thickness loss during PEB in the exposed regions. A detailed analysis of this and other experimental observations is published elsewhere.1 In particular, it has also been demonstrated that the shrinkage during PEB can have a strong impact on both, the CDs and the resist profile shapes which are formed after Negative Tone Development. We therefore highlight the necessity to augment physical modeling of the PEB process step for these NTD photoresists. To account for the shrinkage process during PEB in lithography simulations we start with the following modeling assumptions: The tendency for shrinkage is due to the collapse of the void space (free volume) which is formed after evaporation of the volatile byproduct of the de-protection reaction. However, this will not only induce a (vertical) resist height loss but causes also lateral displacements inside the resist. This yields distorted concentration profiles of all the species that are typically tracked during PEB simulations. In particular, a distorted degree of protection after PEB will result in resist profiles with tilted sidewall angles and changed CDs. As will be shown these effects are strongly pitch-dependent and must be accounted for in a physical simulation approach as well as in OPC modeling. In this work, we discuss our simulation approach to account for mechanical deformations. Using exemplary simulations, we determine the impact of the main effects which are captured by the model. In order to validate the simulation model, the simulated effect of shrinkage-induced mechanical deformations during PEB on CDs and on resist profiles is compared with experimental data.

  15. Design factors influencing weldability of the Mg-4Y-3RE cast magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierzek, A.; Adamiec, J.

    2011-05-01

    Due to low density and good strength properties, magnesium alloys are increasingly used as a structural material They are used, amongst others, for large-size castings in sand moulds, pressure and precision castings. Welding and pad welding is used to repair casting defects, such as misruns, micro-shrinkage, cracks, etc. The most frequent reason for disqualifying of welded joints made to repair the castings is hot cracking which occurs as a result of tensile stresses formed in the material during welding. The Mg-4Y-3RE (WE43) alloy with addition of yttrium and rare earth and zirconium elements used for testing is creep resistant to 300°C. The alloy is used in the automotive industry, for example for engine blocks and in aerospace industry for gearbox housings. This paper describes the welding and remelting tests of the Mg-4Y-3RE (WE43) castings in conditions of constant and variable stiffness. It has been concluded that hot cracks are formed as a result of eutectic melting in the areas of contact of α - Mg solid solution crystals.

  16. Study on effects of solar radiation and rain on shrinkage, shrinkage cracking and creep of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Asamoto, Shingo; Ohtsuka, Ayumu; Kuwahara, Yuta; Miura, Chikako

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, the effects of actual environmental actions on shrinkage, creep and shrinkage cracking of concrete are studied comprehensively. Prismatic specimens of plain concrete were exposed to three sets of artificial outdoor conditions with or without solar radiation and rain to examine the shrinkage. For the purpose of studying shrinkage cracking behavior, prismatic concrete specimens with reinforcing steel were also subjected to the above conditions at the same time. The shrinkage behavior is described focusing on the effects of solar radiation and rain based on the moisture loss. The significant environment actions to induce shrinkage cracks are investigated from viewpoints of the amount of the shrinkage and the tensile strength. Finally, specific compressive creep behavior according to solar radiation and rainfall is discussed. It is found that rain can greatly inhibit the progresses of concrete shrinkage and creep while solar radiation is likely to promote shrinkage cracking and creep.

  17. Shrinkage approach for EEG covariance matrix estimation.

    PubMed

    Beltrachini, Leandro; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Muravchik, Carlos H

    2010-01-01

    We present a shrinkage estimator for the EEG spatial covariance matrix of the background activity. We show that such an estimator has some advantages over the maximum likelihood and sample covariance estimators when the number of available data to carry out the estimation is low. We find sufficient conditions for the consistency of the shrinkage estimators and results concerning their numerical stability. We compare several shrinkage schemes and show how to improve the estimator by incorporating known structure of the covariance matrix.

  18. Controlled Shrinkage of Expanded Glass Particles in Metal Syntactic Foams

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sahlani, Kadhim; Taherishargh, Mehdi; Kisi, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foams have been fabricated via counter-gravity infiltration of a packed bed of recycled expanded glass particles (EG) with A356 aluminum alloy. Particle shrinkage was studied and has been utilized to increase the particles’ strength and tailor the mechanical properties of the expanded glass/metal syntactic foam (EG-MSF). The crushing strength of particles could be doubled by shrinking them for 20 min at 700 °C. Owing to the low density of EG (0.20–0.26 g/cm3), the resulting foam exhibits a low density (1.03–1.19 g/cm3) that increases slightly due to particle shrinkage. Chemical and physical analyses of EG particles and the resulting foams were conducted. Furthermore, metal syntactic foam samples were tested in uni-axial compression tests. The stress-strain curves obtained exhibit three distinct regions: elastic deformation followed by a stress plateau and densification commencing at 70–80% macroscopic strain. Particle shrinkage increased the mechanical strength of the foam samples and their average plateau stress increased from 15.5 MPa to 26.7 MPa. PMID:28902158

  19. Controlled Shrinkage of Expanded Glass Particles in Metal Syntactic Foams.

    PubMed

    Al-Sahlani, Kadhim; Taherishargh, Mehdi; Kisi, Erich; Fiedler, Thomas

    2017-09-13

    Metal matrix syntactic foams have been fabricated via counter-gravity infiltration of a packed bed of recycled expanded glass particles (EG) with A356 aluminum alloy. Particle shrinkage was studied and has been utilized to increase the particles' strength and tailor the mechanical properties of the expanded glass/metal syntactic foam (EG-MSF). The crushing strength of particles could be doubled by shrinking them for 20 min at 700 °C. Owing to the low density of EG (0.20-0.26 g/cm³), the resulting foam exhibits a low density (1.03-1.19 g/cm³) that increases slightly due to particle shrinkage. Chemical and physical analyses of EG particles and the resulting foams were conducted. Furthermore, metal syntactic foam samples were tested in uni-axial compression tests. The stress-strain curves obtained exhibit three distinct regions: elastic deformation followed by a stress plateau and densification commencing at 70-80% macroscopic strain. Particle shrinkage increased the mechanical strength of the foam samples and their average plateau stress increased from 15.5 MPa to 26.7 MPa.

  20. Devitrification and shrinkage behavior of silica fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1972-01-01

    Devitrification and shrinkage of three batches of silica fibers were investigated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1350 C. Fibers with high water and impurity content devitrified rapidly to cristobalite and quartz and exhibited rapid, but the least amount of, shrinkage. A batch with low water and impurity content devitrified more slowly to cristobalite only and underwent severe shrinkage by the mechanism of viscous flow. A third batch of intermediate purity level and low water content devitrified at a moderate rate mainly to cristobalite but shrunk very rapidly. Completely devitrified silica fibers did not exhibit any further shrinkage.

  1. Effect of the key mixture parameters on shrinkage of reactive powder concrete.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Zubair, Ahmed; Maslehuddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 3(3) factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content.

  2. Effect of the Key Mixture Parameters on Shrinkage of Reactive Powder Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 33 factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  3. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  4. Interpretation of Coal-Seam Sequestration Data Using a New Swelling and Shrinkage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Smith, D.H.

    2006-10-01

    This paper deals with the influence of swelling and shrinkage of coal on the production of methane from, and sequestration of carbon dioxide in, a coalbed reservoir. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model was developed. It is based on constitutive equations that account for coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium that undergoes swelling and shrinkage. The swelling and shrinkage strains are computed on the basis of the amounts of different gases (e.g., CO2, CH4) sorbed or desorbed. The amounts of sorption and desorption are computed from measured isotherms with the aid of the Ideal Adsorbed Solution model for mixed gases. The permeability of the reservoir is modified according to the swelling-shrinkage model. The paper presents numerical results for the influence of swelling and shrinkage on reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide. The paper includes results from a number of examples, and analysis of a field injection into a coal seam at a site in the San Juan basin. Results show that with the incorporation of swelling and shrinkage into the analysis, it is possible to get a better history-match of production data. Results also show that coal swelling can reduce the injection volumes of carbon dioxide significantly. The interpretation of field data with the new swelling-shrinkage model shows that the coal swelling during carbon dioxide sequestration in coal-seams is an important factor that can influence field performance.

  5. Compressed sensing recovery via nonconvex shrinkage penalties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, Joseph; Chartrand, Rick

    2016-07-01

    The {{\\ell }}0 minimization of compressed sensing is often relaxed to {{\\ell }}1, which yields easy computation using the shrinkage mapping known as soft thresholding, and can be shown to recover the original solution under certain hypotheses. Recent work has derived a general class of shrinkages and associated nonconvex penalties that better approximate the original {{\\ell }}0 penalty and empirically can recover the original solution from fewer measurements. We specifically examine p-shrinkage and firm thresholding. In this work, we prove that given data and a measurement matrix from a broad class of matrices, one can choose parameters for these classes of shrinkages to guarantee exact recovery of the sparsest solution. We further prove convergence of the algorithm iterative p-shrinkage (IPS) for solving one such relaxed problem.

  6. Investigation of Microstructural Factors that Cause Low Fracture Toughness in Silicon Carbide Whisker/Al Alloy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    TOUGHNESS IN SILICON CARBIDE WHISKER/Al ALLOY COMPOSITES oSubmittLJ to: Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Street Arlington, VA 22217-5000...September 30, 1988 INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURAL FACTORS THAT CAUSE LOW FRACTURE TOUGHNESS IN SILICON CARBIDE WHISKER/Al ALLOY COMPOSITES Submitted...Investigation of Microstructural Factors that Cause Low Fracture Toughness in Silicon Carbide Whisker/Al Alloy Composites .12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) F. E. Wawner

  7. Shrinkage assessment of low shrinkage composites using micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Ronaldo; Clozza, Emanuele; Giannini, Marcelo; Farrokhmanesh, Ehsan; Janal, Malvin; Tovar, Nick; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the polymerization volumetric shrinkage of one regular and two low shrinkage bulk fill composites in class I cavities with or without an adhesive layer, using three-dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (μCT). Class I cavity preparations (2.5 mm depth × 4 mm length × 4 mm wide) were standardized in 36 extracted human third molars, which were randomly divided in six groups (n = 6 each) as follows: Group VIT (regular composite without bonding agent); Group SDR (low shrinkage flowable composite without bonding agent); Group TET (low shrinkage composite without bonding agent); Group VIT/P (regular composite with bonding agent); Group SDR/X (low shrinkage flowable composite with bonding agent); TET/T (low shrinkage composite with bonding agent). Each tooth was scanned via µCT at cavity preparation, immediately after cavity filling, and after light-curing. Acquired μCT data were imported into Amira software for analysis and volume values evaluated between steps from cavity preparation until light-curing. Both low shrinkage composites showed a significantly less volumetric shrinkage than VIT. The use of dental adhesive significantly decreased the average volumetric contraction similarly for the three composites, by about 20%. Both low shrinkage composites showed less volumetric polymerization contraction than the regular composite. The use of dental adhesive decreased the total volumetric shrinkage for all evaluated composites. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an AL-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G A; Scully, J R

    2002-04-09

    Precipitation hardenable Al-Zn-Mg alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength but overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that overaging the copper bearing alloys both inhibits hydrogen ingress from oxide covered surfaces and decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusion rates in the metal.

  9. Polymerization shrinkage kinetics of dimethacrylate resin-cements.

    PubMed

    Spinell, Thomas; Schedle, Andreas; Watts, David C

    2009-08-01

    To determine polymerization shrinkage-strain (S(Y)) and shrinkage-stress (S(Z)) of six resin-cements and to compare their performance with the aid of degree of conversion (DC) data. Variolink 2 (VL2), Multilink Automix (MA), Multilink Sprint (MS, all Ivoclar-Vivadent), Nexus 2 (NX2), Maxcem (MX, both Kerr) and RelyX Unicem (RX, 3M-Espe) were investigated. MS, MX and RX were self-adhesive; others require a bonding-agent. All measurements were conducted at 23 degrees C for 60min (n=5), except 80min for RX, with materials self-cured only (sc) and dual-cured (dc); NX2 and VL2 were additionally light-cured only (lc). S(Y) was measured by the bonded-disk method [Watts DC, Cash AJ. Determination of polymerization shrinkage kinetics in visible-light-cured materials: methods development. Dent Mater 1991;7(4):281-7; Watts DC, Marouf AS. Optimal specimen geometry in bonded-disk shrinkage-strain measurements on light-cured biomaterials. Dent Mater 2000;16(6):447-51]; S(Z) by the Bioman instrument [Watts DC, Satterthwaite JD. Axial shrinkage-stress depends upon both C-factor and composite mass. Dent Mater 2008;24(1):1-8 [Epub October 24, 2007]; Watts DC, Marouf AS, Al-Hindi AM. Photo-polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics in resin-composites: methods development. Dent Mater 2003;19(1):1-11]. Light-cure was achieved by QTH at 500mW/cm(2). The respective DCs were measured under the same conditions by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. Data were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA plus Bonferroni test, and by t-test, at p<0.05. DC by self-curing was less than the DC by dual-curing, for all cements. Shrinkage-strain ranged from 1.77 to 5.29% and shrinkage-stress from 3.36 to 10.37MPa. NX2 and VL2 were not significantly different, when light-cured only. Except for RX, sc and dc shrinkage-strain varied maximally by 0.4%. MX showed the highest S(Y), RX the lowest. When sc, RX initially expanded by <0.5% (t approximately 5min). For most materials, S(Y) correlated with their filler loading. The highest

  10. Development of novel low shrinkage dental nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Wu, Xiaorong; Liu, Yanju; Xie, Weili; Sun, Shouhua

    2009-07-01

    It has been the focus to develop low shrinkage dental composite resins in recent ten years. A major difficulty in developing low shrinkage dental materials is their deficiency in mechanical properties to clinical use. This paper reviews the present investigations of low shrinkage dental composite resins and attempts to develop a novel system with multifunctional POSS incorporated. In this paper, it is especially interesting to evaluate the influences of shrinkage with different weight percentage of POSS (0~15wt%) incorporated in dental composite resins. Their double bond conversions are evaluated and their microstructures are characterized with Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Their mechanical properties are also presented in this paper. The results show that the shrinkage of nanocomposites with POSS can be reduced effectively from 3.53% to 2.18%. The mechanical properties of this novel system, such as strength, hardness and toughness, are also enhanced greatly. Especially with 2wt%POSS incorporated, the best integrative improved effects are revealed. The mechanism of shrinkage is discussed.

  11. Experimental and theoretical modeling of shrinkage damage formation in fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. N.; Rozenberg, B. A.

    1998-03-01

    The cure of a thermoset matrix in the formation of composites is always accompanied by chemical shrinkage that generates internal stresses. In composites with high fiber content, the matrix is cured under three-dimensionally constrained conditions. The results of the previous experimental and theoretical modeling of formation of shrinkage damage under these conditions in epoxy-amine systems are briefly discussed. The effect of the model geometry (tube and plate models), scale factor, cure schedule, and chemical structure of composites is analyzed. A theoretical model for predicting the possibility of formation of shrinkage damage in fiber composites is proposed. A regular square structure was considered. Analysis showed that the maximum level of shrinkage stress in the matrix at the ultimate fiber fraction ϕ+ was close to the stress level σ+ in an experimental long tube model, where the formation of shrinkage damage took place. The experimental results for the short tube model showed that the shrinkage damage in epoxy-amine systems occurred up to approximately σ+/3. The damage development took place within the whole range of fiber content from ϕ+ to ϕ* (where the shrinkage stress level was about σ+/3). In the long tube model, cohesive defects always nucleated inside the matrix. The damage grew, reached the inner surface of the tube, and then extended as adhesive debondings. A similar situation is expected in composites with a high fiber content. The damage considered is local, and the total monolithic character of a composite product is conserved.

  12. Formation of shrinkage porosity during solidification of steel: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, M.; Michelic, S.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-07-01

    The phase transformations in solidification of steel are accompanied by shrinkage and sudden changes in the solubility of alloying elements, resulting in negative side effects as micro- and macrosegregation and the formation of gas and shrinkage porosities. This paper deals with the numerical and experimental simulation of the formation of shrinkage porosity during the solidification of steel. First the physical basics for the mechanism of shrinkage pore formation will be discussed. The main reason for this type of porosity is the restraint of fluid flow in the mushy zone which leads to a pressure drop. The pressure decreases from the dendrite tip to the root. When the pressure falls below a critical value, a pore can form. The second part of the paper deals with different approaches for the prediction of the formation of shrinkage porosity. The most common one according to these models is the usage of a simple criterion function, like the Niyama criterion. For the computation of the porosity criterion the thermal gradient, cooling rate and solidification rate must be known, easily to determine from numerical simulation. More complex simulation tools like ProCAST include higher sophisticated models, which allow further calculations of the shrinkage cavity. Finally, the different approaches will be applied to a benchmark laboratory experiment. The presented results deal with an ingot casting experiment under variation of taper. The dominant influence of mould taper on the formation of shrinkage porosities can both be demonstrated by the lab experiment as well as numerical simulations. These results serve for the optimization of all ingot layouts for lab castings at the Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy.

  13. Metallurgical factors that promote cracking during the heat treatment of high performance alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Klarstrom, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Cracking is sometimes encountered during the heat treatment of iron-, nickel- and cobalt-base high performance alloys. This form of cracking has been variously referred to as ``fire cracking``, ``strain-age cracking`` or ``stress cracking``. The phenomenon is not restricted to age hardenable alloys, as it has also been found to occur in a wide range of solid-solution strengthened materials. The factors responsible for this type of cracking are described and discussed, and various methods for preventing its occurrence are presented.

  14. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; J.R. Scully

    2001-09-12

    It is well established that Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) aluminum alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are commonly used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength. Overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). When freshly bared coupons of AA 7050 are exposed to 90 C, 90% RH air, hydrogen ingress follows inverse-logarithmic-type kinetics and is equivalent for underaged (HEAC susceptible) and overaged (HEAC resistant) tempers. However, when the native oxide is allowed to form (24 hrs in 25 C, 40% RH lab air) prior to exposure to 90 C, 90% RH air, underaged alloy shows significantly greater hydrogen ingress than the overaged alloy. Humid air is a very aggressive environment producing local ({approx}1{micro}m) hydrogen concentrations in excess of 10,000 wt. ppm at 90 C. In the copper bearing alloy, overaging also effects the apparent diffusivity of hydrogen. As AA 7050 is aged from underaged {yields} peak aged {yields} overaged, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion increases and the apparent diffusivity for hydrogen decreases, In the low copper alloy, overaging has little effect on hydrogen diffusion. Comparison of the apparent activation energies for hydrogen diffusion and for K independent (stage II) crack growth

  15. Development of high shrinkage polyethylene terephthalate (PET) shape memory polymer tendons for concrete crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teall, Oliver; Pilegis, Martins; Sweeney, John; Gough, Tim; Thompson, Glen; Jefferson, Anthony; Lark, Robert; Gardner, Diane

    2017-04-01

    The shrinkage force exerted by restrained shape memory polymers (SMPs) can potentially be used to close cracks in structural concrete. This paper describes the physical processing and experimental work undertaken to develop high shrinkage die-drawn polyethylene terephthalate (PET) SMP tendons for use within a crack closure system. The extrusion and die-drawing procedure used to manufacture a series of PET tendon samples is described. The results from a set of restrained shrinkage tests, undertaken at differing activation temperatures, are also presented along with the mechanical properties of the most promising samples. The stress developed within the tendons is found to be related to the activation temperature, the cross-sectional area and to the draw rate used during manufacture. Comparisons with commercially-available PET strip samples used in previous research are made, demonstrating an increase in restrained shrinkage stress by a factor of two for manufactured PET filament samples.

  16. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

  17. Correction of EB-induced shrinkage in contour measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Hotta, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2014-04-01

    We have proposed a new method for correcting electron beam (EB)-induced photoresist shrinkage in two-dimensional pattern contours extracted from a scanning electron microscope image. This method restores the original shrinkage-free contour from the experimentally determined "shrunk contour", based on a shrinkage model which takes into account of the elastic nature of the shrinkage phenomena caused by the photoresist-volume reduction. Verification of this shrinkage model was demonstrated by using ArF resist patterns as follows. First, the model was calibrated with the shrinkage data of several line patters with different linewidth prior to the contour correction. Next, the amount of shrinkage of elbow patterns was measured by comparing its contours obtained with small and sufficiently large EB dosages. It was found that the shrinkage of the inner edge of the elbow corner was smaller than that of the outer edge, which can be interpreted as a result of the elastic deformation. Finally, validity of shrinkage correction was examined. The model calculation correctly reproduced the observed shrinkage including its dependence on the location in the pattern. The restored contour showed a good consistency with the experimental results and the total root-mean-square error of the shrinkage correction was 0.5 nm. This result confirmed that our shrinkage model adequately describes the shrinkage of two dimensional patterns. Consequently, proposed shrinkage correction method is expected to improve the accuracy of contour measurements by a critical dimension-scanning electron microscope.

  18. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  19. Compensating for Shrinkage in Machined Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, L.; Fitchett, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Technique insures machined ceramics shrink to correct dimensions after baked in kiln. New method automatically compensates during machining for shrinkage later, when part baked. Applicable to numerically controlled machines that include provision to adjust for variations in cuttingtool size, but do not provide for automatic verification of dimensions of machined parts.

  20. A Bayesian Shrinkage Approach for AMMI Models.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos Pereira; de Oliveira, Luciano Antonio; Nuvunga, Joel Jorge; Pamplona, Andrezza Kéllen Alves; Balestre, Marcio

    2015-01-01

    Linear-bilinear models, especially the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model, are widely applicable to genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) studies in plant breeding programs. These models allow a parsimonious modeling of GE interactions, retaining a small number of principal components in the analysis. However, one aspect of the AMMI model that is still debated is the selection criteria for determining the number of multiplicative terms required to describe the GE interaction pattern. Shrinkage estimators have been proposed as selection criteria for the GE interaction components. In this study, a Bayesian approach was combined with the AMMI model with shrinkage estimators for the principal components. A total of 55 maize genotypes were evaluated in nine different environments using a complete blocks design with three replicates. The results show that the traditional Bayesian AMMI model produces low shrinkage of singular values but avoids the usual pitfalls in determining the credible intervals in the biplot. On the other hand, Bayesian shrinkage AMMI models have difficulty with the credible interval for model parameters, but produce stronger shrinkage of the principal components, converging to GE matrices that have more shrinkage than those obtained using mixed models. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen, and resulted in models being selected that were similar to those obtained by the Cornelius F-test (α = 0.05) in traditional AMMI models and cross validation based on leave-one-out. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen and more GEI pattern retained on the first two components. The resulting model chosen by posterior distribution of singular value was also similar to those produced by the cross-validation approach in traditional AMMI models. Our method enables the estimation of credible interval for AMMI biplot plus the choice of AMMI model based on direct posterior

  1. A Bayesian Shrinkage Approach for AMMI Models

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luciano Antonio; Nuvunga, Joel Jorge; Pamplona, Andrezza Kéllen Alves

    2015-01-01

    Linear-bilinear models, especially the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model, are widely applicable to genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) studies in plant breeding programs. These models allow a parsimonious modeling of GE interactions, retaining a small number of principal components in the analysis. However, one aspect of the AMMI model that is still debated is the selection criteria for determining the number of multiplicative terms required to describe the GE interaction pattern. Shrinkage estimators have been proposed as selection criteria for the GE interaction components. In this study, a Bayesian approach was combined with the AMMI model with shrinkage estimators for the principal components. A total of 55 maize genotypes were evaluated in nine different environments using a complete blocks design with three replicates. The results show that the traditional Bayesian AMMI model produces low shrinkage of singular values but avoids the usual pitfalls in determining the credible intervals in the biplot. On the other hand, Bayesian shrinkage AMMI models have difficulty with the credible interval for model parameters, but produce stronger shrinkage of the principal components, converging to GE matrices that have more shrinkage than those obtained using mixed models. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen, and resulted in models being selected that were similar to those obtained by the Cornelius F-test (α = 0.05) in traditional AMMI models and cross validation based on leave-one-out. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen and more GEI pattern retained on the first two components. The resulting model chosen by posterior distribution of singular value was also similar to those produced by the cross-validation approach in traditional AMMI models. Our method enables the estimation of credible interval for AMMI biplot plus the choice of AMMI model based on direct posterior

  2. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  3. Exploiting tumor shrinkage through temporal optimization of radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Craft, David; Hong, Theodore; Papp, Dávid; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Salari, Ehsan; Wolfgang, John; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    In multi-stage radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated mostly by radiobiological considerations, but also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. The paper considers the optimal design of multi-stage treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of multi-stage radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the normal tissue is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one-third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of multi-stage treatments in terms of normal tissue sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large dose reductions by more than a factor of 2 for plausible model parameters. The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at multi-stage radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced target volumes.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Macrosegregation and Shrinkage in Large-Diameter Steel Roll Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastac, Laurentiu

    2011-12-01

    Minimizing macrosegregation and shrinkage in large cast steel mill rolls challenges the limits of commercial foundry technology. Processing improvements have been achieved by balancing the total heat input of casting with the rate of heat extraction from the surface of the roll in the mold. A submerged entry nozzle (SEN) technique that injects a dilute alloy addition through a nozzle into the partially solidified net-shaped roll ingot can mitigate both centerline segregation and midradius channel segregate conditions. The objective of this study is to optimize the melt chemistry, solidification, and SEN conditions to minimize centerline and midradius segregation, and then to improve the quality of the transition region between the outer shell and the diluted interior region. To accomplish this objective, a multiphase, multicomponent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was developed for studying the macrosegregation and shrinkage under various casting conditions for a 65-ton, 1.6-m-diameter steel roll. The developed CFD framework consists of solving for the volume fraction of phases (air and steel mixture), temperature, flow, and solute balance in multicomponent alloy systems. Thermal boundary conditions were determined by measuring the temperature in the mold at several radial depths and height locations. The thermophysical properties including viscosity of steel alloy used in the simulations are functions of temperature. The steel mixture in the species-transfer model consists of the following elements: Fe, Mn, Si, S, P, C, Cr, Mo, and V. Density and liquidus temperature of the steel mixture are locally affected by the segregation of these elements. The model predictions were validated against macrosegregation measured from pieces cut from the 65-ton roll. The effect of key processing parameters such as melt composition and superheat of both the shell and the dilute interior alloy are addressed. The influence of mold type and thickness on macrosegregation and

  5. Discrete multiscale wavelet shrinkage and integrodifferential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didas, S.; Steidl, G.; Weickert, J.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate the relation between discrete wavelet shrinkage and integrodifferential equations in the context of simplification and denoising of one-dimensional signals. In the continuous setting, strong connections between these two approaches were discovered in 6 (see references). The key observation is that the wavelet transform can be understood as derivative operator after the convolution with a smoothing kernel. In this paper, we extend these ideas to the practically relevant discrete setting with both orthogonal and biorthogonal wavelets. In the discrete case, the behaviour of the smoothing kernels for different scales requires additional investigation. The results of discrete multiscale wavelet shrinkage and related discrete versions of integrodifferential equations are compared with respect to their denoising quality by numerical experiments.

  6. A study on factors affecting the degradation of magnesium and a magnesium-yttrium alloy for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ian; Liu, Huinan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling degradation of magnesium or its alloys in physiological saline solutions is essential for their potential applications in clinically viable implants. Rapid degradation of magnesium-based materials reduces the mechanical properties of implants prematurely and severely increases alkalinity of the local environment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effects of three interactive factors on magnesium degradation, specifically, the addition of yttrium to form a magnesium-yttrium alloy versus pure magnesium, the metallic versus oxide surfaces, and the presence versus absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution. In the immersion solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the slowest, followed by pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface degraded the fastest. However, in deionized (DI) water, the degradation rate showed a different trend. Specifically, pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces degraded the slowest, followed by the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the fastest. Interestingly, only magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded slower in PBS than in DI water, while all the other samples degraded faster in PBS than in DI water. Clearly, the results showed that the alloy composition, presence or absence of surface oxide layer, and presence or absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution all influenced the degradation rate and mode. Moreover, these three factors showed statistically significant interactions. This study revealed the complex interrelationships among these factors and their respective contributions to degradation for the first time. The results of this study not only improved our understanding of magnesium degradation in physiological environment, but also presented the key

  7. A Study on Factors Affecting the Degradation of Magnesium and a Magnesium-Yttrium Alloy for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian; Liu, Huinan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling degradation of magnesium or its alloys in physiological saline solutions is essential for their potential applications in clinically viable implants. Rapid degradation of magnesium-based materials reduces the mechanical properties of implants prematurely and severely increases alkalinity of the local environment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effects of three interactive factors on magnesium degradation, specifically, the addition of yttrium to form a magnesium-yttrium alloy versus pure magnesium, the metallic versus oxide surfaces, and the presence versus absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution. In the immersion solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the slowest, followed by pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface degraded the fastest. However, in deionized (DI) water, the degradation rate showed a different trend. Specifically, pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces degraded the slowest, followed by the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the fastest. Interestingly, only magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded slower in PBS than in DI water, while all the other samples degraded faster in PBS than in DI water. Clearly, the results showed that the alloy composition, presence or absence of surface oxide layer, and presence or absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution all influenced the degradation rate and mode. Moreover, these three factors showed statistically significant interactions. This study revealed the complex interrelationships among these factors and their respective contributions to degradation for the first time. The results of this study not only improved our understanding of magnesium degradation in physiological environment, but also presented the key

  8. Shrinkage measurement for holographic recording materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Navarro Fuster, V.; Neipp, C.; Ortuño, M.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2017-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for new holographic recording materials. One of them are photopolymers, which are becoming a classic media in this field. Their versatility is well known and new possibilities are being created by including new components, such as nanoparticles or dispersed liquid crystal molecules in classical formulations, making them interesting for additional applications in which the thin film preparation and the structural modification have a fundamental importance. Prior to obtaining a wide commercialization of displays based on photopolymers, one of the key aspects is to achieve a complete characterization of them. In this sense, one of the main parameters to estimate and control is the shrinkage of these materials. The volume variations change the angular response of the hologram in two aspects, the angular selectivity and the maximum diffraction efficiency. One criteria for the recording material to be used in a holographic data storage application is the shrinkage, maximum of 0.5%. Along this work, we compare two different methods to measure the holographic recording material shrinkage. The first one is measuring the angle of propagation for both diffracted orders +/-1 when slanted gratings are recorded, so that an accurate value of the grating vector can be calculated. The second one is based on interference measurements at zero spatial frequency limit. We calculate the shrinkage for three different photopolymers: a polyvinyl alcohol acrylamide (PVA/AA) based photopolymer, one of the greenest photopolymers whose patent belongs to the Alicante University called Biophotopol and on the last place a holographic-dispersed liquid crystal photopolymer (H-PDLC).

  9. Compensating For Shrinkage In A Cryogenic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arnold E.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed design for seals in liquid-hydrogen plumbing eliminates leaks caused by contraction of seals at low operating temperature. Each seal consists of rubber, polytetrafluorethylene, or lead O-ring including hollow core filled with water. At temperature of liquid hydrogen, anomalous expansion of water keeps seal gland filled and leaktight despite shrinkage of surrounding O-ring material. Design also used in systems using cryogenic fluids other than liquid hydrogen.

  10. Nearest shrunken centroids via alternative genewise shrinkages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Yeob; Bair, Eric; Lee, Jae Won

    2017-01-01

    Nearest shrunken centroids (NSC) is a popular classification method for microarray data. NSC calculates centroids for each class and “shrinks” the centroids toward 0 using soft thresholding. Future observations are then assigned to the class with the minimum distance between the observation and the (shrunken) centroid. Under certain conditions the soft shrinkage used by NSC is equivalent to a LASSO penalty. However, this penalty can produce biased estimates when the true coefficients are large. In addition, NSC ignores the fact that multiple measures of the same gene are likely to be related to one another. We consider several alternative genewise shrinkage methods to address the aforementioned shortcomings of NSC. Three alternative penalties were considered: the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD), the adaptive LASSO (ADA), and the minimax concave penalty (MCP). We also showed that NSC can be performed in a genewise manner. Classification methods were derived for each alternative shrinkage method or alternative genewise penalty, and the performance of each new classification method was compared with that of conventional NSC on several simulated and real microarray data sets. Moreover, we applied the geometric mean approach for the alternative penalty functions. In general the alternative (genewise) penalties required fewer genes than NSC. The geometric mean of the class-specific prediction accuracies was improved, as well as the overall predictive accuracy in some cases. These results indicate that these alternative penalties should be considered when using NSC. PMID:28199352

  11. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  12. Comparative Study of Shrinkage and Non-Shrinkage Model of Food Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahari, N.; Jamil, N.; Rasmani, KA.

    2016-08-01

    A single phase heat and mass model has always been used to represent the moisture and temperature distribution during the drying of food. Several effects of the drying process, such as physical and structural changes, have been considered in order to increase understanding of the movement of water and temperature. However, the comparison between the heat and mass equation with and without structural change (in terms of shrinkage), which can affect the accuracy of the prediction model, has been little investigated. In this paper, two mathematical models to describe the heat and mass transfer in food, with and without the assumption of structural change, were analysed. The equations were solved using the finite difference method. The converted coordinate system was introduced within the numerical computations for the shrinkage model. The result shows that the temperature with shrinkage predicts a higher temperature at a specific time compared to that of the non-shrinkage model. Furthermore, the predicted moisture content decreased faster at a specific time when the shrinkage effect was included in the model.

  13. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  14. Extracellular Na+ inhibits Na+/H+ exchange: cell shrinkage reduces the inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Philip B; Kelley, Scott J; Logue, Paul J

    2004-08-01

    Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE) are ubiquitous transporters participating in regulation of cell volume and pH. Cell shrinkage, acidification, and growth factors activate NHE by increasing its sensitivity to intracellular H+ concentration. In this study, the kinetics were studied in dog red blood cells of Na+ influx through NHE as a function of external Na+ concentration ([Na+](o)). In cells in isotonic media, [Na+](o) inhibited Na+ influx >40 mM. Osmotic shrinkage activated NHE by reducing this inhibition. In cells in isotonic media + 120 mM sucrose, there was no inhibition, and influx was a hyperbolic function of [Na+](o). The kinetics of Na+-inhibited Na+ influx were analyzed at various extents of osmotic shrinkage. The curves for inhibited Na+ fluxes were sigmoid, indicating more than one Na+ inhibitory site associated with each transporter. Shrinkage significantly increased the Na+ concentration at half-maximal velocity of Na+-inhibited Na+ influx, the mechanism by which shrinkage activates NHE.

  15. Shrinkage and growth compensation in common sunflowers: refining estimates of damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Oldemeye, John L.; Swenson, Elizabeth L.

    1986-01-01

    Shrinkage and growth compensation of artificially damaged common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were studied in central North Dakota during 1981-1982 in an effort to increase accuracy of estimates of blackbird damage to sunflowers. In both years, as plants matured damaged areas on seedheads shrank at a greater rate than the sunflower heads themselves. This differential shrinkage resulted in an underestimation of the area damaged. Sunflower head and damaged-area shrinkage varied widely by time and degree of damage and by size of the seedhead damaged. Because variation in shrinkage by time of damage was so large, predicting when blackbird damage occurs may be the most important factor in estimating seed loss. Yield'occupied seed area was greater (P < 0.05) for damaged than undamaged heads and tended to increase as degree of damage inflicted increased, indicating growth compensation was occurring in response to lost seeds. Yields of undamaged seeds in seedheads damaged during early seed development were higher than those of heads damaged later. This suggested that there was a period of maximal response to damage when plants were best able to redirect growth to seeds remaining in the head. Sunflowers appear to be able to compensate for damage of ≤ 15% of the total hear area. Estimates of damage can be improved by applying empirical results of differential shrinkage and growth compensations.

  16. Development of early age shrinkage stresses in reinforced concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William, Gergis W.; Shoukry, Samir N.; Riad, Mourad Y.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes the instrumentation and data analysis of a reinforced concrete bridge deck constructed on 3-span continuous steel girders in Evansville, West Virginia. An instrumentation system consisting of 232 sensors is developed and implemented specifically to measure strains and temperature in concrete deck, strains in longitudinal and transverse rebars, the overall contraction and expansion of concrete deck, and crack openings. Data from all sensors are automatically collected every 30 minutes starting at the time of placing the concrete deck. Measured strain and temperature time-histories were used to calculate the stresses, which were processed to attenuate the thermal effects due to daily temperature changes and isolate the drying shrinkage component. The results indicated that most of concrete shrinkage occurs during the first three days. Under the constraining effects from stay-in-place forms and reinforcement, early age shrinkage leads to elevated longitudinal stress, which is the main factor responsible for crack initiation.

  17. Effect of mixing technique on shrinkage rate of one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

    PubMed

    Lampé, István; Marton, Sándor; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2004-01-01

    Different mixing techniques may affect the quality of set impression materials. Therefore, dimensional accuracy is the most important factor when constructing a passive and accurate prosthesis. In this study, observation of the shrinkage rate of one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials, which are both commercially available for cartridge- and hand-mix techniques, was used for comparative analysis. The hypothesis was that the cartridgemix technique would produce a more precise impression. The authors also sought to confirm the hypothesis that the studied materials would remain stable after setting. The low-viscosity polyether material was Permadyne Garant 2:1, type 3 (ESPE). The polyvinyl siloxane materials were: (1) medium-viscosity Provil Novo Medium, cartridge- and hand-mix type 2 (Heraeus Kulzer); and (2) low-viscosity President, hand- and cartridge-mix type 3 (Coltène). Measurements were made according to American Dental Association specification No. 19. Ten specimens were made of each impression material; the same examiner measured each specimen 10 times. Shrinkage rates of the same materials mixed using different techniques were compared 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 72 hours after mixing. Dimensional changes at the different measuring times were also compared. The results were statistically analyzed and compared with the SPSS for Windows program package, version 11.0 (SPSS); a two-sample t test was applied to compare the mixing techniques at every measuring time; and a Friedman test was used to analyze the changes in shrinkage rate during the evaluation period (P > .05). Figure 1 shows the shrinkage rate data for all materials. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference at any measuring point when the mixing techniques of the polyvinyl siloxane materials were compared. However, analysis showed significant differences for both hand- and cartridge-mixed materials when measurements at 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 72 hours were compared

  18. Do low-shrink composites reduce polymerization shrinkage effects?

    PubMed

    Tantbirojn, D; Pfeifer, C S; Braga, R R; Versluis, A

    2011-05-01

    Progress in polymer science has led to continuous reduction of polymerization shrinkage, exemplified by a new generation of "low-shrink composites". The common inference that shrinkage stress effects will be reduced in teeth restored with such restoratives with lower shrinkage was tested in extracted human premolars. Mesio-occluso-distal slot-shaped cavities were cut and restored with a conventional (SupremePlus) or low-shrink (RefleXions, Premise, Kalore, and LS) composite (N = 5). We digitized the coronal surfaces before and 10 min after restoration to determine cuspal deflection from the buccal and lingual volume change/area. We also determined the main properties involved (total shrinkage, post-gel shrinkage, degree of conversion, and elastic modulus), as well as microleakage, to verify adequate bonding. It was shown that, due to shrinkage stresses, buccal and lingual surfaces pulled inward after restoration (9-14 microns). Only Kalore and LS resulted in significantly lower tooth deformation (ANOVA/Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc, p = 0.05). The other two low-shrink composites, despite having the lowest and highest total shrinkage values, did not cause significant differences in cuspal deflection. Deflection seemed most related to the combination of post-gel shrinkage and elastic modulus. Therefore, even for significantly lower total shrinkage values, shrinkage stress is not necessarily reduced.

  19. Entropic shrinkage of an oxide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Seiji; Hosono, Hideo; Ito, Setsuro

    2015-03-01

    Entropic elasticity, a property typical of rubbers and well known in organic polymers with appropriate network structures, is not known to occur in oxide glasses. Here, we report the occurrence of entropic elasticity in phosphate-glass fibres with highly anisotropic structures, drawn by mechanical elongation from supercooled liquids. We observed a large lengthwise shrinkage of ~35% for phosphate glasses with an enhanced one-dimensional structure, as well as a distinct endotherm on reheating them up to temperatures between that of the glass transition temperature and the softening temperature. Our results strongly suggest the possibility of designing oxide glasses with a rubbery nature at high temperatures.

  20. Entropic shrinkage of an oxide glass.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Seiji; Hosono, Hideo; Ito, Setsuro

    2015-03-01

    Entropic elasticity, a property typical of rubbers and well known in organic polymers with appropriate network structures, is not known to occur in oxide glasses. Here, we report the occurrence of entropic elasticity in phosphate-glass fibres with highly anisotropic structures, drawn by mechanical elongation from supercooled liquids. We observed a large lengthwise shrinkage of ~35% for phosphate glasses with an enhanced one-dimensional structure, as well as a distinct endotherm on reheating them up to temperatures between that of the glass transition temperature and the softening temperature. Our results strongly suggest the possibility of designing oxide glasses with a rubbery nature at high temperatures.

  1. Factors Influencing Fracture Toughness and Other Properties of Aluminum- Lithium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-14

    tramp elements sodium, potassium and sulfuir presumably segregated in the grain boundaries. Furthermore, the hydrogen content of the alloys was also shown...tion of these elements at grain boundaries is worth noting. Furthermore, the hydrogen content of the Al-Li and A1-Mg-Li alloys is significantly higher...than the hydrogen content of typical commerical high strength aluminum alloys. Fatigue Crack Growth (FCG) The FCG performance of the Al-Cu-Li alloy

  2. The influence of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements on bonding to metal.

    PubMed

    Verzijden, C W; Feilzer, A J; Creugers, N H; Davidson, C L

    1992-02-01

    During the setting of a resin composite cement (RCC) used as an adhesive between a resin-bonded bridge and tooth structure, the adhesion may be disrupted by the development of shrinkage stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shrinkage stress of three different RCCs on their adhesive and cohesive qualities when bonded to metal surfaces in a rigid set-up. Two opposing parallel NiCr discs (Wiron 77) were mounted in a tensilometer at a mutual distance of 200 microns and cemented with Panavia Ex, Clearfil F2, or Microfill Pontic C. The alloy surfaces were treated by either electrolytic etching, sand-blasting, silane-coating, or tin-plating. During setting, the discs were kept at their original mutual distance to simulate the extreme clinical situation of "complete" rigidity, where the casting and the tooth cannot move toward each other. The developing shrinkage stress was recorded continuously. During setting, the adhesive strength of the RCCs to silane-coated surfaces was always higher than their early cohesive strength. Electrolytically-etched surfaces as well as sand-blasted surfaces showed, in almost all cases, adhesive failure. The tin-plated samples showed mainly adhesive failure at the metal/resin interface. The highest bond strength values were found for silane-coated surfaces in combination with Clearfil F2.

  3. Shrinkage strain-rates of dental resin-monomer and composite systems.

    PubMed

    Atai, Mohammad; Watts, David C; Atai, Zahra

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shrinkage strain rate of different monomers, which are commonly used in dental composites and the effect of monomer functionality and molecular mass on the rate. Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, MMA, HEMA, HPMA and different ratios of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA were mixed with Camphorquinone and Dimethyl aminoethyle methacrylate as initiator system. The shrinkage strain of the samples photopolymerised at Ca. 550 mW/cm2 and 23 degrees C was measured using the bonded-disk technique of Watts and Cash (Meas. Sci. Technol. 2 (1991) 788-794), and initial shrinkage-strain rates were obtained by numerical differentiation. Shrinkage-strain rates rose rapidly to a maximum, and then fell rapidly upon vitrification. Strain and initial strain rate were dependent upon monomer functionality, molecular mass and viscosity. Strain rates were correlated with Bis-GMA in Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixtures up to 75-80 w/w%, due to the higher molecular mass of Bis-GMA affecting termination reactions, and then decreased due to its higher viscosity affecting propagation reactions. Monofunctional monomers exhibited lower rates. UDMA, a difunctional monomer of medium viscosity, showed the highest shrinkage strain rate (P < 0.05). Shrinkage strain rate, related to polymerization rate, is an important factor affecting the biomechanics and marginal integrity of composites cured in dental cavities. This study shows how this is related to monomer molecular structure and viscosity. The results are significant for the production, optimization and clinical application of dental composite restoratives.

  4. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper.

  5. Change of magnetic properties of nanocrystalline alloys under influence of external factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, Jozef; Holková, Dominika; Dekan, Julius; Novák, Patrik

    2016-10-01

    Nanocrystalline (Fe3Ni1)81Nb7B12 alloys were irradiated using different types of radiation and subsequently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. External magnetic field of 0.5 T, electron-beam irradiation up to 4 MGy, neutron irradiation up to 1017 neutrons/cm2 and irradiation with Cu ions were applied on the samples. All types of external factors had an influence on the magnetic microstructure manifested as a change in the direction of the net magnetic moment, intensity of the internal magnetic field and volumetric fraction of the constituent phases. The direction of the net magnetic moment was the most sensitive parameter. Changes of the microscopic magnetic parameters were compared after different external influence and results of nanocrystalline samples were compared with their amorphous precursors.

  6. Analysis of Factors Influencing Measurement Accuracy of Al Alloy Tensile Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Žužek, Borut; Sedlaček, Marko; Kevorkijan, Varužan; Hostej, Boris

    2016-02-01

    In order to properly use materials in design, a complete understanding of and information on their mechanical properties, such as yield and ultimate tensile strength must be obtained. Furthermore, as the design of automotive parts is constantly pushed toward higher limits, excessive measuring uncertainty can lead to unexpected premature failure of the component, thus requiring reliable determination of material properties with low uncertainty. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of different metrology factors, including the number of tested samples, specimens machining and surface quality, specimens input diameter, type of testing and human error on the tensile test results and measurement uncertainty when performed on 2xxx series Al alloy. Results show that the most significant contribution to measurement uncertainty comes from the number of samples tested, which can even exceed 1 %. Furthermore, moving from experimental laboratory conditions to very intense industrial environment further amplifies measurement uncertainty, where even if using automated systems human error cannot be neglected.

  7. [Influence of industrial factors on health status of workers engaged in obtaining and processing non-ferrous alloys].

    PubMed

    Ozhiganova, V N; Ivanova, L A; Khelkovskiĭ-Sergeev, N A; Lobanopva, E A; Stasenkova, T Iu; Aleshina, O E; Kozlova, T N

    1996-01-01

    Workers engaged into treatment of nonferrous alloys are exposed to aerosols of condensation and disintegration. Those who contact aerosols of nonferrous metals demonstrate respiratory, gastrointestinal and skin diseases. To reveal a role of occupational factors in formation of those diseases, the authors designed diagnostic criteria according to results of clinical, allergologic, immunologic and cytochemical studies.

  8. Magnetomechanical coupling factor and energy density of single crystal iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supratik; Flatau, Alison B.

    2008-03-01

    Energy density and coupling factor are widely used as figures of merit for comparing different active materials. These parameters are usually evaluated as material constants assuming a linear behavior of the material over all operating ranges. In this work it is shown that the operating conditions have an effect on the energy density and coupling factor which cannot be ignored. A single crystal rod of Fe 84Ga 16 was characterized as a magnetostrictive actuator and sensor under different quasi-static stress and magnetic field conditions. The material showed a saturation magnetostriction of 247 μɛ and a maximum stress sensitivity of 45 T/GPa. A maximum energy density of 2.38 kJ/m 3 and coupling factor higher than 0.6 were calculated from experimental results. The experimental behavior was modeled using an energy based non-linear approach which was further used to calculate the coupling factor and energy density as continuous functions of stress and magnetic field in the material. Guidelines on optimal operating conditions for magnetostrictive actuators and sensors using FeGa alloys have been suggested.

  9. Four-Phase Dendritic Model for the Prediction of Macrosegregation, Shrinkage Cavity, and Porosity in a 55-Ton Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Honghao; Ren, Fengli; Li, Jun; Han, Xiujun; Xia, Mingxu; Li, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    A four-phase dendritic model was developed to predict the macrosegregation, shrinkage cavity, and porosity during solidification. In this four-phase dendritic model, some important factors, including dendritic structure for equiaxed crystals, melt convection, crystals sedimentation, nucleation, growth, and shrinkage of solidified phases, were taken into consideration. Furthermore, in this four-phase dendritic model, a modified shrinkage criterion was established to predict shrinkage porosity (microporosity) of a 55-ton industrial Fe-3.3 wt pct C ingot. The predicted macrosegregation pattern and shrinkage cavity shape are in a good agreement with experimental results. The shrinkage cavity has a significant effect on the formation of positive segregation in hot top region, which generally forms during the last stage of ingot casting. The dendritic equiaxed grains also play an important role on the formation of A-segregation. A three-dimensional laminar structure of A-segregation in industrial ingot was, for the first time, predicted by using a 3D case simulation.

  10. Four-Phase Dendritic Model for the Prediction of Macrosegregation, Shrinkage Cavity, and Porosity in a 55-Ton Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Honghao; Ren, Fengli; Li, Jun; Han, Xiujun; Xia, Mingxu; Li, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    A four-phase dendritic model was developed to predict the macrosegregation, shrinkage cavity, and porosity during solidification. In this four-phase dendritic model, some important factors, including dendritic structure for equiaxed crystals, melt convection, crystals sedimentation, nucleation, growth, and shrinkage of solidified phases, were taken into consideration. Furthermore, in this four-phase dendritic model, a modified shrinkage criterion was established to predict shrinkage porosity (microporosity) of a 55-ton industrial Fe-3.3 wt pct C ingot. The predicted macrosegregation pattern and shrinkage cavity shape are in a good agreement with experimental results. The shrinkage cavity has a significant effect on the formation of positive segregation in hot top region, which generally forms during the last stage of ingot casting. The dendritic equiaxed grains also play an important role on the formation of A-segregation. A three-dimensional laminar structure of A-segregation in industrial ingot was, for the first time, predicted by using a 3D case simulation.

  11. Technique Incorporating Cooling & Contraction / Expansion Analysis to Illustrate Shrinkage Tendency in Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, S.; Chisamera, M.; Riposan, I.; Neacsu, L.; Cojocaru, A. M.; Stan, I.

    2017-06-01

    With the more widespread adoption of thermal analysis testing, thermal analysis data have become an indicator of cast iron quality. The cooling curve and its first derivative display patterns that can be used to predict the characteristics of a cast iron. An experimental device was developed with a technique to simultaneously evaluate cooling curves and expansion or contraction of cast metals during solidification. Its application is illustrated with results on shrinkage tendency of ductile iron treated with FeSiMgRECa master alloy and inoculated with FeSi based alloys, as affected by mould rigidity (green sand and resin sand moulds). Undercooling at the end of solidification relative to the metastable (carbidic) equilibrium temperature and the expansion within the solidification sequence appear to have a strong influence on the susceptibility to macro - and micro - shrinkage in ductile iron castings. Green sand moulds, as less rigid moulds, encourage the formation of contraction defects, not only because of high initial expansion values, but also because of a higher cooling rate during solidification, and consequently, increased undercooling below the metastable equilibrium temperature up to the end of solidification.

  12. PLASTIC SHRINKAGE CONTROLLING EFFECT BY POLYPROPYLENE SHORT FIBER WITH HYDROPHILY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Akira; Sadatsuki, Yoshitomo; Oshima, Akihiro; Ishii, Akina; Tsubaki, Tatsuya

    The aim of this research is to clarify the mechanism of controlling plastic shrinkage crack by adding small amout of synthetic short fiber, and to propose optimum polypropylene short fiber to control plastic shrinkage crack. In this research, the effect of the hydrophily of polypropylene fiber was investigated in the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar, total area of plastic shrinkage crack, and bond properties between fiber and mortar. The plastic shrinkage test of morar was conducted under high temperature, low relative humidity, and constant wind velocity. When polypropylene fiber had hydrophily, the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained, which was because cement paste in morar was captured by hydrophilic fiber and then bleeding of mortar was restrained. With hydrophily, plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained and bridging effect was improved due to better bond, which led to remarkable reduction of plastic shrinkage crack. Based on experimental results, the way of developing optimum polypropylene short fiber for actual construction was proposed. The fiber should have large hydrophily and small diameter, and should be used in as small amount as possible in order not to disturb workability of concrete.

