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Sample records for alloy tool steel

  1. Frictional conditions between alloy AA6060 aluminium and tool steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wideroee, Fredrik; Welo, Torgeir

    2011-05-04

    The frictional conditions in the new process of screw extrusion of aluminium have been investigated. The contact behaviour between the aluminum alloy and the tool steel in the extruder is vital for understanding the extrusion process. Using a compressive-rotational method for frictional measurements the conditions for unlubricated sticking friction between aluminum alloy AA6060 and tool steel at different combinations of temperatures and pressures have been investigated. In this method the samples in the form of disks are put under hydrostatic pressure while simultaneously being rotated at one end. Pins made from contrast material have been inserted into the samples to measure the deformation introduced. This approach along with 3D simulations form a method for determining the frictional conditions. The paper describes the test method and the results. It was found that the necessary pressure for sticking to occur between the aluminum AA6060 and the different parts of the extruder is heavily influenced by the temperature.

  2. Frictional conditions between alloy AA6060 aluminium and tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widerøe, Fredrik; Welo, Torgeir

    2011-05-01

    The frictional conditions in the new process of screw extrusion of aluminium have been investigated. The contact behaviour between the aluminum alloy and the tool steel in the extruder is vital for understanding the extrusion process. Using a compressive-rotational method for frictional measurements the conditions for unlubricated sticking friction between aluminum alloy AA6060 and tool steel at different combinations of temperatures and pressures have been investigated. In this method the samples in the form of disks are put under hydrostatic pressure while simultaneously being rotated at one end. Pins made from contrast material have been inserted into the samples to measure the deformation introduced. This approach along with 3D simulations form a method for determining the frictional conditions. The paper describes the test method and the results. It was found that the necessary pressure for sticking to occur between the aluminum AA6060 and the different parts of the extruder is heavily influenced by the temperature.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Hot Isostatically Pressed-Produced Stainless Steel/High Alloy Tool Steel Compound Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, Greta; Flyg, Jesper; Frisk, Karin; Sandberg, Odd

    2011-05-01

    Consolidation of tool steel powders and simultaneous joining to a stainless 316L steel are performed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Two tool steel grades are considered: a high vanadium alloyed carbon tool steel, and a high vanadium and chromium alloyed nitrogen tool steel. The boundary layer arising during diffusion bonding is in focus and, in particular, the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen over the joint. Measurements of the elemental concentration profiles and corrosion tests by the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) method are performed. Comparative calculations with the DICTRA software are performed and are found to be in agreement with the experimental results. It is found that the carbon tool steel grade has a more critical influence on the corrosion resistance of the stainless 316L steel in comparison to the nitrogen tool steel grade.

  4. [Analysis of alloy tool steel using X-ray fluorescence spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Cai, Y; Huang, Z

    2001-08-01

    This report briefly introduces the analysis of Mn, Cr, V, W, Ti, Nb, Co, Zr, Ni, Mo, S, P, Si and Cu in alloy tool steel with X-ray florescence spectrometer. After being polished with grinding well and being cleaned with ethly alcohol, the test samples can be directly measured, and the results agree well with the standard values of the laboratory standards. The precision of the method (RSD) is in the range of 0.13%-9.56% (n = 8) for all elements except W, Ti, Nb and Zr. The method can be applied to many kinds of steel, such as chrome vanadium steel, manganese steel, die steel, middle-low alloy steel, tool steel. The measure instrument should be rectified with two or three standard samples which the quantity contained is suitable. The standard samples include 1Cr18Ni9Ti, C17Ni2, 25CrMo1V, 30CrMnSiA, 3CrW8V, Gx-8, Cr12MoV, chrome vanadium steel, manganese-boron steel, middle-low alloy steel and other kinds of steel. If there is not conditions to make work curves for all kinds steel separately, sometimes we don't know what kind of steel for one complex sample, the more real way will be to make an overall work curves which contains more kinds of steel as far as possible.

  5. Improvement of Laser Deposited High Alloyed Powder Metallurgical Tool Steel by a Post-tempering Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leunda, J.; Navas, V. García; Soriano, C.; Sanz, C.

    Laser cladding process of a high alloyed powder metallurgical tool steel was studied for die repairing purposes. The low hardness obtained after the deposition process was improved by later tempering cycles, achieving crack free coatings with hardness well above 700 HV. The effect of different post tempering cycles was investigated in order to determine the optimal temperature range. The microstructure of the samples was studied using optical and scanning electron microscope and the volumetric ratio of retained austenite was determined by X-ray diffraction. The tempering effect was mainly evaluated through cross-section microhardness profiles.

  6. Direct Metal Deposition of H13 Tool Steel on Copper Alloy Substrate: Parametric Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M. Khalid; Masood, S. H.; Brandt, Milan

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated interest in tribology and prototyping by the laser aided material deposition process. Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) enables the formation of a uniform clad by melting the powder to form desired component from metal powder materials. In this research H13 tool steel has been used to clad on a copper alloy substrate using DMD. The effects of laser parameters on the quality of DMD deposited clad have been investigated and acceptable processing parameters have been determined largely through trial-and-error approaches. The relationships between DMD process parameters and the product characteristics such as porosity, micro-cracks and microhardness have been analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), image analysis software (ImageJ) and microhardness tester. It has been found that DMD parameters such as laser power, powder mass flow rate, feed rate and focus size have an important role in clad quality and crack formation.

  7. Alloy design to control the size and morphology of niobium carbides in tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, M.M.; Andrade, M.S. , Belo Horizonte, MG ); Guimaraes, J.R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Controlling the size and the morphology of niobium carbides is crucial to develop a carbide volume fraction capable of significantly influencing the cutting/wear properties of tool steels and cast irons. The phase diagram suggests that by increasing the delta phase field, ferrite may be forced to precipitate preferentially to NbC. Hence, alloying with a strong ferritizer such as aluminum and/or silicon may result in more convenient microstructure when Nb %{gt}3. To check that possibility, as-cast microstructures were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. By combining additions of niobium and aluminum, it seems possible to control the size and the morphology of niobium carbides without necessarily resorting to more complex processes such as atomization and the like.

  8. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-01

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry1,2,3. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago1. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear. First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test. All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  9. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-04

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear.First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test.All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  10. Effect of Laser Beam Alloying Strategies on the Metallurgical and Mechanical Properties of Hot Forming Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Konstantin; Neubauer, Franziska; Holzer, Matthias; Mann, Vincent; Hugger, Florian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    In terms of increasing lightweight designs of car body parts, the machining of high strength steels in hot stamping processes becomes of particular interest. Due to high process forces at hot stamping, the surface of such tools in the area of maximal stress is subject wear, which necessitate some local increase of microhardness to enhance the mechanical performance. Especially laser beam alloying using filler wire and beam oscillation is some suitable method to modify the mechanical properties of tool surfaces to emcompass some continuous martensitic structure, featuring a certain microhardness. Nevertheless the thermal energy input during laser beam alloying induces tempering in the heat affected zone and reduces the hardness. This paper discusses the influence of alloying strategies on the thermal energy input and the resulting metallurgical structure of modified tool surfaces. Also the cooling behavior of alloyed lines for different energy inputs per unit length is of interest. Therefore, the metallurgical microstructure is analyzed regarding microhardness as well as formation of carbides. Furthermore, a numerical thermal simulation is developed to investigate the temperature profile in the heat affected zone of the specimen. These investigations permit the control of the spatiotemporal energy input to avoid tempering of the microstructure.

  11. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  12. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  13. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  15. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  16. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  17. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    PubMed

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them.

  18. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhmanii, S.; Mohideen, R.; Zaidi, A. M. A.; Hasan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips.

  19. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  20. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  1. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  2. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  3. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  4. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  5. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Dr. Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  6. Direct Alloying of Steel with Nickel Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Proshunin, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    A technology of alloying steel with nickel reduced from nickel concentrate is analysed and developed. Limits of reduction concentration areas are defined. An optimal composition of nickel concentrate pellets and a method of feeding them into the furnace are deduced from experiments. It is proved that when pellets made of nickel concentrate and coke are added into the charge during steel smelting by the technology of alloyed scrap remelting, nickel recovery achieves 92-95%. The technology was tested by smelting DSP-40 steel.

  7. Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, D.E. )

    1994-06-01

    A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

  8. Effect of inclusion size on the high cycle fatigue strength and failure mode of a high V alloyed powder metallurgy tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Qu, Xuan-hui; He, Xin-bo; Zhang, Lin

    2012-07-01

    The fatigue strength of a high V alloyed powder metallurgy tool steel with two different inclusion size levels, tempered at different temperatures, was investigated by a series of high cycle fatigue tests. It was shown that brittle inclusions with large sizes above 30 μm prompted the occurrence of subsurface crack initiation and the reduction in fatigue strength. The fracture toughness and the stress amplitude both exerted a significant influence on the fish-eye size. A larger fish-eye area would form in the sample with a higher fracture toughness subjected to a lower stress amplitude. The stress intensity factor of the inclusion was found to lie above a typical value of the threshold stress intensity factor of 4 MPa·m1/2. The fracture toughness of the sample with a hardness above HRC 56 could be estimated by the mean value of the stress intensity factor of the fish-eye. According to fractographic evaluation, the critical inclusion size can be calculated by linear fracture mechanics.

  9. Tungsten carbide laser alloying of a low alloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Mihai; Taca, Mihaela

    1996-10-01

    Laser alloying is a way to change the composition of metal surfaces in order to improve their corrosion-resistance, high-temperature strength and hardness. The results of a structural and phase analysis of a tungsten carbide based surface layer prepared by laser alloying of a low carbon steel substrate are presented. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of surface alloyed layers have been investigated. The surface of the samples exhibited a thin layer with a different chemical and phase composition. An increase in alloyed surface hardness and wear-resistance was observed.

  10. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  11. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  12. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  13. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  14. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding of Hardenable Alloy Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    bead-on-plate FSW traverses, approximately 64 inches (1.6 m) in total length, on 0.25 inch (6.4 mm) thick plates of a hardenable alloy steel . The...base plate. Based on preliminary findings, FSW of hardenable alloy steel is a feasible process and should be further researched and refined. 15...v ABSTRACT The objective of this thesis is to determine whether friction stir welding ( FSW ) is a feasible welding process for steels in an

  15. Microstructural characterisation of friction stir welding joints of mild steel to Ni-based alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.; Ramirez, A.J.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, 6-mm-thick mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 plates were friction stir welded using a tool rotational speed of 300 rpm and a travel speed of 100 mm·min{sup −1}. A microstructural characterisation of the dissimilar butt joint was performed using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (XEDS). Six different weld zones were found. In the steel, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was divided into three zones and was composed of ferrite, pearlite colonies with different morphologies, degenerated regions of pearlite and allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite. The stir zone (SZ) of the steel showed a coarse microstructure consisting of allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite, degenerate pearlite and MA constituents. In the Ni-based alloy 625, the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) showed deformed grains and redistribution of precipitates. In the SZ, the high deformation and temperature produced a recrystallised microstructure, as well as fracture and redistribution of MC precipitates. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates, present in the base material, were also redistributed in the stir zone of the Ni-based alloy. TMAZ in the steel and HAZ in the Ni-based alloy could not be identified. The main restorative mechanisms were discontinuous dynamic recrystallisation in the steel, and discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallisation in the Ni-based alloy. The interface region between the steel and the Ni-based alloy showed a fcc microstructure with NbC carbides and an average length of 2.0 μm. - Highlights: • Comprehensive microstructural characterisation of dissimilar joints of mild steel to Ni-based alloy • Friction stir welding of joints of mild steel to Ni-based alloy 625 produces sound welds. • The interface region showed deformed and recrystallised fcc grains with NbC carbides and a length of 2.0 μm.

  16. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    joining techniques for the dissimilar materials. 2. Recent technologies for joining aluminum alloys to steels ...2012) 143-147. UNCLASSIFIED 33 UNCLASSIFIED [19] J. Bruckner, Considering thermal processes for dissimilar metals- joining steel to aluminum in...Murakami, K. Nakata, H. Tong, M. Ushio, Dissimilar metal joining of aluminum to steel by MIG arc brazing using flux cored wire, ISIJ Int. 43 (10)

  17. Isothermal superplastic boronizing of high carbon and low alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.H.; Gao, W.; Xi, J.K.

    1996-02-01

    Superplasticity has been developed rapidly since the 1960`s. Superplasticity and superplastic deformation technique of steel and ferrous alloys offer a new method of forming complex parts for industrial applications, such as dies and gears. On the other hand, boronizing has long been used to improve the surface properties of dies and tools because boride has high hardness, good wear resistance, and good corrosion and oxidation resistance. Superplastic boronizing, a new technique, is the processes that combines boronizing with superplastic deformation. Because two processes become one, energy and time can be saved. In the present paper, the superplastic boronizing processes for commercial 0.9C-1Si-1Cr-Fe and 1C-1Cr-Fe steels are described first. Then, the microstructure and properties of specimens produced by using superplastic and conventional boronizing are compared. Finally, a physical model for superplastic boronizing processes is suggested.

  18. Reducing tool wear when machining austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.H.; Kosa, T.

    1998-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered more difficult to machine than carbon steels due to their high work hardening rate, large spread between yield and ultimate tensile strength, high toughness and ductility, and low thermal conductivity. These characteristics can result in a built-up edge or excessive tool wear during machining, especially when the cutting speed is too high. The practical solution is to lower the cutting speed until tool life reaches an acceptable level. However, lower machining speed negatively impacts productivity. Thus, in order to overcome tool wear at relatively high machining speeds for these alloys, on-going research is being performed to improve cutting fluids, develop more wear-resistant tools, and to modify stainless steels to make them less likely to cause tool wear. This paper discusses compositional modifications to the two most commonly machined austenitic stainless steels (Type 303 and 304) which reduced their susceptibility to tool wear, and allowed these grades to be machined at higher cutting speeds.

  19. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Hovanski, Y.; Grant, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in a lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential: a 0.8 mm thick, electrogalvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5 mm thick hot-dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel. These steels were joined to 2.33 mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and the process parameters were kept the same. The average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating present on the steel sheets, and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulted in the formation of a solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer.

  20. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  1. Tool Steel Heat Treatment Optimization Using Neural Network Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Belič, Igor; Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaz

    2016-11-01

    Optimization of tool steel properties and corresponding heat treatment is mainly based on trial and error approach, which requires tremendous experimental work and resources. Therefore, there is a huge need for tools allowing prediction of mechanical properties of tool steels as a function of composition and heat treatment process variables. The aim of the present work was to explore the potential and possibilities of artificial neural network-based modeling to select and optimize vacuum heat treatment conditions depending on the hot work tool steel composition and required properties. In the current case training of the feedforward neural network with error backpropagation training scheme and four layers of neurons (8-20-20-2) scheme was based on the experimentally obtained tempering diagrams for ten different hot work tool steel compositions and at least two austenitizing temperatures. Results show that this type of modeling can be successfully used for detailed and multifunctional analysis of different influential parameters as well as to optimize heat treatment process of hot work tool steels depending on the composition. In terms of composition, V was found as the most beneficial alloying element increasing hardness and fracture toughness of hot work tool steel; Si, Mn, and Cr increase hardness but lead to reduced fracture toughness, while Mo has the opposite effect. Optimum concentration providing high KIc/HRC ratios would include 0.75 pct Si, 0.4 pct Mn, 5.1 pct Cr, 1.5 pct Mo, and 0.5 pct V, with the optimum heat treatment performed at lower austenitizing and intermediate tempering temperatures.

  2. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-07-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ``noble`` nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation.

  3. Practical handbook of stainless steels and nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, S.

    1999-07-01

    This new handbook is an up-to-date technical guide to the grades, properties, fabrication characteristics, and applications of stainless steels and nickel alloys. The individual chapters were written by industry experts and focus on the key properties and alloy characteristics important in material selection and specification as well as the practical factors that influence the development and application of these materials. The contents include: alloy grades and their welding and fabrication characteristics and their application; monel metal; iron-based and nickel-based alloys; ferritic, austenitic, superaustenitic, and martensitic stainless steels; hastelloys; alloys 20, G, and 825; AOD and new refining technology; duplex stainless steels; 6-Mo alloys; corrosion-resistant castings; specification cross-reference tables; trade names; hardness conversions; list of common abbreviations.

  4. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-01-13

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-II reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  5. A statistical model for cleavage fracture of low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Wang, G.Z.; Wang, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    A new statistical model for cleavage fracture of the low alloy steel is proposed. This model is based on a recently suggested physical model and takes account of the effect of the preceding loading processes. This statistical model satisfactorily describes the failure probability distribution of 42 precracked specimens fractured at various loads at a test temperature of {minus}100 C. The micromechanisms of cleavage fracture of low alloy steel are also further discussed.

  6. 75 FR 26273 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China AGENCY...-fair-value imports from China of certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure... merchandise as ``* * * Certain seamless carbon and alloy steel (other than stainless steel) pipes and...

  7. 48 CFR 252.225-7030 - Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. 252.225-7030 Section 252.225-7030 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. As prescribed in 225.7011-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate (DEC 2006) (a) Carbon, alloy, and...

  8. 48 CFR 252.225-7030 - Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. 252.225-7030 Section 252.225-7030 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. As prescribed in 225.7011-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate (DEC 2006) (a) Carbon, alloy, and...

  9. 48 CFR 252.225-7030 - Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. 252.225-7030 Section 252.225-7030 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. As prescribed in 225.7011-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate (DEC 2006) (a) Carbon, alloy, and...

  10. 48 CFR 252.225-7030 - Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. 252.225-7030 Section 252.225-7030 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. As prescribed in 225.7011-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate (DEC 2006) (a) Carbon, alloy, and...

  11. 48 CFR 252.225-7030 - Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. 252.225-7030 Section 252.225-7030 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate. As prescribed in 225.7011-3, use the following clause: Restriction on Acquisition of Carbon, Alloy, and Armor Steel Plate (DEC 2006) (a) Carbon, alloy, and...

  12. Comparative Structural Strength Research of Hardened Carbon Steel and Hot-Rolled Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Zhakupov, A. N.; Kanayev, A. T.; Sikach, I. A.; Tugumov, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on quantitative evaluation of fatigue strength showed that St5ps and St5sp carbon steels with A400 strength class can be fully applied for erection of constructions and buildings having cyclical loads during operation. Study of corrosion resistance of hardened carbon steel in comparison with hot-rolled alloy steel consists in difference in structures and hence, difference in intensity of electric and chemical processes featuring presence of steel in concrete. Structure of St5sp steel with A400 strength class in surface area has significantly less corrosion rate than ferritic-perlitic structure of 35GS steel with A400 strength class.

  13. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  14. The Austenitizing Behavior of a Low Alloy Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    to differences in melting and solidification between the two types of steels ; ESR exhibiting a more uniform dendritic grain structure and possibly...AD-AoVtS^ MCHNICAi; LIBRARY AD TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR-80013 TIE AUSIENITIZING BEHAVIOR OF A LDW ALLDY STEEL P, A. Thornton May 1980 US...Behavior of a Low Alloy Steel 5. TYPE OF REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHORf*; 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERf*) Peter A

  15. Simulation of Structural Transformations in Heating of Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, A. S.; Makarov, E. L.; Kurkin, A. B.; Rubtsov, D. E.; Rubtsov, M. E.

    2017-07-01

    Amathematical model for computer simulation of structural transformations in an alloy steel under the conditions of the thermal cycle of multipass welding is presented. The austenitic transformation under the heating and the processes of decomposition of bainite and martensite under repeated heating are considered. Amethod for determining the necessary temperature-time parameters of the model from the chemical composition of the steel is described. Published data are processed and the results used to derive regression models of the temperature ranges and parameters of transformation kinetics of alloy steels. The method developed is used in computer simulation of the process of multipass welding of pipes by the finite-element method.

  16. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  17. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  18. ASM Specialty Handbook{reg_sign}: Carbon and alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Carbon and alloy steels are the workhorse of structural materials in modern engineering because of their very reasonable costs coupled with their many and varied properties that allow their use in such a large array of applications. it`s very easy to take steel for granted and forget how much it`s relied upon in critical uses such as cars, bridges, buildings, landing gear assemblies, and more. There are in-depth reviews on formability weldability, machineability, and hardenability of the various steel grades. One can also discover how adding certain alloys can significantly improve steel processing. The strength and toughness section has been greatly expanded with more coverage than ever before of corrosion fatigue. One has access to extensive reports detailing which steels are more susceptible to environmental damage such as stress-corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. Temperature effects relating to mechanical properties and corrosion are also discussed.

  19. Friction Properties of Molybdenum Alloyed Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianliang; Xiong Dangsheng; Wu Hongyan

    2011-01-17

    The high-temperature properties of steel surface can be improved by molybdenum surface alloying. Molybdenzing was carried out on carbon steel in the multi-function double glow plasma surface alloying furnace. The friction and wear tests were conducted on a high temperature ball-on-disk tribometer under the temperature of 25 deg. C{approx}600 deg. C. The contents of alloy element varied with alloyed layer were detected by SEM attached with EDS. The molybdenized layer is composed of the deposited layer and diffused layer. The micro-hardness of alloyed layer decreases from HV650 on the top layer to HV240. The friction coefficient of molybdenized layer decreases from 0.5{approx}0.6 to 0.2{approx}0.3 and wear rate decreases by 20% at elevated temperature after molybdenizing.

  20. Undervehicle corrosion testing of zinc and zinc alloy coated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, R.J.; de Souza, K.M.

    1986-12-01

    Undervehicle and on-vehicle coupon corrosion test programs are initiated by Dofasco Inc. in 1981, using two commercial trucks operated in the deicing salt/snow belt area of Southern Ontario, Canada. The purpose was to investigate the relative corrosion performance of numerous zinc and zinc alloy coated steels. Seventeen coated steels were tested. Results to date indicate that the hot dip coated steels with the thicker coatings are outperforming the electrolytic coated steels in both the unpainted and phosphated/cathodic primed conditions. Fully painted on-vehicle test coupons show minimal corrosion and little difference to date.

  1. Fatigue Strength Restoration in Corrosion Pitted 4340 Alloy Steel Via Low Plasticity Burnishing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    at far lower cost7. LPB can be performed on conventional and CNC machine tools at costs and speeds comparable to those in conventional machining ...typical multi-axis CNC machining operation. Fatigue Strength Restoration in Corrosion Pitted 4340 Alloy Steel via Low Plasticity Burnishing Page -4...distribution produced. This allows application of the process at the highest practical CNC machining speeds. Figure 2 - LPB tool being used in four

  2. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Various Aluminum Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuying; Suzumura, Akio; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    Brazing of a stainless steel to various aluminum alloys was carried out using an Al-Si filler metal and a fluoride-active flux in air. The brazeability was remarkably different by the aluminum alloys and the brazing conditions. It was considered that the differences were originated with the compositions of base metals and the filler metal, the solidus temperature and the partially melting behavior of the aluminum alloys, and the behavior of the surface oxide film layers of both base metals. On the other hand, the obstruction of brazeability was identified as the rapid reaction between the aluminum alloys and the brazing filler metal, which makes the molten brazing filler metal disappear at the joining interface before the wetting occurs to the stainless steel. Taking this phenomena into consideration, it was attempted to make previous wetting of the brazing filler to the stainless steel before brazing to the aluminum alloys. This method provided the successful brazed joints for the most combinations of the stainless steel and the aluminum alloys.

  3. Influence of Processing and Heat Treatment on Corrosion Resistance and Properties of High Alloyed Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Horst; Weber, Sebastian; Raab, Ulrich; Theisen, Werner; Wagner, Lothar

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion and abrasive wear are two important aspects to be considered in numerous engineering applications. Looking at steels, high-chromium high-carbon tool steels are proper and cost-efficient materials. They can either be put into service as bulk materials or used as comparatively thin coatings to protect lower alloyed construction or heat treatable steels from wear and corrosion. In this study, two different corrosion resistant tool steels were used for the production of coatings and bulk material. They were processed by thermal spraying and super solidus liquid phase sintering as both processes can generally be applied to produce coatings on low alloyed substrates. Thermally sprayed (high velocity oxygen fuel) coatings were investigated in the as-processed state, which is the most commonly used condition for technical applications, and after a quenching and tempering treatment. In comparison, sintered steels were analyzed in the quenched and tempered condition only. Significant influence of alloy chemistry, processing route, and heat treatment on tribological properties was found. Experimental investigations were supported by computational thermodynamics aiming at an improvement of tribological and corrosive resistance.

  4. 30 CFR 57.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 57.7050 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  5. 30 CFR 57.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 57.7050 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  6. 30 CFR 57.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 57.7050 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  7. 30 CFR 56.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 56.7050 Section 56... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  8. 30 CFR 56.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 56.7050 Section 56... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  9. 30 CFR 57.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 57.7050 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  10. 30 CFR 56.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 56.7050 Section 56... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  11. 30 CFR 56.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 56.7050 Section 56... Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for drill steel and tools stored or carried on drills....

  12. 75 FR 69125 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... COMMISSION Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China Determination... alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe (``seamless SLP pipe''), provided for in subheadings 7304... USITC Publication 4190 (November 2010), entitled Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard,...

  13. 77 FR 59892 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final... mm to 5.0 mm. \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary... on said entries.\\4\\ \\2\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Initiation of...

  14. 77 FR 19711 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... COMMISSION Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany... revocation of the antidumping duty order on certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and... Commission found one Domestic Like Product consisting of seamless carbon and alloy steel standard,...

  15. Materials data handbooks prepared for aluminum alloys 2014, 2219, and 5456, and stainless steel alloy 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbooks summarize all presently known properties of commercially available structural aluminum alloys 2014, 2219, and 5456 and structural stainless steel alloy 301. The information includes physical and mechanical property data and design data presented in tables, illustrations, and text.

  16. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  17. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x}, have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 23}Zr{sub 6} during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy.

  18. Use of hypereutectoid high-speed steel 11M5F for the production of cutting and cold-stamping tools in the Avtovaz Joint-Stock Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, V. V.; Yartsev, A. N.; Buyanskaya, T. A.; Matveev, S. V.; Berdnikova, L. N.

    1997-05-01

    The development of low-alloy high-speed steels that reduce the production cost of cutting tools and dies can present practical interest for plants and small enterprises manufacturing tools for their special purposes. The present paper gives the results of an investigation of hypereutectoid low-alloy high-speed steel 11M5F and a widely used steel of grade R6M5. The basic and technological properties of these steels are compared, and the results of industrial tests of cutting, thread-rolling, cold-stamping tools and tools for semihot deformation operating under various conditions are described.

  19. Producing Fe-W-Co-Cr-C Alloy Cutting Tool Material Through Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Banik, Bibhas; Dutta, Debasish; Ray, Siddhartha

    2016-06-01

    High speed steel tools can withstand high impact forces as they are tough in nature. But they cannot retain their hardness at elevated temperature i.e. their hot hardness is low. Therefore permissible cutting speed is low and tools wear out easily. Use of lubricants is essential for HSS cutting tools. On the other hand cemented carbide tools can withstand greater compressive force, but due to lower toughness the tool can break easily. Moreover the cost of the tool is comparatively high. To achieve a better machining economy, Fe-W-Co-Cr-C alloys are being used nowadays. Their toughness is as good as HSS tools and hardness is very near to carbide tools. Even, at moderate cutting speeds they can be safely used in old machines having vibration. Moreover it is much cheaper than carbide tools. This paper highlights the Manufacturing Technology of the alloy and studies the comparative tribological properties of the alloy and tungsten mono carbide.

  20. Producing Fe-W-Co-Cr-C Alloy Cutting Tool Material Through Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Banik, Bibhas; Dutta, Debasish; Ray, Siddhartha

    2017-04-01

    High speed steel tools can withstand high impact forces as they are tough in nature. But they cannot retain their hardness at elevated temperature i.e. their hot hardness is low. Therefore permissible cutting speed is low and tools wear out easily. Use of lubricants is essential for HSS cutting tools. On the other hand cemented carbide tools can withstand greater compressive force, but due to lower toughness the tool can break easily. Moreover the cost of the tool is comparatively high. To achieve a better machining economy, Fe-W-Co-Cr-C alloys are being used nowadays. Their toughness is as good as HSS tools and hardness is very near to carbide tools. Even, at moderate cutting speeds they can be safely used in old machines having vibration. Moreover it is much cheaper than carbide tools. This paper highlights the Manufacturing Technology of the alloy and studies the comparative tribological properties of the alloy and tungsten mono carbide.

  1. Metallurgical aspects in laser welding of steels and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Muneharu

    1996-12-31

    Rapid cooled microstructures, solid state transformation, hardness distribution, porosity formation, hot cracking and crack susceptibility are discussed as the metallurgical aspects in laser welding of carbon steels, stainless steels and aluminum alloys in the present paper. In the cases of CO{sub 2} and YAG laser welding, the thermal cycles during welding of carbon steels showed a rapid heating rate of 10{sup 5} K/s and a rapid cooling rate of 10{sup 4} K/s. The solid state transformations during the thermal cycle are different from that in steel welds by arc. The microstructure in heat affected zone consists of ferrite band or matrix and hard martensite colonies with high carbon. It seems a kind of composite materials. The hardness distribution of steel welds by laser is different from that of arc welds in which the location of maximum hardness is coarse grain zone. However, it is the center of fusion zone or near the base metal in laser welds of carbon steel. Even in ultra low carbon steel welds, the hardness of weld metal is higher than 200 Hv and the microstructure is bainitic ferrite and low carbon martensite which have a low cold crack susceptibility. In addition, two mechanisms of porosity formation in laser welding of aluminum alloys including A3003, A5052, A5083, A5182 and A6061 alloys were investigated using the fundamental knowledge and the solidification crack susceptibility in laser welding of A5052, A5083, A6061 and A7NO1 alloys were studied for the application of laser welding in industries.

  2. Process for making a martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding product

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.

    1990-01-01

    This is a very narrowly defined martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding material for liquid metal cooled reactors, and a process for making such a martensitic steel alloy material. The alloy contains about 10.6 wt. % chromium, about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, about 0.85 wt. % manganese, about 0.2 wt. % niobium, about 0.37 wt. % silicon, about 0.2 wt. % carbon, about 0.2 wt. % vanadium, 0.05 maximum wt. % nickel, about 0.015 wt. % nitrogen, about 0.015 wt. % sulfur, about 0.05 wt. % copper, about 0.007 wt. % boron, about 0.007 wt. % phosphorous, and with the remainder being essentially iron. The process utilizes preparing such an alloy and homogenizing said alloy at about 1000.degree. C. for 16 hours; annealing said homogenized alloy at 1150.degree. C. for 15 minutes; and tempering said annealed alloy at 700.degree. C. for 2 hours. The material exhibits good high temperature strength (especially long stress rupture life) at elevated temperature (500.degree.-760.degree. C.).

  3. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  4. Barnacle-induced corrosion of high-alloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Koryakova, M.D.; Filonenko, N.Yu.; Kaplin, Yu.M.

    1995-03-01

    Local corrosion of two sorts of high-alloyed steels under the action of acorn barnacles (Balanuses) has been studied. It has been shown that in natural seawater at anaerobic conditions beneath living and dead barnacles, metabolic activity of bacteria may be considered as a primary cause for local surface depassivation.

  5. Pressurized metallurgy for high performance special steels and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Zhu, H. C.; Li, H. B.; Li, Y.; Liu, F. B.

    2016-07-01

    The pressure is one of the basic parameters which greatly influences the metallurgical reaction process and solidification of steels and alloys. In this paper the history and present situation of research and application of pressurized metallurgy, especially pressurized metallurgy for special steels and alloys have been briefly reviewed. In the following part the physical chemistry of pressurized metallurgy is summarized. It is shown that pressurizing may change the conditions of chemical reaction in thermodynamics and kinetics due to the pressure effect on gas volume, solubility of gas and volatile element in metal melt, activity or activity coefficient of components, and change the physical and chemical properties of metal melt, heat transfer coefficient between mould and ingot, thus greatly influencing phase transformation during the solidification process and the solidification structure, such as increasing the solidification nucleation rate, reducing the critical nucleation radius, accelerating the solidification speed and significant macro/micro-structure refinement, and eliminating shrinkage, porosity and segregation and other casting defects. In the third part the research works of pressured metallurgy performed by the Northeastern University including establishment of pressurized induction melting (PIM) and pressurized electroslag remelting (PESR) equipments and development of high nitrogen steels under pressure are described in detail. Finally, it is considered in the paper that application of pressurized metallurgy in manufacture of high performance special steels and alloys is a relatively new research area, and its application prospects will be very broad and bright.

  6. Thermophysical property measurements on low alloy high strength carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Brooks, J.A.; Atteridge, D.G.; Porter, W.D.

    1997-06-15

    The alloys of interest in this study were AISI Type 4230 and Type 4320 low alloy high strength carbon steels. They are heat-treatable steels and are usually used in the quenched and tempered condition. The Type 4130 has about 0.3% (wt.)C, 0.95%Cr, and 0.2% Mo. The Type 4320 has about 0.2%C, 1.7%Ni, 0.7%Cr, and 0.3% Mo. They are among the most popular alloy steels because of their excellent combination of mechanical properties and are used in both cast and wrought forms for many applications requiring high strength and toughness. However, during the casting operation, carbon segregation to the part surface forms a high carbon content surface layer in the part, which will induce surface cracking in the subsequent quenching process. And, during the welding operation, the critical cooling rate in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) will determine if the weldment is crack-free or not. Thus, the numerical effort to study the thermal history, microstructure evolution and residual stress development during welding and casting is critical to the application of these steels. This modeling effect requires the accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties, such as thermal expansion, solidus and liquidus temperatures, specific heat capacity, and heat of fusion. Unfortunately, these thermophysical properties are unavailable for temperatures over 1,000 C (1,2), thus the need for this study.