  13. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz; Trtik, Pavel; Münch, Beat; Weiss, Jason; Vontobel, Peter; Lura, Pietro

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  14. 3D mapping of polymerization shrinkage using X-ray micro-computed tomography to predict microleakage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jirun; Eidelman, Naomi; Lin-Gibson, Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) demonstrate X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) as a viable method for determining the polymerization shrinkage and microleakage on the same sample accurately and non-destructively, and (2) investigate the effect of sample geometry (e.g., C-factor and volume) on polymerization shrinkage and microleakage. Composites placed in a series of model cavities of controlled C-factors and volumes were imaged using microCT to determine their precise location and volume before and after photopolymerization. Shrinkage was calculated by comparing the volume of composites before and after polymerization and leakage was predicted based on gap formation between composites and cavity walls as a function of position. Dye penetration experiments were used to validate microCT results. The degree of conversion (DC) of composites measured using FTIR microspectroscopy in reflectance mode was nearly identical for composites filled in all model cavity geometries. The shrinkage of composites calculated based on microCT results was statistically identical regardless of sample geometry. Microleakage, on the other hand, was highly dependent on the C-factor as well as the composite volume, with higher C-factors and larger volumes leading to a greater probability of microleakage. Spatial distribution of microleakage determined by microCT agreed well with results determined by dye penetration. microCT has proven to be a powerful technique in quantifying polymerization shrinkage and corresponding microleakage for clinically relevant cavity geometries.

  15. SEM-induced shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores with feature sizes around 5 nm play a critical role in bio-sensing fields, especially in single molecule detection and sequencing of DNA, RNA and proteins. In this paper we present a systematic study on shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores with a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Square nanopores with measurable sizes as small as 8 nm × 8 nm and rectangle nanopores with feature sizes (the smaller one between length and width) down to 5 nm have been obtained, using the SEM-induced shrinkage technique. The analysis of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and the recovery of the pore size and morphology reveal that the grown material along with the edge of the nanopore is the result of deposition of hydrocarbon compounds, without structural damage during the shrinking process. A simplified model for pore shrinkage has been developed based on observation of the cross-sectional morphology of the shrunk nanopore. The main factors impacting on the task of controllably shrinking the nanopores, such as the accelerating voltage, spot size, scanned area of e-beam, and the initial pore size have been discussed. It is found that single-crystal silicon nanopores shrink linearly with time under localized irradiation by SEM e-beam in all cases, and the pore shrinkage rate is inversely proportional to the initial equivalent diameter of the pore under the same e-beam conditions.

  16. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    PubMed

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  17. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  18. Polymerization shrinkage, modulus, and shrinkage stress related to tooth-restoration interfacial debonding in bulk-fill composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryan Jin-Young; Kim, Yu-Jin; Choi, Nak-Sam; Lee, In-Bog

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure the polymerization shrinkage, modulus, and shrinkage stress of bulk-fill and conventional composites during polymerization and to investigate the relationship between tooth-composite interfacial debonding and shrinkage stress of the composites. Polymerization shrinkage, dynamic modulus, and shrinkage stress of two high-viscosity bulk-fill (SonicFill (SF)/Tetric N-Ceram Bulk-Fill (TNB)) and two low-viscosity bulk-fill composites (Filtek Bulk-Fill (FB)/SureFil SDR Flow (SDR)) as well as one high-viscosity conventional (Filtek Z250 (Z250)) and one low-viscosity conventional composite (Filtek Z350 XT Flowable (Z350F)) were measured using custom-made instruments. Acoustic emission (AE) analysis was performed to evaluate the tooth-composite interfacial debonding during polymerization of the composites in Class 1 cavities on extracted third molars. The low-viscosity composites exhibited higher shrinkage and lower modulus than the high-viscosity composites. Polymerization shrinkage at 10 min ranged between 2.05% (SF) and 3.53% (Z350F). Polymerization shrinkage stress values at 10 min ranged between 1.68MPa (SDR) and 3.51MPa (Z350F). The number of AE events was highest in Z350F and lowest in SDR. Composites that exhibited greater polymerization shrinkage stress generated more tooth-composite interfacial debonding. In contrast to similar outcomes among the high-viscosity composites (conventional: Z250, bulk-fill: TNB and SF), the low-viscosity bulk-fill composites (FB and SDR) demonstrated better results in terms of polymerization shrinkage stress and tooth-composite interfacial debonding than did the low-viscosity conventional composite (Z350F). Despite the better performance by some of the bulk-fill composites, clinicians should be aware that the bulk-fill composites are not perfect substitutes for conventional composites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Linear attenuation coefficient and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy for dose accuracy, beam collimation, and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Deidre N; Maqbool, Muhammad; Islam, Mohammed S

    2012-07-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy were determined for (60)Co, (54)Mn, and (137)Cs gamma emitters and a NaI detector. The thickness of the MCP-96 attenuator was varied from 1 to 4 cm. A collimated beam of gamma rays was allowed to pass through various thicknesses of the MCP-96 alloy. The attenuated beam was detected by a NaI detector, and data were recorded by a multichannel analyzer. The run was repeated without the collimator for broad-beam geometry. For each run, the attenuated beam intensity was normalized by the intensity of the unattenuated incident beam obtained by removing the attenuators. Linear attenuation coefficients were determined by plotting of the intensity of the collimated beam against the attenuator thickness. For every thickness of the alloy, the ratio of the attenuated to the unattenuated beam was found to be higher in broad-beam geometry as compared to the same ratio in narrow-beam geometry. We used the difference in these ratios in broad and narrow-beam geometries to calculate the buildup factor. The buildup factor was found to increase with beam energy and attenuator thickness. Variation in the source-to-detector distance gave a lower value of the buildup factor for a small and a large distance and a higher value for an intermediate distance. The buildup factor was found to be greater than 1 in all cases. We conclude that the buildup factor must be calculated and incorporated for dose correction and precision when the MCP-96 alloy is used for tissue compensation or radiation shielding and protection purposes.

  20. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  1. Characterizetion of Flexural Strength, Warpage and Shrinkage of Polypropylene-Nanoclay-Nanocomposites Blend with Gigantochloa Scortechinii.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamis, S. Z.; Othman, M. H.; Hasan, S.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the characterization of Flexural Strength, Warpage and Shrinkage of reinforcement gigantochloa scortechinii fibre. The content of fiber were fixed at 0 wt.%, 3 wt.% and 6 wt.% in uniform increased. The selected injection moulding processing conditions were packing pressure, melt temperature, screw speed and filling time. The quality factors that need to be improved upon the characterization were flexural strength, warpage and shrinkage. This research started by drying the Gigantochloa Scortechinii fibres at 120°C. After that, 3 wt.% of the fibres were mixed with 81 wt.% of polypropylene, 15 wt.% of polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride (compatibilizer) and 1 wt. % of nanoclay. Samples with 6 wt.% of fibers were also prepared for comparison purpose. The mixing process was performed by using Brabender Lab-Compounder KETSE 20/40 and the pallets were produced using used Brabender® pelletizer with diameters of 1 to 4 mm. The optimisation process was accomplished by adopting the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array method. According to the results, for 0 wt.% GS, the flexural strength is 30.0082 MPa, the warpage is 0.0030000 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure 40%, melt temperature 165°C, filled time 2 seconds and screw speed 35%. For the result 3 wt.% GS, the flexural strength is 32.2477 MPa, the warpage is 0.006670 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure is 35%, melt temperature 165°C, filled times is 1 seconds and screw speed is 30%. While for the 6 wt.% GS, the results of the flexural strength is 36.9084 MPa, the warpage is 0.0066700 mm and the shrinkage is 0.0003830 mm at packing pressure is 35%, melt temperature 165°C, filled time is 2 seconds and screw speed is 30%. The existence of Gigantochloa Scortechinii fibre was also proven to effect significantly towards flexural strength with 6% increasing value ordering from 0 wt.% GS to 6 wt.% GS. while, the warpage value increasing from 0.003000 mm to 0.00667 mm and

  2. Alternative methods for determining shrinkage in restorative resin composites.

    PubMed

    de Melo Monteiro, Gabriela Queiroz; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassú Resende; Rolim, Tiago Vieira; de Oliveira Mota, Cláudia Cristina Brainer; de Barros Correia Kyotoku, Bernardo; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage of resin composites using a coordinate measuring machine, optical coherence tomography and a more widely known method, such as Archimedes Principle. Two null hypothesis were tested: (1) there are no differences between the materials tested; (2) there are no differences between the methods used for polymerization shrinkage measurements. Polymerization shrinkage of seven resin-based dental composites (Filtek Z250™, Filtek Z350™, Filtek P90™/3M ESPE, Esthet-X™, TPH Spectrum™/Dentsply 4 Seasons™, Tetric Ceram™/Ivoclar-Vivadent) was measured. For coordinate measuring machine measurements, composites were applied to a cylindrical Teflon mold (7 mm × 2 mm), polymerized and removed from the mold. The difference between the volume of the mold and the volume of the specimen was calculated as a percentage. Optical coherence tomography was also used for linear shrinkage evaluations. The thickness of the specimens was measured before and after photoactivation. Polymerization shrinkage was also measured using Archimedes Principle of buoyancy (n=5). Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Games-Howell test. The results show that polymerization shrinkage values vary with the method used. Despite numerical differences the ranking of the resins was very similar with Filtek P90 presenting the lowest shrinkage values. Because of the variations in the results, reported values could only be used to compare materials within the same method. However, it is possible rank composites for polymerization shrinkage and to relate these data from different test methods. Independently of the method used, reduced polymerization shrinkage was found for silorane resin-based composite. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Specimen size effect in the volumetric shrinkage of cancellous bone measured at two levels of dehydration.

    PubMed

    Lievers, W Brent; Lee, Victoria; Arsenault, Simon M; Waldman, Stephen D; Pilkey, A Keith

    2007-01-01

    Water is commonly removed from bone to study its effect on mechanical behaviour; however, dehydration also alters the bone structure. To make matters worse, measuring structural changes in cancellous bone is complicated by a number of factors. Therefore, the goals of this study were to address these issues by (1) comparing Archimedes' method and a helium pycnometer as methods for measuring cancellous bone volume; (2) measuring the apparent dimensional and volumetric tissue shrinkage of cancellous bone at two levels of dehydration; and, (3) identifying whether a size effect exists in cancellous bone shrinkage. Cylindrical specimens (3, 5 and 8.3 mm diameters) of cancellous bone were taken from the distal bovine femur. The apparent dimensions of each cylindrical specimen were measured in a fully hydrated state (HYD), after drying at room temperature (AIR), and after oven drying at 105 degrees C (OVEN). Tissue volume measurements for those three hydration states were obtained using both a helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method. Aluminium foams, which mimic the cancellous structure, were used as controls. The results suggest that the helium pycnometer and Archimedes' method yield identical results in the HYD and AIR states, but that Archimedes' method under-predicts the nominal OVEN volume by incorporating the collagen-apatite porosity. A distinct size effect on volumetric shrinkage is observed (p<0.025) using the pycnometer in both AIR and OVEN states. Apparent dimensional shrinkage (2% and 7%) at the two dehydration levels is much smaller than the measured volumetric tissue shrinkage (16% and 29%), which results in a reduced dehydrated bone volume fraction.

  4. CELL SHRINKAGE AND MONOVALENT CATION FLUXES

    PubMed Central

    Bortner, Carl D.; Cidlowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The loss of cell volume or cell shrinkage has been a morphological hallmark of the programmed cell death process known as apoptosis. This isotonic loss of cell volume has recently been term apoptotic volume decrease or AVD to distinguish it from inherent volume regulatory responses that occurs in cells under anisotonic conditions. Recent studies examining the intracellular signaling pathways that result in this unique cellular characteristic have determined that a fundamental movement of ions, particularly monovalent ions, underlie the AVD process and plays an important role on controlling the cell death process. An efflux of intracellular potassium was shown to be a critical aspect of the AVD process, as preventing this ion loss could protect cells from apoptosis. However, potassium plays a complex role as a loss of intracellular potassium has also been shown to be beneficial to the health of the cell. Additionally, the mechanisms that a cell employs to achieve this loss of intracellular potassium vary depending on the cell type and stimulus used to induce apoptosis, suggesting multiple ways exist to accomplish the same goal of AVD. Additionally, sodium and chloride have been shown to play a vital role during cell death in both the signaling and control of AVD in various apoptotic model systems. This review examines the relationship between this morphological change and intracellular monovalent ions during apoptosis. PMID:17321483

  5. Model Shrinkage for Discriminative Language Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Takanobu; Hori, Takaaki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ito, Akinori

    This paper describes a technique for overcoming the model shrinkage problem in automatic speech recognition (ASR), which allows application developers and users to control the model size with less degradation of accuracy. Recently, models for ASR systems tend to be large and this can constitute a bottleneck for developers and users without special knowledge of ASR with respect to introducing the ASR function. Specifically, discriminative language models (DLMs) are usually designed in a high-dimensional parameter space, although DLMs have gained increasing attention as an approach for improving recognition accuracy. Our proposed method can be applied to linear models including DLMs, in which the score of an input sample is given by the inner product of its features and the model parameters, but our proposed method can shrink models in an easy computation by obtaining simple statistics, which are square sums of feature values appearing in a data set. Our experimental results show that our proposed method can shrink a DLM with little degradation in accuracy and perform properly whether or not the data for obtaining the statistics are the same as the data for training the model.

  6. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  7. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700–950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service. PMID:26537060

  8. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700-950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  9. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  10. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; ...

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys bymore » illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.« less

  11. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes, part 3: hydrophobic vials and the question of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The importance of cake adhesion to the inside vial wall during lyophilization of amorphous trehalose cakes was determined by using hydrophobized vials. The degrees of cake shrinkage and cracking were determined independently by photographic imaging of the cake top surface in a dark cell. Additionally, measurements with microcomputed tomography were performed. Adhesion is found to be a determining factor in both cake shrinkage and cracking. The correlation between cake detachment from the vial inner wall and trehalose concentration indicates that adhesion of the frozen solute phase is a determining factor in shrinkage. The hydrophobized vials give reduced cracking at trehalose concentrations of up to 15%. The reduced wetting of the hydrophobized inside vial wall gives a planar cake topography with a uniform distribution of cracks within the cake.

  12. Comparison of shrinkage related properties of various patch repair materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Fitrianto, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    A patch repair material has been developed in the form of unsaturated polyester resin (UPR)-mortar. The performance and durability of this material are governed by its compatibility with the concrete being repaired. One of the compatibility issue that should be tackled is the dimensional compatibility as a result of differential shrinkage between the repair material and the concrete substrate. This research aims to evaluate such shrinkage related properties of UPR-mortar and to compare with those of other patch repair materials. The investigation includes the following aspects: free shrinkage, resistance to delamination and cracking. The results indicate that UPR-mortar poses a lower free shrinkage, lower risk of both delamination and cracking tendency in comparison to other repair materials.

  13. Influence of gelatinous fibers on the shrinkage of silver maple

    Treesearch

    Donals G. Arganbright; Dwight W. Bensend; Floyd G. Manwiller

    1970-01-01

    The degree of lean was found to have a significant influence on the logitudinal and transverse shrinkage of three soft maple trees. This may be accounted for by differences in the cell wall layer thickness and fibril angle.

  14. Color Image Denoising via Discriminatively Learned Iterative Shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Sun, Jian; Xu, Zingben

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model, a discriminatively learned iterative shrinkage (DLIS) model, for color image denoising. The DLIS is a generalization of wavelet shrinkage by iteratively performing shrinkage over patch groups and whole image aggregation. We discriminatively learn the shrinkage functions and basis from the training pairs of noisy/noise-free images, which can adaptively handle different noise characteristics in luminance/chrominance channels, and the unknown structured noise in real-captured color images. Furthermore, to remove the splotchy real color noises, we design a Laplacian pyramid-based denoising framework to progressively recover the clean image from the coarsest scale to the finest scale by the DLIS model learned from the real color noises. Experiments show that our proposed approach can achieve the state-of-the-art denoising results on both synthetic denoising benchmark and real-captured color images.

  15. Development of spraying agent for reducing drying shrinkage of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Maruoka, Masanori; Liu, Lingling

    2017-02-01

    Mortar used to repair is sometimes exposed to drying state in early ages after construction and a few days later water is sprayed frequently on the surface of the mortar in order to prevent cracks. This research studied on shrinkage characteristic of mortar subjected to drying conditions like this. The result showed that the water spraying on the mortar after initial drying did not have any effect to prevent shrinkage, but increased. And it also showed when various chemical agents are mixed and used in watersprayingit had the prevention effect on shrinkage. This report was to understand this kind of phenomenon and clarify the mechanism. In addition, based on the results, the new spraying agent was developed to reduce drying shrinkage.

  16. Nuclear shrinkage in live mouse hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Kasischke, K; Büchner, M; Ludolph, A C; Riepe, M W

    2001-05-01

    Brain slices are used extensively for biochemical, electrophysiological and molecular investigations. However, only the time frame for electrophysiological and biochemical investigations has as yet been defined. The goal of the present study was to investigate the time course of nuclear structure in live brain slices. Hippocampal slices (300 microm) were prepared from male CD1 mice (25-30 g), stained with Hoechst 33342 (10 microM), calcein-AM (2 microM) and ethidium homodimer (4 microM), and imaged with single- and dual-photon microscopy. The volume of CA1 pyramidal cell nuclei decreased from 759+/-229 microm3 in 40-50 microm depth 25 min after preparation to 453+/-169 microm3 (P<0.001) after 60 min, 315+/-112 microm3 (P<0.001) after 120 min and 128+/-71 microm3 (P<0.001) after 8 h. Similar results were obtained on a prolonged time scale in 70-80 microm depth and with an accelerated time scale in 20-30 microm depth. Live-dead staining showed that cell damage is progressing from the surface to deeper layers of the slices in a time-dependent fashion. We conclude that nuclei of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells show a time- and depth-dependent shrinkage converging 8 h after slice preparation to a volume of 90-130 microm; in any depth between 20 and 80 microm. The nucleus in the superficial 80 microm of each side appears dysfunctional even at times suitable for electrophysiological and biochemical experimentation in hippocampal slices. Molecular analysis of cell regulation in brain slices may, therefore, be time-dependently distorted by progressing cell death in at least half of the tissue under investigation.

  17. Hydrogen embrittlement: the game changing factor in the applicability of nickel alloys in oilfield technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento Klapper, Helmuth; Klöwer, Jutta; Gosheva, Olesya

    2017-06-01

    Precipitation hardenable (PH) nickel (Ni) alloys are often the most reliable engineering materials for demanding oilfield upstream and subsea applications especially in deep sour wells. Despite their superior corrosion resistance and mechanical properties over a broad range of temperatures, the applicability of PH Ni alloys has been questioned due to their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), as confirmed in documented failures of components in upstream applications. While extensive work has been done in recent years to develop testing methodologies for benchmarking PH Ni alloys in terms of their HE susceptibility, limited scientific research has been conducted to achieve improved foundational knowledge about the role of microstructural particularities in these alloys on their mechanical behaviour in environments promoting hydrogen uptake. Precipitates such as the γ', γ'' and δ-phase are well known for defining the mechanical and chemical properties of these alloys. To elucidate the effect of precipitates in the microstructure of the oil-patch PH Ni alloy 718 on its HE susceptibility, slow strain rate tests under continuous hydrogen charging were conducted on material after several different age-hardening treatments. By correlating the obtained results with those from the microstructural and fractographic characterization, it was concluded that HE susceptibility of oil-patch alloy 718 is strongly influenced by the amount and size of precipitates such as the γ' and γ'' as well as the δ-phase rather than by the strength level only. In addition, several HE mechanisms including hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and hydrogen-enhanced local plasticity were observed taking place on oil-patch alloy 718, depending upon the characteristics of these phases when present in the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  18. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  19. Factors influencing the elastic moduli, reversible strains and hysteresis loops in martensitic Ti-Nb alloys.

    PubMed

    Bönisch, Matthias; Calin, Mariana; van Humbeeck, Jan; Skrotzki, Werner; Eckert, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    While the current research focus in the search for biocompatible low-modulus alloys is set on β-type Ti-based materials, the potential of fully martensitic Ti-based alloys remains largely unexplored. In this work, the influence of composition and pre-straining on the elastic properties of martensitic binary Ti-Nb alloys was studied. Additionally, the phase formation was compared in the as-cast versus the quenched state. The elastic moduli and hardness of the studied martensitic alloys are at a minimum of 16wt.% Nb and peak between 23.5 and 28.5wt.% Nb. The uniaxial deformation behavior of the alloys used is characterized by the absence of distinct yield points. Monotonic and cyclic (hysteretic) loading-unloading experiments were used to study the influence of Nb-content and pre-straining on the elastic moduli. Such experiments were also utilized to assess the recoverable elastic and anelastic deformations as well as hysteretic energy losses. Particular attention has been paid to the separation of non-linear elastic from anelastic strains, which govern the stress and strain limits to which a material can be loaded without deforming it plastically. It is shown that slight pre-straining of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys can lead to considerable reductions in their elastic moduli as well as increases in their total reversible strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Variation of Shrinkage Strain within the Depth of Concrete Beams

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Park, Yeong-Seong; Lee, Yong-Hak

    2015-01-01

    The variation of shrinkage strain within beam depth was examined through four series of time-dependent laboratory experiments on unreinforced concrete beam specimens. Two types of beam specimens, horizontally cast and vertically cast, were tested; shrinkage variation was observed in the horizontally cast specimens. This indicated that the shrinkage variation within the beam depth was due to water bleeding and tamping during the placement of the fresh concrete. Shrinkage strains were measured within the beam depth by two types of strain gages, surface-attached and embedded. The shrinkage strain distribution within the beam depth showed a consistent tendency for the two types of gages. The test beams were cut into four sections after completion of the test, and the cutting planes were divided into four equal sub-areas to measure the aggregate concentration for each sub-area of the cutting plane. The aggregate concentration increased towards the bottom of the beam. The shrinkage strain distribution was estimated by Hobbs’ equation, which accounts for the change of aggregate volume concentration. PMID:28793677

  1. Learned Shrinkage Approach for Low-Dose Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zibulevsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We propose a direct nonlinear reconstruction algorithm for Computed Tomography (CT), designed to handle low-dose measurements. It involves the filtered back-projection and adaptive nonlinear filtering in both the projection and the image domains. The filter is an extension of the learned shrinkage method by Hel-Or and Shaked to the case of indirect observations. The shrinkage functions are learned using a training set of reference CT images. The optimization is performed with respect to an error functional in the image domain that combines the mean square error with a gradient-based penalty, promoting image sharpness. Our numerical simulations indicate that the proposed algorithm can manage well with noisy measurements, allowing a dose reduction by a factor of 4, while reducing noise and streak artifacts in the FBP reconstruction, comparable to the performance of a statistically based iterative algorithm. PMID:23864851

  2. Non-linear shrinkage estimation of large-scale structure covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    In many astrophysical settings, covariance matrices of large data sets have to be determined empirically from a finite number of mock realizations. The resulting noise degrades inference and precludes it completely if there are fewer realizations than data points. This work applies a recently proposed non-linear shrinkage estimator of covariance to a realistic example from large-scale structure cosmology. After optimizing its performance for the usage in likelihood expressions, the shrinkage estimator yields subdominant bias and variance comparable to that of the standard estimator with a factor of ∼50 less realizations. This is achieved without any prior information on the properties of the data or the structure of the covariance matrix, at a negligible computational cost.

  3. Porcine Intestinal Mast Cells. Evaluation of Different Fixatives for Histochemical Staining Techniques Considering Tissue Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, J.; Twardziok, S.; Huenigen, H.; Hirschberg, R.M.; Plendl, J.

    2013-01-01

    Staining of mast cells (MCs), including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF) has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkagedifferences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from data using different

  4. Effect of Water Vapor Pressure on Fatigue Crack Growth in Al-Zn-Cu-Mg Alloy Over Wide-Range Stress Intensity Factor Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    Lee United States Air Force Academy Title: Effect of Water Vapor Pressure on Fatigue Crack Growth in Al-Zn-Cu- Mg Alloy Over Wide-range Stress...Al- li-Cu- Mg alloys in vacuum, Metall Trans A, 24 (1993) 1807-1817. [46] R.D. Carter, E.W. Lee, E.A. Starke, C.J. Beevers, The Effect of...Vapor Pressure on Fatigue Crack Growth in Al-Zn-Cu- Mg Alloy Over Wide-range Stress Intensity Factor Loading J.T. Bums1, R.W. Bush2, J. Ai1, J.L Jones1

  5. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner.

  6. Identification of signalling cascades involved in red blood cell shrinkage and vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Elena B.; Beuger, Boukje M.; Klei, Thomas R.L.; Halonen, Pasi; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Even though red blood cell (RBC) vesiculation is a well-documented phenomenon, notably in the context of RBC aging and blood transfusion, the exact signalling pathways and kinases involved in this process remain largely unknown. We have established a screening method for RBC vesicle shedding using the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin which is a rapid and efficient method to promote vesiculation. In order to identify novel pathways stimulating vesiculation in RBC, we screened two libraries: the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the Selleckchem Kinase Inhibitor Library for their effects on RBC from healthy donors. We investigated compounds triggering vesiculation and compounds inhibiting vesiculation induced by ionomycin. We identified 12 LOPAC compounds, nine kinase inhibitors and one kinase activator which induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. Thus, we discovered several novel pathways involved in vesiculation including G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)–Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, the Jak–STAT (Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway and the Raf–MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)–ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated a link between casein kinase 2 (CK2) and RBC shrinkage via regulation of the Gardos channel activity. In addition, our data showed that inhibition of several kinases with unknown functions in mature RBC, including Alk (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. PMID:25757360

  7. Evidence for the correcting-mechanism explanation of the Kanizsa amodal shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Mitsudo, Hiroyuki; Nakamizo, Sachio

    2005-01-01

    An object phenomenally shrinks in its horizontal dimension when shown on a 2-D plane as if the central portion of the object were partially occluded by another vertical one in 3-D space (the Kanizsa amodal shrinkage). We examined the predictions of the correcting-mechanism hypothesis proposed by Ohtsuka and Ono (2002, Proceedings of SPIE 4864 167-174), which states that an inappropriate operation of the mechanism that corrects a phenomenal increase in monocularly visible areas accompanied by a stereoscopic occluder gives rise to the illusion. In this study we measured the perceived width (or height in experiment 3) of a square seen behind a rectangle, while controlling other factors which potentially influence the illusion, such as the division of space or depth stratification. The results of five experiments showed that (a) the perceived width was not influenced when the occluder had a relatively large binocular disparity, but was underestimated when the occluder did not have disparity, and (b) the shrinkage diminished when the foreground rectangle was transparent, was horizontally oriented, or contained no pictorial occlusion cues. These results support the hypothesis that the correcting mechanism, triggered by pictorial occlusion cues, contributes to the Kanizsa shrinkage.

  8. Wetlands shrinkage, fragmentation and their links to agriculture in the Muleng-Xingkai Plain, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaishan; Wang, Zongming; Li, Lin; Tedesco, Lenore; Li, Fang; Jin, Cui; Du, Jia

    2012-11-30

    In the past five decades, the wetlands in the Muleng-Xingkai Plain, Northeast China, have experienced rapid shrinkage and fragmentation. In this study, wetlands cover change and agricultural cultivation were investigated through a time series of thematic maps from 1954, and Landsat satellite images representing the last five decades (1976, 1986, 1995, 2000, and 2005). Wetlands shrinkage and fragmentation were studied based on landscape metrics and the land use changes transition matrix. Furthermore, the driving forces were explored according to socioeconomic development and major natural environmental factors. The results indicate a significant decrease in the wetlands area in the past five decades, with an average annual decrease rate of 9004 ha/yr. Of the 625,268 ha of native wetlands in 1954, approximately 64% has been converted to other land use types by 2005, of which conversion to cropland accounts for the largest share (83%). The number of patches decreased from 1272 (1954) to 197 (1986) and subsequently increased to 326 (2005). The mean patch size changed from 480 ha (1954) to 1521 ha (1976), and then steadily decreased to 574 ha (2005). The largest patch index (total core area index) indicates wetlands shrinkage with decreased values from 31.73 (177,935 ha) to 3.45 (39,421 ha) respectively. Climatic changes occurred over the study period, providing a potentially favorable environment for agricultural development. At the same time population, groundwater harvesting, and fertilizer application increased significantly, resulting in wetlands degradation. According to the results, the shrinkage and fragmentation of wetlands could be explained by socioeconomic development and secondarily aided by changing climatic conditions.

  9. The shrinkage behavior and surface topographical investigation for micro metal injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A.; Giannekas, N.; Marhöfer, D. M.; Tosello, G.; Hansen, H. N.

    2015-05-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) is a near net shape manufacturing technology that can produce highly complex and dimensionally stable parts for high end engineering applications. Despite the recent growth and industrial interest, micro metal molding is yet to be the field of extensive research especially when it is compared with micro molding of thermoplastics. The current paper presents a thorough investigation on the process of metal injection molding where it systematically characterizes the effects of important process conditions on the shrinkage and surface quality of molded parts with micro features. Effects of geometrical factors like feature dimensions and distance from the gate on the replication quality are studied. The influence of process conditions on the achievable roughness for the final metal parts is discussed based on the experimental findings. The test geometry is characterized by 2½D surface structures containing thin ribs of different aspect ratios and thicknesses in the sub-mm dimensional range. The test parts were molded from Catamold 316L with a conventional injection molding machine. Afterwards, the parts were de-binded and sintered to produce the final test samples. Among the different process parameters studied, the melt temperature was the most influential parameters for better replication and dimensional stability of the final part. The results presented in the paper clearly show that the shrinkage in metal part is not uniform in the micro scale. It depends on the feature dimensions and also on the process conditions. A thin section of the part exhibits higher relative shrinkage compared with a thicker section. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that a micro part molded by MIM process will have higher relative shrinkage compared to a macro part made with the same process.

  10. Shrinkage Stresses Generated during Resin-Composite Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Luis Felipe J.; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Silikas, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Many developments have been made in the field of resin composites for dental applications. However, the manifestation of shrinkage due to the polymerization process continues to be a major problem. The material's shrinkage, associated with dynamic development of elastic modulus, creates stresses within the material and its interface with the tooth structure. As a consequence, marginal failure and subsequent secondary caries, marginal staining, restoration displacement, tooth fracture, and/or post-operative sensitivity are clinical drawbacks of resin-composite applications. The aim of the current paper is to present an overview about the shrinkage stresses created during resin-composite applications, consequences, and advances. The paper is based on results of many researches that are available in the literature. PMID:20948573

  11. Improving the Incoherence of a Learned Dictionary via Rank Shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Ubaru, Shashanka; Seghouane, Abd-Krim; Saad, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    This letter considers the problem of dictionary learning for sparse signal representation whose atoms have low mutual coherence. To learn such dictionaries, at each step, we first update the dictionary using the method of optimal directions (MOD) and then apply a dictionary rank shrinkage step to decrease its mutual coherence. In the rank shrinkage step, we first compute a rank 1 decomposition of the column-normalized least squares estimate of the dictionary obtained from the MOD step. We then shrink the rank of this learned dictionary by transforming the problem of reducing the rank to a nonnegative garrotte estimation problem and solving it using a path-wise coordinate descent approach. We establish theoretical results that show that the rank shrinkage step included will reduce the coherence of the dictionary, which is further validated by experimental results. Numerical experiments illustrating the performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison to various other well-known dictionary learning algorithms are also presented.

  12. Compressive dynamic range imaging via Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin

    2016-12-01

    We apply the Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning into compressive dynamic-range imaging. By attenuating the luminous intensity impinging upon the detector at the pixel level, we demonstrate a conceptual design of an 8-bit camera to sample high-dynamic-range scenes with a single snapshot. Coding strategies for both monochrome and color cameras are proposed. A Bayesian reconstruction algorithm is developed to learn a dictionary in situ on the sampled image, for joint reconstruction and demosaicking. We use global-local shrinkage priors to learn the dictionary and dictionary coefficients representing the data. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed camera and the superior performance of the Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning algorithm.

  13. Brain shrinkage and subdural effusion associated with ACTH administration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Takeshige, H; Hara, H; Fukuyama, Y

    1982-01-01

    Sequential computed tomographic (CT) studies of 11 patients (aged five months to seven years) with intractable epilepsy treated with synthetic ACTH-Z showed brain shrinkage in all cases. Brain shrinkage started to appear on daily ACTH injections for seven days, reached the maximum within four weeks of administration (14 injections every day and then 7 injections every other day), and almost returned to the original status in seven out of nine cases which were followed up for one to three months after the therapy. The subjects aged less than two years showed more remarkable brain shrinkage than did those aged more than five years. Furthermore, two other cases were complicated by subdural effusion after ACTH therapy. It is the authors' assumption that both of these phenomena are caused by the high concentration of corticosteroid through a change of the water and electrolyte contents in the brain.

  14. Bayesian Nonparametric Shrinkage Applied to Cepheid Star Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Berger, James; Jefferys, William; Müller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian nonparametric regression with dependent wavelets has dual shrinkage properties: there is shrinkage through a dependent prior put on functional differences, and shrinkage through the setting of most of the wavelet coefficients to zero through Bayesian variable selection methods. The methodology can deal with unequally spaced data and is efficient because of the existence of fast moves in model space for the MCMC computation. The methodology is illustrated on the problem of modeling the oscillations of Cepheid variable stars; these are a class of pulsating variable stars with the useful property that their periods of variability are strongly correlated with their absolute luminosity. Once this relationship has been calibrated, knowledge of the period gives knowledge of the luminosity. This makes these stars useful as "standard candles" for estimating distances in the universe.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation Using Johnson Potential on Gd-Mg Alloy for Debye-Waller Factor and Debye Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, S.; Ramachandran, K.

    Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) on the thermal properties in Gd-Mg alloy becomes essential as there are only limited experiments available. A realistic Johnson potential is used to workout the specific heats for various temperatures and hence the Debye temperature. The results from the present simulation technique are very well compared with our shell model calculation. The need of better X-ray measurements for Debye-Waller factor and Debye temperature other than the measurements of Subadhra and Sirdeshmukh, is discussed in detail.

  16. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  17. Influence of Blasted Uranium Ore Heap on Radon Concentration in Confined Workspaces of Shrinkage Mining Stope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y. J.; Liang, T.; Ding, D. X.; Lei, B.; Su, H.; Zhang, Y. F.

    2017-07-01

    A calculation model for radon concentration in shrinkage mining stopes under various ventilation conditions was established in this study. The model accounts for the influence of permeability and area of the blasted ore heap, ventilation air quantity, and airflow direction on radon concentration in a confined workspace; these factors work together to allow the engineer to optimize the ventilation design. The feasibility and effectiveness of the model was verified by applying it to mines with elevated radon radiation exposure. The model was found to accurately changes in radon concentration according to the array of influence factors in underground uranium mines.

  18. Minimum risk wavelet shrinkage operator for Poisson image denoising.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wu; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2015-05-01

    The pixel values of images taken by an image sensor are said to be corrupted by Poisson noise. To date, multiscale Poisson image denoising techniques have processed Haar frame and wavelet coefficients--the modeling of coefficients is enabled by the Skellam distribution analysis. We extend these results by solving for shrinkage operators for Skellam that minimizes the risk functional in the multiscale Poisson image denoising setting. The minimum risk shrinkage operator of this kind effectively produces denoised wavelet coefficients with minimum attainable L2 error.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, shrinkage and curing kinetics of a new low-shrinkage urethane dimethacrylate monomer for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Atai, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Babanzadeh, Samal; Watts, David C

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study was to synthesize and characterize an isophorone-based urethane dimethacrylate (IP-UDMA) resin-monomer and to investigate its shrinkage and curing kinetics. The IP-UDMA monomer was synthesized through the reaction of polyethylene glycol 400 and isophorone diisocyanate followed by reacting with HEMA to terminate it with methacrylate end groups. The reaction was followed using a standard back titration method and FTIR spectroscopy. The final product was purified and characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and refractive index measurement. The shrinkage-strain of the specimens photopolymerized at circa 700mW/cm(2) was measured using the bonded-disk technique at 23, 35, and 45 degrees C. Initial shrinkage-strain-rates were obtained by numerical differentiation of shrinkage-strain data with respect to time. Degree-of-conversion of the specimens was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. The thermal curing kinetics of the monomer were also studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The characterization methods confirmed the suggested reaction route and the synthesized monomer. A low shrinkage-strain of about 4% was obtained for the new monomer. The results showed that the shrinkage-strain-rate of the monomer followed the autocatalytic model of Kamal and Sourour [Kamal MR, Sourour S. Kinetic and thermal characterization of thermoset cure. Polym Eng Sci 1973;13(1):59-64], which is used to describe the reaction kinetics of thermoset resins. The model parameters were calculated by linearization of the equation. The model prediction was in a good agreement with the experimental data. The properties of the new monomer compare favorably with properties of the commercially available resins.

  20. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    specimens than those cured for a shorter period. The third portion of the study evaluates the cracking tendency of concrete mixtures using the restrained ring tests. Different concrete ring thicknesses and drying conditions have been tested. The results indicate that specimens with thinner concrete rings crack earlier than those with thicker concrete rings. Exposing specimens to severe drying conditions results in the earlier formation of cracks, although it does not result in increased crack width. Mixtures with a lower water-cement (w/c) ratio crack earlier than mixtures with a higher w/c ratio. Concretes with a higher paste content crack earlier than concretes with a lower paste content. The final portion of the study details the development, construction, and preliminary performance (with most bridges at three years of age) of LC-HPC and control bridge decks in Kansas. The results indicate that the techniques embodied in the LC-HPC bridge deck specifications are easy to learn. Contractor personnel can be trained in a relatively short time. The techniques used for LC-HPC bridge decks are effective in reducing bridge deck cracking. The crack surveys indicate that LC-HPC bridge decks are performing much better than the control decks, with average crack densities reduced by about seventy five percent at three years of age. The factors that may affect bridge deck cracking are analyzed. The analyses indicate that an increase in paste content, slump, compressive strength, maximum daily air temperature, and daily air temperature range causes increased crack densities. Contractor techniques influence cracking. Keywords: bridge construction, bridge deck, contractor, concrete mix design, compressive strength, cracking, curing, evaporable water, fly ash, free shrinkage, high-performance concrete, non-evaporable water, paste content, restrained shrinkage, restrained ring tests, shrinkage reducing admixture, slump

  1. 3D-marginal adaptation versus setting shrinkage in light-cured microhybrid resin composites.

    PubMed

    Kakaboura, Afrodite; Rahiotis, Christos; Watts, David; Silikas, Nick; Eliades, George

    2007-03-01

    To comparatively evaluate the 3D-marginal adaptation to dentine versus shrinkage strain of two light-cured microhybrid resin composites. Dentine cavities (Ø: 2 mm; h: 1 mm; n=2x4) were prepared, filled with a single layer of EsthetX and Premise resin composites, respectively, without any adhesive cavity pre-treatment, and light-cured for 40s at 750 mW/cm2. All the specimens were imaged by computerized X-ray microtomography. Sequential sections (n=11) at 8.09 pixel size were taken at top, middle and bottom sites of each restoration relative to the axial wall and the interfacial micro-void volume fraction (%VF) was calculated. Shrinkage strain (%S) and strain rate (%SR) of the composites were measured by the bonded-disc method (n=4). The results of %VF per material and restoration site were subjected to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, whereas the results of %S and %SR were analysed by t-test (p=0.05). Regression analysis was performed to determine correlations between %PF and %S, %S(R). The results of %VF at top (t), middle (m) and bottom (b) restoration sites were (%, mean+/-S.D.): EsthetX 0.84+/-0.11 (t), 0.80+/-0.32 (m), 6.74+/-5.12 (b), Premise 0.99+/-0.24 (t), 0.92+/-0.38 (m), 1.72+/-0.97 (b). The results of %S were (%, mean+/-S.D.): EsthetX 2.60+/-0.29, Premise 1.91+/-0.10 and of %SR were (%, mean+/-S.D.): EsthetX 1.47+/-0.04, Premise 1.18+/-0.02. %VF(b) of EsthetX showed the highest values within and between the testing groups (p<0.05). %S and %S(R) values of EsthetX were significantly higher from Premise (p<0.05). Strong positive correlations were documented between %VF(b)-%S (r=0.843) and %VF(b)-%SR (r=0.943). The results confirmed a positive correlation between setting shrinkage and interfacial gap volume at bottom sites of light-cured microhybrid composite restoration due to differential shrinkage. Shrinkage strain rate seems to be a more sensitive factor in determining percentage volume of interfacial porosity at bottom restoration

  2. Water transfer properties and shrinkage in lime-based rendering mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizzi, A.; Cultrone, G.

    2012-04-01

    aspect to be considered in the evaluation of the decay caused by water is the high shrinkage suffered by renders when they are applied on an extended surface (i.e. a wall), especially when they are aerial lime-based mortars. The shrinkage causes the formation of fissures that become an easy way for water to entry and diffuse through the mortar pore system. This factor is rarely taken into consideration during the hydric assays performed in the laboratory, since mortar samples of 4x4x16 or 4x4x4 cm in size do not undergo to such degree of shrinkage. For this reason, we have also studied the shrinkage of these mortars and considered it in the final assessment of mortars hydric properties. The shrinkage was evaluated according to a non-standardized method, by means of a shrinkage-measuring device that measures the mortar dimensional variations over time. This measurement has shown that the highest the lime content the biggest the mortar shrinkage and, consequently, the strongest the decay due to water.

  3. Stiffness and shrinkage of green and dry joists

    Treesearch

    Lyman W. Wood; Lawrence A. Soltis

    1964-01-01

    This report gives information on the edgewise modulus of elasticity, stiffness, and shrinkage of 360 joists in three species, three grades, and two sizes, each species obtained from two sources. Each joist was evaluated nondestructively at four moisture content values ranging from the green condition to about 11 percent. Information is also given on specific gravity,...

  4. Flowable composite resins: do they decrease microleakage and shrinkage stress?

    PubMed

    Conte, Nicholas R; Goodchild, Jason H

    2013-06-01

    All flowable composites shrink and undergo polymerization stress; however, new technologic developments have sought to minimize this, while streamlining dental techniques and producing better results. The new category of bulk-fill flowable composites promotes the effective use of 4-mm increments while decreasing shrinkage stresses generated during polymerization.

  5. Fast generation of computer-generated holograms using wavelet shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-01-09

    Computer-generated holograms (CGHs) are generated by superimposing complex amplitudes emitted from a number of object points. However, this superposition process remains very time-consuming even when using the latest computers. We propose a fast calculation algorithm for CGHs that uses a wavelet shrinkage method, eliminating small wavelet coefficient values to express approximated complex amplitudes using only a few representative wavelet coefficients.

  6. Calcium channel blockers enhance sac shrinkage after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Sohrabi, Soroush; Flood, Karen; Griffin, Kathryn J; Rashid, S Tawqeer; Johnson, Anne B; Baxter, Paul D; Patel, Jai V; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-06-01

    Sac shrinkage is a surrogate marker of success after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). We set out to determine if any common cardioprotective medications had a beneficial effect on sac shrinkage. This retrospective observational study took place at Leeds Vascular Institute, a tertiary vascular unit in the Northern United Kingdom. The cohort comprised 149 patients undergoing EVAR between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2008. Medication use was recorded at intervention (verified at study completion in 33 patients), and patients were monitored for 2 years. The main outcome measures were the effect of medication on sac shrinkage as determined by percentage change in maximal idealized cross-sectional area of the aneurysm at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years by linear regression model, in addition to 2-year endoleak and death rates determined by a binary logistic regression model. After exclusions, 112 patients, who were a median age of 78 years (interquartile range, 78-83 years), remained for analysis. The median Glasgow Aneurysm Score was 85 (interquartile range, 79-92). At 2 years, mortality was 13.4%, endoleak developed in 37.5%, and significant endoleak developed in 14.3%. Patients taking a calcium channel blocker had enhanced sac shrinkage, compared with those not taking a calcium channel blocker, by 6.6% at 6 months (-3.0% to 16.3%, P = .09), 12.3% at 1 year (2.9% to 21.7%, P = .008), and 13.1% at 2 years (0.005% to 26.2%, P = .007) independent of other medication use, graft type, endoleak development, or death. Enhanced sac shrinkage occurred after EVAR in patients taking calcium channel blockers. This warrants further study in other centers and at the molecular level. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using hyperbranched oligomer functionalized glass fillers to reduce shrinkage stress

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Sheng; Azarnoush, Setareh; Smith, Ian R.; Cramer, Neil B.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N

    2012-01-01

    Objective Fillers are widely utilized to enhance the mechanical properties of polymer resins. However, polymerization stress has the potential to increase due to the higher elastic modulus achieved upon filler addition. Here, we demonstrate a hyperbranched oligomer functionalized glass filler UV curable resin composite which is able to reduce the shrinkage stress without sacrificing mechanical properties. Methods A 16-functional alkene-terminated hyperbranched oligomer is synthesized by thiol-acrylate and thiol-yne reactions and the product structure is analyzed by 1H-NMR, mass spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Surface functionalization of the glass filler is measured by thermogravimetric analysis. Reaction kinetics, mechanical properties and shrinkage stress are studied via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis and a tensometer, respectively. Results Silica nanoparticles are functionalized with a flexible 16-functional alkene-terminated hyperbranched oligomer which is synthesized by multistage thiol-ene/yne reactions. 93% of the particle surface was covered by this oligomer and an interfacial layer ranging from 0.7 – 4.5 nm thickness is generated. A composite system with these functionalized silica nanoparticles incorporated into the thiol-yne-methacrylate resin demonstrates 30% reduction of shrinkage stress (from 0.9 MPa to 0.6 MPa) without sacrificing the modulus (3100 ± 300 MPa) or glass transition temperature (62 ± 3 °C). Moreover, the shrinkage stress of the composite system builds up at much later stages of the polymerization as compared to the control system. Significance Due to the capability of reducing shrinkage stress without sacrificing mechanical properties, this composite system will be a great candidate for dental composite applications. PMID:22717296

  8. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  9. Further Evaluation of Covariate Analysis using Empirical Bayes Estimates in Population Pharmacokinetics: the Perception of Shrinkage and Likelihood Ratio Test.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu Steven; Yuan, Min; Yang, Haitao; Feng, Yan; Xu, Jinfeng; Pinheiro, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Covariate analysis based on population pharmacokinetics (PPK) is used to identify clinically relevant factors. The likelihood ratio test (LRT) based on nonlinear mixed effect model fits is currently recommended for covariate identification, whereas individual empirical Bayesian estimates (EBEs) are considered unreliable due to the presence of shrinkage. The objectives of this research were to investigate the type I error for LRT and EBE approaches, to confirm the similarity of power between the LRT and EBE approaches from a previous report and to explore the influence of shrinkage on LRT and EBE inferences. Using an oral one-compartment PK model with a single covariate impacting on clearance, we conducted a wide range of simulations according to a two-way factorial design. The results revealed that the EBE-based regression not only provided almost identical power for detecting a covariate effect, but also controlled the false positive rate better than the LRT approach. Shrinkage of EBEs is likely not the root cause for decrease in power or inflated false positive rate although the size of the covariate effect tends to be underestimated at high shrinkage. In summary, contrary to the current recommendations, EBEs may be a better choice for statistical tests in PPK covariate analysis compared to LRT. We proposed a three-step covariate modeling approach for population PK analysis to utilize the advantages of EBEs while overcoming their shortcomings, which allows not only markedly reducing the run time for population PK analysis, but also providing more accurate covariate tests.

  10. In vitro and in vivo degradation and mechanical properties of ZEK100 magnesium alloy coated with alginate, chitosan and mechano-growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Jin; Gao, Lilan; Li, Mingshuo

    2016-06-01

    The biocompatibility, ultimate loading capacity and biodegradability of magnesium alloy make it an ideal candidate in biomedical fields. Fabrications of multilayered coatings carrying sodium alginate (ALG), chitosan (CHI) and mechano-growth factor (MGF) on fluoride-pretreated ZEK100 magnesium alloy have been obtained via layer by layer (LBL) to reduce the degradation rate of magnesium alloy in this study. The modified surfaces of ZEK100 substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and CARE EUT-1020 tester. Results reveal that multilayer-coated magnesium alloy can be successfully obtained with smooth surface morphology, and the mechanical properties of coated samples are almost the same as those of uncoated samples. However, the fatigue life of coated ZEK100 is slightly larger than that of uncoated samples after 1 day of immersion. By comparing the degradation of uncoated and multilayer-coated ZEK100 samples in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it is found that the degradation rate of ZEK100 samples can be inhibited by LBL modification on the surface of the sample; and the corrosion rate in vivo is lower than that in vitro, which help solve the rapid degradation problem of magnesium alloy. In terms of the visible symptom of tissues in the left femur medullary cavity and material responses on the surface, multilayer-coated ZEK100 magnesium alloy has a good biocompatibility. These results indicate that multilayer-coated ZEK100 may be a promising material for bone tissue repair.

  11. Shrinkage and footage loss from drying 4/4-inch hard maple lumber.

    Treesearch

    Daniel E. Dunmire

    1968-01-01

    Equations are presented for estimating shrinkage and resulting footage losses due to drying hard maple lumber. The equations, based on board shrinkage data taken from a representative lumber sample, are chiefly intended for use with lots of hard maple lumber, such as carloads, truckloads, or kiln loads, but also can be used for estimating the average shrinkage of...

  12. Factors Affecting the Nucleation Kinetics of Microporosity Formation in Aluminum Alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Reilly, Carl; Zhu, Jindong

    2012-03-01

    Metal cleanliness is one of the most critical parameters affecting microporosity formation in aluminum alloy castings. It is generally acknowledged that oxide inclusions in the melt promote microporosity formation by facilitating pore nucleation. In this study, microporosity formation under different casting conditions, which aimed to manipulate the tendency to form and entrain oxide films in small directionally cast A356 samples was investigated. Castings were prepared with and without the aid of argon gas shielding and with a varying pour surface area. Two alloy variants of A356 were tested in which the main difference was Sr content. Porous disc filtration analysis was used to assess the melt cleanliness and identify the inclusions in the castings. The porosity volume fraction and size distribution were measured using X-ray micro-tomography analysis. The measurements show a clear increment in the volume fraction, number density, and pore size in a manner consistent with an increasing tendency to form and entrain oxide films during casting. By fitting the experimental results with a comprehensive pore formation model, an estimate of the pore nucleation population has been made. The model predicts that increasing the tendency to form oxide films increases both the number of nucleation sites and reduces the supersaturation necessary for pore nucleation in A356 castings. Based on the model predictions, Sr modification impacts both the nucleation kinetics and the pore growth kinetics via grain structure.

  13. TH-E-BRF-01: Exploiting Tumor Shrinkage in Split-Course Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, J; Craft, D; Hong, T; Papp, D; Wolfgang, J; Bortfeld, T; Ramakrishnan, J; Salari, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In split-course radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated by radiobiological considerations. However, using modern image-guidance, it also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. In this work, we consider the optimal design of split-course treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. Methods: We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of splitcourse radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. Results: We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of split-course treatments in terms of liver sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large liver dose reductions by more than a factor of two for plausible model parameters. Conclusion: The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at split-course radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced

  14. Analysis of the Influence of Thermal Treatment on the Dry Turning of Al-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salguero, J.; Carrilero, M. S.; Batista, M.; Álvarez, M.; Marcos, M.

    2009-11-01

    Manufacturing performance improvement must take into account economic, energetic and environmental considerations. Thus, when intermediate processes are avoided, manufacturing performance is improved from the three cited viewpoints. In the aerospace industry, pre-forms of UNS A92024 (Al-Cu) alloy-based structural elements are machined in T3 temper state previously to be thermally treated to reach O state, in order to facilitate its posterior plastic forming process. In this work, a comparative study of the dry turning of UNS A92024 alloy in both states has been carried out in order to eliminate the thermal treatment process. This study has been based on the finishing surface quality, cutting tool changes and chip arrangement. SOM/SEM/EDS analysis has shown that the main deviations are caused by secondary adhesion effects, which involve not only changes in the initial tool geometry but also a reduction of the chip shrinkage factor as a consequence of the lateral compression. However, the obtained results have revealed that alloy in O state can be dry-machined at cutting speeds higher than 120 m/min in order to reach similar quality levels as alloy in T3 state.

  15. Variant selection of twins with low Schmid factors in cross grain boundary twin pairs in a magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.-Z.; Zhang, Y. D.; Wagner, F.; Juan, P.-A.; Berbenni, S.; Capolungo, L.; Lecomte, J.-S.; Richeton, T.

    2015-04-01

    Samples of magnesium AZ31 alloys are deformed in compression at room temperature under a strain rate of 1×10-3 s-1. The initial texture with respect to the loading direction is favorable for {10-12}<-1011> extension twinning during the deformation. At an engineering strain of 2.75%, many extension twins are found to be connected with each other at grain boundaries, forming cross grain boundary twin pairs. Some have low positive or even negative Schmid factors (SFs). The variant selection of them are interpreted in terms of shear accommodations. The observed twin variants require the least or no accommodation through deformation modes with high CRSSs, but the most or more accommodation through those with low CRSSs.

  16. Determination of in vitro lung solubility and intake-to-dose conversion factor for tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Labone, Thomas R; Staack, Gregory C; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Varallo, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the U.S. Department of Energy Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide was determined to be 9.4 × 10 Sv Bq, which is less than the DCF for tritiated water. Therefore, the radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

  17. DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

    2011-11-11

    A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

  18. Correction factors for on-line microprobe analysis of multielement alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.; Brewer, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line correction technique was developed for the conversion of electron probe X-ray intensities into concentrations of emitting elements. This technique consisted of off-line calculation and representation of binary interaction data which were read into an on-line minicomputer to calculate variable correction coefficients. These coefficients were used to correct the X-ray data without significantly increasing computer core requirements. The binary interaction data were obtained by running Colby's MAGIC 4 program in the reverse mode. The data for each binary interaction were represented by polynomial coefficients obtained by least-squares fitting a third-order polynomial. Polynomial coefficients were generated for most of the common binary interactions at different accelerating potentials and are included. Results are presented for the analyses of several alloy standards to demonstrate the applicability of this correction procedure.

  19. Modelling of elastoplastic damage in concrete due to desiccation shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, F.; Burlion, N.; Shao, J. F.

    2002-07-01

    We present a numerical modelling of elastoplastic damage due to drying shrinkage of concrete in the framework of mechanics of partially saturated porous media. An elastoplastic model coupled with isotropic damage is first formulated. Two plastic flow mechanisms are involved, controlled by applied stress and suction, respectively. A general concept of net effective stress is used in take into account effects of capillary pressure and material damage on stress-controlled plastic deformation. Damage evolution depends both on elastic and plastic strains. The model's parameters are determined or chosen from relevant experimental data. Comparisons between numerical simulations and experimental data are presented to show the capacity of model to reproduce mains features of concrete behaviour under mechanical loading and during drying shrinkage of concrete. An example of application concerning drying of a concrete wall is finally presented. The results obtained allow to show potential capacity of proposed model for numerical modelling of complex coupling processes in concrete structures.

  20. Glacier shrinkage driving global changes in downstream systems.

    PubMed

    Milner, Alexander M; Khamis, Kieran; Battin, Tom J; Brittain, John E; Barrand, Nicholas E; Füreder, Leopold; Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Gíslason, Gísli Már; Jacobsen, Dean; Hannah, David M; Hodson, Andrew J; Hood, Eran; Lencioni, Valeria; Ólafsson, Jón S; Robinson, Christopher T; Tranter, Martyn; Brown, Lee E

    2017-09-12

    Glaciers cover ∼10% of the Earth's land surface, but they are shrinking rapidly across most parts of the world, leading to cascading impacts on downstream systems. Glaciers impart unique footprints on river flow at times when other water sources are low. Changes in river hydrology and morphology caused by climate-induced glacier loss are projected to be the greatest of any hydrological system, with major implications for riverine and near-shore marine environments. Here, we synthesize current evidence of how glacier shrinkage will alter hydrological regimes, sediment transport, and biogeochemical and contaminant fluxes from rivers to oceans. This will profoundly influence the natural environment, including many facets of biodiversity, and the ecosystem services that glacier-fed rivers provide to humans, particularly provision of water for agriculture, hydropower, and consumption. We conclude that human society must plan adaptation and mitigation measures for the full breadth of impacts in all affected regions caused by glacier shrinkage.

  1. New System of Shrinkage Measurement through Cement Mortars Drying

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Saiz, Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; García-Fuentevilla, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Cement mortar is used as a conglomerate in the majority of construction work. There are multiple variants of cement according to the type of aggregate used in its fabrication. One of the major problems that occurs while working with this type of material is the excessive loss of moisture during cement hydration (setting and hardening), known as shrinkage, which provokes a great number of construction pathologies that are difficult to repair. In this way, the design of a new sensor able to measure the moisture loss of mortars at different age levels is useful to establish long-term predictions concerning mortar mass volume loss. The purpose of this research is the design and fabrication of a new capacitive sensor able to measure the moisture of mortars and to relate it with the shrinkage. PMID:28272297

  2. Reversible cerebral shrinkage in kwashiorkor: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Gunston, G D; Burkimsher, D; Malan, H; Sive, A A

    1992-08-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is associated with cerebral atrophy which may be detrimental to intellectual development. The aim of this study was to document the anatomical abnormalities which lead to the appearance of cerebral atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and to monitor changes during nutritional rehabilitation. Twelve children aged 6 to 37 months requiring admission to hospital for the treatment of kwashiorkor were studied. The children were evaluated clinically, biochemically, and by MRI of their brains on admission and 30 and 90 days later. Brain shrinkage was present in every child on admission. White and grey matter appeared equally affected and the myelination was normal for age. At 90 days, the cerebral changes had resolved in nine and improved substantially in the remainder, by which time serum proteins and weight for age were within the normal range. The findings of this study suggest that brain shrinkage associated with kwashiorkor reverses rapidly with nutritional rehabilitation.

  3. Health, Height, Height Shrinkage, and SES at Older Ages: Evidence from China†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Lei, Xiaoyan; Ridder, Geert; Strauss, John

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we build on the literature that examines associations between height and health outcomes of the elderly. We investigate the associations of height shrinkage at older ages with socioeconomic status, finding that height shrinkage for both men and women is negatively associated with better schooling, current urban residence, and household per capita expenditures. We then investigate the relationships between pre-shrinkage height, height shrinkage, and a rich set of health outcomes of older respondents, finding that height shrinkage is positively associated with poor health outcomes across a variety of outcomes, being especially strong for cognition outcomes. PMID:26594311

  4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE SHRINKAGE STRESS OF COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; de Araujo, Paulo Amarante; Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shrinkage stress of composite resins by three methods. In the first method, composites were inserted between two stainless steel plates. One of the plates was connected to a 20 kgf load cell of a universal testing machine (EMIC-DL-500). In the second method, disk-shaped cavities were prepared in 2-mm-thick Teflon molds and filled with the different composites. Gaps between the composites and molds formed after polymerization were evaluated microscopically. In the third method, the wall-to-wall shrinkage stress of the resins that were placed in bovine dentin cavities was evaluated. The gaps were measured microscopically. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The obtained contraction forces were: Grandio = 12.18 ± 0.428N; Filtek Z 250 = 11.80 ± 0.760N; Filtek Supreme = 11.80 ± 0.707 N; and Admira = 11.89 ± 0.647 N. The gaps obtained between composites and Teflon molds were: Filtek Z 250 = 0.51 ± 0.0357%; Filtek Supreme = 0.36 ± 0.0438%; Admira = 0.25 ± 0.0346% and Grandio = 0.16 ± 0.008%. The gaps obtained in wall-to-wall contraction were: Filtek Z 250 = 11.33 ± 2.160 μm; Filtek Supreme = 10.66 ± 1.211μm; Admira = 11.16 ± 2.041 μm and Grandio = 10.50 ± 1.224 μm. There were no significant differences among the composite resins obtained with the first (shrinkage stress generated during polymerization) and third method (wall-to-wall shrinkage). The composite resins obtained with the second method (Teflon method) differed significantly regarding gap formation. PMID:19089286

  5. The role of mutational dynamics in genome shrinkage.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, Milan J A; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2007-11-01

    Genome shrinkage occurs after whole genome duplications (WGDs) and in the evolution of parasitic or symbiotic species. The dynamics of this process, whether it occurs by single gene deletions or also by larger deletions are however unknown. In yeast, genome shrinkage has occurred after a WGD. Using a computational model of genome evolution, we show that in a random genome single gene deletions cannot explain the observed pattern of gene loss in yeast. The distribution of genes deleted per event can be very well described by a geometric distribution, with a mean of 1.1 genes per event. In terms of deletions of a stretch of base pairs, we find that a geometric distribution with an average of 500-600 base pairs per event describes the data very well. Moreover, in the model, as in the data, gene pairs that have a small intergenic distance are more likely to be both deleted. This proves that simultaneous deletion of multiple genes causes the observed pattern of gene deletions, rather than deletion of functionally clustered genes by selection. Furthermore, we found that in the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola larger deletions than in yeast are necessary to explain the clustering of deleted genes. We show that the excess clustering of deleted genes in B. aphidicola can be explained by the clustering of genes in operons. Therefore, we show that selection has little effect on the clustering of deleted genes after the WGD in yeast, while it has during genome shrinkage in B. aphidicola.

  6. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  7. Study of Magnetic Alloys: Critical Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAGNETIC ALLOYS, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES), ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COBALT ALLOYS, GADOLINIUM ALLOYS, GOLD ALLOYS, IRON ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, PALLADIUM ALLOYS, PLATINUM ALLOYS, RHODIUM ALLOYS

  8. Shrinkage processes in standard-size Norway spruce wood specimens with different vulnerability to cavitation

    PubMed Central

    ROSNER, SABINE; KARLSSON, BO; KONNERTH, JOHANNES; HANSMANN, CHRISTIAN

    2011-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to observe the radial shrinkage of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.)] trunkwood specimens with different hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation from the fully saturated state until the overall shrinkage reaches a stable value, and to relate wood shrinkage and recovery from shrinkage to cavitations of the water column inside the tracheids. Radial shrinkage processes in standard-size sapwood specimens (6 mm × 6 mm × 100 mm; radial, tangential and longitudinal) obtained at different positions within the trunk, representing different ages of the cambium, were compared. Cavitation events were assessed by acoustic emission (AE) testing, hydraulic vulnerability by the AE feature analysis and shrinkage was calculated from the changes in contact pressure between the 150 kHz AE transducer and the wood specimen. Two shrinkage processes were observed in both juvenile (annual rings 1 and 2) and mature wood (annual rings 17–19), the first one termed tension shrinkage and the second one cell wall shrinkage process, which started when most of the tracheids reached relative water contents below fiber saturation. Maximum tension shrinkage coincided with high-energy AEs, and the periods of shrinkage recovery could be traced to tension release due to cavitation. Juvenile wood, which was less sensitive to cavitation, had lower earlywood tracheid diameters and was less prone to deformation due to tensile strain than mature wood, showed a lower cell wall shrinkage, and thus total shrinkage. Earlywood lumen diameters and maximum tension shrinkage were strongly positively related to each other, meaning that bigger tracheids are more prone to deformation at the same water tension than the smaller tracheids. PMID:19797244

  9. A semi-automated 2D/3D marker-based registration algorithm modelling prostate shrinkage during radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Budiharto, Tom; Slagmolen, Pieter; Hermans, Jeroen; Maes, Frederik; Verstraete, Jan; Heuvel, Frank Van den; Depuydt, Tom; Oyen, Raymond; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-03-01

    Currently, most available patient alignment tools based on implanted markers use manual marker matching and rigid registration transformations to measure the needed translational shifts. To quantify the particular effect of prostate gland shrinkage, implanted gold markers were tracked during a course of radiotherapy including an isotropic scaling factor to model prostate shrinkage. Eight patients with prostate cancer had gold markers implanted transrectally and seven were treated with (neo) adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. After patient alignment to skin tattoos, orthogonal electronic portal images (EPIs) were taken. A semi-automated 2D/3D marker-based registration was performed to calculate the necessary couch shifts. The registration consists of a rigid transformation combined with an isotropic scaling to model prostate shrinkage. The inclusion of an isotropic shrinkage model in the registration algorithm cancelled the corresponding increase in registration error. The mean scaling factor was 0.89+/-0.09. For all but two patients, a decrease of the isotropic scaling factor during treatment was observed. However, there was almost no difference in the translation offset between the manual matching of the EPIs to the digitally reconstructed radiographs and the semi-automated 2D/3D registration. A decrease in the intermarker distance was found correlating with prostate shrinkage rather than with random marker migration. Inclusion of shrinkage in the registration process reduces registration errors during a course of radiotherapy. Nevertheless, this did not lead to a clinically significant change in the proposed table translations when compared to translations obtained with manual marker matching without a scaling correction.

  10. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems.

    PubMed

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-07-14

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  11. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    PubMed Central

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined. PMID:28773696

  12. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  13. Visualization study on distortion of a metal frame by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of resin.

    PubMed

    Kakino, Ken; Endo, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masanori; Furuta, Kunihiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Three types of metal specimens (ring-shaped, plate-shaped, and a simulated anterior arch) for distortion observations were made from Au-Ag-Pd-Cu alloy. Distortion due to polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing acrylic resin containing 4-META (4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride, 4-META resin) could be visualized for the ring-shaped specimen, which showed increasing distortion of the metal frame upon adhesion of the resin to the outer metal surface. Distortion of the plateshaped specimen adhering to 4-META resin decreased with increasing thickness of the cured resin. The distortion of the metal frame simulating an anterior arch of a six-unit bridge with a facing composite resin showed that the curvature of the metal frame was larger after curing of the facing composite resin. However, it recovered most of its original curvature with an associated increase in the number of cracks between the crowns after trimming the resin to a tooth profile.

  14. Optimal tumor shrinkage predicts long-term outcome in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with target therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yang; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Jianwei; Hong, Shaodong; Sheng, Jin; Zhang, Zhonghan; Yang, Yunpeng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Hongyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapies for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation positive. Because these targeted therapies could cause tumor necrosis and shrinkage, the purpose of the study is to search for a value of optimal tumor shrinkage as an appropriate indicator of outcome for advanced NSCLC. A total of 88 NSCLC enrollees of 3 clinical trials (IRESSA registration clinical trial, TRUST study and ZD6474 study), who received Gefitinib (250 mg, QD), Erlotinib (150 mg, QD), and ZD6474 (100 mg, QD), respectively, during December 2003 and October 2007, were retrospectively analyzed. The response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) were used to identify responders, who had complete response (CR) or partial responses (PR) and nonresponders who had stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to find the optimal tumor shrinkage as an indicator for tumor therapeutic outcome. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between responders and nonresponders stratified based on radiologic criteria. Among the 88 NSCLC patients, 26 were responders and 62 were nonresponders based on RECIST 1.0. ROC indicated that 8.32% tumor diameter shrinkage in the sum of the longest tumor diameter (SLD) was the cutoff point of tumor shrinkage outcomes, resulting in 46 responders (≤8.32%) and 42 nonresponders (≥8.32%). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses indicated that (1) the responders (≤8.32%) and nonresponders (≥ −8.32%) were significantly different in median PFS (13.40 vs 1.17 months, P < 0.001) and OS (19.80 vs 7.90 months, P < 0.001) and (2) –8.32% in SLD could be used as the optimal threshold for PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 8.11, 95% CI, 3.75 to 17.51, P < 0.001) and OS

  15. Influence of curing light power and energy on shrinkage force and acoustic emission characteristics of a dental composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Jae; Gu, Ja-Uk; Choi, Nak-Sam; Arakawa, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the density effects of light power and energy on the volumetric polymerization shrinkage and acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of a dental resin composite in the cavities of human teeth. Two experiments were performed at different power levels (1,000 and 4,000 mW/cm2) using a light curing unit: (1) cylindrical cavities with diameters of 4 mm and depths of 2 mm were constructed using two symmetric steel molds. The cavities were filled with resin, and the shrinkage force during polymerization was measured using a load cell attached to the mold. Polymerization shrinkage forces were measured under four conditions (1,000 mW/cm2 x 10 seconds, 1,000 mW/cm2 x 20 seconds, 4,000 mW/cm2 x 3 seconds, and 4,000 mW/cm2 x 5 seconds); (2) tooth specimens with cavity diameters of 6 mm and depths of 2 mm were made from human molars. AE signals during polymerization shrinkage were monitored in real time for 10 minutes after irradiation and two AE factors (amplitude for defect size and hit number for defect number) were assessed in the examination of defects. Two levels of light energy (20 J/cm2 = 1,000 mW/cm2 x 20 seconds and 12 J/cm2 = 4,000 mW/cm2 x 3 seconds) were used. Shrinkage occurred more quickly at 4,000 mW/cm2 than at 1,000 mW/cm2 during the initial phase. The shrinkage force became almost the same for equivalent light energy as time increased. Higher light energy (20 J/cm2) under low-power conditions (1,000 mW/cm2) caused larger cumulative numbers of AE hits than did lower light energy (12 J/cm2) under high-power conditions (4,000 mW/cm2). At 4,000 mW/cm2 and 12 J/cm2 (i.e., high power, low energy), the average amplitude of the AE signals was larger than at 1,000 mW/cm2 and 20 J/cm2 (low power, high energy).

  16. Effect of a weightlifting belt on spinal shrinkage.

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, N D; Reilly, T

    1991-01-01

    Spinal loading during weightlifting results in a loss of stature which has been attributed to a decrease in height of the intervertebral discs--so-called 'spinal shrinkage'. Belts are often used during the lifting of heavy weights, purportedly to support, stabilize and thereby attenuate the load on the spine. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a standard weightlifting belt in attenuating spinal shrinkage. Eight male subjects with a mean age of 24.8 years performed two sequences of circuit weight-training, one without a belt and on a separate occasion with a belt. The circuit training regimen consisted of six common weight-training exercises. These were performed in three sets of ten with a change of exercise after each set of ten repetitions. A stadiometer sensitive to within 0.01 mm was used to record alterations in stature. Measurements of stature were taken before and after completion of the circuit. The absolute visual analogue scale (AVAS) was used to measure the discomfort and pain intensity resulting from each of the two conditions. The circuit weight-training caused stature losses of 3.59mm without the belt and 2.87 mm with the belt (P greater than 0.05). The subjects complained of significantly less discomfort when the belt was worn (P less than 0.05). The degree of shrinkage was significantly correlated (r = 0.752, P less than 0.05) with perceived discomfort but only when the belt was not worn. These results suggest the potential benefits of wearing a weightlifting belt and support the hypothesis that the belt can help in stabilizing the trunk. Images Figure 1 PMID:1810615

  17. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultraseal XT and Wave). Measurements for linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces were performed using custom made measuring devices. Polymerization of the test materials was carried out for 60 seconds by means of a light curing unit, and each property was measured for 180 seconds from the start of curing in eight specimens for each material. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) test (p=0.05) and simple linear regression. A wide range of values was recorded for linear polymerization displacement (26.61 to 80.74 microns) and polymerization forces (3.23 to 7.48 kilograms). Statistically significant differences among materials were found for both properties studied. Very few materials (Freedom, Glacier, and Photo SC) presented low values of linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces (similar to hybrid resin composites), while the majority of materials presented very high values in both properties studied. Study of the shrinkage kinetics revealed the exponential growth process of both properties. The polymerization forces development exhibited a few seconds delay over linear polymerization displacement. Simple linear regression showed that the two polymerization shrinkage properties that were studied were not highly correlated (r2=0.59).

  18. Laser guide star spot shrinkage for affordable wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Wilfried; Hugot, Emmanuel; Fusco, Thierry; Neichel, Benoit; Ferrari, Marc; Correia, Carlos; Pueyo, Laurent; Dohlen, Kjetil; Pascal, Sandrine; Vola, Pascal; Sauvage, Jean-François; El Hadi, Kacem; Gach, Jean Luc

    2016-07-01

    Innovative optical designs allow tackling the spot elongation issues in Shack-Hartman based laser guide star wavefront sensors. We propose two solutions using either a combination of two arrays of freeform microlenses, or a combination of freeform optics, to perform a shrinkage of the laser spots as well as a magnification of the SH focal plane. These approaches will drastically reduce the number of needed pixels, thus making possible the use of existing detectors. We present the recent advances on this activity as well as the estimation of performance, linearity and sensitivity of the compressed system in presence of aberrations.

  19. Sonar target enhancement by shrinkage of incoherent wavelet coefficients.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alan J; van Vossen, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Background reverberation can obscure useful features of the target echo response in broadband low-frequency sonar images, adversely affecting detection and classification performance. This paper describes a resolution and phase-preserving means of separating the target response from the background reverberation noise using a coherence-based wavelet shrinkage method proposed recently for de-noising magnetic resonance images. The algorithm weights the image wavelet coefficients in proportion to their coherence between different looks under the assumption that the target response is more coherent than the background. The algorithm is demonstrated successfully on experimental synthetic aperture sonar data from a broadband low-frequency sonar developed for buried object detection.

  20. A fast-firing shrinkage rate controlled dilatometer using an infrared image furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenberger, W. S.; Speyer, R. F.

    1994-03-01

    A novel dilatometer design is described for performing rate controlled sintering experiments on powder compacts. Previous rate controlled sintering systems, which control the shrinkage of a sintering compact, possessed only limited shrinkage rate control and shrinkage profile complexity due to the high thermal mass of conventional furnaces and dilatometers. The instrument described in this work features an infrared imaging furnace and a low thermal mass dilatometer assembly which together provide a very rapid temperature response. The system is capable of heating and cooling ceramic samples at up to 500 °C/min. Shrinkage control is accomplished using a modified, computer interfaced proportional-integral-derivative algorithm, and tests on glass-alumina composite samples demonstrated excellent shrinkage control with differences routinely less than 0.2% between the set point and actual shrinkage.

  1. A new method to measure the polymerization shrinkage kinetics of light cured composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, I B; Cho, B H; Son, H H; Um, C M

    2005-04-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new measurement method to determine the initial dynamic volumetric shrinkage of composite resins during polymerization, and to investigate the effect of curing light intensity on the polymerization shrinkage kinetics. The instrument was basically an electromagnetic balance that was constructed with a force transducer using a position sensitive photo detector (PSPD) and a negative feedback servo amplifier. The volumetric change of composites during polymerization was detected continuously as a buoyancy change in distilled water by means of the Archimedes' principle. Using this new instrument, the dynamic patterns of the polymerization shrinkage of seven commercial composite resins were measured. The polymerization shrinkage of the composites was 1.92 approximately 4.05 volume %. The shrinkage of a packable composite was the lowest, and that of a flowable composite was the highest. The maximum rate of polymerization shrinkage increased with increasing light intensity but the peak shrinkage rate time decreased with increasing light intensity. A strong positive relationship was observed between the square root of the light intensity and the maximum shrinkage rate. The shrinkage rate per unit time, dVol%/dt, showed that the instrument can be a valuable research method for investigating the polymerization reaction kinetics. This new shrinkage-measuring instrument has some advantages that it was insensitive to temperature changes and could measure the dynamic volumetric shrinkage in real time without complicated processes. Therefore, it can be used to characterize the shrinkage kinetics in a wide range of commercial and experimental visible-light-cure materials in relation to their composition and chemistry.

  2. Alternate stresses and temperature variation as factors of influence of ultrasonic vibration on mechanical and functional properties of shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Sergey; Volkov, Alexander; Resnina, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the main factors in a variation in the shape memory alloy properties under insonation are heating of the material and alternate stresses action. In the present work the experimental study of the mechanical behaviour and functional properties of shape memory alloy under the action of alternate stresses and varying temperature was carried out. The data obtained had demonstrated that an increase in temperature of the sample resulted in a decrease or increase in deformation stress depending on the structural state of the TiNi sample. It was shown that in the case of the alloy in the martensitic state, a decrease in stress was observed, and on the other hand, in the austenitic state an increase in stress took place. It was found that action of alternate stresses led to appearance of strain jumps on the strain-temperature curves during cooling and heating the sample through the temperature range of martensitic transformation under the constant stress. The value of the strain jumps depended on the amplitude of alternate stresses and the completeness of martensitic transformation. It was shown that the heat action of ultrasonic vibration to the mechanical behaviour of shape memory alloys was due to the non-monotonic dependence of yield stress on the temperature. The force action of ultrasonic vibration to the functional properties was caused by formation of additional oriented martensite.

  3. Differential tissue shrinkage and compression in the z-axis: implications for optical disector counting in vibratome-, plastic- and cryosections.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Dean; Hatton, William J; Rind, Howard B; Rosen, Glenn D; von Bartheld, Christopher S

    2003-03-30

    The optical disector is among the most efficient cell counting methods, but its accuracy depends on an undistorted particle distribution in the z-axis of tissue sections. Because the optical disector samples particle densities exclusively in the center of sections, it is essential for unbiased estimates of particle numbers that differential shrinkage or compression (and resulting differences in particle densities along the z-axis) are known and corrected. Here we examined, quantified, and compared differential shrinkage and compression of vibratome-, celloidin- and cryosections. Vibratome sections showed a significant z-axis distortion, while celloidin- and cryosections were minimally distorted. Results were directly compared with previous data obtained from paraffin and methacrylate sections. We conclude that z-axis distortion varies significantly between embedding and sectioning methods, and that vibratome-, methacrylate- and paraffin sections can result in grossly biased estimates. We describe a simple method for assessing differential z-axis shrinkage or compression, as well as simple strategies to minimize the bias of the optical disector. Minimal bias can be achieved by either adjusting the placement and extent of counting boxes and guard spaces for sampling, or by applying a correction factor in cases when guard spaces are deemed essential for particle recognition.

  4. Using "spinal shrinkage" as a trigger for motivating students to learn about obesity and adopt a healthy lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Yar, Talay

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is a global problem; however, relatively little attention is directed toward preparing and inspiring students of medicine and allied medical sciences to address this serious matter. Students are not routinely exposed to the assessment methods for obesity, its overall prevalence, causative factors, short- and long-term consequences, and its management by lifestyle modification. This physiology laboratory exercise involving students of medicine (n = 106) was developed to 1) introduce medical students to methods of obesity assessment and to differentiate between general and abdominal obesity, 2) generate an interest and sensitivity about obesity, and 3) stimulate thinking about modification of their lifestyle in relation to eating habits, weight control, and physical activity. Spinal shrinkage (the difference between the standing height of a person and his/her recumbent length) was used as an immediate observable parameter to demonstrate the effect of adiposity. Spinal shrinkage is recognized as an index of the compressive forces acting on the spine and is related to body mass index. A positive correlation (r = 0.365, P < 0.05) was observed between body mass index and spinal shrinkage. A questionnaire was used to assess student responses to this exercise. Students were motivated to engage in more physical activity (74%), adopt healthier eating (63%), and enhance their knowledge about obesity (67%). They expressed keen interest in the laboratory exercise and found the sessions enjoyable (91%). The laboratory exercise proved to be a success in motivating the students to actively learn and inquire about obesity and to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

  5. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  6. The Sparse Laplacian Shrinkage Estimator for High-Dimensional Regression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Ma, Shuangge; Li, Hongzhe; Zhang, Cun-Hui

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new penalized method for variable selection and estimation that explicitly incorporates the correlation patterns among predictors. This method is based on a combination of the minimax concave penalty and Laplacian quadratic associated with a graph as the penalty function. We call it the sparse Laplacian shrinkage (SLS) method. The SLS uses the minimax concave penalty for encouraging sparsity and Laplacian quadratic penalty for promoting smoothness among coefficients associated with the correlated predictors. The SLS has a generalized grouping property with respect to the graph represented by the Laplacian quadratic. We show that the SLS possesses an oracle property in the sense that it is selection consistent and equal to the oracle Laplacian shrinkage estimator with high probability. This result holds in sparse, high-dimensional settings with p ≫ n under reasonable conditions. We derive a coordinate descent algorithm for computing the SLS estimates. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate the performance of the SLS method and a real data example is used to illustrate its application. PMID:22102764

  7. Impaired decision-making and brain shrinkage in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, A-P; Rauchs, G; La Joie, R; Mézenge, F; Boudehent, C; Vabret, F; Segobin, S; Viader, F; Allain, P; Eustache, F; Pitel, A-L; Beaunieux, H

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol-dependent individuals usually favor instant gratification of alcohol use and ignore its long-term negative consequences, reflecting impaired decision-making. According to the somatic marker hypothesis, decision-making abilities are subtended by an extended brain network. As chronic alcohol consumption is known to be associated with brain shrinkage in this network, the present study investigated relationships between brain shrinkage and decision-making impairments in alcohol-dependent individuals early in abstinence using voxel-based morphometry. Thirty patients performed the Iowa Gambling Task and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging investigation (1.5T). Decision-making performances and brain data were compared with those of age-matched healthy controls. In the alcoholic group, a multiple regression analysis was conducted with two predictors (gray matter [GM] volume and decision-making measure) and two covariates (number of withdrawals and duration of alcoholism). Compared with controls, alcoholics had impaired decision-making and widespread reduced gray matter volume, especially in regions involved in decision-making. The regression analysis revealed links between high GM volume in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and right hippocampal formation, and high decision-making scores (P<0.001, uncorrected). Decision-making deficits in alcoholism may result from impairment of both emotional and cognitive networks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanoleakage, ultramorphological characteristics, and microtensile bond strengths of a new low-shrinkage composite to dentin after artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sillas; Phark, Jin-Ho; Varjão, Fabiana Mansur; Sadan, Avishai

    2009-05-01

    To study the microtensile bond strengths and nanoleakage of low-shrinkage composite to dentin. The null hypotheses tested were (1) aging does not affect the bonding of low-shrinkage composite; (2) there is no difference in microtensile bond strengths and nanoleakage using different bonding strategies. 32 extracted molars were assigned to one of four groups: LS System Adhesive (LS, 3M ESPE); dentin etched for 15s with phosphoric acid+LS System Adhesive (LSpa); Adper Single Bond Plus (SB, 3M ESPE); SB+LS Bond (SBLS). Occlusal dentin was exposed and restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE). The samples were tested after 24h or after 20,000 thermocycles and 6 months of aging. Teeth were sectioned with a cross-section of 0.8+/-0.2mm(2) and fractured at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. The data were submitted to ANOVA/Duncan's post hoc test, at p<0.05. Five slabs from each group were selected and immersed in 50wt% ammoniacal silver nitrate. Then, specimens were processed for SEM, the silver penetration was measured and data analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis at p<0.05. No statistically significant difference was found among the experimental groups for the factor dentin treatment (p=0.165) and aging (p=0.091). All experimental groups exhibit some degree of nanoleakage. There was no adhesion of Filtek LS applied directly over dentin surfaces treated with SB. The new low-shrinkage resin composite showed compatibility only with its dedicated adhesive. Pre-etching did not improve the bond strengths to low-shrinkage resin composite. Some degree of nanoleakage was evident in all groups.

  9. A Look at Type K Shrinkage-Compensating Cement Production and Specifications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    minutes after demolding. All aggregate larger than 3/4—in. (19.0—mm) was wet screened from the mixture prior to casting the bars. rn. Drying Shrinkage ... aggregate , had 10 of the 19 cements exhibit more shrinkage than expansion. Although not measured , the shrinkage trends indicated that by 120 days age, 16...A0 A053 997 ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIpq~~~ STATION VICKS5(~~ MISS F/s 11/2A LOOK AT TYPE K SHRINKAG ~_COMPCNSATING CEMENT PRODUCTION AND S

  10. A physical resist shrinkage model for full-chip lithography simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zheng, Leiwu; Ma, Maggie; Zhao, Qian; Fan, Yongfa; Zhang, Qiang; Feng, Mu; Guo, Xin; Wallow, Tom; Gronlund, Keith; Goossens, Ronald; Zhang, Gary; Lu, Yenwen

    2016-03-01

    Strong resist shrinkage effects have been widely observed in resist profiles after negative tone development (NTD) and therefore must be taken into account in computational lithography applications. However, existing lithography simulation tools, especially those designed for full-chip applications, lack resist shrinkage modeling capabilities because they are not needed until only recently when NTD processes begin to replace the conventional positive tone development (PTD) processes where resist shrinkage effects are negligible. In this work we describe the development of a physical resist shrinkage (PRS) model for full-chip lithography simulations and present its accuracy evaluation against experimental data.

  11. The leaf-area shrinkage effect can bias paleoclimate and ecology research.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Benjamin; Buzzard, Vanessa; Simova, Irena; Sloat, Lindsey; Boyle, Brad; Lipson, Rebecca; Aguilar-Beaucage, Brianna; Andrade, Angelina; Barber, Benjamin; Barnes, Chris; Bushey, Dharma; Cartagena, Paulina; Chaney, Max; Contreras, Karina; Cox, Mandarava; Cueto, Maya; Curtis, Cannon; Fisher, Mariah; Furst, Lindsey; Gallegos, Jessica; Hall, Ruby; Hauschild, Amelia; Jerez, Alex; Jones, Nadja; Klucas, Aaron; Kono, Anita; Lamb, Mary; Matthai, Jacob David Ruiz; McIntyre, Colten; McKenna, Joshua; Mosier, Nicholas; Navabi, Maya; Ochoa, Alex; Pace, Liam; Plassmann, Ryland; Richter, Rachel; Russakoff, Ben; Aubyn, Holden St; Stagg, Ryan; Sterner, Marley; Stewart, Emily; Thompson, Ting Ting; Thornton, Jake; Trujillo, Parker J; Volpe, Trevor J; Enquist, Brian J

    2012-11-01

    Leaf area is a key trait that links plant form, function, and environment. Measures of leaf area can be biased because leaf area is often estimated from dried or fossilized specimens that have shrunk by an unknown amount. We tested the common assumption that this shrinkage is negligible. We measured shrinkage by comparing dry and fresh leaf area in 3401 leaves of 380 temperate and tropical species and used phylogenetic and trait-based approaches to determine predictors of this shrinkage. We also tested the effects of rehydration and simulated fossilization on shrinkage in four species. We found that dried leaves shrink in area by an average of 22% and a maximum of 82%. Shrinkage in dried leaves can be predicted by multiple morphological traits with a standard deviation of 7.8%. We also found that mud burial, a proxy for compression fossilization, caused negligible shrinkage, and that rehydration, a potential treatment of dried herbarium specimens, eliminated shrinkage. Our findings indicate that the amount of shrinkage is driven by variation in leaf area, leaf thickness, evergreenness, and woodiness and can be reversed by rehydration. The amount of shrinkage may also be a useful trait related to ecologically and physiological differences in drought tolerance and plant life history.

  12. The effect of fiber orientation on the polymerization shrinkage strain of fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil, A; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the linear polymerization shrinkage strain of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) according to the fiber orientation. Test specimens (n=5) (10.0 x 10.0 x 1.5mm) were prepared from different brands of photopolymerizable resin-preimpregnated FRC; unidirectional continuous FRC, experimental random-oriented FRC, and bidirectional continuous FRC. As control materials, particulate filler composite resin and unfilled dimethacrylate monomer resin were used. Two uniaxial strain gages (gage length 2mm) were used to measure shrinkage strains in two directions: longitudinally and transversally to the fiber direction. The uncured composite or resin was placed on top of the strain gages, covered with a separating sheet and a glass plate, and irradiated for 40s with a light-curing unit. The shrinkage strain was monitored for 300 s. ANOVA and Tukey's posthoc test were used at a significance level of 0.05. ANOVA revealed that orientation of fiber and brand of material had a significant effect (P<0.05) on shrinkage strain. The unidirectional FRC revealed no shrinkage longitudinally to the fiber direction, whereas the shrinkage occurred transversally to the fiber direction. Particulate filler composite resin and unfilled resin revealed equal shrinkage strain in both of the measured directions. Anisotropic nature of FRC exists with regard to polymerization shrinkage strain. The variation of polymerization shrinkage strains of FRC compared to those of particulate filler composites and unfilled resin might be important for future clinical applications.

  13. Increasing the life of molds for casting copper and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. N.; Spiridonov, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    The work of the molds intended for casting copper and copper alloys in semicontinuous casters for producing flat billets is considered. It is shown that, to increase the resistance of mold plates, the inner space of the mold should have a taper shape toward the casting direction and take into account the shrinkage of the linear dimensions of the ingot during its motion in the mold. The taper shape increases the intensity and uniformity of heat removal due to close contact between the ingot and the mold inner surface. Testing of new design molds under industrial conditions demonstrates that their resistance increases by a factor of 4.0-4.5. The taper effect of the mold plates is much more pronounced in their narrow faces.

  14. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  15. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neurinomas according to 3-D tumor volume shrinkage and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Henzel, Martin; Hamm, Klaus; Sitter, Helmut; Gross, Markus W; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2009-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and also fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offer high local control (LC) rates (> 90%). This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional (3-D) tumor volume (TV) shrinkage and to assess quality of life (QoL) after SRS/SRT. From 1999 to 2005, 35/74 patients were treated with SRS, and 39/74 with SRT. Median age was 60 years. Treatment was delivered by a linear accelerator. Median single dose was 13 Gy (SRS) or 54 Gy (SRT). Patients were followed up > or = 12 months after SRS/SRT. LC and toxicity were evaluated by clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. 3-D TV shrinkage was evaluated with the planning system. QoL was assessed using the questionnaire Short Form-36. Median follow-up was 50/36 months (SRS/SRT). Actuarial 5-year freedom from progression/overall survival was 88.1%/100% (SRS), and 87.5%/87.2% (SRT). TV shrinkage was 15.1%/40.7% (SRS/SRT; p = 0.01). Single dose (< 13 Gy) was the only determinant factor for TV shrinkage after SRS (p = 0.001). Age, gender, initial TV, and previous operations did not affect TV shrinkage. Acute or late toxicity (> or = grade 3) was never seen. Concerning QoL, no significant differences were observed after SRS/SRT. Previous operations and gender did not affect QoL (p > 0.05). Compared with the German normal population, patients had worse values for all domains except for mental health. TV shrinkage was significantly higher after SRT than after SRS. Main symptoms were not affected by SRS/SRT. Retrospectively, QoL was neither affected by SRS nor by SRT.

  16. Identification of the Factors Governing the Origin and Propagation of Corrosion Failure of Organically Coated Aluminum Aerospace Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-14

    temperature regardless of surface pretreatment with activation energy of 30- 40 kJ/mol, as well as by artificial aging of the alloy and certain alloy...regardless of surface pretreatment with activation energy of 30-40 kJ/mol, as well as by artificial aging and surface pretreatments. Scribe-creep rate...heterogeneities. Upon the departure of S. Ray Taylor from UVA- CESE in 2003, the statement of work was revised to reflect those portions of the study

  17. Shrinkage of the human core microbiome and a proposal for launching microbiome biobanks.

    PubMed

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saeedi, Nazli; Saei, Amir Ata

    2014-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) revealed the significance of the gut microbiome in promoting health. Disruptions in microbiome composition are associated with the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. The indigenous microflora has co-evolved with humans for millions of years and humans have preserved the inherited microbiomes through consumption of fermented foods and interactions with environmental microbes. Through modernization, traditional foods were abandoned, native food starters were substituted with industrial products, vaccines and antibiotics were used, extreme hygiene measures were taken, the rate of cesarean section increased, and breast feeding changed into formula. These factors have reduced human exposure to microbial symbionts and led to shrinkage of the core microbiome. Reduction in microbiome biodiversity can compromise the human immune system and predispose individuals to several modern diseases. This article suggests launching microbiome biobanks for archiving native microbiomes, supervising antibiotic use, probiotic design and native starter production, as well as advertising a revisit to native lifestyles.

  18. Cicatricial ectropion due to essential skin shrinkage: treatment with rotational upper-lid pedicle flaps.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, J J; Lichter, M; Rodgers, J

    1983-10-01

    Ectropion is sometimes due to a shortage of skin of the lower lid (cicatricial) and may result from previous surgery, trauma, burns, skin diseases etc. Excessive exposure to the sun has also been incriminated. Vertical traction lines in the skin of the lower lid, accentuated by gazing up or by opening the mouth, suggest this condition. This paper describes the use of pedicle skin flaps rotated from the upper lid to treat cicatricial ectropion occurring in the absence of any predisposing factor and not responding to conservative treatment--that is, due to essential skin shrinkage. All 10 patients had an improved appearance, and epiphora persisted in only 1 patient, who subsequently underwent a punctum-enlarging procedure. In an 11th patient there was insufficient redundant upper-lid skin, so a free skin graft was used instead.

  19. Early age stresses and creep-shrinkage interaction of restrained concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoubat, Salah Ahmed

    2000-10-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses were performed to characterize the early age tensile creep and shrinkage behavior of concrete. A uniaxial restrained shrinkage test was developed. The experiment tested two identical specimens: restrained and unrestrained. The test was controlled by computer, and the shrinkage deformation was checked continuously and compared to a threshold value of 5 mum, which when exceeded, triggered an increase in tensile load to recover the shrinkage strain in the restrained specimen. Thus, a restrained condition is achieved and the stress generated by shrinkage mechanisms was measurable. The experiment revealed how shrinkage stresses developed and how creep mechanisms reduced shrinkage strain. The tests revealed that shrinkage stresses in the first days after casting are significant and caused fracture of the concrete. The rate of stress evolution influenced the time and stress of first cracking. The tensile creep of concrete formed a substantial part of the time dependent deformation and reduced the shrinkage stresses by 50%. A method separating drying creep mechanisms of concrete into stress-induced shrinkage and microcracking was developed. The method required measurement of creep and shrinkage of concrete under drying, sealed, and moist curing conditions. The moist-curing test produce the basic creep; the sealed test provided data on basic creep and stress-induced shrinkage, and the drying test provided data on basic creep, stress-induced shrinkage and microcracking. The basic creep results of young concrete indicated a high creep rate in the initial 10--20 hours after loading. Then, the rate decreased and the creep function approached a stable value. The initial rate of creep was sensitive to age at loading in the first two days, and became age-independent after a few days. The analysis revealed stress-induced shrinkage as a major mechanism of drying creep for plain and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC). Microcracking forms a significant

  20. Factors contributing to plastic strain amplification in slip dominated deformation of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. W.; Martin, G.; Lebensohn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    While plastic strains are never distributed uniformly in polycrystals, it has recently been shown experimentally that the distribution can be extremely heterogeneous in magnesium polycrystals even when the deformation is dominated by slip. Here, we attempt to provide insight into the (macroscopic) factors that contribute to this strain amplification and to explain, from a local perspective, the origins of this strain amplification. To do this, full field VPFFT crystal plasticity simulations have been performed under the simplifying assumption that twinning is inoperative. It is shown that the experimentally observed heterogeneity can be reproduced when a sufficiently high anisotropy in slip system strength is assumed. This can be further accentuated by a weakening of the texture.

  1. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  2. Measurement of the density of liquid aluminum-319 alloy by an x-ray attenuation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Gallegos, G.F.

    1994-11-01

    This study was made for assisting in casting simulations. A relatively simple apparatus was constructed for measuring the density of Al-based alloys in the solid and liquid states up to 900 C. One of the more important physical properties of a casting alloy, solidification shrinkage, was measured for a commercial Al alloy (Al-319). It was found that while the thermal expansion of Al-319 in both solid and liquid phases is similar to that of pure Al, the density of the liquid alloy is lower than estimated by averaging the atomic volumes of the pure liquid components. The densities were measured by x-ray attenuation.

  3. Crosslink-induced shrinkage of grafted Gaussian chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetatos, Panayotis

    2014-04-01

    The statistical mechanics of polymers grafted on surfaces has been the subject of intense research activity because of many potential applications. In this paper, we analytically investigate the conformational changes caused by a single crosslink on two ideal (Gaussian) chains grafted onto a rigid planar surface. Both the crosslink and the surface reduce the number of allowed configurations. In the absence of the hard substrate, the sole effect of the crosslink is a reduction in the effective Kuhn length of a tethered chain. The crosslink-induced shrinkage (collapse) of the grafted chains (mushrooms) turns out to be a reduction in the variance of the distribution of the height of the chain rather than a reduction of the height itself.

  4. Analysis of gene set using shrinkage covariance matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-09-01

    Microarray methodology has been exploited for different applications such as gene discovery and disease diagnosis. This technology is also used for quantitative and highly parallel measurements of gene expression. Recently, microarrays have been one of main interests of statisticians because they provide a perfect example of the paradigms of modern statistics. In this study, the alternative approach to estimate the covariance matrix has been proposed to solve the high dimensionality problem in microarrays. The extension of traditional Hotelling's T2 statistic is constructed for determining the significant gene sets across experimental conditions using shrinkage approach. Real data sets were used as illustrations to compare the performance of the proposed methods with other methods. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  5. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  6. Microstructurally based mechanisms for modeling shrinkage of cement paste at multiple levels

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Yunping

    1993-07-15

    Shrinkage of cement paste is controlled by a number of mechanisms that operate in various parts of the microstructure and at various length scales. A model for creep and shrinkage can be developed by combining several models that describe phenomena at each of several length scales, ranging from the nanometer to the meter. This model is described and preliminary results are discussed.

  7. Post-resection mucosal margin shrinkage in oral cancer: quantification and significance.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh C; Qureshi, Sajid S; Kumaran, C

    2005-08-01

    The importance of tumor free margins in outcome of cancer surgery is well known. Often the pathological margins are reported to be significantly smaller than the in situ margins. This discrepancy is due to margin shrinkage the quantum of which has not been studied in patients with oral cancers. To quantify the shrinkage of mucosal margin following excision for carcinoma of the oral tongue and buccal mucosa. Mucosal margins were measured prior to resection and half an hour after excision in 27 patients with carcinoma of the tongue and buccal mucosa. The mean margin shrinkage was assessed and the variables affecting the quantum of shrinkage analyzed. The mean shrinkage from the in situ to the post resection margin status was 22.7% (P < 0.0001). The mean shrinkage of the tongue margins was 23.5%, compared to 21.2% for buccal mucosa margins. The mean shrinkage in T1/T2 tumors (25.6%) was significantly more than in T3/T4 (9.2%, P < 0.011). There is significant shrinkage of mucosal margins after surgery. Hence this should be considered and appropriate margins should be taken at initial resection to prevent the agony of post-operative positive surgical margins. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  9. Hardness, density, and shrinkage characteristics of silk-oak from Hawaii

    Treesearch

    R. L. Youngs

    1964-01-01

    Shrinkage, specific gravity, and hardness of two shipments of silk-oak (Grevillea robusta) from Hawaii were evaluated to provide basic information pertinent to the use of the wood for cabinet and furniture purposes. The wood resembles Hawaii-grown shamel ash (Fraxinus uhdei ) in the properties evaluated. Shrinkage compares well with that of black cherry, silver maple,...

  10. Hyperosmotic and isosmotic shrinkage differentially affect protein phosphorylation and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Koltsova, Svetlana V; Akimova, Olga A; Kotelevtsev, Sergei V; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Orlov, Sergei N

    2012-02-01

    In the present work, we compared the outcome of hyperosmotic and isosmotic shrinkage on ion transport and protein phosphorylation in C11-MDCK cells resembling intercalated cells from collecting ducts and in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the rat aorta. Hyperosmotic shrinkage was triggered by cell exposure to hypertonic medium, whereas isosmotic shrinkage was evoked by cell transfer from an hypoosmotic to an isosmotic environment. Despite a similar cell volume decrease of 40%-50%, the consequences of hyperosmotic and isosmotic shrinkage on cellular functions were sharply different. In C11-MDCK and VSMC, hyperosmotic shrinkage completely inhibited Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Na(+),P(i) cotransport. In contrast, in both types of cells isosmotic shrinkage slightly increased rather than suppressed Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and did not change Na(+),P(i) cotransport. In C11-MDCK cells, phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases was augmented in hyperosmotically shrunken cells by ∼7- and 2-fold, respectively, but was not affected in cells subjected to isosmotic shrinkage. These results demonstrate that the data obtained in cells subjected to hyperosmotic shrinkage cannot be considered as sufficient proof implicating cell volume perturbations in the regulation of cellular functions under isosmotic conditions.

  11. The Effect of Aluminum Content and Processing on the Tensile Behavior of High Pressure Die Cast Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deda, Erin M.

    Due to their high specific strength and good castability, magnesium alloys are desirable for use in weight reduction strategies in automotive applications. However, the mechanical properties of high pressure die cast (HPDC) magnesium can be highly variable and dependent on location in the casting. To better understand the relationship between microstructure and tensile properties, the influence of alloying and section thickness on the microstructural features and tensile properties of Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Mn alloys is quantified. This investigation provides experimental input to modeling activities for the development of an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering capability, to assess and quantify the impact of microstructure on the tensile behavior of HPDC Mg AM series (magnesium-aluminum-manganese) alloys. As a result of this work, it is found that with increasing aluminum content, the yield strength increases and the ductility decreases. Increasing the plate thickness results in a decrease in both the yield strength and ductility. HPDC components have varying microstructural features through the plate thickness, developing a "skin" and "core". The grain size, beta-Mg 17Al12 phase, and solute content are all quantified through the thickness of the plates. By quantifying microstructural variations, a physics-based model has been developed which is able to predict the effects of alloying and plate thickness on yield strength. The primary factors affecting strengthening are accounted for using a linear superposition model of solid solution, grain size, and dispersion hardening. This model takes into account through-thickness microstructure gradients that exist in HPDC components by using a composite model to incorporate the skin and core changes. The yield strength in these alloys is dominated by grain boundary strengthening and solute hardening effects. In order to isolate the effects of eutectic phases, shrinkage porosity and oxide films on strength and

  12. Monitoring of collagen shrinkage by use of second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Lo, Wen; Sun, Yen; Chen, Wei-Liang; Chan, Jung-Yi; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chih-Jung; Young, Tai-Horng; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    Thermal treatment induced collagen shrinkage has a great number of applications in medical practice. Clinically, the there is lack of reliable non-invasive methods to quantify the shrinkage. Overt treatment by heat application can lead to devastating results. We investigate the serial changes of collagen shrinkage by thermal treatment of rat tail tendons. The change in length is correlated with the finding in second harmonic generation microscopy and histology. Rat tail tendon shortens progressively during initial thermal treatment. After a certain point in time, the length then remains almost constant despite further thermal treatment. The intensity of second harmonic generation signals also progressively decreases initially and then remains merely detectable upon further thermal treatment. It prompts us to develop a mathematic model to quantify the dependence of collagen shrinkage on changes of SHG intensity. Our results show that SHG intensity can be used to predict the degree of collagen shrinkage during thermal treatment for biomedical applications.

  13. Thermoelectrically controlled device for studies of temperature-induced corneal shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Fernandez, Viviana; Lamar, Peggy; Soederberg, Per G.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and calibrate a device to measure the dynamics of thermal shrinkage in corneal and scleral strips. The apparatus consists of a thermoelectric cell controlled by a temperature controller designed to generate temperatures up to 90 degree(s)C in rectangular corneal strips; a copper cuvette filled with Dextran solution that holds the corneal strip and a displacement sensor that measures the change in length of the tissue during heat-induced shrinkage. The device was tested on corneal tissue from Florida Eye-Bank eyes that were cut into 2x4mm rectangular strips. Preliminary results indicate that our system can reproducibly create and accurately measure thermally induced corneal shrinkage. Shrinkage experiments will be used to optimize laser parameters for corneal shrinkage during laser thermokeratoplasty and laser scleral buckling.

  14. Association of SOD2, a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, with gray matter volume shrinkage in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vibhuti; Buzas, Beata; Momenan, Reza; Oroszi, Gabor; Pulay, Attila J; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hommer, Daniel W; Goldman, David

    2010-04-01

    Chronic alcoholism leads to gray matter shrinkage and induces the formation of superoxide anions (O(2)(-)) that can cause neuronal cell death. The mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) enzyme is critical in the metabolism of superoxide. An Ala16Val polymorphism putatively affects SOD2 enzyme activity in vivo. Brain volumes of 76 treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals were measured with a 1.5T MRI. Intracranial tissue margins were manually outlined on coronal sections. Gray matter, white matter, sulcal, and ventricular CSF volumes were estimated using intensity-based K-means clustering. Ala16Val (rs4880) and a second haplotype tagging SNP, rs10370, were genotyped. The q-value package was used to correct for multiple comparisons. In the alcoholics, cerebrospinal fluid and intra-cranial volumes showed significant differences across the six diplotype categories. The homozygous Ala16-containing diplotype rs10370TT-rs4880GG was associated with lowest gray matter ratio (greater shrinkage; p=0.005). Presence of one or two copies of the low activity Ala16 allele was a risk factor for lower gray matter volume in alcoholics below the median alcohol consumption (p=0.03) but not in alcoholics above this level. White matter ratio was associated with sex (p=0.002) and lifetime total alcohol consumption (p=0.01) but not with diplotypes. In this exploratory analysis, a putative functional missense variant of SOD2 appears to influence gray matter loss in alcoholics. This may be due to impaired clearance of reactive oxygen species formed as a result of alcohol exposure. The risk/protective effect was observed in alcoholics with lower levels of lifetime alcohol consumption. Highest levels of exposure may overwhelm the protective action of the SOD2 enzyme.