  7. Oxygen effect on low-alloy steel weld metal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, N.N. . Welding Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    It is shown that the weld metal oxygen content in submerged arc low-alloy steel welds, as well as in low-carbon steel welds is dependent on the concentration of oxides decomposed at low temperatures in a weld pool slag phase. The oxygen is mainly in the form of fine dispersed oxide inclusions of less than 0.03 [mu]m. Differentiated evaluation of silicon reduction effects in submerged arc welded low-alloy steels revealed that weld metal brittle fracture strength depends to a considerable degree on total weld metal oxide inclusion content than on silicon increment in the weld. Therefore, the increase of weld metal brittle fracture susceptibility with the growth of weld oxide inclusion content is important to know. Welds with lowered oxygen content [0] [<=] 0.02% also display the tendency to decrease in plasticity because (1) the ferritic-pearlitic matrix of improved purity is likely to generate unbalanced structures on cooling and, (2) when there are no oxide inclusions, the shape of sulfur and phosphor precipitation from the melt changes from globular to film-like. Optimal low-alloy steel weld metal oxygen content is defined in the range of 0.02-0.035.

  8. Oriented microtexturing on the surface of high-speed steel cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    Microtexturing the metal cutting tool surfaces is a novel technique intended for enhancing the workability of these tools. The microtexturing is used in machining the titanium alloys for air-space applications for reducing the adhesion wear of metal cutting blades. This paper is focused on forming the microtextured dotted, banded and overlapped areas on the surfaces of high-speed steel samples. The treated areas have been examined using laser scanning microscopy for the microtexture pattern and roughness. It has been shown that the microtextured surfaces obtained on the high-speed steel samples were free of cracks. Surface pattern and roughness of all three microtextured areas have been examined and analyzed.

  9. Influence of alloying elements on corrosion resistance of low alloy steels in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, F.I.

    1995-09-01

    Most area of the earth is ocean. Therefore, exploitation of marine resources and utilization of marine space rapidly increase in recent years. Most of marine structures, such as wharfs, oil drilling platforms, coastal bridges, airports, etc. are mainly constructed by steel. It is therefore very important to develop marine corrosion resistant steels that do not require protection and are inexpensive. In this study, a series of low alloy steels were prepared by the method of experimental design as well as conventional design to study the effects of alloying elements on the marine corrosion resistance, under consideration of the requirement of mechanical properties. All steels were cyclically dipped to synthetic sea water in the laboratory for 7 weeks or exposed in the Taichung Harbor for more than 4 years. Both test results show similar tendency of the effects of alloying elements, but the effects of fouling on pitting were only observed in the latter. Addition of phosphorus and copper can improve the general corrosion resistance in atmospheric splash zone and titanium has the same effect in sea water. Molybdenum can improve the general corrosion resistance in both splash and tidal zones and pitting resistance in tidal and submerged zones. Due to enrichment of the alloying elements in the rust resulting in development of inner dense rust layer and change of rust composition, the anti-corrosion ability of most designed steels can be enhanced in marine environment. In addition, the corrosion resistance of most tested steels is superior to plain carbon steel (A-36) and weathering steel (Acr-Ten A) in Taichung Harbor.

  10. 77 FR 54926 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel; Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel; Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany... U.S.C. 1675(c)), that revocation of the antidumping duty order on certain seamless carbon and alloy... 2012), entitled Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from...

  11. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  12. Improved Heat Treatment Of Steel Alloy 4340

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lawrence B.

    1993-01-01

    New process takes significantly less time than prior heat-treatment processes. Involves placing steel plate directly in furnace and heat-treating. Plate then quenched in slowly moving oil to reduce stresses. Any deflection then pressed out. Possible uses of 4340 steel include new and improved bulletproof vests for military and police personnel and armor for bulletproof automobiles for military, police, diplomatic, and private users. Also used in other military land vehicles as tanks and in both military and civilian aircraft. Lighter armorplate enables land vehicles and aircraft to attain greater speed and maneuverability, consume less fuel, and afford better protection from snipers or terrorists.

  13. Improved Heat Treatment Of Steel Alloy 4340

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lawrence B.

    1993-01-01

    New process takes significantly less time than prior heat-treatment processes. Involves placing steel plate directly in furnace and heat-treating. Plate then quenched in slowly moving oil to reduce stresses. Any deflection then pressed out. Possible uses of 4340 steel include new and improved bulletproof vests for military and police personnel and armor for bulletproof automobiles for military, police, diplomatic, and private users. Also used in other military land vehicles as tanks and in both military and civilian aircraft. Lighter armorplate enables land vehicles and aircraft to attain greater speed and maneuverability, consume less fuel, and afford better protection from snipers or terrorists.

  14. Study of hot hardness characteristics of tool steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Dietrich, M. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Hardness measurements of tool steel materials in electric furnace at elevated temperatures and low oxygen environment are discussed. Development of equation to predict short term hardness as function of intial room temperature hardness of steel is reported. Types of steel involved in the process are identified.

  15. [The LIBS experiment condition optimization of alloy steel].

    PubMed

    Shao, Yan; Gao, Xun; Du, Chuang; Zhao, Zhen-Ming; Chen, Wei-Yu; Hao, Zuo-Qiang; Sun, Chang-Kai; Lin, Jing-Quan

    2013-02-01

    Laser induced plasma spectroscopy of alloy steel was produced by Nd : YAG pulsed laser at 1 064 nm, and the spectral signal was detected by high resolution and width controlled ICCD. Several Fe atomic spectral lines such as 404.581, 414.387, 427.176 and 438.355 nm were chosen for analysis, and the effects of different experimental parameters on LIBS spectral signal intensity were investigated. It is shown that the experimental parameters such as pulse energy, laser focus location and laser delay time have great influence on the LIBS signal. LIBS signals with high spectral intensity and signal-background ratio (SBR) as well as the optimum experiment conditions were obtained by optimizing these experiment parameters so as to make composition analysis of the alloy steel.

  16. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  17. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  18. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  19. Reclamation and additional alloying of 18Ni(350) maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Salam, I.; Nasim, I.; Hussain, S.W.; Hashmi, F.H.; Khan, A.Q. )

    1994-06-01

    The possibility of gainfully utilizing grade 18Ni(350) maraging steel scrap has been investigated, along with the effect of additional alloying with niobium. A vacuum induction melting and casting furnace was used for melting and additional alloying. The cast ingots were hot forged and their properties compared with those of the stock material. The composition of the reprocessed material was found to be within the prescribed range for 18Ni(350) steel, except for some loss in titanium content. The hardness and tensile strength of the recycled steels were similar to those of the stock material. A slight decrease in hardness in the aged condition could be attributed to loss of titanium during remelting. Charpy V-notch impact testing indicated significantly higher toughness in the remelted material; this has been attributed to a homogeneous, refined microstructure and a lower level of inclusions. Additional alloying with 2% Nb not only improved the mechanical properties but also affected the amount of reverted austenite obtained after aging.

  20. Creation of composite bronze - maraging steel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekhin, B. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Khristolyubov, A. S.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Ernandes, A.

    2013-09-01

    The possibility is demonstrated of creating alloys based on the system Cu - Fe - Ni - Al, within which the matrix is bronze BrNA 4-1, "reinforced" with dendrites containing, apart from Fe and Cu, about 15% Ni and 1% Al. This dendrite composition provides dispersion hardening. Favorable dendrite morphology provides high deformability of these bronzes, and makes it possible to control mechanical and service properties by heat treatment over a wide range.

  1. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  2. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  3. 30 CFR 57.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 57.7050 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or...

  4. 30 CFR 56.7050 - Tool and drill steel racks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tool and drill steel racks. 56.7050 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7050 Tool and drill steel racks. Receptacles or racks shall be provided for...

  5. Development of Efficient Recycling System for Steel Alloying Elements in End of Life Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hajime; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Testsuya

    Special steels, which have been imparted various properties by the addition of alloying elements, have become increasingly important as materials for human life in recent years. As the largest industrial consumer of special steel materials, the motor vehicle industry requires large volumes of various types of special steel for vehicle production. Scrap containing base metals and alloying elements is generated from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). In current scrap treatment processes, alloying elements in steel materials are rarely considered, instead becoming impurities in steel recycling processes at electric arc furnaces (EAF) and losing their worth.

  6. Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

    2011-09-14

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  7. Development and selection of heat-resistant tool steels for water-cooled dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremney, L. S.; Zabezhinskii, A. Ya.

    1980-02-01

    Alloying and heat treatment of tool steels for water-cooled dies to improve the service life in high-speed automatic presses must ensure: 1) The lowest but still sufficient level of hardening during precipitation hardening; 2) the smallest amount of carbide not dissolved during quenching; 3) prevention of the decomposition of martensite in grain boundaries during tempering; 4) a structure of lath martensite.

  8. Mössbauer and XRD study of Al-Sn linished steel bimetal alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Silva, L. da; Stichleutner, S.; El-Sharif, M.; Homonnay, Z.; Klencsár, Z.; Sziráki, L.; Chisholm, C. U.; Lak, B.

    2016-12-01

    Aluminium alloy free CS1 type steel (0.06 wt% C, 0.45 wt% Mn) and samples of cold roll bonded steel bimetal alloys (MAS15 and MAS16) were fabricated and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) at room temperature. XRD has revealed only the existence of the alpha iron solid solution (steel) phase in the steel only sample, while identified steel and metallic Al and Sn constituent phases in the bimetallic alloys. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed the presence of 4 % secondary iron-bearing phase attributed mainly to iron oxide/ oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite) besides the steel matrix on the surface of the steel sample. A significant difference between the occurrences of the secondary phase of differently prepared bimetal alloys found in their 57Fe CEM spectra allowed to identify the main phase of debris as different iron oxide/ oxyhydroxides.

  9. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  10. Galvanic corrosion between dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels used for dental magnetic attachments.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriko; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we examined the corrosion behavior of dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels, namely SUS 444, SUS XM27, and SUS 447J1, used for dental magnetic attachments. Their galvanic corrosion behavior was evaluated from the viewpoint of corrosion potentials when they were in contact with each other. Rest potentials of the precious alloys were constantly higher than those of magnetic stainless steels. Since most gold alloys raised the corrosion potential more significantly than silver alloys did, silver alloys seemed to be better suited than gold alloys for combination with magnetic stainless steels. However, all corrosion potential values were sufficiently lower than the breakdown potentials of the stainless steels and existed within their passive regions. Based on the findings of this study, SUS XM27 and SUS 447J1--which exhibited higher breakdown potentials than SUS 444--emerged as the preferred choices for combination with gold alloys.

  11. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  12. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  13. Bactericidal activity of copper and niobium-alloyed austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Baena, M I; Márquez, M C; Matres, V; Botella, J; Ventosa, A

    2006-12-01

    Biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion are processes of material deterioration that originate from the attachment of microorganisms as quickly as the material is immersed in a nonsterile environment. Stainless steels, despite their wide use in different industries and as appliances and implant materials, do not possess inherent antimicrobial properties. Changes in hygiene legislation and increased public awareness of product quality makes it necessary to devise control methods that inhibit biofilm formation or to act at an early stage of the biofouling process and provide the release of antimicrobial compounds on a sustainable basis and at effective level. These antibacterial stainless steels may find a wide range of applications in fields, such as kitchen appliances, medical equipment, home electronics, and tools and hardware. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibacterial stainless steel and thus mitigate the microbial colonization and bacterial infection. Copper is known as an antibacterial agent; in contrast, niobium has been demonstrated to improve the antimicrobial effect of copper by stimulating the formation of precipitated copper particles and its distribution in the matrix of the stainless steel. Thus, we obtained slides of 3.8% copper and 0.1% niobium alloyed stainless steel; subjected them to three different heat treatment protocols (550 degrees C, 700 degrees C, and 800 degrees C for 100, 200, 300, and 400 hours); and determined their antimicrobial activities by using different initial bacterial cell densities and suspending solutions to apply the bacteria to the stainless steels. The bacterial strain used in these experiments was Escherichia coli CCM 4517. The best antimicrobial effects were observed in the slides of stainless steel treated at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C using an initial cell density of approximately 10(5) cells ml(-1) and phosphate-buffered saline as the solution in which the bacteria came into contact with

  14. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  15. 75 FR 21658 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago AGENCY: United States... in the antidumping duty Investigation No. 731-TA-961 concerning carbon and certain alloy steel...

  16. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate....

  17. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate....

  18. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate....

  19. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate....

  20. 48 CFR 225.7011 - Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restriction on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate. 225.7011 Section 225.7011 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on carbon, alloy, and armor steel plate....

  1. 78 FR 2658 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Rescission of... its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire...

  2. 77 FR 73015 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe... merchandise subject to the order is circular welded non-alloy steel pipe and tube. The product is...

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  4. 78 FR 76653 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine Scheduling of full five-year reviews concerning the countervailing duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel ] wire rod from Brazil and the antidumping duty orders on carbon and certain alloy steel wire...

  5. 78 FR 34342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and... duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico.\\1\\ This administrative review.... \\1\\ See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and...

  6. 78 FR 60316 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine... determine whether revocation of the countervailing duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from Brazil and antidumping duty orders on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from...

  7. 77 FR 73617 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... covered by the order are circular welded non-alloy steel pipes and tubes, of circular cross-section,...

  8. 75 FR 20342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of... antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

  9. 76 FR 44304 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended..., 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the... during the period of review. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of...

  10. 75 FR 57444 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe... alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe (``seamless pipe'') from the People's Republic of China... determination. See Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from the...

  11. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  12. 76 FR 14649 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Extension of Time... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico for the November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009, period of review. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  13. 75 FR 34980 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Final... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), covering the period November 1, 2007, through October 31, 2008. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic...

  14. 75 FR 13255 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe... determination in this countervailing duty investigation of certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard... of seamless pipe from the PRC. See Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line,...

  15. 75 FR 78216 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe and Tube...

  16. 75 FR 29972 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe... antidumping duty investigation of certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe... in this proceeding. See Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure...

  17. 76 FR 77770 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico.\\1\\ This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

  18. 77 FR 8808 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  19. 76 FR 76369 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), covering... Korea. See Notice of Antidumping Duty Orders: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from...

  20. 76 FR 15941 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  1. 78 FR 60850 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the... certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Brazil would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence... Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, 67 FR 55805 (August 30, 2002). \\2\\ See Initiation of...

  2. 78 FR 28190 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of... carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review (POR) is October 1... (the Act). \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  4. 75 FR 69050 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe... duty order on certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe (``seamless... seamless pipe from the PRC. See Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure...

  5. 78 FR 79664 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of the 2011-2012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of the 2011-2012 Antidumping Duty... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico for the period November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012... Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping...

  6. 75 FR 77838 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''). The period... Antidumping Duty Orders: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Brazil, the Republic of...

  7. 78 FR 17637 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Notice of Amended... welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. The period of review (POR) is November 1, 2007, through October 31, 2008.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Final Results...

  8. 75 FR 6183 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION (A-570-956) Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and... investigation on certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic of China. See Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From...

  9. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  10. 78 FR 78336 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... the antidumping duty order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea...: Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the order is circular welded non-alloy steel pipe and...

  11. 77 FR 66954 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of... on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review is October 1... certain alloy steel wire rod. The product is currently classified under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule...

  12. 76 FR 49437 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico, 75 FR 82374 (December 30,...

  13. 77 FR 21968 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... International Trade Administration Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the... and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic of China. The period of... countervailing duty order on seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the...

  14. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  15. 78 FR 35248 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) for the period... has been sold at less than normal value. \\1\\ See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From...

  16. 75 FR 69052 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe... Department is issuing an antidumping duty order on certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line... and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from the People's Republic of China:...

  17. Precipitation sequence in niobium-alloyed ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Nobuhiro; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Kikuchi, Masao

    2004-03-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element in the design of heat-resistant ferritic stainless steels for automotive exhaust systems. When in solid solution, it improves both the high temperature strength and the resistance to thermal fatigue. However, it also forms several kinds of precipitates during service. These reactions have been modelled, taking into account the multicomponent nature of the diffusion process and allowing for capillarity effects. It has been possible to estimate not only the volume fractions but also the particle sizes for Fe2Nb (Laves phase) and Fe3Nb3C (M6C) carbide in a 19Cr-0.8Nb steel, with good agreement against experimental data.

  18. Crack initiation mechanisms in IASCC of stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cookson, J.M.; Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    An abnormally high oxygen concentration was recently discovered in a high purity stainless steel alloy widely used in IASCC studies. This led to an investigation into the role of oxygen on the initiation of intergranular cracking in irradiated samples in high temperature water. The concentration of oxygen in the alloys correlated with the number of cracks initiated in the proton irradiated region of samples strained in water containing 0.5 {micro}S/cm H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 288 C. This suggests that the presence of oxygen, in the form of spinel oxide particles, can lead to a substantial increase in the likelihood of crack initiation. This effect is only observed in irradiated samples strained in water, not in either unirradiated (non-sensitized) samples strained in water or irradiated samples strained in argon This paper examines the possible role of oxides in promoting crack initiation and the implications for IASCC.

  19. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  20. Cavitation Erosion of Electro Spark Deposited Nitinol vs. Stellite Alloy on Stainless Steel Substrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-15

    EROSION OF ELECTRO SPARK DEPOSITED NITINOL VS. STELLITE® ALLOY ON STAINLESS STEEL SUBSTRATE Theresa A. Hoffard Lean-Miguel San Pedro Mikhail...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER CAVITATION EROSION TESTING OF ELECTRO SPARK DEPOSITED NITINOL VS STELLITE® ALLOY ON STAINLESS STEEL SUBTRATE 5b. GRANT...of combining Nitinol (NiTi) superelastic metal alloy with ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) technology to increase the cavitation erosion resistance of

  1. Standard specification for forged carbon and alloy steel flanges for low-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.22 on Steel Forgings and Wrought Fittings for Piping Applications and Bolting Materials for Piping and Special Purpose Applications. Current edition approved Mar. 10, 1998 and published October 1998.

  2. Study of ultrasonically assisted turning of stainless steel and brass alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, S. M. A.; Gouda, M. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonically assisted turning (UAT) is a hybrid machining technique employing high-frequency small-amplitude vibration superimposed on the tool movement during turning. It is superior to conventional turning (CT) with regard to cutting forces, surface quality and machining accuracy. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different machining parameters on stainless steel and brass alloys, during both UAT and CT, and evaluate improvements of cutting forces, surface roughness, surface integrity, and machining accuracy. An experimental setup for UAT at Loughborough University was used to accomplish this investigation. This setup used a Picoscope data acquisition add-on with Kistler three-component dynamometer, Seco DNMG cutting inserts were utilized, a surface tester from Taylor Hobson was used to evaluate surface roughness, Alicona Infinite Focus microscope was used to evaluate surface roughness and surface integrity, while Metris CMM with Renishaw probe was employed to evaluate machining accuracy. Cylindrical workpieces of steel and brass alloys were turned under CT and UAT conditions; cutting forces, surface roughness, and machining accuracy produced with both techniques where compared. Significant improvements were noticed in the ultrasonically assisted machining when compared to the CT for both alloys.

  3. Predictions of titanium alloy properties using thermodynamic modeling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Xie, F.-Y.; Chen, S.-L.; Chang, Y. A.; Furrer, D.; Venkatesh, V.

    2005-12-01

    Thermodynamic modeling tools have become essential in understanding the effect of alloy chemistry on the final microstructure of a material. Implementation of such tools to improve titanium processing via parameter optimization has resulted in significant cost savings through the elimination of shop/laboratory trials and tests. In this study, a thermodynamic modeling tool developed at CompuTherm, LLC, is being used to predict β transus, phase proportions, phase chemistries, partitioning coefficients, and phase boundaries of multicomponent titanium alloys. This modeling tool includes Pandat, software for multicomponent phase equilibrium calculations, and PanTitanium, a thermodynamic database for titanium alloys. Model predictions are compared with experimental results for one α-β alloy (Ti-64) and two near-β alloys (Ti-17 and Ti-10-2-3). The alloying elements, especially the interstitial elements O, N, H, and C, have been shown to have a significant effect on the β transus temperature, and are discussed in more detail herein.

  4. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  5. Some aspects of machining cast Al-SiCp composites with conventional high speed steel and tungsten carbide tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahari, P.; Pai, B. C.; Pillai, R. M.

    1999-10-01

    An attempt was made to evaluate machining of eutectic Al-Si (LM6) and hypoeutectic Al-Si (LM25) alloys reinforced with 10, 15, and 20% SiCp of two particle sizes using conventional high-speed steel (HSS) and tungsten carbide (WC) tools by varying cutting speed, feed, depth of cut, and environment. Machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is a difficult task using HSS and WC tools. The tool life of both these conventional tools was observed to decrease with increasing percentage and coarseness of SiCp in the composites. Tungsten carbide tools had a longer tool life than HSS under all the different conditions studied. Contrary to the known phenomenon of enhanced tool life in machining monolithic alloys with the use of cutting fluid, the tool life of WC/HSS tool in machining composites with cutting fluid was only 10 to 20% of that without cutting fluid.

  6. Development and Demonstration of Adanced Tooling Alloys for Molds and Dies

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Enrique J. Lavernia

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes research results in the project Development and Demonstration of Advanced Tooling Alloys for Molds and Dies. Molds, dies and related tooling are used to manufacture most of the plastic and metal products we use every day. Conventional fabrication of molds and dies involves a multiplicity of machining, benching and heat treatment unit operations. This approach is very expensive and time consuming. Rapid Solidifcation Process (RSP) Tooling is a spray-forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The appraoch combines rapid solidifcation processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. An atomized spray of a tool-forming alloy, typically a tool steel, is deposited onto an easy-to-form tool pattern to replicate the pattern's shape and surface features. By so doing, the approach eliminates many machining operations in conventional mold making, significantly reducing cost, lead time and energy. Moreover, rapid solidification creates unique microstructural features by suppressing carbide precipitation and growth, and creating metastable phases. This can result in unique material properties following heat treatment. Spray-formed and aged tool steel dies have exhibited extended life compared to conventional dies in many forming operations such as forging, extrusion and die casting. RSP Tooling technolocy was commercialized with the formation of RSP Tooling, LLC in Solon, Oh.

  7. Reactive Boride Brazing on Low-Alloy Automotive Grade Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, B.; Upadhyaya, A.

    2011-11-01

    Brazing is a widely used process to improve the performance of steels used in automotive applications. The substrate material is often exposed to harsh conditions in these applications and may affect the service life of the component. Reactive boride brazing aims to improve the mechanical properties of the substrate material by forming a ceramic-metal composite coating in a single-step process in situ. In this study, sintered Ancor 4300 low-alloy steel is used as the substrate with chromium-rich braze and chromium-lean braze materials. The mechanical properties of the brazed samples were studied in detail using microindentation hardness measurements and the transverse rupture test. The results indicate that the brazed superlayer has a 10 times higher hardness. There was a significant improvement in the transverse rupture strength of the steel brazed with the chromium-rich boride as compared to the pure substrate material. In an effort to reduce processing time, green compacts of the substrate were also directly brazed and yielded favorable results.

  8. Effect of Si addition on secondary hardening of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ki Sub; Kwon, Hoon

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the precipitation kinetics of secondary carbides in Si-bearing steels was examined via calorimetric analysis coupled with the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetic model. In particular, the properties of two commercial high-speed steels (10V and ASP 23), which contained the secondary carbides described by the formulas MC/M23C6 and MC/M23C6/M6C, respectively, were investigated and compared with those of PSD and AISI D2 steels. The obtained results revealed that the presence of Si in alloys not only inhibited the precipitation of the cementite phase, but also accelerated the precipitation kinetics of the secondary carbides. Using the obtained magnitudes of the thermodynamic driving force for complete precipitation in the metastable systems formed under para-equilibrium and ortho-equilibrium conditions, it was found that the addition of Si decreased the stability of the system produced under para-equilibrium conditions and, therefore, enabled the diffusion of interstitial carbon species at low temperatures as well as rapid aging during the secondary hardening reaction.

  9. Anticorrosion nitrided layers on unalloyed and alloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wach, P.; Michalski, J.; Burdyński, K.; Ciski, A.

    2017-02-01

    In the paper, nitrided layers on unalloyed and alloyed steels and their corrosion properties are presented. Nitrided layers in the controlled gas nitriding process on C10 and 42CrMo4 steels were formed. Two types of nitrided layers are presented: with nitride iron layers above and below 15 µm. Nitrided layer with nitride layer above 15 µm has good corrosion resistance, but after nitriding of machine parts were subsequently oxidised and impregnated. In the second type of nitrided layer, the surface layers of iron nitrides had a thickness of 3.0 to 11.0 µm. Nitrided layers with a surface layer of iron nitrides with the γ’ (Fe4N) structure were formed on unalloyed steel and investigated. The so-formed layers were subject to basic metallographic, X-ray diffraction and corrosion resistance studies carried out by electrochemical methods and in a neutral salt spray chamber. It was found that the layers consisting only of γ’ phase had a good corrosion resistance. Necessary requirements for achieving an enhanced resistance comprise their complete tightness and thickness not lower than 9.0 µm. Thinner layers had good electrochemical properties but did not exhibit corrosion resistance in the salt spray chamber.

  10. Laser beam surface melting of high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Woollin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The welding of high alloy austenitic stainless steels is generally accompanied by a substantial reduction in pitting corrosion resistance relative to the parent, due to microsegregation of Mo and Cr. This prevents the exploitation of the full potential of these steels. Processing to achieve remelting and rapid solidification offers a means of reducing microsegregation levels and improving corrosion resistance. Surface melting of parent UNS S31254 steel by laser beam has been demonstrated as a successful means of producing fine, as-solidified structures with pitting resistance similar to that of the parent, provided that an appropriate minimum beam travel speed is exceeded. The use of N{sub 2} laser trail gas increased the pitting resistance of the surface melted layer. Application of the technique to gas tungsten arc (GTA) melt runs has shown the ability to raise the pitting resistance significantly. Indeed, the use of optimized beam conditions, N{sub 2} trail gas and appropriate surface preparation prior to laser treatment increased the pitting resistance of GTA melt runs to a level approaching that of the parent material.

  11. Fatigue Properties of Butt Welded Aluminum Alloy and Carbon Steel Joints by Friction Stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okane, M.; Shitaka, T.; Ishida, M.; Chaki, T.; Yasui, T.; Fukumoto, M.

    2017-05-01

    The butt dissimilar joints of Al-Mg-Si alloy JIS A6063 and carbon steel JIS S45C by means of friction stir welding were prepared for investigating fatigue properties of the joints. The joining tool used has cemented carbide thread probe and a shoulder made of alloy tool steel. All the fatigue tests were carried out under a load-controlled condition with a load ratio R=0.1 in air at room temperature. From the experimental results, it was found that hardness near the interface in A6063 was lower than that of base material. Three types of fatigue fracture occurred even in case of same welding condition. The first one was fracture at boundary between the lower hardness region and base material in A6063, the second type was initiated in the stir zone by FSW process and the last one was fracture at interface. Fatigue strength in case of the second one was lower than others. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of heat treatment on fatigue properties of the dissimilar joints, fatigue tests were also carried out with using the specimens which were heat treated under the same condition to aging process in T6 treatment. Fatigue fracture was initiated at interface between A6063 and S45C in case of the heat treated specimen, but fatigue strength was improved approximately 25% as compared with that of the non-heat treated specimen.

  12. Improved the microstructures and properties of M3:2 high-speed steel by spray forming and niobium alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.; Hou, L.G.; Zhang, J.X.; Wang, H.B.; Cui, H.; Huang, J.F.; Zhang, Y.A.; Zhang, J.S.

    2016-07-15

    The microstructures and properties of spray formed (SF) high-speed steels (HSSs) with or without niobium (Nb) addition were studied. Particular emphasis was placed on the effect of Nb on the solidification microstructures, decomposition of M{sub 2}C carbides, thermal stability and mechanical properties. The results show that spray forming can refine the cell size of eutectic carbides due to the rapid cooling effect during atomization. With Nb addition, further refinement of the eutectic carbides and primary austenite grains are obtained. Moreover, the Nb addition can accelerate the decomposition of M{sub 2}C carbides and increase the thermal stability of high-speed steel, and also can improve the hardness and bending strength with slightly decrease the impact toughness. The high-speed steel made by spray forming and Nb alloying can give a better tool performance compared with powder metallurgy M3:2 and commercial AISI M2 high-speed steels. - Highlights: • Spray forming can effectively refine the microstructure of M3:2 steel. • Niobium accelerates the decomposition of M{sub 2}C carbides. • Niobium increases the hardness and bending strength of spray formed M3:2 steel. • Spray-formed niobium-containing M3:2 steel has the best tool performance.

  13. Cathodic protection of steel by electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, K.R.; Smith, C.J.E.; Robinson, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings to cathodically protect steel was studied in dilute chloride solutions. The potential distribution along steel strips partly electroplated with zinc-nickel alloys was determined, and the length of exposed steel that was held below the minimum protection potential (E{sub prot}) was taken as a measure of the level of cathodic protection (CP) provided by the alloy coatings. The level of CP afforded by zinc alloy coatings was found to decrease with increasing nickel content. When nickel content was increased to {approx} {ge} 21 wt%, no CP was obtained. Surface analysis of uncoupled zinc-nickel alloys that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions showed the concentration of zinc decreased in the surface layers while the concentration of nickel increased, indicating that the alloys were susceptible to dezincification. The analysis of zinc-nickel alloy coatings on partly electroplated steel strips that were immersed in chloride solution showed a significantly higher level of dezincification than that found for uncoupled alloy coatings. This effect accounted for the rapid loss of CP afforded to steel by some zinc alloy coatings, particularly those with high initial nickel levels.

  14. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  15. Alloy Shrinkage Factors for the Investment Casting of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Porter, Wallace D.

    2008-04-01

    In this study, alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made, in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed a different evolution on heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation was performed with thermal expansion obtained on heating, and another one was performed with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from the numerical simulation results of the solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly overpredicted.

  16. Deformation and fracture of low alloy steels at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Marriott, D.L.; Stubbins, J.F.; Leckie, F.A.; Muddle, B.

    1988-12-01

    This project formed part of the initiative in the AR TD program to characterize high temperature, time-dependent damage processes in low alloy steels, for use in the construction of coal-gasification plant. This project was broadly aimed at adding to the knowledge base for this bainitic form of 2.25Cr 1Mo steel, as it related to time-dependent performance at elevated temperature. Its original intention was to obtain information in specific grades of 2.25Cr 1Mo steel, in particular those containing reduced residual elements and microalloyed modifications, which were being considered as candidate materials at the time. This objective was subsequently modified, in the course of the contract period, to a more generic study of bainitic steel, using the 2.25Cr 1Mo material as a representative of the class. The main thrust of the project was directed initially at the detrimental effect of cyclic loading on creep resistance and manifesting itself in an apparently severe creep-fatigue interaction. Three subtasks were eventually identified. These are: a study of the evolution of microstructural changes in bainitic materials during steady load creep and under constant amplitude cyclic deformation, investigation of the effect of cyclic softening on the fatigue and creep strength of complex geometries, focusing on circumferentially notched bars, and investigation of the influence of environment as a possible cause of observed fatigue/elevated temperature interaction through its effects on crack initiation and propagation, using EDM notched specimens tested in air and vacuum. Results are discussed. 24 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-12-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  18. Temperature rise and wear of sliding contact of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Arindam Roy; Sardar, Santanu; Karmakar, Santanu Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The tribo-failure of machine elements under relative sliding velocities is greatly affected by frictional heating and resultant contact temperature rise. Nevertheless, the tribo-failure of automotive components is a combined effect of mechanical, thermal and chemical phenomena. Over the decades, there have been developed a number of different mathematical models for predicting surface temperature rise at sliding contact under different geometries of asperity contacts and operating conditions. The experimental investigation is still relevant today to find out the surface temperature rise at sliding contact along with the outcomes of friction and wear under various operating conditions for real time applications. The present work aims at finding average surface temperature rise at different sliding velocities, normal loads with different surface roughness experimentally. It also involves to prepare two different rough surfaces of alloy steels and to study their influences in the process of generating contact temperature rise under a given operating conditions.

  19. Reaction of Unalloyed and Cr-Mo Alloyed Steels with Nitrogen from the Sintering Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlapka, Magdalena; Gierl-Mayer, Christian; Calderon, Raquel de Oro; Danninger, Herbert; Bengtsson, Sven; Dudrova, Eva

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is usually regarded as an inert sintering atmosphere for PM steels; however, this cannot be taken for granted in particular for steels alloyed with nitride forming elements. Among those elements, chromium has become more and more important as an alloying element in sintered low alloy structural steels in the last decade due to the moderate alloying cost and the excellent mechanical properties obtainable, in particular when sinter hardening is applied. The high affinity of Cr to oxygen and the possible ways to overcome related problems have been the subject of numerous studies, while the fact that chromium is also a fairly strong nitride forming element has largely been neglected at least for low alloy steel grades, although frequently used materials like steels from Cr and Cr-Mo prealloyed powders are commonly sintered in atmospheres consisting mainly of nitrogen. In the present study, nitrogen pickup during sintering at different temperatures and for varying times has been studied for Cr-Mo prealloyed steel grades as well as for unalloyed carbon steel. Also the effect of the cooling rate and its influence on the properties, of the microstructure and the composition have been investigated. It showed that the main nitrogen uptake occurs not during isothermal sintering but rather during cooling. It could be demonstrated that a critical temperature range exists within which the investigated CrM-based steel is particularly sensitive to nitrogen pickup.

  20. Microscopic study of the structure of the Steel Ni-based Alloy: Hastelloy G35 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabir, F.; Ben Lenda, O.; Saissi, S.; Marbouh, K.; Tyouke, B.; Zerrouk, L.; Ibnlfassi, A.; Ouzaouit, K.; Elmadani, S.