  15. Association of SOD2, a Mitochondrial Antioxidant Enzyme, with Gray Matter Volume Shrinkage in Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vibhuti; Buzas, Beata; Momenan, Reza; Oroszi, Gabor; Pulay, Attila J; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hommer, Daniel W; Goldman, David

    2010-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism leads to gray matter shrinkage and induces the formation of superoxide anions (O2−) that can cause neuronal cell death. The mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) enzyme is critical in the metabolism of superoxide. An Ala16Val polymorphism putatively affects SOD2 enzyme activity in vivo. Brain volumes of 76 treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals were measured with a 1.5T MRI. Intracranial tissue margins were manually outlined on coronal sections. Gray matter, white matter, sulcal, and ventricular CSF volumes were estimated using intensity-based K-means clustering. Ala16Val (rs4880) and a second haplotype tagging SNP, rs10370, were genotyped. The q-value package was used to correct for multiple comparisons. In the alcoholics, cerebrospinal fluid and intra-cranial volumes showed significant differences across the six diplotype categories. The homozygous Ala16-containing diplotype rs10370TT-rs4880GG was associated with lowest gray matter ratio (greater shrinkage; p=0.005). Presence of one or two copies of the low activity Ala16 allele was a risk factor for lower gray matter volume in alcoholics below the median alcohol consumption (p=0.03) but not in alcoholics above this level. White matter ratio was associated with sex (p=0.002) and lifetime total alcohol consumption (p=0.01) but not with diplotypes. In this exploratory analysis, a putative functional missense variant of SOD2 appears to influence gray matter loss in alcoholics. This may be due to impaired clearance of reactive oxygen species formed as a result of alcohol exposure. The risk/protective effect was observed in alcoholics with lower levels of lifetime alcohol consumption. Highest levels of exposure may overwhelm the protective action of the SOD2 enzyme. PMID:20043000

  16. Effect of short glass fibers on the polymerization shrinkage stress of dental composite.

    PubMed

    Shouha, Paul S R; Ellakwa, Ayman E

    2016-06-13

    This study examines contraction stresses of seven short fiber reinforced composites (sFRC) exhibiting different volume loads and aspect ratios (AR)* of fibres. The shift towards a greater utilization of posterior resin composites in dentistry has seen increased interest in the use of randomly oriented short glass fibers in these restorative materials. While the effect of these fibers on modulus, strength, and toughness has been studied, very little information exists on their effect on polymerization shrinkage and even less on shrinkage stress. S2-glass fibers with an average AR of 68 were used to form three experimental groups with 5%, 10%, and 20% volume loads. Commercial sFRC with ARs of 20 and 100 were also tested. A tensilometer set up was used with moderate compliance, 5.4 J/cm(2) irradiance, and a C-factor of 2.75. Data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey's test. The addition of 5% of the experimental fiber did not significantly increase stress while the 10% and 20% groups resulted in 36.3% and 39.1% higher stress values, respectively, compared to the non-fiber control group (p < 0.05). Of all the sFRC groups, the very low AR material exhibited the lowest stress [0.682 MPa (p = 0.001)] while another commercial material with higher AR fibers exhibited the highest overall value [1.822 MPa (p < 0.001)] when compared to the control group. The results indicate that both short fiber volume and AR are important variables to consider with regards to setting stresses of sFRC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  17. Aerosol particle shrinkage event phenomenology in a South European suburban area during 2009-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Núñez, L.; Pujadas, M.; Cusack, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2017-07-01

    A high number of aerosol particle shrinkage cases (70) have been identified and analyzed from an extensive and representative database of aerosol size distributions obtained between 2009 and 2015 at an urban background site in Madrid (Spain). A descriptive classification based on the process from which the shrinkage began is proposed according which shrinkage events were divided into three groups: (1) NPF + shrinkage (NPF + S) events, (2) aerosol particle growth process + shrinkage (G + S) events, and (3) pure shrinkage (S) events. The largest number of shrinkages corresponded to the S-type followed by NPF + S, while the G + S events were the least frequent group recorded. Duration of shrinkages varied widely from 0.75 to 8.5 h and SR from -1.0 to -11.1 nm h-1. These processes typically occurred in the afternoon, around 18:00 UTC, caused by two situations: i) a wind speed increase usually associated with a change in the wind direction (over 60% of the observations) and ii) the reduction of photochemical activity at the end of the day. All shrinkages were detected during the warm period, mainly between May and August, when local meteorological conditions (high solar irradiance and temperature and low relative humidity), atmospheric processes (high photochemical activity) and availability of aerosol-forming precursors were favorable for their development. As a consequence of these processes, the particles concentration corresponding to the Aitken mode decreased into the nucleation mode. The accumulation mode did not undergo significant changes during these processes. In some cases, a dilution of the particulate content in the ambient air was observed. This work, goes further than others works dealing with aerosol particles shrinkages, as it incorporates as a main novelty a classification methodology for studying these processes. Moreover, compared to other studies, it is supported by a high and representative number of observations. Thus, this study contributes to

  18. Effect of temperature and humidity on post-gel shrinkage, cusp deformation, bond strength and shrinkage stress - Construction of a chamber to simulate the oral environment.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, Aline Aredes; de Souza, Silas Júnior Boaventura; de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-12-01

    Evaluate the effect of environment on post-gel shrinkage (Shr), cuspal strains (CS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS), elastic modulus (E) and shrinkage stress in molars with large class II restorations. Sixty human molars received standardized Class II mesio-oclusal-distal cavity preparations. Restorations were made with two composites (CHA, Charisma Diamond, Heraus Kulzer and IPS Empress Direct, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using three environment conditions (22°C/50% humidity, 37°C/50% humidity and 37°C/90% humidity) simulated in custom developed chamber. Shr was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). CS was measured using strain gauges. Half of the teeth (n=5) were used to assess the elastic modulus (E) and Knoop hardness (KHN) at different depths using microhardness indentation. The other half (n=5) was used to measure the μTBS. The composites and environment conditions were simulated in a two-dimensional finite element analysis of a tooth restoration. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using Shr data. The Shr, CS, μTBS, KHN and E data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (significance level: 0.05). Both composites had similar Shr, CS, μTBS and shrinkage stress. CHA had higher elastic modulus than IPS. Increasing temperature and humidity significantly increased Shr, CS and shrinkage stress. μTBS were similar for groups with lower humidity, irrespective of temperature, and higher with higher humidity. E and KHN were constant through the depth for CHA. E and KHN values were affected by environment only for IPS, mainly deeper in the cavity. Shrinkage stress at dentin/composite interface had high inverse correlation with μTBS. Shrinkage stress in enamel had high correlation with CS. Increasing temperature and humidity caused higher post-gel shrinkage and cusp deformation with higher shrinkage stresses in the tooth structure and tooth/restoration interface for both composites tested. The chamber developed for simulating the

  19. Spatial shrinkage/expansion patterns between breast density measured in two MRI scans evaluated by non-rigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Muqing; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Mehta, Rita S.; Bahri, Shadfar; Chan, Siwa; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Su, Min-Ying

    2011-09-01

    Breast MRI acquires many images from the breast, and computer-aided algorithms and display tools are often used to assist the radiologist's interpretation. Women with lifetime risk greater than 20% of developing breast cancer are recommended to receive annual screening MRI, but the current breast MRI computer-aided-diagnosis systems do not provide the necessary function for comparison of images acquired at different times. The purpose of this work was to develop registration methods for evaluating the spatial change pattern of fibroglandular tissue between two breast MRI scans of the same woman taken at different times. The registration method is based on rigid alignment followed by a non-rigid Demons algorithm. The method was tested on three different subjects who had different degrees of changes in the fibroglandular tissue, including two patients who showed different spatial shrinkage patterns after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery, and one control case from a normal volunteer. Based on the transformation matrix, the collapse of multiple voxels on the baseline images to one voxel on the follow-up images is used to calculate the shrinkage factor. Conversely, based on the reverse transformation matrix the expansion factor can be calculated. The shrinkage/expansion factor, the deformation magnitude and direction, as well as the Jacobian determinate at each location can be displayed in a 3D rendering view to show the spatial changes between two MRI scans. These different parameters show consistent results and can be used for quantitative evaluation of the spatial change patterns. The presented registration method can be further developed into a clinical tool for evaluating therapy-induced changes and for early diagnosis of breast cancer in screening MRI.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of La-Ga-Al and U-Ga-Al alloys and the separation factor of U/La couple in the molten salt-liquid metal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselova, A.; Smolenski, V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Ivanov, A. B.; Osipenko, A.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of lanthanum and uranium was studied in fused 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic and Ga-Al eutectic liquid metal alloy between 723 and 823 K. Electrode potentials were recorded vs. Cl-/Cl2 reference electrode and the temperature dependencies of the apparent standard potentials of La-(Ga-Al) and U-(Ga-Al) alloys were determined. Lanthanum and uranium activity coefficients and U/La couple separation factor were calculated. Partial excess free Gibbs energy, partial enthalpy of mixing and partial excess entropy of La-(Ga-Al) and U-(Ga-Al) alloys were estimated.

  1. Improvement in thermoelectric power factor of mechanically alloyed p-type SiGe by incorporation of TiB{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Sajid; Dubey, K.; Bhattacharya, Shovit; Basu, Ranita; Bhatt, Ranu; Bohra, A. K.; Singh, Ajay; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2016-05-23

    Nearly 60% of the world’s useful energy is wasted as heat and recovering a fraction of this waste heat by converting it as useful electrical power is an important area of research{sup [1]}. Thermoelectric power generators (TEG) are solid state devices which converts heat into electricity. TEG consists of n and p-type thermoelements connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel{sup [2]}. Silicon germanium (SiGe) alloy is one of the conventional high temperature thermoelectric materials and is being used in radio-isotopes based thermoelectric power generators for deep space exploration programs.Temperature (T) dependence of thermoelectric (TE) properties of p-type SiGe and p-type SiGe-x wt.%TiB{sub 2} (x=6,8,10%) nanocomposite materials has been studied with in the temperature range of 300 K to 1100 K. It is observed that there is an improvement in the power factor (α{sup 2}/ρ) of SiGe alloy on addition of TiB{sub 2} upto 8 wt.% that is mainly due to increase in the Seebeck coefficient (α) and electrical conductivity (σ) of the alloy.

  2. Importance of shrinkage in empirical bayes estimates for diagnostics: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Savic, Radojka M; Karlsson, Mats O

    2009-09-01

    Empirical Bayes ("post hoc") estimates (EBEs) of etas provide modelers with diagnostics: the EBEs themselves, individual prediction (IPRED), and residual errors (individual weighted residual (IWRES)). When data are uninformative at the individual level, the EBE distribution will shrink towards zero (eta-shrinkage, quantified as 1-SD(eta (EBE))/omega), IPREDs towards the corresponding observations, and IWRES towards zero (epsilon-shrinkage, quantified as 1-SD(IWRES)). These diagnostics are widely used in pharmacokinetic (PK) pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling; we investigate here their usefulness in the presence of shrinkage. Datasets were simulated from a range of PK PD models, EBEs estimated in non-linear mixed effects modeling based on the true or a misspecified model, and desired diagnostics evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Identified consequences of eta-shrinkage on EBE-based model diagnostics include non-normal and/or asymmetric distribution of EBEs with their mean values ("ETABAR") significantly different from zero, even for a correctly specified model; EBE-EBE correlations and covariate relationships may be masked, falsely induced, or the shape of the true relationship distorted. Consequences of epsilon-shrinkage included low power of IPRED and IWRES to diagnose structural and residual error model misspecification, respectively. EBE-based diagnostics should be interpreted with caution whenever substantial eta- or epsilon-shrinkage exists (usually greater than 20% to 30%). Reporting the magnitude of eta- and epsilon-shrinkage will facilitate the informed use and interpretation of EBE-based diagnostics.

  3. Effect of plasma arc curing on polymerization shrinkage of orthodontic adhesive resins.

    PubMed

    Bang, H-C; Lim, B-S; Yoon, T-H; Lee, Y-K; Kim, C-W

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage of three orthodontic adhesive resins when polymerized with a high-energy plasma arc light (1340 mW cm(-2)) and a conventional halogen light (500 mW cm(-2)), and to correlate the polymerization shrinkage with the degree of conversion. To equalize the total light energy delivered to the adhesive resin, irradiation time was varied between 3 or 6 s for a plasma arc-curing unit, and 8 or 16 s for a halogen light-curing unit. The polymerization shrinkage of adhesive resins during the light-curing process was measured using a computer-controlled mercury dilatometer and the degree of conversion was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A plasma arccuring unit produced significantly lower polymerization shrinkage than a halogen light-curing unit when the equivalent total light energy was irradiated to the orthodontic adhesive resins (P < 0.05). The magnitude of polymerization shrinkage was significantly different depending on the kind of adhesive resins (P < 0.05), but there was no significant correlation between the filler fraction and the polymerization shrinkage (r2 = 0.039). There was strong correlation (r2 = 0.787) between the polymerization shrinkage and the degree of conversion with a halogen light-curing unit, but poor correlation (r2 = 0.377) was observed with a plasma arc-curing unit.

  4. Study of shrinkage-strain and contraction rates of commercial and experimental compomers.

    PubMed

    Latorre-García, Mariana; Alvarez-Gayosso, Carlos; Barceló-Santana, Federico; Vera-Graziano, Ricardo

    2006-11-01

    To asses the contraction rate and shrinkage-strain of a new experimental compomer in comparison with four commercial compomers and a flowable composite resin. Shrinkage-strain and contraction rate were calculated by measuring the deflection of a disc in a developed instrument using "bonded disk" method. Both shrinkage-strain and contraction rate are reported. Total shrinkage-strain for compomer systems varies from 2.59 to 3.34%, whereas the flowable composite resin showed a value of 3.50%. The contraction rate for compomers varies from 81.60 to 109.80 microm/min, whereas the flowable composite resin obtained 141.6 microm/min. Commercial compomers show a lower contraction rate than the control group, whereas the experimental group only shows statistical differences with a commercial compomer (Dyract AP). The shrinkage-strain and contraction rate results for the experimental compomer are as good as those obtained for a commercial flowable compomer and a flowable composite resin. The contraction rates of all compomers could be directly related to polymerization rates. The method used to measure shrinkage-strain and contraction rate is adequate because it simulates conditions in situ. It can be inferred that the contraction rate is directly related to shrinkage-strain.

  5. Effect of resin-composite filler particle size and shape on shrinkage-stress.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, Julian D; Maisuria, Amit; Vogel, Karin; Watts, David C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of variations in filler particle size and shape on the polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics of resin-composites. A model series of 12 VLC resin-composites were studied. The particulate dispersed phase volume fraction was 56.7%: these filler particles were systematically graded in size, and further were either spherical or irregular. A Bioman instrument (cantilever beam method) was employed to determine the shrinkage-stress kinetics following 40s irradiation (600 mW/cm(2)) at 23°C (n=3). All data were captured for 60 min and the final shrinkage-stress calculated. Shrinkage-stress varied between 3.86 MPa (SD 0.14) for S3 (spherical filler particles of 500 nm) and 8.44 MPa (SD 0.41) for I1 (irregular filler particles of 450 nm). The shrinkage-stress values were generally lower for those composites with spherical filler particles than those with irregular filler particles. The differences in shrinkage-stress with filler particle size and shape were statistically significant (p<0.001). Composites with spherical filler particles exhibit lower shrinkage-stress values compared to those with irregular filler particles. Shrinkage-stress and shrinkage-stress rate vary in a complex manner with variations in the size of the dispersed phase particles: a hypothesized explanation for the effect of filler particle size and shape is presented. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  7. Strain-induced band gap shrinkage in Ge grown on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Cannon, Douglas D.; Liu, Jifeng; Luan, Hsin-Chiao; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2003-03-01

    Band gap shrinkage induced by tensile strain is shown for Ge directly grown on Si substrate. In Ge-on-Si pin diodes, photons having energy lower than the direct band gap of bulk Ge were efficiently detected. According to photoreflectance measurement, this property is due to band gap shrinkage. The origin of the shrinkage is not the Franz-Keldysh effect but rather tensile strain. It is discussed that the generation of such a tensile strain can be ascribed to the difference of thermal expansion between Ge and Si. Advantages of this tensile Ge for application to photodiode are also discussed.

  8. Method to measure the polymerization shrinkage of light-cured composites.

    PubMed

    Puckett, A D; Smith, R

    1992-07-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of light-cured dental composite resins has been reported to cause a marginal gap between the cavity wall and the restoration, leading to the premature and/or tensile stress failure of the composite restoration. This study measured the volumetric shrinkage of six light-cured posterior composites by measuring specific gravity differences between uncured and cured composite test specimens, using a modified version of ASTM method D792 "Specific Gravity and Density of Plastics by Displacement." The measured volumetric shrinkage ranged from 1.35% to 3.22%.

  9. Effects of drying conditions, admixtures and specimen size on shrinkage strains

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, Saleh A. . E-mail: alsaleh@dr.com; Al-Zaid, Rajeh Z.

    2006-10-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the effects of drying conditions, specimen size and presence of plasticizing admixture on the development of shrinkage strains. The measurements are taken in a harsh (50 deg. C and 5% R.H.) and a moderate environment (28 deg. C and 50% R.H.). The results include strain development at various levels of cross sections of concrete prisms. The drying conditions are found to be the dominant parameter affecting the shrinkage strain development particularly in specimens of smaller sizes. The effect of plasticizing admixture on shrinkage strains is negligible.

  10. Laser-induced scleral shrinkage for refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiushi; Simon, Gabriel; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    1994-06-01

    We investigate the laser refractive scleroplasty (LRS) as a potential minimal-invasive method for correcting post-operative astigmatism. The scleral shrinkage near limbus was induced on 6 cadaver eyes using a 200 micrometers fiber optic probe coupled to a pulsed Ho:YAG laser. The diameter of the treatment spot was 0.8 mm. The output energy measured at tip was 60.2+/- 0.6 mJ. The treatments consisted of multiple sector patterns placed along the major axis of astigmatism parallel to the limbus, and round patterns placed along the limbus. Three treatment spots were applied on each side of the sector. The separation among sectors and limbus is 1 mm. Keratometry and topography of the cornea were measured after each sector or round pattern treatment. Effect of 5 and 10 pulses at each treatment spot were compared. Histology was performed to evaluate laser tissue damage. The major axis of astigmatism was shifted 90 degrees after the sector pattern treatment and amount of dioptric change increased when adding a new treatment or using more treatment pulses. However, the spherical equivalent of the eyes was essentially unchanged. The keratometry of the corneas remained the same after the round pattern treatment. Laser refractive scleroplasty may be applied for the correction of post-operative astigmatism.

  11. Gene Network Reconstruction using Global-Local Shrinkage Priors*

    PubMed Central

    Leday, Gwenaël G.R.; de Gunst, Mathisca C.M.; Kpogbezan, Gino B.; van der Vaart, Aad W.; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; van de Wiel, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a gene network from high-throughput molecular data is an important but challenging task, as the number of parameters to estimate easily is much larger than the sample size. A conventional remedy is to regularize or penalize the model likelihood. In network models, this is often done locally in the neighbourhood of each node or gene. However, estimation of the many regularization parameters is often difficult and can result in large statistical uncertainties. In this paper we propose to combine local regularization with global shrinkage of the regularization parameters to borrow strength between genes and improve inference. We employ a simple Bayesian model with non-sparse, conjugate priors to facilitate the use of fast variational approximations to posteriors. We discuss empirical Bayes estimation of hyper-parameters of the priors, and propose a novel approach to rank-based posterior thresholding. Using extensive model- and data-based simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed inference strategy outperforms popular (sparse) methods, yields more stable edges, and is more reproducible. The proposed method, termed ShrinkNet, is then applied to Glioblastoma to investigate the interactions between genes associated with patient survival. PMID:28408966

  12. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  13. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  14. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  15. INTER-GROUP IMAGE REGISTRATION BY HIERARCHICAL GRAPH SHRINKAGE.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shihui; Wu, Guorong; Liao, Shu; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we propose a novel inter-group image registration method to register different groups of images (e.g., young and elderly brains) simultaneously. Specifically, we use a hierarchical two-level graph to model the distribution of entire images on the manifold, with intra-graph representing the image distribution in each group and the inter-graph describing the relationship between two groups. Then the procedure of inter-group registration is formulated as a dynamic evolution of graph shrinkage. The advantage of our method is that the topology of entire image distribution is explored to guide the image registration. In this way, each image coordinates with its neighboring images on the manifold to deform towards the population center, by following the deformation pathway simultaneously optimized within the graph. Our proposed method has been also compared with other state-of-the-art inter-group registration methods, where our method achieves better registration results in terms of registration accuracy and robustness.

  16. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  17. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  18. Meniscal allograft transplantation. Part 1: systematic review of graft biology, graft shrinkage, graft extrusion, graft sizing, and graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Taylor, Dean C; Rill, Brian; Lock, Terrence; Moutzouros, Vasilius; Kolowich, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    To provide a systematic review of the literature regarding five topics in meniscal allograft transplantation: graft biology, shrinkage, extrusion, sizing, and fixation. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect, and EBSCO-CINAHL databases. Articles were classified only in one topic, but information contained could be reported into other topics. Information was classified according to type of study (animal, in vitro human, and in vivo human) and level of evidence (for in vivo human studies). Sixty-two studies were finally included: 30 biology, 3 graft shrinkage, 11 graft extrusion, 17 graft size, and 6 graft fixation (some studies were categorized in more than one topic). These studies corresponded to 22 animal studies, 22 in vitro human studies, and 23 in vivo human studies (7 level II, 10 level III, and 6 level IV). The principal conclusions were as follows: (a) Donor cells decrease after MAT and grafts are repopulated with host cells form synovium; (b) graft preservation alters collagen network (deep freezing) and causes cell apoptosis with loss of viable cells (cryopreservation); (c) graft shrinkage occurs mainly in lyophilized and gamma-irradiated grafts (less with cryopreservation); (d) graft extrusion is common but has no clinical/functional implications; (e) overall, MRI is not superior to plain radiograph for graft sizing; (f) graft width size matching is more important than length size matching; (g) height appears to be the most important factor influencing meniscal size; (h) bone fixation better restores contact mechanics than suture fixation, but there are no differences for pullout strength or functional results; and (i) suture fixation has more risk of graft extrusion compared to bone fixation. Systematic review of level II-IV studies, Level IV.

  19. Technical Operations Support III (TOPS III). Task Order 0061: Fundamental Theory Based Assessment of Thermoelectric Merit Factor for Heusler Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    is believed to posses the phonon behavior of a glass and electronic conduction of a crystal. The interest in Half-Heusler alloys is resulted from...concentration. Glasses are known for low kl a. But, electrons in glasses are scattered making them poor thermoelectrics. Low or High m*? From...result of large electronegativity differences, but both have a good zT. Final Verdict One needs a “phonon- glass and an electron crystal”1 to realize

  20. Modeling of the factors contributing to the initiation and propagation of the crevice corrosion of alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Scully, J.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Crevice corrosion of alloy 625 in both chlorinated and nonchlorinated American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) artificial ocean water was modeled. Secondary current and potential distributions as a function of crevice depth were obtained from the model using the following crevice initiation criteria (1) E < E[sub Flade], (2) i[sub diss] = 10 [mu]A/cm[sup 2], and (3) pH [approximately]0.46 at the site where the first two criteria are met. For alloy 625 in nonchlorinated ASTM artificial ocean water these criteria are satisfied at depths which are near the mouth of the crevice. These depths are incompatible with the mass-transport conditions governing the development of the critical crevice solution. In the chlorinated system the model predicts that initiation occurs at greater depths which are compatible with all the critical crevice solution. In the chlorinated system the model predicts that initiation occurs at greater depths which are compatible with all the criteria including mass-transport considerations. The model results are in agreement with remote crevice assembly experiments which show that crevice corrosion occurs more readily in the chlorinated ASTM artificial ocean water. Propagation of the crevice corrosion of alloy 625 is shown to be ohmically controlled by the resistance between the mouth of the crevice and the initiation site.

  1. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  2. Numerical simulation on open wellbore shrinkage and casing equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Linzhi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  3. Measurement of composite shrinkage using a fibre optic Bragg grating sensor.

    PubMed

    Milczewski, M S; Silva, J C C; Paterno, A S; Kuller, F; Kalinowski, H J

    2007-01-01

    Fibre Bragg grating is used to determine resin-based composite shrinkage. Two composite resins (Freedom from SDI and Z100 from 3M) were tested to determine the polymerization contraction behaviour. Each sample of resin was prepared with an embedded fibre Bragg grating. A LED activation unit with wavelength from 430 nm to 470 nm (Dabi Atlante) was used for resin polymerization. The wavelength position of the peak in the optical reflection spectra of the sensor was measured. The wavelength shift was related to the shrinkage deformation of the samples. Temperature and strain evolution during the curing phase of the material was monitored. The shrinkage in the longitudinal direction was 0.15 +/- 0.02% for resin Z100 (3M) and 0.06+/-0.01% for Freedom (SDI); two-thirds of shrinkage occurred after the first 50 s of illumination.

  4. Numerical Simulation on Open Wellbore Shrinkage and Casing Equivalent Stress in Bedded Salt Rock Stratum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength. PMID:24198726

  5. Mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of short fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of a short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC) were investigated in this study and compared to both a bulk fill resin composite (BFRC) and conventional glass/ceramic-filled resin composite (CGRC). Fracture toughness, flexural properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of the SFRC, BFRC and CGRC were measured. SFRC had significantly higher fracture toughness than BFRCs and CGRCs. The flexural properties of SFRC were comparable with BFRCs and CGRCs. SFRC showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested resin composites. The depth of cure of the SFRC was similar to BFRCs and higher than CGRCs. The data from this laboratory investigation suggests that SFRC exhibits improvements in fracture toughness, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure when compared with CGRC, but depth of cure of SFRC was similar to BFRC.

  6. Formation of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM).

    PubMed

    Klein, Fritz; Ospina, Carlos; Rudolph, Birgit; Wüstefeld, Joost; Denecke, Timm; Neuhaus, Peter; Schmidt, Sven-Christian

    2012-10-01

    The case of a 58-year-old male patient who developed a chronic pain syndrome after laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh for treatment of a large symptomatic umbilical hernia combined with rectus diastasis is reported. Twelve months after an uncomplicated initial surgery, the patient presented with progressive signs of a foreign body sensation and pain in the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography examination revealed no pathologic findings but a marked shrinkage of the mesh implant. Because of further progressive symptoms, explorative laparotomy was performed. Mesh shrinkage and adhesions with a surrounding chronic tissue reaction were found as the cause of the pain syndrome. This case demonstrates a case of a chronic pain syndrome due to mesh shrinkage 12 months after initial ventral hernia repair. Mesh shrinkage should therefore be taken into consideration in patients with progressive pain chronic syndromes after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

  7. Photo-polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics in resin-composites: methods development.

    PubMed

    Watts, D C; Marouf, A S; Al-Hindi, A M

    2003-01-01

    Studies of free shrinkage-strain kinetics on restoratives have begun to multiply. However, there have been fewer investigations of the more difficult problem of concurrent stress-kinetic measurements. The aim was to outline design parameters for a new methodology for this problem, amenable especially to light-cured materials, and to present illustrative results for a range of restorative composites. Absolute values of stress measurable for a given material and geometry are dependent upon the stiffness of the measurement system. In an infinitely stiff system, the measured stress would also tend towards infinity. Real teeth and their cavities are not infinitely stiff; they have elastic and visco-elastic compliance. Consequently, it is important that some minimal, but essentially constant compliance be allowed, whatever the final or time-dependent modulus of the material may be. This goal has been realised by measurement of the time-development, for a disk-geometry specimen (phi=10, h approximately 1.0 mm) of stress (S(r)), with a calibrated cantilever beam-geometry load cell. A novel specimen-holder design was used for this purpose, held in a rigid base assembly. Specimen thicknesses (or gap-widths) of 0.8 and 1.2 mm were specifically investigated on four representative resin-composites. Concurrent measurements were made of the end-displacement of the cantilever load cell, relative to a lower glass plate retaining the specimen. Load-calibration of the cantilever load cell gave an end-displacement per unit stress of circa 6 microm/MPa. This compares with literature values for cuspal compliance or displacement of circa 20 microm. Re-normalisation of the stress-data was implemented. This was accomplished assuming Hooke's law behavior at each instant and equivalent to a stiffer system, with a correction (multiplier) factor of 4 on the raw-stress values. For the materials examined, resultant maximum-stress levels determined were circa 5-8 MPa Stress-levels obtained at 1

  8. The effects of epoxy shrinkage on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility Technology Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    A method is shown analytically which reduces the effects of epoxy shrinkage for an ultra-high precision X-ray telescope to within the system error budget. The three-dimensional shrinkage effects are discussed with reference to this telescope. The results of the analysis point to the use of an interrupted rather than continuous bond line as the best solution. Discussion of the finite element modelling techniques is included.

  9. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  10. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  11. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    PubMed

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Drying shrinkage of fibre-reinforced lightweight aggregate concrete containing fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kayali, O.; Haque, M.N.; Zhu, B.

    1999-11-01

    Lightweight aggregate concretes containing fly ash with a compressive strength between 61 to 67 NPa were produced. The lightweight aggregate used was sintered fly ash. The concretes were reinforced with either polypropylene or steel fibres. The fibres did not affect the compressive strength, but did increase the tensile strength of these concretes. The modulus of elasticity of all the lightweight concretes tested was about 21 GPa, compared to 35 GPa for the normal-weight concrete. Fibre reinforcement did not affect the value of the elastic modulus. This type of lightweight concrete, containing fly ash as 23% of the total cementitious content, resulted in long-term shrinkage that is nearly twice as large as normal-weight concrete of somewhat similar strength. Polypropylene fibre reinforcement did not reduce drying shrinkage, while steel fibres did. Early shrinkage behavior of this type of lightweight concrete was similar to normal-weight concrete. However, the rate of shrinkage of the lightweight concrete remained constant until nearly 100 days of drying. This is different from normal-weight concrete that showed appreciably after 56 days. Shrinkage of normal-weight concrete stabilized after 400 days, which shrinkage of lightweight concrete did not appear to stabilize after a similar period of continuous drying.

  13. Exploration of statistical shrinkage parameters of disproportionality methods in spontaneous reporting system of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ye, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Tian; Qi, Na; Hou, Yong-Fang; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Shi, Wen-Tao; Wei, Xin; Liu, Yu-Zhou; Wu, Gui-Zhi; He, Jia

    2015-09-01

    Statistical shrinkage is a potential statistical method to improve the accuracy of signal detection results and avoid spurious associations detected by disproportionality analyses. In this study, we introduced statistical shrinkage influence on disproportionality methods in spontaneous reporting system in China. We added the shrinkage parameters in the numerator and denominator, denoted as in the formula of disproportionality analysis. The shrinkage parameters were subjectively set to between 0 and 5, with an interval of 0.1. Adverse drug reaction product label database was deemed as a proxy of golden standard to evaluate the effect of statistical shrinkage. Reports in the years of 2010-2011 were extracted from the national spontaneous reporting system database as the data source for analysis in this study. When α was around 0.5, the Youden index reached the maximum for each disproportionality methods in this study. The value of 0.6 was suggested as the most appropriate statistical shrinkage parameter for reporting odds ratio and proportional reporting ratio and 0.2 for information component based on the spontaneous reporting system of China. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Conversion-dependent shrinkage stress and strain in dental resins and composites.

    PubMed

    Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Trujillo-Lemon, Marianela; Lu, Hui; Ding, Xingzhe; Lin, Yan; Ge, Junhao

    2005-01-01

    The placement of dental composites is complicated by the contraction that accompanies polymerization of these materials. The resulting shrinkage stress that develops during cure of a bonded restoration can induce defects within the composite, the tooth or at the interface resulting in compromised clinical performance and/or esthetics. In light of the substantial efforts devoted to understanding and attempting to control shrinkage stress and strain in dental composite restoratives, this paper offers a perspective on the conversion dependent development of shrinkage and stress. The relationships between polymer property development and the physical evolution of the network structures associated with dental polymers as well as the interrelated kinetics of the photopolymerization reaction process are examined here. Some of the methods used to assess conversion in dental resins and composites are considered. In particular, newly introduced techniques that allow real time analysis of conversion by near-infrared spectroscopy to be coupled directly to simultaneous dynamic measurements of either shrinkage stress or strain are described. The results are compared with reports from the dental materials literature as well as complementary studies in other related fields of polymer science. The complex, nonlinear correlation between conversion, shrinkage and stress are highlighted. A brief review of some of the materials-based approaches designed to minimize polymerization shrinkage and stress is also provided.

  15. Microcomputed Tomography Evaluation of Polymerization Shrinkage of Class I Flowable Resin Composite Restorations.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, C S; Chiu, K-J; Farrokhmanesh, E; Janal, M; Puppin-Rontani, R M; Giannini, M; Bonfante, E A; Coelho, P G; Hirata, R

    The present study aimed to characterize the pattern and volume of polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin composites, including one conventional, two bulk fill, and one self-adhesive. Standardized class I preparations (2.5 mm depth × 4 mm length × 4 mm wide) were performed in 24 caries-free human third molars that were randomly divided in four groups, according to the resin composite and adhesive system used: group 1 = Permaflo + Peak Universal Bond (PP); group 2 = Filtek Bulk Fill + Scotchbond Universal (FS); group 3 = Surefil SDR + XP Bond (SX); and group 4 = Vertise flow self-adhering (VE) (n=6). Each tooth was scanned three times using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) apparatus. The first scan was done after the cavity preparation, the second after cavity filling with the flowable resin composite before curing, and the third after it was cured. The μCT images were imported into three-dimensional rendering software, and volumetric polymerization shrinkage percentage was calculated for each sample. Data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and post hoc comparisons. No significant difference was observed among PP, FS, and VE. SX bulk fill resin composite presented the lowest values of volumetric shrinkage. Shrinkage was mostly observed along the occlusal surface and part of the pulpal floor. In conclusion, polymerization shrinkage outcomes in a 2.5-mm deep class I cavity were material dependent, although most materials did not differ. The location of shrinkage was mainly at the occlusal surface.

  16. Transient brain shrinkage in infantile spasms after ACTH treatment. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, K; Ohta, H; Tamai, I

    1980-02-01

    This is the report of two cases of infantile spasms, manifesting transient brain shrinkage in computerized tomography (CT) after ACTH treatment. ACTH was given for 8 weeks to a 8-months-old Japanese girl with infantile spasms. First CT performed at 2 weeks after the final ACTH injection, displayed moderate brain shrinkage. Second CT at 4 months showed marked diminution of the shrinkage. ACTH was also given for 8 weeks to a 14 months old Japanese boy with infantile spasms. First CT, just before ACTH treatment, showed mild cortical atrophy, the second at 7 days after the final ACTH injection revealed marked brain shrinkage and moderate ventricular dilatation, and the third at 2 months, disclosed mild improvement of the shrinkage. ACTH or corticoateroid has widespread effects on the developing nervous system. In animal experiments, ACTH or steroids interfere with brain growth of young rats. CT findings of transient brain shrinkage in a child with infantile spasms might suggest that intensive treatment with ACTH or steroids in infancy interferes with brain growth as seen in the results of animal experiments.

  17. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  18. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  19. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  20. Aeronautical Industry Requirements for Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, D. T.; Elefterie, C. F.; Ghiban, B.

    2017-06-01

    The project presents the requirements imposed for aviation components made from Titanium based alloys. A significant portion of the aircraft pylons are manufactured from Titanium alloys. Strength, weight, and reliability are the primary factors to consider in aircraft structures. These factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used to construct or repair the aircraft. Many forces and structural stresses act on an aircraft when it is flying and when it is static and this thesis describes environmental factors, conditions of external aggression, mechanical characteristics and loadings that must be satisfied simultaneously by a Ti-based alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Inconel super alloys, Aluminum alloys).For this alloy class, the requirements are regarding strength to weight ratio, reliability, corrosion resistance, thermal expansion and so on. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  1. Effectiveness of shrinkage and variable selection methods for the prediction of complex human traits using data from distantly related individuals.

    PubMed

    Berger, Swetlana; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Veturi, Yogasudha; Simianer, Henner; de los Campos, Gustavo

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have detected large numbers of variants associated with complex human traits and diseases. However, the proportion of variance explained by GWAS-significant single nucleotide polymorphisms has been usually small. This brought interest in the use of whole-genome regression (WGR) methods. However, there has been limited research on the factors that affect prediction accuracy (PA) of WGRs when applied to human data of distantly related individuals. Here, we examine, using real human genotypes and simulated phenotypes, how trait complexity, marker-quantitative trait loci (QTL) linkage disequilibrium (LD), and the model used affect the performance of WGRs. Our results indicated that the estimated rate of missing heritability is dependent on the extent of marker-QTL LD. However, this parameter was not greatly affected by trait complexity. Regarding PA our results indicated that: (a) under perfect marker-QTL LD WGR can achieve moderately high prediction accuracy, and with simple genetic architectures variable selection methods outperform shrinkage procedures and (b) under imperfect marker-QTL LD, variable selection methods can achieved reasonably good PA with simple or moderately complex genetic architectures; however, the PA of these methods deteriorated as trait complexity increases and with highly complex traits variable selection and shrinkage methods both performed poorly. This was confirmed with an analysis of human height. © 2015 The Authors. Annals of Human Genetics published by University College London (UCL) and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. PILOT EVALUATION OF VANADIUM ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARCS, SHEETS, ROLLING(METALLURGY), HIGH TEMPERATURE, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, DUCTILITY, CREEP, OXIDATION, COATINGS , SILICIDES , HARDNESS, WELDING, EXTRUSION, TANTALUM ALLOYS, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS....VANADIUM ALLOYS, * NIOBIUM ALLOYS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS, CARBON ALLOYS, MELTING, ELECTRIC

  3. Predominant factor determining wear properties of β-type and (α+β)-type titanium alloys in metal-to-metal contact for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The predominant factor determining the wear properties of a new titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) was investigated for TNTZ and Ti64 combinations in metal-to-metal contacting bio-implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damages were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron-back scattered diffraction analysis. The volume loss of TNTZ is found to be larger than that of Ti64, regardless of the mating material. The wear track of TNTZ exhibits the galled regions and severe plastic deformation with large flake-like debris, indicative of delamination wear, which strongly suggests the occurrence of adhesive wear. Whereas, the wear track of Ti64 have a large number of regular grooves and microcuttings with cutting chip-like wear debris and microfragmentation of fine oxide debris, indicative of abrasive wear combined with oxidative wear. This difference in the wear type is caused by severe and mild subsurface deformations of TNTZ and Ti64, respectively. The lower resistance to plastic shearing for TNTZ compared to that of Ti64 induces delamination, resulting in a higher wear rate.

  4. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  5. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  6. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  7. Testing Departure from Additivity in Tukey’s Model using Shrinkage: Application to a Longitudinal Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A.; Park, Sung Kyun; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Allison, Matthew A.; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Chen, Jinbo; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2014-01-01

    While there has been extensive research developing gene-environment interaction (GEI) methods in case-control studies, little attention has been given to sparse and efficient modeling of GEI in longitudinal studies. In a two-way table for GEI with rows and columns as categorical variables, a conventional saturated interaction model involves estimation of a specific parameter for each cell, with constraints ensuring identifiability. The estimates are unbiased but are potentially inefficient because the number of parameters to be estimated can grow quickly with increasing categories of row/column factors. On the other hand, Tukey’s one degree of freedom (df) model for non-additivity treats the interaction term as a scaled product of row and column main effects. Due to the parsimonious form of interaction, the interaction estimate leads to enhanced efficiency and the corresponding test could lead to increased power. Unfortunately, Tukey’s model gives biased estimates and low power if the model is misspecified. When screening multiple GEIs where each genetic and environmental marker may exhibit a distinct interaction pattern, a robust estimator for interaction is important for GEI detection. We propose a shrinkage estimator for interaction effects that combines estimates from both Tukey’s and saturated interaction models and use the corresponding Wald test for testing interaction in a longitudinal setting. The proposed estimator is robust to misspecification of interaction structure. We illustrate the proposed methods using two longitudinal studies — the Normative Aging Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. PMID:25112650

  8. Testing departure from additivity in Tukey's model using shrinkage: application to a longitudinal setting.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A; Park, Sung Kyun; Kardia, Sharon L R; Allison, Matthew A; Vokonas, Pantel S; Chen, Jinbo; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2014-12-20

    While there has been extensive research developing gene-environment interaction (GEI) methods in case-control studies, little attention has been given to sparse and efficient modeling of GEI in longitudinal studies. In a two-way table for GEI with rows and columns as categorical variables, a conventional saturated interaction model involves estimation of a specific parameter for each cell, with constraints ensuring identifiability. The estimates are unbiased but are potentially inefficient because the number of parameters to be estimated can grow quickly with increasing categories of row/column factors. On the other hand, Tukey's one-degree-of-freedom model for non-additivity treats the interaction term as a scaled product of row and column main effects. Because of the parsimonious form of interaction, the interaction estimate leads to enhanced efficiency, and the corresponding test could lead to increased power. Unfortunately, Tukey's model gives biased estimates and low power if the model is misspecified. When screening multiple GEIs where each genetic and environmental marker may exhibit a distinct interaction pattern, a robust estimator for interaction is important for GEI detection. We propose a shrinkage estimator for interaction effects that combines estimates from both Tukey's and saturated interaction models and use the corresponding Wald test for testing interaction in a longitudinal setting. The proposed estimator is robust to misspecification of interaction structure. We illustrate the proposed methods using two longitudinal studies-the Normative Aging Study and the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

  9. Leaf shrinkage with dehydration: coordination with hydraulic vulnerability and drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-04-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in K(leaf) at declining leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of K(leaf) with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the K(leaf) versus Ψ(leaf) curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus Ψ(leaf) curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions.

  10. Leaf Shrinkage with Dehydration: Coordination with Hydraulic Vulnerability and Drought Tolerance1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in Kleaf at declining leaf water potential (Ψleaf). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of Kleaf with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the Kleaf versus Ψleaf curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus Ψleaf curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions. PMID:24306532

  11. Improving Reliability of Subject-Level Resting-State fMRI Parcellation with Shrinkage Estimators

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Amanda F.; Nebel, Mary Beth; Shou, Haochang; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Pekar, James J.; Mostofsky, Stewart; Caffo, Brian; Lindquist, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent interest in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) lies in subdividing the human brain into anatomically and functionally distinct regions of interest. For example, brain parcellation is often a necessary step for defining the network nodes used in connectivity studies. While inference has traditionally been performed on group-level data, there is a growing interest in parcellating single subject data. However, this is difficult due to the inherent low signal-to-noise ratio of rsfMRI data, combined with typically short scan lengths. A large number of brain parcellation approaches employ clustering, which begins with a measure of similarity or distance between voxels. The goal of this work is to improve the reproducibility of single-subject parcellation using shrinkage-based estimators of such measures, allowing the noisy subject-specific estimator to “borrow strength” in a principled manner from a larger population of subjects. We present several empirical Bayes shrinkage estimators and outline methods for shrinkage when multiple scans are not available for each subject. We perform shrinkage on raw inter-voxel correlation estimates and use both raw and shrinkage estimates to produce parcellations by performing clustering on the voxels. While we employ a standard spectral clustering approach, our proposed method is agnostic to the choice of clustering method and can be used as a pre-processing step for any clustering algorithm. Using two datasets – a simulated dataset where the true parcellation is known and is subject-specific and a test-retest dataset consisting of two 7-minute resting-state fMRI scans from 20 subjects – we show that parcellations produced from shrinkage correlation estimates have higher reliability and validity than those produced from raw correlation estimates. Application to test-retest data shows that using shrinkage estimators increases the reproducibility of subject-specific parcellations of the motor

  12. Time dependence of composite shrinkage using halogen and LED light curing.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Alexander; Mills, Robin W; Rzanny, Angelika E; Jandt, Klaus D

    2005-03-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of light cured dental composites presents the major drawback for these aesthetically adaptable restorative materials. LED based light curing technology has recently become commercially available. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if there was a statistically significant difference in linear and volumetric composite shrinkage strain if a LED LCU is used for the light curing process rather than a conventional halogen LCU. The volumetric shrinkage strain was determined using the Archimedes buoyancy principle after 5, 10, 20, 40 s of light curing and after 120 s following the 40 s light curing time period. The linear shrinkage strain was determined with a dynamic mechanical analyzer for the composites Z100, Spectrum, Solitaire2 and Definite polymerized with the LCUs Trilight (halogen), Freelight I (LED) and LED63 (LED LCU prototype). The changes in irradiance and spectra of the LCUs were measured after 0, 312 and 360 min of duty time. In general there was no considerable difference in shrinkage of the composites Z100, Spectrum or Solitaire2 when the LED63 was used instead of the Trilight. There was, however, a statistically significant difference in shrinkage strain when the composite Definite was polymerized with the LED63 instead of the Trilight. The spectrum of the Trilight changed during the experiment considerably whereas the LED63 showed an almost constant light output. The Freelight I dropped considerably in irradiance and had to be withdrawn from the study because of technical problems. The composites containing only the photoinitiator camphorquinone showed similar shrinkage strain behaviour when a LED or halogen LCU is used for the polymerization. The irradiance of some LED LCUs can also decrease over time and should therefore be checked on a regular basis.

  13. Temperature-dependent biphasic shrinkage of lipid-coated bubbles in ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cox, Debra J; Thomas, James L

    2013-04-09

    Lipid-coated microbubbles and emulsions are of interest as possible ultrasound-mediated drug delivery vehicles and for their interesting behaviors and fundamental properties. We and others have noted that bubbles coated with the long chain saturated phospholipid distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) rapidly shrink to a quasistable size when repeatedly insonated with short ultrasound pulses; such stability may adversely affect the bubble's subsequent ability to deliver its pharmacological cargo. Bubbles coated with the unsaturated lipid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) did not show stability but did undergo an abrupt change from rapid initial shrinkage to a slow persistent shrinkage, leading ultimately to dissolution or dispersion. As DOPC and DSPC differ not only in chain saturation but also phase behavior, we performed additional studies using dimyristoyl PC (DMPC) as a coat lipid and controlled the solution temperature to study bubble behavior on exposure to repeated ultrasound pulses for the same coat, in both fluid and gel phases. We find, first, that essentially all bubbles show an initially rapid shrinkage, in which gas loss exceeds the limit imposed by gas diffusion into the surrounding medium; this rapid shrinkage may be evidence of nanoscopic bubble fragmentation. Second, upon reaching a fraction of their initial size, bubbles begin a slower shrinkage with a shrinkage rate that depends on the resting phase state of the coat lipid: fluid DMPC monolayers give a more rapid shrinkage than gel phase. DOPC-coated bubbles showed no temperature-dependent responses in the same temperature range. The results are especially interesting in that bubble compression during the pulse is likely to adiabatically heat the bubble and fluidize the coat, regardless of its initial phase state; thus, some structural feature of the resting coat, such as defect lines in the gel phase, may be important in the subsequent response to the ~3 μs ultrasound pulse.

  14. Non-Ionotropic NMDA Receptor Signaling Drives Activity-Induced Dendritic Spine Shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ivar S; Gray, John A; Zito, Karen

    2015-09-02

    The elimination of dendritic spine synapses is a critical step in the refinement of neuronal circuits during development of the cerebral cortex. Several studies have shown that activity-induced shrinkage and retraction of dendritic spines depend on activation of the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which leads to influx of extracellular calcium ions and activation of calcium-dependent phosphatases that modify regulators of the spine cytoskeleton, suggesting that influx of extracellular calcium ions drives spine shrinkage. Intriguingly, a recent report revealed a novel non-ionotropic function of the NMDAR in the regulation of synaptic strength, which relies on glutamate binding but is independent of ion flux through the receptor (Nabavi et al., 2013). Here, we tested whether non-ionotropic NMDAR signaling could also play a role in driving structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging and time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, we show that low-frequency glutamatergic stimulation results in shrinkage of dendritic spines even in the presence of the NMDAR d-serine/glycine binding site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7CK), which fully blocks NMDAR-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients. Notably, application of 7CK or MK-801 also converts spine enlargement resulting from a high-frequency uncaging stimulus into spine shrinkage, demonstrating that strong Ca(2+) influx through the NMDAR normally overcomes a non-ionotropic shrinkage signal to drive spine growth. Our results support a model in which NMDAR signaling, independent of ion flux, drives structural shrinkage at spiny synapses. Dendritic spine elimination is vital for the refinement of neural circuits during development and has been linked to improvements in behavioral performance in the adult. Spine shrinkage and elimination have been widely accepted to depend on Ca(2+) influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in conjunction with long-term depression

  15. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available for calculating long-term deflections. The drying shrinkage profile through the thickness of a composite slab is greatly affected by the impermeable steel deck at the slab soffit, and this has only recently been quantified. This paper presents the results of long-term laboratory tests on composite slabs subjected to both drying shrinkage and sustained loads. Based on laboratory measurements, a design model for the shrinkage strain profile through the thickness of a slab is proposed. The design model is based on some modifications to an existing creep and shrinkage prediction model B3. In addition, an analytical model is developed to calculate the time-dependent deflection of composite slabs taking into account the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage. The calculated deflections are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  16. Control of polymerization shrinkage and stress in nanogel-modified monomer and composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Rafael R.; Garcia, Jeffrey W.; Barros, Matthew D.; Lewis, Steven H.; Pfeifer, Carmem S.; Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study demonstrates the effects of nano-scale prepolymer particles as additives to model dental monomer and composite formulations. Methods Discrete nanogel particles were prepared by solution photopolymerization of isobornyl methacrylate and urethane dimethacrylate in the presence of a chain transfer agent, which also provided a means to attach reactive groups to the prepolymer. Nanogel was added to triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in increments between 5 and 40 wt% with resin viscosity, reaction kinetics, shrinkage, mechanical properties, stress and optical properties evaluated. Maximum loading of barium glass filler was determined as a function of nanogel content and composites with varied nanogel content but uniform filler loading were compared in terms of consistency, conversion, shrinkage and mechanical properties. Results High conversion, high molecular weight internally crosslinked and cyclized nanogel prepolymer was efficiently prepared and redispersed into TEGDMA with an exponential rise in viscosity accompanying nanogel content. Nanogel addition at any level produced no deleterious effects on reaction kinetics, conversion or mechanical properties, as long as reactive nanogels were used. A reduction in polymerization shrinkage and stress was achieved in proportion to nanogel content. Even at high nanogel concentrations, the maximum loading of glass filler was only marginally reduced relative to the control and high strength composite materials with low shrinkage were obtained. Significance The use of reactive nanogels offers a versatile platform from which resin and composite handling properties can be adjusted while the polymerization shrinkage and stress development that challenge the adhesive bonding of dental restoratives are controllably reduced. PMID:21388669

  17. Shrinkage modeling of concrete reinforced by palm fibres in hot dry environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchiche, Hamida; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2017-02-01

    The cement materials, such as concrete and conventional mortar present very little resistance to traction and cracking, these hydraulic materials which induces large withdrawals on materials and cracks in structures. The hot dry environments such as: the Saharan regions of Algeria, Indeed, concrete structures in these regions are very fragile, and present high shrinkage. Strengthening of these materials by fibers can provide technical solutions for improving the mechanical performance. The aim of this study is firstly, to reduce the shrinkage of conventional concrete with its reinforcement with date palm fibers. In fact, Algeria has an extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp) but without valorization in practical areas, especially in building materials. Secondly, to model the shrinkage behavior of concrete was reinforced by date palm fibers. In the literature, several models for still fiber concrete were founded but few are offers for natural fiber concretes. To do so, a still fiber concretes model of YOUNG - CHERN was used. According to the results, a reduction of shrinkage with reinforcement by date palm fibers was showed. A good ability of molding of shrinkage of date palm reinforced concrete with YOUNG - CHERN Modified model was obtained. In fact, a good correlation between experimental data and the model data was recorded.

  18. Perceptual shrinkage of a one-way motion path with high-speed motion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yutaka; Sakaguchi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Back-and-forth motion induces perceptual shrinkage of the motion path, but such shrinkage is hardly perceived for one-way motion. If the shrinkage is caused by temporal averaging of stimulus position around the endpoints, it should also be induced for one-way motion at higher motion speeds. In psychophysical experiments with a high-speed projector, we tested this conjecture for a one-way motion stimulus at various speeds (4–100 deg/s) along a straight path. Results showed that perceptual shrinkage of the motion path was robustly observed in higher-speed motion (faster than 66.7 deg/s). In addition, the amount of the forwards shift at the onset position was larger than that of the backwards shift at the offset position. These results demonstrate that high-speed motion can induce shrinkage, even for a one-way motion path. This can be explained by the view that perceptual position is represented by the integration of the temporal average of instantaneous position and the motion representation. PMID:27464844

  19. A novel two-dimensional method to measure surface shrinkage in cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.C.; Ferraro, C.C.; Yin, W.Q.; Ishee, C.A.; Ifju, P.G.