    2017-03-01

    The study of the influence of heat treatment on changes of mechanical and structural properties of Steel Ni-based Alloy is a highly interdisciplinary topic at the interface of the physical chemistry of metallic materials, which also helps in environmental and economic protection.After heat treatment, the structural and micro-structural studies for the different transformation temperature led to identify phases formed and the morphology. This work has been carried out using different techniques: X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. The Evolution of the Segregation Behavior of Alloying Elements in a Low-Alloy Steel

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Papworth; D.B. Knorr; D.B. Williams

    2002-08-21

    The segregation of alloying and impurity elements to prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) in low-alloy steels controls temper-embrittlement although the precise microchemical and microstructural interactions are, as yet, unclear because of the many variables involved. Competing segregation and de-segregation phenomena are observed. For example, Auger analyses of fracture surfaces indicate that brittle fracture is caused by the segregation of P to the PAGB. The addition of small amounts ({approx} 0.5 wt%) of Mo appears to regard, but not stop, temper-embrittlement, possibly due to Mo{sub 2}C precipitates that form at elevated temperatures causing de-segregation of Mo from the PAGB. The relationship between segregation and temper embrittlement is further complicated in commercial alloys by both the number of segregating elements and the complex, multi-stage heat treatments. Auger analysis pre-selects the most embrittled boundaries and so the complete distribution of segregants across all PAGBs cannot be determined by this technique. Previous work has shown how X-ray mapping (XRM) in a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM) offers a more complete view of the distribution of segregants on both non-embrittled and embrittled PAGBs. XRM was used to observe the evolution of the segregation and desegregation of five elements during four successive heat-treatment stages of commercial low-alloy steel forging. In the last and crucial temper-embrittlement stage, increases in the degree and frequency of Ni segregation occur while other elements either segregate, remain constant or desegregate from the PAGBs.

  2. Corrosion Behavior and Durability of Low-Alloy Steel Rebars in Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Yue, Pan; Li, Jun

    2016-11-01

    The corrosion resistance of Cr-modified low-alloy steels and HRB400 carbon steel was estimated using the open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, and weight loss methods in simulated concrete pore solution. Results show that Cr-modified steels exhibit a higher corrosion resistance with a higher critical chloride level (CTL), lower corrosion current density, and higher impedance than carbon steel. The CTL of the steels significantly reduces with increasing temperature. Weight loss measurement shows that the Cr-modified steels exhibit low corrosion rates and small corrosion pitting. The primary constituents of the corrosion scales are Fe2O3, Fe3O4, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and α-FeOOH. A large amount of α-FeOOH could be detected in the Cr-modified steel corrosion products. Moreover, the Cr-modified steels demonstrate a higher durability than HRB400 carbon steel.

  3. Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

    2011-06-06

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  4. Iodine sorption on low-chromium alloy steel. [HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Briggs, R.B.; Wichner, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of iodine sorption on low-alloy steel in helium atmosphere included both computer calculations and experimental measurements under conditions that could be related to the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Adsorption measurements provide data on the potentially releasable inventory of iodine (a major radiological hazard) stored on surfaces in the coolant circuit during normal operation. Measurements of the rate and extent of iodine desorption when test conditions were changed are useful for evaluating the consequences of accidents. The results of calculations with the SOLGASMIX-PV computer program indicated that HI is the dominant iodine species in the system and that the deposition of CrI/sub 2/(s) or FeI/sub 2/(s) in the cooler regions will effectively limit the amount of iodine in the gas phase. Experimental measurements were obtained on 2-1/4% Cr-1% Mo steel specimens at iodine burdens as low as 10/sup -6/ Pa (10/sup -11/ atm), about 100 times lower than any previous work.

  5. Boric acid corrosion of carbon and low alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.A.; Fyfitch, S.; Martin, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    Leakage of borated water from the reactor coolant system of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and the resulting corrosion of carbon and low alloy steel components are concerns that have been addressed by utilities for many years. Significant corrosion has been observed in instances where such leakage has gone undetected for several months. In 1990, the B and W Owners Group (B and WOG) sponsored a test program to determine the levels of wastage that are possible when primary water leakage occurs. In this test program, carbon and stainless steel specimens were exposed to borated water at temperatures from 300 F to 550 F. Initial boric acid concentration was controlled within the limits of 13,000 to 15,000 ppm (as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) with 1.0--2.0 ppm lithium (as LiOH) added to duplicate the primary water chemistry. Testing was performed to determine the degree of attack caused by a leak traveling along a pipe both with and without insulation. These tests show the importance of temperature and boric acid concentrations on the wastage that can occur from such a leak.

  6. Nanosized controlled surface pretreatment of biometallic alloy 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Loftis, Derek; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel (AISI 316L) is a medical grade stainless steel alloy used extensively in medical devices and in the biomedical field. 316L stainless steel was successfully electropolished via an ecologically friendly and biocompatible ionic liquid (IL) medium based on Vitamin B4 (NB4) and resulting in nanosized surface roughness and topography. Voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests determined optimum polishing conditions for the stainless steel alloy while atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided surface morphology comparisons to benchmark success of each electropolishing condition. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) combined with SEM revealed significantly smoother surfaces for each alloy surface while indicating that the constituent metals comprising each alloy effectively electropolished at uniform rates.

  7. 76 FR 66899 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico, the... certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and Taiwan; and... initiation of the sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders on certain circular welded non-alloy...

  8. 77 FR 43806 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... International Trade Administration Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the... Department) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on seamless carbon and alloy... carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic of China covering...

  9. Crack-Growth Behavior of Laser Surface-Alloyed Low-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šturm, Roman; Žnidaršič, Matjaž; Grum, Janez

    2013-09-01

    Crack-growth behavior of Nd:YAG laser surface-alloyed as-received low-carbon steel Fe360B was evaluated. Thin surface layer was alloyed with silicon carbide SiC. During laser surface alloying process SiC powder dissolved in the melted pool. The surface-alloyed layer had as-solidified structure composed mainly of dendrites of ferrite, fine martensite needles, and retained austenite. The micro-hardness of the laser surface-alloyed layer was about 850 HV0.1. In laser surface-alloyed layer compressive residual stresses of average amount of σ RS = -100 MPa were obtained. In crack-growth tests comparison between specimens of as-received low-carbon steel Fe360B and the same steel with laser-alloyed surface was made. As the crack propagation was perpendicular to the interface between the laser-alloyed layers and the base metal, laser surface-alloyed specimens exhibited higher crack-growth resistance in the low stress intensity factor range Δ K th than as-received steel specimens.

  10. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  11. Al-Li alloys and ultrahigh-strength steels for U. S. Navy aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.W.; Neu, C.E.; Kozol, J. )

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation is made of the development status and prospective performance advantages and cost reductions obtainable through the application of state-of-the-art Al-Li alloys to naval aircraft airframes and ultrahigh strength Ni-Co alloy steels to their landing gears. Structural weight fractions are expected to be reduced by 8-10 percent through substitution of high-stiffness Al-Li for conventional Al alloys. Ni-Co alloy steels enhance landing gear damage tolerance and resistance to environmental degradation, without associated weight penalty, when supplanting conventional low-alloy steels. Both materials are judged ready for immediate application to existing and next-generation U.S. Navy aircraft. 8 refs.

  12. Raising the Structural Strength of Systematically Alloyed Fe - Cr - Ni - Mo-Base Maraging Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkovskii, S. V.; Ishina, E. A.; Kuteneva, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of systematical Mo, Ti, Al and Ca alloying of corrosion-resistant maraging steels of type Kh11N10M2T and of the modes of their heat treatment on the phase composition, combination of properties and resistance to brittle fracture is studied. It is shown that the structural strength of the steels can be raised by additional alloying with copper and formation of a regulated content of metastable retained austenite.

  13. Spark Plasma Co-Sintering of Mechanically Milled Tool Steel and High Speed Steel Powders

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzari, Massimo; Fedrizzi, Anna; Zadra, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hot work tool steel (AISI H13) and high speed steel (AISI M3:2) powders were successfully co-sintered to produce hybrid tool steels that have properties and microstructures that can be modulated for specific applications. To promote co-sintering, which is made difficult by the various densification kinetics of the two steels, the particle sizes and structures were refined by mechanical milling (MM). Near full density samples (>99.5%) showing very fine and homogeneous microstructure were obtained using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The density of the blends (20, 40, 60, 80 wt % H13) was in agreement with the linear rule of mixtures. Their hardness showed a positive deviation, which could be ascribed to the strengthening effect of the secondary particles altering the stress distribution during indentation. A toughening of the M3:2-rich blends could be explained in view of the crack deviation and crack arrest exerted by the H13 particles. PMID:28773603

  14. Comparison of Channel Segregation Formation in Model Alloys and Steels via Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y. F.; Chen, Y.; Li, D. Z.; Liu, H. W.; Fu, P. X.

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the evolutions of channel segregations in several alloy systems, such as the typically used model alloys ( e.g., Ga-In, Sn-Pb, Sn-Bi, Al-Cu, and Ni-based superalloy) and some special steels, are numerically simulated in a cavity solidified unidirectionally. The simulations are based on a modified continuum macrosegregation model with an extension to the multicomponent systems. The results of model alloys and steels indicate that when the thermosolutal convection is strong enough, flow instability occurs, which in turn destabilizes the mushy zone. Subsequently, the channel segregation forms with the continuous interaction between solidification and flow. The formation behavior and severity of channel segregations in various systems are different owing to their distinct melt convection strengths and solidification natures. In the current simulations, channels are apparent for model alloys with high content of solutes, whereas they are slight in some special steels, such as 27SiMn steel, and totally disappear in carbon steels. These occurrence features of channel segregation in simulations of steels are consistent with the analyses by a modified Rayleigh number associated with alloying elements, and both outcomes are well supported by the fully sectioned steel ingots in experiments.

  15. Mechanical properties and microstructure evaluation of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlami, C. S.; Pan, X.

    2017-07-01

    Austenitic manganese steel has a high toughness, high ductility, high strain hardening capacity and excellent wear resistance, the material is mostly used in the mining industry for crushing and loading equipment. High manganese steel shows superior wear resistance when used under primary crushing system than when used under secondary and tertiary modes of crushing. This work presents the effect of vanadium content on the mechanical properties and microstructure evaluation of high manganese steel. The addition of vanadium to high manganese steels has a direct increase on the hardness and wear resistance. Impact testing for alloys containing vanadium showed low impact energies compared to the standard manganese steel. The increase in hardness and the wear resistance of the alloys was explained based on the vanadium carbide which had formed on the austenitic matrix. It was observed that the carbon and vanadium content will influence the mechanical properties of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium. Microstructural examination showed that the size and distribution of vanadium carbidesinfluences the mechanical properties and the wear behaviour. Therefore, this work showsthat the addition of vanadium to high manganese steel will increase the hardness and wear resistance while decreasing the impact energy of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium.

  16. Stablization of Nanotwinned Microstructures in Stainless Steels Through Alloying and Microstructural Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-23

    stable nanotwinned microstructure---high-temperature strength. The long - term goal of this effort is to develop austenitic stainless steels capable of...microstructures. The long - term alloy design strategy focuses on microalloying additions to 1) reduce the stacking fault energy (SFE), enhance twinning formation...15. SUBJECT TERMS materials design, stainless steels , plastic deformation by twinning, computational materials science, experimental characterization

  17. Use of Nitrocarburizing for Strengthening Threaded Joints of Drill Pipes from Medium-Carbon Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priymak, E. Yu.; Stepanchukova, A. V.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Nitrocarburizing is tested at the Drill Equipment Plant for reinforcing threaded joints of drill pipes for units with retrievable core receiver (RCR). The effect of the nitrocarburizing on the mechanical properties of steels of different alloying systems is considered. Steels for the production of threaded joints of drill pipes are recommended.

  18. Etching process mills PH 14-8 Mo alloy steel to precise tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, B. L.; Mulland, P. W.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical milling process, which combines an aqua regia etchant with a sulfonate wetting agent, produces finishes on PH 14-8 molybdenum alloy steel to precise tolerances. This process permits precision removal of excess metal from the steel in annealed and/or aged conditions.

  19. Stainless High-Strength Sparingly Alloyed Steel for Operation in Aggressive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Smirnov, L. A.; Panfilova, L. M.

    2017-05-01

    Formation of structure and properties is analyzed in a number of stainless high-strength steels used in oil production for shafts of submerged centrifugal electric pumps. The factors elevating the cuttability and corrosion resistance of sparingly alloyed steel 14Cr17Ni2NV are determined.

  20. Three-dimensional atom probe characterization of alloy element partitioning in cementite during tempering of alloy steel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Xiong, X Y; Cerezo, A; Hardwicke, R; Krauss, G; Smith, G D W

    2007-09-01

    Hardness measurements confirm that the martensitic microstructure of an alloy steel, AISI/SAE 4340, is significantly more resistant to softening, compared to the martensitic microstructure of a high-purity Fe-0.4% C alloy, at tempering temperatures, 300-400 degrees C, just above the temperatures where cementite replaces transition carbides in the martensitic matrix. Three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) analyses of the 4340 steel show that Si rejection from the cementite is first detected after low-temperature tempering for times of 1 h. After 10-h tempering at 400 degrees C, Mn and Cr contents are increased, and Ni contents decreased, in cementite according to their carbide- and non-carbide-forming tendencies, respectively. The results are discussed with respect to the diffusivity of the substitutional alloying elements in the 4340 steel, and the effect that such diffusion-controlled redistribution would have on maintaining fine distributions of cementite that resist softening during tempering.

  1. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  2. Progress in bearing performance of advanced nitrogen alloyed stainless steel, Cronidur 30

    SciTech Connect

    Trojahn, W.; Streit, E.; Chin, H.A.; Ehlert, D.

    1998-12-31

    The bearing rig tests performed in this study demonstrate superior bearing performance of Cronidur 30 steel over conventional bearing steels. In these tests the L{sub 10} life of Cronidur 30 steel as calculated by the DIN/ISO 281 method was 80 times the unfactored L{sub 10} life under full lubrication conditions. In boundary lubrication conditions, the Cronidur 30 steel demonstrated the L{sub 10} life capability typical of EHD lubrication conditions, whereas the other steels showed drastically reduced lives. In tests with predamaged races and boundary lubrication conditions, Cronidur 30 demonstrated 8 times the calculated L{sub 10} life, whereas the conventional steels exhibited further reduction in lives. The improved performance of Cronidur 30 steel over conventional bearing steels is attributed to its unique compositional formulation and microstructure that results in provision of balanced properties in the alloy--hardness, toughness, and corrosion resistance.

  3. M551 metals melting experiment. [space manufacturing of aluminum alloys, tantalum alloys, stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.; Busch, G.; Creter, C.

    1976-01-01

    The Metals Melting Skylab Experiment consisted of selectively melting, in sequence, three rotating discs made of aluminum alloy, stainless steel, and tantalum alloy. For comparison, three other discs of the same three materials were similarly melted or welded on the ground. The power source of the melting was an electron beam unit. Results are presented which support the concept that the major difference between ground base and Skylab samples (i.e., large elongated grains in ground base samples versus nearly equiaxed and equal sized grains in Skylab samples) can be explained on the basis of constitutional supercooling, and not on the basis of surface phenomena. Microstructural observations on the weld samples and present explanations for some of these observations are examined. In particular, ripples and their implications to weld solidification were studied. Evidence of pronounced copper segregation in the Skylab A1 weld samples, and the tantalum samples studied, indicates a weld microhardness (and hence strength) that is uniformly higher than the ground base results, which is in agreement with previous predictions. Photographs are shown of the microstructure of the various alloys.

  4. Fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Michaud, W.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-10-01

    Fatigue tests have been conducted on A106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel to evaluate the effects of an oxygenated-water environment on the fatigue life of these steels. For both steels, environmental effects are modest in PWR water at all strain rates. Fatigue data in oxygenated water confirm the strong dependence of fatigue life on dissolved oxygen (DO) and strain rate. The effect of strain rate on fatigue life saturates at some low value, e.g., between 0.0004 and 0.001%/s in oxygenated water with {approximately}0.8 ppm DO. The data suggest that the saturation value of strain rate may vary with DO and sulfur content of the steel. Although the cyclic stress-strain and cyclic-hardening behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels is distinctly different, the degradation of fatigue life of these two steels with comparable sulfur levels is similar. The carbon steel exhibits pronounced dynamic strain aging, whereas strain-aging effects are modest in the low-alloy steel. Environmental effects on nucleation of fatigue crack have also been investigated. The results suggest that the high-temperature oxygenated water has little or no effect on crack nucleation.

  5. Plastic Instabilities and Their Consequences in Steels and Other High Strength Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    rate yes Superalloys * Alloy 600 quasi-static no Rend 41 quasi-static no Steels * HY80 quasi-static no ultra-soft5 no low temperatures no AISI 4340...AD-A240 976 ([f) A Final Technical Report Contract No. N00014-88-K-0111 S PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH...PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Submitted to: Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street

  6. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-02-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  7. Steam Oxidation Behavior of Advanced Steels and Ni-Based Alloys at 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, T.; Boroń, L.; Deodeshmukh, V.; Sobczak, J.; Sobczak, N.; Witkowska, M.; Ratuszek, W.; Chruściel, K.

    2017-03-01

    This publication studies the steam oxidation behavior of advanced steels (309S, 310S and HR3C) and Ni-based alloys (Haynes® 230®, alloy 263, alloy 617 and Haynes® 282®) exposed at 800 °C for 2000 h under 1 bar pressure, in a pure water steam system. The results revealed that all exposed materials showed relatively low weight gain, with no spallation of the oxide scale within the 2000 h of exposure. XRD analysis showed that Ni-based alloys developed an oxide scale consisting of four main phases: Cr2O3 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282®, alloy 263 and Haynes® 230®), MnCr2O4 (alloy 617, Haynes® 282® and Haynes® 230®), NiCr2O4 (alloy 617) and TiO2 (alloy 263, Haynes® 282®). In contrast, advanced steels showed the development of Cr2O3, MnCr2O4, Mn7SiO12, FeMn(SiO4) and SiO2 phases. The steel with the highest Cr content showed the formation of Fe3O4 and the thickest oxide scale.

  8. Self-Pierce Riveting of Three Aluminium Alloy and Mild Steel Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Sakai, S.; Kato, T.

    2010-06-15

    Three aluminium alloy and steel sheets were joined with a self-piercing rivet. Self-pierce riveting has the function of joining steel and aluminium alloys having very different melting points due to plastic joining. The requisites for joining the three sheets are the driving of the rivet leg through the middle sheet, the flaring of the rivet leg in the lower sheet and the prevention of the fracture of the lower sheet. The joinability for various combinations of the three sheets was determined. When the rivet leg is small, no driving through the middle sheet occurs, the lower sheet ruptures for a large rivet leg. In addition, 980 MPa high strength steel, mild steel and aluminium alloy sheets were joined by the self-pierce riveting.

  9. Self-Pierce Riveting of Three Aluminium Alloy and Mild Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.; Sakai, S.

    2010-06-01

    Three aluminium alloy and steel sheets were joined with a self-piercing rivet. Self-pierce riveting has the function of joining steel and aluminium alloys having very different melting points due to plastic joining. The requisites for joining the three sheets are the driving of the rivet leg through the middle sheet, the flaring of the rivet leg in the lower sheet and the prevention of the fracture of the lower sheet. The joinability for various combinations of the three sheets was determined. When the rivet leg is small, no driving through the middle sheet occurs, the lower sheet ruptures for a large rivet leg. In addition, 980 MPa high strength steel, mild steel and aluminium alloy sheets were joined by the self-pierce riveting.

  10. The success and limitations of high alloy stainless steels in seawater service

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.; Malpas, R.E. )

    1989-01-01

    The performance of high alloy stainless steels has been determined in chlorinated natural seawater in large scale and prototype seawater handling systems consisting of pumps, pipework and valves at ambient North Sea temperatures. In addition the influence of temperature on the corrosion characteristics of these alloys has been investigated. The results show that austenitic stainless steels with minimum molybdenum and nitrogen contents of 6% and 0.2% respectively and high alloy duplex stainless steels with minimum compositions of 25% Cr, 3% Mo and 0.15% N can be successfully used for the fabrication of seawater systems handling North Sea ambient or heated seawater. These alloys have some limitations, however, in areas of heat transfer, particularly where air spaces are present in a system; where dissimilar metal crevices are present and at positions where fretting can occur.

  11. Finite Element Simulation of Plastic Joining Processes of Steel and Aluminum Alloy Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.

    2007-05-17

    Various high tensile strength steel sheets and an aluminum alloy sheet were joined with a self-piercing rivet. It is not easy to weld the aluminum alloy sheet and high tensile strength sheets by means of conventional resistance welding because of very different melting points. To obtain optimum joining conditions, joining defects were categorized into separation of the sheets and an inner fracture. The joining range of ultra high tensile strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was extended by means of dies optimized by finite element simulation. The joint strength is greatly influenced by not only the strength of the sheets and rivets but also the ratio of the thickness of the lower sheet to the total thickness. In addition, mechanical clinching of high strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was simulated.

  12. Finite Element Simulation of Plastic Joining Processes of Steel and Aluminum Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.

    2007-05-01

    Various high tensile strength steel sheets and an aluminum alloy sheet were joined with a self-piercing rivet. It is not easy to weld the aluminum alloy sheet and high tensile strength sheets by means of conventional resistance welding because of very different melting points. To obtain optimum joining conditions, joining defects were categorized into separation of the sheets and an inner fracture. The joining range of ultra high tensile strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was extended by means of dies optimized by finite element simulation. The joint strength is greatly influenced by not only the strength of the sheets and rivets but also the ratio of the thickness of the lower sheet to the total thickness. In addition, mechanical clinching of high strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was simulated.

  13. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  14. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  15. Histopathologic evaluation following chronic implantation of chromium and steel based metal alloys in the rabbit central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rauch, H C; Ekstrom, M E; Montgomery, I N; Parada, F; Berke, J

    1986-01-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of three metal alloys for chronic implantation in the central nervous system (CNS) was undertaken in rabbits. Throughout the 8 month evaluation period the inflammatory response to the alloys was bland. Two of the alloys tested (chromium based MP35N, Trademark of the Standard Pressed Steel Company, and a stainless steel alloy, BG42 VacArc, Trademark of Latrobe Steel) appeared suitable as CNS implants. The third alloy (stainless steel 440C, Carpenter Steel Company) showed more corrosion than the other alloys, and may be less suitable for implantation. While E. cuniculi infection was found in four rabbits, the infection did not directly interfere with the assessment of the histologic changes directly due to the implants. Autoantibodies to a brain constituent were not observed.

  16. Processing and structure of a Nitrogen Alloyed Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Austenitic Stainless Steel by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingli; Zhou, Zhangjian

    2013-03-01

    Pure metallic powders of Fe, Cr, Ni, W, Ti and nano-Y2O3 powders were mechanical alloyed by high energy mechanical milling under N2 atmosphere to develop a nitrogen contained oxide dispersion strengthened austenitic steel powders. The compositions of the mixed powders are Fe-18Cr-8Ni-2W-1Ti-0.35Y2O3. The effects of milling time on nitrogen absorption were investigated. The nitrogen contents in the as-milled powders reached 0.31 wt% after milling for 60 hours and nearly 0.8 wt% after milling for 150 hours. The as-milled powders were then annealed under vacuum at 1173K and 1373 K to promote the formation of the resultant equilibrium phases. Fully austenitic structure was achieved after annealing at 1173K.

  17. Process of vacuum hardening of cutting and sharpening tools of high-speed steels in belt furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasovi, A. N.

    1996-12-01

    The technical possibilities of vacuum elevator and bell furnaces commonly used for brazing and annealing precision parts in instrument-making and electronics can be widened. Small thin-blade tools of powder steels R6M5-P, 10R6M5-MP and "silver" steels R6M5, R6M5K5 with a minimum tolerance for sizing after hardening at a low cooling rate have high operational properties. The present paper is devoted to the process of heat treatment of special tools of the listed steels used to cut and shape ribbons, rods, and foils of alloys 36NKhTYu, 29NK, BrB2 in vacuum bcil furnaces under conditions of batch and small-batch production in electrical-engineering enterprises.

  18. Comparative MRI compatibility of 316 L stainless steel alloy and nickel-titanium alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Holton, Andrea; Walsh, Edward; Anayiotos, Andreas; Pohost, Gerald; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2002-01-01

    The initial success of coronary stenting is leading to a proliferation in peripheral stenting. A significant portion of the stents used in a clinical setting are made of 316 low carbon stainless steel (SS). Other alloys that have been used for stent manufacture include tantalum, MP35N, and nickel-titanium (NiTi). The ferromagnetic properties of SS cause the production of artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The NiTi alloys, in addition to being known for their shape memory or superelastic properties, have been shown to exhibit reduced interference in MRI. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the comparative MRI compatibility of SS and NiTi stents. Both gradient echo and spin-echo images were obtained at 1.5 and 4.1 T field strengths. The imaging of stents of identical geometry but differing compositions permitted the quantification of artifacts produced due to device composition by normalizing the radio frequency shielding effects. These images were analyzed for magnitude and spatial extent of signal loss within the lumen and outside the stent. B1 mapping was used to quantify the attenuation throughout the image. The SS stent caused significant signal loss and did not allow for visibility of the lumen. However, the NiTi stent caused only minor artifacting and even allowed for visualization of the signal from within the lumen. In addition, adjustments to the flip angle of standard imaging protocols were shown to improve the quality of signal from within the lumen.

  19. Evolution of carbides in cold-work tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hoyoung; Kang, Jun-Yun; Son, Dongmin; Lee, Tae-Ho; Cho, Kyung-Mox

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to present the complete history of carbide evolution in a cold-work tool steel along its full processing route for fabrication and application. A sequence of processes from cast to final hardening heat treatment was conducted on an 8% Cr-steel to reproduce a typical commercial processing route in a small scale. The carbides found at each process step were then identified by electron diffraction with energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning or transmission electron microscope. After solidification, MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 2}C carbides were identified and the last one dissolved during hot compression at 1180 °C. In a subsequent annealing at 870 °C followed by slow cooling, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were added, while they were dissolved in the following austenitization at 1030 °C. After the final tempering at 520 °C, fine M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitated again, thus the final microstructure was the tempered martensite with MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. The transient M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C originated from the segregation of Mo and finally disappeared due to attenuated segregation and the consequent thermodynamic instability. - Highlights: • The full processing route of a cold-work tool steel was simulated in a small scale. • The carbides in the tool steel were identified by chemical–crystallographic analyses. • MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 2}C, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were found during the processing of the steel. • M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C finally disappeared due to thermodynamic instability.

  20. [Study on the multivariate quantitative analysis method for steel alloy elements using LIBS].

    PubMed

    Gu, Yan-hong; Li, Ying; Tian, Ye; Lu, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of steel alloys was carried out using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) taking into account the complex matrix effects in steel alloy samples. The laser induced plasma was generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and repeated frequency of 10 Hz. The LIBS signal was coupled to the echelle spectrometer and recorded by a high sensitive ICCD detector. To get the best experimental conditions, some parameters, such as the detection delay, the CCDs integral gate width and the detecting position from the sample surface, were optimized. The experimental results showed that the optimum detection delay time was 1.5 micros, the optimal CCDs integral gate width was 2 micros and the best detecting position was 1.5 mm below the alloy sample's surface. The samples used in the experiments are ten standard steel alloy samples and two unknown steel alloy samples. The quantitative analysis was investigated with the optimum experimental parameters. Elements Cr and Ni in steel alloy samples were taken as the detection targets. The analysis was carried out with the methods based on conditional univariate quantitative analysis, multiple linear regression and partial least squares (PLS) respectively. It turned out that the correlation coefficients of calibration curves are not very high in the conditional univariate calibration method. The analysis results were obtained with the unsatisfied relative errors for the two predicted samples. So the con- ditional univariate quantitative analysis method can't effectively serve the quantitative analysis purpose for multi-components and complex matrix steel alloy samples. And with multiple linear regression method, the analysis accuracy was improved effectively. The method based on partial least squares (PLS) turned out to be the best method among all the three quantitative analysis methods applied. Based on PLS, the correlation coefficient of calibration curve for Cr is 0

  1. Cutting tool study: 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.

    1992-07-29

    The Rocky Flats Plant conducted a study to test cermet cutting tools by performing machinability studies on War Reserve product under controlled conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the most satisfactory tools that optimize tool life, minimize costs, improve reliability and chip control, and increase productivity by performing the operations to specified Accuracies. This study tested three manufacturers' cermet cutting tools and a carbide tool used previously by the Rocky Flats Plant for machining spherical-shaped 21-6-9 stainless steel forgings (Figure 1). The 80-degree diamond inserts were tested by experimenting with various chip-breaker geometries, cutting speeds, feedrates, and cermet grades on the outside contour roughing operation. The cermets tested were manufactured by Kennametal, Valenite, and NTK. The carbide tool ordinarily used for this operation is manufactured by Carboloy. Evaluation of tho tools was conducted by investigating the number of passes per part and parts per insert, tool wear, cutting time, tool life, surface finish, and stem taper. Benefits to be gained from this study were: improved part quality, better chip control, increased tool life and utilization, and greater fabrication productivity. This was to be accomplished by performing the operation to specified accuracies within the scope of the tools tested.

  2. Cutting tool study: 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.

    1992-07-29

    The Rocky Flats Plant conducted a study to test cermet cutting tools by performing machinability studies on War Reserve product under controlled conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the most satisfactory tools that optimize tool life, minimize costs, improve reliability and chip control, and increase productivity by performing the operations to specified Accuracies. This study tested three manufacturers` cermet cutting tools and a carbide tool used previously by the Rocky Flats Plant for machining spherical-shaped 21-6-9 stainless steel forgings (Figure 1). The 80-degree diamond inserts were tested by experimenting with various chip-breaker geometries, cutting speeds, feedrates, and cermet grades on the outside contour roughing operation. The cermets tested were manufactured by Kennametal, Valenite, and NTK. The carbide tool ordinarily used for this operation is manufactured by Carboloy. Evaluation of tho tools was conducted by investigating the number of passes per part and parts per insert, tool wear, cutting time, tool life, surface finish, and stem taper. Benefits to be gained from this study were: improved part quality, better chip control, increased tool life and utilization, and greater fabrication productivity. This was to be accomplished by performing the operation to specified accuracies within the scope of the tools tested.

  3. Oxidation resistance of novel ferritic stainless steels alloyed with titanium for SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2008-05-15

    Chromia (Cr2O3) forming ferritic stainless steels are being developed for interconnect application in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). A problem with these alloys is that in the SOFC environment chrome in the surface oxide can evaporate and deposit on the electrochemically active sites within the fuel cell. This poisons and degrades the performance of the fuel cell. The development of steels that can form conductive outer protective oxide layers other than Cr2O3 or (CrMn)3O4 such as TiO2 may be attractive for SOFC application. This study was undertaken to assess the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel containing 1 weight percent (wt.%) Ti, in an effort to develop alloys that form protective outer TiO2 scales. The effect of Cr content (6–22 wt.%) and the application of a Ce-based surface treatment on the oxidation behavior (at 800° C in air+3% H2O) of the alloys was investigated. The alloys themselves failed to form an outer TiO2 scale even though the large negative {delta}G of this compound favors its formation over other species. It was found that in conjunction with the Ce-surface treatment, a continuous outer TiO2 oxide layer could be formed on the alloys, and in fact the alloy with 12 wt.% Cr behaved in an identical manner as the alloy with 22 wt.% Cr.

  4. 75 FR 39917 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration (A-580-809) Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea... non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008 through...

  5. 76 FR 52636 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial... the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``circular welded...

  6. 76 FR 34044 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Extension of Time Limits... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod from...

  7. 75 FR 44763 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. We also received review requests on November 30, 2009,...

  8. 76 FR 40689 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe...

  9. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel-Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  10. Complex alloy steel for heavily loaded carburized gear wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel'dekov, V. A.; Merilova, E. A.; Shevchuk, V. P.

    1987-05-01

    The tendency of steel 18KhGN2MFB towards internal oxidation and austenite grain growth during CHT is markedly lower than for steel 20KhNZA normally used for gear wheels. Steel 18KhGN2MFB has sufficiently high hardenability for the carburized and carbonitrided layers.

  11. 75 FR 13729 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2007 through October 31, 2008. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea:...

  12. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-07-15

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B{sub 2} intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  13. Cryo-quenched Fe-Ni-Cr alloy single crystals: A new decorative steel

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Kolopus, James A.; Lavrik, Nicolay V.; Phani, P. Sudharshan

    2016-08-31

    In this paper, a decorative steel is described that is formed by a process that is unlike that of the fabrication methods utilized in making the original Damascus steels over 2000 years ago. The decorative aspect of the steel arises from a three-dimensional surface pattern that results from cryogenically quenching polished austenitic alloy single crystals into the martensitic phase that is present below 190 K. No forging operations are involved – the mechanism is entirely based on the metallurgical phase properties of the ternary alloy. The symmetry of the decorative pattern is determined and controlled by the crystallographic orientation and symmetry of the 70%Fe,15%Ni,15%Cr alloy single crystals. Finally, in addition to using “cuts” made along principal crystallographic surface directions, an effectively infinite number of other random-orientation “cuts” can be utilized to produce decorative patterns where each pattern is unique after the austenitic-to-martensitic phase transformation.

  14. Cryo-quenched Fe-Ni-Cr alloy single crystals: A new decorative steel

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Kolopus, James A.; Lavrik, Nicolay V.; Phani, P. Sudharshan

    2016-08-31

    In this paper, a decorative steel is described that is formed by a process that is unlike that of the fabrication methods utilized in making the original Damascus steels over 2000 years ago. The decorative aspect of the steel arises from a three-dimensional surface pattern that results from cryogenically quenching polished austenitic alloy single crystals into the martensitic phase that is present below 190 K. No forging operations are involved – the mechanism is entirely based on the metallurgical phase properties of the ternary alloy. The symmetry of the decorative pattern is determined and controlled by the crystallographic orientation and symmetry of the 70%Fe,15%Ni,15%Cr alloy single crystals. Finally, in addition to using “cuts” made along principal crystallographic surface directions, an effectively infinite number of other random-orientation “cuts” can be utilized to produce decorative patterns where each pattern is unique after the austenitic-to-martensitic phase transformation.

  15. Characterization of Coatings on Steel Self-Piercing Rivets for Use with Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Robert C.; Forsmark, Joy H.; Upadhyay, Vinod; Battocchi, Dante

    Incorporation of magnesium alloys in self-pierce rivet (SPR) joints poses several unique challenges among which are the creation of spurious galvanic cells and aggravated corrosion of adjacent magnesium when coated steel rivets are employed. This work firstly reviews efforts on development of coatings to steel fasteners for the diminution of galvanic corrosion when used with magnesium alloys. Secondly, approaches, based on several electrochemical methods, for the measurement of the galvanic-limiting effect of a number of commercially-available coatings to hardened 10B37 steel self-piercing rivets inserted into alloy couples incorporating several grades of magnesium are reported. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), zero-resistance ammeter (ZRA), corrosion potential and potential-mapping visualization methods (e.g. scanning vibrating electrode technique — SVET) are illustrated for the several rivet coatings considered.

  16. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  17. Tribological behavior of NiTi alloy against 52100 steel and WC at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini, M.; Ghasemi, H.M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2010-07-15

    The dry tribological behavior of a Ti-50.3 at.% Ni alloy at temperatures of 25 deg. C, 50 deg. C and 200 deg. C was studied. The wear tests were performed on a high temperature pin-on-disk tribometer using 52100 steel and tungsten carbide pins. The worn surfaces of the NiTi alloy were examined by scanning electron microscope. The results showed that in the wear tests involving steel pins, the wear rate of the NiTi decreased as the wear testing temperature was increased. However, for the NiTi/WC contact, a reverse trend was observed. There was also a large decrease in the coefficient of friction for the NiTi/steel contact with increasing wear testing temperature. The formation of compact tribological layers could be the main reason for the reduction of the wear rate and coefficient of friction of the NiTi/steel contact at higher wear testing temperatures.

  18. Effects of mechanical alloying time on microstructure and properties of 9Cr-ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Rui; Lu, Zheng; Lu, Chenyang; Liu, Chunming

    2014-12-01

    Pre-alloyed powders of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels were produced by atomization. The atomized powders without mechanical alloying (MA) and with short-time MA were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The morphology and microstructure of the atomized and the MA powders were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of 9Cr-ODS steels with different MA time was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and atom probe tomography (APT). The results showed that high-density of nanosized precipitates and ultrafine grains are formed in the ODS steels using the processing route, which remarkably reduce MA time. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of ODS steels are improved with the increase of MA time.

  19. Diamond tool wear of electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Donaldson, R.R.; Syn, C.K. ); Sugg, D.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Nickel-Phosphorus alloys are attractive materials for diamond turning applications such as fabrication of large optics and other high precision parts. Although the mechanism is not understood, diamond tool wear is minimized when the phosphorus content of the deposit is greater than 11% (wgt). In recent years, increased attention has been directed at electrodeposition as an alternate to electroless deposition for producing Ni-P alloys. One principal advantage of the electrodeposition process is that alloys with 14--15% P can be obtained; another is that an order of magnitude greater deposition thickness can be provided if necessary. This paper compares diamond turning results for electrodeposited and electroless Ni-P alloys and shows that the electrodeposited coatings provide promising results. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Laser Surface Alloying of SUS316 Stainless Steel with Al-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, Sergey; Maekawa, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Terutake; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    The effect of varying temperature of the type 316 stainless steel substrate on the structure and properties of laser alloyed layer was investigated. The material for alloying (Al-Si powder mixture) was placed on the surface of stainless steel substrate by pasting. The surface was scanned by a pulsed Nd: YAG laser beam to achieve surface alloying. The temperature of substrate continuously increased during laser treatment to about 830°C. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition and microhardness of the modified layer were studied then. It has been found that four different types of structure were formed in the alloyed zone depending on the temperature of the substrate. These structures differ from each other in phase composition, microhardness and relation to cracking. Based on the results, optimal parameters for the production of a uniform, crack-free layer with a high hardness were developed.

  1. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  2. Interfacial characterization of joint between mild steel and aluminum alloy welded by resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Ranfeng; Shi Hongxin; Zhang Keke; Tu Yimin; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Satonaka, Shinobu

    2010-07-15

    The interfacial characteristics of resistance spot welded steel-aluminum alloy joint have been investigated using electron microscopy. The results reveal that reaction product FeAl{sub 3} is generated in the peripheral region of the weld while a reaction layer consisting of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} adjacent to steel and FeAl{sub 3} adjacent to aluminum alloy forms in the central region of the weld, and that the morphology and thickness of the reaction layer vary with the position at the welding interface.

  3. Comparison of stainless steel and titanium alloy orthodontic miniscrew implants: a mechanical and histologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan N; Sexton, Brent E; Gabriel Chu, Tien-Min; Katona, Thomas R; Stewart, Kelton T; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2014-04-01

    The detailed mechanical and histologic properties of stainless steel miniscrew implants used for temporary orthodontic anchorage have not been assessed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare them with identically sized titanium alloy miniscrew implants. Forty-eight stainless steel and 48 titanium alloy miniscrew implants were inserted into the tibias of 12 rabbits. Insertion torque and primary stability were recorded. One hundred grams of tensile force was applied between half of the implants in each group, resulting in 4 subgroups of 24 specimens each. Fluorochrome labeling was administered at weeks 4 and 5. When the rabbits were euthanized at 6 weeks, stability and removal torque were measured in half (ie, 12 specimens) of each of the 4 subgroups. Microdamage burden and bone-to-implant contact ratio were quantified in the other 12 specimens in each subgroup. Mixed model analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. All implants were stable at insertion and after 6 weeks. The only significant difference was the higher (9%) insertion torque for stainless steel. No significant differences were found between stainless steel and titanium alloy miniscrew implants in microdamage burden and bone-to-implant contact regardless of loading status. Stainless steel and titanium alloy miniscrew implants provide the same mechanical stability and similar histologic responses, suggesting that both are suitable for immediate orthodontic clinical loads. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Submerged Arc Welding Consumables for HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy)-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    0.001 Manganese 0.02 Silicon 0.01 Phosphorus 0.002 Sulfur 0.001 Nickel 0.05 Molybdenum 0.01 Chromium 0.02 Vanadium 0.001 Aluminum 0.002 Titanium 0.002...carbon-manganese steels with small amounts of alloys added such as aluminum, titanium , niobium , or vanadium . Since these steels exhibit high strength...83 Chemical check analysis for boron and phosphorus ................................................. 88 Mechanical property data summary

  5. Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bing; Brady, Michael P; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; More, Karren Leslie; Young, David J; Tortorelli, Peter F; Payzant, E Andrew; Walker, Larry R

    2007-01-01

    Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni-Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr{sub 2}N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe-27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

  6. Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Brady, M. P.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; More, K. L.; Young, D. J.; Tortorelli, P. F.; Payzant, E. A.; Walker, L. R.

    2007-09-07

    Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni–Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr2N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V2O3–Cr2O3, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe–27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

  7. Microstructure and phase identification in type 304 stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Daniel P.; McDeavitt, Sean M.; Park, Jangyul

    1996-08-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium alloys have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel. This article discusses the various phases that are formed in as-cast alloys of type 304 stainless steel and zirconium that contain up to 92 wt pct Zr. Microstructural characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and crystal structure information was obtained by X-ray diffraction. Type 304SS-Zr alloys with 5 and 10 wt pct Zr have a three-phase microstructure—austenite, ferrite, and the Laves intermetallic, Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni)2+x. whereas alloys with 15, 20, and 30 wt pct Zr contain only two phases—ferrite and Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni)2+x. Alloys with 45 to 67 wt pct Zr contain a mixture of Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni)2+x and Zr2(Ni,Fe), whereas alloys with 83 and 92 wt pct Zr contain three phases—α-Zr, Zr2(Ni,Fe), and Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni)2+x. Fe3Zr-type and Zr3Fe-type phases were not observed in the type 304SS-Zr alloys. The changes in alloy microstructure with zirconium content have been correlated to the Fe-Zr binary phase diagram.

  8. Effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior of Mo-containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. B.; Kim, C. M.; Yang, H. R.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior in Fe-Mo-C steels has been investigated by means of the successive alloying additions of Cr, Co, and Ni. The Cr additions promote M3C cementite formation. The Ni additions destabilize the cementite formation, while the Co additions retard dislocation recovery and present the necessary sites for M2C formation which provides the secondary hardening.

  9. Parameters of Models of Structural Transformations in Alloy Steel Under Welding Thermal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, A. S.; Makarov, E. L.; Kurkin, A. B.; Rubtsov, D. E.; Rubtsov, M. E.

    2017-05-01

    A mathematical model of structural transformations in an alloy steel under the thermal cycle of multipass welding is suggested for computer implementation. The minimum necessary set of parameters for describing the transformations under heating and cooling is determined. Ferritic-pearlitic, bainitic and martensitic transformations under cooling of a steel are considered. A method for deriving the necessary temperature and time parameters of the model from the chemical composition of the steel is described. Published data are used to derive regression models of the temperature ranges and parameters of transformation kinetics in alloy steels. It is shown that the disadvantages of the active visual methods of analysis of the final phase composition of steels are responsible for inaccuracy and mismatch of published data. The hardness of a specimen, which correlates with some other mechanical properties of the material, is chosen as the most objective and reproducible criterion of the final phase composition. The models developed are checked by a comparative analysis of computational results and experimental data on the hardness of 140 alloy steels after cooling at various rates.

  10. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Field, Kevin G; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  11. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Jose C.; Pina, Jose C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-17

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  12. Tool deflection in the milling of titanium alloy: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebala, W.

    2015-09-01

    Tool deflection strongly influences on the workpiece quality. Author of the paper built a simulation model of the down milling process of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) with a tool made of sintered carbides. Material model consists of strain, strain rate and thermal sensitivity formulations to predict the stress field distribution in the cutting zone. Numerical calculations were experimentally verified on the milling center, equipped with measuring devices: force dynamometer, thermo-vision and high-speed video cameras.

  13. Crystallography and metallography of carbides in high alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hetzner, Dennis W. Van Geertruyden, William

    2008-07-15

    The carbides in high carbon, high chromium bearing steels, high chromium carburizing steels, newly developed easily carburizable low carbon, low chromium high speed steels and M62 high speed steel fabricated by powder metal processing were studied. The particular steels evaluated include 440C, BG42. M50-Nil, CHS1, CHS50, Pyrowear 675 , CSS-42L{sup TM} and M62. The morphology and structure of the carbides were evaluated by means of metallography, X-ray diffraction and electron beam backscattered diffraction. The combination of these three techniques has provided new insight into how different carbide morphologies form during processing and the carbide structures that can be expected to be present in components fabricated from these steels by various types of heat treating.

  14. Effect of Alloying Element Partition in Pearlite on the Growth of Austenite in High-Carbon Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. N.; Xia, Y.; Enomoto, M.; Zhang, C.; Yang, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    The growth of austenite from pearlite in high-carbon low alloy steel occurs with and without alloy element redistribution depending on the amount of superheating above the eutectoid temperature. The transition temperature of austenite growth (denoted PNTT) is calculated as a function of pearlite transformation temperature and subsequent holding time, which affect the degree of partitioning in pearlite, using experimental partition coefficients k θ/ α of Mn, Cr, Co, Si, and Ni reported in the literature. PNTT is the highest in Cr-containing alloys which have the largest k θ/ α in pearlite. Post-transformation aging, usually accompanied by cementite spheroidization, leads to a marked increase of PNTT in Mn and Cr alloys. PNTT of Ni alloy does not depend on pearlite transformation temperature because practically the formation of partitioned pearlite is severely limited in this alloy for kinetic reasons. Above PNTT, austenite growth occurs fast initially, but slows down in the order of ten seconds when the ferrite disappears, and the remaining small carbide particles dissolve very slowly under the control of alloy element diffusion.

  15. Effects of LWR environments on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    SME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A 106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  16. A study of steel alloys for potential use in CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C.; Blankenship, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The effect of CO2 as a greenhouse gas, and the potential of global warming, has led to the study of sequestration of CO2 as a mineral carbonate. Some of the processes of mineral sequestration involve handing large tonnages of silicate minerals and reacting them with CO2. In this study the Albany Research Center evaluated the effects of wear and corrosion individually, and any possible synergetic effects resulting from a combination of wear and corrosion, on steel alloys that might be used in CO2 sequestration. By understanding the mechanism of slurry material loss, a better selection of erosion/corrosion resistant steel alloys can be chosen which in turn help plan construction costs. Four different conventional alloys were chosen. The alloys include AISI 1080 carbon steel, a 9Cr, 1 Mo steel, a 316 stainless steel, and a heat treatable 440C stainless steel. These materials covered a large range of alloy composition and cost. A variety of erosion and corrosion tests were used to evaluate the steels response to selected sequestration environments. The tests used included: (i) wear from dry Jet and HAET erosion tests, (ii) corrosion from immersion tests, and (iii) slurry erosion/corrosion tests. The slurry wear tests were conducted using a 270-μm silica abrasive in water and a solution (a mixture of sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, and sodium carbonate) saturated with CO2 at pH levels of 4.5 and 9.4. The results of these tests were compared with the results dry erosion and immersion corrosion tests. The results of the various tests were then used to evaluate the mechanism of material loss and determine is the presence of synergetic effects. The corrosion test showed little loss of material for all alloys. The erosion tests showed only a small difference between alloys. The slurry tests showed synergistic effect of combining erosion and corrosion resulted in a significant additional loss of material. It was further found both increasing the hardness and amounts of

  17. Development of microstructure in high-alloy steel K390 using semi-solid forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opatova, K.; Aisman, D.; Rubesova, K.; Ibrahim, K.; Jenicek, S.

    2016-03-01

    Semi-solid processing of light alloys, namely aluminium and magnesium alloys, is a widely known and well-established process. By contrast, processing of powder steels which have high levels of alloying elements is a rather new subject of research. Thixoforming of high-alloy steels entails a number of technical difficulties. If these are overcome, the method can offer a variety of benefits. First of all, the final product shape and the desired mechanical properties can be obtained using a single forming operation. Semi-solid forming can produce unusual powder steel microstructures unattainable by any other route. Generally, the microstructures, which are normally found in thixoformed steels, consist of large fractions of globular or polygonal particles of metastable austenite embedded in a carbide network. An example is the X210Cr12 steel which is often used for semi-solid processing experiments. A disadvantage of the normal microstructure configuration is the brittleness of the carbide network, in which cracks initiate and propagate, causing low energy fractures. However, there is a newly-developed mini-thixoforming route which produces microstructures with an inverted configuration. Here, the material chosen for this purpose was K390 steel, in which the content of alloying elements is up to 24%. Its microstructure which was obtained by mini- thixoforming did not contain polyhedral austenite grains but hard carbides embedded in a ductile austenitic matrix. This provided the material with improved toughness. The spaces between the austenite grains were filled with a eutectic in which chromium, molybdenum and cobalt were distributed uniformly. After the processing parameters were optimized, complexshaped demonstration products were manufactured by this route. These products showed an extraordinary compressive strength and high wear resistance, thanks to the hardness of their microstructure constituents, predominantly the carbides.

  18. Status of Irradiation Tests of Dilute Uranium Alloys in NaK-Containing Stainless Steel Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    2001-03-26

    To extend experience with uranium metal fuels to the high exposures required for power reactor operation, the Savannah River Laboratory has conducted over several years a series of irradiation tests of small uranium specimens of various alloy compositions in NaK-containing stainless steel capsules. These tests were designed specifically to establish the limits on exposure that could be reached during irradiation of the alloys at various temperatures without swelling and to determine the metallurgical factors that promoted the stability of the alloys. This paper discusses those test results.

  19. Surface microstructures and antimicrobial properties of copper plasma alloyed stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Jiang, Li; Ma, Yong; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces is one of the major reason causing the cross-contamination and infection in many practical applications. An approach to solve this problem is to enhance the antibacterial properties on the surface of stainless steel. In this paper, novel antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different copper content have been prepared by a plasma surface alloying technique at various gas pressures. The microstructure of the alloyed surfaces was investigated using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of bacteria attached to the antibacterial surfaces was tested using the spread plate method. The antibacterial mechanism of the alloyed surfaces was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that gas pressure has a great influence on the surface elements concentration and the depth of the alloyed layer. The maximum copper concentration in the alloyed surface obtained at the gas pressure of 60 Pa is about 7.1 wt.%. This alloyed surface exhibited very strong antibacterial ability, and an effective reduction of 98% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) within 1 h was achieved by contact with the alloyed surface. The maximum thickness of the copper alloyed layer obtained at 45 Pa is about 6.5 μm. Although the rate of reduction for E. coli of this alloyed surface was slower than that of the alloyed surface with the copper content about 7.1 wt.% over the first 3 h, few were able to survive more than 12 h and the reduction reached over 99.9%. The XPS analysis results indicated that the copper ions were released when the copper alloyed stainless steel in contact with bacterial solution, which is an important factor for killing bacteria. Based on an overall consideration of bacterial killing rate and durability, the alloyed surface with the copper content of 2.5 wt.% and the thickness of about 6.5 μm obtained at the gas pressure of 45 Pa is expected

  20. High-strength economically alloyed corrosion-resistant steels with the structure of nitrogen martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O.; Blinov, V.; Lukin, E.

    2016-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as the main alloying element allowing one both to increase the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of steels and to improve their processability is a new trend in physical metallurgy of high-strength corrosion resistant steels. The principles of alloying, which are developed for high-nitrogen steel in IMET RAS, ensure the formation of the structure, which contains predetermined amounts of martensite (70-80%) and austenite (20-30%) and is free from δ-ferrite, σ-phase, and Cr23C6 carbide. These principles were used as the base for the creation of new high-strength corrosion-resistant weldable and deformable 0Kh16AN5B, 06Kh16AN4FD, 08Kh14AN4MDB, 09Kh16AN3MF, 27Kh15AN3MD2, 40Kh13AN3M2, and 19Kh14AMB steels, which are operative at temperatures ranging from - 70 to 400°C. The developed nitrogen-containing steels compared with similar carbon steels are characterized by a higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion and are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. The new steels successfully passed trial tests as heavy duty articles.

  1. Carbide Precipitation During Tempering of a Tool Steel Subjected to Deep Cryogenic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriljuk, V. G.; Sirosh, V. A.; Petrov, Yu. N.; Tyshchenko, A. I.; Theisen, W.; Kortmann, A.

    2014-05-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and measurements of hardness, the carbide precipitation during tempering of steel X153CrMoV12 containing (mass pct) 1.55C, 11.90Cr, 0.70V, and 0.86Mo is studied after three treatments: quenching at RT and deep cryogenic treatment, DCT, at 77 K or 123 K (-196 °C or -150 °C). In contrast to some previous studies, no fine carbide precipitation after long-time holding at cryogenic temperatures is detected. After quenching at room temperature, RT, the transient ɛ( ɛ') carbide is precipitated between 373 K and 473 K (100 °C and 200 °C) and transformed to cementite starting from 573 K (300 °C). In case of DCT at 123 K (-150 °C), only fine cementite particles are detected after tempering at 373 K (200 °C) with their delayed coarsening at higher temperatures. Dissolution of cementite and precipitation of alloying element carbides proceed at 773 K (500 °C) after quenching at RT, although some undissolved cementite plates can also be observed. After DCT at 123 K (-150 °C), the transient ɛ( ɛ') carbide is not precipitated during tempering, which is attributed to the intensive isothermal martensitic transformation accompanied by plastic deformation. In this case, cementite is the only carbide phase precipitated in the temperature range of 573 K to 773 K (300 °C to 500 °C). If DCT is carried out at 77 K (-196 °C), the ɛ( ɛ') carbide is found after tempering at 373 K to 473 K (100 °C to 200 °C). Coarse cementite particles and the absence of alloying element carbides constitute a feature of steel subjected to DCT and tempering at 773 K (500 °C). As a result, a decreased secondary hardness is obtained in comparison with the steel quenched at RT. According to Mössbauer studies, the structure after DCT and tempering at 773 K (500 °C) is characterized by the decreased fraction of the retained austenite and clustering of alloying elements in the α solid solution. It is suggested that a competition

  2. Transformation process for production of ultrahigh carbon steels and new alloys

    DOEpatents

    Strum, M.J.; Goldberg, A.; Sherby, O.D.; Landingham, R.L.

    1995-08-29

    Ultrahigh carbon steels with superplastic properties are produced by heating a steel containing ferrite and carbide phases to a soaking temperature approximately 50 C above the A{sub 1} transformation temperature, soaking the steel above the A{sub 1} temperature for a sufficient time that the major portion of the carbides dissolve into the austenite matrix, and then cooling the steel in a controlled manner within predetermined limits of cooling rate or transformation temperature, to obtain a steel having substantially spheroidal carbides. New alloy compositions contain aluminum and solute additions which promote the formation of a fine grain size and improve the resistance of the carbides to coarsening at the forming temperature. 9 figs.

  3. Transformation process for production of ultrahigh carbon steels and new alloys

    DOEpatents

    Strum, Michael J.; Goldberg, Alfred; Sherby, Oleg D.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    Ultrahigh carbon steels with superplastic properties are produced by heating a steel containing ferrite and carbide phases to a soaking temperature approximately 50.degree. C. above the A.sub.1 transformation temperature, soaking the steel above the A.sub.1 temperature for a sufficient time that the major portion of the carbides dissolve into the austenite matrix, and then cooling the steel in a controlled manner within predetermined limits of cooling rate or transformation temperature, to obtain a steel having substantially spheroidal carbides. New alloy compositions contain aluminum and solute additions which promote the formation of a fine grain size and improve the resistance of the carbides to coarsening at the forming temperature.

  4. A comparison of fracture behavior of low alloy steel with different sizes of carbide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.Z.; Chen, J.H.

    1996-07-01

    The fracture behaviors of low alloy steels with similar grain sizes but different sizes of carbide particles were investigated using precracked and notched specimens. The results indicate that in precracked specimens (COD), steel with coarser carbide particles has a lower toughness than steel with finer carbide particles over a temperature range from {minus}196 C to {minus}90 C. However, in notched specimens (four-point bending (4PB) and Charpy V), these two steels shows similar toughness at low temperature where specimens are fractured by cleavage without fibrous cracking. In the transition temperature range, the steel with coarser carbide particles conversely shows a little higher toughness due to the longer extension length of the fibrous crack. This phenomenon indicates that in precracked specimens, the second-phase particles play a leading role in cleavage fracture, while in notched specimens, the grain size dominates the fracture behavior.

  5. Development of a Nitrogen-Modified Stainless-Steel Hardfacing Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ryan Thomas

    A 2nd generation hardfacing alloy, Nitromaxx, has been designed though an integrated approach of chemical modification, characterization, and testing. Nitromaxx is a stainless-steel alloy modified with 0.5wt% nitrogen which has improved elevated temperature properties and wear performance. This is achieved by changing both the microstructure phase balance and inherent deformation characteristics of the metal. The alloy is fabricated by a powder metallurgy-hot isostatic pressing (PM-HIP) method, rather than traditional cladding methods. This allows for alloy property modification by equilibrium heat treatment while eliminating significant fabrication defects, so that component life is extended wear and galling performance is improved. The design approach involved extensive characterization of severely worn and galled surfaces of the 1st generation of hardfacing alloys. Observation of samples after galling testing showed highly inhomogeneous deformation in regions of the gall scar, leading to the design hypothesis that strain-localization is a controlling mechanism in severe wear of stainless-steels. Additionally, the presence and subsequent loss was investigated and correlated microstructurally to the transition to poor galling behavior in the existing stainless steel hardfacing NOREM02. This provided new insight and identification of key microstructural and mechanical properties that improve galling performance: 1) increased strain-hardening rate in the metal matrix at elevated temperature, 2) increased yield strength in the matrix leading to higher hardness, and 3) increased volume fraction of hard, non-deforming phases. All of these alloy design goals can be realized by the addition of nitrogen, which 1) at high concentration is shown to lower the stacking fault energy in the stainless steel matrix, 2) increases interstitial matrix strengthening, and 3) increases the volume fraction of nitride phases. These observations have been confirmed qualitatively and

  6. Corrosion fatigue behavior of low alloy steels under simulated BWR coolant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Young, M. C.; Jeng, S. L.; Yeh, J. J.; Huang, J. S.; Kuo, R. C.

    2010-10-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior of A533 and A508 low alloy steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) coolant conditions was studied. Corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of A533B3 and A508 cl. 3 steels were significantly affected by the steel sulfur content, loading frequency and dissolved oxygen content of water environments. The data points outside the bound of Eason's model could be attributed to the low frequency, higher steel sulfur content and high dissolved oxygen in water environments. The sulfur dissolved in the water environment from the higher-sulfur steels was sufficiently concentrated to acidify the crack tip chemistry even in the hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). Therefore, nitrogenated or HWC water showed little or no beneficiary effect on the high-sulfur steels. For the steel specimens of the same sulfur level, their corrosion fatigue crack growth rates were comparable in different orientations, which could be related to the exposure of fresh sulfides to the water environment. The percentages of sulfides per unit area, by quantitative metallography, were comparable for the steel specimens of both orientations. When the steel sulfur content was decreased to a critical sulfur content 0.005 wt.%, the crack growth rates decreased remarkably.

  7. Use of steel and tantalum apparatus for molten Cd-Mg-Zn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, G. A.; Burris, L., Jr.; Kyle, M. L.; Nelson, P. A.

    1966-01-01

    Steel and tantalum apparatus contains various ternary alloys of cadmium, zinc, and magnesium used in pyrochemical processes for the recovery of uranium-base reactor fuels. These materials exhibit good corrosion resistance at the high temperatures necessary for fuel separation in liquid metal-molten salt solvents.

  8. Evaluation of Protection Schemes for Ultrahigh-Strength Steel Alloys for Landing Gear Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    components are victims of hydrogen embrittlement , corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking associated with alloys currently in use for landing gear. The...protected by a passive chromium -oxide layer. Keywords: Ultrahigh-strength steel, corrosion, ASTM B117, landing gear, UNS S10500, UNS K91973

  9. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  10. Characterization of Nonmetallic Inclusions in High-Manganese and Aluminum-Alloyed Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jin; Min, Dong Joon

    2012-07-01

    The effects of Al and Mn contents on the size, composition, and three-dimensional morphologies of inclusions formed in Fe- xMn- yAl ( x = 10 and 20 mass pct, y = 1, 3, and 6 mass pct) steels were investigated to enhance our understanding of the inclusion formation behavior in high Mn-Al-alloyed steels. By assuming that the alumina is a dominant oxide compound, the volume fraction of inclusions estimated from the chemical analysis, i.e., insoluble Al, in the Fe-Mn-3Al steels was larger than the inclusion volume fractions in the Fe-Mn-1Al and Fe-Mn-6Al steels. A similar tendency was found in the analysis of inclusions from a potentiostatic electrolytic extraction method. This finding could be explained from the terminal velocities of the compounds, which was affected by the thermophysical properties of Fe-Mn-Al steels. The inclusions formed in the Fe-Mn-Al-alloyed steels are classified into seven types according to chemistry and morphology: (1) single Al2O3 particle, (2) single AlN or AlON particle, (3) MnAl2O4 single galaxite spinel particle, (4) Al2O3(-Al(O)N) agglomerate, (5) single Mn(S,Se) particle, (6) oxide core with Mn(S,Se) skin (wrap), and (7) Mn(S,Se) core with Al2O3(-Al(O)N) aggregate (or bump). The Mn(S,Se) compounds were formed by the contamination of the steels by Se from the electrolytic Mn. Therefore, the raw materials (Mn) should be used carefully in the melting and casting processes of Fe-Mn-Al-alloyed steels.

  11. Investigation of the Phase Formation of AlSi-Coatings for Hot Stamping of Boron Alloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Veit, R.; Kolleck, R.; Hofmann, H.; Sikora, S.

    2011-01-17

    Hot stamping of boron alloyed steel is gaining more and more importance for the production of high strength automotive body parts. Within hot stamping of quenchenable steels the blank is heated up to austenitization temperature, transferred to the tool, formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. To avoid scale formation during the heating process of the blank, the sheet metal can be coated with an aluminium-silicum alloy. The meltimg temperature of this coating is below the austenitization temperature of the base material. This means, that a diffusion process between base material and coating has to take place during heating, leading to a higher melting temperature of the coating.In conventional heating devices, like roller hearth furnaces, the diffusion process is reached by relatively low heating rates. New technologies, like induction heating, reach very high heating rates and offer great potentials for the application in hot stamping. Till now it is not proofed, that this technology can be used with aluminum-silicon coated materials. This paper will present the results of comparative heating tests with a conventional furnace and an induction heating device. For different time/temperature-conditions the phase formation within the coating will be described.

  12. Investigation of the Phase Formation of AlSi-Coatings for Hot Stamping of Boron Alloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veit, R.; Hofmann, H.; Kolleck, R.; Sikora, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hot stamping of boron alloyed steel is gaining more and more importance for the production of high strength automotive body parts. Within hot stamping of quenchenable steels the blank is heated up to austenitization temperature, transferred to the tool, formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. To avoid scale formation during the heating process of the blank, the sheet metal can be coated with an aluminium-silicum alloy. The meltimg temperature of this coating is below the austenitization temperature of the base material. This means, that a diffusion process between base material and coating has to take place during heating, leading to a higher melting temperature of the coating. In conventional heating devices, like roller hearth furnaces, the diffusion process is reached by relatively low heating rates. New technologies, like induction heating, reach very high heating rates and offer great potentials for the application in hot stamping. Till now it is not proofed, that this technology can be used with aluminum-silicon coated materials. This paper will present the results of comparative heating tests with a conventional furnace and an induction heating device. For different time/temperature-conditions the phase formation within the coating will be described.

  13. The effects of sulfate reducing bacteria on stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo alloy weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, T.A.; Taylor, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Previous research in this laboratory demonstrated a direct correlation between alloy composition and corrosion susceptibility of stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo alloy weldments exposed to lake water augmented with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). It was shown that lake water containing an active SRB population reduced the polarization resistance (R{sub p}) on all alloys studied including those with 9% Mo. In addition, preliminary evidence indicated that edge preparation and weld heat input were also important parameters in determining corrosion performance. This prior research, however, looked at ``doctored`` weldments in which the thermal oxide in the heat affected zone was removed. The objectives of the research presented here are to further confirm these observations using as-received welds. The materials examined (listed in increasing alloy content) are 1/4 inch thick plates of 316L, 317L, AL6XN (6% Mo), alloy 625 clad steel, alloy 625, and alloy 686. Materials were welded using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process in an argon purged environment. In addition, 317L was welded in air to test oxide effects. All samples were prepared for welding by grinding to a V-edge, except the 625 clad steel samples which were prepared using a J-edge. Electrochemical performance of welded samples was monitored in four glass cells which could each allow exposure of 8 samples to the same environment. Two cells contained lake water inoculated with SRS, and two cells contained sterilized lake water. The open circuit potential (E{sub oc}) and R{sub p} was used to correlate corrosion susceptibility and bacterial activity with alloy composition and welding parameters.

  14. Crystalline gamma-Al2O3 physical vapour deposition-coating for steel thixoforging tools.

    PubMed

    Bobzin, K; Hirt, G; Bagcivan, N; Khizhnyakova, L; Ewering, M

    2011-10-01

    The process of thixoforming, which has been part of many researches during the last decades, combines the advantages of forging and casting for the shaping of metallic components. But due to the high temperatures of semi-solid steel alloys high demands on the tools are requested. To resists the thermal and mechanical loads (wear, friction, thermal and thermomechanical fatigue) protecting thin films are necessary. In this regard crystalline gamma-Al2O3 deposited via Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) is a promising candidate: It exhibits high thermal stability, high oxidation resistance and high hot hardness. In the present work the application of a (Ti, Al)N/gamma-Al2O3 coating deposited by means of Magnetron Sputter Ion Plating in an industrial coating unit is presented. The coating was analysed by means of Rockwell test, nanoindentation, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The coated tool was tested in thixoforging experiments with steel grade X210CrW12 (AlSI D6). The surface of the coated dies was examined with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) after 22, 42, 90 and 170 forging cycles.

  15. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  16. Application of nitrogen-alloyed martensitic stainless steels in the aviation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, G.; Kirschner, W.; Lueg, J.

    1997-12-31

    Nitrogen in stainless martensitic steels has a beneficial influence on the mechanical as well as on the chemical properties. However the effect of nitrogen is limited due to the rather low solubility of this element. A special alloy development in combination with a pressurized melting technique lead to distinctly higher nitrogen contents. Stainless martensitic steels containing high nitrogen contents are manufactured by VSG today on an industrial scale using the PESR-process (Pressurized Electroslag Remelting). Depending on special applications these steels are available with different chemical analysis under the trademark CRONIDUR. The basic composition of all CRONIDUR-alloys consists of about 15% Chromium, 1% Molybdenum, 0.15 to 0.35% Carbon and 0.20 to 0.40% Nitrogen. The combination of Cr + Mo + N leads to a superior corrosion resistance of these HNS-steels (HNS: High Nitrogen Steels) in comparison to similar carbon based alloys. Focused on applications with a required minimum hardness of 58 HRC, like stainless bearings or screw shafts, the C+N-content is tuned between 0.60 and 0.80% (Brand: CRONIDUR 30). Additions of max. 0.3% Vanadium and 0.1% Niobium qualifies the brand CRONIDUR 20 for enhanced temperature applications like turbine disks or blades.

  17. Galvanic Corrosion of Mg-Zr Alloy and Steel or Graphite in Mineral Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambertin, David; Rooses, Adrien; Frizon, Fabien

    The dismantling of UNGG nuclear reactor generates numerous nuclear wastes such as fuel decanning commonly composed of Mg-Zr alloy. A conditioning strategy consists in encapsulating these wastes into a hydraulic binder in a suitable state for storage. The eventual presence of steel and graphite accompanying the magnesium wastes could imply corrosion by galvanic coupling. This work is an experimental investigation of the galvanic coupling between Mg-Zr alloy and steel or graphite using ZRA electrochemical method in Portland cement or geopolymer pastes. The lowest corrosion activity of magnesium alloy while coupled to graphite or steel cathode has been observed in geopolymer pastes. Indeed, in this binder, an efficient corrosion protection of the magnesium alloy maintains the galvanic current very low during all the hardening process. In geopolymer paste, current densities of anodised Mg-Zr alloy is not dependent of the cathode/anode surface ratio in the range of 0.1 to 5 due to the dominance of the anode resistance.