    2010-05-15

    A novel experimental technique, Cure Reference Method (CRM), was developed for the measurement of surface shrinkage in cementitious materials. The technique combines the replication of diffraction grating on a specimen during the curing process and the use of high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Once demolded, the specimen was stored in an environmental chamber in order to establish specific curing conditions. Measurements were conducted on a daily basis for the duration of 7 days by recording a set of the consecutive phase shifted fringe patterns using the Portable Engineering Moire interferometer II (PEMI II). An automated fringe analysis system was developed and used to obtain displacement and strain information in two dimenzsions. Surface shrinkage behavior in both cement paste and mortar specimens was investigated by the use of the technique under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. Furthermore, an experimental control was developed in an effort to remove the effects of drying shrinkage on cementitious specimens at early ages. This was done in an effort to explore the relative contribution of autogenous shrinkage to the overall shrinkage in cementitious materials.

  20. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes) were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P > 0.05) or significantly larger (P < 0.05) than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P < 0.05) rather than the PMMA bead size (P = 0.335). Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins. PMID:24779020

  1. Concentration-dependent specimen shrinkage in iodine-enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    Vickerton, Paula; Jarvis, Jonathan; Jeffery, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Iodine potassium iodide (I2KI) solution can be employed as a contrast agent for the visualisation of soft tissue structures in micro-computed tomography studies. This technique provides high resolution images of soft tissue non-destructively but initial studies suggest that the stain can cause substantial specimen shrinkage. The degree of specimen shrinkage, and potential deformation, is an important consideration when using the data for morphological studies. Here we quantify the macroscopic volume changes in mouse skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and cerebellum as a result of immersion in the common fixatives 10% phosphate-buffered formal saline, 70% ethanol and 3% glutaraldehyde, compared with I2KI staining solution at concentrations of 2, 6, 10 and 20%. Immersion in the I2KI solution resulted in dramatic changes of tissue volume, which were far larger than the shrinkage from formalin fixation alone. The degree of macroscopic change was most dependent upon the I2KI concentration, with severe shrinkage of 70% seen in solutions of 20% I2KI after 14 days' incubation. When using this technique care needs to be taken to use the lowest concentration that will give adequate contrast to minimise artefacts due to shrinkage. PMID:23721431

  2. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  3. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  4. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  5. Low-shrink composite resins: a review of their history, strategies for managing shrinkage, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Pitel, Mark L

    2013-09-01

    Despite numerous advances in composite resin technology over the course of many decades, shrinkage behavior and the resultant stresses inherent to direct placed composite restorations continue to challenge clinicians. This overview of composite resins includes a review of their history and development along with a discussion of strategies for reducing polymerization shrinkage. An assessment of the clinical significance of these materials is also provided, including a discussion of the differences between polymerization shrinkage and stress, incremental layering versus bulk placement, and the emergence of lower shrinkage stress monomer chemistry.

  6. Ultra low-K shrinkage behavior when under electron beam in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lorut, F.; Imbert, G.; Roggero, A.

    2013-08-28

    In this paper, we investigate the tendency of porous low-K dielectrics (also named Ultra Low-K, ULK) behavior to shrink when exposed to the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. Various experimental electron beam conditions have been used for irradiating ULK thin films, and the resulting shrinkage has been measured through use of an atomic force microscope tool. We report the shrinkage to be a fast, cumulative, and dose dependent effect. Correlation of the shrinkage with incident electron beam energy loss has also been evidenced. The chemical modification of the ULK films within the interaction volume has been demonstrated, with a densification of the layer and a loss of carbon and hydrogen elements being observed.

  7. Shrinkage of polyurethane molecular stamp fixed on epoxy resin modified glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengchun; He, Quanguo; Xiao, Pengfeng; Tang, Jianxin; He, Nongyue; Lu, Zuhong

    2003-01-01

    The shrinkage of polyurethane stamps used for the in situ synthesis of DNA microarrays via molecular stamping method was studied with Micron XYZ Scope. It was found that the polyurethane stamp fixed on the epoxy resin modified glass strongly and showed minimum linear shrinkage. The linear shrinkage of the whole polyurethane stamp and that of each feature of polyurethane stamp were controlled within 0.0341% and 0.309%, respectively, which were due to the strong van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds between polyurethane and epoxy resin. It was also confirmed by scanning electron microscope that the polyurethane stamp fixed on the epoxy resin modified glass replicated the patterns of motherboard with a high fidelity. All these underlay the synthesis of DNA microarray through molecular stamping method.

  8. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  9. Effect of monomer diffusion on photoinduced shrinkage in photopolymer layers determined by electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Pramanik, Manojit; Toal, Vincent; Naydenova, Izabela

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of monomer diffusion on the photoinduced shrinkage profile in acrylamide based photopolymer layers during holographic recording. Using phase shifting electronic speckle pattern interferometry the displacement at each pixel in the image of the layer is measured. The complete displacement profile of the layer was obtained using phase shifting technique. We observed a reduction in shrinkage as a result of monomer diffusion from unexposed regions of holographic exposure. As a result of diffusion the maximum shrinkage was reduced by 26 % from 7.18μm to 5.28μm in a photopolymer layer of thickness160 +/- 3 μm after 84 seconds of recording.

  10. Accurate ranking of differentially expressed genes by a distribution-free shrinkage approach.

    PubMed

    Opgen-Rhein, Rainer; Strimmer, Korbinian

    2007-01-01

    High-dimensional case-control analysis is encountered in many different settings in genomics. In order to rank genes accordingly, many different scores have been proposed, ranging from ad hoc modifications of the ordinary t statistic to complicated hierarchical Bayesian models. Here, we introduce the "shrinkage t" statistic that is based on a novel and model-free shrinkage estimate of the variance vector across genes. This is derived in a quasi-empirical Bayes setting. The new rank score is fully automatic and requires no specification of parameters or distributions. It is computationally inexpensive and can be written analytically in closed form. Using a series of synthetic and three real expression data we studied the quality of gene rankings produced by the "shrinkage t" statistic. The new score consistently leads to highly accurate rankings for the complete range of investigated data sets and all considered scenarios for across-gene variance structures.

  11. Shrinkage- and refractive-index shift-corrected volume holograms for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Heng; Su, Der-Chin; Su, Jung-Chieh

    2002-08-01

    The Bragg mismatching condition for volume holograms occurs because of the changes in the thickness and the refractive index of holographic recording materials during the recording and reconstruction procedures. We propose an improved compensation method to physically correct these effects in the fabrications of volume holograms for optical interconnects. In order to show the validity of this method, Slavich photographic plate VRP-M is used to fabricate optical interconnects. The correction of the Bragg diffraction angle shift of about 2.10deg, which is induced by 6.14% film shrinkage and 0.06 refractive index shift, is successfully demonstrated with the surface-normal configuration. A shrinkage- and refractive-index shift-corrected volume hologram with 23% diffraction efficiency is experimentally confirmed. The methodology proposed is applicable to other phase media when the associated film shrinkage and refractive-index shift data are experimentally determined.

  12. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R.; Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C.

    1992-12-31

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component`s protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  13. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  14. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R. ); Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Hormone-dependent shrinkage of a sphenoid wing meningioma after pregnancy: case report.

    PubMed

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Freyschlag, Christian F; Stockhammer, Günter; Taucher, Susanne; Maier, Hans; Thomé, Claudius; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are known to be associated with female sex hormones. Worsening neurological symptoms or newly diagnosed meningiomas have been described in the context of elevated levels of sex hormones, for example, in pregnancy. To the authors' knowledge, tumor shrinkage after the normalization of hormones has not been described, even if it is known that neurological deficits due to meningioma compression may improve after giving birth. A 32-year-old female patient presented with severe headache and vision disturbances at the end of her second pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extended mass at the lateral left-sided sphenoid wing that was suspected to be a meningioma. After delivery, the patient's symptoms improved, and MRI obtained 2 months postpartum showed significant shrinkage of the lesion. Significant tumor shrinkage can occur after pregnancy. Thus, repeat imaging is indicated in these patients.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy and age-related brain shrinkage: regional effects.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Acker, James D

    2004-11-15

    Neuroprotective properties of estrogen have been established in animal models, but clinical trials of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) produced contradictory results. We examined the impact of HRT on age-related regional changes in human brain volume. Six brain regions were measured twice, five years apart, in 12 healthy women who took HRT and in matched controls who did not. The controls showed a typical pattern of differential brain shrinkage in the association cortices and the hippocampus with no change in the primary visual cortex. In contrast, women who took HRT showed comparable shrinkage of the hippocampus but no significant shrinkage of the neocortex. Future large scale studies may benefit from applying regional rather than global measures in assessment of brain integrity.

  17. Shrinkage control in a photopolymerizable hybrid solgel material for holographic recording.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Alvarez-Herrero, Alberto; Belenguer, Tomas; del Monte, Francisco; Levy, David

    2004-07-10

    We report the correction of the shrinkage observed during UV postrecording curing in a holographic solgel material that was recently achieved by the use of various chemical formulations for the composition of the hybrid supporting matrix. We found that a chemical modification of the matrix noticeably attenuates the shrinkage (from 1.3% to 0.4% of the material's initial thickness with the inclusion of just 20% tetramethylorthosilicate), providing a material with improved stability for permanent data storage applications. The holographic properties of samples with different binders are also reported. In addition, a theoretical study has revealed the way by which to compensate for angular deviation in the Bragg condition during UV postrecording by tailoring the binder shrinkage (s), the maximum refractive-index modulation capability of the photosensitive mixture (deltan), or both.

  18. Mechanical properties of laser welded aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, D.M.; Mazumder, J.

    1996-12-31

    The demand for lighter weight vehicles has prompted accelerated development in processing aluminum alloys for automobile structural applications. One of the current research initiatives centers on laser beam welding of aluminum alloys. Autogenous butt welds have been performed on Al 3003, 5754, 6111, and 6061-T6 plates with a 6 kW CO2 laser. For 6061, tensile data indicate about 60% of the base metal strength was attained in the as-welded condition, with a brittle fracture occurring through the weld. A post-weld heat treatment to the T6 condition resulted in a recovery of original ultimate tensile strengths, although these also failed in the weld. Hardness measurements of the post-weld T6 reveal a uniform hardness across the HAZ and fusion zone that is comparable to the original hardness. All 3003 welds fractured in the parent material in a ductile fashion. A high quality bead was consistently achieved with the 3003 alloy, whereas the other alloys demonstrated bead irregularities. SEM photographs reveal large, spherical pores, suggesting that they were formed by gas entrapment rather than by shrinkage.

  19. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  20. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  1. Diversity Shrinkage: Cross-Validating Pareto-Optimal Weights to Enhance Diversity via Hiring Practices.

    PubMed

    Song, Q Chelsea; Wee, Serena; Newman, Daniel A

    2017-07-27

    To reduce adverse impact potential and improve diversity outcomes from personnel selection, one promising technique is De Corte, Lievens, and Sackett's (2007) Pareto-optimal weighting strategy. De Corte et al.'s strategy has been demonstrated on (a) a composite of cognitive and noncognitive (e.g., personality) tests (De Corte, Lievens, & Sackett, 2008) and (b) a composite of specific cognitive ability subtests (Wee, Newman, & Joseph, 2014). Both studies illustrated how Pareto-weighting (in contrast to unit weighting) could lead to substantial improvement in diversity outcomes (i.e., diversity improvement), sometimes more than doubling the number of job offers for minority applicants. The current work addresses a key limitation of the technique-the possibility of shrinkage, especially diversity shrinkage, in the Pareto-optimal solutions. Using Monte Carlo simulations, sample size and predictor combinations were varied and cross-validated Pareto-optimal solutions were obtained. Although diversity shrinkage was sizable for a composite of cognitive and noncognitive predictors when sample size was at or below 500, diversity shrinkage was typically negligible for a composite of specific cognitive subtest predictors when sample size was at least 100. Diversity shrinkage was larger when the Pareto-optimal solution suggested substantial diversity improvement. When sample size was at least 100, cross-validated Pareto-optimal weights typically outperformed unit weights-suggesting that diversity improvement is often possible, despite diversity shrinkage. Implications for Pareto-optimal weighting, adverse impact, sample size of validation studies, and optimizing the diversity-job performance tradeoff are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Regional Brain Shrinkage over Two Years: Individual Differences and Effects of Pro-Inflammatory Genetic Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Persson, N.; Ghisletta, P.; Dahle, C.L.; Bender, A.R.; Yang, Y.; Yuan, P.; Daugherty, A.M.; Raz, N.

    2014-01-01

    We examined regional changes in brain volume in healthy adults (N = 167, age 19-79 years at baseline; N = 90 at follow-up) over approximately two years. With latent change score models, we evaluated mean change and individual differences in rates of change in 10 anatomically-defined and manually-traced regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), orbital frontal cortex (OF), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (HC), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), caudate nucleus (Cd), putamen (Pt), insula (In), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC). Significant mean shrinkage was observed in the HC, CbH, In, OF, and the PhG, and individual differences in change were noted in all regions, except the OF. Pro-inflammatory genetic variants mediated shrinkage in PhG and CbH. Carriers of two T alleles of interleukin-1β (IL-1βC-511T, rs16944) and a T allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFRC677T, rs1801133) polymorphisms showed increased PhG shrinkage. No effects of a pro-inflammatory polymorphism for C-reactive protein (CRP-286C>A>T, rs3091244) or apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele were noted. These results replicate the pattern of brain shrinkage observed in previous studies, with a notable exception of the LPFC thus casting doubt on the unique importance of prefrontal cortex in aging. Larger baseline volumes of CbH and In were associated with increased shrinkage, in conflict with the brain reserve hypothesis. Contrary to previous reports, we observed no significant linear effects of age and hypertension on regional brain shrinkage. Our findings warrant further investigation of the effects of neuroinflammation on structural brain change throughout the lifespan. PMID:25264227

  3. Regional brain shrinkage over two years: individual differences and effects of pro-inflammatory genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Persson, N; Ghisletta, P; Dahle, C L; Bender, A R; Yang, Y; Yuan, P; Daugherty, A M; Raz, N

    2014-12-01

    We examined regional changes in brain volume in healthy adults (N=167, age 19-79years at baseline; N=90 at follow-up) over approximately two years. With latent change score models, we evaluated mean change and individual differences in rates of change in 10 anatomically-defined and manually-traced regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), orbital frontal cortex (OF), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), caudate nucleus (Cd), putamen (Pt), insula (In), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC). Significant mean shrinkage was observed in the Hc, CbH, In, OF, and PhG, and individual differences in change were noted in all regions, except the OF. Pro-inflammatory genetic variants modified shrinkage in PhG and CbH. Carriers of two T alleles of interleukin-1β (IL-1β C-511T, rs16944) and a T allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, rs1801133) polymorphisms showed increased PhG shrinkage. No effects of a pro-inflammatory polymorphism for C-reactive protein (CRP-286C>A>T, rs3091244) or apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele were noted. These results replicate the pattern of brain shrinkage observed in previous studies, with a notable exception of the LPFC, thus casting doubt on the unique importance of prefrontal cortex in aging. Larger baseline volumes of CbH and In were associated with increased shrinkage, in conflict with the brain reserve hypothesis. Contrary to previous reports, we observed no significant linear effects of age and hypertension on regional brain shrinkage. Our findings warrant further investigation of the effects of neuroinflammation on structural brain change throughout the lifespan.

  4. Shrinkage Study of Polypropylene Films Laminated on Steel-Influence of the Conformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponçot, Marc; Martin, Julien; Dahoun, Abdesselam; Hiver, Jean-Marie; Bourson, Patrice; Verchère, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, thermoplastic polymers do not cease to attract the interest of the industrialists as steel / polymer composites for various applications in several domains, such as the automotive and the packaging. The ratio between their wide range of thermo-mechanical properties and their low weight density make these materials a real alternative for the current solutions for the lightening and the reinforcement of structural pieces. Likewise, their working facility is a major asset for performing parts of complex geometry. In this paper, we highlight the narrow relationship between the microstructure of a small impact isotactic polypropylene film, either filled or not by mineral particles (calcite), and its behaviour towards shrinkage which can occur during thermal treatments above its melting temperature. This phenomenon of shrinkage is characterized by dimensional instabilities which can in particular, affect the life cycle of the material. Indeed, they may induce the partial delamination of the steel sheet which is consequently exposed to various environmental aggressions. Corrosive behaviour can occur and cause early breakdown of the material. Influences of the extrusion and stamping processes on the microstructure and the shrinkage are presented. The macromolecular chains orientation of the crystalline phase, the volume damage and the heating parameters are studied, and show a real impact on the phenomenon magnitude. An experimental setup was developed at the laboratory to measure in real-time and with good precision, the displacements induced by shrinkage and the microstructural evolution of the polymer film during different thermal cycles. Finally, an empirical law allowing the shrinkage prediction is presented, taking into account the deformation value and the initial degree of chains orientation. These studies and their results have led to the determination of the optimal parameters settings for the different conformation processes with the aim of reducing

  5. Studies of spinal shrinkage to evaluate low-back loading in the workplace.

    PubMed

    McGill, S M; van Wijk, M J; Axler, C T; Gletsu, M

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of spinal shrinkage (stadiometry) has been suggested to be a convenient measure of low-back load in workplace settings. This report documents three separate experiments that collectively form a central theme: Is the measurement of spinal shrinkage a suitable assessment technique to quantify the cumulative effect of loading on the low back given the many sources for variability in the signal? A stadiometer was fabricated to measure both sitting and standing height. The first experiment was to compare sitting with standing stature changes over time in an attempt to locate the major site of shrinkage. There were no statistically significant differences in stature change found between either the sitting or standing posture for any condition suggesting that nearly all height changes occur in the spine. The second experiment compared the cumulative effects from static load holding to dynamic load lifting. Some subjects experienced more shrinkage in the static task while others experienced more in the dynamic task. In the third experiment, subjects performed work-rest cycles consisting of periods of sitting and lifting, and repeated over two days, to examine the recovery phenomenon. No specific pattern emerged owing to unpredictable subject variability. The first general observation obtained from the results of all three experiments is that the response of subjects to a wide array of activities appears to be variable both within each subject and over repeated exposures to identical conditions on different days. While subject variability (and perhaps biological variability) is a liability, it may be feasible to develop load time integrals for load exposure in the future, since the asset of the spinal shrinkage approach appears to be that it is one of the few available techniques to assess cumulative loading for both isometric postures, prolonged sitting, repeated tasks and responds to the positive adaptive changes that occur from periods of rest. However, it

  6. Ge1-xSnx alloys synthesized by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kun; Prucnal, S.; Huebner, R.; Baehtz, C.; Skorupa, I.; Wang, Yutian; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-07-01

    The tunable bandgap and the high carrier mobility of Ge1-xSnx alloys stimulate a large effort for bandgap and strain engineering for Ge based materials using silicon compatible technology. In this Letter, we present the fabrication of highly mismatched Ge1-xSnx alloys by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting with Sn concentration ranging from 0.5 at. % up to 1.5 at. %. According to the structural investigations, the formed Ge1-xSnx alloys are monocrystalline with high Sn-incorporation rate. The shrinkage of the bandgap of Ge1-xSnx alloys with increasing Sn content is proven by the red-shift of the E1 and E1 + Δ1 critical points in spectroscopic ellipsometry. Our investigation provides a chip technology compatible route to prepare high quality monocrystalline Ge1-xSnx alloys.

  7. Modeling of the formation of microporosity in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Tsai, H.L.

    1993-07-01

    A complete mathematical model, consisting of a continuum model and a gas evolution model, was established for the prediction of shrinkage- and gas-caused porosity in castings. The model allows simultaneous calculation of transient temperature, velocity, pressure, and porosity distributions in a solidifying casting. Fluid flow caused by both natural convection and solidification contraction, as well as change of global domain due to shrinkage, were considered. A parametric study was performed to investigate the effects of various solidification variables in the formation of microporosity, including the use of chilling, initial gas content, characteristics of heat transfer between the casting and the mold, casting size, and riser height. It was found that a low initial gas content in the molten metal and casting conditions that facilitate solidification-rate decrease the formation of microporosity. The calculated porosity distribution in 1% Cr-steel alloys compares favorably with published experimental data.

  8. OPTIMAL SHRINKAGE ESTIMATION OF MEAN PARAMETERS IN FAMILY OF DISTRIBUTIONS WITH QUADRATIC VARIANCE

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianchao; Kou, S. C.; Brown, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the simultaneous inference of mean parameters in a family of distributions with quadratic variance function. We first introduce a class of semi-parametric/parametric shrinkage estimators and establish their asymptotic optimality properties. Two specific cases, the location-scale family and the natural exponential family with quadratic variance function, are then studied in detail. We conduct a comprehensive simulation study to compare the performance of the proposed methods with existing shrinkage estimators. We also apply the method to real data and obtain encouraging results. PMID:27041778

  9. Cake shrinkage during freeze drying: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, S; Obert, J P; Luthra, S; Bhugra, C; Pikal, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate, by experimental studies and theoretical analysis, the phenomenon of cake shrinkage during the lyophilization process and to investigate the effect of shelf temperature during primary drying and secondary drying on the degree of cake shrinkage. Freeze-drying experiments were performed using 5% w/v sucrose where the drying protocols were altered in order to produce differing product temperature profiles. Resistance data during freeze drying were evaluated by the Manometric Temperature Measurement (MTM) method. Theoretical simulation of the freeze-drying process was performed using the Passage Freeze-Drying software. The difference between the glass transition temperature and the product temperature (Tg-T) obtained from the theoretical analysis was calculated and used for correlation with experimental shrinkage data. The Brunauer, Emmeth, Teller (BET) Specific Surface Area (SSA) Analysis was used as a method to quantify the degree of shrinkage. Samples were also analyzed for pore volume by mercury porosimetry. The SSA analysis on the freeze-dried samples showed an increase in SSA when samples were freeze dried at a lower shelf temperature during primary drying and at a slower ramp rate during secondary drying. The trend in surface area values was consistent with that obtained for pore size values. However, differences obtained among the various samples are small and cake diameter measurements showed that there was approximately 17% shrinkage even in the sample freeze dried at temperatures well below the Tg' and Tg. Variations in process and product temperature only accounted for an additional 2%-3% shrinkage. Resistance data obtained at various primary drying shelf temperatures showed a good correlation with surface area. The Tg-T behavior of the freeze-dried samples showed that a slow ramp rate of 0.1 degrees C/min during secondary drying maintains a product well below the Tg at all times and a higher ramp rate gives negative

  10. Mining pharmacovigilance data using Bayesian logistic regression with James-Stein type shrinkage estimation.

    PubMed

    An, Lihua; Fung, Karen Y; Krewski, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    Spontaneous adverse event reporting systems are widely used to identify adverse reactions to drugs following their introduction into the marketplace. In this article, a James-Stein type shrinkage estimation strategy was developed in a Bayesian logistic regression model to analyze pharmacovigilance data. This method is effective in detecting signals as it combines information and borrows strength across medically related adverse events. Computer simulation demonstrated that the shrinkage estimator is uniformly better than the maximum likelihood estimator in terms of mean squared error. This method was used to investigate the possible association of a series of diabetic drugs and the risk of cardiovascular events using data from the Canada Vigilance Online Database.

  11. Compressible cake filtration: monitoring cake formation and shrinkage using synchrotron X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bierck, B.R.; Wells, S.A.; Dick, R.I.

    1988-05-01

    High energy, highly collimated X-rays produced at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Sources (CHESS) enabled real-time suspended solids concentration measurements each second with 0.5 mm vertical separation in a kaolin filter cake. Suspended solids concentration profiles reflected expected effects of cumulative fluid drag forces. Shrinkage caused a significant increase in average cake suspended solids concentration after expiration of the slurry, and the saturated cake ultimately formed was virtually homogeneous. Shrinkage is consolidation under compressive forces created when capillary menisci form at air/liquid interfaces, and has a significant effect on cake structure in latter stages of compressible cake filtration.

  12. A theoretical and experimental analysis of polymerization shrinkage of bone cement: A potential major source of porosity.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J L; Hasenwinkel, J M; Wixson, R L; Lautenschlager, E P

    2000-10-01

    A theoretical basis for understanding polymerization shrinkage of bone cement is presented based on density changes in converting monomer to polymer. Also, an experimental method, based on dilatometry and the Archimedes' principle is presented for highly precise and accurate measurement of unconstrained volumetric shrinkage of bone cement. Furthermore, a theoretical and experimental analysis of polymerization shrinkage in a constrained deformational state is presented to demonstrate that porosity can develop due to shrinkage. Six bone-cement conditions (Simplex-Ptrade mark vacuum and hand mixed, Endurancetrade mark vacuum mixed, and three two-solution experimental bone cements with higher initial monomer levels) were tested for volumetric shrinkage. It was found that shrinkage varied statistically (p< or = 0.05) from 5.1% (hand-mixed Simplex-Ptrade mark) to 6.7% (vacuum-mixed Simplex-Ptrade mark) to 10.5% for a 0.6:1 (polymer g/monomer mL) two-solution bone cement. Shrinkage was highly correlated with initial monomer content (R(2) = 0.912) but with a lower than theoretically expected rate. This discrepancy was due to the presence of residual monomer after polymerization. Using previously determined residual monomer levels, the theoretic shrinkage analysis was shown to be predictive of the shrinkage results with some residual monomer left after polymerization. Polymerization of a two-solution bone cement in a constrained state resulted in pores developing with volumes predicted by the theory that they are the result of shrinkage. The results of this study show that shrinkage of bone cement under certain constrained conditions may result in the development of porosity at the implant-bone cement interface and elsewhere in the polymerizing cement mantle.

  13. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodrigo S.; Moro, André F.V.; Perez, Cesar R.; Pessôa, Bárbara M.; Dias, Katia R.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable) resin-based composite (RBC) do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness. Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after curing with 36 J/cm2 light energy density. Depth of cure was determined, using a penetrometer and the Knoop microhardness was tested from the top surface to a depth of 5 mm. Results. Considering polymerization shrinkage, the authors found significant differences (p < 0.05) between different materials: non-flowable RBCs showed lower values compared to flowable RBCs, with the silorane-based resin presenting the smallest shrinkage. The low shrinkage flowable composite performed similarly to non-flowable with significant statistical differences compared to the two other flowable RBCs. Regarding to depth of cure, low-shrinkage flowable RBC, were most effective compared to other groups. Microhardness was generally higher for the non-flowable vs. flowable RBCs (p < 0.05). However, the values for low-shrinkage flowable did not differ significantly from those of non-flowable, but were significantly higher than those of the other flowable RBCs. Clinical Significance. RBCs have undergone many modifications as they have evolved and represent the most relevant restorative materials in today’s dental practice. This study of low-shrinkage RBCs, conventional RBCs (non-flowable and flowable) and silorane-based composite—by in vitro evaluation of volumetric shrinkage, depth of cure and microhardness—reveals that although filler content is an important determinant of polymerization shrinkage, it is not the only variable that affects properties of materials that were tested in this study

  14. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Maia, Rodrigo R; Reis, Rodrigo S; Moro, André F V; Perez, Cesar R; Pessôa, Bárbara M; Dias, Katia R H C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable) resin-based composite (RBC) do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness. Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after curing with 36 J/cm(2) light energy density. Depth of cure was determined, using a penetrometer and the Knoop microhardness was tested from the top surface to a depth of 5 mm. Results. Considering polymerization shrinkage, the authors found significant differences (p < 0.05) between different materials: non-flowable RBCs showed lower values compared to flowable RBCs, with the silorane-based resin presenting the smallest shrinkage. The low shrinkage flowable composite performed similarly to non-flowable with significant statistical differences compared to the two other flowable RBCs. Regarding to depth of cure, low-shrinkage flowable RBC, were most effective compared to other groups. Microhardness was generally higher for the non-flowable vs. flowable RBCs (p < 0.05). However, the values for low-shrinkage flowable did not differ significantly from those of non-flowable, but were significantly higher than those of the other flowable RBCs. Clinical Significance. RBCs have undergone many modifications as they have evolved and represent the most relevant restorative materials in today's dental practice. This study of low-shrinkage RBCs, conventional RBCs (non-flowable and flowable) and silorane-based composite-by in vitro evaluation of volumetric shrinkage, depth of cure and microhardness-reveals that although filler content is an important determinant of polymerization shrinkage, it is not the only variable that affects properties of materials that were tested in this study.

  15. Investigation on Formation Mechanism of Irregular Shape Porosity in Hypoeutectic Aluminum Alloy by X-Ray Real Time Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Yuna; Fan, Ran; Wang, Qigui; Pan, Ye

    2012-08-01

    The formation mechanism of irregular shape porosity in hypoeutectic aluminum silicon alloy (A356) was investigated by X-ray real time observation on porosity evolution during solidification and re-melting. Porosity in the hypoeutectic aluminum A356 alloy with high hydrogen content (>0.3 mL/100 g Al) first forms in the liquid as small spherical gas bubbles, then expands along with the pressure drop in the mushy zone due to shrinkage and lack of feeding, and finally deforms into irregular morphology by the impingement of aluminum dendrite network. Degassing is a key to eliminate porosity in aluminum alloy castings.

  16. Study of SEM preparation artefacts with correlative microscopy: Cell shrinkage of adherent cells by HMDS-drying.

    PubMed

    Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Puetz, Norbert; Gepp, Michael M; Neubauer, Julia C; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    One of the often reported artefacts during cell preparation to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is the shrinkage of cellular objects, that mostly occurs at a certain time-dependent stage of cell drying. Various methods of drying for SEM, such as critical point drying, freeze-drying, as well as hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-drying, were usually used. The latter becomes popular since it is a low cost and fast method. However, the correlation of drying duration and real shrinkage of objects was not investigated yet. In this paper, cell shrinkage at each stage of preparation for SEM was studied. We introduce a shrinkage coefficient using correlative light microscopy (LM) and SEM of the same human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of HMDS-drying duration on the cell shrinkage is shown: the longer drying duration, the more shrinkage is observed. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that cell shrinkage is inversely proportional to cultivation time: the longer cultivation time, the more cell spreading area and the less cell shrinkage. Our results can be applicable for an exact SEM quantification of cell size and determination of cell spreading area in engineering of artificial cellular environments using biomaterials. SCANNING 38:625-633, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of microstructural factors on quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors of Ti-6Al-4V alloys with widmanstätten structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Geun; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Chong Soo; Hur, Sunmoo

    2003-11-01

    The effects of microstructural factors on the quasi-static tensile and dynamic torsional deformation behaviors in Ti-6Al-4V alloys with Widmanstätten structures were investigated in this study. Dynamic torsional tests were conducted using a torsional Kolsky bar for five Widmanstätten structures, in which microstructural parameters such as colony size and α lamellar spacing were varied by heat treatments, and then the test data were analyzed in relation to microstructures, tensile properties, and fracture mode. Under dynamic torsional loading, maximum shear stress was largely dependent on colony size, whereas shear strain at the maximum shear stress point was on colony size as well as α lamellar spacing. Adiabatic shear bands were found in the deformed area of the fractured torsional specimens, and their width was smallest in the structure whose colony size and α lamellar spacing were both large. The possibility of the adiabatic shear band formation was quantitatively analyzed in relation to microstructural factors. It was the highest in the coarse Widmanstätten structure, which was confirmed by the theoretical critical shear strain (υ c ) condition for the adiabatic shear band formation.

  18. Temperature dependence of band gap ratio and Q-factor defect mode in a semiconductor quaternary alloy hexagonal photonic-crystal hole slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cano, R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical predictions for the photonic TE-like band gap ratio and the quality factors of symmetric localized defect as a function of the thickness slab and temperature by the use of plane wave expansion and the finite-difference time-domain methods. The photonic-crystal hole slab is composed of a 2D hexagonal array with identical air holes and a circular cross section, embedded in a non-dispersive III-V semiconductor quaternary alloy slab, which has a high value of dielectric function in the near-infrared region, and the symmetric defect is formed by increasing the radius of a single hole in the 2D hexagonal lattice. We show that the band gap ratio depends linearly on the temperature in the range 150-400 K. Our results show a strong temperature dependence of the quality factor Q, the maximum (Q = 7000) is reached at T = 350 hbox {K}, but if the temperature continues to increase, the efficiency drops sharply. Furthermore, we present numerical predictions for the electromagnetic field distribution at T = 350 hbox {K}.

  19. Relation of early tumor shrinkage (ETS) observed in first-line treatment to efficacy parameters of subsequent treatment in FIRE-3 (AIOKRK0306).

    PubMed

    Modest, Dominik P; Stintzing, Sebastian; Fischer von Weikersthal, Ludwig; Decker, Thomas; Kiani, Alexander; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Heintges, Tobias; Lerchenmüller, Christian; Kahl, Christoph; Seipelt, Gernot; Kullmann, Frank; Scheithauer, Werner; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas; Stauch, Martina; von Einem, Jobst Christian; Moehler, Markus; Held, Swantje; Heinemann, Volker

    2017-04-15

    We explored the association of early tumor shrinkage (ETS) and non-ETS with efficacy of first-line and consecutive second-line treatment in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer treated in FIRE-3. Assessment of tumor shrinkage was based on the sum of longest diameters of target lesions, evaluated after 6 weeks of treatment. Shrinkage was classified as ETS (shrinkage by ≥ 20%), mETS (shrinkage by 0 to <20%), mPD (minor progression >0 to <20%) and PD (progression ≥20%). Overall survival (OS) was 33.2 (95% CI 28.0-38.4) months in ETS patients, while non-ETS was associated with less favorable outcome (mETS 24.0 (95% CI 21.2-26.9) months, mPD 19.0 (95% CI 13.0-25.0) months, PD 12.8 (95% CI 11.1-14.5) months). Differences in PFS of first-line therapy were less pronounced. ETS subgroups defined in first-line therapy also correlated with efficacy of second-line therapy. Progression-free survival in second-line (PFS2nd) was 6.5 months (5.8-7.2) for ETS, and was 5.6 (95% CI 4.7-6.5) months for mETS, 4.9 (95% CI 3.7-6.1) months for mPD and 3.3 (95% CI 2.3-4.3) months for PD. PFS of first-line and PFS2nd showed a linear correlation (Bravais-Pearson coefficient: 0.16, p = 0.006). While ETS is associated with the most favorable outcome, non-ETS represents a heterogeneous subgroup with distinct characteristics of less favorable initial tumor response to treatment. This is the first analysis to demonstrate that early tumor response observed during first-line FOLFIRI-based therapy may also relate to efficacy of second-line treatment. Early response parameters may serve as stratification factors in trials recruiting pretreated patients. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  1. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether alloy softening in Fe alloys is dependent on electron concentration and to provide a direct comparison of alloy softening and hardening in several binary Fe alloy systems having the same processing history. Alloy additions to Fe included the elements in the Periods 4-6 and the Groups IV-VIII with the exception of technetium. A total of 19 alloy systems was investigated, and hardness testing was the primary means of evaluation. Testing was carried out at four temperatures over a homologous temperature range of 0.043-0.227 times the absolute melting temperature of unalloyed Fe. Major conclusions are that the atomic radius ratio of solute-to-Fe is the key factor in controlling low-temperature hardness of the binary Fe alloys and that alloy softening rates at 77 K and alloy hardening rates at 411 K are correlated with this atomic radius ratio for 15 of the binary alloy systems. Mechanisms of alloy softening and hardening are proposed.

  2. Iterative Shrinkage Algorithm for Patch-Smoothness Regularized Medical Image Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Yasir Q; Ongie, Gregory; Jacob, Mathews

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a fast iterative shrinkage algorithm for patch-smoothness regularization of inverse problems in medical imaging. This approach is enabled by the reformulation of current non-local regularization schemes as an alternating algorithm to minimize a global criterion. The proposed algorithm alternates between evaluating the denoised inter-patch differences by shrinkage and computing an image that is consistent with the denoised inter-patch differences and measured data. We derive analytical shrinkage rules for several penalties that are relevant in non-local regularization. The redundancy in patch comparisons used to evaluate the shrinkage steps are exploited using convolution operations. The resulting algorithm is observed to be considerably faster than current alternating non-local algorithms. The proposed scheme is applicable to a large class of inverse problems including deblurring, denoising, and Fourier inversion. The comparisons of the proposed scheme with state-of-the-art regularization schemes in the context of recovering images from undersampled Fourier measurements demonstrate a considerable reduction in alias artifacts and preservation of edges.

  3. Iterative Shrinkage Algorithm for Patch-Smoothness Regularized Medical Image Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Yasir Q.; Ongie, Gregory; Jacob, Mathews

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a fast iterative shrinkage algorithm for patch-smoothness regularization of inverse problems in medical imaging. This approach is enabled by the reformulation of current non-local regularization schemes as an alternating algorithm to minimize a global criterion. The proposed algorithm alternates between evaluating the denoised inter-patch differences by shrinkage and computing an image that is consistent with the denoised inter-patch differences and measured data. We derive analytical shrinkage rules for several penalties that are relevant in non-local regularization. The redundancy in patch comparisons used to evaluate the shrinkage steps are exploited using convolution operations. The resulting algorithm is observed to be considerably faster than current alternating non-local algorithms. The proposed scheme is applicable to a large class of inverse problems including deblurring, denoising, and Fourier inversion. The comparisons of the proposed scheme with state-of-the-art regularization schemes in the context of recovering images from undersampled Fourier measurements demonstrate a considerable reduction in alias artifacts and preservation of edges. PMID:25647445

  4. Shrinkage of bubbles and drops in the lattice Boltzmann equation method for nonideal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Lee, Taehun; Guo, Zhaoli; Rumschitzki, David

    2014-03-01

    One characteristic of multiphase lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) methods is that the interfacial region has a finite (i.e., noninfinitesimal) thickness known as a diffuse interface. In simulations of, e.g., bubble or drop dynamics, for problems involving nonideal gases, one frequently observes that the diffuse interface method produces a spontaneous, nonphysical shrinkage of the bubble or drop radius. In this paper, we analyze in detail a single-fluid two-phase model and use a LBE model for nonideal gases in order to explain this fundamental problem. For simplicity, we only investigate the static bubble or droplet problem. We find that the method indeed produces a density shift, bubble or droplet shrinkage, as well as a critical radius below which the bubble or droplet eventually vanishes. Assuming that the ratio between the interface thickness D and the initial bubble or droplet radius r0 is small, we analytically show the existence of this density shift, bubble or droplet radius shrinkage, and critical bubble or droplet survival radius. Numerical results confirm our analysis. We also consider droplets on a solid surface with different curvatures, contact angles, and initial droplet volumes. Numerical results show that the curvature, contact angle, and the initial droplet volume have an effect on this spontaneous shrinkage process, consistent with the survival criterion.

  5. [Shrinkage In the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient and Unbiased Estimates of Treatment Effects Using Omega Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Starrett

    The amount of variance accounted for by treatment can be estimated with omega squared or with the squared multiple correlation coefficient. Monte Carlo methods were employed to compare omega squared, the squared multiple correlation coefficient, and the squared multiple correlation coefficient to which a shrinkage formula had been applied, in…

  6. Prediction of Shrinkage Porosity Defect in Sand Casting Process of LM25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Hardik; Dhulia, Jay K.; Maniar, Nirav P.

    2017-08-01

    In the present worldwide and aggressive environment, foundry commercial enterprises need to perform productively with least number of rejections and create casting parts in shortest lead time. It has become extremely difficult for foundry industries to meet demands of defects free casting and meet strict delivery schedules. The process of casting solidification is complex in nature. Prediction of shrinkage defect in metal casting is one of the critical concern in foundries and is one of the potential research areas in casting. Due to increasing pressure to improve quality and to reduce cost, it is very essential to upgrade the level of current methodology used in foundries. In the present research work, prediction methodology of shrinkage porosity defect in sand casting process of LM25 using experimentation and ANSYS is proposed. The objectives successfully achieved are prediction of shrinkage porosity distribution in Al-Si casting and determining effectiveness of investigated function for predicting shrinkage porosity by correlating results of simulating studies to those obtained experimentally. The real-time application of the research reflects from the fact that experimentation is performed on 9 different Y junctions at foundry industry and practical data obtained from experimentation are used for simulation.

  7. EFFECTS OF DYNEL FIBER BLENDING ON YARN SHRINKAGE AND WOVEN-FABRIC PROPERTIES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A 50/50 picker blend warp was woven with fillings from the various blends and twists. The fabrics were scoured and treated for water repellency . Highest...results of yarn and fabric shrinkage and air permeability. All water repellency tests were poor; fabrics with low-twist fillings were better than those

  8. Swelling-shrinkage measurements of bentonite using coupled environmental scanning electron microscopy and digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Montes-H, G

    2005-04-01

    The swelling clays have been proposed as engineered barriers in geological disposal systems for waste because these materials are assumed to build a better impermeable zone around wastes by swelling. However, the swelling potential of soils is also considered a prevalent cause of damage to buildings and constructions. For these reasons, it is fundamental to investigate the physicochemical and mechanical behavior of swelling clays. In the current study, the swelling-shrinkage potential (aggregates scale) was estimated using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with a digital image analysis (DIA) program (Visilog). In fact, the isolated aggregates of raw and cation-exchanged bentonite were directly observed at different relative humidities in an ESEM chamber. Then the "Visilog" software was used to estimate the percent augmentation of the aggregate surface as a function of time and as a function of relative humidity. This estimation allows for the calculation of the swelling-shrinkage potential (%) of bentonite. Finally, a kinetic model of first order was tested to fit the kinetic experimental data of swelling-shrinkage potential. The results show that ESEM-DIA coupling can be a powerful method of estimating the swelling-shrinkage potential of expansive clays. In addition, the exponential models fit well with the kinetic experimental data.

  9. Calculation of contraction rates due to shrinkage in light-cured composites.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gayosso, Carlos; Barceló-Santana, Federico; Guerrero-Ibarra, Jorge; Sáez-Espínola, Gabriel; Canseco-Martínez, Miguel A

    2004-03-01

    To calculate the contraction rate that results from polymerization shrinkage in photo-cured resins. Fourteen materials were irradiated in a previously developed instrument. This instrument uses measurements of deflection using a 'bonded disk' method. Six measurements were made on each material at 20 +/- 2 degrees C and 70 +/- 10% RH. Means and standard deviations were analyzed. Shrinkage-strain and contraction rate are reported. Total shrinkage-strain for photo-polymerized resins (packable and flowable composites) varies between 1.65 and 4.16%. Both are ormocers. The contraction rate for photo-polymerized resins varies between 55.71 and 167.00 microm/min. Packable resins present a lower contraction rate than flowable resins. The distance-time graph is linear. The slope of this line is the average velocity. This concept was used to calculate the average contraction rate. The monomer percentage affects the contraction rate, because higher contraction rate means higher percentage of monomer. We can infer that contraction rate bears some relation to polymerization shrinkage.

  10. Likelihood-fuzzy analysis of parotid gland shrinkage in radiotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Pota, Marco; Scalco, Elisa; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Belli, Maria Luisa; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Esposito, Massimo; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    In head-and-neck radiotherapy, an early detection of patients who will undergo parotid glands shrinkage during the treatment is of primary importance, since this condition has been found to be associated with acute toxicity. In this work, a recently proposed approach, here named Likelihood-Fuzzy Analysis, based on both statistical learning and Fuzzy Logic, is proposed to support the identification of early predictors of parotid shrinkage from Computed Tomography images acquired during radiotherapy. For this purpose, a set of textural image parameters was extracted and considered as candidate of parotid shrinkage prediction; for all these parameters and combinations of maximum three of them, a fuzzy rule base was extracted, gaining very good results in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The performance of classification was also compared to a classical Fisher's Linear Discriminant Analysis and found to provide better results. Moreover, the use of Fuzzy Logic allowed obtaining an interpretable description of the relations between textural features and the shrinkage process.

  11. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part IV: Effects of freezing protocol.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-11-10

    The shrinkage and cracking of pure trehalose cakes during lyophilization has been determined quantitatively using different protocols for the freezing step. The influences of shelf cooling rate and of a two-step freezing protocol with holding and annealing phases were investigated. A small change in the shelf cooling rate from 0.4°C to 0.2°C per minute produced surprisingly large increases in shrinkage and reductions in cracking over all trehalose concentrations up to 30% w/v. The two-step freezing protocol also increased shrinkage and reduced cracking in the final-product cakes, especially at trehalose concentrations ≥ 15% and with large vial fill height. A combination of two-step freezing with use of TopLyo vials produced less than 1.5% cracking even at high trehalose concentrations and large fill height. The results give further confirmation of the causal linkage of shrinkage and cracking during lyophilization, and also illustrate how cracking can be greatly reduced by manipulating the freezing protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Urban shrinkage in Germany and the USA: a comparison of transformation patterns and local strategies.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Thorsten; Pallagst, Karina M

    2012-01-01

    Many American and European cities have to deal with demographic and economic trajectories leading to urban shrinkage. According to official data, 13% of urban regions in the US and 54% of those in the EU have lost population in recent years. However, the extent and spatial distribution of declining populations differ significantly between Europe and the US. In Germany, the situation is driven by falling birth rates and the effects of German reunification. In the US, shrinkage is basically related to long-term industrial transformation. But the challenges of shrinking cities seldom appeared on the agendas of politicians and urban planners until recently. This article provides a critical overview of the development paths and local strategies of four shrinking cities: Schwedt and Dresden in eastern Germany; Youngstown and Pittsburgh in the US. A typology of urban growth and shrinkage, from economic and demographic perspectives, enables four types of city to be differentiated and the differences between the US and eastern Germany to be discussed. The article suggests that a new transatlantic debate on policy and planning strategies for restructuring shrinking cities is needed to overcome the dominant growth orientation that in most cases intensifies the negative consequences of shrinkage.

  13. Shrinkage evaluation of heavyweight and lightweight polypropylene meshes in inguinal hernia repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, A C; de Mathia, G B; Fagundes, D J; Medeiros, L R; Rosa, M I

    2011-12-01

    One of the current complications in inguinal repair is shrinkage following the use of mesh. The selected mesh material, heavyweight (HWM) mesh or lightweight (LWM) mesh, is associated with the frequency of shrinkage. The aim of this study was to investigate shrinkage of these two types of mesh in a controlled trial of male inguinal hernia repair. Thirty-two healthy men with primary unilateral inguinal hernias (Nyhus classification), who presented at São José Hospital of Criciúma, Brazil, underwent the Lichtenstein procedure. In total, 16 polypropylene HWM (105 g/m(2)) and 16 partially absorbable LWM (28 g/m(2)) were implanted into randomly selected patients. On post-operative days 1, 30, 60 and 90, the area of the mesh was evaluated by digital radiography. The study randomized 32 patients and analyzed 30 patients--15 for each type of mesh. At baseline, there were no differences between groups. There were significant differences between the two meshes when comparing the total area initially and on postoperative day 90 (P = 0.001). The HWM had significantly less area initial area, as compared with 90 days postoperatively (P = 0.04). Shrinkage was significantly higher for HWM, although the difference was not large.

  14. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber—polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance. PMID:28773256

  15. Significant reversibility of alcoholic brain shrinkage within 3 weeks of abstinence.

    PubMed

    Trabert, W; Betz, T; Niewald, M; Huber, G

    1995-08-01

    Chronic alcoholism is often associated with brain shrinkage or atrophy. During recent years, it has been demonstrated that this shrinkage is, at least in part, reversible when abstinence is maintained. There are different hypotheses concerning the mechanisms for this reversibility, but many questions are still open. Especially the time conditions for these reversible changes are subject of discussion. Twenty-eight male patients with severe alcohol dependence were investigated in a computed tomographic study at the beginning of abstinence and 3 weeks later. Planimetric evaluation of 5 selected slices revealed a significant decrease in liquor areas and an increase of brain volume. The densitometric analysis showed an increase in brain tissue density. In a multiple regression approach it was shown that the reversibility was mostly influenced by the age of the patients. Our results support neither the hypothesis of an increase in brain water as the most important principle for reversibility in alcoholic brain shrinkage nor the hypothesis of augmented dendritic growth. Other mechanisms like reduced (during chronic intoxication) and normalized (during abstinence) cerebral hemoperfusion have to be considered as possible mechanisms for the reversibility of alcoholic brain shrinkage.

  16. Differential brain shrinkage over 6 months shows limited association with cognitive practice.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Schmiedek, Florian; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2013-07-01

    The brain shrinks with age, but the timing of this process and the extent of its malleability are unclear. We measured changes in regional brain volumes in younger (age 20-31) and older (age 65-80) adults twice over a 6 month period, and examined the association between changes in volume, history of hypertension, and cognitive training. Between two MRI scans, 49 participants underwent intensive practice in three cognitive domains for 100 consecutive days, whereas 23 control group members performed no laboratory cognitive tasks. Regional volumes of seven brain structures were measured manually and adjusted for intracranial volume. We observed significant mean shrinkage in the lateral prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus, the caudate nucleus, and the cerebellum, but no reliable mean change of the prefrontal white matter, orbital-frontal cortex, and the primary visual cortex. Individual differences in change were reliable in all regions. History of hypertension was associated with greater cerebellar shrinkage. The cerebellum was the only region in which significantly reduced shrinkage was apparent in the experimental group after completion of cognitive training. Thus, in healthy adults, differential brain shrinkage can be observed in a narrow time window, vascular risk may aggravate it, and intensive cognitive activity may have a limited effect on it.

  17. Brain shrinkage in alcoholics is not caused by changes in hydration: a pathological study.

    PubMed

    Harper, C G; Kril, J J; Daly, J M

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of the water content of the cerebral white matter in 26 control and 24 alcoholic cases supports in vivo MRI studies and previous necropsy studies which appeared to show an increase in the water content in the alcoholic group. This negates the hypothesis that reversible brain shrinkage in alcoholics is caused by changes in the state of hydration.

  18. Evaluating shrinkage of wood propellers in a high-temperature environment

    Treesearch

    Richard Bergman; Robert J. Ross

    2008-01-01

    Minimizing wood shrinkage is a priority for many wood products in use, particularly engineered products manufactured to close tolerances, such as wood propellers for unmanned surveillance aircraft used in military operations. Those currently in service in the Middle East are experiencing performance problems as a consequence of wood shrinking during long-term storage...

  19. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-02-26

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance.

  20. Direct voxel-based comparisons between grey matter shrinkage and glucose hypometabolism in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Ludivine; Segobin, Shailendra; Lannuzel, Coralie; Boudehent, Céline; Vabret, François; Eustache, Francis; Beaunieux, Hélène; Pitel, Anne L

    2016-09-01

    Alcoholism is associated with widespread brain structural abnormalities affecting mainly the frontocerebellar and the Papez's circuits. Brain glucose metabolism has received limited attention, and few studies used regions of interest approach and showed reduced global brain metabolism predominantly in the frontal and parietal lobes. Even though these studies have examined the relationship between grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism, none has performed a direct voxel-by-voxel comparison between the degrees of structural and metabolic abnormalities. Seventeen alcoholic patients and 16 control subjects underwent both structural magnetic resonance imaging and (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography examinations. Structural abnormalities and hypometabolism were examined in alcoholic patients compared with control subjects using two-sample t-tests. Then, these two patterns of brain damage were directly compared with a paired t-test. Compared to controls, alcoholic patients had grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism in the fronto-cerebellar circuit and several nodes of Papez's circuit. The direct comparison revealed greater shrinkage than hypometabolism in the cerebellum, cingulate cortex, thalamus and hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. Conversely, hypometabolism was more severe than shrinkage in the dorsolateral, premotor and parietal cortices. The distinct profiles of abnormalities found within the Papez's circuit, the fronto-cerebellar circuit and the parietal gyrus in chronic alcoholism suggest the involvement of different pathological mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Taguchi design and flower pollination algorithm application to optimize the shrinkage of triaxial porcelain containing palm oil fuel ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainudin, A.; Sia, C. K.; Ong, P.; Narong, O. L. C.; Nor, N. H. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the preparation of triaxial porcelain from Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA), a new parameter variable must be determined. The parameters involved are the particle size of POFA, percentage of POFA in triaxial porcelain composition, moulding pressure, sintering temperature and soaking time. Meanwhile, the shrinkage is the dependent variable. The optimization process was investigated using a hybrid Taguchi design and flower pollination algorithm (FPA). The interaction model of shrinkage was derived from regression analysis and found that the shrinkage is highly dependent on the sintering temperature followed by POFA composition, moulding pressure, POFA particle size and soaking time. The interaction between sintering temperature and soaking time highly affects the shrinkage. From the FPA process, targeted shrinkage approaching zero values were predicted for 142 μm particle sizes of POFA, 22.5 wt% of POFA, 3.4 tonne moulding pressure, 948.5 °C sintering temperature and 264 minutes soaking time.