  18. Boriding of high carbon high chromium cold work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, W.

    2014-06-01

    High-carbon high-chromium cold work tool steels are widely used for blanking and cold forming of punches and dies. It is always advantageous to obtain an increased wear resistant surface to improve life and performance of these steels. In this connection boriding of a high-carbon high-chromium cold work die steel, D3, was conducted in a mixture of 30% B4C, 70% borax at 950 °C for two, four and six hours. Case depth of the borided layer obtained was between 40 to 80 μm. After boriding, the surface hardness achieved was between 1430 to 1544 HV depending upon the process time. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of a duplex compound layer consisting of FeB and Fe2B. It is generally considered that FeB is undesirable because of its inherent brittleness. Post boriding treatment (homogenization) transformed the compound layer into single-phase layer of Fe2B, while surface hardness decreased to 1345-1430 HV. Pin-on-disc wer test showed that wear resistance of the borided samples was superior as compared to non-borided material and increased with boriding time.

  19. Factors influencing the surface quality of polished tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebeggiani, S.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-09-01

    Today’s demands on surface quality of moulds for injection moulding of plastic components involve no/low defect contents and roughness levels in the nm-range for high gloss applications. Material properties as well as operating conditions influence the mould finish, and thus the final surface of moulded products. This paper focuses on how particle content and different polishing strategies influence final surface qualities of moulds. Visual estimations of polished tool steel samples were combined with non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis in order to correlate traditional assessments to more quantitative methods, and to be able to analyse the surfaces at nanometre-level. It was found that steels with a lower proportion of particles, like carbides and oxides, gave rise to smoother polished surfaces. In a comparative study of polishers from different polishing shops, it was found that while different surface preparation strategies can lead to similar final roughness, similar preparation techniques can produce high-quality surfaces from different steel grades. However, the non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis showed that not all smooth polished surfaces have desirable functional topographies for injection moulding of glossy plastic components.

  20. Influence Of Tool Geometry, Tool Coating And Process Parameters In Thixoextrusion Of Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knauf, Frederik; Hirt, Gerhard; Immich, Philipp; Bobzin, Kirsten

    2007-04-07

    Thixoextrusion could become one possibility to enlarge the complexity of extruded profiles made of steel. Accordingly semi-solid extrusion experiments of X210CrW12 tool steel using round dies of approximately 15 mm diameter were performed in order to achieve first information concerning possible process windows and process limits. For liquid fractions between 38% and 10%, extrusion press velocities from 10 mm/s to 50 mm/s and dies with novel PVD-coatings no complete solidification during extrusion was achieved. However the collected pieces of the extruded bars showed a fine and evenly distributed globular microstructure.

  1. Oxide formation and alloying elements enrichment on TRIP steel surface during inter-critical annealing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y F; Birosca, S; Kim, H S; De Cooman, B C

    2008-06-01

    The gas atmosphere in continuous annealing and galvanizing lines alters both composition and microstructure of the surface and sub-surface of sheet steels. The alloying element enrichments and the oxide morphology on transformation-induced plasticity steel surfaces are strongly influenced by the dew point of the furnace atmosphere and annealing temperature. The formation of a thin oxide film and enrichment of the alloying elements during annealing may result in surface defects on galvanized sheet products. The present contribution reports on the use of microanalysis techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and electron probe micro-analysis for the detailed surface analysis of inter-critically annealed transformation-induced plasticity steel such as oxide phase determination, microstructure and microtexture evolutions.

  2. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel and Ni-Based Alloy 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Johnnatan Rodriguez; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2017-01-01

    Microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 was studied. Regarding the Ni-based alloy, the welding process led to grain refinement caused by discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallization, where bulging of the pre-existing grains and subgrain rotation were the primary mechanisms of recrystallization. In the steel, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was identified as the recovery process experienced by the austenite. Simple shear textures were observed in the regions affected by the deformation of both materials. Although the allotropic transformation obscured the deformation history, the thermo-mechanically affected zone was identified in the steel by simple shear texture components. A new methodology for the study of texture evolution based on rotations of the slip systems using pole figures is presented as an approximation to describe the texture evolution in FSW.

  3. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel and Ni-Based Alloy 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Johnnatan Rodriguez; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2017-03-01

    Microstructure evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of mild steel and Ni-based alloy 625 was studied. Regarding the Ni-based alloy, the welding process led to grain refinement caused by discontinuous and continuous dynamic recrystallization, where bulging of the pre-existing grains and subgrain rotation were the primary mechanisms of recrystallization. In the steel, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was identified as the recovery process experienced by the austenite. Simple shear textures were observed in the regions affected by the deformation of both materials. Although the allotropic transformation obscured the deformation history, the thermo-mechanically affected zone was identified in the steel by simple shear texture components. A new methodology for the study of texture evolution based on rotations of the slip systems using pole figures is presented as an approximation to describe the texture evolution in FSW.

  4. Nondestructive inspection assessment of eddy current and electrochemical analysis to separate inconel and stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.G.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1998-02-01

    This report presents a nondestructive inspection assessment of eddy current and electrochemical analysis to separate inconel alloys from stainless steel alloys as well as an evaluation of cleaning techniques to remove a thermal oxide layer on aircraft exhaust components. The results of this assessment are presented in terms of how effective each technique classifies a known exhaust material. Results indicate that either inspection technique can separate inconel and stainless steel alloys. Based on the experiments conducted, the electrochemical spot test is the optimum for use by airframe and powerplant mechanics. A spot test procedure is proposed for incorporation into the Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 65-9A Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic - General Handbook. 3 refs., 70 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  6. Neutron-irradiated model alloys and pressure-vessel steels studied using positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumblidge, Stephen Eric

    We have used positron-annihilation-lifetime spectroscopies to examine microstructural evolution of pressure vessel steels and model alloys that have systematically varied amounts of copper, nickel, and phosphorus during neutron irradiation and post-irradiation annealing. The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron-irradiation induced microstructural features that cause the embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure-vessel steel. We used positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler-broadening spectroscopy to examine the model alloys and pressure-vessel steels before and after irradiation and after post-irradiation annealing. We followed the changes in the mechanical properties of the materials using Rockwell 15N hardness measurements. The results show that in both the model alloys and pressure-vessel steels neutron irradiation causes the formation of vacancy-type defect clusters and a fine distribution of copper- and nickel-enriched metallic precipitates. The vacancy clusters are small in size and were present in all samples, and disappear upon annealing at 450°C. The metallic precipitates are present only in the model alloy samples with either high Cu or a combination of medium Cu and high Ni, and they remain in the microstructure after annealing up to 550°C, starting to anneal possibly at 600°C. The neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels behave similarly to the high Cu samples, indicating that neutron irradiation induced precipitation occurs in these alloys as well. This work provides independent evidence for the irradiation-induced metallic precipitates seen by other techniques, gives evidence for the exact nature of the matrix damage, and is significant to understanding the in-service degradation of pressure vessel materials.

  7. Zr/ZrC modified layer formed on AISI 440B stainless steel by plasma Zr-alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X. Z.; Guo, Q.; Meng, T. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Yang, H. J.; Liu, X. P.

    2016-12-01

    The surface Zr/ZrC gradient alloying layer was prepared by double glow plasma surface alloying technique to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of AISI 440B stainless steel. The microstructure of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer formed at different alloying temperatures and times as well as its formation mechanism were discussed by using scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrum, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adhesive strength, hardness and tribological property of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer were also evaluated in the paper. The alloying surface consists of the Zr-top layer and ZrC-subsurface layer which adheres strongly to the AISI 440B steel substrate. The thickness of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer increases gradually from 16 μm to 23 μm with alloying temperature elevated from 900 °C to 1000 °C. With alloying time from 0.5 h to 4 h, the alloyed depth increases from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the ZrC-rich alloyed thickness vs time is basically parabola at temperature of 1000 °C. Both the hardness and wear resistance of the Zr/ZrC alloying layer obviously increase compared with untreated AISI 440B steel.

  8. Effect of microstructure on the susceptibility of low-alloy steels to hydrogen attack

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.O.

    1981-08-01

    In an alloy steel in which one or more alloy additions stabilize the carbide phase, the carbon activity depends on the microstructure and the prior thermal history. The carbon activity is a major factor in the susceptibility of such steels to form internal methane bubbles when heated in high-pressure hydrogen. Thus one can expect to vary the susceptibility to hydrogen attack of a given steel by its prior treatment. The problem has two aspects. First, one needs to be able to calculate the equilibrium carbon activity when the steel is in internal equilibrium. A computer program in the appendix of this report takes care of part of this problem. When the thermodynamics of the mixed carbide phase is adequately modeled, then this problem can be solved. The second part is the rate of approach to equilibrium. An analysis of the rate of coarsening of carbides in such steels shows that this rate is enhanced by a fine carbide dispersion. Such a fine dispersion is also desirable for the maximum strength. Thus, we believe that under favorable circumstances the resistance to hydrogen attack can be enhanced by suitable thermal treatments of the steels used for the pressure vessels for hydrogen service. 12 figures.

  9. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Plasma-Nitriding Parameters on the Properties of Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdravecká, Eva; Slota, Ján; Solfronk, Pavel; Kolnerová, Michaela

    2017-07-01

    This work is concerned with the surface treatment (ion nitriding) of different plasma-nitriding parameters on the characteristics of DIN 1.8519 low-alloy steel. The samples were nitrided from 500 to 570 °C for 5-40 h using a constant 25% N2-75% H2 gaseous mixture. Lower temperature (500-520 °C) favors the formation of compound layers of γ' and ɛ iron nitrides in the surface layers, whereas a monophase γ'-Fe4 N layer can be obtained at a higher temperature. The hardness of this layer can be obtained when nitriding is performed at a higher temperature, and the hardness decreases when the temperature increases to 570 °C. These results indicate that pulsed plasma nitriding is highly efficient at 550 °C and can form thick and hard nitrided layers with satisfactory mechanical properties. The results show the optimized nitriding process at 540 °C for 20 h. This process can be an interesting means of enhancing the surface hardness of tool steels to forge dies compared to stamped steels with zinc coating with a reduced coefficient of friction and improving the anti-sticking properties of the tool surface.

  10. Lubricant Carriers for Drawing Alloyed and Unalloyed Steels,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    high C steels. It must be dissolved in hot water at 80 degrees. Additives such as wax or Na3PO4 increase the pliability of the layer of lubricant carrier. Addn. of glycerol increases the soly. of the salt.

  11. High-temperature property data: Ferrous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    In this book over 250 alloys are organized by AISI number into 10 major sections: Irons, Carbon Steels, Alloy Steels, Low Alloy Constructional Steels, Ultra High Strength Steels, Tool Steels, Maraging Steels, Wrought Stainless Steels, Heat Resistnat Casting Alloys, and Iron Based Rought Superalloys. Each alloy record lists the designation, specifications, UNS number, composition, product forms and a comment on the high-temperature properties and applications. Referenced data is then given for physical properties such as density, specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, electrical conductivity, Poisson's ratio, moduli of elasticity and rigidity, etc. Mechanical properties follow, and include tensile properties, shearing and bearing properties, impact properties, creep, stress rupture and stress relaxation and fatigue properties. The last part of the alloy record gives other effects of temperature, such as hot hardness, corrosion, and growth.

  12. Fe-Zn Alloy Coating on Galvannealed (GA) Steel Sheet to Improve Product Qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata; Guin, Akshya Kumar; Raju, Pankaj; Manna, Manindra; Dutta, Monojit; Venugopalan, T.

    2014-09-01

    Galvannealed steel sheets (GA) have become the mainstream steel sheet for automobile applications because of their superior corrosion resistance, paintability, and weldability. To impart specific properties, different coatings on GA steel sheet were reported to improve properties further. In this context, we have developed an electroplating process (flash coating) for bright and adherent Fe-Zn alloy coating on GA steel sheet to enhance performances such as weldability, frictional behavior, phosphatability, and defect coverage. A comparative study with bare GA steel sheet was carried out for better elastration. The electroplating time was reduced below 10 s for practical applicability in an industrial coating line by modulating the bath composition. Electroplating was performed at current density of 200-500 A/m2 which yielded with higher cathode current efficiency of 85-95%. The performance results show that Fe-10 wt.% Zn-coated GA steel sheet (coating time 7 s) has better spot weldability, lower dynamic coefficient of friction (0.06-0.07 in lubrication), and better corrosion resistance compared to bare GA steel sheet. Uniform phosphate coating with globular crystal size of 2-5 µm was obtained on Fe-Zn flash-coated GA steel sheet. Hopeite was the main phosphate compound (77.9 wt.%) identified along with spencerite (13.6 wt.%) and phosphophyllite (8.5 wt.%).

  13. Oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr steels alloyed with titanium at 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Asep Ridwan; Artono, Tri Juni

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the oxidation behavior of Fe-20 wt%Cr steels alloyed with different titanium contents: 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% are studied as a function of time in air atmosphere. The samples were isothermally oxidized at 1073 K for 86.4, 172.8, and 345.6 ks in a muffle furnace. The mass of specimen were recorded before and after oxidation. After the oxidation, phases in the oxide were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy observation on the chromium base alloys show that the microstructure consist only ferritic phases. The addition of titanium in the Fe-20Cr alloys does not alter the microstructure significantly. The oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr, Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti were followed the classical parabolic relationship with time. XRD analysis indicated that the oxide scales developed on the Fe-20Cr alloys surface during oxidation tests consisted mainly of Cr2O3. On the other hand, the oxide scales developed on the surface of Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti alloys comprised of Cr2O3 and TiO2 oxide. The formation of TiO2 oxide in the Ti-containing alloys consequently increases the mass gain of the alloys during oxidation compared to that of Fe-20Cr alloys.

  14. Tribological characteristics of aluminum alloys against steel lubricated by ammonium and imidazolium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M; Truhan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear characteristics of aluminum alloys against AISI 52100 steel lubricated by ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at both room and elevated temperatures. The tested aluminum alloys include a commercially pure aluminum Al 1100, a wrought alloy Al 6061-T6511, and a cast alloy Al 319-T6. The lubricating performance of two ILs with the same anion, one ammonium-based [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium-based C10mim.Tf2N, were compared each other and benchmarked against that of a conventional fully-formulated engine oil. Significant friction (up to 35%) and wear (up to 55%) reductions were achieved by the ammonium IL when lubricating the three aluminum alloys compared to the engine oil. The imidazolium IL performed better than the oil but not as well as the ammonium IL for Al 1100 and 319 alloys. However, accelerated wear was unexpectedly observed for Al 6061 alloy when lubricated by C10mim.Tf2N. Surface chemical analyses implied complex tribochemical reactions between the aluminum surfaces and ILs during the wear testing, which has been demonstrated either beneficial by forming a protective boundary film or detrimental by causing severe tribo-corrosion. The effects of the IL cation structure, aluminum alloy composition, and tribo-testing condition on the friction and wear results have been discussed.

  15. adwTools Developed: New Bulk Alloy and Surface Analysis Software for the Alloy Design Workbench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Morse, Jeffrey A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2004-01-01

    A suite of atomistic modeling software, called the Alloy Design Workbench, has been developed by the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). The main goal of this software is to guide and augment experimental materials research and development efforts by creating powerful, yet intuitive, software that combines a graphical user interface with an operating code suitable for real-time atomistic simulations of multicomponent alloy systems. Targeted for experimentalists, the interface is straightforward and requires minimum knowledge of the underlying theory, allowing researchers to focus on the scientific aspects of the work. The centerpiece of the Alloy Design Workbench suite is the adwTools module, which concentrates on the atomistic analysis of surfaces and bulk alloys containing an arbitrary number of elements. An additional module, adwParams, handles ab initio input for the parameterization used in adwTools. Future modules planned for the suite include adwSeg, which will provide numerical predictions for segregation profiles to alloy surfaces and interfaces, and adwReport, which will serve as a window into the database, providing public access to the parameterization data and a repository where users can submit their own findings from the rest of the suite. The entire suite is designed to run on desktop-scale computers. The adwTools module incorporates a custom OAI/Glenn-developed Fortran code based on the BFS (Bozzolo- Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys, ref. 1). The heart of the suite, this code is used to calculate the energetics of different compositions and configurations of atoms.

  16. Diffusion Bonding Behavior and Characterization of Joints Made Between 316L Stainless Steel Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elthalabawy, Waled Mohamed

    The 316L austenitic stainless steel and AZ31 magnesium alloy have physical and mechanical properties which makes these alloys suitable in a number of high technology based industries such as the aerospace and automotive sectors. However, for these alloys to be used in engineering applications, components must be fabricated and joined successfully. The differences in the physical and metallurgical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional fusion welding processes commonly employed in aerospace and transport industry. Therefore, alternative techniques need to be developed and diffusion bonding technology is a process that has considerable potential to join these two dissimilar alloys. In this research work both solid-state and transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding processes were applied. The solid-state bonding of 316L steel to AZ31 magnesium alloy was possible at a bonding temperature of 550°C for 120 minutes using a pressure of 1.3 MPa. The interface characterization of the joint showed a thin intermetallic zone rich in Fe-Al was responsible for providing a metallurgical bond. However, low joint shear strengths were recorded and this was attributed to the poor surface to surface contact. The macro-deformation of the AZ31 alloy prevented the use of higher bonding pressures and longer bonding times. In order to overcome these problems, the TLP bonding process was implemented using pure Cu and Ni foils as interlayers which produced a eutectic phase at the bonding temperature. This research identified the bonding mechanism through microstructural and differential scanning calorimetry investigations. The microstructural characterization of the TLP joints identified intermetallics which became concentrated along the 316L steel/AZ31 bond interface due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The size and concentration of the intermetallics had a noticeable effect on the final joint

  17. Friction Stir Welding of Stainless Steel to Al Alloy: Effect of Thermal Condition on Weld Nugget Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Husain, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is always a global challenge. Sometimes it is unavoidable to execute multifarious activities by a single component. In the present investigation, 6061 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) at different tool rotational rates. Welded joints were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. Reaction products in the stirring zone (SZ) were confirmed through X-ray diffraction. Joint strength was evaluated by tensile testing. It was found that the increment in average heat input and temperature at the weld nugget (WN) facilitated iron enrichment near the interface. Enhancement in the concentration of iron shifted the nature of intermetallics from the Fe2Al5 to Fe-rich end of the Fe-Al binary phase diagram. The peak microhardness and ultimate tensile strength were found to be maxima at the intermediate tool rotational rate, where Fe3Al and FeAl2 appeared along with Fe2Al5.

  18. Influence of nitrogen alloying on hydrogen embrittlement in AISI 304-type stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, Simo-Pekka; Hänninen, Hannu; Tähtinen, Seppo

    1984-12-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 304-type austenitic stainless steels has been studied with special emphasis on the effects of the nitrogen content of the steels. Hydrogen charging was found to degrade the mechanical properties of all the steels studied, as measured by a tensile test. The fracture surfaces of hydrogen charged specimens were brittle cleavage-like whereas the uncharged specimens showed ductile, dimpled fracture. In sensitized materials transgranular cleavage mode of fracture was replaced by an intergranular mode of fracture and the losses of mechanical properties were higher. Nitrogen alloying decreased the hydrogen-induced losses of mechanical properties by increasing the stability of austenite. In sensitized steels the stability of austenite and nitrogen content were found to have only a minor effect on hydrogen embrittlement, except when sensitization had caused α'-martensite transformation at the grain boundaries.

  19. Performance Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    alloys , foundry, muzzle brake, supply center, tooling, sources Notice Distribution Statement A Format Information Report created in Microsoft Word...Development of Sand Properties 103 Advanced Modeling Dataset.. 105 High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) Steels 107 Steel Casting and Engineering Support...University, University of Northern Iowa, Non- Ferrous Founders’ Society, QuesTek, buyCASTINGS.com, Spokane Industries, Nova Precision Casting, Waukesha

  20. Effect of alloying elements on metadynamic recrystallization in HSLA steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roucoules, C.; Yue, S.; Jonas, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    By means of interrupted torsion tests, the kinetics of metadynamic recrystallization (MDRX) were studied in a Mo, a Nb, and a Ti microalloyed steel at temperatures ranging from 850 °C to 1000 °C and strain rates from 0.02 to 2 s1. Quenches were also performed after full MDRX. In contrast to the case of static recrystallization (SRX), the kinetics of MDRX are shown to be highly sensitive to a change of an order of magnitude in strain rate and are relatively insensitive to temperature changes within the range of values applicable to industrial hot-rolling practice. A similar algebraic dependence of the MDRX grain size on strain rate and temperature was found in the three steels. The kinetics of MDRX were slower in the Nb than in the Mo steel, and those of the Ti steel were slower than in the Nb and Mo steels. Above 900 °C and 950 °C, the retardation of MDRX in the Nb and Ti steels, respectively, is due to solute drag. Models predicting the start time for Nb and Ti carbonitride precipitation showed that MDRX is delayed below these temperatures by this mechanism. Comparison of the MDRX and precipitation start times in the Nb steel indicated that a temperature of “no-MDRX” could not be defined, in contrast to the well-defined T nr (no recrystallization temperature) of SRX. By means of torsion simulations composed of multiple interruptions, it is shown that MDRX is retarded decreasingly as the accumulated strain is increased. This appears to be due to the promotion of precipitate coarsening by the continuing deformation.

  1. Synchrotron Radiography Studies of Shear-Induced Dilation in Semisolid Al Alloys and Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, C. M.; O'Sullivan, C.; Fonseca, J.; Yuan, L.; Kareh, K. M.; Nagira, T.; Yasuda, H.

    2014-08-01

    An improved understanding of the response of solidifying microstructures to load is required to further minimize casting defects and optimize casting processes. This article overviews synchrotron radiography studies that directly measure the micromechanics of semisolid alloy deformation in a thin-sample direct-shear cell. It is shown that shear-induced dilation (also known as Reynolds' dilatancy) occurs in semisolid alloys with morphologies ranging from equiaxed-dendritic to globular, at solid fractions from the dendrite coherency point to ~90% solid, and it occurs in both Al alloys and carbon steels. Discrete-element method simulations that treat solidifying microstructures as granular materials are then used to explore the origins of dilatancy in semisolid alloys.

  2. Thirty year atmospheric corrosion performance of 55% aluminum-zinc alloy-coated sheet steel

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, H.E.; Borzillo, A.R.

    1996-04-01

    In 1964, a series of aluminum-zinc (Al-Zn) alloy coatings were applied to steel sheet on a laboratory continuous hot-dip coating pilot line. The coated sheets were exposed in outdoor corrosion tests in severe marine, moderate marine, rural, and industrial atmospheres. Following eight years of testing, the 55% Al-Zn composition was selected as the optimum composition because it combined excellent long-term durability with the ability to provide cut-edge protection to the steel substrate. Now, after 30 years of continued outdoor testing, the results show conclusively that the 55% Al-Zn alloy coating has better than twice the life of an ordinary zinc coating of equal thickness, and that it provides enduring cut-edge protection. Following identification of the optimum composition in 1972, steel sheet with the 55% Al-Zn alloy coating was produced commercially by Bethlehem Steel. Large quantities of this material have been put in service as unpainted roofing on metal buildings. Inspections of these buildings show that the corrosion performance is excellent for roofs that have been in service for up to 22 years in a variety of US environments. These results confirm the conclusions of the earlier outdoor tests.

  3. Effect of alloy composition on high-temperature bending fatigue strength of ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yong-Sik; Song, Jeon-Young

    2011-12-01

    Exhaust manifolds are subjected to an environment in which heating and cooling cycles occur due to the running pattern of automotive engines. This temperature profile results in the repeated bending stress of exhaust pipes. Therefore, among high-temperature characteristics, the bending fatigue strength is an important factor that affects the lifespan of exhaust manifolds. Here, we report on the effect of the alloy composition, namely the weight fraction of the elements Cr, Mo, Nb, and Ti, on the high-temperature bending fatigue strength of the ferritic stainless steel used in exhaust manifolds. Little difference in the tensile strength and bending fatigue strength of the different composition steels was observed below 600 °C, with the exception of the low-Cr steel. However, steels with high Cr, Mo, or Nb fractions showed considerably larger bending fatigue strength at temperatures of 800 °C. After heating, the precipitates from the specimens were extracted electrolytically and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Alloying with Cr and Mo was found to increase the bending fatigue strength due to the substitutional solid solution effect, while alloying with Nb enhanced the strength by forming fine intermetallic compounds, including NbC and Fe2Nb.

  4. Study on fatigue resistance of low alloy steels with Mo and Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enculescu, E.; Chicet, D. L.; Dia, V.; Stanciu, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents, based on a case study, the analysis of the factors that influence the mechanical cyclic fatigue resistance of two grades of low alloy steel with Mo and Cr. It was studied the fatigue behavior in real operating conditions of some active elements manufactured from the two low-alloyed steel grades, elements that are equipping some farm implements. Using the fractographic analysis, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, were analyzed the samples that carried away because of the fatigue fracture. On samples taken from the two brands of low alloy steels with Mo and Cr were performed tempering thermal treatments that modified the structure, in order to improve the operating characteristics. The effect of those thermal treatments was initially observed by microstructural analysis of metallographic prepared samples (by polishing and chemical attack using nital reagent), that revealed a troostite type structure. On the heat-treated samples were determined a number of mechanical properties: hardness, impact strength and tensile test. There was observed an improvement of the impact bending strength for both alloys and a tensile behavior that favors increasing resistance to fatigue.

  5. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Stubbins, J. F.; Edwards, D. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop Al25), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop Al25 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface.

  6. 78 FR 33809 - Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Rescission..., line, and pressure pipe from the People's Republic of China. The period of review is November 1, 2011... China covering the period [[Page 33810

  7. Nitrogen alloying of the 12% Cr martensitic-ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Artem'eva, D. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of the nitrogen content on the structure and mechanical properties of heat and corrosion resistant 12% Cr martensitic-ferritic steel developed at the Central Research Institute of Structural Materials Prometey has been studied. Steel containing 0.061 wt % nitrogen possesses a high level of mechanical properties. The decrease in the nitrogen content to 0.017 wt % leads to an increase of structurally free ferrite fraction in the steel, a decrease in the density of dislocations, a decrease of structural dispersity and the absence of finely dispersed precipitates of niobium and vanadium nitrides and carbides. As a result, there is a decrease in the strength properties, especially in the heat resistance.

  8. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  9. Role of alloy additions on strengthening in 17-4 PH stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Arpana Sudershan

    Alloy modifications by addition of niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), nitrogen (N) and cobalt (Co) to cast 17-4 PH steel were investigated to determine the effect on mechanical properties. Additions of Nb, V, and N increased the yield strength from 1120 MPa to 1310 MPa while decreased the room temperature charpy V notch (CVN) toughness from 20 J to four Joules. The addition of Co to cast 17-4 PH steel enhanced the yield strength and CVN toughness from 1140 MPa to 1290 MPa and from 3.7 J to 5.5 J, respectively. In the base 17-4 PH steel, an increase in block width from 2.27 ± 0.10 μm in the solution treated condition to 3.06 ± 0.17 μm upon aging at 755 K was measured using orientation image microscopy. Cobalt inhibited recrystallization and block boundary migration during aging resulting in a finer martensitic block structure. The influence of Co on copper (Cu) precipitation in steels was studied using atom probe tomography. A narrower precipitate size distribution was observed in the steels with Co addition. The concentration profile across the matrix / precipitate interface indicated rejection of Co atoms from the copper precipitates. This behavior was observed to be energetically favorable using first principle calculations. The activation energies for Cu precipitation increased from 205 kJ/ mol in the non-cobalt containing alloy, to 243 kJ/ mol, and 272 kJ/ mol in alloys with 3 wt. %Co, and 7 wt. % Co, respectively. The role of Co on Cu precipitation in cast 17-4 PH steel is proposed as follows: (i) Co is rejected out of the Cu precipitate and sets up a barrier to the growth of the Cu precipitate; (ii) results in Cu precipitates of smaller size and narrower distribution; (iii) the coarsening of Cu precipitates is inhibited; and (iv) the activation energy for Cu precipitation increases.

  10. Calculations of Stainless Steel-Aluminum Alloy Clad Forming Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Peng

    Base on the Hosford's higher order yield criteria, the forming limit diagram of clad was developed with M-K theory at the positive strain ratio. The relationship of forming limit with thickness ratio, thickness irregular coefficient and the exponent of yield function were analyzed. The result show that the forming limit of clad material is between those of its component materials, and increases with the rising of stainless steel thickness ratio and the thickness irregular coefficient. So the forming limit can be improved by increase the stainless steel thickness ratio and improve the surface condition of the clad materials.

  11. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  12. An analysis of intergranular segregation of sulphur in a low alloy steel by stress-induced diffusion process

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, R.D.K.; Kashyap, B.P.

    1996-09-15

    Grain boundary segregation isotherms, determined through fracture experiments in a scanning Auger microprobe, have recently been employed to study interactions amongst trace and alloying elements in a low alloy steel, to elucidate alloying and microstructural effects and to describe the effects of tensile stress on grain boundary segregation of elements. It was determined from the ready applicability of grain boundary segregation isotherms, recorded for isothermally aged low alloy steels under unstressed and stressed conditions, that the application of tensile stress during aging enhances the grain boundary segregation of trace elements, in particular, sulphur. The present paper is a sequel to the earlier work concerning the influence of applied tensile stress on intergranular segregation of sulphur in 2.6NiCrMoV low alloy steel. The study attempts to corroborate the earlier viewpoint that stress-driven diffusion of impurity element, sulphur, is a transient redistribution process and is a particular manifestation of Coble creep effect.

  13. Investigation on laser brazing AA6056 Al alloy to XC18 low-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jianjun; Li, Feiqun; Qu, Feng; Peyre, Patrice; Fabbro, Remy

    2005-01-01

    Based on the studies of influence of YAG laser heating conditions for Al alloy melt and steel on wettability, the mechanics of the laser overlap braze welding of 6056 Al and XC18 steel sheet has been investigated. Under the temperature range which is above the melting point of the Al alloy and below the melting point of the steel, two dissimilar metals can be joined by means of laser braze welding. There is no crack observed in the joining area, i.e. Al-Fe intermetallic phase (Fe3Al/FeAl/FeAl3/Fe2Al5) layer formed by solution and diffusion between liquid-solid interface. The temperature range can be defined as the process temperatures of laser braze welding of Al-Fe materials. Selecting a higher laser heating temperature can improve the wettability of Al melt to steel surface, but the intermetallic phase layer is also thicker. When the laser heating temperature is so high that the joining surface of steel is melted, there is a crack trend in the joining area.

  14. Study of Effects of Alloying and Heat Treatment on Hydrogen Enbrittlement Susceptibility of Electroslag Remelted 4340 Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    toughness data ....... 45 A.5 Example of instrumented impact data ...... 46 iX TECHNICAL REPORT 1.0 INTRODUCTION Ballistically resistant advanced...Conventional alloys steels of ESR 4340 (baseline), ESR 4340M or ESR 300M , and the new ESR HP310 alloy steels, respectively, were used to represent this...method uses the rapid, inexpensive, modular (RIM) SCC-testing system. Only a maximum of five Charpy -Sized specimens are required to obtain

  15. Microscopy of Alloy Formation on Arc Plasma Sintered Oxide Dispersion Strengthen (ODS) Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandriyana, B.; Sujatno, A.; Salam, R.; Dimyati, A.; Untoro, P.

    2017-07-01

    The oxide dispersed strengthened (ODS) alloys steel developed as structure material for nuclear power plants (NPP) has good resistant against creep due to their unique microstructure. Microscopy investigation on the microstructure formation during alloying process especially at the early stages was carried out to study the correlation between structure and property of ODS alloys. This was possible thanks to the arc plasma sintering (APS) device which can simulate the time dependent alloying processes. The ODS sample with composition of 88 wt.% Fe and 12 wt.% Cr powder dispersed with 1 wt.% ZrO2 nano powder was mixed in a high energy milling, isostatic compressed to form sample coins and then alloyed in APS. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy (EDX) line scan and mapping was used to characterize the microstructure and elemental composition distribution of the samples. The alloying process with unification of each Fe and Cr phase continued by the alloying formation of Fe-Cr by inter-diffusion of both Fe and Cr and followed by the improvement of the mechanical properties of hardness.

  16. Explosion bonding: aluminum-magnesium alloys bonded to austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The explosion bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys to 300 series stainless steel alloys is summarized. The process technique involves a parallel gap arrangement with copper or aluminum bonding aids. Successful bonds have been achieved using either a single shot process for joining the trilayer clad or a sequential shot technique for each metal component. Bond success is monitored through a combined metallographic and tensile strength evaluation. Tensile properties are shown to be strongly dependent upon process parameters and the amount of intermetallic formation at the aluminum bond interface. Empirical data has been compared with experimental and destructive test results to determine the optimum procedures.

  17. Experimental and analytical investigation of the seizure process in aluminum-silicon alloy/steel tribocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaozhou

    1998-12-01

    This research is an experimental and analytical investigation of the scuffing/seizure mechanism in Al-Si alloy/steel tribocontacts. An analytical model is developed based on analyses and experiments to predict scuffing/seizure failure in Al-Si alloy/steel tribocontacts, which can be applied to tribo-components in engines, refrigerators and air conditioners. The wear and scuffing/seizure experiments have been conducted through a block-on-ring tester for 339 and ESE-M2A137 Al-Si alloys under the dry and boundary lubrication conditions. The experimental research consists of: (a) wear debris generation and EDX analysis, (b) wear surface morphological analysis, (c) scuffing/seizure mechanism and process analysis, (d) scuffing/seizure PV curves under the dry contact and boundary lubrication, and (e) effects of several main factors on scuffing/seizure. The analytical research includes the following: (a) the investigation of the scuffing/seizure mechanisms in the Al-Si alloy/steel tribocontacts, (b) 3-D asperity contact pressures for longitudinal, transverse and isotropic surface roughness profiles, (c) 3-D surface asperity contact temperature rise due to the friction, (d) failure analyses of the various lubricating films, (e) analyses of the temperature dependence of surface tangential traction and shear strength in a surface layer of Al-Si alloy, (f) the scuffing/seizure failure analytical model under dry contact and boundary lubrication. The analytical model is based on the new hypothesis of three defense lines against scuffing/seizure failure: the adsorbed oil film, oxide film and the ratio of surface tangential traction with the shear strength in a surface layer. These two films together with a surface layer itself form three defense lines against scuffing/seizure. The surface tangential traction exceeds the bulk shear strength in a surface layer of Al-Si alloy is the necessary and sufficient condition for the scuffing/seizure occurrence. The analytical model has a

  18. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  19. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  20. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  1. MULTI-PHASE HIGH TEMPERATURE ALLOYS: EXPLORATION OF LAVES-STRENGTHENED STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Lu, Zhao Ping; Liu, Chain T

    2007-01-01

    Exploratory effort was initiated for the development of Fe-base alloys strengthened by intermetallic Laves phase combined with MC (M: metals) carbide for improved elevated-temperature strength in fossil energy system components such as super-heater tubes and industrial gas turbines. Work in FY 2006 was focused on strengthening of Fe-Cr-Ni base austenitic stainless alloys by Fe2Nb Laves-phase precipitates with/without MC carbides, in combination with the improvement of oxidation resistance via Al-modification to promote alumina scale formation. A series of Fe-Cr-Ni-Nb base austenitic alloys with additions of Mo, Al, Si, C, B, etc. were cast and thermomechanically processed, and then tensile creep-rupture tested at the conditions of 750-850oC/70-170 MPa. The Al-modified alloys strengthened by Laves + MC show superior creep strength to that of conventional type 347 stainless steels, and their creep life-limit reaches up to 500 h at 750 oC/100 MPa. These alloys also show an excellent oxidation resistance from 650-800oC in air and air + 10% water vapor environments due to formation of a protective Al2O3 scale. Microstructural analysis of alloys strengthened by only Laves phase revealed that the Laves phase was effective to pin dislocations when the particle size is less than 0.5 m, but the resultant creep rupture lives were relatively short. The Al-modification was also applied to an advanced carbide-strengthened austenitic stainless steel, and it yielded creep resistance comparable to state-of-the-art austenitic alloys such as NF709, together with protective alumina scale formation. Modification of this alloy composition for its creep strength and oxidation resistance will be pursued in FY2007. Preliminary results suggest that the developed alloys with Al-modification combined with MC carbide strengthening are promising as a new class of high-temperature austenitic stainless steels.