  2. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  3. Permeability Enhancement in Fine-Grained Sediments by Chemically Induced Clay Fabric Shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, A M; Kansa, E J; Viani, B E; Blake, R G; Roberts, J J; Huber, R D

    2004-02-26

    ?'' To this end, we performed a crack propagation experiment under confining stress on an initially water-saturated bentonite clay layer that was exposed to pure ethanol on one surface and water on the other. We measured the rate of transport of ethanol across the clay layer and found that crack breakthrough across the clay layer was accompanied by a very large sudden increase in solvent flow through the layer. Although an experimental artifact prevented measurement of the exact breakthrough time, visual evidence indicates that the clay layer cracked rapidly in this experiment. Direct evidence of the cracks provided by X-ray tomographic images provide clear proof that an extensive array of cracks was created by the ethanol-induced shrinkage. Calculations based on measured fluid pressure and flow rates, and published permeabilities of unaltered calcium bentonite clays, show that the effective permeability of the clay layer increased by a factor of 10{sup 9}-10{sup 12}. Estimates of effective permeability based on crack dimensions measured from the X-ray tomographic images support these findings. Further detailed experiments and analyses are needed to develop a predictive theory and a quantitative design capability for this process. We have begun work on securing the necessary support for these studies, with the ultimate objective of developing and deploying this novel concept as a practical remediation technology in the field.

  4. Microstructural evolution and macroscopic shrinkage in the presence of density gradients and agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peizhen

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can characterize internal density gradients. An in-situ laser dilatometry has been constructed to track dimensional change at different positions of a sample during binder removal and sintering. This combination of tools not only allows us to better understand how microscopic change affects macroscopic dimensions, but also provides guidance for a variety of ceramic processes. Non-uniform agglomerate packing and deformation provide density gradients which drive binder migration during binder removal. Simultaneously, density undergoes a slight decrease accompanied by a 1.0% loss in dimensional tolerance. This and CT difference images suggest that capillary forces generated during binder melting can change the density distribution. During sintering, nonuniformities present in the green state persist into the fired state and become exaggerated. Regions of different initial density can occupy different stages sintering. At ˜88% sintered density, CT clearly showed that open porosity follows the distribution of low density areas. Mercury porosimetry detected three distinct levels of porosity. Microstructural examination correlated the porosity level with the coordination of (i) two to three or (ii) multiple grains around pores. Microstructural packing controls both the observed macroscopic expansion at T ≤ 1000°C and the onset of shrinkage. Neck formation initiates during expansion and not exclusively during shrinkage. Inter- and intra-agglomerate expansion/shrinkage proceed simultaneously but the effective 'transmission' of particle-level behavior to the macroscopic level appears to be controlled by the initial agglomerate bonding and internal agglomerate densities. Discrete element modeling provides corroborating evidence regarding the importance of compact continuity. Following the expansion-shrinkage transition, the higher the zone density the faster the initial shrinkage. The 25% RH sample shrank more rapidly than the same zone in

  5. The role of gravity on macrosegregation in alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Chen, C. F.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    During dendritic solidification liquid flow is induced both by buoyancy forces and solidification shrinkage. There is strong evidence that the major reason for the liquid flow is the former, i.e., thermosolutal convection. In the microgravity environment, it is thought that the thermosolutal convection will be greatly diminished so that convection will be confined mainly to the flow of interdendritic liquid required to satisfy the solidification shrinkage. An attempt is made to provide improved models of dendritic solidification with emphasis on convection and macrosegregation. Macrosegregation is an extremely important subject to the commercial casting community. The simulation of thermosolutal convection in directionally solidified (DS) alloys is described. A linear stability analysis was used to predict marginal stability curves for a system that comprises a mushy zone underlying an all-liquid zone. The supercritical thermosolutal convection in directionally solidified dendritic alloys was also modeled. The model assumes a nonconvective initial state with planar and horizontal isotherms and isoconcentration that move upward at a constant solidification velocity. Results are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys and show significant differences with results of plane-front solidification.

  6. Shrinkage of Dental Composite in Simulated Cavity Measured with Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianying; Thakur, Preetanjali; Fok, Alex S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental resin composites can lead to restoration debonding or cracked tooth tissues in composite-restored teeth. In order to understand where and how shrinkage strain and stress develop in such restored teeth, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to provide a comprehensive view of the displacement and strain distributions within model restorations that had undergone polymerization shrinkage. Specimens with model cavities were made of cylindrical glass rods with both diameter and length being 10 mm. The dimensions of the mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity prepared in each specimen measured 3 mm and 2 mm in width and depth, respectively. After filling the cavity with resin composite, the surface under observation was sprayed with first a thin layer of white paint and then fine black charcoal powder to create high-contrast speckles. Pictures of that surface were then taken before curing and 5 min after. Finally, the two pictures were correlated using DIC software to calculate the displacement and strain distributions. The resin composite shrunk vertically towards the bottom of the cavity, with the top center portion of the restoration having the largest downward displacement. At the same time, it shrunk horizontally towards its vertical midline. Shrinkage of the composite stretched the material in the vicinity of the “tooth-restoration” interface, resulting in cuspal deflections and high tensile strains around the restoration. Material close to the cavity walls or floor had direct strains mostly in the directions perpendicular to the interfaces. Summation of the two direct strain components showed a relatively uniform distribution around the restoration and its magnitude equaled approximately to the volumetric shrinkage strain of the material. PMID:25079865

  7. Isoosmotic shrinkage by self-stimulated outward Na-K-Cl cotransport in quail erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lou, Josè M; Garay, Ricardo P; Gimenez, Ignacio; Escanero, Jesus F; Alda, Josè O

    2003-10-01

    In mammalian erythrocytes, outward fluxes by the Na-K-Cl cotransporter NKCC have been clearly characterized, but NKCC fluxes are small and their physiological role, if any, is poorly understood. Avian erythrocytes are nucleated cells, in which a physiologically relevant NKCC acts as a cell volume regulator. Therefore, we further investigated outward cotransport and its relation to cell volume by using quail erythrocytes. Unlike human or rat erythrocytes, quail erythrocytes exhibit outward cotransport fluxes: (1) of high magnitude [maximal rate of bumetanide-sensitive Li+ efflux=12.3+/-1.1 mmol (l cells x h)(-1), mean +/-SEM, n=23] and (2) strongly stimulated by hyperosmotic media (by 100-200% in 500 mosmol/l media). Na+- or Li+-loaded quail erythrocytes exhibited rapid cell shrinkage when incubated in K+-free media. Thus, cell volume remained stationary up to 5-10 min and then started to shrink. Shrinkage was first slow, but progressively accelerated, finally reaching a new stationary state where cell volume had decreased by about 20%. Such rapid cell shrinkage was fully inhibited by bumetanide and was associated with outward cotransport stimulation (self-stimulated or an auto-catalytic process, i.e. a reaction stimulated by its product). External K+ reduced all these phenomena, but significant cell shrinkage was still observed at an external K+ concentration of 2.8 mM. K+ removal failed to stimulate outward cotransport in hypotonic media (250 mosmol/l). Finally, reincubation of shrunken erythrocytes in physiological saline revealed that inward cotransport was stimulated more than outward cotransport. In conclusion, isoosmotic hypokalaemia drives a rapid shrinkage of quail erythrocytes, due to auto-catalytic net outward cotransport stimulation. Whether this is an experimental curiosity or indicates that outward cotransport can have some physiological role deserves further investigation.

  8. Polymerization stresses in low-shrinkage dental resin composites measured by crack analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Kubota, Yu; Momoi, Yasuko; Ferracane, Jack L

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare several dental restoratives currently advertised as low-shrinkage composites (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kalore, Reflexions XLS Dentin and Venus Diamond) with a microfill composite (Heliomolar) in terms of polymerization stress, polymerization shrinkage and elastic modulus. Cracks were made at several distances from the edge of a precision cavity in a soda-lime glass disk. The composites were placed into the cavity and lengths of the cracks were measured before and after light curing. Polymerization stresses generated in the glass at 2 and 10 min after the irradiation were calculated from the crack lengths and K(c) of the glass. Polymerization shrinkage and elastic modulus of the composites also were measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation using a video-imaging device and a nanoindenter, respectively. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVAs and Tukey's test (p<0.05). The stress was significantly affected by composite brand, distance and time. The stress was directly proportional to time and inversely proportional to distance from the edge of the cavity. Clearfil Majesty Posterior demonstrated the highest stress and it resulted in the fracture of the glass at 2 min. Venus Diamond and Heliomolar exhibited the greatest shrinkage at both times. The elastic moduli of Clearfil Majesty Posterior and Reflexions XLS Dentin were greatest at 2 and 10 min, respectively. Among the four low-shrinkage composites, two demonstrated significantly reduced polymerization stress compared to Heliomolar, which has previously been shown in in vitro tests to generate low curing stress. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Orthodontic silver brazing alloys.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, P J; Pham, H L

    1989-10-01

    Orthodontic silver brazing alloys suffer from the presence of cadmium, excessive flow temperatures, and crevice corrosion on stainless steel. Seven alloys were examined. Two alloys contained cadmium. The lowest flow temperature observed was 629 degrees C for a cadmium alloy and 651 degrees C for two cadmium free alloys. Three alloys had corrosion resistance superior to the other solders. Addition of low melting temperature elements gallium and indium reduced flow temperature in some cases but produced brittleness in the brazing alloy.

  10. Superplasticity in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T. G.

    1997-12-01

    We have characterized in the Al-Mg system the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cold-rolled Al-6Mg-0.3Sc alloy. The alloy exhibited superplasticity at relatively high strain rates (about 10-2 s-1). At a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 there exists a wide temperature range (475-520`C) within which the tensile elongation is over 1000%. There also exists a wide strain rate range (10-3 - 10-1 s-1) within which the tensile elongation is over 500%. The presence of Sc in the alloy results in a uniform distribution of fine coherent Al3SC precipitates which effectively pin grain and subgrain boundaries during static and continuous recrystallization. As a result, the alloy retains its fine grain size (about 7 micron), even after extensive superplastic deformation (>1000%). During deformation, dislocations Mg with a high Schmidt factor slip across subgrains but are trapped by subgrain boundaries, as a result of the strong pining of Al3Sc. This process leads to the conversion of low-angled subgrain boundaries to high-angled grain boundaries and the subsequent grain boundary sliding, which produces superelasticity. A model is proposed to describe grain boundary sliding accommodated by dislocation glide across grains with a uniform distribution of coherent precipitates. The model predictions is consistent with experimental observations.

  11. Determination of the dynamic stress intensity factors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy using the reflected caustic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Seiji; Takahashi, Susumu; Shimamoto, Akira

    1996-12-31

    Dynamic fracture initiation and propagation in Al 7075-T6 was investigated experimentally using the optical method of reflected caustics combined with a simplified high speed photography. A crack propagation testing configuration consisting of a three point bending specimen loaded In a drop weighting was used. It was found that prior to crack initiation the stress intensity factor time record calculated using the dynamic impact load and a static formula disagrees with the actual stress Intensity factor measured by caustics. The impact fracture tests are performed. With use of Al 7075-T6 band plate test specimens with a V-notch on their one side. The dynamic stress intensity factor K{sub id} are given. With this, the authors experimentally calculated the dynamic fracture toughness K{sub ID}.

  12. Carbon--silicon coating alloys for improved irradiation stability

    DOEpatents

    Bokros, J.C.

    1973-10-01

    For ceramic nuclear fuel particles, a fission product-retaining carbon-- silicon alloy coating is described that exhibits low shrinkage after exposure to fast neutron fluences of 1.4 to 4.8 x 10/sup 21/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E = 0.18 MeV) at irradiation temperatures from 950 to 1250 deg C. Isotropic pyrolytic carbon containing from 18 to 34 wt% silicon is co-deposited from a gaseous mixiure of propane, helium, and silane at a temperature of 1350 to 1450 deg C. (Official Gazette)

  13. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  14. Oxidation behavior in reaction-bonded aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Shari Hanayo

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of producing low-shrinkage mullite/alumina composites by applying the reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) process to an aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina system. Mirostructural and compositional changes during heat treatment were studied by removing samples from the furnace at different steps in the heating schedule and then using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS and XRD to characterize the powder compacts. Results suggest that the oxidation behavior of the alloy compact is different from the model proposed for the pure Al/alumina system.

  15. Oxidation behavior in reaction-bonded aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, S.H.

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of producing low-shrinkage mullite/alumina composites by applying the reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) process to an aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina system. Mirostructural and compositional changes during heat treatment were studied by removing samples from the furnace at different steps in the heating schedule and then using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS and XRD to characterize the powder compacts. Results suggest that the oxidation behavior of the alloy compact is different from the model proposed for the pure Al/alumina system.

  16. Cryogenic Properties of a New Tough-Strong Iron Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A program was undertaken to develop an iron-base alloy having a fracture toughness of 220 MPa. m superscript 1/2 with a corresponding yield stress of 1.4 GPa (200 ksi) at-196 C. An Fe-12Ni alloy was selected as the base alloy. Factors considered included reactive metal additions, effects of interstitial impurities, strengthening mechanisms, and weldability. The goals were met in an Fe-12Ni-0.5Al alloy strengthened by thermomechanical processing or by precipitate strengthening with 2 percent Cu. The alloy is weldable with the weld metal and heat affected zone in the postweld annealed condition having toughness equivalent to the base alloy.

  17. Comparison of the Oxidation Rates of Some New Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper alloys were studied for oxidation resistance and mechanisms between 550 and 700 C, in reduced-oxygen environments expected in rocket engines, and their oxidation behaviors compared to that of pure copper. They included two dispersion-strengthened alloys (precipitation-strengthened and oxide-dispersion strengthened, respectively) and one solution-strengthened alloy. In all cases the main reaction was oxidation of Cu into Cu2O and CuO. The dispersion-strengthened alloys were superior to both Cu and the solution-strengthened alloy in oxidation resistance. However, factors retarding oxidation rates seemed to be different for the two dispersion-strengthened alloys.

  18. The role of bFGF in down-regulating α-SMA expression of chondrogenically induced BMSCs and preventing the shrinkage of BMSC engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Liu, Tianyi; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2011-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proved to be an ideal cell source for cartilage regeneration. Our previous studies demonstrated that a three-dimensional (3D) cartilage could be constructed successfully in vitro using BMSCs and biodegradable scaffolds. However, an obvious shrinkage and deformation was observed during in vitro chondrogenic induction. According to the literatures, it can be speculated that the up-regulation of smooth muscle actin-alpha (α-SMA) caused by transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is one of the leading reasons and that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) could antagonize the role of TGFβ to down-regulate α-SMA expression and prevent the shrinkage of BMSC engineered cartilage. This study testified these speculations by adding bFGF to chondrogenic media. According to the current results, chondrogenic induction significantly up-regulated α-SMA expression of BMSCs at both cell and tissue levels, and the engineered tissue only retained 12.4% of original size after 6 weeks of chondrogenic induction. However, the supplement of bFGF in chondrogenic media efficiently down-regulated α-SMA expression and the engineered tissue still retained over 60% of original size after 6 weeks of culture. Moreover, bFGF showed a beneficial influence on 3D cartilage formation of BMSCs in terms of gene expression and deposition of cartilage specific matrices. All these results suggested that bFGF could repress α-SMA expression caused by chondrogenic induction, efficiently prevent shrinkage of BMSC engineered tissue, and have a positive influence on cartilage formation, which provides a clue for both shape control and quality improvement of BMSC engineered 3D cartilage.

  19. Effects of molecular structure of the resins on the volumetric shrinkage and the mechanical strength of dental restorative composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, L U; Kim, J W; Kim, C K

    2006-09-01

    To prepare a dental composite that has a low amount of curing shrinkage and excellent mechanical strength, various 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) derivatives were synthesized via molecular structure design, and afterward, properties of their mixtures were explored. Bis-GMA derivatives, which were obtained by substituting methyl groups for hydrogen on the phenyl ring in the Bis-GMA, exhibited lower curing shrinkage than Bis-GMA, whereas their viscosities were higher than that of Bis-GMA. Other Bis-GMA derivatives, which contained a glycidyl methacrylate as a molecular end group exhibited reduced curing shrinkage and viscosity. Methoxy substitution for hydroxyl groups on the Bis-GMA derivatives was performed for the further reduction of the viscosity and curing shrinkage. Various resin mixtures, which had the same viscosity as the commercial one, were prepared, and their curing shrinkage was examined. A resin mixture containing 2,2-bis[3,5-dimethyl, 4-(2-methoxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane] (TMBis-M-GMA) as a base resin and 4-tert-butylphenoxy-2-methyoxypropyl methacrylate (t-BP-M-GMA) as a diluent exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage among them. The composite prepared from this resin mixture also exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage along with enhanced mechanical properties.

  20. Ultrastructural evaluation of shrinkage artefacts induced by fixatives and embedding resins on osteocyte processes and pericellular space dimensions.

    PubMed

    Shah, Furqan A; Johansson, Bengt R; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The integrity of the interface between the osteocyte (Ot) process and the canalicular wall was investigated in terms of change in the lateral dimensions of the Ot process in relation to the canalicular width, i.e., widening of the pericellular space. This has been interpreted as shrinkage of the Ot process relative to the canalicular wall during sample preparation stages of fixation, dehydration, and resin embedding. Sprague-Dawley rat tibial cross-sections were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four different fixative preparations: paraformaldehyde (PF), modified Karnovsky's (MK), glutaraldehyde (GRR) with ruthenium red (GRR), and zinc formalin (ZF); and two different embedding resins: LR Gold (LRG) and Epon812 (Epon) were evaluated. It was found that for LRG embedding, formalin-only fixatives (PF and ZF) induced lower shrinkage than GRR-containing fixatives (MK and GRR). In contrast, for Epon embedding, MK showed the highest shrinkage, while no differences were found between the remaining fixatives (PF, ZF, and GRR). All formalin-containing fixatives (MK, PF, and ZF) induced similar shrinkage in both embedding media. The most dramatic difference was for GRR fixation, which in combination with LRG embedding showed ∼ 62% more shrinkage than with Epon embedding, suggesting that the combination of GRR fixation and LRG embedding synergistically amplifies Ot shrinkage. These differences likely suggest a role of the resin in secondarily influencing the tissue structure following fixation. Further, the work confirms LRG as a poor embedding medium for bone specimens, as it causes large variations in shrinkage depending on fixation.

  1. Assessment of murine brain tissue shrinkage caused by different histological fixatives using magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehrl, Hans F; Bezrukov, Ilja; Wiehr, Stefan; Lehnhoff, Mareike; Fuchs, Kerstin; Mannheim, Julia G; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Kneilling, Manfred; Pichler, Bernd J; Sauter, Alexander W

    2015-05-01

    Especially for neuroscience and the development of new biomarkers, a direct correlation between in vivo imaging and histology is essential. However, this comparison is hampered by deformation and shrinkage of tissue samples caused by fixation, dehydration and paraffin embedding. We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging to analyze the degree of shrinkage on murine brains for various fixatives. After in vivo imaging using 7 T MRI, animals were sacrificed and the brains were dissected and immediately placed in different fixatives, respectively: zinc-based fixative, neutral buffered formalin (NBF), paraformaldehyde (PFA), Bouin-Holland fixative and paraformaldehyde-lysine-periodate (PLP). The degree of shrinkage based on mouse brain volumes, radiodensity in Hounsfield units (HU), as well as non-linear deformations were obtained. The highest degree of shrinkage was observed for PLP (68.1%, P < 0.001), followed by PFA (60.2%, P<0.001) and NBF (58.6%, P<0.001). The zinc-based fixative revealed a low shrinkage with only 33.5% (P<0.001). Compared to NBF, the zinc-based fixative shows a slightly higher degree of deformations, but is still more homogenous than PFA. Tissue shrinkage can be monitored non-invasively with CT and MR. Zinc-based fixative causes the smallest degree of brain shrinkage and only small deformations and is therefore recommended for in vivo ex vivo comparison studies.

  2. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process.

  3. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  4. A moment projection method for population balance dynamics with a shrinkage term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaohua; Yapp, Edward K. Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian; Xu, Rong; Yang, Wenming; Kraft, Markus

    2017-02-01

    A new method of moments for solving the population balance equation is developed and presented. The moment projection method (MPM) is numerically simple and easy to implement and attempts to address the challenge of particle shrinkage due to processes such as oxidation, evaporation or dissolution. It directly solves the moment transport equation for the moments and tracks the number of the smallest particles using the algorithm by Blumstein and Wheeler (1973) [41]. The performance of the new method is measured against the method of moments (MOM) and the hybrid method of moments (HMOM). The results suggest that MPM performs much better than MOM and HMOM where shrinkage is dominant. The new method predicts mean quantities which are almost as accurate as a high-precision stochastic method calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA).

  5. Effect of selected physical properties of waxes on investments and casting shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Yamagishi, T; Oshida, Y; Munoz, C A

    1996-02-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between flow characteristics, bending strength, and softening temperature of paraffin and dental inlay waxes to casting shrinkage when patterns were invested with a phosphate-bonded investment. This study found that the casting shrinkage decreased as the flow of the wax pattern increased. If a low flow wax is used or if there is a need for a thick pattern, the size of the casting ring should be increased. When wax patterns are formed for cast restorations, it is important to select the type of wax with the most desirable properties for the margin and the occlusal portions. Moreover, to accurately fabricate castings, it is necessary to understand the physical properties of the chosen waxes.

  6. The origin of early age expansions induced in cementitious materials containing shrinkage reducing admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sant, Gaurav; Lothenbach, Barbara; Juilland, Patrick; Le Saout, Gwenn; Weiss, Jason; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    Studies on the early-age shrinkage behavior of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes containing shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) have indicated these mixtures frequently exhibit an expansion shortly after setting. While the magnitude of the expansion has been noted to be a function of the chemistry of the cement and the admixture dosage; the cause of the expansion is not clearly understood. This investigation uses measurements of autogenous deformation, X-ray diffraction, pore solution analysis, thermogravimetry, and scanning electron microscopy to study the early-age properties and describe the mechanism of the expansion in OPC pastes made with and without SRA. The composition of the pore solution indicates that the presence of the SRA increases the portlandite oversaturation level in solution which can result in higher crystallization stresses which could lead to an expansion. This observation is supported by deformation calculations for the systems examined.

  7. Light-Curing Volumetric Shrinkage in Dimethacrylate-Based Dental Composites by Nanoindentation and PAL Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Olha; Adamiak, Stanislaw; Bezvushko, Elvira; Cebulski, Jozef; Iskiv, Maryana; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Balitska, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Light-curing volumetric shrinkage in dimethacrylate-based dental resin composites Dipol® is examined through comprehensive kinetics research employing nanoindentation measurements and nanoscale atomic-deficient study with lifetime spectroscopy of annihilating positrons. Photopolymerization kinetics determined through nanoindentation testing is shown to be described via single-exponential relaxation function with character time constants reaching respectively 15.0 and 18.7 s for nanohardness and elastic modulus. Atomic-deficient characteristics of composites are extracted from positron lifetime spectra parameterized employing unconstrained x3-term fitting. The tested photopolymerization kinetics can be adequately reflected in time-dependent changes observed in average positron lifetime (with 17.9 s time constant) and fractional free volume of positronium traps (with 18.6 s time constant). This correlation proves that fragmentation of free-volume positronium-trapping sites accompanied by partial positronium-to-positron traps conversion determines the light-curing volumetric shrinkage in the studied composites.

  8. Seislet-based morphological component analysis using scale-dependent exponential shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengliang; Fomel, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Morphological component analysis (MCA) is a powerful tool used in image processing to separate different geometrical components (cartoons and textures, curves and points etc.). MCA is based on the observation that many complex signals may not be sparsely represented using only one dictionary/transform, however can have sparse representation by combining several over-complete dictionaries/transforms. In this paper we propose seislet-based MCA for seismic data processing. MCA algorithm is reformulated in the shaping-regularization framework. Successful seislet-based MCA depends on reliable slope estimation of seismic events, which is done by plane-wave destruction (PWD) filters. An exponential shrinkage operator unifies many existing thresholding operators and is adopted in scale-dependent shaping regularization to promote sparsity. Numerical examples demonstrate a superior performance of the proposed exponential shrinkage operator and the potential of seislet-based MCA in application to trace interpolation and multiple removal.

  9. Accelerated Path-following Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm with Application to Semiparametric Graph Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tuo; Liu, Han

    2016-01-01

    We propose an accelerated path-following iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (APISTA) for solving high dimensional sparse nonconvex learning problems. The main difference between APISTA and the path-following iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (PISTA) is that APISTA exploits an additional coordinate descent subroutine to boost the computational performance. Such a modification, though simple, has profound impact: APISTA not only enjoys the same theoretical guarantee as that of PISTA, i.e., APISTA attains a linear rate of convergence to a unique sparse local optimum with good statistical properties, but also significantly outperforms PISTA in empirical benchmarks. As an application, we apply APISTA to solve a family of nonconvex optimization problems motivated by estimating sparse semiparametric graphical models. APISTA allows us to obtain new statistical recovery results which do not exist in the existing literature. Thorough numerical results are provided to back up our theory. PMID:28133430

  10. Quantitative investigation of chemical shrinkage stress in flip chip using a 3D moire interferometry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fei; Liu, Lie; Yi, Sung; Chian, Kerm S.

    2002-06-01

    Thermo-mechanical reliability is a key issue of IC packaging. In this paper, the chemical shrinkage stress caused by the underfill curing is quantitatively investigated: DSC test result provides the basis for the determination of temperature profile for the curing of underfill. The 3D deformation of the flip chip during the underfill curing process is measured with 3D Moire interferometry system. Also a simple theoretical model is set up for this problem, DMA test provide the necessary parameters for this model. The experimental and theoretical results agree well with each other, both results show that the chemical shrinkage stress is fairly small when compared with the thermal residual stress, so this part of residual stress can be neglected in the commonly used finite element analysis (FEA) model.

  11. Unsupervised defect detection in textiles based on Fourier analysis and wavelet shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guang-Hua; Wang, Qing-Hui; Zhang, Guo-Hui

    2015-04-01

    An unsupervised approach for the inspection of defects in textiles by applying Fourier analysis and wavelet shrinkage is proposed. It does not rely on any reference images. For each sample under inspection, the periodic pattern in the background is first eliminated by zero-masking their dominant frequency components that show high gradient values in the spectrum. The Fourier-restored residual image is then denoised by wavelet shrinkage. The approximation coefficients and the processed wavelet coefficients are individually back-transformed to produce a pair of reconstructions from which either the low or the high-frequency information about the defects can be segmented using a simple thresholding process. The performance of the method has been extensively evaluated by a wide variety of samples with different defect types and texture backgrounds. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by the experimental results in comparison with other methods.

  12. Effectiveness of Hyalobarrier and Seprafilm to prevent polypropylene mesh shrinkage: a macroscopic and histological experimental study.

    PubMed

    Nohuz, Erdogan; Alaboud, Maher; Darcha, Claude; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Aublet-Cuvelier, Bruno; Jacquetin, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) mesh shrinkage represents a serious complication, as a significant cause of pain and recurrence of pelvic organ prolapse or ventral hernias, frequently requiring several surgical interventions. The retraction seems to be caused by the host, in response to the implantation, through the occurrence of periprosthetic adhesions and fibrosis. We hypothesized that avoiding the postoperative adhesions can prevent PP mesh shrinkage. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to three groups. A standardized hernia defect was induced on the abdominal wall, which was repaired using an extraperitoneal PP mesh alone (group 1), with application of a hyaluronate carboxymethylcellulose-based bioresorbable membrane (Seprafilm, group 2), or an auto-cross-linked polysaccharide hyaluronan-based solution (Hyalobarrier gel, group 3). Eight weeks after the procedure, a repeat laparotomy was performed. After scoring the adhesion and measuring the mesh surface, a microscopic study of the prosthesis-host tissue interfaces was performed. Group 1 displayed a median shrinkage of 29% of the mesh. The Seprafilm group (p = 0.0238) and Hyalobarrier gel group (p = 0.0072) displayed a significantly smaller reduction of 19.12 and 17 %, respectively. Control group 1 displayed a significantly greater adhesion score (30.40) than the Seprafilm (11.67, p = 0.0028) and Hyalobarrier gel groups (11.19, p = 0.0013). The fibrosis was reduced in the Hyalobarrier gel group only. This experimental study revealed that Hyalobarrier gel and Seprafilm can prevent PP mesh shrinkage and postoperative adhesions. They might be integrated in a mesh size-saving strategy, which should preserve the quality and durability of the surgical repair and limit the postoperative pain.

  13. Influence of Shrinkage and Swelling Properties of Coal on Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.; Smith, D.H.

    2007-05-01

    The potential for enhanced methane production and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in coalbeds needs to be evaluated before large-scale sequestration projects are undertaken. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal seams with the potential for enhanced coalbed methane production has become a viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The coal matrix is believed to shrink during methane production and swell during the injection of carbon dioxide, causing changes in tlie cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. However, the influence of swelling and shrinkage, and the geomechanical response during the process of carbon dioxide injection and methane recovery, are not well understood. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model based on constitutive equations that account for the coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium was developed and implemented in an existing reservoir model. Several reservoir simulations were performed at a field site located in the San Juan basin to investigate the influence of swelling and shrinkage, as well as other geomechanical parameters, using a modified compositional coalbed methane reservoir simulator (modified PSU-COALCOMP). The paper presents numerical results for interpretation of reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide at this site. Available measured data at the field site were compared with computed values. Results show that coal swelling and shrinkage during the process of enhanced coalbed methane recovery can have a significant influence on the reservoir performance. Results also show an increase in the gas production rate with an increase in the elastic modulus of the reservoir material and increase in cleat porosity. Further laboratory and field tests of the model are needed to furnish better estimates of petrophysical parameters, test the applicability of thee model, and determine the need for further refinements to the mathematical

  14. Lower prolactin levels during cabergoline treatment are associated to tumor shrinkage in prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, M; Lupi, I; Cosottini, M; Rossi, G; Manetti, L; Raffaelli, V; Sardella, C; Martino, E; Bogazzi, F

    2014-12-01

    Dopamine agonists are considered as the first line therapy in prolactin (PRL) secreting pituitary adenomas inducing a normalization of serum PRL and reduction of tumor size. It is known that serum PRL levels, obtained during treatment, are a predictor of tumor shrinkage. Whether PRL suppression below the lower limit of the normal range is related to a greater chance of tumor shrinkage than just its normalization has not been established. This retrospective cohort study was carried out in a tertiary center. Clinical records of 151 patients with PRL-secreting pituitary adenomas (73 micro-, 78 macroadenomas) treated with cabergoline for at least 24 months were analyzed. The adenoma size was analyzed by MRI before and after 24 months of treatment. PRL levels were evaluated every 6 months, assigning a score at each time point (PRL 0 = suppressed; 1 = normal; 2 = above normal). The total score, after 24 months of treatment, was expressed as the sum of the score at each time point and ranged between 0 and 8. A tumor shrinkage was observed in 102/151 patients (67.5%) and it was significantly associated to a lower PRL total score (p = 0.021, OR = 0.85, CI = 0.73-0.97), being significantly more frequent in patients with suppressed PRL than in those with normal PRL (p = 0.045, OR = 0.42, CI = 0.18-0.98) at 24 months. Cabergoline therapy with the goal of achieving PRL levels below the lower limit of normal range can increase the chance to obtain tumor shrinkage of PRL-secreting pituitary adenomas.

  15. Na+/K+ pump inhibition induces cell shrinkage in cultured chick cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W; Rasmusson, R L; Lobaugh, L A; Lieberman, M

    1993-01-01

    Myocardial cell swelling occurs in ischemia and in reperfusion injury before the onset of irreversible injury. Swelling has been attributed to failure of the Na+/K+ pump and the accumulation of intracellular Na+. To evaluate the role of the pump-leak model of cell volume maintenance, short term changes in cell volume in response to Na+/K+ pump inhibition were studied in aggregates of cultured embryonic chick cardiac myocytes using optical and biochemical methods. Exposure to 100 microM ouabain over 20 min induced cell shrinkage of approximately 10%. Cell water was also decreased by Na+/K+ pump inhibition; incubation for 1 hr either in the presence of 100 microM ouabain or in K(+)-free solution reduced cell water by 18.4% and 28.4% respectively. When exposed to ouabain in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, the aggregates swelled by approximately 15%, indicating that extracellular Ca2+ was required for the ouabain-induced shrinkage to occur. Ouabain still caused shrinkage, however, in the presence of the Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil (10 microM) and nifedipine (10 microM), suggesting that Na+/Ca2+ exchange, rather than Ca2+ channels, is the route for Ca2+ influx during Na+/K+ pump inhibition. Efflux of amino acids (taurine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine and alanine) from confluent monolayers of chick heart cells exposed to ouabain for 20 min was nearly double that observed in control solution. These results suggest that, during Na+/K+ pump inhibition, chick heart cells can limit accumulation of intracellular sodium by means of Na+/Ca2+ exchange, and that a rise in intracellular [Ca2+], also mediated by Na+/Ca2+ exchange, promotes the loss of amino acids and ions to cause cell shrinkage. Therefore, swelling during ischemic injury may not result from Na+/K+ pump failure alone, but may reflect the exhaustion of alternative volume regulatory transport mechanisms.

  16. Pre-Voyager velocities, accelerations and shrinkage rates of Jovian cloud features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, R. F.; Youngblood, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Voyager I data provide detailed information on the latitudinal dependence of velocities in the Jovian atmosphere. In the present paper, pre-Voyager velocity data are summarized, and gross differences with the Voyager I results are revealed. Analytical expressions are derived for the shrinkage rates and acceleration of the Great Red Spot and white ovals (located at -23 degrees and -34 degrees latitude, respectively) for the period from 1943 to 1979.

  17. Evolutionary Trajectory of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) Genome Shrinkage during Spread in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hemerik, Lia; Vlak, Just M.

    2010-01-01

    Background White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the sole member of the novel Nimaviridae family, and the source of major economic problems in shrimp aquaculture. WSSV appears to have rapidly spread worldwide after the first reported outbreak in the early 1990s. Genomic deletions of various sizes occur at two loci in the WSSV genome, the ORF14/15 and ORF23/24 variable regions, and these have been used as molecular markers to study patterns of viral spread over space and time. We describe the dynamics underlying the process of WSSV genome shrinkage using empirical data and a simple mathematical model. Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped new WSSV isolates from five Asian countries, and analyzed this information together with published data. Genome size appears to stabilize over time, and deletion size in the ORF23/24 variable region was significantly related to the time of the first WSSV outbreak in a particular country. Parameter estimates derived from fitting a simple mathematical model of genome shrinkage to the data support a geometric progression (k<1) of the genomic deletions, with k = 0.371±0.150. Conclusions/Significance The data suggest that the rate of genome shrinkage decreases over time before attenuating. Bioassay data provided support for a link between genome size and WSSV fitness in an aquaculture setting. Differences in genomic deletions between geographic WSSV isolates suggest that WSSV spread did not follow a smooth pattern of geographic radiation, suggesting spread of WSSV over long distances by commercial activities. We discuss two hypotheses for genome shrinkage, an adaptive and a neutral one. We argue in favor of the adaptive hypothesis, given that there is support for a link between WSSV genome size and fitness. PMID:20976239

  18. Influence of raw materials composition on firing shrinkage, porosity, heat conductivity and microstructure of ceramic tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurovics, E.; Buzimov, A. Y.; Gömze, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this work some new raw material compositions from alumina, conventional brick-clays and sawdust were mixed, compacted and heat treated by the authors. Depending on raw material compositions and firing temperatures the specimens were examined on shrinkage, water absorption, heat conductivity and microstructures. The real raised experiments have shown the important role of firing temperature and raw material composition on color, heat conductivity and microstructure of the final product.

  19. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  20. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder-Metallurgy-Produced Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, T. R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Frederick, D. A.; Contescu, C. I.; Chen, W.; Lim, Y. C.; Peter, W. H.; Feng, Z.

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was undertaken using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas-forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap, where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal and minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders are critical for achieving equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  1. Coupled growth of immiscible alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, B.; Hayes, L.; Arikawa, Y.; O`Dell, S.; Cheney, A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the flight experiment Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics scheduled to fly aboard the Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission during the Summer of 1996. The experiment is designed to directionally solidify samples in immiscible alloy systems in an attempt to obtain an improved understanding of the physics controlling the solidification process. This paper specifically addresses some of the unique difficulties concerning ampoule design for these experiments. As an example, an ampoule material must be utilized that is not wet by the minor immiscible liquid phase. In addition, a means must be provided to accommodate thermal contraction and solidification shrinkage during processing in order to avoid free surface formation on the melt. An attempt has also been made to control thermal end effects in order to obtain a relatively constant growth rate during processing. The final design results in an ampoule assembly that contains insulating segments, dummy samples, moving pistons and a high temperature spring assembly. The details of this design and the results of ground based testing will be discussed.

  2. Coupled growth in immiscible alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Hayes, Larry C.; Arikawa, Y.; O'Dell, S.; Cheney, A.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses the flight experiment 'Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics' schedules to fly aboard the life and microgravity spacelab mission during the summer of 1996. The experiment is designed to directionally solidify samples in immiscible alloy systems in an attempt to obtain an improved understanding of the physics controlling the solidification process. This paper specifically addresses some of the unique difficulties concerning ampoule design for these experiments. As an example, an ampoule material must be utilized that is not wet by the minor immiscible liquid phase. In addition, a means must be provided to accommodate thermal contraction and solidification shrinkage during processing in order to avoid free surface formation on the melt. An attempt has also been made to control thermal end effects in order to obtain a relatively constant growth rate during processing. The final design results in an ampoule assembly that contains insulating segments, dummy samples, moving pistons and a high temperature spring assembly. The details of this design and the results of ground based testing will be discussed.

  3. A Study of Shrinkage Stress Reduction and Mechanical Properties of Nanogel-Modified Resin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Howard, Gregory D.; Lewis, Steven H.; Barros, Matthew D.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    A series of nanogel compositions were prepared from urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA) in the presence of a thiol chain transfer agent. The linear oligomer of IBMA was synthesized by a similar solution polymerization technique. The nanogels were prepared with different crosslinker concentrations to achieve varied branching densities and molecular weights. The prepolymers were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at loading levels ranging from 10 wt% to 50 wt%. Photopolymerization reaction kinetics of all prepolymer modified systems were enhanced relative to the nanogel-free control during early stage polymerization while limiting conversion was similar for most samples. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was reduced proportionally with the prepolymer content while the corresponding decrease in polymerization stress was potentially greater than an additive linear behavior. Flexural strength for inert linear polymer-modified systems decreased significantly with the increase in the prepolymer content; however, with an increase in the crosslinker concentration within the nanogel additives, and an increase in the concentration of residual pendant reactive sites, flexural strength was maintained or improved regardless of the nanogel loading level. This demonstrates that covalent attachment rather than just physical entanglement with the polymer matrix is important for effective polymer mechanical reinforcement by nanogel additives. Reactive nanogel additives can be considered as a practical, generic means to achieve substantial reductions in polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress in common polymers. PMID:23109731

  4. A Study of Shrinkage Stress Reduction and Mechanical Properties of Nanogel-Modified Resin Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiancheng; Howard, Gregory D; Lewis, Steven H; Barros, Matthew D; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2012-11-01

    A series of nanogel compositions were prepared from urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA) in the presence of a thiol chain transfer agent. The linear oligomer of IBMA was synthesized by a similar solution polymerization technique. The nanogels were prepared with different crosslinker concentrations to achieve varied branching densities and molecular weights. The prepolymers were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at loading levels ranging from 10 wt% to 50 wt%. Photopolymerization reaction kinetics of all prepolymer modified systems were enhanced relative to the nanogel-free control during early stage polymerization while limiting conversion was similar for most samples. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was reduced proportionally with the prepolymer content while the corresponding decrease in polymerization stress was potentially greater than an additive linear behavior. Flexural strength for inert linear polymer-modified systems decreased significantly with the increase in the prepolymer content; however, with an increase in the crosslinker concentration within the nanogel additives, and an increase in the concentration of residual pendant reactive sites, flexural strength was maintained or improved regardless of the nanogel loading level. This demonstrates that covalent attachment rather than just physical entanglement with the polymer matrix is important for effective polymer mechanical reinforcement by nanogel additives. Reactive nanogel additives can be considered as a practical, generic means to achieve substantial reductions in polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress in common polymers.

  5. Hysteresis from Multiscale Porosity: Modeling Water Sorption and Shrinkage in Cement Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinson, Matthew B.; Masoero, Enrico; Bonnaud, Patrick A.; Manzano, Hegoi; Ji, Qing; Yip, Sidney; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2015-06-01

    Cement paste has a complex distribution of pores and molecular-scale spaces. This distribution controls the hysteresis of water sorption isotherms and associated bulk dimensional changes (shrinkage). We focus on two locations of evaporable water within the fine structure of pastes, each having unique properties, and we present applied physics models that capture the hysteresis by dividing drying and rewetting into two related regimes based on relative humidity (RH). We show that a continuum model, incorporating a pore-blocking mechanism for desorption and equilibrium thermodynamics for adsorption, explains well the sorption hysteresis for a paste that remains above approximately 20% RH. In addition, we show with molecular models and experiments that water in spaces of ≲1 nm width evaporates below approximately 20% RH but reenters throughout the entire RH range. This water is responsible for a drying shrinkage hysteresis similar to that of clays but opposite in direction to typical mesoporous glass. Combining the models of these two regimes allows the entire drying and rewetting hysteresis to be reproduced accurately and provides parameters to predict the corresponding dimensional changes. The resulting model can improve the engineering predictions of long-term drying shrinkage accounting also for the history dependence of strain induced by hysteresis. Alternative strategies for quantitative analyses of the microstructure of cement paste based on this mesoscale physical model of water content within porous spaces are discussed.

  6. Hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of latewood cell wall micropillars reveal ultrastructural anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Stiefel, Michael; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Mokso, Rajmund; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-06-06

    We document the hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of the central and the thickest secondary cell wall layer of wood (named S2) in response to changes in environmental humidity using synchrotron radiation-based phase contrast X-ray tomographic nanoscopy. The S2 layer is a natural fibre-reinforced nano-composite polymer and is strongly reactive to water. Using focused ion beam, micropillars with a cross section of few micrometres are fabricated from the S2 layer of the latewood cell walls of Norway spruce softwood. The thin neighbouring cell wall layers are removed to prevent hindering or restraining of moisture-induced deformation during swelling or shrinkage. The proposed experiment intended to get further insights into the microscopic origin of the anisotropic hygro-expansion of wood. It is found that the swelling/shrinkage strains are highly anisotropic in the transverse plane of the cell wall, larger in the normal than in the direction parallel to the cell wall's thickness. This ultrastructural anisotropy may be due to the concentric lamellation of the cellulose microfibrils as the role of the cellulose microfibril angle in the transverse swelling anisotropy is negligible. The volumetric swelling of the cell wall material is found to be substantially larger than the one of wood tissues within the growth ring and wood samples made of several growth rings. The hierarchical configuration in wood optimally increases its dimensional stability in response to a humid environment with higher scales of complexity.

  7. DH and ESPI laser interferometry applied to the restoration shrinkage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. P.; Parra, D. F.; Vasconcelos, M. R.; Vaz, M.; Monteiro, J.

    2014-01-01

    In dental restoration postoperative marginal leakage is commonly associated to polymerization shrinkage effects. In consequence the longevity and quality of restorative treatment depends on the shrinkage mechanisms of the composite filling during the polymerization. In this work the development of new techniques for evaluation of those effects under light-induced polymerization of dental nano composite fillings is reported. The composite resins activated by visible light, initiate the polymerization process by absorbing light in wavelengths at about 470 nm. The techniques employed in the contraction assessment were digital holography (DH) and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) based on laser interferometry. A satisfactory resolution was achieved in the non-contact displacement field measurements on small objects concerning the experimental dental samples. According to a specific clinical protocol, natural teeth were used (human mandibular premolars). A class I cavity was drilled and restored with nano composite material, according to Black principles. The polymerization was monitored by DH and ESPI in real time during the cure reaction of the restoration. The total displacement reported for the material in relation of the tooth wall was 3.7 μm (natural tooth). The technique showed the entire tooth surface (wall) deforming during polymerization shrinkage.

  8. Multiple-Shrinkage Multinomial Probit Models with Applications to Simulating Geographies in Public Use Data

    PubMed Central

    Burgette, Lane F.; Reiter, Jerome P.

    2013-01-01

    Multinomial outcomes with many levels can be challenging to model. Information typically accrues slowly with increasing sample size, yet the parameter space expands rapidly with additional covariates. Shrinking all regression parameters towards zero, as often done in models of continuous or binary response variables, is unsatisfactory, since setting parameters equal to zero in multinomial models does not necessarily imply “no effect.” We propose an approach to modeling multinomial outcomes with many levels based on a Bayesian multinomial probit (MNP) model and a multiple shrinkage prior distribution for the regression parameters. The prior distribution encourages the MNP regression parameters to shrink toward a number of learned locations, thereby substantially reducing the dimension of the parameter space. Using simulated data, we compare the predictive performance of this model against two other recently-proposed methods for big multinomial models. The results suggest that the fully Bayesian, multiple shrinkage approach can outperform these other methods. We apply the multiple shrinkage MNP to simulating replacement values for areal identifiers, e.g., census tract indicators, in order to protect data confidentiality in public use datasets. PMID:24358073

  9. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach based on robust trimmed mean in gene sets detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed; Ghani, Nor Azura Md; Aripin, Rasimah; Yusop, Noorezatty Mohd

    2015-02-01

    Microarray involves of placing an orderly arrangement of thousands of gene sequences in a grid on a suitable surface. The technology has made a novelty discovery since its development and obtained an increasing attention among researchers. The widespread of microarray technology is largely due to its ability to perform simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes in a massively parallel manner in one experiment. Hence, it provides valuable knowledge on gene interaction and function. The microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints. Therefore, the sample covariance matrix in Hotelling's T2 statistic is not positive definite and become singular, thus it cannot be inverted. In this research, the Hotelling's T2 statistic is combined with a shrinkage approach as an alternative estimation to estimate the covariance matrix to detect significant gene sets. The use of shrinkage covariance matrix overcomes the singularity problem by converting an unbiased to an improved biased estimator of covariance matrix. Robust trimmed mean is integrated into the shrinkage matrix to reduce the influence of outliers and consequently increases its efficiency. The performance of the proposed method is measured using several simulation designs. The results are expected to outperform existing techniques in many tested conditions.

  10. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Predict Colour Change, Shrinkage and Texture of Osmotically Dehydrated Pumpkin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S. Y.; Lee, J. S.; Loh, S. P.; Tham, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to use Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to predict colour change, shrinkage and texture of osmotically dehydrated pumpkin slices. The effects of process variables such as concentration of osmotic solution, immersion temperature and immersion time on the above mentioned physical properties were studied. The colour of the samples was measured using a colorimeter and the net colour difference changes, ΔE were determined. The texture was measured in terms of hardness by using a Texture Analyzer. As for the shrinkage, displacement of volume method was applied and percentage of shrinkage was obtained in terms of volume changes. A feed-forward backpropagation network with sigmoidal function was developed and best network configuration was chosen based on the highest correlation coefficients between the experimental values versus predicted values. As a comparison, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) statistical analysis was also employed. The performances of both RSM and ANN modelling were evaluated based on absolute average deviation (AAD), correlation of determination (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE). The results showed that ANN has higher prediction capability as compared to RSM. The relative importance of the variables on the physical properties were also determined by using connection weight approach in ANN. It was found that solution concentration showed the highest influence on all three physical properties.

  11. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of dental composites by an optical method.

    PubMed

    Weig, K M; Magalhães Filho, T R; Costa Neto, C A; Costa, M F

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes an alternative methodology for evaluating polymerization shrinkage of dental composites using an advanced video extensometer (AVE) system. This equipment measures the displacement between two points drawn on a tooth's wall without requiring physical contact with the tooth. By doing so, the polymerization process was monitored by the cusp deflection. This technique was used in human and bovine teeth, where the cavities were prepared under controlled conditions so that the volume of the composite used was the same in both types of teeth. After the cavity preparation, the specimens were acid etched, washed and dried, and then the adhesive was applied and polymerized. The composite was then inserted into the cavity. Polymerization was performed with two different light polymerizing units (LD Max and Optilight Max - Gnatus do Brasil), and the displacement curve of the tooth cusp was recorded for a period of 400 s. After a statistical analysis, it was concluded that the technique was capable of evaluating shrinkage by the deflection from the cusps and that the human and bovine teeth do not react in a similar manner towards the polymerization shrinkage of composites.

  12. Thoracoscopic CO laser coagulation shrinkage of blebs in treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensaki, Koji; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Takagi, Keigo; Tanaka, Susumu; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1992-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a common disease in young people. Operative intervention has been done in most of the recurrent cases. Recently thoracoscopic treatment has been tested as a less invasive treatment modarity. We adopted carbon monoxide (CO) laser for thoracoscopic treatment of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. CO laser (wavelength; 5.4 micrometers ) could be delivered by chalcogenide glass (As - S) covered with a teflon sheath and ZnSe fiber tip. The sterilized flexible bronchoscope was inserted through the thoracoscopic outer sheath under local anesthesia. Shrinkage of blebs was obtained by non-contact method of CO laser irradiation. Laser power at the tip was 2.5 - 5 W and irradiation duration was 0.5 s each. Excellent shrinkage of bleb and bulla could be obtained by CO laser without perforation complication. Advantages of CO laser as a thoracoscopic treatment were: (1) capability of fiber delivery (flexible thoracoscopy was easy to operate and clear to visualize the blebs which were frequently found at the apical portion of the lung, and (2) shallow extinction length (good shrinkage of blebs, low risk of perforation, and thin layer of carbonization). In conclusion, our new technique of thoracoscopic CO laser irradiation was found to be a safe and effective treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  13. Large-proportional shrunken bio-replication of shark skin based on UV-curing shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Che, Da; Zhang, Xin; Yue, Yue; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-01-01

    The shark skin effect has attracted worldwide attention because of its superior drag reduction. As the product of natural selection, the maximum drag reduction of shark skin is found in its normal living environment. Large-proportional shrinkage of shark skin morphology is greatly anticipated for its adaptation to faster fluid flow. One novel approach, large-proportional shrunken bio-replication, is proposed as a method to adjust the optimal drag reduction region of shark skin based on the shrinkage of UV-cured material. The shark skin is taken as a replica template to allow large-proportional shrinking in the drag reduction morphology by taking advantage of the shrinkage of UV-curable material. The accuracy of the large-proportional shrunken bio-replication approach is verified by a comparison between original and shrunken bio-replicated shark skin, which shows that the shrinking ratio can reach 23% and the bio-replication accuracy is higher than 95%. In addition, the translation of the optimum drag reduction peak of natural surface function to various applications and environments is proved by drag reduction experiments.

  14. Depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites. Depth of cure and flexural properties were determined according to ISO 4049, and volumetric shrinkage was measured using a dilatometer. The depths of cure of giomers were significantly lower than those of resin composites, regardless of photo polymerization times. No difference in flexural strength and modulus was found among either high or low viscosity bulk fill materials. Volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill resin composites was significantly less than low and high viscosity giomers. Depth of cure of both low and high viscosity bulk-fill materials is time dependent. Flexural strength and modulus of high viscosity or low viscosity bulk-fill giomer or resin composite materials are not different for their respective category. Resin composites exhibited less polymerization shrinkage than giomers.

  15. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, I.; Teramoto, A.

    2013-08-15

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections.