  2. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  3. Oxidation and corrosion behavior of modified-composition, low-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of substituting less strategic elements than Cr on the oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of at least 33%. Two alloys containing 12% Cr and 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified as most promising for more detailed evaluation.

  4. RBS, AES, EDX and ESCA investigation of heat treatment effects on stainless steel alloy 440C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, T.; Ila, D.; Cochrane, J. C.

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated the oxidation of stainless steel alloy 440C at various temperatures using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The chemical state of the various oxides formed at each temperature was measured by ESCA. The relative surface concentrations of Cr and Fe were measured using all four techniques. EDX data provided us with a standard for bulk concentrations of Cr and Fe. The results of RBS and AES were used to develop an empirical relationship between the {Cr}/{Fe} ratio and the heat treatment temperature. This empirical relationship can be used to determine the temperature at which a given component made of stainless steel alloy 440C, has been operating by measuring the {Cr}/{Fe} ratio at the surface.

  5. The development of ultrahigh strength low alloy cast steels with increased toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Paul C.

    This work describes the initial work on the development of the next generation of ultrahigh strength low alloy (UHSLA) cast steels. These UHSLA cast steels have both ultrahigh strength levels and good impact toughness. The influence of heat treatment, secondary processing using hot isostatic processing (HIP), and chemical composition on the microstructure and properties of UHSLA cast steels have been evaluated. The extent of microsegregation reduction expected during the heat treatment of UHSLA cast steels has also been estimated by diffusion modeling. This new family of UHSLA cast steels is similar in composition and properties to UHSLA wrought steels. However, the heat treatment and secondary processing of the UHSLA cast steels is used to develop microstructures and properties typically developed through thermomechanical processing and heat treatment for wrought UHSLA steels. Two martensitic UHSLA steels, 4340+ (silicon modified 4340) and ES-1 were investigated for this study. For the 4340+ alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, tempering temperature, and austempering temperature and time. For the ES-1 alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, austenization temperature, cryogenic treatment, and tempering temperature. The effect of high temperature hot isostatic processing (HIP) on the 4340+ and ES- 1 alloys was also investigated. Tensile properties, charpy v-notch impact toughness (CVN), microstructures, and fractographs have all been characterized after heat treatment. The effects of HIP on microporosity reduction in the ES-1 alloy were also investigated. The experiments carried out on the investment cast 4340+ alloy have shown that increasing the homogenization temperature can increase CVN without changing the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) or yield strength (YS) of the cast material. By replacing the homogenization step in the conventional heat treatment process with

  6. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    A select group of copper alloys and bonded copper alloy-stainless steel panels are under consideration for heat sink applications in first wall and divertor structures of a planned thermonuclear fusion reactor. Because these materials must retain high strengths and withstand high heat fluxes, their material properties and microstructures must be well understood. Candidate copper alloys include precipitate strengthened CuNiBe and CuCrZr and dispersion strengthened Cu-Alsb2Osb3 (CuAl25). In this study, uniaxial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on bulk copper alloy materials at temperatures up to 500sp°C in air and vacuum environments. Based on standardized mechanical properties measurement techniques, a series of tests were also implemented to characterize copper alloy-316L stainless steel joints produced by hot isostatic pressing or by explosive bonding. The correlation between mechanical properties and the microstructure of fatigued copper alloys and the interface of copper alloy-stainless steel laminates was examined. Commercial grades of these alloys were used to maintain a degree of standardization in the materials testing. The commercial alloys used were OMG Americas Glidcop CuAl25 and CuAl15; Brush Wellman Hycon 3HP and Trefimetaux CuNiBe; and Kabelmetal Elbrodur and Trefimetaux CuCrZr. CuAl25 and CuNiBe alloys possessed the best combination of fatigue resistance and microstructural stability. The CuAl25 alloy showed only minimal microstructural changes following fatigue while the CuNiBe alloy consistently exhibited the highest fatigue strength. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that small matrix grain sizes and high densities of submicron strengthening phases promoted homogeneous slip deformation in the copper alloys. Thus, highly organized fatigue dislocation structure formation, as commonly found in oxygen-free high conductivity Cu, was inhibited. A solid plate of CuAl25 alloy hot isostatically pressed to a 316L stainless steel

  7. Alloying effect of copper on the corrosion properties of low-alloy steel for flue gas desulfurization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hong; Park, Sun-Ah; Kim, Jung-Gu; Shin, Kee-Sam; He, Yinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The alloying effect of Cu for a flue gas desulfurization materials was investigated using the electrochemical methods in the modified green death solution and the surface analyses. The test results demonstrated that the densely formed rust layer with high metallic Cu content improves the corrosion resistance of Cu-containing steel in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) environment. The rust layer on the surface of the 0.02 wt% Cu steel, which has an insufficient Cu content, was less protective than others. The 0.05 wt% Cu steel represented the highest corrosion resistance due to the formation of the densely formed rust layer with optimum Cu content. Because the free standing Cu2S precipitates had the insoluble characteristic in highly acidic solution, it produced the relatively porous Cu-enriched layer on the 0.08 wt% Cu steel surface. From these phenomena, the corrosion resistance of specimen decreased as the Cu content of specimen increased from 0.05 wt% to 0.08 wt%.

  8. Effects of alloying on aging and hardening processes of steel with 20% nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogachev, I. N.; Zvigintsev, N. V.; Maslakova, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of hardness, thermal emf, and electrical resistance were used to study the effects of Co, Mo, Ti and Al contents on aging and hardening processes in Fe 20%Ni steel. It is shown that the effects of these alloying elements differ substantially. Anomalies which arise in the temperature dependence of physical properties due to the presence of cobalt and molybdenum are reduced by the inclusion of titanium and aluminum (and vice versa).

  9. Structure and phase composition of manganese steels modified by alloying elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Natalya; Dement, Taras; Nikonenko, Elena; Kurzina, Irina; Kozlov, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of the phase composition and the fine structure of manganese non-alloyed and Cr- and V-alloyed steels using methods of X-ray diffraction analysis, optical metallography, and transmission electron microscopy. Manganese steel is divided into two groups. The first group includes steels with carbon content of 1-1.2 wt.%. The second group consists of 0.4-0.5 wt.% carbon content. Mn concentration in each group ranges between 6-18 wt.%. It is shown that depending on Mn and C concentration, a matrix of Fe-Mn-C steels is either γ-Fe-based solid solution (austenite) or α-Fe-based solid solution (α-martensite) as well as ɛ-martensite formed after quenching during γ → α transformation. With all selected C and Mn concentrations, the introduction of Cr and C alloying elements does not change the phase composition of a matrix, but rather extends γ-area of phase diagram and reduces the volume fractions of both α- and ɛ-martensite. The faulted structure is represented by the dislocation structure and mechanical (deformation) microtwins. The distinctions of the dislocation structure are closely connected with stacking fault energy. It is shown that lowering stacking fault energy makes γ- and ɛ-phases more stable than α-phase. The dissapearance of α-phase is connected with the formation of ɛ-phase. The investigations show that Cr and C alloying, first, shifts ɛ-phase to the lower Mn concentration and, second, slightly increases the amount of α-phase.

  10. Changes in the structure and properties of low-carbon low-alloy pipe steels upon inoculation with REM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, T. V.; Vyboishchik, M. A.; Tetyueva, T. V.; Ioffe, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of REM additives on the structure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of low-carbon low-alloy steels is studied. The effect of inoculation with rare-earth metals on the content of sulfur and oxygen in the steels and on the degree of their contamination with nonmetallic inclusions are investigated. The resistance of the steels to stress sulfide corrosion cracking, hydrogen cracking and total, local, carbon dioxide and bacterial corrosion is determined.

  11. Shape memory alloy/shape memory polymer tools

    DOEpatents

    Seward, Kirk P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2005-03-29

    Micro-electromechanical tools for minimally invasive techniques including microsurgery. These tools utilize composite shape memory alloy (SMA), shape memory polymer (SMP) and combinations of SMA and SMP to produce catheter distal tips, actuators, etc., which are bistable. Applications for these structures include: 1) a method for reversible fine positioning of a catheter tip, 2) a method for reversible fine positioning of tools or therapeutic catheters by a guide catheter, 3) a method for bending articulation through the body's vasculature, 4) methods for controlled stent delivery, deployment, and repositioning, and 5) catheters with variable modulus, with vibration mode, with inchworm capability, and with articulated tips. These actuators and catheter tips are bistable and are opportune for in vivo usage because the materials are biocompatible and convenient for intravascular use as well as other minimal by invasive techniques.

  12. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  13. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  14. Corrosion of carbon steel substrate under alloy C-276 wallpaper

    SciTech Connect

    Caudill, D.L.; Koch, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems or wet scrubbers are essentially chemical plants, which are used to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power plants. The most common process involves wet limestone scrubbing. The scrubbed flue gas is discharged from the scrubber modules into an outlet duct that leads into the stack. The scrubbed flue gas enters the outlet duct at its adiabatic saturation temperature and, as a result, a considerable amount of condensation occurs on the duct walls. The condensate usually contains various mineral acids and many dissolved ions, which makes the condensate very corrosive. Following start up of two FGD systems, leaks were experienced in the welds of the C-276 wallpaper. In order to address the concern that absorber liquid or outlet duct condensate would cause unacceptable corrosion of the carbon steel shell, laboratory experiments were conducted. The results of these experiments demonstrated the indeed under certain conditions, significant corrosion of the carbon steel could occur.

  15. Comparison of transmutation and activation effects in five ferritic alloys and aisi 316 stainless steel in a fusion neutron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, G. J.; Jarvis, O. N.

    1984-05-01

    Transmutation and activation characteristics are presented for alloys FV448, EM12, 1.4914, HT-9, the Japanese alloy E5 and 316 stainless steel as a reference material. The alloys were assumed to be subjected to a first wall neutron power loading of 7 MWm -2 continuously for 2.5 years in the spectrum of the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor IIA. The computations used a modified ORIGEN code and the neutron cross section data library UKCTRIIIA.

  16. Cryo-quenched Fe-Ni-Cr alloy single crystals: A new decorative steel

    DOE PAGES

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Kolopus, James A.; Lavrik, Nicolay V.; ...

    2016-08-31

    In this paper, a decorative steel is described that is formed by a process that is unlike that of the fabrication methods utilized in making the original Damascus steels over 2000 years ago. The decorative aspect of the steel arises from a three-dimensional surface pattern that results from cryogenically quenching polished austenitic alloy single crystals into the martensitic phase that is present below 190 K. No forging operations are involved – the mechanism is entirely based on the metallurgical phase properties of the ternary alloy. The symmetry of the decorative pattern is determined and controlled by the crystallographic orientation andmore » symmetry of the 70%Fe,15%Ni,15%Cr alloy single crystals. Finally, in addition to using “cuts” made along principal crystallographic surface directions, an effectively infinite number of other random-orientation “cuts” can be utilized to produce decorative patterns where each pattern is unique after the austenitic-to-martensitic phase transformation.« less

  17. Precipitation in Microalloyed Steel by Model Alloy Experiments and Thermodynamic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisk, Karin; Borggren, Ulrika

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation in microalloyed steel has been studied by applying thermodynamic calculations based on a description of the Gibbs energies of the individual phases over the full multicomponent composition range. To validate and improve the thermodynamic description, new experimental investigations of the phase separation in the cubic carbides/nitrides/carbonitrides in alloys containing Nb, V, Mo, and Cr, have been performed. Model alloys were designed to obtain equilibrium carbides/carbonitrides that are sufficiently large for measurements of compositions, making it possible to study the partitioning of the elements into different precipitates, showing distinctly different composition sets. The reliability of the calculations, when applied to multicomponent alloys, was tested by comparing with published experimental studies of precipitation in microalloyed steel. It is shown that thermodynamic calculations accurately describe the observed precipitation sequences. Further, they can reproduce several important features of precipitation processes in microalloyed steel such as the partitioning of Mo between matrix and precipitates and the variation of precipitate compositions depending on precipitation temperature.

  18. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of high dose carbon-implanted steel and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviente, J. L.; García, A.; Alonso, F.; Braceras, I.; Oñate, J. I.

    1999-04-01

    A study has been made of the depth dependence of the atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy implanted with 75 keV C + at very high doses (above 10 18 ions cm -2), by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an Ar + sputtering. A Gaussian-like carbon distribution was observed on both materials at the lowest implanted dose. More trapezoidal carbon depth-profiles were found with increasing implanted doses, and a pure carbon layer was observed only on the titanium alloy implanted at the highest dose. The implanted carbon was combined with both base metal and carbon itself to form metallic carbides and graphitic carbon. Furthermore, carbon-enriched carbides were also found by curve fitting the C 1s spectra. The titanium alloy showed a higher carbidic contribution than the steel implanted at the same C + doses. A critical carbon concentrations of about 33 at.% and 23 at.% were measured for the formation of C-C bonds in Ti-6Al-4V and steel samples, respectively. The carbon atoms were bound with metal to form carbidic compounds until these critical concentrations were reached; when this C concentration was exceeded the proportion of C-C bonds increased and resulted in the growth of carbonaceous layers.

  20. Crack initiation and crack growth behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gavenda, D.J.; Luebbers, P.R.; Chopra, O.K.

    1997-01-01

    Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. These curves were based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves, but recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be a factor of {approx}70 shorter than in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environment on crack imitation and crack growth of carbon and low-alloy steels are presented. Crack lengths as a function of fatigue cycles were determined in air by a surface replication technique, and in water by block loading that leaves marks on the fracture surface. Decreases in fatigue life of low-alloy steels in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water are primarily caused by the effects of environment during early stages of fatigue damage, i.e., growth of short cracks <100 {micro}m in depth. For crack sizes of >100 {micro}m, crack growth rates in high-DO water are higher than in air by one order of magnitude. The effects of LWR environments on growth of short cracks are discussed.

  1. Boronization and Carburization of Superplastic Stainless Steel and Titanium-Based Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Bronization and carburization of fine-grain superplastic stainless steel is reviewed, and new experimental results for fine grain Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 are reported. In superplastic duplex stainless steel, the diffusion of carbon and boron is faster than in non-superplastic duplex stainless steel. Further, diffusion is activated by uniaxial compressive stress. Moreover, non-superplastic duplex stainless steel shows typical grain boundary diffusion; however, inner grain diffusion is confirmed in superplastic stainless steel. The presence of Fe and Cr carbides or borides is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which indicates that the diffused carbon and boron react with the Fe and Cr in superplastic stainless steel. The Vickers hardness of the carburized and boronized layers is similar to that achieved with other surface treatments such as electro-deposition. Diffusion of boron into the superplastic Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 alloy was investigated. The hardness of the surface exposed to boron powder can be increased by annealing above the superplastic temperature. However, the Vickers hardness is lower than that of Ti boride. PMID:28824144

  2. Fatigue strain-life behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Keisler, J.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    The existing fatigue strain vs. life (S-N) data, foreign and domestic, for carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 used in the construction of nuclear power plant components have been compiled and categorized according to material, loading, and environmental conditions. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the effects of the various service conditions on the fatigue life of these materials. The results of a rigorous statistical analysis have been used to estimate the probability of initiating a fatigue crack. Data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the effects of size, geometry, and surface finish of a component on its fatigue life. The fatigue S-N curves for components have been determined by adjusting the probability distribution curves for smooth test specimens for the effect of mean stress and applying design margins to account for the uncertainties due to component size/geometry and surface finish. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve and on the proposed interim design curves published in NUREG/CR-5999 is discussed. Estimations of the probability of fatigue cracking in sample components from BWRs and PWRs are presented.

  3. Effect of Cr content on the corrosion performance of low-Cr alloy steel in a CO2 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lining; Wang, Bei; Zhu, Jinyang; Li, Wei; Zheng, Ziyi

    2016-08-01

    Low-Cr alloy steel demonstrates lower corrosion rate than does C steel in a high-temperature and high-pressure CO2-containing environment. This study aimed to clarify the role of the Cr content in mitigating corrosion and reports the performance of 1%Cr, 2%Cr, 3%Cr, 4%Cr, 5%Cr, and 6.5%Cr steels. The results show that low-Cr alloy steel in CO2 at 80 °C and 0.8 MPa possesses spontaneous prepassivation characteristics when the Cr content is 3% or higher. Furthermore, the formation and peel-off of a prepassivation film on 3%Cr-6.5%Cr steels surfaces during polarization demonstrate that adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate can cause protective layer. The main component of prepassivation film on 3%Cr steel is Cr(OH)3. Thus, the role of Cr is revealed. An adequate amount of Cr in the steel substrate causes the formation of protective Cr(OH)3 layer, which helps low-Cr steel to possess prepassivation characteristics. Prepassivation is the reason why low-Cr steel has a lower corrosion rate than C steel.

  4. Effects of solute elements on irradiation hardening and microstructural evolution in low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Katsuhiko; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Fukuya, Koji

    2011-10-01

    The effects of the elements Mn, Ni, Si and Cu on irradiation hardening and microstructural evolution in low alloy steels were investigated in ion irradiation experiments using five kinds of alloys prepared by removing Mn, Ni and Si from, and adding 0.05 wt.%Cu to, the base alloy (Fe-1.5Mn-0.5Ni-0.25Si). The alloy without Mn showed less hardening and the alloys without Ni or Si showed more hardening. The addition of Cu had hardly any influence on hardening. These facts indicated that Mn enhanced hardening and that Ni and Si had some synergetic effects. The formation of solute clusters was not confirmed by atom probe (AP) analysis, whereas small dislocation loops were identified by TEM observation. The difference in hardening between the alloys with and without Mn was qualitatively consistent with loop formation. However, microstructural components that were not detected by the AP and TEM were assumed to explain the hardening level quantitatively.

  5. Alloy 31, a new 6 moly stainless steel with improved corrosion resistance in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Jasner, M.; Heubner, U.

    1995-10-01

    Alloy 31--UNS N08031--31Ni-27Cr-6.5Mo-1.2Cu-0.2N-balance iron--is an advanced 6 Mo stainless steel with increased chromium and nickel, contents for seawater service. In hot seawater the pitting potential of alloy 31 remains high up to 90 C (194 F). Investigations of resistance to crevice corrosion in real piping systems in natural seawater, both North Sea and Baltic Sea, show that the threshold conditions for alloy 31 in chlorinated seawater (North Sea) are at 40 C and 1 ppm chlorine well superior to the 6 Mo stainless grades being currently in use. In addition, alloy 31 shows an excellent resistance to corrosion versus both hot reducing media (e.g. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hot oxidizing media (e.g. HNO{sub 3}). The combination of high resistance to localized corrosion vs. hot chloride-bearing cooling waters including seawater and aggressive oxidizing and reducing hot corrosive media is a unique feature of alloy 31. Alloy 31 is recommended for the construction of heat exchangers, process coolers and piping systems. The material is supplied in a number of semifinished products such as seamless and welded pipes, fittings, flanges, forged bars, plate, sheet, strip, wire and prefabricated piping systems.

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of the three-layer material based on a vanadium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rozhnov, A. B.; Nechaikina, T. A.; Rogachev, S. O.; Zavodchikov, S. Yu.; Khatkevich, V. M.

    2014-10-01

    The quality of three-layer pipes has been studied; they are manufactured by hot pressing of a three-layer assembly of tubular billets followed by forging and cold rolling. The operating core is made from a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy. The protective claddings are made from corrosion-resistant steels of two grades, 08Kh17T and 20Kh13. The results of investigation into the structure and microhardness of the junction zone of steel and the vanadium alloy, which includes a contact zone and a transition diffusion layer, are reported. The 08Kh17T steel is shown to be a preferred cladding material.

  7. Cr-Al coatings on low carbon steel prepared by a mechanical alloying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hia, A. I. J.; Sudiro, T.; Aryanto, D.; Sebayang, K.

    2016-08-01

    Four different compositions of Cr and Al coatings as Cr10o, Cr87.5Al12.5, Cr5oAl5o, and Al100 have been prepared on the surface of low carbon steel by a mechanical alloying technique. The composition of each powder was milled for 2 hour in a stainless steel crucible with a ball to powder ratio of 10:1. Hereafter, the Cr-Al powder and substrate were mechanical alloyed in air for 1 hour. Heat treatment of coated sample were carried out at 800°C in a vacuum furnace. In order to characterize the phase composition and microstructure of the coating before and after heat treatment, XRD and SEM-EDX were used. The results show that Cr, Cr-Al or Al coatings were formed on the surface of low carbon steel. After heat treatment, new phases and interdiffusion zone were formed in the coating and at the coating/steel interface, depending on the coating composition.

  8. Secondary hardening and fracture behavior in alloy steels containing Mo, W, and Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Lee, K. B.; Yang, H. R.; Lee, J. B.; Kim, Y. S.

    1997-03-01

    In 4Mo, 6W, 2Mo3W, 2Mo2Cr, and 3W2Cr alloy steels, which cointain alloying elements, such as Mo, W and Cr, contributing to the secondary hardening by forming M2C type carbide, the secondary hardening and fracture behavior were studied. Molybdenum had a strong effect on secondary hardening, while W had a very weak effect on it but delayed the overaging. The MoW steel exhibited both moderately strong hardening and considerable resistance to overaging. On the other hand, the secondary hardening effect was diminished by the Cr addition, because the cementite of M3C type was stabilized at higher temperatures and the formation of M2C carbides was thus inhibited. Although the Cr addition had no merit in the secondary hardening itself, it eliminated the secondary hardening embrittlement (SHE). This was observed as a severe intergranular embrittlement due to the impurity segregation for the Mo and MoW steels and as a decrease in upper shelf energy for W steel, even in the overaged condition.

  9. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  10. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  11. Laser alloying of bearing steel with boron and self-lubricating addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotkowiak, Mateusz; Piasecki, Adam; Kulka, Michał

    2016-12-01

    100CrMnSi6-4 bearing steel has been widely used for many applications, e.g. rolling bearings which work in difficult operating conditions. Therefore, this steel has to be characterized by special properties such as high wear resistance and high hardness. In this study laser-boriding was applied to improve these properties. Laser alloying was conducted as the two step process with two different types of alloying material: amorphous boron only and amorphous boron with addition of calcium fluoride CaF2. At first, the surface was coated with paste including alloying material. Second step of the process consisted in laser re-melting. The surface of sample, coated with the paste, was irradiated by the laser beam. In this study, TRUMPF TLF 2600 Turbo CO2 laser was used. The microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of both laser-borided layer and laser-borided layer with the addition of calcium fluoride were investigated. The layer, alloyed with boron and CaF2, was characterized by higher wear resistance than the layer after laser boriding only.

  12. Alloying effect of Ni and Cr on irradiated microstructural evolution of type 304 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-11-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear power plants imposes significant challenges to core structural materials that suffer increased fluences. This paper presents the microstructural evolution of a type 304 stainless steel and its variants alloyed with extra Ni and Cr under neutron irradiation at ˜320 °C for up to 10.2 dpa. Similar to the reported data of type 304 variants, a large amount of Frank loops, ultrafine G-phase/M23C6 particles, and limited amount of cavities were observed in the irradiated samples. The irradiation promoted the growth of pre-existing M23C6 at grain boundaries and resulted in some phase transformation to CrC in the alloy with both extra Ni and Cr. A new type of ultrafine precipitates, possibly (Ti,Cr)N, was observed in all the samples, and its amount was increased by the irradiation. Additionally, α-ferrite was observed in the type 304 steel but not in the Ni or Ni + Cr alloyed variants. The effect of Ni and Cr alloying on the microstructural evolution is discussed.

  13. Microstructure-fracture toughness relationship of vanadium alloy/stainless steel brazed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Y. X.; Aglan, H. A.; Steward, R. V.; Chin, B. A.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    2001-11-01

    In this work, brazing V-5Ti-5Cr to 304 stainless steel (SS 304) using Au-18Ni alloy as filler material was conducted under high vacuum condition. Sessile drop technique was used to determine the wettability of filler alloy to the stainless steel and the vanadium alloy substrates upon which the relationship between the contact angles with time was obtained. Tensile tests were performed on unnotched and notched specimens to demonstrate the overloading behavior and the fracture toughness of the base materials and the brazed joint. Fracture surface was examined for both the V-5Ti-5Cr and the joint to identify the failure mechanisms under static loadings. It was found that the Au-18Ni filler material exhibited good wettability with the SS 304 and V-5Ti-5Cr. The ultimate tensile strength of the brazed joint reached 245 MPa. The strain to failure was about 1.3%. Young's modulus was about 351 GPa. The fracture toughness ( KIc) of this joint was 19.1 MPa √ m. The fracture surface of the joint showed well brazed area with good wettability and proper amount of residual filler material which came from the solidification of residual liquid filler alloy of Au-Ni. The failure of the joint occurred along the interface of the vanadium/filler under static load.

  14. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  15. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, L.; Haenninen, H.; Paro, J.; Kauppinen, V.

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  16. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-Coated high speed steel and tin-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Laizhu; Hänninen, Hannu; Paro, Jukka; Kauppinen, Veijo

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  17. Semi-solid processing of high-chromium tool steel to obtain microstructures without carbide network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirková, H.; Aišman, D.; Rubešová, K.; Opatová, K.; Mašek, B.

    2017-02-01

    Treatment of high-alloy tool steels that involves transition to the semi-solid state can transform the sharp-edged primary carbides which usually form during solidification. These carbides severely impair toughness and are virtually impossible to eliminate by conventional treatment routes. Upon classical semi-solid processing which dissolves these carbides, the resulting microstructure consists of polyhedral and super-saturated austenite embedded in lamellar austenite-carbide network. This type of microstructure reflects in the mechanical properties, predominantly in material behaviour under tensile loading. Such a network, however, can be removed by appropriate thermomechanical treatment. In the present experiment, various procedures involving heating to the semi-solid state were tested on X210Cr12 tool steel. The feedstock was heated to the temperature range of 1220 – 1280 °C. The heating was followed by procedures involving either water quenching to the forming temperature, room temperature or temperature from the range from 500 °C to 1000 °C followed by reheating to the forming temperature. It was found that the development of the lamellar network strongly depends on the temperature of heating to semi-solid state. Thermomechanical treatment produced microstructures in which the matrix consisted of a mixture of polyhedral austenite grains and the M-A constituent. In addition, the initial lamellar eutectic network was partially or even completely melted and substituted with a mixture of very fine recrystallized austenite grains and precipitates of chromium carbides. Some fine M7C3 carbides were present in the austenitic-martensitic matrix as well. When appropriate processing parameters were chosen, very good mechanical properties were obtained, among them a hardness of 860 HV10.

  18. Simultaneous material flow analysis of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum used in alloy steel by means of input-output analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2013-05-07

    Steel is not elemental iron but rather a group of iron-based alloys containing many elements, especially chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Steel recycling is expected to promote efficient resource use. However, open-loop recycling of steel could result in quality loss of nickel and molybdenum and/or material loss of chromium. Knowledge about alloying element substance flow is needed to avoid such losses. Material flow analyses (MFAs) indicate the importance of steel recycling to recovery of alloying elements. Flows of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum are interconnected, but MFAs have paid little attention to the interconnected flow of materials/substances in supply chains. This study combined a waste input-output material flow model and physical unit input-output analysis to perform a simultaneous MFA for nickel, chromium, and molybdenum in the Japanese economy in 2000. Results indicated the importance of recovery of these elements in recycling policies for end-of-life (EoL) vehicles and constructions. Improvement in EoL sorting technologies and implementation of designs for recycling/disassembly at the manufacturing phase are needed. Possible solutions include development of sorting processes for steel scrap and introduction of easier methods for identifying the composition of secondary resources. Recovery of steel scrap with a high alloy content will reduce primary inputs of alloying elements and contribute to more efficient resource use.

  19. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of ferritic martensitic steel in liquid lead alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Bosch, R. W.; Sapundjiev, D.; Almazouzi, A.

    2008-06-01

    The susceptibility of the ferritic-martensitic steels T91 and EUROFER97 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) in lead alloys has been examined under various conditions. T91, which is currently the most promising candidate material for the high temperature components of the future accelerator driven system (ADS) was tested in liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), whereas the reduced activation steel, EUROFER97 which is under consideration to be the structural steel for fusion reactors was tested in liquid lead lithium eutectic. These steels, similar in microstructure and mechanical properties in the unirradiated condition were tested for their susceptibility to LME as function of temperature (150-450 °C) and strain rate (1 × 10 -3-1 × 10 -6 s -1). Also, the influence of pre-exposure and surface stress concentrators was evaluated for both steels in, respectively, liquid PbBi and PbLi environment. To assess the LME effect, results of the tests in liquid metal environment are compared with tests in air or inert gas environment. Although both unirradiated and irradiated smooth ferritic-martensitic steels do not show any or little deterioration of mechanical properties in liquid lead alloy environment compared to their mechanical properties in gas as function of temperature and strain rate, pre-exposure or the presence of surface stress concentrators does lead to a significant decrease in total elongation for certain test conditions depending on the type of liquid metal environment. The results are discussed in terms of wetting enhanced by liquid metal corrosion or crack initiation processes.

  20. Wear Evaluation of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel with WC/C Lamellar Coatings Sliding Against EN 8 Using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Nikhil Rajendra; Karthikeyan, Ganesarethinam

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the experiments in this paper is to use the Taguchi methods to investigate the wear of WC/C coated nitrided AISI 4140 alloy steel. A study of lamellar WC/C coating which were deposited by a physical vapor deposition on nitrided AISI 4140 alloy steel. The investigation includes wear evaluation using Pin-on-disk configuration. When WC/C coated AISI 4140 alloy steel slides against EN 8 steel, it was found that carbon-rich coatings show much lower wear of the countersurface than nitrogen-rich coatings. The results were correlated with the properties determined from tribological and mechanical characterization, therefore by probably selecting the proper processing parameters the deposition of WC/C coating results in decreasing the wear rate of the substrate which shows a potential for tribological application.

  1. Fabrication of Nanostructured Medical-Grade Stainless Steel by Mechanical Alloying and Subsequent Liquid-Phase Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad J.; Ghaffari, Mohammad; Mashhadi, Shirazeh Bagheri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2012-08-01

    This article focuses on the microstructure of medical-grade P558 (ASTM F2581) stainless steel produced by mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering. Rietveld X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reflect that the mechanically alloyed stainless steel powder is a nanocrystal dispersed amorphous matrix composite. Mn-11.5 wt pct Si eutectic alloy as additive improves densification of the synthesized P558 alloy via liquid-phase sintering mechanism. X-ray mapping shows that after sintering at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 1 hour, a uniform distribution of dissolved Mn and Si is achieved. Moreover, the development of a nanostructured, fully austenitic stainless steel after sintering at the same temperature is realized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  2. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  3. Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

    2009-03-10

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 301b heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(l-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions. AFA alloy properties to date have been obtained from small laboratory scale arc-castings made at ORNL. The goal of the ORNL-CarTech CRADA was to establish the viability for producing plate, sheet and foil of the AFA alloys by conventional casting and hot working approaches as a first step towards scale up and commercialization of the AFA alloys. The AFA alloy produced under this effort will then be evaluated in related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers for gas turbine recuperator applications.

  4. Ni3Al-based alloys for die and tool application

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Bloom, Everett E.

    2001-01-01

    A novel Ni.sub.3 Al-based alloy exhibits strengths and hardness in excess of the standard base alloy IC-221M at temperatures of up to about 1000.degree. C. The alloy is useful in tool and die applications requiring such temperatures, and for structural elements in engineering systems exposed to such temperatures.

  5. R-Curve Approach to Describe the Fracture Resistance of Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picas, Ingrid; Casellas, Daniel; Llanes, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This work addresses the events involved in the fracture of tool steels, aiming to understand the effect of primary carbides, inclusions, and the metallic matrix on their effective fracture toughness and strength. Microstructurally different steels were investigated. It is found that cracks nucleate on carbides or inclusions at stress values lower than the fracture resistance. It is experimentally evidenced that such cracks exhibit an increasing growth resistance as they progressively extend, i.e., R-curve behavior. Ingot cast steels present a rising R-curve, which implies that the effective toughness developed by small cracks is lower than that determined with long artificial cracks. On the other hand, cracks grow steadily in the powder metallurgy tool steel, yielding as a result a flat R-curve. Accordingly, effective toughness for this material is mostly independent of the crack size. Thus, differences in fracture toughness values measured using short and long cracks must be considered when assessing fracture resistance of tool steels, especially when tool performance is controlled by short cracks. Hence, material selection for tools or development of new steel grades should take into consideration R-curve concepts, in order to avoid unexpected tool failures or to optimize microstructural design of tool steels, respectively.

  6. Alloy Design, Combinatorial Synthesis, and Microstructure-Property Relations for Low-Density Fe-Mn-Al-C Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, D.; Springer, H.; Gutierrez-Urrutia, I.; Roters, F.; Bausch, M.; Seol, J.-B.; Koyama, M.; Choi, P.-P.; Tsuzaki, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present recent developments in the field of austenitic steels with up to 18% reduced mass density. The alloys are based on the Fe-Mn-Al-C system. Here, two steel types are addressed. The first one is a class of low-density twinning-induced plasticity or single phase austenitic TWIP (SIMPLEX) steels with 25-30 wt.% Mn and <4-5 wt.% Al or even <8 wt.% Al when naturally aged. The second one is a class of κ-carbide strengthened austenitic steels with even higher Al content. Here, κ-carbides form either at 500-600°C or even during quenching for >10 wt.% Al. Three topics are addressed in more detail, namely, the combinatorial bulk high-throughput design of a wide range of corresponding alloy variants, the development of microstructure-property relations for such steels, and their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  7. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  8. Alloy Design Based on Computational Thermodynamics and Multi-objective Optimization: The Case of Medium-Mn Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristeidakis, John S.; Haidemenopoulos, Gregory N.

    2017-05-01

    A new alloy design methodology is presented for the identification of alloy compositions, which exhibit process windows (PWs) satisfying specific design objectives and optimized for overall performance. The methodology is applied to the design of medium-Mn steels containing Al and/or Ni. By implementing computational alloy thermodynamics, a large composition space was investigated systematically to map the fraction and stability of retained austenite as a function of intercritical annealing temperature. Alloys exhibiting PWs, i.e., an intercritical annealing range, which when applied satisfies the given design objectives, were identified. A multi-objective optimization method, involving Pareto optimality, was then applied to identify a list of optimum alloy compositions, which maximized retained austenite amount and stability, as well as intercritical annealing temperature, while minimized overall alloy content. A heuristic approach was finally employed in order to rank the optimum alloys. The methodology provided a final short list of alloy compositions and associated PWs ranked according to their overall performance. The proposed methodology could be the first step in the process of computational alloy design of medium-Mn steels or other alloy systems.

  9. Alloy Design Based on Computational Thermodynamics and Multi-objective Optimization: The Case of Medium-Mn Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristeidakis, John S.; Haidemenopoulos, Gregory N.

    2017-02-01

    A new alloy design methodology is presented for the identification of alloy compositions, which exhibit process windows (PWs) satisfying specific design objectives and optimized for overall performance. The methodology is applied to the design of medium-Mn steels containing Al and/or Ni. By implementing computational alloy thermodynamics, a large composition space was investigated systematically to map the fraction and stability of retained austenite as a function of intercritical annealing temperature. Alloys exhibiting PWs, i.e., an intercritical annealing range, which when applied satisfies the given design objectives, were identified. A multi-objective optimization method, involving Pareto optimality, was then applied to identify a list of optimum alloy compositions, which maximized retained austenite amount and stability, as well as intercritical annealing temperature, while minimized overall alloy content. A heuristic approach was finally employed in order to rank the optimum alloys. The methodology provided a final short list of alloy compositions and associated PWs ranked according to their overall performance. The proposed methodology could be the first step in the process of computational alloy design of medium-Mn steels or other alloy systems.

  10. Vacuum Brazing TC4 Titanium Alloy to 304 Stainless Steel with Cu-Ti-Ni-Zr-V Amorphous Alloy Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Honggang; Yang, Zhonglin; Wang, Zengrui; Deng, Dewei; Dong, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Dissimilar metal vacuum brazing between TC4 titanium alloy and 304 stainless steel was conducted with newly designed Cu-Ti-Ni-Zr-V amorphous alloy foils as filler metals. Solid joints were obtained due to excellent compatibility between the filler metal and stainless steel substrate. Partial dissolution of stainless steel substrate occurred during brazing. The shear strength of the joint brazed with Cu43.75Ti37.5Ni6.25Zr6.25V6.25 foil was 105 MPa and that with Cu37.5Ti25Ni12.5Zr12.5V12.5 was 116 MPa. All the joints fractured through the gray layer in the brazed seam, revealing brittle fracture features. Cr4Ti, Cu0.8FeTi, Fe8TiZr3 and Al2NiTi3C compounds were found in the fractured joint brazed with Cu43.75Ti37.5Ni6.25Zr6.25V6.25 foil, and Fe2Ti, TiCu, Fe8TiZr3 and NiTi0.8Zr0.3 compounds were detected in the joint brazed with Cu37.5Ti25Ni12.5Zr12.5V12.5 foil. The existence of Cr-Ti, Fe-Ti, Cu-Fe-Ti, and Fe-Ti-V intermetallic compounds in the brazed seam caused fracture of the resultant joints.

  11. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  12. Failure analysis of a tool-steel torque shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A low design load drive shaft from an experimental diesel truck engine failed unexpectedly during highway testing. The shaft was driven by a turbine used to deliver power from an experimental exhaust heat recovery system to the engine's crankshaft. During design, fatigue was not considered a major problem because of the low operating cyclic stresses. An independent testing laboratory analyzed the failure by routine metallography. The structure of the hardened S-7 tool steel shaft was banded and the laboratory attributed the failure to fatigue induced by a banded microstructure. NASA was asked to confirm this analysis. Visual examination of the failed shaft plus the knowledge of the torsional load that it carried pointed to a 100% ductile failure with no evidence of fatigue. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed this. Torsional test specimens were produced from pieces of the failed shaft and torsional overload testing produced identical failures to that which had occurred in the truck engine. This pointed to a failure caused by a high overload and although the microstructure was defective it was not the cause of the failure.

  13. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  14. Alloying of steel and graphite by hydrogen in nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.

    2017-02-01

    In traditional power engineering hydrogen may be one of the first primary source of equipment damage. This problem has high actuality for both nuclear and thermonuclear power engineering. Study of radiation-hydrogen embrittlement of the steel raises the question concerning the unknown source of hydrogen in reactors. Later unexpectedly high hydrogen concentrations were detected in irradiated graphite. It is necessary to look for this source of hydrogen especially because hydrogen flakes were detected in reactor vessels of Belgian NPPs. As a possible initial hypothesis about the enigmatical source of hydrogen one can propose protons generation during beta-decay of free neutrons поскольку inasmuch as protons detected by researches at nuclear reactors as witness of beta-decay of free neutrons.

  15. Laser Cladding of Vanadium-Carbide Tool Steels for Die Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leunda, J.; Soriano, C.; Sanz, C.; Navas, V. García

    A study of the laser cladding of powder metallurgical tool steels has been carried out. CPM 10 V and Vanadis 4 Extra tool steel powders have been deposited on Vanadis 4 Extra tool steel plates, for repairing purposes, using a Nd:YAG laser. The microstructure of the laser cladding samples was investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The volumetric fraction of retained austenite was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and microhardness profiles were measured. Crack free 700 HV 0.3 cladding tracks were achieved with both materials and coatings show a microstructure of carbides embedded in a martensite plus retained austenite matrix.

  16. Alternative Fabrication Routes toward Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steels and Model Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Frank; Hilger, Isabell; Virta, Jouko; Lagerbom, Juha; Gerbeth, Gunter; Connolly, Sarah; Hong, Zuliang; Grant, Patrick S.; Weissgärber, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The standard powder metallurgy (PM) route for the fabrication of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels involves gas atomization to produce a prealloyed powder, mechanical alloying (MA) with fine oxide powders, consolidation, and finally thermal/thermomechanical treatment (TMT). It is well established that ODS steels with superior property combinations, for example, creep and tensile strength, can be produced by this PM/MA route. However, the fabrication process is complex and expensive, and the fitness for scaling up to the industrial scale is limited. At the laboratory scale, production of small amounts of well-controlled model systems continues to be desirable for specific purposes, such as modeling-oriented experiments. Thus, from the laboratory to industrial application, there is growing interest in complementary or alternative fabrication routes for ODS steels and related model systems, which offer a different balance of cost, convenience, properties, and scalability. This article reviews the state of the art in ODS alloy fabrication and identifies promising new routes toward ODS steels. The PM/AM route for the fabrication of ODS steels is also described, as it is the current default process. Hybrid routes that comprise aspects of both the PM route and more radical liquid metal (LM) routes are suggested to be promising approaches for larger volumes and higher throughput of fabricated material. Although similar uniformity and refinement of the critical nanometer-sized oxide particles has not yet been demonstrated, ongoing innovations in the LM route are described, along with recent encouraging preliminary results for both extrinsic nano-oxide additions and intrinsic nano-oxide formation in variants of the LM route. Finally, physicochemical methods such as ion beam synthesis are shown to offer interesting perspectives for the fabrication of model systems. As well as literature sources, examples of progress in the authors' groups are also highlighted.

  17. Calculations of the influence of alloying elements (Al, Cr, Mn, Ni, Si) on the Solubility of carbonitrides in low-carbon low-alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, I. I.; Popov, V. V.; Pasynkov, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the CALPHAD method, a thermodynamic description of the Fe- M-V-NB-Ti-C-N system (where M is Al, Cr, Mn, Ni, or Si) has been constructed and, using this description, the solubilities of carbonitrides in austenite for low-alloy low-carbon steels with V, Nb, and Ti have been calculated using 10G2FB steel as an example. The influence of the alloy composition and temperature on the composition and amount of carbonitride phases and on the concentration of these elements in the solid solution has been analyzed.

  18. Is galvanic corrosion between titanium alloy and stainless steel spinal implants a clinical concern?

    PubMed

    Serhan, Hassan; Slivka, Michael; Albert, Todd; Kwak, S Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Surgeons are hesitant to mix components made of differing metal classes for fear of galvanic corrosion complications. However, in vitro studies have failed to show a significant potential for galvanic corrosion between titanium and stainless steel, the two primary metallic alloys used for spinal implants. Galvanic corrosion resulting from metal mixing has not been described in the literature for spinal implant systems. To determine whether galvanic potential significantly affects in vitro corrosion of titanium and stainless steel spinal implant components during cyclical compression bending. Bilateral spinal implant constructs consisting of pedicle screws, slotted connectors, 6.35-mm diameter rods and a transverse rod connector assembled in polyethylene test blocks were tested in vitro. Two constructs had stainless steel rods with mixed stainless steel (SS-SS) and titanium (SS-Ti) components, and two constructs had titanium rods with mixed stainless steel (Ti-SS) and titanium (Ti-Ti) components. Each construct was immersed in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 37 C and tested in cyclic compression bending using a sinusoidal load-controlling function with a peak load of 300 N and a frequency of 5 Hz until a level of 5 million cycles was reached. The samples were then removed and analyzed visually for evidence of corrosion. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the extent of corrosion at the interconnections. None of the constructs failed during testing. Gross observation of the implant components after disassembly revealed that no corrosion had occurred on the surface of the implants that had not been in contact with another component. The Ti-Ti interfaces showed some minor signs of corrosion only detectable using SEM and EDS. The greatest amount of corrosion occurred at the SS-SS interfaces and was qualitatively less at the SS-Ti and Ti-SS interfaces. The results from this study indicate

  19. Mechanically Alloyed-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels for Use in Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-04

    The mechanical and thermo-physical properties of Mechanically Alloyed (MA)-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are reviewed and their potential for use in space nuclear reactor power systems is examined. The three MA-ODS alloys examined are Inconel MA-ODS754 (77.55Ni, 20Cr, 1Fe, 0.5Ti, 0.3Al, 0.05C, and 0.6Y2O3), Incoloy MA-ODS956 (74.45Fe, 20Cr, 4.5Al, 0.5Ti, 0.05C, 0.5Y2O3), and Incoloy MA-ODS957 (84.55Fe, 14Cr, 0.3Mo, 0.9Ti, 0.25Y2O3). The major advantages of these alloys are: (a) their strength at high temperatures (>1000 K) is relatively higher and decreases slower with temperature than niobium (Nb) and molybdenum (Mo) refractory alloys; (b) they are relatively lightweight and less expensive; (c) they have been shown to experience low swelling and embrittlement with exposure to high-energy neutrons (> 0.1 MeV) up to a fluence of 1023 n/cm2; and (d) their high resistance to oxidation and nitration at high temperatures, which simplifies handling and assembly. These MS-ODS alloys are also lighter and much stronger than 316-stainless steel and super-alloys such as Inconel 601, Haynes 25, and Hastalloy-X at moderately high temperatures (688-1000 K). The little data available on the compatibility of the MA-ODS alloys with alkali liquid metals up to 1100 K are encouraging, however, additional tests at typical operation temperatures (1000-1400 K) in liquid metal cooled and alkali metal heat pipe-cooled space nuclear reactors are needed. The anisotropy of the MA-ODS alloys when cold worked, and in particularly when rolled into tubes, should not hinder their use in space nuclear power systems, in which the operation pressure is either near atmospheric or as high as 2 MPa.

  20. A novel active fire protection approach for structural steel members using NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, H.; Wong, M. B.; Al-Mahaidi, R.; Zhao, X. L.

    2013-02-01

    A novel active fire protection approach, based on integrating a shape memory alloy, NiTi, with a steel structure, was proposed to satisfy the fire resistance requirements in structural design. To demonstrate the principles of this approach, a simple structure in the form of a simply supported steel beam was used. The internal action of the beam due to a transverse applied load was reduced by utilizing the shape memory effect in the NiTi alloy at rising temperatures. As a result, the net internal action from the load design was kept below the deteriorated load capacity of the beam during the fire scenario for period of time that was longer than that of the original beam without the NiTi alloy. By integrating the NiTi alloy into the beam system, the structure remained stable even though the steel temperature exceeded the critical temperature which may have caused the original beam structure to collapse. Prior to testing the composite NiTi-steel beam under simulated fire conditions, the NiTi alloy specimens were characterized at high temperatures. At 300 °C, the stiffness of the specimens increased by three times and its strength by four times over that at room temperature. The results obtained from the high-temperature characterization highlighted the great potential of the alloy being used in fire engineering applications.

  1. Effects of gaseous nitriding AISI4140 alloy steel on corrosion and hardness properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamil Moli, L.; Wahab, N.; Gopinathan, M.; Karmegam, K.; Maniyarasi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion is one of the major problems in the industry especially on machinery since it weakens the structure of the machinery part and causes the mechanical failure. This will stop the production and increase the maintenance cost. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of gas nitriding on a screw press machine shaft made from AISI 4140 steel was investigated. Pitting corrosion was identified as a major cause of the shaft failure and this study was conducted to improve the corrosion resistance on the AISI 4140 alloy steel shaft by gas nitriding as a surface hardening treatment. Gas nitriding was performed with composition of 15% ammonia and 85% nitrogen at temperatures of 525 °C, 550 °C and 575 °C and with the soaking time of 30, 45 and 60 minutes, respectively. The samples were prepared as rectangular sized of 30mm x 12mm x 3mm for immersion testing. The results showed that corrosion rate of untreated samples was 77% higher compared to the nitrided samples. It was also found that hardness of the nitrided samples was higher than untreated sample. All in all, it can be concluded that gaseous nitriding can significantly improve the surface hardness and the corrosion resistance of the shaft made of AISI 4140 alloy steel, hence reduces the pitting that is the root cause of failure.

  2. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between alloy 800 and HP heat-resistant steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmolaei, R.; Shamanian, M. Kermanpur, A.

    2008-10-15

    In this study, dissimilar welds between HP heat-resistant steel and Incoloy 800 were made with four different filler materials including: 309 stainless steel and nickel-based Inconel 82, 182 and 617. The microstructure of the base metals, weld metals and their interfaces were characterized by utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopy. Grain boundaries migration in the weld metals was studied. It was found that the migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive. Precipitates of TiC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr and Mo) in the Inconel 617 weld metal are identified. The necessary conditions for the formation of cracks close to the fusion line of the 309-HP joints are described. Furthermore unmixed zone near the fusion line between HP steel base metal and Inconel 82 weld metal is discussed. An epitaxial growth is characterized at the fusion line of the 309-Alloy 800 and Inconel 617-Alloy 800 joints.

  3. Phase chemistry and precipitation reactions in maraging steels: Part 3. Model alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W. .Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy); Cerezo, A.; Smith, G.D.W. . Department of Materials)

    1993-06-01

    This article describes studies of phase transformations during aging in a variety of model maraging steels. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) was the main research technique employed. Thermochemical calculation was also used during the course of the work. The composition and morphology of precipitates were compared in several maraging systems aged at different temperatures for different times to investigate the aging sequence. The APFIM results are compared with studies by other workers using different experimental techniques. In Fe-Ni(-Co)-Mo model alloys, [omega] phase and Fe[sub 7]Mo[sub 6] [mu] phase have been found to contribute to age hardening at different stages of aging; no evidence was found for the existence of Mo-rich clusters in the as-quenched Fe-Ni-Co-Mo alloy. In a high-Si Cr-containing steel, Ti[sub 6]Si[sub 7]Ni[sub 16]G phase and Ni[sub 3]Ti have been found to contribute to age hardening; reverted austenite was found after aging for 5 hours at 520 [degree]C. In a Mn-containing steel, Fe[sub 2]Mo Laves phase and a structurally uncertain phase with a composition of Fe[sub 45]Mn[sub 32]Co[sub 5]Mo[sub 19] have been found to contribute to age hardening.

  4. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitasari, Arini; Mabruri, Efendi

    2016-04-01

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  5. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitasari, Arini Mabruri, Efendi

    2016-04-19

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  6. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  7. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Five Different Steel Alloys in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilthan, B.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, G.

    2015-08-01

    The need for characterization of thermophysical properties of steel and nickel-based alloys was addressed in the FFG-Bridge Project 810999 in cooperation with a partner from industry, Böhler Edelstahl GmbH & Co KG. To optimize numerical simulations of production processes, such as remelting or plastic deformation, additional, and more accurate data were necessary for the alloys under investigation. With a fast ohmic pulse heating circuit system, the temperature-dependent specific electrical resistivity, density, and specific heat capacity for a set of five high alloyed steels were measured. Hence, using the Wiedemann-Franz law with a Lorenz number of , the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity could be calculated for the solid and liquid phases up to temperatures of 2500 K. This experimental approach is limited by the following requirements for the specimens: they have to be electrically conducting, the melting point has to be high enough for the implemented pyrometric temperature measurement, and one has to be able to draw wires of the material. The latter restriction is technologically challenging with some of the materials being very brittle. For all samples, electrical and temperature signals are recorded and a fast shadowgraph method is used to measure the volume expansion. For each material under investigation, a set of data including the chemical composition, the density at room temperature, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and the change of enthalpy, resistivity, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature is reported.

  8. Shake table tests and analytical simulations of a steel structure with shape memory alloy dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parulekar, Y. M.; Kiran, A. Ravi; Reddy, G. R.; Singh, R. K.; Vaze, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    This study uses the pseudoelastic properties of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy wires for attenuation of the seismic response of a steel structure and evaluates its effectiveness and applicability in seismic response control. In this paper, shake table tests, carried out on a model of a steel structure with and without wire-based shape memory alloy dampers, are discussed in detail. Shake table tests, comprised of free vibration tests and spectrum compatible time history tests, were carried out. The former were used for the evaluation of the frequency and damping, and the later were used to prove the efficacy of the shape memory alloy dampers. Further analytical simulations are carried out using detailed time history analysis utilizing a thermomechanical model of an SMA and taking into account the residual martensite accumulation, which is irreversibly due to cyclic forward/reverse martensitic transformation. Moreover, a simple iterative response spectrum (IRS) method with equivalent damping and stiffness is also used to evaluate the response of the structure with SMA dampers, and it is proved that the method can be conservatively used by designers.

  9. Photoemission Electron Microscopy as a Tool for Studying Steel Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roese, Peter; Keutner, Christoph; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Westphal, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Key properties of steel like stability, weldability, or ability for absorbing deformation energy are defined by their grain structure. The knowledge about their micrometer and submicrometer structure is of particular interest for tailor-cut macroscopic steel properties. We report on photoemission electron microscopy studies which in principle yield a higher magnification than comparable optical techniques. A flat surface without any topographic features was obtained by applying a non-etching preparation procedure. PEEM images showed very tiny phase islands embedded within a steel phase matrix. Furthermore, we developed an analysis procedure for PEEM images for dual-phase steels. As a result, it is possible to identify the individual work functions of different steel phases at the surface.

  10. Photoemission Electron Microscopy as a Tool for Studying Steel Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roese, Peter; Keutner, Christoph; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Westphal, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Key properties of steel like stability, weldability, or ability for absorbing deformation energy are defined by their grain structure. The knowledge about their micrometer and submicrometer structure is of particular interest for tailor-cut macroscopic steel properties. We report on photoemission electron microscopy studies which in principle yield a higher magnification than comparable optical techniques. A flat surface without any topographic features was obtained by applying a non-etching preparation procedure. PEEM images showed very tiny phase islands embedded within a steel phase matrix. Furthermore, we developed an analysis procedure for PEEM images for dual-phase steels. As a result, it is possible to identify the individual work functions of different steel phases at the surface.

  11. Damage and fracture loci for a dual-phase steel and a high-strength low-alloyed steel: Revealing the different plastic localization-damage-ductile fracture pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Junhe; Münstermann, Sebastian; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The ductile fracture locus has been developed in the recent years as a relevant tool to predict the ductile fracture and assess the structure safety. In the various developed models, the occurrence of the final fracture or the initiation of the fracture is considered as the critical phase of deformation for materials or structures. However, in the application of high-strength steels, the damage onset and evolution are of significant importance in the forming processes, as they are naturally interacting with the plastic localization and ductile fracture and eventually creating various possible failure patterns. The present study contributes to a demonstration of the differences of these features in different steels by quantitatively comparing the material parameters of a hybrid damage mechanics model. A dual-phase steel sheet (DP600) and a high-strength low-alloy steel plate (S355J2+N), which show very different relation patterns between damage and fracture, are investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the plastic localization, damage and fracture loci of them and reveal the differences in their localization-damage initiation-ductile fracture patterns. The reasons for the observed different patterns are discussed and it is concluded that the microstructural features are ultimately contributing to the different patterns and the criteria for evaluating the cold formability of these steels shall be varied depending on their failure patterns.

  12. Temperature and environmentally assisted cracking in low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Auten, T.A.; Monter, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) can be defined as the propagation of fatigue cracks in water at rates that are anywhere from 3 to over 40 times the growth rates expected in air. In the present work, five ASTM A 508 Class 2 forgings with ladle and check analyses that ranged from 0.010 to 0.019 wt% S were tested in high purity deaerated water in the temperature range of 93 to 260 C. At 260 C these forgings did not undergo EAC, reinforcing earlier results for two similar forgings. This broad sampling indicates a strong resistance to EAC for this class of forging at 260 C. On the other hand, EAC occurred consistently in the three of these forgings that were tested below 204 C, provided the test conditions were high enough to produce a high baseline fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), where the baseline FCGR is that expected in air. At 149 C, EAC occurred at test conditions that combined to yield a baseline FCGR greater than {approx}2E-6 mm/s. At 204, 121, and 93 C, this ``critical crack growth rate`` appeared to shift to lower baseline values. The EAC that occurred at lower temperatures was a factor of 3 to 12 times higher than baseline air rates, which was not as strong as the effect for higher sulfur steels at 240 to 290 C. Also, no plateau in the growth rates occurred as it does with the higher sulfur steels. In another approach, EAC was induced at 93 and at 260 C by raising the dissolved oxygen content of the water from <10 to >15 ppb. In this case, the EAC growth rates decreased to non-EAC levels when the oxygen supply was shut off. The oxygen-related EAC occurred over a broader range of baseline growth rates than found for the EAC driven by the baseline crack tip speed. Again, this can be rationalized by the buildup of sulfur in the crack tip water, which can be associated with the higher corrosion potential of the bulk water.

  13. Microstructure design of low alloy transformation-induced plasticity assisted steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruixian

    The microstructure of low alloy Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels has been systematically varied through the combination of computational and experimental methodologies in order to enhance the mechanical performance and to fulfill the requirement of the next generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). The roles of microstructural parameters, such as phase constitutions, phase stability, and volume fractions on the strength-ductility combination have been revealed. Two model alloy compositions (i.e. Fe-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.3C, and Fe-3Mn-1Si-0.3C in wt%, nominal composition) were studied. Multiphase microstructures including ferrite, bainite, retained austenite and martensite were obtained through conventional two step heat treatment (i.e. intercritical annealing-IA, and bainitic isothermal transformation-BIT). The effect of phase constitution on the mechanical properties was first characterized experimentally via systematically varying the volume fractions of these phases through computational thermodynamics. It was found that martensite was the main phase to deteriorate ductility, meanwhile the C/VA ratio (i.e. carbon content over the volume fraction of austenite) could be another indicator for the ductility of the multiphase microstructure. Following the microstructural characterization of the multiphase alloys, two microstructural design criteria (i.e. maximizing ferrite and austenite, suppressing athermal martensite) were proposed in order to optimize the corresponding mechanical performance. The volume fraction of ferrite was maximized during the IA with the help of computational thermodyanmics. On the other hand, it turned out theoretically that the martensite suppression could not be avoided on the low Mn contained alloy (i.e. Fe- 1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.3C). Nevertheless, the achieved combination of strength (~1300MPa true strength) and ductility (˜23% uniform elongation) on the low Mn alloy following the proposed design criteria fulfilled the

  14. Critical Aspects of Alloying of Sintered Steels with Manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryha, Eduard; Dudrova, Eva; Nyborg, Lars

    2010-11-01

    This study examines the sintering behavior and properties of Fe-0.8Mn-0.5C manganese powder metallurgy steels. The study focuses on the influence of mode of alloying—admixing using either high-purity electrolytic manganese or medium carbon ferromanganese as well as the fully prealloying of water-atomized powder. Three main aspects were studied during the whole sintering process—microstructure development, interparticle necks evolution, and changes in the behavior of manganese carrier particles during both heating and sintering stages. The prealloyed powder shows considerable improvement in carbon homogenization and interparticle neck development in comparison with admixed materials. The first indication of pearlite for the fully prealloyed material was registered at ~1013 K (740 °C) in comparison with ~1098 K (825 °C) in the case of the admixed systems. The negative effect of the oxidized residuals of manganese carrier particles and high microstructure inhomogeneity, which is a characteristic feature of admixed systems, is reflected in the lower values of the mechanical properties. The worst results in this respect were obtained for the system admixed with electrolytic manganese because of more intensive manganese sublimation and resulting oxidation at lower temperatures. According to the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses, the observed high brittleness of admixed materials is connected with intergranular decohesion failure associated with manganese oxide formation on the grain boundaries.

  15. Tensile and pack compressive tests of some sheets of aluminum alloy, 1025 carbon steel, and chromium-nickel steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, C S; Miller, James A

    1942-01-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain curves, stress-deviation curves, and secant modulus-stress curves are given for longitudinal and transverse specimens of 17S-T, 24S-T, and 24S-RT aluminum-alloy sheet in thicknesses from 0.032 to 0.081 inch, 1025 carbon steel sheet in thicknesses of 0.054 and 0.120 inch, and chromium-nickel steel sheet in thicknesses form 0.020 to 0.0275 inch. Significant differences were found between the tensile and the compressive stress-strain curves, and also the corresponding corollary curves; similarly, differences were found between the curves for the longitudinal and transverse directions. These differences are of particular importance in considering the compressive strength of aircraft structures made of thin sheet. They are explored further for the case of compression by giving tangent modulus-stress curves in longitudinal and transverse compression and dimensionless curves of the ratio of tangent modulus to Young's modulus and of the ratio of reduced modulus for a rectangular section to Young's modulus, both plotted against the ratio of stress to secant yield strength.

  16. Microstructural Quantification of Rapidly Solidified Undercooled D2 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valloton, J.; Herlach, D. M.; Henein, H.; Sediako, D.

    2017-10-01

    Rapid solidification of D2 tool steel is investigated experimentally using electromagnetic levitation (EML) under terrestrial and reduced gravity conditions and impulse atomization (IA), a drop tube type of apparatus. IA produces powders 300 to 1400 μm in size. This allows the investigation of a large range of cooling rates ( 100 to 10,000 K/s) with a single experiment. On the other hand, EML allows direct measurements of the thermal history, including primary and eutectic nucleation undercoolings, for samples 6 to 7 mm in diameter. The final microstructures at room temperature consist of retained supersaturated austenite surrounded by eutectic of austenite and M7C3 carbides. Rapid solidification effectively suppresses the formation of ferrite in IA, while a small amount of ferrite is detected in EML samples. High primary phase undercoolings and high cooling rates tend to refine the microstructure, which results in a better dispersion of the eutectic carbides. Evaluation of the cell spacing in EML and IA samples shows that the scale of the final microstructure is mainly governed by coarsening. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of IA samples reveals that IA powders are polycrystalline, regardless of the solidification conditions. EBSD on EML samples reveals strong differences between the microstructure of droplets solidified on the ground and in microgravity conditions. While the former ones are polycrystalline with many different grains, the EML sample solidified in microgravity shows a strong texture with few much larger grains having twinning relationships. This indicates that fluid flow has a strong influence on grain refinement in this system.

  17. Dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of maraging steel linear cellular alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam E.; Fredenberg, David A.; McCoy, Tammy; Thadhani, Naresh; Cochran, Joe K.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN finite element code. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with highspeed imaging. Analysis of observed deformation states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation.

  18. Amorphization by friction welding between 5052 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, S.; Tsubakino, H.; Okita, K.; Aritoshi, M.; Tomita, T.

    2000-04-14

    The joining of dissimilar metals such as aluminum/stainless steel is a very important technique. In the case of fusion welding of an Fe-Al system, excess formation of brittle intermetallic compounds degrades the joint. Since friction welding is one of the solid-state bonding procedures, few intermetallic compounds are formed at the weld interface. However, in the Al-Fe system, the solid solubility is almost nil, so some intermetallic compounds will be formed in spite of the friction welding. In the present study, microstructure of the friction weld interface between Al-Mg alloy and austenitic stainless steel was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the mechanism of friction welding was examined.

  19. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  20. Assessment of precipitation in alloy steel using nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Sebastian; Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Wall, James J.; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic waves have shown to be sensitive to various microstructural changes in metals including coherent precipitates; these precipitates introduce a strain field in the lattice structure. The thermal aging of certain alloy steels leads to the formation of coherent precipitates, which pin dislocations and contribute to the generation of a second harmonic component. A precipitate hardenable material namely 17-4 PH stainless steel is thermally treated in this research to obtain different precipitation stages, and then the influence of precipitates on the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is assessed. Conclusions about the microstrucutural changes in the material are drawn based on the results from a nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurement and complementary thermo-electric power, hardness and ultrasonic velocity measurements. The results show that the nonlinear parameter is sensitive to coherent precipitates in the material and moreover that precipitation characteristics can be characterized based on the obtained experimental data.

  1. Investigation of dynamic dry friction between stainless steel and aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keightley, Peter; Winter, Ron; Stirk, Stewart

    2009-06-01

    Previous workers studied dynamic friction by using an impacting copper plate to drive a tapered aluminium alloy plug into a matching hole in a stainless steel outer sheath. The velocity of the back surface of the plug was measured using velocity interferometry. We have performed experiments on a version of this basic configuration that has been enlarged so that the sliding surfaces remain in contact for a longer time than with the original configuration. By comparing our results with computer simulations we conclude that the frictional forces between the inner cone and the steel outer are initially high but decrease significantly as the sliding proceeds. This effect is assumed to result from thermal softening of the material at the sliding interface. The study is supported by metallography of the recovered components.

  2. Surface scanning techniques to locate and study defects in painted zinc and zinc alloy coated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.; Thierry, D.; Simpson, T.C.

    1995-02-01

    Current density and impedance mapping measurements have been used to locate and monitor corrosion and defects on painted surfaces in solution. Measurements are reported for painted zinc and aluminum-zinc alloy coated steel surfaces. When scratched, current density mapping showed corrosion of the metal coating started at localized sites in both dilute chloride and sulfate solutions. Different scribing techniques were tested exposing only the metal coating and both the coating and the underlying steel. Effect of roll forming was investigated. Current density mapping located corrosion susceptible defects on painted roll formed materials that were not readily discernible optically. Scanning ac mapping showed that artificially formed defects were readily observed. Local impedance variations with frequency were measured for simulated defects and defect free areas of painted surfaces. Variations in paint thickness and the presence of defects were detected using the ac techniques.

  3. Influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, V. B.; Mello, R. S. T.; Payão, J. C.; Paranhos, R. P. R.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metal was studied. Weld metals with different zirconium contents were obtained adding iron-zirconium alloy in the welding flux formulation. Weld metal chemical composition proved that zirconium was able to be transferred from the flux to the weld metal. The addition of zirconium refined the weld metal microstructure, increasing the acicular ferrite content. Weld metal toughness, determined by means of impact Charpy-V tests, showed that the zirconium addition is beneficial up to a content of 0.005 wt.%. Above this level, zirconium was not able to produce further microstructure refinement, although the toughness was reduced, possibly due to the formation of microconstituent such as the martensite-austenite constituent (M-A), which is considered to be deleterious to the weld metal toughness.

  4. EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-21

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  5. Surface Modification of Micro-Alloyed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel by Controlled TIG Arcing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification of micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate has been carried out by autogenous conventional and pulse current tungsten inert gas arcing (TIGA) processes at different welding parameters while the energy input was kept constant. At a given energy input the influence of pulse parameters on the characteristics of surface modification has been studied in case of employing single and multi-run procedure. The role of pulse parameters has been studied by considering their summarized influence defined by a factor Φ. The variation in Φ and pulse frequency has been found to significantly affect the thermal behavior of fusion and accordingly the width and penetration of the modified region along with its microstructure, hardness and wear characteristics. It is found that pulsed TIGA is relatively more advantageous over the conventional TIGA process, as it leads to higher hardness, improved wear resistance, and a better control over surface characteristics.

  6. Texture effects on magnetic properties in high-alloyed non-oriented electrical steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K.