  16. Electron beam-assisted healing of nanopores in magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Wu, Shujing; Jia, Shuangfeng; Cao, Ajing; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Nanopore-based sensing has emerged as a promising candidate for affordable and powerful DNA sequencing technologies. Herein, we demonstrate that nanopores can be successfully fabricated in Mg alloys via focused electron beam (e-beam) technology. Employing in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, we obtained unambiguous evidence that layer-by-layer growth of atomic planes at the nanopore periphery occurs when the e-beam is spread out, leading to the shrinkage and eventual disappearance of nanopores. The proposed healing process was attributed to the e-beam-induced anisotropic diffusion of Mg atoms in the vicinity of nanopore edges. A plausible diffusion mechanism that describes the observed phenomena is discussed. Our results constitute the first experimental investigation of nanopores in Mg alloys. Direct evidence of the healing process has advanced our fundamental understanding of surface science, which is of great practical importance for many technological applications, including thin film deposition and surface nanopatterning. PMID:23719630

  17. Partial shrinkage of venous tissues near valves using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura; Milleret, René; Pichot, Olivier; Lacoste, François; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    The cross-section of a vein can be reduced by exposing the collagen of the vein wall to high temperature (85° C) for a few seconds. Partial shrinkage of the vein is appropriate for correcting deformations of valvular tissues that can cause the abnormal blood reflux which is the main cause of varicose veins and Superficial Venous Insufficiency. Due to its suitability for inducing localized heating, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a good method for correcting valvular tissue. In the present study, the feasibility of using HIFU for inducing partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein wall is demonstrated. The position and size of valvular deformations are well suited to being heated and, consequently, reduced with HIFU. The resulting shrinkage of deformations should restore normal function of the valve. An experimental protocol was used in which several in vitro segments of human saphenous vein were exposed with a monochromatic signal produced by a real-time imaging HIFU probe. The probe has a focal length of 45 mm, a diameter of 52.5 mm and operates at 3 MHz. Ultrasonic imaging, obtained with an 8-MHz 128-element linear array placed at the centre of the HIFU probe, was used to target the vein. The segment was inserted in a porcine muscle sample, and both were placed into a PVC cylinder. Individual sonications of the vein wall were performed for acoustic power values ranging between 8.75 and 35 W at a constant sonication duration of 5 s. Different durations ranging between 3 and 7 s at constant power were also tested. Finally, a long duration of 18 s was tested while the focal point was displaced along the vein wall at a speed of 0.5 mm/s. Results showed that shrinkage of the vein wall was observed using echographic and macroscopic analysis. In particular, the vein diameter was reduced by 15% for a sonication-duration of 18 s with continuous displacement of the focal point. Results showed that HIFU is suitable for partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein and

  18. The histological analysis of the anterior cruciate ligament of canine after radiofrequency shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Ma, W-P; Yuan, Z-F; Li, J-M; Li, W-P; Wang, D-W; Xin, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) shrinkage has been widely conducted in clinical practice and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) laxity is regarded as one of the indications. However, basic researches regarding the postoperative histological changes were still insufficient. The study aimed to investigate postoperative histological changes of different areas of ACL for further identifying the optimal area for RF shrinkage. A total of 29 healthy canine (16.5 ± 2.2 kg, 4.1 ± 0.7 years) were recruited, 24 of which were randomly divided into group A and group B. The epiphyseal arrest was confirmed by X-ray examination in all animals. On one canine, an ACL's vascular perfusion model was established by the ink-perfusion method to observe the blood supply of the ACL. The mid-portion of ACL was conducted by RF in group A while the amph-portions of ACL were conducted in group B. Two legs of each canine were sub-divided into fixation group (group A1 and B1) and non-fixation group (group A2 and B2). 8 ACLs were separated from the rest 4 canine. 2 ACLs were sent for the histological examination after RF shrinkage and the rest 6 ACLs were served as blank controls. Masson staining and hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) staining were applied to observe the features of inner fibrous changes of ACL, cell count and vascular density. According to the Masson staining, collagenous tissues were observed in area after RF shrinkage, which was more evident among group B1 than the others. The cellar density in both group A and B was found lower at 12 weeks postoperatively than that at 6 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.05). In addition, the cellar density in B1 group was found higher than that in A1 group at both 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.05). The density of subsynovial vessel in B1 group was found higher than that in A1 group at 6 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.05) and the density of subsynovial vessel in both A1 and B1 groups was found lower at 12 postoperatively weeks than that at 6 weeks

  19. Influence of ceramic thickness and curing mode on the polymerization shrinkage kinetics of dual-cured resin cements.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Bog; An, Woong; Chang, Juhea; Um, Chung Moon

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how ceramic disc thickness and curing mode (light or chemical) affects the polymerization shrinkage of dual-cured resin cements and to evaluate the effect of the ceramic discs on the curing speed of the cements during light exposure. Six commercial resin cements, RelyX ARC, Bistite II, Duolink, Panavia F, Variolink II and Choice were used. Filler weight contents were determined by the ash method. Four ceramic discs with thicknesses of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4mm, respectively, were made. The attenuation of light intensity due to the ceramic discs was measured using a radiometer. The polymerization shrinkage kinetics of the resin cements by chemical or light cure through the different ceramic discs was measured using a bonded-disc method. There were differences in filler content among brands of resin cement. The polymerization shrinkage without ceramic disc was 2.61-4.59% by chemical cure and 2.93-4.66% by light cure. The polymerization shrinkage of RelyX ARC and Panavia F by chemical cure was statistically lower than by light cure (p<0.05). Polymerization shrinkage and filler weight were inversely related (R=-0.965). Both the transmitted light intensity and polymerization shrinkage decreased with increasing thickness of ceramic discs (p<0.05). The time to reach the maximum shrinkage rate of the resin cements increased with increasing ceramic thickness. The cure speed by light cure was 15-322 times faster than by chemical cure. The polymerization shrinkage kinetics of dual-cured resin cements significantly differed between brands under various curing conditions. Clinicians should be aware of the setting characteristics of the cements, so they can choose the optimal materials for different clinical situations.

  20. Mesh shrinkage depends on mesh properties and anchoring device: an experimental long-term study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Harsløf, S; Zinther, N; Harsløf, T; Danielsen, C; Wara, P; Friis-Andersen, H

    2017-02-01

    The choice of mesh and anchoring device in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is controversial. Clinically important long-term properties of mesh and anchoring device such as mesh shrinkage have been sparsely investigated. Furthermore, the effect of various anchoring devices on mesh properties has never been examined. In 20 sheep, using laparoscopy, we inserted three PhysiomeshTM (large pore, lightweight) and three VentralightTMST (small pore, mediumweight), anchored with ProTackTM, SecurestrapTM or GlubranTM, respectively. After 6 and 12 months, 10 sheep at each time-point, we euthanized the animals, harvested the meshes with fascia, and measured the exact size and area of the mesh, expressing mesh shrinkage as a percentage of the initial area. The shrinkage of PhysiomeshTM was 35.7 %, 23.8 % and 17.7 % when anchored with ProtackTM, GlubranTM or SecurestrapTM, respectively. Shrinkage with ProtackTM was significantly higher than with either GlubranTM or SecurestrapTM, respectively (p<0.01 and p<0.01). The shrinkage of VentralightTMST was 19.3 %, 22.2 % and 19.6 % when anchored with ProtackTM, GlubranTM and SecurestrapTM, respectively (p>0.05 for all pairwise comparisons). Overall shrinkage of PhysiomeshTM anchored with ProtackTM was significantly higher for all comparisons (p<0.01). Our results suggest that mesh shrinkage in sheep takes place within 6 months after implantation. A significant interaction between mesh and type of anchoring indicates that shrinkage may depend on both mesh properties and anchoring device. The results of the current study imply that the combined effect of mesh and anchoring device should be evaluated in future studies.

  1. Hyperhomocysteinemia as a new risk factor for brain shrinkage in patients with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bleich, S; Bandelow, B; Javaheripour, K; Müller, A; Degner, D; Wilhelm, J; Havemann-Reinecke, U; Sperling, W; Rüther, E; Kornhuber, J

    2003-01-02

    Chronic alcohol consumption can induce brain atrophy, whereby the exact mechanism of brain damage in alcoholics remains unknown. There is evidence that chronic alcoholism is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neuronal cells to excitotoxic and oxidative injury in vitro and in vivo. The present volumetric magnetic resonance imaging study included 52 chronic alcoholics and 30 non-drinking healthy controls. Patients were active drinkers and had an established diagnosis of alcohol dependence. We investigated the influence of different variables on the hippocampal volume of patients suffering from chronic alcoholism. We observed that pathological raised levels of plasma homocysteine showed the most significant correlation to hippocampal volume reduction (P<0.001, multiple regression analysis). Raised plasma levels of homocysteine are associated with hippocampal (brain) atrophy in alcoholism.

  2. 1-D diffusion based solidification model with volumetric expansion and shrinkage effect: A semi-analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monde, Aniket D.; Chakraborty, Prodyut R.

    2017-10-01

    Volumetric expansion and shrinkage due to different densities of solid and liquid phases are common phenomena during solidification process. Simple analytical models addressing effect of volumetric expansion/shrinkage during solidification are rarely found. The few existing 1-D solidification models are valid only for semi-infinite domain with limitations of their application for finite domain size. The focus of the present work is to develop a 1-D semi-analytical solidification model addressing effects of volumetric expansion/shrinkage in a finite domain. The proposed semi-analytical scheme involves finding simultaneous solution of transient 1-D heat diffusion equations at solid and liquid domain coupled at the interface by Stefan condition. The change of the total domain length during solidification due to volumetric expansion/shrinkage is addressed by using mass conservation. For validation of the proposed model, solidification of water in a finite domain is studied without considering volumetric expansion/shrinkage effect and results are compared with those obtained from existing enthalpy updating based numerical model. After validation, case studies pertaining to volumetric expansion and shrinkage are performed considering solidification of water and paraffin respectively and physically consistent results are obtained. The study is relevant for understanding unidirectional crystal growth under the effect of controlled boundary condition.

  3. Capturing heterogeneous nucleation of nanoscale pits and subsequent crystal shrinkage during Ostwald ripening of a metal phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Young-Min; Choi, Si-Young; Kim, Jin-Gyu

    2015-01-27

    It has been generally accepted that crystal shrinkage during Ostwald ripening can be understood simply as a reverse process of crystal growth, and as a result, little attention has been paid to shrinkage behavior. The entire microstructure of polycrystalline materials, however, forms as a consequence of both growing and shrinking crystals. Thus, scrutiny of shrinking characteristics in addition to growth aspects is essential for a complete understanding of the evolution of microstructure during Ostwald ripening. By capturing real-time in situ high-resolution electron micrographs at high temperature, we herein demonstrate the shrinkage behavior of nanocrystals embedded in a solid crystalline matrix during the ripening process of a metal phosphate. Unlike typical crystal growth behavior based on two-dimensional homogeneous nucleation, heterogeneous types of nucleation with nanoscale pits at solid-solid interfaces (or crystal edges) are observed to dominantly occur during shrinkage of the crystals. The findings of this study suggest that crystal shrinkage proceeds with a lower activation energy barrier than that of crystal growth, although both crystal growth and shrinkage take place at the same time during Ostwald ripening.

  4. Development of Creep Resistant Mg-Al-Sr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekguleryuz, Mihriban O.; Baril, Eric

    There have been attempts since in the 70's to develop creep resistant magnesium diecasting alloys for automotive applications such as automatic-transmission case and engine components. The earliest die casting alloys developed as a result of these activities were the Mg-Al- RE and Mg-Al-Si systems (AE and AS alloys). The shortcomings of these two alloy systems related to high cost or borderline properties have led to renewed activity in the 90's in the development of magnesium alloys with improved elevaied-temperature properties. This paper presents the development of a new family of creep-resistant Mg alloys based on the Mg-Al-Sr system. Creep resistance, the tensile yield strength and the bolt-load-retention of these alloys at 150°C and 175°C show improvement over Mg-Al-RE and Mg-Al-Si system. The microstructure of the alloys is characterized by Al-Sr-(Mg) containing intermetallic second phases. The absence of the Mg17Al12 phase in the microstructure, either creep-induced or as-cast, is one of the factors that contribute to improved creep-resistance of these alloys over the Mg-Al based diecasting alloys. Furthermore, the alloys exhibit better salt-spray corrosion resistance (0.09-0.15mg/cm2/day) than other commercial magnesium diecasting alloys such as AM60B, AS41, AE42 and the aluminum diecasting alloy A380.

  5. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia. PMID:25248834

  6. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-12-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia.

  7. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  8. Striatal Iron Content Predicts Its Shrinkage and Changes in Verbal Working Memory after Two Years in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, E. Mark; Raz, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of non-heme iron in the brain has been proposed as a harbinger of neural and cognitive decline in aging and neurodegenerative disease, but support for this proposal has been drawn from cross-sectional studies, which do not provide valid estimates of change. Here, we present longitudinal evidence of subcortical iron accumulation in healthy human adults (age 19–77 at baseline). We used R2* relaxometry to estimate regional iron content twice within a 2 year period, measured volumes of the striatum and the hippocampus by manual segmentation, and assessed cognitive performance by working memory tasks. Two-year change and individual differences in the change of regional volumes, regional iron content, and working memory were examined by latent change score models while taking into account the age at baseline and metabolic risk indicators. Over the examined period, volume reduction occurred in the caudate nucleus and hippocampus, but iron content increased only in the striatum, where it explained shrinkage. Higher iron content in the caudate nucleus at baseline predicted lesser improvement in working memory after repeat testing. Although advanced age and elevated metabolic syndrome risk were associated with greater iron content in the putamen at baseline, neither age nor metabolic risk influenced change in any variable. Thus, longitudinal evidence supports the notion that accumulation of subcortical iron is a risk factor for neural and cognitive decline in normal aging. PMID:25926451

  9. Atomic displacement in the CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy - A scaling factor to predict solid solution strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Yuge, Koretaka; Tanaka, Katsushi; Inui, Haruyuki; George, Easo P.

    2016-12-01

    Although metals strengthened by alloying have been used for millennia, models to quantify solid solution strengthening (SSS) were first proposed scarcely seventy years ago. Early models could predict the strengths of only simple alloys such as dilute binaries and not those of compositionally complex alloys because of the difficulty of calculating dislocation-solute interaction energies. Recently, models and theories of SSS have been proposed to tackle complex high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here we show that the strength at 0 K of a prototypical HEA, CrMnFeCoNi, can be scaled and predicted using the root-mean-square atomic displacement, which can be deduced from X-ray diffraction and first-principles calculations as the isotropic atomic displacement parameter, that is, the average displacements of the constituent atoms from regular lattice positions. We show that our approach can be applied successfully to rationalize SSS in FeCoNi, MnFeCoNi, MnCoNi, MnFeNi, CrCoNi, CrFeCoNi, and CrMnCoNi, which are all medium-entropy subsets of the CrMnFeCoNi HEA.

  10. A geometric atlas to predict lung tumor shrinkage for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Rimner, Andreas; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Kuo, Licheng; Apte, Aditya; Lockney, Natalie; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2017-02-01

    To develop a geometric atlas that can predict tumor shrinkage and guide treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer. To evaluate the impact of the shrinkage atlas on the ability of tumor dose escalation. The creation of a geometric atlas included twelve patients with lung cancer who underwent both planning CT and weekly CBCT for radiotherapy planning and delivery. The shrinkage pattern from the original pretreatment to the residual posttreatment tumor was modeled using a principal component analysis, and used for predicting the spatial distribution of the residual tumor. A predictive map was generated by unifying predictions from each individual patient in the atlas, followed by correction for the tumor’s surrounding tissue distribution. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the predictive model for classifying voxels inside the original gross tumor volume were evaluated. In addition, a retrospective study of predictive treatment planning (PTP) escalated dose to the predicted residual tumor while maintaining the same level of predicted complication rates for a clinical plan delivering uniform dose to the entire tumor. The effect of uncertainty on the predictive model’s ability to escalate dose was also evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the predictive model were 0.73, 0.76, and 0.74, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for voxel classification was 0.87. The Dice coefficient and mean surface distance between the predicted and actual residual tumor averaged 0.75, and 1.6 mm, respectively. The PTP approach allowed elevation of PTV D95 and mean dose to the actual residual tumor by 6.5 Gy and 10.4 Gy, respectively, relative to the clinical uniform dose approach. A geometric atlas can provide useful information on the distribution of resistant tumors and effectively guide dose escalation to the tumor without compromising the organs at risk complications. The atlas can be further refined by using

  11. A geometric atlas to predict lung tumor shrinkage for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Rimner, Andreas; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Kuo, Licheng; Apte, Aditya; Lockney, Natalie; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig; Deasy, Joseph O

    2017-01-10

    To develop a geometric atlas that can predict tumor shrinkage and guide treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer. To evaluate the impact of the shrinkage atlas on the ability of tumor dose escalation. The creation of a geometric atlas included twelve patients with lung cancer who underwent both planning CT and weekly CBCT for radiotherapy planning and delivery. The shrinkage pattern from the original pretreatment to the residual posttreatment tumor was modeled using a principal component analysis, and used for predicting the spatial distribution of the residual tumor. A predictive map was generated by unifying predictions from each individual patient in the atlas, followed by correction for the tumor's surrounding tissue distribution. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the predictive model for classifying voxels inside the original gross tumor volume were evaluated. In addition, a retrospective study of predictive treatment planning (PTP) escalated dose to the predicted residual tumor while maintaining the same level of predicted complication rates for a clinical plan delivering uniform dose to the entire tumor. The effect of uncertainty on the predictive model's ability to escalate dose was also evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the predictive model were 0.73, 0.76, and 0.74, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for voxel classification was 0.87. The Dice coefficient and mean surface distance between the predicted and actual residual tumor averaged 0.75, and 1.6 mm, respectively. The PTP approach allowed elevation of PTV D95 and mean dose to the actual residual tumor by 6.5 Gy and 10.4 Gy, respectively, relative to the clinical uniform dose approach. A geometric atlas can provide useful information on the distribution of resistant tumors and effectively guide dose escalation to the tumor without compromising the organs at risk complications. The atlas can be further refined by using more

  12. An efficient reconstruction method for bioluminescence tomography based on two-step iterative shrinkage approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Jia, Kebin; Tian, Jie; Han, Dong; Liu, Xueyan; Wu, Ping; Feng, Jinchao; Yang, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Among many molecular imaging modalities, Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an important optical molecular imaging modality. Due to its unique advantages in specificity, sensitivity, cost-effectiveness and low background noise, BLT is widely studied for live small animal imaging. Since only the photon distribution over the surface is measurable and the photo propagation with biological tissue is highly diffusive, BLT is often an ill-posed problem and may bear multiple solutions and aberrant reconstruction in the presence of measurement noise and optical parameter mismatches. For many BLT practical applications, such as early detection of tumors, the volumes of the light sources are very small compared with the whole body. Therefore, the L1-norm sparsity regularization has been used to take advantage of the sparsity prior knowledge and alleviate the ill-posedness of the problem. Iterative shrinkage (IST) algorithm is an important research achievement in a field of compressed sensing and widely applied in sparse signal reconstruction. However, the convergence rate of IST algorithm depends heavily on the linear operator. When the problem is ill-posed, it becomes very slow. In this paper, we present a sparsity regularization reconstruction method for BLT based on the two-step iterated shrinkage approach. By employing Two-step strategy of iterative reweighted shrinkage (IRS) to improve IST, the proposed method shows faster convergence rate and better adaptability for BLT. The simulation experiments with mouse atlas were conducted to evaluate the performance of proposed method. By contrast, the proposed method can obtain the stable and comparable reconstruction solution with less number of iterations.

  13. Inclusion of biological knowledge in a Bayesian shrinkage model for joint estimation of SNP effects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Miguel; Thompson, John R; Weichenberger, Christian X; Thomas, Duncan C; Minelli, Cosetta

    2017-05-01

    With the aim of improving detection of novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genetic association studies, we propose a method of including prior biological information in a Bayesian shrinkage model that jointly estimates SNP effects. We assume that the SNP effects follow a normal distribution centered at zero with variance controlled by a shrinkage hyperparameter. We use biological information to define the amount of shrinkage applied on the SNP effects distribution, so that the effects of SNPs with more biological support are less shrunk toward zero, thus being more likely detected. The performance of the method was tested in a simulation study (1,000 datasets, 500 subjects with ∼200 SNPs in 10 linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks) using a continuous and a binary outcome. It was further tested in an empirical example on body mass index (continuous) and overweight (binary) in a dataset of 1,829 subjects and 2,614 SNPs from 30 blocks. Biological knowledge was retrieved using the bioinformatics tool Dintor, which queried various databases. The joint Bayesian model with inclusion of prior information outperformed the standard analysis: in the simulation study, the mean ranking of the true LD block was 2.8 for the Bayesian model versus 3.6 for the standard analysis of individual SNPs; in the empirical example, the mean ranking of the six true blocks was 8.5 versus 9.3 in the standard analysis. These results suggest that our method is more powerful than the standard analysis. We expect its performance to improve further as more biological information about SNPs becomes available. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Early daily trunk shrinkage is highly sensitive to water stress in nectarine trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Pastor, Alejandro; De la Rosa, Jose M.; Dodd, Ian C.; Conesa, María R.; Domingo, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity to water stress of different plant water status indicators was evaluated during two consecutive years in early nectarine trees grown in a semi-arid region. Measurements were made post-harvest and two irrigation treatments were applied: a control treatment (CTL), irrigated at 120% of crop evapotranspiration demand to achieve non-limiting water conditions, and a deficit irrigation treatment (DI), that applied around 37% less water than CTL during late postharvest. The plant water status indicators evaluated were midday stem water potential (Ψstem) and parameters derived from trunk diameter fluctuations (TDF): maximum daily shrinkage (MDS), trunk daily growth rate (TGR), early daily shrinkage measured between 0900 and 1200 h solar time (EDS), and late daily shrinkage (LDS) that occurred between 1200 h solar time and the moment that minimum trunk diameter was reached (typically 1600 h solar time). The most sensitive (highest ratio of signal intensity (SI) to noise) indicators to water stress were Ψstem together with EDS. The SI of EDS was greater than that of Ψstem, although with greater variability. EDS was a better indicator than MDS, with higher SI and similar variability. Although MDS was linearly related to Ψstem down to -1.5 MPa, thereafter MDS decreased with increasing water stress. In contrast, EDS was linearly related to Ψstem, although the slope of the regression decreased as the season progressed, as in the case of MDS. Further studies are needed to determine whether EDS is a sensitive indicator of water stress in a range of species.

  15. Seeing without the occipito-parietal cortex: Simultagnosia as a shrinkage of the attentional visual field.

    PubMed

    Michel, François; Henaff, Marie-Anne

    2004-01-01

    Following bi-parietal lesions patient AT showed a severe inability to relocate her attention within a visual field which perimetry proved to be near-normal. An experimental approach with tasks testing visuo-spatial attention demonstrated a shrinkage of A.T.'s attentional visual field. With her visual attention narrowed to a kind of functional tunnel vision, the patient exhibited simultanagnosia (Wolpert, 1924), a symptom previously described in 1909 by Balint under the label of Psychic paralysis of "Gaze". In striking contrast AT showed an efficient and effortless perception of complex natural scenes, which, according to recent work in normal subjects, necessitate few if any attentional resources.

  16. C-O-H-S magmatic fluid system in shrinkage bubbles of melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, P.; Frezzotti, M. L.; Hauri, E. H.; Aiuppa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Magmatic volatiles include multiple phases in the C-O-H-S system of shrinkage bubbles for which a conceptual model is still unclear during melt inclusion formation [1,2,3,4]. The present study aims to qualitatively explore the evolution of the volatile migration, during and after the formation of the shrinkage bubble in melt inclusions trapped by olivines from Holocene to present at San Cristóbal volcano (Nicaragua), Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). Combined scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy observations allow to define the mineral-fluid phases inside typical shrinkage bubbles at ambient temperature. The existence of residual liquid water is demonstrated in the shrinkage bubbles of naturally quenched melt inclusion and this water could represents the principal agent for chemical reactions with other dissolved ionic species (SO42-, CO32-, etc.) and major elements (Mg, Fe, Cu, etc.) [4,5]. With the objective of following the cooling story of the bubble-inclusion system, the new methodological approach here estimate the interval of equilibrium temperatures for each SEM-Raman identified mineral phase (carbonates, hydrous carbonates, sulfurs, sulfates, etc.). Finally, two distinct mechanisms are proposed to describe the evolution of this heterogeneous fluid system in bubble samples at San Cristóbal which imply a close re-examination for similar volcanoes in subduction zone settings: (1) bubbles are already contracted and filled by volatiles by diffusion processes from the glass and leading to a C-O-H-S fluid-glass reaction enriched in Mg-Fe-Cu elements (2) bubbles are formed by oversaturation of the volatiles from the magma which is producing an immiscible metal-rich fluid. [1]Moore et al. (2015). Am. Mineral. 100, 806-823 [2]Wallace et al. (2015). Am. Mineral. 100, 787-794 [3]Lowenstern (2015). Am. Mineral. 100, 672-673 [4]Esposito, et al. (2016). Am. Mineral. 101, 1691-1708 [5]Kamenetsky et al. (2001). Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 184, 685-702

  17. The Future of Alumina-Forming Alloys: Challenges and Applications for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Alumina-forming alloys have been studied for over 50 years and are now needed for high efficiency power generation applications operating at higher temperatures. Especially in the presence of water vapor, alumina-forming alloys outperform conventional chromia-forming alloys above 1000 C. However, alloy mechanical behavior is a significant issue and alumina-forming alloy development has been limited. The opportunity for alloy development is discussed as well as the factors that limit oxidation resistance, including alloy thermal expansion and optimizing reactive element additions. Finally, lifetime modeling is discussed for thick section components together with the need to address performance in more complex environments.

  18. Sintering and Cold Swaging of Tungsten Heavy Alloys Prepared from Various Grades of W Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, S.

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, sintering and cold swaging of 92.5W-5.25Ni-2.25Fe heavy alloys prepared from various grades of W powder were investigated. The mean particle sizes of the W powder grades were 3.4 µm, 10.5 µm, and 28.0 µm. It was observed that linear shrinkage decreased with increasing W particle size. The sintering behavior of the alloys was discussed in terms of liquid capillarity and W particle size. The alloy prepared from the 28.0-µm grade W powder exhibited incomplete densification. This alloy could not be swaged because of the poor mechanical properties. The alloys of the other grades were fully densified. They exhibited better ductility and swageability. The alloy of the 10.5-µm grade W powder had good mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength 1300 MPa, hardness 38 HRC after 10% cold swaging) that were equivalent to those of the alloy of the fine-grade W powder (3.4 µm).

  19. Sintering and Cold Swaging of Tungsten Heavy Alloys Prepared from Various Grades of W Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, S.

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, sintering and cold swaging of 92.5W-5.25Ni-2.25Fe heavy alloys prepared from various grades of W powder were investigated. The mean particle sizes of the W powder grades were 3.4 µm, 10.5 µm, and 28.0 µm. It was observed that linear shrinkage decreased with increasing W particle size. The sintering behavior of the alloys was discussed in terms of liquid capillarity and W particle size. The alloy prepared from the 28.0-µm grade W powder exhibited incomplete densification. This alloy could not be swaged because of the poor mechanical properties. The alloys of the other grades were fully densified. They exhibited better ductility and swageability. The alloy of the 10.5-µm grade W powder had good mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength 1300 MPa, hardness 38 HRC after 10% cold swaging) that were equivalent to those of the alloy of the fine-grade W powder (3.4 µm).

  20. Possible future lakes resulting from continued glacier shrinkage in the Aosta Valley Region (Western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, Cristina; Machguth, Horst; Huggel, Christian; Godio, Alberto; Perotti, Luigi; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Aosta Valley (NW-Alps, Italy) is the region with the largest glaciarized area of Italy (133.73 km2). Like the other alpine regions it has shown a significant glacier retreat starting from the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1850 AD), by losing about 60% of its glaciarized area. As a direct consequence of glacier shrinkage, within glacially-sculpted landscapes, glacier-bed overdeepenings become exposed, offering suitable conditions for glacier lakes formation. In the Aosta Valley region, about 200 glacier lakes have been recognized in different time periods within LIA maximum extent boundaries, mainly dammed by bedrock landforms. With respect to human activities, glacier lakes represent both opportunities (e.g. Miage lake for tourism) and risks (e.g. outburst flood of the Gran Croux lake above Cogne in August 2016) in such a densely populated and developed region. The objective of this contribution is to assess locations of possible future glacier lakes in the Aosta Valley by using the GlabTop2 model (Glacier Bed Topography model version 2). Understanding where future lakes will appear is of fundamental importance for the identification of potential hazards and the interpretation of conditioning factors and dynamics. We first assessed ice thickness and consequently glacier bed topography over large glaciated areas of the region, by using both glaciers outlines related to 1999 (provided by the GlaRiskAlp project) and the regional DEM of 1990 (provided by the Aosta Valley Region) as input data. We performed several runs by varying different input parameters (e,g.: pixel size and basal shear stress). Then we compared modelled results on selected test glaciers (Rutor and Grand Etrèt) with available GPR data. As a validation, we also carried out a GPR survey during summer 2016 on the central area of Indren Glacier (Monte Rosa massif) where GlabTop2 shows the presence of a possible subglacial overdeepening morphology. We found that ice thickness and consequently the

  1. Superconductivity in Metals and Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LEAD(METAL), LIQUEFIED GASES, LOW TEMPERATURE RESEARCH, METAL FILMS, METALLIC SOAPS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, PHASE STUDIES, RESISTANCE (ELECTRICAL), SAMARIUM...SYNTHESIS, TANTALUM ALLOYS, TIN, TIN ALLOYS, TRANSITION TEMPERATURE, VANADIUM ALLOYS

  2. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-01-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  3. Multiple imputation of missing covariates in NONMEM and evaluation of the method's sensitivity to η-shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Åsa M; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-10-01

    Multiple imputation (MI) is an approach widely used in statistical analysis of incomplete data. However, its application to missing data problems in nonlinear mixed-effects modelling is limited. The objective was to implement a four-step MI method for handling missing covariate data in NONMEM and to evaluate the method's sensitivity to η-shrinkage. Four steps were needed; (1) estimation of empirical Bayes estimates (EBEs) using a base model without the partly missing covariate, (2) a regression model for the covariate values given the EBEs from subjects with covariate information, (3) imputation of covariates using the regression model and (4) estimation of the population model. Steps (3) and (4) were repeated several times. The procedure was automated in PsN and is now available as the mimp functionality ( http://psn.sourceforge.net/ ). The method's sensitivity to shrinkage in EBEs was evaluated in a simulation study where the covariate was missing according to a missing at random type of missing data mechanism. The η-shrinkage was increased in steps from 4.5 to 54%. Two hundred datasets were simulated and analysed for each scenario. When shrinkage was low the MI method gave unbiased and precise estimates of all population parameters. With increased shrinkage the estimates became less precise but remained unbiased.

  4. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yih-Dean; Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lin, Chun-Pin; Tseng, Wan-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the main causes of dental restoration failure. This study tried to conjugate two diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate resins in order to reduce polymerization shrinkage and increase the hardness of composite resins. Diisocyanate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and bisphenol A dimethacrylate were reacted in different ratios to form urethane-modified new resin matrices, and then mixed with 50 wt.% silica fillers. The viscosities of matrices, polymerization shrinkage, surface hardness, and degrees of conversion of experimental composite resins were then evaluated and compared with a non-modified control group. The viscosities of resin matrices increased with increasing diisocyanate side chain density. Polymerization shrinkage and degree of conversion, however, decreased with increasing diisocyanate side chain density. The surface hardness of all diisocyanate-modified groups was equal to or significantly higher than that of the control group. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Shrinkage estimation of the genomic relationship matrix can improve genomic estimated breeding values in the training set.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dominik; Technow, Frank; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated several methods for computing shrinkage estimates of the genomic relationship matrix and demonstrated their potential to enhance the reliability of genomic estimated breeding values of training set individuals. In genomic prediction in plant breeding, the training set constitutes a large fraction of the total number of genotypes assayed and is itself subject to selection. The objective of our study was to investigate whether genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) of individuals in the training set can be enhanced by shrinkage estimation of the genomic relationship matrix. We simulated two different population types: a diversity panel of unrelated individuals and a biparental family of doubled haploid lines. For different training set sizes (50, 100, 200), number of markers (50, 100, 200, 500, 2,500) and heritabilities (0.25, 0.5, 0.75), shrinkage coefficients were computed by four different methods. Two of these methods are novel and based on measures of LD, the other two were previously described in the literature, one of which was extended by us. Our results showed that shrinkage estimation of the genomic relationship matrix can significantly improve the reliability of the GEBVs of training set individuals, especially for a low number of markers. We demonstrate that the number of markers is the primary determinant of the optimum shrinkage coefficient maximizing the reliability and we recommend methods eligible for routine usage in practical applications.

  6. Does work stress make you shorter? An ambulatory field study of daily work stressors, job control, and spinal shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Igic, Ivana; Ryser, Samuel; Elfering, Achim

    2013-10-01

    Body height decreases throughout the day due to fluid loss from the intervertebral disk. This study investigated whether spinal shrinkage was greater during workdays compared with nonwork days, whether daily work stressors were positively related to spinal shrinkage, and whether job control was negatively related to spinal shrinkage. In a consecutive 2-week ambulatory field study, including 39 office employees and 512 days of observation, spinal shrinkage was measured by a stadiometer, and calculated as body height in the morning minus body height in the evening. Physical activity was monitored throughout the 14 days by accelerometry. Daily work stressors, daily job control, biomechanical workload, and recreational activities after work were measured with daily surveys. Multilevel regression analyses showed that spinal disks shrank more during workdays than during nonwork days. After adjustment for sex, age, body weight, smoking status, biomechanical work strain, and time spent on physical and low-effort activities during the day, lower levels of daily job control significantly predicted increased spinal shrinkage. Findings add to knowledge on how work redesign that increases job control may possibly contribute to preserving intervertebral disk function and preventing occupational back pain.

  7. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  8. The effect of casting temperature on the fatigue properties of cast nickel aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gieseke, B.; Sikka, V.K.

    1991-01-01

    The results of high cycle fatigue tests at 650{degree}C on several cast Ni{sub 3}Al alloys are reported and compared to cast IN-713C. These alloys include IC-221M and several variations to the IC-221M composition. The effect of casting temperature is investigated using castings poured at three different temperatures spanning a 56{degree}C range. The results show that IC-221M cast at the highest temperature has the best fatigue strength, exceeding that for IN-713C. In these alloys, crack initiation occurs at shrinkage microporosity and the effect of casting temperature on porosity is related to the observed differences in fatigue lives. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A bootstrapping soft shrinkage approach for variable selection in chemical modeling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bai-Chuan; Yun, Yong-Huan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Yin, Yu-Long; Wang, Wei-Ting; Lu, Hong-Mei; Luo, Qian-Yi; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2016-02-18

    In this study, a new variable selection method called bootstrapping soft shrinkage (BOSS) method is developed. It is derived from the idea of weighted bootstrap sampling (WBS) and model population analysis (MPA). The weights of variables are determined based on the absolute values of regression coefficients. WBS is applied according to the weights to generate sub-models and MPA is used to analyze the sub-models to update weights for variables. The optimization procedure follows the rule of soft shrinkage, in which less important variables are not eliminated directly but are assigned smaller weights. The algorithm runs iteratively and terminates until the number of variables reaches one. The optimal variable set with the lowest root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV) is selected. The method was tested on three groups of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic datasets, i.e. corn datasets, diesel fuels datasets and soy datasets. Three high performing variable selection methods, i.e. Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE), competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) and genetic algorithm partial least squares (GA-PLS) are used for comparison. The results show that BOSS is promising with improved prediction performance. The Matlab codes for implementing BOSS are freely available on the website: http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/52770-boss.

  11. Influence of vertical holes on creep and shrinkage of railway prestressed concrete sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-09-01

    Railway prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) must successfully perform two critical duties: first, to carry wheel loads from the rails to the ground; and second, to secure rail gauge for dynamic safe movements of trains. The second duty is often fouled by inappropriate design of the time-dependent behaviors due to their creep, shrinkage and elastic shortening responses of the materials. In addition, the concrete sleepers are often modified on construction sites to fit in other systems such as cables, signalling gears, drainage pipes, etc. Accordingly, this study is the world first to investigate creep and shrinkage effects on the railway prestressed concrete sleepers with vertical holes. This paper will highlight constitutive models of concrete materials within the railway sleepers under different environmental conditions over time. It will present a comparative investigation using a variety of methods to evaluate shortening effects in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will improve material design, which is very critical to the durability of railway track components.

  12. Light-Curing Volumetric Shrinkage in Dimethacrylate-Based Dental Composites by Nanoindentation and PAL Study.

    PubMed

    Shpotyuk, Olha; Adamiak, Stanislaw; Bezvushko, Elvira; Cebulski, Jozef; Iskiv, Maryana; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Balitska, Valentina

    2017-12-01

    Light-curing volumetric shrinkage in dimethacrylate-based dental resin composites Dipol® is examined through comprehensive kinetics research employing nanoindentation measurements and nanoscale atomic-deficient study with lifetime spectroscopy of annihilating positrons. Photopolymerization kinetics determined through nanoindentation testing is shown to be described via single-exponential relaxation function with character time constants reaching respectively 15.0 and 18.7 s for nanohardness and elastic modulus. Atomic-deficient characteristics of composites are extracted from positron lifetime spectra parameterized employing unconstrained x3-term fitting. The tested photopolymerization kinetics can be adequately reflected in time-dependent changes observed in average positron lifetime (with 17.9 s time constant) and fractional free volume of positronium traps (with 18.6 s time constant). This correlation proves that fragmentation of free-volume positronium-trapping sites accompanied by partial positronium-to-positron traps conversion determines the light-curing volumetric shrinkage in the studied composites.

  13. Assessment and prediction of drying shrinkage cracking in bonded mortar overlays

    SciTech Connect

    Beushausen, Hans Chilwesa, Masuzyo

    2013-11-15

    Restrained drying shrinkage cracking was investigated on composite beams consisting of substrate concrete and bonded mortar overlays, and compared to the performance of the same mortars when subjected to the ring test. Stress development and cracking in the composite specimens were analytically modeled and predicted based on the measurement of relevant time-dependent material properties such as drying shrinkage, elastic modulus, tensile relaxation and tensile strength. Overlay cracking in the composite beams could be very well predicted with the analytical model. The ring test provided a useful qualitative comparison of the cracking performance of the mortars. The duration of curing was found to only have a minor influence on crack development. This was ascribed to the fact that prolonged curing has a beneficial effect on tensile strength at the onset of stress development, but is in the same time not beneficial to the values of tensile relaxation and elastic modulus. -- Highlights: •Parameter study on material characteristics influencing overlay cracking. •Analytical model gives good quantitative indication of overlay cracking. •Ring test presents good qualitative indication of overlay cracking. •Curing duration has little effect on overlay cracking.

  14. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  15. Characterization of a Low Shrinkage Dental Composite Containing Bismethylene Spiroorthocarbonate Expanding Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing; Liu, Wenjia; Hao, Zhichao; Wu, Xiangnan; Yin, Jian; Panjiyar, Anil; Liu, Xiaoqing; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel dental composite based on the unsaturated bismethylene spiroorthocarbonate expanding monomer 3,9-dimethylene-1,3,5,7-tetraoxa-spiro[5,5]undecane (BMSOC) and bisphenol-S-bis(3-meth acrylate-2-hydroxypropyl)ether (BisS-GMA) was prepared. CQ (camphorquinone) of 1 wt % and DMAEMA (2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) of 2 wt % were used in a photoinitiation system to initiate the copolymerization of the matrix resins. Distilled water contact angle measurements were performed for the wettability measurement. Degree of conversion, volumetric shrinkage, contraction stress and compressive strength were measured using Fourier Transformation Infrared-FTIR spectroscopy, the AccuVol and a universal testing machine, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the resin composites modified by bismethylene spiroorthocarbonate and BisS-GMA showed a low volumetric shrinkage at 1.25% and a higher contact angle. The lower contraction stress, higher degree of conversion and compressive strength of the novel dental composites were also observed. PMID:24518683

  16. Image denoising via fundamental anisotropic diffusion and wavelet shrinkage: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayraktar, Bulent; Analoui, Mostafa

    2004-05-01

    Noise removal faces a challenge: Keeping the image details. Resolving the dilemma of two purposes (smoothing and keeping image features in tact) working inadvertently of each other was an almost impossible task until anisotropic dif-fusion (AD) was formally introduced by Perona and Malik (PM). AD favors intra-region smoothing over inter-region in piecewise smooth images. Many authors regularized the original PM algorithm to overcome its drawbacks. We compared the performance of denoising using such 'fundamental' AD algorithms and one of the most powerful multiresolution tools available today, namely, wavelet shrinkage. The AD algorithms here are called 'fundamental' in the sense that the regularized versions center around the original PM algorithm with minor changes to the logic. The algorithms are tested with different noise types and levels. On top of the visual inspection, two mathematical metrics are used for performance comparison: Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and universal image quality index (UIQI). We conclude that some of the regu-larized versions of PM algorithm (AD) perform comparably with wavelet shrinkage denoising. This saves a lot of compu-tational power. With this conclusion, we applied the better-performing fundamental AD algorithms to a new imaging modality: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).

  17. Regression shrinkage and neural models in predicting the results of 400-metres hurdles races

    PubMed Central

    Iskra, J; Maszczyk, A; Nawrocka, M

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the application of regression shrinkage and artificial neural networks in predicting the results of 400-metres hurdles races. The regression models predict the results for suggested training loads in the selected three-month training period. The material of the research was based on training data of 21 Polish hurdlers from the Polish National Athletics Team Association. The athletes were characterized by a high level of performance. To assess the predictive ability of the constructed models a method of leave-one-out cross-validation was used. The analysis showed that the method generating the smallest prediction error was the LASSO regression extended by quadratic terms. The optimal model generated the prediction error of 0.59 s. Otherwise the optimal set of input variables (by reducing 8 of the 27 predictors) was defined. The results obtained justify the use of regression shrinkage in predicting sports outcomes. The resulting model can be used as a tool to assist the coach in planning training loads in a selected training period. PMID:28090147

  18. Prescription-drug-related risk in driving: comparing conventional and lasso shrinkage logistic regressions.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Marta; Adroher, Nuria Duran; Lagarde, Emmanuel; Thiessard, Frantz; Grandvalet, Yves; Contrand, Benjamin; Orriols, Ludivine

    2012-09-01

    Large data sets with many variables provide particular challenges when constructing analytic models. Lasso-related methods provide a useful tool, although one that remains unfamiliar to most epidemiologists. We illustrate the application of lasso methods in an analysis of the impact of prescribed drugs on the risk of a road traffic crash, using a large French nationwide database (PLoS Med 2010;7:e1000366). In the original case-control study, the authors analyzed each exposure separately. We use the lasso method, which can simultaneously perform estimation and variable selection in a single model. We compare point estimates and confidence intervals using (1) a separate logistic regression model for each drug with a Bonferroni correction and (2) lasso shrinkage logistic regression analysis. Shrinkage regression had little effect on (bias corrected) point estimates, but led to less conservative results, noticeably for drugs with moderate levels of exposure. Carbamates, carboxamide derivative and fatty acid derivative antiepileptics, drugs used in opioid dependence, and mineral supplements of potassium showed stronger associations. Lasso is a relevant method in the analysis of databases with large number of exposures and can be recommended as an alternative to conventional strategies.

  19. Shrinkage Estimators for a Composite Measure of Quality Conceptualized as a Formative Construct

    PubMed Central

    Shwartz, Michael; Peköz, Erol A; Christiansen, Cindy L; Burgess, James F; Berlowitz, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the value of shrinkage estimators when calculating a composite quality measure as the weighted average of a set of individual quality indicators. Data Sources Rates of 28 quality indicators (QIs) calculated from the minimum dataset from residents of 112 Veterans Health Administration nursing homes in fiscal years 2005–2008. Study Design We compared composite scores calculated from the 28 QIs using both observed rates and shrunken rates derived from a Bayesian multivariate normal-binomial model. Principal Findings Shrunken-rate composite scores, because they take into account unreliability of estimates from small samples and the correlation among QIs, have more intuitive appeal than observed-rate composite scores. Facilities can be profiled based on more policy-relevant measures than point estimates of composite scores, and interval estimates can be calculated without assuming the QIs are independent. Usually, shrunken-rate composite scores in 1 year are better able to predict the observed total number of QI events or the observed-rate composite scores in the following year than the initial year observed-rate composite scores. Conclusion Shrinkage estimators can be useful when a composite measure is conceptualized as a formative construct. PMID:22716650

  20. Effects of poison panel shrinkage and gaps on fuel storage rack reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W.A.; Mueller, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Fixed poison panels are used in spent fuel rack designs to increase enrichment limits and reduce cell spacing; therefore, assurances that the maximum rack reactivity will meet the design limit (0.95) throughout the lifetime of the racks depend on the continued effectiveness of the poison with time. Industry data have shown that poison panels will shrink under irradiated conditions. From recent data, however, poison panels have been found to have gaps spanning their width after relatively short operating periods. This paper presents results of studies showing the fuel rack reactivity changes associated with poison panel shrinkage and formation of gaps. The discovery of gaps in the fuel rack poison panels at an operating plant raises concerns regarding the effectiveness of the poison over the lifetime of the fuel racks. Studies performed to evaluate the effect of the poison panel shrinkage on reactivity show that reactivity changes from zero to several percent are possible depending on the initial panel size. Results of recent studies show that some gaps can be accommodated in the fuel rack poison panels at the fuel midplane without causing the fuel rack K{sub eff} limit to be exceeded. With worst-case assumptions concerning gap size and the number of panels affected, other actions will likely be required to show that the rack K{sub eff} design limit will not be exceeded.

  1. Photo-crosslinkable cyanoacrylate bioadhesive: shrinkage kinetics, dynamic mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of adhesives containing TMPTMA and POSS nanostructures as crosslinking agents.

    PubMed

    Ghasaban, S; Atai, M; Imani, M; Zandi, M; Shokrgozar, M-A

    2011-11-01

    The study investigates the photo-polymerization shrinkage behavior, dynamic mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of cyanoacrylate bioadhesives containing POSS nanostructures and TMPTMA as crosslinking agents. Adhesives containing 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (2-OCA) and different percentages of POSS nanostructures and TMPTMA as crosslinking agents were prepared. The 1-phenyl-1, 2-propanedione (PPD) was incorporated as photo-initiator into the adhesive in 1.5, 3, and 4 wt %. The shrinkage strain of the specimens was measured using bonded-disk technique. Shrinkage strain, shrinkage strain rate, maximum and time at maximum shrinkage strain rate were measured and compared. Mechanical properties of the adhesives were also studied using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Biocompatibility of the adhesives was examined by MTT method. The results showed that shrinkage strain increased with increasing the initiator concentration up to 3 wt % in POSS-containing and 1.5 wt % in TMPTMA-containing specimens and plateaued out at higher concentrations. By increasing the crosslinking agent, shrinkage strain, and shrinkage strain rate increased and the time at maximum shrinkage strain rate decreased. The study indicates that the incorporation of crosslinking agents into the cyanoacrylate adhesives resulted in improved mechanical properties. Preliminary MTT studies also revealed better biocompatibility profile for the adhesives containing crosslinking agents comparing to the neat specimens.

  2. Oxidation rates of some heat resistant alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.C.; Wilson, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Cyclic oxidation testing of several heat resistant alloys was carried out at 1,093 and 1,149 C for times up to 3,000 hours. The quantitative results, coupled with extensive service history for the established alloys, provide a useful guide to anticipated performance of newly developed grades. Maximum practical use temperature is to some extent a function of section size, thin sheet being more quickly depleted of elements used to form the protective scale. Metallurgical factors influencing oxidation rate include grain size as well as the alloying elements silicon, manganese, molybdenum and columbium. Some comparisons are made between laboratory results and service performance.

  3. Muscle activity patterns and spinal shrinkage in office workers using a sit-stand workstation versus a sit workstation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Cronin, Neil J; Pesola, Arto J; Finni, Taija

    2016-10-01

    Reducing sitting time by means of sit-stand workstations is an emerging trend, but further evidence is needed regarding their health benefits. This cross-sectional study compared work time muscle activity patterns and spinal shrinkage between office workers (aged 24-62, 58.3% female) who used either a sit-stand workstation (Sit-Stand group, n = 10) or a traditional sit workstation (Sit group, n = 14) for at least the past three months. During one typical workday, muscle inactivity and activity from quadriceps and hamstrings were monitored using electromyography shorts, and spinal shrinkage was measured using stadiometry before and after the workday. Compared with the Sit group, the Sit-Stand group had less muscle inactivity time (66.2 ± 17.1% vs. 80.9 ± 6.4%, p = 0.014) and more light muscle activity time (26.1 ± 12.3% vs. 14.9 ± 6.3%, p = 0.019) with no significant difference in spinal shrinkage (5.62 ± 2.75 mm vs. 6.11 ± 2.44 mm). This study provides evidence that working with sit-stand workstations can promote more light muscle activity time and less inactivity without negative effects on spinal shrinkage. Practitioner Summary: This cross-sectional study compared the effects of using a sit-stand workstation to a sit workstation on muscle activity patterns and spinal shrinkage in office workers. It provides evidence that working with a sit-stand workstation can promote more light muscle activity time and less inactivity without negative effects on spinal shrinkage.

  4. Effect of resin and photoinitiator on color, translucency and color stability of conventional and low-shrinkage model composites.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, Dragica; Dramićanin, Miroslav D; Lezaja, Maja; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Miletic, Vesna

    2016-02-01

    To study the effect of a low-shrinkage methacrylate monomer and monoacylphosphine oxide photoinitiator on color, translucency, and color stability of model resin-based composites (RBCs). Four micro-hybrid RBCs were prepared containing barium-glass fillers in bisphenol A-glycidyl-methacrylate (BisGMA) and triethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or urethane-based low-shrinkage monomer FIT-852 (FIT; Esstech Inc.) and TEGDMA matrix. Camphorquinone (CQ)/amine or Lucirin TPO were used as photoinitiators. Commercial low-shrinkage RBCs (Charisma Diamond, Heraeus Kulzer and N'Durance, Septodont) and conventional RBCs (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent and Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were used as controls. Color and translucency were measured using Thermo Scientific Evolution (Thermo Fisher Scientific) and SpectroShade™ Micro (MHT Optic Research) spectrophotometers. Color stability was evaluated after immersion in black tea (pure, with milk or lemon) and distilled water. Data were analyzed using analyses of variance with Tukey's post-test (α=0.05). Photoinitiators had no significant effect on baseline color. Initially whiter FIT-based RBCs showed greater staining in all staining solutions than BisGMA-based RBCs. TPO-containing RBCs showed better color stability than CQ-containing RBCs irrespective of the base monomer. Tea and tea with lemon induced greatest color changes. Adding milk to tea significantly reduced material staining. Urethane-based low-shrinkage monomer FIT and conventional BisGMA affected color, translucency and color stability of their respective RBCs. Despite being used in posterior teeth, low-shrinkage RBCs are expected to have favorable optical and esthetic properties. Manufacturers are urged to provide information on optical properties of monomers and monomer mixtures in their low-shrinkage RBCs to allow understanding of interaction with fillers and photoinitiators. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. Polymerization shrinkage and depth of cure of bulk-fill resin composites and highly filled flowable resin.

    PubMed

    Jang, J-H; Park, S-H; Hwang, I-N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization behavior and depth of cure (DOC) of recently introduced resin composites for posterior use: highly filled flowable composite and composites for bulk fill. A highly filled flowable (G-aenial Universal Flo [GUF]), two bulk-fill flowables (Surefil SDR Flow [SDR] and Venus Bulk fill [VBF]), and a bulk-fill nonflowable composite (Tetric N-Ceram Bulk fill [TBF]) were compared with two conventional composites (Tetric Flow [TF], Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). Linear polymerization shrinkage and polymerization shrinkage stress were each measured with custom-made devices. To evaluate DOC, the composite specimen was prepared using a mold with a hole of 4 mm depth and 4 mm internal diameter. The hole was bulk filled with each of the six composites and light cured for 20 seconds, followed by 24 hours of water storage. The surface hardness was measured on the top and the bottom using a Vickers microhardness (HV) indenter. The linear polymerization shrinkage of the composite specimens after photo-initiation decreased in the following order: TF and GUF > VBF > SDR > FS and TBF (p<0.05). The polymerization shrinkage stress of the six composite groups decreased in the following order: GUF > TF and VBF > SDR > FS and TBF (p<0.05). The mean bottom surface HV of SDR and VBF exceeded 80% of the top surface HV (HV-80%). However, the bottom of GUF and TBF failed to reach HV-80%. A highly filled flowable (GUF) revealed limitations in polymerization shrinkage and DOC. Bulk-fill flowables (SDR and VBF) were properly cured in 4-mm bulk, but they shrank more than the conventional nonflowable composite. A bulk-fill nonflowable (TBF) showed comparable shrinkage to the conventional nonflowable composite, but it was not sufficiently cured in the 4-mm bulk.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage of Two Low-Shrinkage Composites with a Conventional Resin Composite: an In Vitro Assessment.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Maryam; Tayefeh Davalloo, Reza; Darabi, Farideh; Karambin, Mahsa; Kazemi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage stress in composite restorations may lead to microleakage. Clinical methods such as using low-shrinkage composites have been suggested to overcome this problem; however, there are controversies about their efficiency in decreasing the microleakage. This in vitro study was conducted to compare the microleakage of two low-shrinkage resin composites with a conventional one. Fifty class V cavities of 2.5×3×2 mm (depth× length× width) were prepared in the buccal surfaces of intact bovine incisor teeth with the incisal margin on the enamel and gingival margin on the cementum. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups. In group 1, Clearfil APX (conventional) with SE Bond was used in 2 layers (Kuraray; Japan). In group 2, GC Kalore (low -shrinkage) with GC UniFil Bond was applied in one layer (GC Company). In group 3, the material of group 2 was applied in two layers. In group 4, FiltekP90 (low -shrinkage) with P90 System adhesive was applied in one layer (3M ESPE). In group 5, the materials of group 4 were applied in two layers. The samples were thermocycled and immersed in 0.5% fuchsin solution for 24h. The restorations were sectioned in buccolingual direction. Then they were evaluated for microleakage by using a stereomicroscope and scored as 0, 1, 2, and 3 and then Kruskal-Wallis test was used (p< 0.05). The groups were not significantly different regarding the microleakage in the coronal and cervical margins (p< 0.423 and p< 0.212, respectively); however, the Filtek P90 yielded the best results. In all groups, except group 5 (p= 0.018), the cervical margins had greater microleakage than the coronal margins. The results suggested that low-shrinkage resin composites may not reduce the marginal microleakage. The proper use of conventional resin composites may offer comparable clinical results.

  7. Effects of preheating and precooling on the hardness and shrinkage of a composite resin cured with QTH and LED.

    PubMed

    Osternack, F H; Caldas, D B M; Almeida, J B; Souza, E M; Mazur, R F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the hardness and shrinkage of a pre-cooled or preheated hybrid composite resin cured by a quartz-tungsten-halogen light (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) curing units. The temperature on the tip of the devices was also investigated. Specimens of Charisma resin composite were produced with a metal mold kept under 37°C. The syringes were submitted to 4°C, 23°C, and 60°C (n=20) before light-curing, which was carried out with the Optilux 501 VCL and Elipar FreeLight 2 units for 20 seconds. The specimens were kept under 37°C in a high humidity condition and darkness for 48 hours. The Knoop hardness test was carried out with a 50 gram-force (gf) load for 10 seconds, and the measurement of the shrinkage gap was carried out using an optical microscope. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and the Games-Howell test (α=0.05). The mean hardness of the groups were similar, irrespective of the temperatures (p>0.05). For 4°C and 60°C, the top surface light-cured by LED presented significantly reduced shrinkage when compared with the bottom and to both surfaces cured by QTH (p<0.05). It was concluded that the hardness was not affected by pre-cooling or preheating. However, polymerization shrinkage was slightly affected by different pre-polymerization temperatures. The QTH-curing generated greater shrinkage than LED-curing only when the composite was preheated. Different temperatures did not affect the composite hardness and shrinkage when cured by a LED curing unit.

  8. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  9. The microstructure of Portland cement paste and its relationship to drying shrinkage: A study of blended cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Rudolph Andrew, III

    1998-12-01

    The objective was to understand how the microstructure of cement paste influences its susceptibility to drying shrinkage. The strategy was to vary the microstructure via processing and relate the changes to the deformation behavior. There were many processing parameters to choose from that were capable of varying the microstructure, but one very effective way was through addition of mineral admixtures. Since the use of mineral admixtures also has the potential to address current economic, social, and environmental problems, achieving a better understanding of blended cement paste was an added benefit. Ground granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash, and silica fume were the mineral admixtures chosen for this study because they represent a wide range of reactivity. Blended cement pastes of various compositions and degrees of hydration were characterized. Calcium hydroxide, calcium silicate hydrate, pH, free water, and nitrogen surface area were the microstructural parameters chosen for analysis. Because calcium silicate hydrate is usually measured by indirect techniques which are not applicable to blended cements, a technique based on water adsorption was developed; results compared favorably with calculations from the Jennings-Tennis hydration model. The connectivity of the pore network was characterized using impedance spectroscopy. Drying shrinkage was analyzed on the macrolevel using bulk shrinkage measurements and the microstructural level using a deformation mapping technique. Several processing-microstructure-property relationships were developed. Mineral admixtures were found to significantly reduce the connectivity of the pore network and increase the nitrogen surface area of cement paste per gram of calcium silicate hydrate. The bulk drying shrinkage of blended cement pastes dried to 50% relative humidity was found to depend primarily on calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate content; shrinkage decreased with increasing amounts of calcium hydroxide

  10. Association of Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2) Genotype with Gray Matter Volume Shrinkage in Chronic Alcohol Users: Replication and Further Evaluation of an Addiction Gene Panel

    PubMed Central

    Gitik, Miri; Srivastava, Vibhuti; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduction in brain volume, especially gray matter volume, has been shown to be one of the many deleterious effects of prolonged alcohol consumption. High variance in the degree of gray matter tissue shrinkage among alcohol-dependent individuals and a previous neuroimaging genetics report suggest the involvement of environmental and/or genetic factors, such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). Identification of such underlying factors will help in the clinical management of alcohol dependence. Methods: We analyzed quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and genotype data from 103 alcohol users, including both light drinkers and treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. Genotyping was performed using a custom gene array that included genes selected from 8 pathways relevant to chronic alcohol-related brain volume loss. Results: We replicated a significant association of a functional SOD2 single nucleotide polymorphism with normalized gray matter volume, which had been reported previously in an independent smaller sample of alcohol-dependent individuals. The SOD2-related genetic protection was observed only at the cohort’s lower drinking range. Additional associations between normalized gray matter volume and other candidate genes such as alcohol dehydrogenase gene cluster (ADH), GCLC, NOS3, and SYT1 were observed across the entire sample but did not survive corrections for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: Converging independent evidence for a SOD2 gene association with gray matter volume shrinkage in chronic alcohol users suggests that SOD2 genetic variants predict differential brain volume loss mediated by free radicals. This study also provides the first catalog of genetic variations relevant to gray matter loss in chronic alcohol users. The identified gene-brain structure relationships are functionally pertinent and merit replication. PMID:27207918

  11. Association of Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2) Genotype with Gray Matter Volume Shrinkage in Chronic Alcohol Users: Replication and Further Evaluation of an Addiction Gene Panel.

    PubMed

    Gitik, Miri; Srivastava, Vibhuti; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2016-09-01

    Reduction in brain volume, especially gray matter volume, has been shown to be one of the many deleterious effects of prolonged alcohol consumption. High variance in the degree of gray matter tissue shrinkage among alcohol-dependent individuals and a previous neuroimaging genetics report suggest the involvement of environmental and/or genetic factors, such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). Identification of such underlying factors will help in the clinical management of alcohol dependence. We analyzed quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and genotype data from 103 alcohol users, including both light drinkers and treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. Genotyping was performed using a custom gene array that included genes selected from 8 pathways relevant to chronic alcohol-related brain volume loss. We replicated a significant association of a functional SOD2 single nucleotide polymorphism with normalized gray matter volume, which had been reported previously in an independent smaller sample of alcohol-dependent individuals. The SOD2-related genetic protection was observed only at the cohort's lower drinking range. Additional associations between normalized gray matter volume and other candidate genes such as alcohol dehydrogenase gene cluster (ADH), GCLC, NOS3, and SYT1 were observed across the entire sample but did not survive corrections for multiple comparisons. Converging independent evidence for a SOD2 gene association with gray matter volume shrinkage in chronic alcohol users suggests that SOD2 genetic variants predict differential brain volume loss mediated by free radicals. This study also provides the first catalog of genetic variations relevant to gray matter loss in chronic alcohol users. The identified gene-brain structure relationships are functionally pertinent and merit replication. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Network structures of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins differ in DC, shrinkage-strain, hardness and optical properties as a function of reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Adilson Y; Mondelli, José; Watts, David C

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of different tertiary amines on degree of conversion (DC), shrinkage-strain, shrinkage-strain rate, Knoop microhardness, and color and transmittance stabilities of experimental resins containing BisGMA/TEGDMA (3:1wt), 0.25wt% camphorquinone, 1wt% amine (DMAEMA, CEMA, DMPT, DEPT or DABE). Different light-curing protocols were also evaluated. DC was evaluated with FTIR-ATR and shrinkage-strain with the bonded-disk method. Shrinkage-strain-rate data were obtained from numerical differentiation of shrinkage-strain data with respect to time. Color stability and transmittance were evaluated after different periods of artificial aging, according to ISO 7491:2000. Results were evaluated with ANOVA, Tukey, and Dunnett's T3 tests (α=0.05). Studied properties were influenced by amines. DC and shrinkage-strain were maximum at the sequence: CQshrinkage were also influenced by the curing protocol, with positive correlations between DC and shrinkage-strain and DC and shrinkage-strain rate. Materials generally decreased in L* and increased in b*. The strong exception was the resin containing DMAEMA that did not show dark and yellow shifts. Color varied in the sequence: DMAEMAshrinkage-strain, shrinkage-strain rate, and microhardness, in addition to better optical properties. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced Cast Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    microstructure of the Al - Zn -Mg- Cu alloys was similar to the as-cast microstructure ...Further, new research has been initiated on ultra-high strength, microalloyed Al - Zn -Mg- Cu alloys with the goal of producing complex castings with...wrought 2519 alloy . Further, new research has been initiated on ultra-high strength, microalloyed Al - Zn -Mg- Cu alloys with the goal of producing

  14. A 15-year randomized controlled study of a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Lindberg, Anders

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the long term effectiveness of a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite in Class II restorations. The material was compared intra-individually with a microhybrid resin composite. Each of 50 patients with at least one pair of two similar sized Class II cavities participated (22 female, 28 male, mean age 43 years, range 18-64). Each participant received in each pair, in a randomized way, one Class II restoration performed with a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite (InTen-S) and the other restoration with a microhybrid resin composite restoration (Point 4). Both restorations were placed with an etch-and-rinse bonding system and an oblique layering technique. A total of 106 restorations, 33 premolar and 73 molars, were placed. The restorations were evaluated blindly each year using modified USPHS criteria. The overall performance of the experimental restorations was tested after intra-individual comparison using the Friedmańs two-way analysis of variance test. The hypothesis was rejected at the 5% level. At 15 years, 91 restorations were evaluated. The drop out frequency was 15 restorations (5 male, 3 female participants; 2 premolar and 13 molar restorations). Except for 2 participants, who reported slight symptoms during a few weeks after placement, no post-operative sensitivity was observed at the recalls. The overall success rate at 15 years was 77%. Twenty-one non acceptable restorations were observed during the 15 years follow up, 10 InTen-S (21.7%) and 11 Point 4 (24.4%) restorations (p>0.05). Annual failure rates for the resin composites were 1.5% and 1.6%, respectively. The main reasons for failure were secondary caries (8) and resin composite fracture (7). The differences between premolar vs. molar restorations and between restorations in male vs. female participants were not significant. Significant differences were observed between 2-surface vs. 3-surface restorations. During the 15-year

  15. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  16. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  17. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  18. Weldability of intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic alloys are a unique class of material that have potential for structural applications at elevated temperatures. The paper describes the welding and weldability of these alloys. The alloys studied were nickel aluminide (Ni[sub 3]Al), titanium aluminide (Ti[sub 3]Al), and iron aluminide.

  19. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  20. Comparison of Polymerization Shrinkage, Physical Properties, and Marginal Adaptation of Flowable and Restorative Bulk Fill Resin-Based Composites.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Park, S H

    The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal adaptation of two flowable bulk fill resin-based composites (FB-RBCs), two restorative bulk fill resin-based composites (RB-RBCs), and one regular incremental-fill RBC in MOD cavities in vitro. Additionally, the influence of linear polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, flexural modulus, and bottom/top surface hardness ratio on the marginal adaptation was evaluated. A Class II MOD cavity was prepared in 40 extracted sound lower molars. In group 1 (control group), the preparation was filled with Filtek Z350 (Z3, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) using the incremental filling technique. The FB-RBCs, SDR (SD, group 2) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) and Venus Bulk Fill (VB, group 3) (Heraeus Kulzer, Dormagen, Germany), were placed in the core portion of the cavity first, and Z350 was filled in the remaining cavity. The RB-RBCs, Tetric N-Ceram Bulkfill (TB, group 4) (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and SonicFill (SF, Group 5) (Kerr, West Collins, Orange, CA, USA), were bulk filled into the preparation. Images of the magnified marginal area were captured under 100× magnification before and after thermomechanical loading, and the percentage ratio of the imperfect margin (%IMwhole) was calculated. Gaps, cracks in the enamel layer, and chipping of composite, enamel, or dentin were all considered to be imperfect margins. Linear polymerization shrinkage, polymerization shrinkage force, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and bottom/top surface hardness ratio of were measured. Eight specimens were allocated for each material for each test. One-way analysis of variance with the Scheffé test was used to compare the groups at a 95% confidence level. Before thermomechanical loading, %IMwhole was in the order of group 3 ≤ groups 2 and 5 ≤ groups 1 and 4 (p=0.011), whereas after loading, it was in the order of group 4 ≤ group 5 ≤ group 1 ≤ groups 2 and 3 (p<0.001). The order of materials were Z3 < TB and SF

  1. Substitution of Nickel by Combined Addition of Cobalt and Zirconium in Alloy A 332

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüstenhagen, Andreas; Tonn, Babette

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing international competition and the resulting pricing pressure it is imperative to avoid the use of expensive alloying elements during the production of aluminium castings. The piston alloy A 332 shows an optimum combination of mechanical and casting properties and an attractive cost-performance ratio whereas nickel is the most expensive alloying element. A substitution of nickel by a combined addition of low contents of cobalt and zirconium has the potential capacitiy to increase the mechanical properties and reduce the costs of the alloy. At Clausthal University of Technology Thermo-Calc simulations and casting experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the nickel subtitution. Thermo-Calc-simulations were made to analyze the intermetallic phases in these alloys. These simulations were evaluated by observations under optical microscope and SEM of specimens poured into permanent moulds. The size and morphology of the intermetallic phases and the primary silicon was analyzed by the use of image analysis software. The mechanical properties of the alloys were determined by tensile tests at room temperature, 250° C and 350° C. The tensile specimens were tested in as-cast and pre-aged condition. The effect on the castability was characterized by determining the flow length and the susceptibility to form shrinkages and hot cracks. The standard alloy A 332 and the new piston alloy with cobalt and zirconium were compared. The new alloy AlSi12,6Cu1Mg1CoZr exhibits a yield strength of 115 MPa and a tensile strength of 171 MPa at 250° C in pre-aged condition (250° C/100 h). At 350° C the new alloy displays a yield strength of 57 MPa and a tensile strength of 85 MPa in pre-aged condition (350° C/100h). Compared to the reference alloy AlSi12,6Cu1Ni1Mg1 the yield strength at 250° C was improved about 25% and the yield strength at 350° C about 7%. The favorable castability of the reference alloy is not affected by the substitution of

  2. Macrosegregation in Al-7Si alloy caused by abrupt cross-section change during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, M.; Johnson, L.; Lauer, M.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Hypoeutectic Al-7 wt .% Si alloys were directionally solidified vertically downward in cylindrical molds that incorporated an abrupt cross-section decrease (9.5 mm to 3.2 mm diameter) which, after 5 cm, reverted back to 9.5 mm diameter in a Bridgman furnace; two constant growth speeds and thermal gradients were investigated. Thermosolutal convection and cross-section-change-induced shrinkage flow effects on macrosegregation were investigated. Dendrite clustering and extensive radial macrosegregation was seen, particularly in the larger cross-sections, before contraction and after expansion, this more evident at the lower growth speed. This alloy shows positive longitudinal macrosegregation near cross-section decrease followed by negative macrosegregation right after it; the extent of macrosegregation, however, decreases with increasing growth speed. Primary dendrite steepling intensified as solidification proceeded into the narrower section and negative longitudinal macrosegregation was seen on the re-entrant shelves at expansion. A two-dimensional model accounting for both shrinkage and thermo-solutal convection was used to simulate solidification and the resulting mushy-zone steepling and macrosegregation. The experimentally observed longitudinal and radial macrosegregation associated with the cross-section changes during directional solidification of an Al-7Si alloy is well captured by the numerical simulations.

  3. New developments in hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, R.

    1996-02-01

    The hardfacing industry has matured substantially since its inception in the early 1920s. Numerous welding alloys have been developed and field proven. By developing a strong working knowledge of available alloys, wear conditions and the specific wear situation, the goal of selecting the proper alloy to prolong service life and fight wear is now more attainable than ever. Hardfacing is the process in which a coating or cladding is applied to a substrate for the main purpose of reducing wear or loss of material by abrasion, impact, erosion, galling and cavitation. Most service environments involve a combination of these factors. The choice of an alloy system depends to a great degree on the nature of the wear process encountered. This can range from a simple low-stress condition to a very complex situation that involves abrasion combined with a corrodant and high temperature. The list of possible wear conditions is outlined below: (1) low-stress abrasion, (2) high-stress abrasion, (3) impact, (4) metal-to-metal wear, (5) erosion, and (6) cavitation erosion. In general, service conditions involve a combination of several of the conditions listed above. In addition to the type of wear, three other factors are also important as far as the severity of the wear condition is concerned. These are: (1) type of abradant, (2) service temperature, and (3) service environment. It is clear that in terms of the nature of the wear process as well as the environmental conditions, service conditions are extremely complex. They are, therefore, difficult to simulate in the laboratory. The selection of hardfacing alloys for an application is based primarily on actual field experiences and these are refined with data gathered with time.

  4. Aggravation of north channels' shrinkage and south channels' development in the Yangtze Estuary under dam-induced runoff discharge flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bo-yuan; Li, Yi-tian; Yue, Yao; Yang, Yun-ping

    2017-03-01

    Construction of dams on rivers has progressively affected the seasonal variability of runoff discharge, which has consequently produced remarkable impacts on the morphology of estuarine channels. This paper considers four-typical-order bifurcations of the Yangtze Estuary and adopts an ebb partition ratio (defined as the diversion ratio of ebb flow in a given branch divided by the total ebb tidal discharge immediately upstream of the river node where the bifurcation occurs) as a measure of water excavating force in the bifurcation channels. Results show that the seasonal variability of runoff discharge at Datong Hydrological Station (Datong) is flattened, being mainly driven by upstream runoff flattening observed at Yichang Hydrological Station (Yichang) and the tributary rivers. Yearly ebb partition ratios of the channels located to the north and south of the islands present decreasing and increasing trends respectively, and as also do the yearly north and south channel volume of the bifurcations. Yearly ebb partition ratio is proved to be an effective index to represent the water excavating force considering the stability of yearly ebb tidal discharge and its relationship with the channel erosion-deposition. River dams are the driving factors behind the runoff flattening at Datong because of their flattening effects on its main contributors (Yichang and tributary rivers). This flattening significantly helps reduce and enlarge the yearly ebb partition ratios of the north and south channels respectively, and then aggravates the shrinkage and development of the north and south channels separately. Yearly ebb partition ratio of the North Passage (NP) must be enlarged in order for the NP to maintain its function as a shipping channel.

  5. Phosphorylation and activation of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) during osmotic cell shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Rigor, Robert R; Damoc, Catalina; Phinney, Brett S; Cala, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    The Na(+)/H(+)Exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is a highly versatile, broadly distributed and precisely controlled transport protein that mediates volume and pH regulation in most cell types. NHE1 phosphorylation contributes to Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity in response to phorbol esters, growth factors or protein phosphatase inhibitors, but has not been observed during activation by osmotic cell shrinkage (OCS). We examined the role of NHE1 phosphorylation during activation by OCS, using an ideal model system, the Amphiuma tridactylum red blood cell (atRBC). Na(+)/H(+) exchange in atRBCs is mediated by an NHE1 homolog (atNHE1) that is 79% identical to human NHE1 at the amino acid level. NHE1 activity in atRBCs is exceptionally robust in that transport activity can increase more than 2 orders of magnitude from rest to full activation. Michaelis-Menten transport kinetics indicates that either OCS or treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A (CLA) increase Na(+) transport capacity without affecting transport affinity (K(m)=44 mM) in atRBCs. CLA and OCS act non-additively to activate atNHE1, indicating convergent, phosphorylation-dependent signaling in atNHE1 activation. In situ(32)P labeling and immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the net phosphorylation of atNHE1 is increased 4-fold during OCS coinciding with a more than 2-order increase in Na(+) transport activity. This is the first reported evidence of increased NHE1 phosphorylation during OCS in any vertebrate cell type. Finally, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of atNHE1 immunoprecipitated from atRBC membranes reveals 9 phosphorylated serine/threonine residues, suggesting that activation of atNHE1 involves multiple phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation events.

  6. Evaluation of the shrinkage and creep of medium strength self compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz, C. J.; Ramos, G.; Hurtado, W. A.

    2017-02-01

    The difference between self compacting concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete (CC) is in fresh state, is the high fluidity at first and the need for vibration at second, but in hardened state, both concretes must comply with the resistance specified, in addition to securing the safety and functionality for which it was designed. This article describes the tests and results for shrinkage and creep at some medium strength Self Compacting Concrete with added sand (SCC-MSs) and two types of cement. The research was conducted at the Laboratorio de Tecnología de Estructuras (LTE) of the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC), in dosages of 200 liters; with the idea of evaluating the effectiveness of implementation of these new concretes at elements designed with conventional concrete (CCs).

  7. Optimal rejection of multiplicative noise via adaptive shrinkage of undecimated wavelet coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Luciano; Anghele, Nicola; Argenti, Fabrizio

    2001-12-01

    In this paper speckle reduction is approached as a Wiener-like filtering performed in the wavelet domain by means of an adaptive shrinkage of the detail coefficients of an undecimated decomposition. The amplitude of each coefficient is divided by the variance ratio of the noisy coefficient to the noise-free one. All the above quantities are analytically calculated from the speckled image, the speckle variance, and the wavelet filters. On the test image Lenna corrupted by synthetic speckle, the proposed method outperforms Kuan's LLMMSE filtering by almost 3 dB SNR. Experiments carried out on true and synthetic speckled images demonstrate that the visual quality of the results is excellent in terms of both background smoothing and preservation of edge sharpness and textures. The absence of decimation in the wavelet decomposition avoids the typical ringing impairments produced by critically-subsampled wavelet-based denoising.

  8. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Fan, C.; Ding, J.; Xue, S.; Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. Here we show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. This study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.

  9. Polymerization shrinkage and stress development in amorphous calcium phosphate/urethane dimethacrylate polymeric composites

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, J.M.; Regnault, W. F.; Skrtic, D.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how substituting a new high molecular mass oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) extended urethane dimethacrylate (PEG-U) for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in photo-activated urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) resins affects degree of vinyl conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (PS), stress development (PSSD) and biaxial flexure strength (BFS) of their amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) composites. The composites were prepared from four types of resins (UDMA, PEG-U, UDMA/HEMA and UDMA/PEG-U) and zirconia-hybridized ACP. Introducing PEG-U improved DC while not adversely affecting PS, PSSD and the BFS of composites. This improvement in DC is attributed to the long, more flexible structure between the vinyl groups of PEG-U and its higher molecular mass compared to poly(HEMA). The results imply that PEG-U has the potential to serve as an alternative to HEMA in dental and other biomedical applications. PMID:20169007

  10. Mechanical Response to Isotropic Shrinkage of Fibroblasts Measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Taisuke; Haga, Hisashi; Tamura, Kazushi; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2008-07-01

    Mechanical stimuli such as cyclic stretch and fluid stress affect various cellular physiologies, including proliferation, morphology, and differentiation. We investigated cellular response to shrinking stimuli by developing an isotropic deformation device and observing cellular elasticity with mechanical scanning probe microscopy (M-SPM). The isotropic deformation device consists of a steel ring and a deformable elastic culture dish made of transparent silicone rubber. The M-SPM can visualize topography and spatial distribution of local elasticity of biomaterials in solution. Fibroblasts became softer in response to 6% shrinkage. Cell elasticity did not increase for 1 h after the shrinking stimulus. Inhibitory studies using lysophosphatidic acid and calyculin-A revealed that myosin light chain phosphatase leading to dephospholylation of myosin II regulatory light chain is involved in cell softening.

  11. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Fan, C.; Ding, J.; Xue, S.; Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. Here we show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. This study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications. PMID:28045044

  12. The application of wavelet shrinkage denoising to magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James

    2014-02-18

    The application of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) as a non-destructive method of defect detection has proliferated throughout the manufacturing community. Instrument technology and measurement methodology have matured commensurately as applications have moved from the R and D labs to the fully automated manufacturing environment. These new applications present a new set of challenges including a bevy of error sources. A significant obstacle in many industrial applications is a decrease in signal to noise ratio due to (i) environmental EMI and (II) compromises in sensor design for the purposes of automation. The stochastic nature of MBN presents a challenge to any method of noise reduction. An application of wavelet shrinkage denoising is proposed as a method of decreasing extraneous noise in MBN measurements. The method is tested and yields marked improvement on measurements subject to EMI, grounding noise, and even measurements in ideal conditions.

  13. Anisotropic shrinkage of insect air sacs revealed in vivo by X-ray microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Rongchang; Du, Guohao; Yang, Yiming; Wang, Feixiang; Deng, Biao; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Air sacs are thought to be the bellows for insect respiration. However, their exact mechanism of action as a bellows remains unclear. A direct way to investigate this problem is in vivo observation of the changes in their three-dimensional structures. Therefore, four-dimensional X-ray phase contrast microtomography is employed to solve this puzzle. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional image series reveals that the compression of the air sac during respiration in bell crickets exhibits obvious anisotropic characteristics both longitudinally and transversely. Volumetric changes of the tracheal trunks in the prothorax further strengthen the evidence of this finding. As a result, we conclude that the shrinkage and expansion of the insect air sac is anisotropic, contrary to the hypothesis of isotropy, thereby providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system. PMID:27580585

  14. Emerging Applications of Polymersomes in Delivery: from Molecular Dynamics to Shrinkage of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Discher, Dennis E.; Ortiz, Vanessa; Srinivas, Goundla; Klein, Michael L.; Kim, Younghoon; Christian, David; Cai, Shenshen; Photos, Peter; Ahmed, Fariyal

    2014-01-01

    Polymersomes are self-assembled shells of amphiphilic block copolymers that are currently being developed by many groups for fundamental insights into the nature of self-assembled states as well as for a variety of potential applications. While recent reviews have highlighted distinctive properties – particularly stability – that are strongly influenced by both copolymer type and polymer molecular weight, here we first review some of the more recent developments in computational molecular dynamics (MD) schemes that lend insight into assembly. We then review polymersome loading, in vivo stealthiness, degradation-based disassembly for controlled release, and even tumor-shrinkage in vivo. Comparisons of polymersomes with viral capsids are shown to encompass and inspire many aspects of current designs. PMID:24692840

  15. Solving the shrinkage-induced PDMS alignment registration issue in multilayer soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Christopher; Sun, Yu; Simmons, Craig A.

    2009-06-01

    Shrinkage of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) complicates alignment registration between layers during multilayer soft lithography fabrication. This often hinders the development of large-scale microfabricated arrayed devices. Here we report a rapid method to construct large-area, multilayered devices with stringent alignment requirements. This technique, which exploits a previously unrecognized aspect of sandwich mold fabrication, improves device yield, enables highly accurate alignment over large areas of multilayered devices and does not require strict regulation of fabrication conditions or extensive calibration processes. To demonstrate this technique, a microfabricated Braille display was developed and characterized. High device yield and accurate alignment within 15 µm were achieved over three layers for an array of 108 Braille units spread over a 6.5 cm2 area, demonstrating the fabrication of well-aligned devices with greater ease and efficiency than previously possible.

  16. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Jin; Fan, Cuncai; Ding, Jie; ...

    2017-01-03

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. We show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studiesmore » show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. Our study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.« less

  17. Anisotropic shrinkage of insect air sacs revealed in vivo by X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Rongchang; Du, Guohao; Yang, Yiming; Wang, Feixiang; Deng, Biao; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2016-09-01

    Air sacs are thought to be the bellows for insect respiration. However, their exact mechanism of action as a bellows remains unclear. A direct way to investigate this problem is in vivo observation of the changes in their three-dimensional structures. Therefore, four-dimensional X-ray phase contrast microtomography is employed to solve this puzzle. Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional image series reveals that the compression of the air sac during respiration in bell crickets exhibits obvious anisotropic characteristics both longitudinally and transversely. Volumetric changes of the tracheal trunks in the prothorax further strengthen the evidence of this finding. As a result, we conclude that the shrinkage and expansion of the insect air sac is anisotropic, contrary to the hypothesis of isotropy, thereby providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Video Segmentation with Shape Growth or Shrinkage Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Charpiat, Guillaume; Brucker, Ludovic; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method for joint segmentation of monotonously growing or shrinking shapes in a time sequence of noisy images. The task of segmenting the image time series is expressed as an optimization problem using the spatio-temporal graph of pixels, in which we are able to impose the constraint of shape growth or of shrinkage by introducing monodirectional infinite links connecting pixels at the same spatial locations in successive image frames. The globally optimal solution is computed with a graph cut. The performance of the proposed method is validated on three applications: segmentation of melting sea ice floes and of growing burned areas from time series of 2D satellite images, and segmentation of a growing brain tumor from sequences of 3D medical scans. In the latter application, we impose an additional intersequences inclusion constraint by adding directed infinite links between pixels of dependent image structures.

  19. Characterization of field compaction using shrinkage analysis and visual soil examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Alice; Keller, Thomas; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Visual field examination of soil structure can be very useful in extension work, because it is easy to perform, does not require equipment or lab analyses and the result is immediately available. The main limitations of visual methods are subjectivity and variation with field conditions. To provide reliable reference information, methods for objective and quantitative assessment of soil structure quality are still necessary. Soil shrinkage analysis (ShA) (Braudeau et al., 2004) provides relevant parameters for soil functions that allow precise and accurate assessment of soil compaction. To test it, we applied ShA to samples taken from a soil structure observatory (SSO) set up in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland to quantify the structural recovery of compacted agricultural soil. The objective in this presentation is to compare the ability of a visual examination method and ShA to assess soil compaction and structural recovery on the SSO field plots. Eighteen undisturbed soil samples were taken in the topsoil (5-10 cm) and 9 samples in the subsoil (30-35 cm) of compacted plots and control. Each sample went through ShA, followed by a visual examination of the sample and analysis of soil organic carbon and texture. ShA combines simultaneous shrinkage with water retention measurements and, in addition to soil properties such as bulk density, coarse and fine porosity, also provides information on hydrostructural stability and plasma and structural porosity. For visual examination the VESS method of Ball et al. (2007) was adapted to core samples previously equilibrated at -100 hPa matric potential. The samples were randomly and anonymously scored to avoid subjectivity and were equilibrated to insure comparable conditions. Compaction decreased the total specific volume, as well as air and water content at all matric potentials. Structural porosity was reduced, while plasma porosity remained unchanged. Compaction also changed the shape of the shrinkage curve: (i

  20. Bayesian Wavelet Shrinkage of the Haar-Fisz Transformed Wavelet Periodogram.

    PubMed

    Nason, Guy; Stevens, Kara

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly being realised that many real world time series are not stationary and exhibit evolving second-order autocovariance or spectral structure. This article introduces a Bayesian approach for modelling the evolving wavelet spectrum of a locally stationary wavelet time series. Our new method works by combining the advantages of a Haar-Fisz transformed spectrum with a simple, but powerful, Bayesian wavelet shrinkage method. Our new method produces excellent and stable spectral estimates and this is demonstrated via simulated data and on differenced infant electrocardiogram data. A major additional benefit of the Bayesian paradigm is that we obtain rigorous and useful credible intervals of the evolving spectral structure. We show how the Bayesian credible intervals provide extra insight into the infant electrocardiogram data.

  1. On shrinkage and model extrapolation in the evaluation of clinical center performance

    PubMed Central

    Varewyck, Machteld; Goetghebeur, Els; Eriksson, Marie; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    We consider statistical methods for benchmarking clinical centers based on a dichotomous outcome indicator. Borrowing ideas from the causal inference literature, we aim to reveal how the entire study population would have fared under the current care level of each center. To this end, we evaluate direct standardization based on fixed versus random center effects outcome models that incorporate patient-specific baseline covariates to adjust for differential case-mix. We explore fixed effects (FE) regression with Firth correction and normal mixed effects (ME) regression to maintain convergence in the presence of very small centers. Moreover, we study doubly robust FE regression to avoid outcome model extrapolation. Simulation studies show that shrinkage following standard ME modeling can result in substantial power loss relative to the considered alternatives, especially for small centers. Results are consistent with findings in the analysis of 30-day mortality risk following acute stroke across 90 centers in the Swedish Stroke Register. PMID:24812420

  2. Slow and steady cell shrinkage reduces osmotic stress in bovine and murine oocyte and zygote vitrification.

    PubMed

    Lai, D; Ding, J; Smith, G W; Smith, G D; Takayama, S

    2015-01-01

    Does the use of a new cryoprotectant agent (CPA) exchange protocol designed to minimize osmotic stress improve oocyte or zygote vitrification by reducing sublethal cryodamage? The use of a new CPA exchange protocol made possible by automated microfluidics improved oocyte and zygote vitrification with superior morphology as indicated by a smoother cell surface, higher sphericity, higher cytoplasmic lipid retention, less cytoplasmic leakage and higher developmental competence compared with conventional methods. The use of more 'steps' of CPA exposure during the vitrification protocol increases cryosurvival and development in the bovine model. However, such an attempt to eliminate osmotic stress is limited by the practicality of performing numerous precise pipetting steps in a short amount of time. Murine meiotically competent germinal vesicle intact oocytes and zygotes were harvested from the antral follicles in ovaries and ampulla, respectively. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir at random stages of the estrous cycle. A total of 110 murine oocytes, 802 murine zygotes and 52 bovine oocytes were used in this study. Microfluidic devices were fabricated using conventional photo- and soft-lithography. CPAs used were 7.5% ethylene glycol (EG) and 7.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for equilibration solution and 15% EG, 15% DMSO and 0.5 M sucrose for vitrification solution. End-point analyses include mathematical modeling using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, morphometrics assessed by conventional and confocal microscopy, cytoplasmic lipid quantification by nile red staining, cytoplasmic leakage quantification by fluorescent dextran intercalation and developmental competence analysis by 96 h embryo culture and blastomere quantification. The automated microfluidics protocol decreased the shrinkage rate of the oocyte and zygote by 13.8 times over its manual pipetting alternative. Oocytes and zygotes with a lower shrinkage rate during CPA exposure experienced less

  3. Slow and steady cell shrinkage reduces osmotic stress in bovine and murine oocyte and zygote vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Lai, D.; Ding, J.; Smith, G.W.; Smith, G.D.; Takayama, S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does the use of a new cryoprotectant agent (CPA) exchange protocol designed to minimize osmotic stress improve oocyte or zygote vitrification by reducing sublethal cryodamage? SUMMARY ANSWER The use of a new CPA exchange protocol made possible by automated microfluidics improved oocyte and zygote vitrification with superior morphology as indicated by a smoother cell surface, higher sphericity, higher cytoplasmic lipid retention, less cytoplasmic leakage and higher developmental competence compared with conventional methods. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The use of more ‘steps’ of CPA exposure during the vitrification protocol increases cryosurvival and development in the bovine model. However, such an attempt to eliminate osmotic stress is limited by the practicality of performing numerous precise pipetting steps in a short amount of time. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Murine meiotically competent germinal vesicle intact oocytes and zygotes were harvested from the antral follicles in ovaries and ampulla, respectively. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir at random stages of the estrous cycle. A total of 110 murine oocytes, 802 murine zygotes and 52 bovine oocytes were used in this study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Microfluidic devices were fabricated using conventional photo- and soft-lithography. CPAs used were 7.5% ethylene glycol (EG) and 7.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for equilibration solution and 15% EG, 15% DMSO and 0.5 M sucrose for vitrification solution. End-point analyses include mathematical modeling using Kedem–Katchalsky equations, morphometrics assessed by conventional and confocal microscopy, cytoplasmic lipid quantification by nile red staining, cytoplasmic leakage quantification by fluorescent dextran intercalation and developmental competence analysis by 96 h embryo culture and blastomere quantification. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The automated microfluidics protocol decreased the shrinkage rate of

  4. The application of wavelet shrinkage denoising to magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, James

    2014-02-01

    The application of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) as a non-destructive method of defect detection has proliferated throughout the manufacturing community. Instrument technology and measurement methodology have matured commensurately as applications have moved from the R&D labs to the fully automated manufacturing environment. These new applications present a new set of challenges including a bevy of error sources. A significant obstacle in many industrial applications is a decrease in signal to noise ratio due to (i) environmental EMI and (II) compromises in sensor design for the purposes of automation. The stochastic nature of MBN presents a challenge to any method of noise reduction. An application of wavelet shrinkage denoising is proposed as a method of decreasing extraneous noise in MBN measurements. The method is tested and yields marked improvement on measurements subject to EMI, grounding noise, and even measurements in ideal conditions.

  5. Phenomenological evolution equations for heat-induced shrinkage of a collagenous tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S; Wright, N T; Humphrey, J D

    1998-10-01

    Optimization of clinical heat treatments for various pathologies requires accurate numerical modeling of the heat transfer, evolution of thermal damage, and associated changes in the material properties of the tissues. This paper presents two phenomenological equations that quantify time-dependent thermal damage in a uniaxial collagenous tissue. Specifically, an empirical rule-of-mixtures model is shown to describe well heat-induced axial shrinkage (a measure of underlying denaturation) in chordae tendineae which results from a spectrum of thermomechanical loading histories. Likewise an exponential decay model is shown to describe well the partial recovery (e.g., renaturation) of chordae when it is returned to body temperature following heating. Together these models provide the first quantitative descriptors of the evolution of heat-induced damage and subsequent recovery in collagen. Such descriptors are fundamental to numerical analyses of many heat treatments because of the prevalence of collagen in many tissues and organs.

  6. Body shrinkage due to Arctic warming reduces red knot fitness in tropical wintering range.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Jan A; Lisovski, Simeon; Lok, Tamar; Meissner, Włodzimierz; Ożarowska, Agnieszka; de Fouw, Jimmy; Rakhimberdiev, Eldar; Soloviev, Mikhail Y; Piersma, Theunis; Klaassen, Marcel

    2016-05-13

    Reductions in body size are increasingly being identified as a response to climate warming. Here we present evidence for a case of such body shrinkage, potentially due to malnutrition in early life. We show that an avian long-distance migrant (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), which is experiencing globally unrivaled warming rates at its high-Arctic breeding grounds, produces smaller offspring with shorter bills during summers with early snowmelt. This has consequences half a world away at their tropical wintering grounds, where shorter-billed individuals have reduced survival rates. This is associated with these molluscivores eating fewer deeply buried bivalve prey and more shallowly buried seagrass rhizomes. We suggest that seasonal migrants can experience reduced fitness at one end of their range as a result of a changing climate at the other end. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Restrained shrinkage cracking in fiber reinforced concrete: A novel test technique

    SciTech Connect

    Banthia, N.; Yan, C.; Mindess, S.

    1996-01-01

    A novel experimental technique was developed to assess the cracking potential of cement-based materials when used as a bonded overlay. Specimens were cast directly on to a substrate and the assembly was subjected to a drying environment to induce cracking. Lengths and widths of the resulting cracks in the overlay were monitored as a function of time. The use of fibers was found to be very effective not only in reducing the widths of the shrinkage cracks but also in allowing multiple cracking to occur. Interestingly, these two phenomena occurred only up to a fiber volume fraction of 0.5%; at 1% by volume of fibers, only minimal cracking was seen to occur even under a particularly severe environment.

  8. Non uniform shrinkages of double-walled carbon nanotube as induced by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xianfang Li, Lunxiong; Gong, Huimin; Yang, Lan; Sun, Chenghua

    2014-09-01

    Electron beam-induced nanoinstabilities of pristine double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) of two different configurations, one fixed at both ends and another fixed at only one end, were in-situ investigated in transmission electron microscope at room temperature. It was observed that the DWCNT fixed at both ends shrank in its diameter uniformly. Meanwhile, the DWCNT fixed at only one end intriguingly shrank preferentially from its free cap end along its axial direction whereas its diameter shrinkage was offset. A mechanism of “diffusion” along with “evaporation” at room temperature which is driven by the nanocurvature of the DWCNTs, and the athermal activation induced by the electron beam was proposed to elucidate the observed phenomena. The effect of the interlayer interaction of the DWCNTs was also discussed.

  9. Isotropic shrinkage of the oxygen octahedron in SrTiO3 under uniaxial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cong; Temba, Chisato; Nakajima, Nobuo; Kawakami, Shuhei; Ishimatsu, Naoki; Maruyama, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Ti K-edge of a SrTiO3 single crystal under uniaxial pressure were measured to obtain evidence of uniaxial pressure-induced polarization predicted in SrTiO3 from the electronic viewpoint. The pre-edge 3d-e g peak decreases in intensity with increasing uniaxial pressure, together with an energy shift to higher energy side. Contrary to uniaxial deformation, these changes were independent of incident x-ray polarization. This implies the presence of a mechanism that maintains the isotropic coordination environment around a Ti atom, i.e. a tilt and rotation of the TiO6 octahedron accompanied by its isotropic shrinkage, hence the local polarization essential to the ferroelectric order cannot be observed.

  10. Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

    1980-03-01

    A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model.

  11. [Light-induced control of polymerization shrinkage of dental composites by generating temporary hardness gradients].

    PubMed

    Sommer, A P; Gente, M

    1999-10-01

    Irradiation of light-curing dental filling materials in a single direction results in a temporary hardness gradient in the direction of the irradiation. The photoactivated polymerisation process begins at the site of the highest light intensity. In the simplest possible model, the polymerizing composites irradiated in a single direction shows three adjacent co-existing phases: an almost hardened, a gelled and a still plastic phase. As long as all three phases are present, any shrinking of the contracting phases can be compensated by the plastic phase. A knowledge of the distribution of these phases and their spatial and temporal modulation by the selection of suitable curing light parameters provides simple techniques for reducing shrinkage gaps around voluminous fillings in large dental cavities.

  12. A proposed configuration for a stepped specimen to be used in the systematic evaluation of factors influencing warpage in metallic alloys being used for cryogenic wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A proposed configuration for a stepped specimen to be used in the system evaluation of mechanisms that can introduce warpage or dimensional changes in metallic alloys used for cryogenic wind tunnel models is described. Considerations for selecting a standard specimen are presented along with results obtained from an investigation carried out for VASCOMAX 200 maraging steel. Details of the machining and measurement techniques utilized in the investigation are presented. Initial results from the sample of VASCOMAX 200 show that the configuration and measuring techniques are capable of giving quantitative results.

  13. Rhenium alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    German, R.M.; Bose, A.; Jerman, G.

    1989-01-01

    Alloying experiments were performed using rhenium additions to a classic 90 mass % tungsten heavy alloy. The mixed-powder system was liquid phase sintered to full density at 1500 C in 60 min The rhenium-modified alloys exhibited a smaller grain size, higher hardness, higher strength, and lower ductility than the unalloyed system. For an alloy with a composition of 84W-6Re-8Ni-2Fe, the sintered density was 17, 4 Mg/m{sup 3} with a yield strength of 815 MPa, tensile strength of 1180 MPa, and elongation to failure of 13%. This property combination results from the aggregate effects of grain size reduction and solid solution hardening due to rhenium. In the unalloyed system these properties require post-sintering swaging and aging; thus, alloying with rhenium is most attractive for applications where net shaping is desired, such as by powder injection molding.

  14. Microstructure and tailoring hydrogenation performance of Y-doped Mg2Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenjie; Li, Jinshan; Zhang, Tiebang; Kou, Hongchao; Xue, Xiangyi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microstructure and the hydrogenation properties of melt-spun Mg67Ni33-xYx alloys are studied with the purpose to investigate the influence of Y doping and rapid solidification on hydrogenation performance of Mg2Ni. Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) alloys are firstly prepared in an electric resistance furnace under the protection of a covering reagent. Then, the as-cast alloys are re-melted and spun on a rotating copper roller. The phase compositions and microstructures of as-cast and melt-spun alloys are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The hydrogen activation properties and absorption/desorption kinetics of melt-spun Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) ribbons are evaluated using an automatic Sieverts apparatus. The melt-spun Mg67Ni32Y alloy preserves high hydrogen absorption capacity and kinetics and absorbs 96% of the maximum capacity (3.79 wt. %) within 8 min. The lattice distortion caused by Y doping and the shrinkage porosity by melt-spun not only raise the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate, but significantly improve the hydrogen storage capacity of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) alloys. The activation and hydrogen absorption/desorption mechanisms are also discussed based on a nucleation and growth theory.

  15. Aeronautical requirements for Inconel 718 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elefterie, C. F.; Guragata, C.; Bran, D.; Ghiban, B.

    2017-06-01

    The project goal is to present the requirements imposed by aviation components made from super alloys based on Nickel. A significant portion of fasteners, locking lugs, blade retainers and inserts are manufactured from Alloy 718. The thesis describes environmental factors (corrosion), conditions of external aggression (salt air, intense heat, heavy industrial pollution, high condensation, high pressure), mechanical characteristics (tensile strength, yield strength and fatigue resistance) and loadings (tensions, compression loads) that must be satisfied simultaneously by Ni-based super alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Titanium alloys, Aluminum alloys). For this alloy the requirements are strength durability, damage tolerance, fail safety and so on. The corrosion can be an issue, but the fatigue under high-magnitude cyclic tensile loading it’s what limits the lifetime of the airframe. Also, the excellent malleability and weldability characteristics of the 718 system make the material physical properties tolerant of manufacturing processes. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  16. Application of a Pore Fraction Hot Tearing Model to Directionally Solidified and Direct Chill Cast Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ruifeng; Phillion, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    Hot tearing susceptibility is commonly assessed using a pressure drop equation in the mushy zone that includes the effects of both tensile deformation perpendicular to the thermal gradient as well as shrinkage feeding. In this study, a Pore Fraction hot tearing model, recently developed by Monroe and Beckermann (JOM 66:1439-1445, 2014), is extended to additionally include the effect of strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient. The deformation and shrinkage pore fractions are obtained on the basis of the dimensionless Niyama criterion and a scaling variable method. First, the model is applied to the binary Al-Cu system under conditions of directional solidification. It is shown that for the same Niyama criterion, a decrease in the cooling rate increases both the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions because of an increase in the time spent in the brittle temperature region. Second, the model is applied to the industrial aluminum alloy AA5182 as part of a finite element simulation of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process. It is shown that an increase in the casting speed during DC casting increases the deformation and shrinkage pore fractions, causing the maximum point of pore fraction to move towards the base of the casting. These results demonstrate that including the strain rate parallel to the thermal gradient significantly improves the predictive quality of hot tearing criteria based on the pressure drop equation.

  17. Aridification of the Sahara desert caused by Tethys Sea shrinkage during the Late Miocene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongshi; Ramstein, Gilles; Schuster, Mathieu; Li, Camille; Contoux, Camille; Yan, Qing

    2014-09-18

    It is widely believed that the Sahara desert is no more than ∼2-3 million years (Myr) old, with geological evidence showing a remarkable aridification of north Africa at the onset of the Quaternary ice ages. Before that time, north African aridity was mainly controlled by the African summer monsoon (ASM), which oscillated with Earth's orbital precession cycles. Afterwards, the Northern Hemisphere glaciation added an ice volume forcing on the ASM, which additionally oscillated with glacial-interglacial cycles. These findings led to the idea that the Sahara desert came into existence when the Northern Hemisphere glaciated ∼2-3 Myr ago. The later discovery, however, of aeolian dune deposits ∼7 Myr old suggested a much older age, although this interpretation is hotly challenged and there is no clear mechanism for aridification around this time. Here we use climate model simulations to identify the Tortonian stage (∼7-11 Myr ago) of the Late Miocene epoch as the pivotal period for triggering north African aridity and creating the Sahara desert. Through a set of experiments with the Norwegian Earth System Model and the Community Atmosphere Model, we demonstrate that the African summer monsoon was drastically weakened by the Tethys Sea shrinkage during the Tortonian, allowing arid, desert conditions to expand across north Africa. Not only did the Tethys shrinkage alter the mean climate of the region, it also enhanced the sensitivity of the African monsoon to orbital forcing, which subsequently became the major driver of Sahara extent fluctuations. These important climatic changes probably caused the shifts in Asian and African flora and fauna observed during the same period, with possible links to the emergence of early hominins in north Africa.

  18. Gravitropism and phototropism of oat coleoptiles: post-tropic autostraightening and tissue shrinkage during tropism.

    PubMed

    Tarui, Y; Iino, M

    1999-01-01

    We measured changes in length on the two opposite sides of the red-light-grown oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles subjected to either gravitropic or phototropic stimulation and subsequently rotated on a horizontal clinostat. The length measurement was conducted using three 5 mm-long zones delimited by ink markers from the tip. Curvature of each zone was analyzed from the length difference between the two sides. Gravitropism was induced by displacing the seedling from the vertical by 30 degrees or 90 degrees for 25 min. Phototropism was induced by exposing the coleoptile to unilateral blue light for 30 s, which provided a fluence (1.0 micromoles m-2) optimal for the pulse-induced positive phototropism or a lower, suboptimal fluence (0.03 micromoles m-2). After negatively gravitropic bending, the upper two zones straightened rapidly at either displacement angle. After positively phototropic bending, straightening occurred, but only in the top zone and at the lower fluence. The upper two zones straightened rapidly, however, when bilateral blue light (30 s; 15 micromoles m-2 from either direction) was applied 25 min after unilateral stimulation at the higher fluence. Bilateral blue light alone induced no curvature. These results confirm that the straightening of gravitropically bent coleoptiles is autonomic, and suggest that a similar autonomic response participates in the straightening of phototropically bent coleoptiles. Suppression of elongation on the concave side of the coleoptile mainly accounted for gravitropic and phototropic curvatures. The concave side of the top zone shrank during both tropisms. This shrinkage progressed at a high rate from the beginning of curvature response, suggesting that a drop in turgor pressure is the main and direct cause of the shrinkage.

  19. The engineering significance of shrinkage and swelling soils in blast damage investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Vitton, S.J.; Harris, W.W.

    1996-12-01

    In the US each year it has been estimated that expansive soils cause approximately $9.0 billion in damage to buildings, roads, airports, and other facilities. This figure alone exceeds the damage estimate for earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and hurricanes combined. Unfortunately, some cases of expansive soil damage (swelling) are blamed on rock blasting operations if the blasting operations are located within the immediate area. While simple tests, such as the Atterberg limits test, can characterize a soil as expansive, it does not necessarily answer the question whether the foundation soils are causing distresses to a structure. In particular, it appears that once a soil has been labeled as nonexpansive it is no longer considered as a problem soil, in which case blast vibrations become the prime suspect. It should be emphasized, however, that even non-plastic soils, those soils with low to nonexistent plastic indexes, can exhibit significant shrinkage characteristics that can result in significant damage to structures. While expansive soil is a function of the mineralogy of the soil particles, i.e., swelling clay minerals, shrinkage is caused by the loss of moisture from soil as capillary pressures exceed the cohesion or tensile strength and is therefore a function of the soils particle size and its pore size distribution. This is a significant problem for all fine grained soils regardless of the soil`s mineralogy. It`s particularly important for regions of the US that typically have a positive water balance but experience significant drought periods when soil moisture is lost.

  20. Degree of vinyl conversion, polymerization shrinkage and stress development in experimental endodontic composite

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Skrtic, D.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores degree of vinyl conversion (DVC), polymerization shrinkage (PS) and shrinkage stress (PSS) of the experimental amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) composites intended for use as an endodontic sealer. Light-cure (LC), chemical cure (CC) or dual-cure (DC; combined light and chemical cure) resins comprised urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), methacryloyloxyethyl phthalate (MEP) and a high molecular mass oligomeric co-monomer, poly(ethyleneglycol)-extended UDMA (PEG-U) (designated UPHM resin). To fabricate composites, a mass fraction of 60 % UPHM resin was blended with a mass fraction of 40 % as-made (am-ACP) or ground ACP (g-ACP). DVC values of copolymer (unfilled UPHM resin) and composite specimens were determined by infrared spectroscopy. Glass-filled composites were used as controls. PS and PSS of composites were determined by dilatometry and tensometry, respectively. LC copolymers attained extraordinary high DVC values at 24 h post-cure (95.7 %), compared to CC (52 %) and DC (79.3 %) copolymer specimens. While the DVC values of LC and DC am-ACP composites were reduced between 5 and 10 %, DVC values of DC g-ACP composites increased almost 8 % compared to the corresponding copolymers. High DVC attained in LC composites was, expectedly, accompanied with high PS values (on average 7 vol%). However, PSS developed in LC and especially DC composites did not exceed PSS values seen in other UDMA-based composites. Based on this initial evaluation, it is concluded that, DC, g-ACP filled UPHM composite shows promise as an endodontic sealer. However, further physicochemical evaluations, including water sorption, mechanical stability and ion release as well as a leachability studies need to be performed before this experimental material is tested for cellular responses and, eventually recommended for clinical utility. PMID:20411033