    2007-11-01

    In high-alloyed non-oriented electrical steels with the addition of Co, Mo, and an increased quantity of Ni, a very low level of core loss ( W 15/50 = 2.2 W/kg) and high magnetic induction ( B 50 = 1.7 T) were obtained. However, Co and Mo degrade the magnetic properties substantially. With respect to the texture effect on magnetic properties, core loss decreases and magnetic induction increases proportionally to the texture factor (the ratio of the sum of cubic and Goss texture volumes to the volume of the γ-phase fibrous texture).

  7. The dependence of complex alloyed steel properties on quenching and tempering conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokur, Bertold B.; Vinokur, Alexandr; Shtessel, Victoriya E.

    1996-09-01

    M.P. Braun 's school in the Scientific-Research Institute of Casting Problems, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, the Ukraine, investigated the structure and properties of complex alloyed steels for many years, focusing on carbide formation and phase transformations. My son, Alexandr Vinokur, prior to his death, was working in the Scientific-Research E.O. Paton Institute of Electrical Welding, Ukrainian Academy of Science, the Ukraine, as a researcher. This article is a result of our collaboration and his input is invaluable.

  8. Twenty-five-year corrosion tests of 55% Al-Zn alloy coated steel sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, H.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Long-term atmospheric corrosion tests of steel sheet hot-dip coated with a series of aluminum-zinc alloy compositions were conducted in a wide range of environments. In a severe marine environment, coatings containing 44.6% or more aluminum lasted about three times as long as conventional galvanized with the same coating thickness. In moderate marine, rural, and industrial environments, coatings containing 44.6% or more aluminum remained intact after 25 years and have already lasted twice as long as conventional galvanized.

  9. Microstructural, mechanical and magnetic properties of high-strength low-alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, S. Prakash; Rao, V.; Mohanty, O. N.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on commercial grade high-strength low-alloy steel, microalloyed with Nb, V and Ti with a view to developing high-strength material with moderate soft magnetic properties. In order to obtain a suitable microstructure necessary for achieving the desired mechanical strength and magnetic properties, spheroidisation annealing (SA) as well as quenching and tempering (QT) treatments have been employed. At longer annealing or tempering time (⩾ 30 h), both the SA and QT samples have shown ample spheroidisation of carbides resulting in considerable improvement in the magnetic properties without much deterioration in mechanical strength.

  10. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  11. Tool wear mechanisms in the machining of Nickel based super-alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sun, Jianfei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Wuyi; Saleem, Zawar

    2014-06-01

    Nickel based super-alloys are widely employed in aircraft engines and gas turbines due to their high temperature strength, corrosion resistance and, excellent thermal fatigue properties. Conversely, these alloys are very difficult to machine and cause rapid wear of the cutting tool, frequent tool changes are thus required resulting in low economy of the machining process. This study provides a detailed review of the tool wear mechanism in the machining of nickel based super-alloys. Typical tool wear mechanisms found by different researchers are analyzed in order to find out the most prevalent wear mechanism affecting the tool life. The review of existing works has revealed interesting findings about the tool wear mechanisms in the machining of these alloys. Adhesion wear is found to be the main phenomenon leading to the cutting tool wear in this study.

  12. DC electrodeposition of Mn–Co alloys on stainless steels for SOFC interconnect application

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junwei; Jiang, Yinglu; Johnson, Christopher; Liu, Xingbo

    2008-03-01

    High conductivity coatings that resist oxide scale growth and reduce chromium evaporation are needed to make stainless steel interconnect materials viable for long-term stable operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel is one of the most promising coatings for interconnect application because of its high conductivity, good chromium retention capability, as well as good CTE match to ferritic stainless steels. Mn–Co electrodeposition followed by oxidization is potentially a low cost method for fabrication of (Mn,Co)3O4 spinel coatings. This work looks at the co-deposition of Mn–Co alloys for this application. As a guide to optimize the deposition process, characterizations of the cathodic reactions and reaction potentials are done using polarization curves. It was found that as cobalt concentration was varied that the alloy composition became richer in cobalt, indicating that the deposition is regular co-deposition process. It was also found that at 0.05M Co concentration in excess gluconate the Mn–Co alloys composition could be tuned by varying the current density. Coatings with Mn–Co around 1:1 could be obtained at a current density of 250 mA/cm2. However, the higher potential increased hydrogen production making the films more porous. Oxidation of the alloy coatings showed that much of the porosities could be eliminated during oxidation. It was found in a number of samples that fully dense coatings where obtained. The composition of the oxidized coating was found to become enriched in Mn, possibly due to the Mn fast diffusion from the substrate.

  13. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  14. Quantifying Recycling and Losses of Cr and Ni in Steel Throughout Multiple Life Cycles Using MaTrace-Alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Pauliuk, Stefan

    2017-09-05

    Alloying metals are indispensable ingredients of high quality alloy steel such as austenitic stainless steel, the cyclical use of which is vital for sustainable resource management. Under the current practice of recycling, however, different metals are likely to be mixed in an uncontrolled manner, resulting in function losses and dissipation of metals with distinctive functions, and in the contamination of recycled steels. The latter could result in dilution loss, if metal scrap needed dilution with virgin iron to reduce the contamination below critical levels. Management of these losses resulting from mixing in repeated recycling of metals requires tracking of metals over multiple life cycles of products with compositional details. A new model (MaTrace-alloy) was developed that tracks the fate of metals embodied in each of products over multiple life cycles of products, involving accumulation, discard, and recycling, with compositional details at the level of both alloys and products. The model was implemented for the flow of Cr and Ni in the Japanese steel cycle involving 27 steel species and 115 final products. It was found that, under a high level of scrap sorting, greater than 70% of the initial functionality of Cr and Ni could be retained over a period of 100 years, whereas under a poor level of sorting, it could plunge to less than 30%, demonstrating the relevance of waste management technology in circular economy policies.

  15. Numerical Fracture Analysis of Cryogenically Treated Alloy Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasool Mohideen, S.; Thamizhmanii, S.; Fatah, M. M. Muhammed Abdul; Saidin, W. Najmuddin W.

    2016-02-01

    Cryogenic treatment is being used commercially in the industries in the last two decades for improving the life of many engineering component such as bearings and cutting tools. Though their influence in improving the wear resistance of tool materials is well established, the effect of treatment on weldments is not much investigated. In the present work, a two dimensional finite element analysis was carried out on the compact tension specimen model for simulating the treatment process and to study the fracture behaviour. The weldments were modelled by thermo- mechanical coupled field analysis for simulating he temperature distribution in the model during weld pool cooling and introducing thermal stresses due to uneven contraction and cooling. The model was subjected to cryogenic treatment by adopting radiation effect. The fracture analysis was carried out using Rice's J- Integral approach. The analysis produced a similar outcome of experimental results i.e. Increase in the fracture toughness of the specimen after cryogenic treatment in the heat affected zone of weldment.

  16. Alloying the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer with tungsten carbide by the use of a high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzański, L. A.; Bonek, M.; Hajduczek, E.; Klimpel, A.

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents the effect of alloying with tungsten carbide on properties of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer, using the high power diode laser (HPDL). Selection of laser operating conditions is discussed, as well as thickness of the alloying layer, and their influence on structure and chemical composition of the steel. Analysis of the influence of the process conditions on the thicknesses of the alloyed layer and heat-affected zone is presented.

  17. Standard specification for steel, sheet and strip, high-strength, low-alloy, columbium or vanadium, or both, hot-rolled and cold-rolled. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    DoD adopted. This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A05.19 on Steel Sheet and Strip. Current edition approved Jun. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as A 607-70. Last previous edition was A 607-96.

  18. Influence of the pulsed plasma treatment on the corrosion resistance of the low-alloy steel plated by Ni-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumaev, P.; Yakushin, V.; Kalin, B.; Polsky, V.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents investigation results of the influence of high temperature pulsed plasma flows (HTPPF) treatment on the corrosion resistance of low-alloy steel 0.2C-Cr-Mn- Ni-Mo cladded by the rapidly quenched nickel-based alloy. A technique that allows obtaining a defect-free clad layer with a good adhesion to the substrate was developed. It is shown that the preliminary treatment of steel samples by nitrogen plasma flows significantly increases their corrosion resistance in the conditions of intergranular corrosion test in a water solution of sulfuric acid. A change of the corrosion mechanism of the clad layer from intergranular to uniform corrosion was observed as a result of sub-microcrystalline structure formation and homogeneous distribution of alloying elements in the plasma treated surface layer thus leading to the significant increase of the corrosion resistance.

  19. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  20. The microstructure of an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni stainless steel shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Bikas C.; Krishnan, Madangopal; Rama Rao, V. V.

    2003-05-01

    The microstructure and phase stability of the Fe-15Mn-7Si-9Cr-5Ni stainless steel shape memory alloy in the temperature range of 600 °C to 1200 °C was investigated using optical and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and chemical analysis techniques. The microstructural studies show that an austenite single-phase field exists in the temperature range of 1000 °C to 1100 °C, above 1100 °C, there exists a three-phase field consisting of austenite, δ-ferrite, and the (Fe,Mn)3Si intermetallic phase; within the temperature range of 700 °C to 1000 °C, a two-phase field consisting of austenite and the Fe5Ni3Si2 type intermetallic phase exists; and below 700 °C, there exists a single austenite phase field. Apart from these equilibrium phases, the austenite grains show the presence of athermal ɛ martensite. The athermal α' martensite has also been observed for the first time in these stainless steel shape memory alloys and is produced through the γ-ɛ-α' transformation sequence.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on steel and titanium alloy for tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, J.; Koter, R.; Hartelt, M.; Spaltmann, D.; Pentzien, S.; Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) were generated on stainless steel (100Cr6) and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) surfaces upon irradiation with multiple femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration 30 fs, central wavelength 790 nm). The experimental conditions (laser fluence, spatial spot overlap) were optimized in a sample-scanning geometry for the processing of large surface areas (5 × 5 mm2) covered homogeneously by the nanostructures. The irradiated surface regions were subjected to white light interference microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealing spatial periods around 600 nm. The tribological performance of the nanostructured surface was characterized by reciprocal sliding against a ball of hardened steel in paraffin oil and in commercial engine oil as lubricants, followed by subsequent inspection of the wear tracks. For specific conditions, on the titanium alloy a significant reduction of the friction coefficient by a factor of more than two was observed on the laser-irradiated (LIPSS-covered) surface when compared to the non-irradiated one, indicating the potential benefit of laser surface structuring for tribological applications.

  2. Initial bacterial deposition on bare and zeolite-coated aluminum alloy and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gexin; Beving, Derek E; Bedi, Rajwant S; Yan, Yushan S; Walker, Sharon L

    2009-02-03

    In this study, the impact of zeolite thin film coatings on bacterial deposition and "biofouling" of surfaces has been investigated in an aqueous environment. The synthesis of two types of zeolite coatings, ZSM-5 coated on aluminum alloy and zeolite A coated on stainless steel, and the characterization of the coated and bare metal surfaces are described. The extent of cell deposition onto the bare and zeolite-coated aluminum alloy and stainless steel surfaces is investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber system under a laminar flow conditions. The initial rates of bacterial transfer to the various surfaces are compared by utilizing a marine bacterium, Halomonas pacifica g, under a range of ionic strength conditions. H. pacifica g deposited onto bare metal surfaces to a greater extent as compared with cells deposited onto the zeolite coatings. The surface properties found to have the most notable effect on attachment are the electrokinetic and hydrophobicity properties of the metal and zeolite-coated surfaces. These results suggest that a combination of two chemical mechanisms-hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions-contribute to the antifouling nature of the zeolite surface. Additional observations on the relative role of the hydrodynamic and physical phenomena are also discussed.

  3. Mechanical properties of low-alloy-steels with bainitic microstructures and varying carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, A.; Klarner, J.; Vogl, T.; Schöngrundner, R.; Sam, G.; Buchmayr, B.

    2016-03-01

    Materials used in the oilfield industry are subjected to special conditions. These requirements for seamless steel tubes are between the priorities of strength, toughness and sour gas resistance. Steels with bainitic microstructure provide a great opportunity for those harsh environmental conditions. With different morphologies of bainite, like carbide free, upper or lower bainite, the interaction of high tensile strength and elongation is assumed to be better than with tempered martensite. To form carbide free bainite two ways of processing are proposed, isothermal holding with accurate time control or controlled continuous cooling. Both require knowledge of time-temperature transformation behaviour, which can be reached through a detailed alloying concept, focused on the influence of silicon to supress the carbide nucleation and chromium to stabilize the austenite fraction. The present work is based on three alloys with varying silicon and chromium contents. The carbide free microstructure is obtained by a continuous cooling path. Additionally different heat treatments were done to compare the inherent performance of the bainitic morphologies. The bainitic structures were characterized metallographically for their microstructure and the primary phase by means of transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of carbide-free structures were analysed with quasi-static tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. Moreover, investigations about hydrogen embrittlement were done with focus on the effect of retained austenite. The results were ranked and compared qualitatively.

  4. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Medium Carbon Low Alloy Forged Steels by Polymer Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandan, B. R.; Pramod, V.; Ramesha, C. M.; Sharanraj, V.

    2017-08-01

    Medium carbon low alloy forged steels were investigated (EN18, EN19, EN 24, and EN25) with respect to their mechanical properties by polymer quenching. The effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) H‑(O‑CH2‑CH2)n‑OH as a quenchant was studied by varying polymer concentration (10% and 30%) to investigate the mechanical properties and their metallographic structures. The study was carried out on the medium carbon low alloy forged steels in heat treated condition by hardening in the polymer quenchant. The quenched samples were step tempered at 5750C and at 2200C sequentially for 60 min each. Hardness, tensile strength, Charpy impact strength and metallographic were carried out on the untreated and heat treated specimens. The step tempering process of the specimen gives the high strength with high hardenability. The specimen quenched in the polymer solution exhibited the best mechanical properties, viz., as received samples. The mechanical properties are found increased in the polymer quenchant because of the slow and uniform cooling rate of the polymer. The microstructural examination of the specimens were found to have justified reason for the increment recorded in some of the mechanical properties, as it displayed a high proportion of the martensitic phase.

  5. Low temperature mechanical properties, fractographic and metallographic evaluation of several alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties are presented of alloy steels, 4130, 4140, 4340, 6150, and 8740. Test specimens were manufactured from approximately 1.00 inch (2.54 cm) diameter bar stock which had been heat treated to two different hardness levels. The following mechanical tests were performed at temperatures of 80 F (+26.7 C), 0 F (-17.8 C), -100 F (-73 C), and -200 F (-129 C): (1) tensile test (Ultimate, yield, modulus, elongation, and reduction of area), (2) notched tensile test, (3) charpy V-notched impact test (impact energy), and (4) double shear strength test (ultimate and yield). The test data indicate excellent tensile strength, notched/unnotched tensile ratios, ductility, impact, and shear properties at all test temperatures, except at -200 F (-129 C) where the impact strength of the higher strength group of alloy steels, 4130 (Rc-37) and 4140 (Rc-44) decreased to approximately 9 ft. lbs. (12 joules) and 6 ft. lbs. (8 joules), respectively. Chemical, metallographic, and fractographic analyses were also performed to evaluate microstructure, microhardness and the effect of decrease in temperature on the ductile to brittle failure transition.

  6. The Role of Vanadium Carbide Traps in Reducing the Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of High Strength Alloy Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    A723 steel was not sufficient to induce any appreciable embrittlement. 7.0 4.0 HY80 X 0.0i-r 50 4340 r—,—,—|—i—i—i—r—t—i—i—i—i—I—i—’—’—> l...carbide, V4C3) was identified in the A723 steel by x- ray diffraction. V4C3 traps effectively reduced the hydrogen concentrations at the crack ...ALLOY STEELS G. L. SPENCER D. J. DUQUETTE AUGUST 1998 US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER CLOSE COMBAT ARMAMENTS CENTER

  7. Effects of material and loading variables on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  8. Antimony-induced embrittlement in welding heat-affected zones in a Cr-Mo low-alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Song, S.-H.

    2013-07-01

    Heat-affected zones (HAZs) were simulated with a peak temperature of 1320 °C at different welding heat inputs for a Cr-Mo low-alloy steel. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the HAZs increased with increasing heat input. When 0.05 wt.% Sb was added to the steel, the DBTTs of the HAZs became 1 and 10 °C higher than those for the undoped steel at heat inputs of 36 and 60 kJ/cm, respectively. Sb segregation to austenite grain boundaries during thermal cycling was found to be mainly responsible for the DBTT increase.

  9. The erosion resistance of tool alloys in foundry melt the Zamak 4 - 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhametzyanova, GF; Kolesnikov, M. S.; Muhametzyanov, I. R.

    2016-06-01

    The paper considers the resistance against erosion dissolution in the melt of foundry Zamak 4 - 1 die steels used for press machine parts manufacturing for injection molding, and hard alloys system WC - Co. It is established that the solubility in the melt Zamak - 4 - 1 steel of 4H5MFS and DI - 22 are promising for the parts fabrication of metal-wire casting machines of CLT and IDRA types. A significant reserve to increase the resistance of metal wires is the use of cast steel, as well as in electroslag and electro-beam remelting options. Metal-ceramic alloy doped with chromium VK25H may be recommended for reinforcement of heavily loaded parts of the press-nodes of hot casting machines under pressure.

  10. Fabric cutting application of FeAl-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Blue, C.A.; Sklad, S.P.; Deevi, S.C.; Shih, H.R.

    1998-11-01

    Four intermetallic-based alloys were evaluated for cutting blade applications. These alloys included Fe{sub 3}Al-based (FAS-II and FA-129), FeAl-based (PM-60), and Ni{sub 3}Al-based (IC-50). These alloys were of interest because of their much higher work-hardening rates than the conventionally used carbon and stainless steels. The FeAl-based PM-60 alloy was of further interest because of its hardening possibility through retention of vacancies. The vacancy retention treatment is much simpler than the heat treatments used for hardening of steel blades. Blades of four intermetallic alloys and commercially used M2 tool steel blades were evaluated under identical conditions to cut two-ply heavy paper. Comparative results under identical conditions revealed that the FeAl-based alloy PM-60 outperformed the other intermetallic alloys and was equal to or somewhat better than the commercially used M2 tool steel.

  11. Effect of microstructure on transformation-induced plasticity of silicon-containing low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki; Morioka, Kojiro

    1997-04-01

    Fe-0.6C-1.5Si-0.8Mn steel was studied to determine the effect of the microstructure on transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) of silicon-containing low-alloy steel. A remarkable increase in elongation through TRIP can develop in the steel subjected to the following heat treatments: (1) austemper combined with subcritical annealing (SA Aus-T): subcritical annealing at 993K followed by austempering at 673K and then light tempering (after austenitization at 1173K); (2) austemper coupled with interrupted quenching (IQ Aus-T): interrupted quenching at 533K followed by austempering at 673K and light tempering (after austenization at 1,173K). The SA Aus-T treatment produced the triple structures of carbide-free upper bainite, retained austenite ({gamma}R), and free ferrite. As a result of the IQ Aus-T treatment, the triple structures of carbide-free upper bainite, {gamma}R, and tempered martensite appeared. The results are described and microstructural factors in TRIP are discussed.

  12. Ab initio study of the phase stability in paramagnetic duplex steel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, H.; Alatalo, M.; Puisto, A.; Ropo, M.; Kokko, K.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Olsson, P.; Johansson, B.; Hertzman, S.; Vitos, L.

    2009-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels have many superior properties compared to conventional steels, this being mainly due to their microstructure containing approximately equal amount of ferrite and austenite phases formed by iron, chromium (or Cr equivalent), and nickel (or Ni equivalent). Using computational methods based on first-principles theories, the phase stability of paramagnetic Fe1-c-nCrcNin alloys ( 0.12≤c≤0.32 and 0.04≤n≤0.32 ) at high temperatures (≳1000K) is addressed. It is shown that the stabilization of the ferrite-austenite two-phase field in duplex steels is a result of complex interplay of several competing phenomena. Taking into account only the formation energies yields a complete phase separation, strongly overestimating the two-phase region. The formation energies are calculated to be lower for the austenite than for the ferrite, meaning that the configurational entropy has a more significant impact on the stability field of the austenitic phase. The magnetic and vibrational free energies have opposite effects on the phase stability. Namely, the magnetic entropy favors the ferrite phase, whereas the vibrational free energy stabilizes the austenite phase. Combining the formation energies with the magnetic, vibrational, and configurational free energies, a region of coexistence between the two phases is obtained, in line with former thermodynamic assessments as well as with experimental observations.

  13. Chemical elements diffusion in the stainless steel components brazed with Cu-Ag alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Vasile, I. M.; Binchiciu, E. F.; Winestoock, R.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the study of diffusion of chemical elements through a brazing joint, between two thin components (0.5mm) made of stainless steel 304. An experimental brazing filler material has been used for brazing stainless steel component and then the diffusion phenomenon has been studied, in terms of chemical element displacement from the brazed separation interface. The filler material is in the form of a metal rod coated with ceramic slurry mixture of minerals, containing precursors and metallic powders, which can contribute to the formation of deposit brazed. In determining the distance of diffusion of chemical elements, on both sides of the fusion line, were performed measurements of the chemical composition using electron microscopy SEM and EDX spectrometry. Metallographic analysis of cross sections was performed with the aim of highlight the microstructural characteristics of brazed joints, for estimate the wetting capacity, adherence of filler metal and highlight any imperfections. Analyzes performed showed the penetration of alloying elements from the solder (Ag, Cu, Zn and Sn) towards the base material (stainless steel), over distances up to 60 microns.

  14. Ultrasonic butt welding of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hidai, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kanai, Ryoichi; Matsuura, Hisanori; Matsushima, Kaoru; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2002-05-01

    Welding characteristics of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens of 6.0 mm thickness by a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding system were studied. There are no detailed welding condition data of these specimens although the joining of these materials are required due to anticorrosive and high strength characteristics for not only large specimens but small electronic parts especially. These specimens of 6.0 mm thickness were welded end to end using a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding equipment with a vibration source using eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. The stainless steel plate specimens electrolytically polished were joined with welding strength almost equal to the material strength under rather large vibration amplitude of 25 microm (peak-to-zero value), static pressure 70 MPa and welding time of 1.0-3.0 s. The hardness of stainless steel specimen adjacent to a welding surface increased about 20% by ultrasonic vibration.

  15. Wear Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Limaye, P. K.; Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, Ram P.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, Dinesh; Soni, N. L.; Patel, R. J.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dry sliding wear characteristics of the Ni-based hardfacing alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding have been presented. Dry sliding wear behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated against two different counter bodies, AISI 52100 chromium steel (~850 VHN) and tungsten carbide ball (~2200 VHN) to study both adhesive and abrasive wear characteristics, in comparison with the substrate SS316L using ball on plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance was evaluated as a function of load and sliding speed for a constant sliding amplitude and sliding distance. The wear mechanisms were studied on the basis of wear surface morphology and microchemical analysis of the wear track using SEM-EDS. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si on SS316L exhibited much higher hardness (~700 VHN) than that of substrate SS316L (~200 VHN). The laser clad layer exhibited higher wear resistance as compared to SS316L substrate while sliding against both the counterparts. However, the improvement in the wear resistance of the clad layer as compared to the substrate was much higher while sliding against AISI 52100 chromium steel than that while sliding against WC, at the same contact stress intensity.

  16. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  17. Low-Temperature Toughening Mechanism in Thermomechanically Processed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2011-03-01

    High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels were fabricated by varying thermomechanical processing conditions such as rolling and cooling conditions in the intercritical region, and the low-temperature toughening mechanism was investigated in terms of microstructure and the associated grain boundary characteristics. The steels acceleratedly cooled to relatively higher temperature had lower tensile strength than those acceleratedly cooled to room temperature due to the increased volume fraction of granular bainite or polygonal ferrite (PF) irrespective of rolling in the intercritical region, while the yield strength was dependent on intercritical rolling, and start and finish cooling temperatures, which affected the formation of PF and low-temperature transformation phases. The steel rolled in the intercritical region and cooled to 673 K (400 °C) provided the best combination of high yield strength and excellent low-temperature toughness because of the presence of fine PF and appropriate mixture of various low-temperature transformation phases such as granular bainite, degenerate upper bainite (DUB), lower bainite (LB), and lath martensite (LM). Despite the high yield strength, the improvement of low-temperature toughness could be explained by the reduction of overall effective grain size based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis data, leading to the decrease in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  18. Performance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels, Fe-base and Ni-base alloys exposed to metal dusting environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Unocic, Kinga A; Pint, Bruce A; Brady, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    A series of conventional Fe- and Ni- base, chromia- and alumina- forming alloys, and a newly developed creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic steel were developed and its performance relative to conventional Fe- and Ni-based chromia-forming alloys was evaluated in metal dusting environments with a range of water vapor contents. Five 500h experiments have been performed at 650 C with different water vapor contents and total pressures. Without water vapor, the Ni-base alloys showed greater resistance to metal dusting than the Fe-base alloys, including AFA. However, with 10-28% water vapor, more protective behavior was observed with the higher-alloyed materials and only small mass changes were observed. Longer exposure times are in progress to further differentiate performance.

  19. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  20. Fabrication of Fe-Cr-Mo powder metallurgy steel via a mechanical-alloying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jooyoung; Jeong, Gowoon; Kang, Singon; Lee, Seok-Jae; Choi, Hyunjoo

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we employed a mechanical-alloying process to manufacture low-alloy CrL and CrM steel powders that have similar specifications to their water-atomized counterparts. X-ray diffraction showed that Mo and Cr are alloyed in Fe after four cycles of planetary milling for 1 h at 150 RPM with 15-min pauses between the cycles (designated as P2C4 process). Furthermore, the measured powder size was found to be similar to that of the water-atomized counterparts according to both scanning electron microscope images and laser particle size analysis. The samples were sintered at 1120 °C, after which the P2C4-milled CrL showed similar hardness to that of water-atomized CrL, whereas the P2C4-milled CrM showed about 45% lower hardness than that of its water-atomized counterpart. Water-atomized CrM consists of a well-developed lathtype microstructure (bainite or martensite), while a higher fraction of polygonal ferrite is observed in P2C4-milled CrM. This phase difference causes the reduction of hardness in the P2C4-milled CrM, implying that the phase transformation behavior of specimens produced via powder metallurgy is influenced by the powder fabrication method.

  1. Effect of superheat on macrostructure and macrosegregation in continuous cast low-alloy steel slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, T.; Vuorenmaa, V.; Rentola, I.; Leinonen, M.; Porter, D.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of superheat on grain sedimentation and macrosegregation has been investigated using experimental castings of a low-alloyed steel grade. With a high superheat of ∼ 40 °C, the central equiaxed parts of the slabs consisted of randomly oriented fine dendrites but with a low superheat of ∼ 10 °C, coarse globular structures formed. The mean carbon content measured with optical emission spectroscopy was of the order of 15% smaller with coarse globular structures than in fine equiaxed dendritic structures. Electron probe microanalysis of other alloying elements indicates that the negative segregation in the slab central zones is caused by sedimentation of globulites. With superheat in the range ∼ 20 - 40 °C, the equiaxed zone is bordered by a columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) zone. In this region a positive macrosegregation of carbon and other alloying elements was observed. These phenomena are important when considering the through-thickness properties of the slabs and final products.

  2. Infrared repair brazing of 403 stainless steel with a nickel-based braze alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiue, R. K.; Wu, S. K.; Hung, C. M.

    2002-06-01

    Martensitic stainless steel (403SS) is extensively used for intermediate and low-pressure steam turbine blades in fossil-fuel power plants. The purpose of this investigation is to study the repair of shallow cracks on the surface of 403SS steam turbine blades by infrared repair brazing using rapid thermal cycles. A nickel-based braze alloy (NICROBRAZ LM) is used as filler metal. The braze alloy after brazing is primarily comprised of borides and an FeNi3 matrix with different amounts of alloying elements, especially B and Si. As the brazing temperature increases, more Fe atoms are dissolved into the molten braze. Some boron atoms diffuse into the 403SS substrate primarily via grain boundary diffusion and form B-Cr-Fe intermetallic precipitates along the grain boundaries. The LM filler metal demonstrates better performance than 403SS in both microhardness and wear tests. It is also noted that specimens brazed in a vacuum have less porosity than those brazed in an Ar atmosphere. The shear strength of the joint is around 300 MPa except for specimens brazed in short time periods, e.g., 5 seconds in Ar flow and 30 seconds in vacuum. The fractographs mainly consist of brittle fractures and no ductile dimple fractures observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination.

  3. Surface laser alloying of 17-4PH stainless steel steam turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Qunli; Kong, Fanzhi; Lou, Chenghua; Chen, Zhijun

    2008-09-01

    As a known high-quality precipitation hardening stainless steel with high strength, high antifatigue, excellent corrosion resistance and good weldability, 17-4PH has been widely used to produce steam turbine blades. However, under the impact of high-speed steam and water droplets, the blades are prone to cavitation, which could lead to lower efficiency, shorter life time, and even accidents. In this article, the 17-4PH blade's surface was alloyed using a high power CO 2 laser. The microstructure and microhardness of hardened 17-4PH were tested by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and a microhardness tester. After laser alloying, the surface layer was denser and the grain refined, while the microhardness of the surface (average 610HV 0.2) was about one times higher than that of the substrate material (330HV 0.2). The friction coefficient of the laser-alloyed 17-4PH layer was much lower than that of the substrate.

  4. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    graphite inserts at the bottom of the Rheocaster to eliminate ’hot spots’. Large quantities of 304 and 440C stainless steel alloys were cast during this...period (approximately 800 pounds of 304 and 2000 pounds of 440C ) and smaller quantities of other materials were also Rheocast including M2 tool steel, and

  5. 78 FR 33103 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... countervailing duty order on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Brazil and the antidumping duty orders on wire rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine... (``Commerce'') issued a countervailing duty order on imports of wire rod from Brazil (67 FR 64871). On October...

  6. Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Components (MRP-76)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Deardorff; D. Harris; D. Dedhia

    2002-11-30

    This report evaluates the conservatisms and uncertainties reported in NUREG/CR-6674 that lead to high probabilities of cracking in carbon and low-alloy steel for reactor piping. The report uses additional data generated since the completion of the report to eliminate uncertainties and show lower probabilities of cracking.

  7. The design of an Fe-12Mn-O.2Ti alloy steel for low temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. K.; Morris, J. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made to improve the low temperature mechanical properties of Fe-8 approximately 12% Mn-O 2Ti alloy steels. A two-phase(alpha + gamma) tempering in combination with cold working or hot working was identified as an effective treatment. A potential application as a Ni-free cryogenic steel was shown for this alloy. It was also shown that an Fe-8Mn steel could be grain-refined by a purely thermal treatment because of its dislocated martensitic structure and absence of epsilon phase. A significant reduction of the ductile-brittle transition temperature was obtained in this alloy. The nature and origin of brittle fracture in Fe-Mn alloys were also investigated. Two embrittling regions were found in a cooling curve of an Fe-12Mn-O 2Ti steel which was shown to be responsible for intergranular fracture. Auger electron spectroscopy identified no segregation during solution-annealing treatment. Avoiding the embrittling zones by controlled cooling led to a high cryogenic toughness in a solution-annealed condition.

  8. Flight Planning for the International Space Station-Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Matson, D. M.; Loser, W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the status and science for the LODESTARS (Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification) research project. The program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures.

  9. Flight Planning for the International Space Station-Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Matson, D. M.; Loser, W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the status and science for the LODESTARS (Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification) research project. The program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures.

  10. Surface and cut-edge corrosion behavior of Zn-Mg-Al alloy-coated steel sheets as a function of the alloy coating microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Min-Suk; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Jong-Sang; Lee, Jae-Won; Shon, Je-Ha; Jin, Young-Sool

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Mg and Al content on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of hot-dip Zn-Mg-Al alloycoated steel sheets were investigated. Pure Zn and Zn-based alloy coatings containing Mg (0-5 wt%) and Al (0.2-55 wt%) were produced by a hot-dip galvanizing method. Mg and Al addition induced formation of intermetallic microstructures, like primary Zn, Zn/MgZn2 binary eutectic, dendric Zn/Al eutectoid, and Zn/Al/MgZn2/ternary eutectic structures in the coating layer. MgZn2-related structures (Zn/MgZn2, Zn/Al/MgZn2, MgZn2) played an important role in increasing the corrosion resistance of Zn-Mg-Al alloy-coated steel sheets. Zn-3%Mg-2.5%Al coating layer containing a large volume of lamellar-shaped Zn/MgZn2 binary eutectic structures showed the best cut-edge corrosion resistance. The analysis indicated that Mg dissolved from MgZn2 in the early stage of corrosion and migrated to the cathodic region of steel-exposed cut-edge area to form dense and ordered protective corrosion products, leading to prolonged cathodic protection of Zn-Mg-Al alloy-coated steel sheets.

  11. Metallic ions released from stainless steel, nickel-free, and titanium orthodontic alloys: toxicity and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Antonio José; Fernández, Esther; Vicente, Ascensión; Calvo, José L; Ortiz, Clara

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the amounts of metallic ions that stainless steel, nickel-free, and titanium alloys release to a culture medium, and to evaluate the cellular viability and DNA damage of cultivated human fibroblasts with those mediums. The metals were extracted from 10 samples (each consisting of 4 buccal tubes and 20 brackets) of the 3 orthodontic alloys that were submerged for 30 days in minimum essential medium. Next, the determination of metals was performed by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, cellular viability was assessed by using the tetrazolium reduction assay (MTT assay) (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), and DNA damage was determined with the Comet assay. The metals measured in all the samples were Ti(47), Cr(52), Mn(55), Co(59), Ni(60), Mo(92), Fe(56), Cu(63), Zn(66), As(75), Se(78), Cd(111), and Pb(208). The cellular viability of the cultured fibroblasts incubated for 7 days with minimum essential medium, with the stainless steel alloy submerged, was close to 0%. Moreover, high concentrations of titanium, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, iron, copper, and zinc were detected. The nickel-free alloy released lower amounts of ions to the medium. The greatest damage in the cellular DNA, measured as the olive moment, was also produced by the stainless steel alloy followed by the nickel-free alloy. Conversely, the titanium alloy had an increased cellular viability and did not damage the cellular DNA, as compared with the control values. The titanium brackets and tubes are the most biocompatible of the 3 alloys studied. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Laser Peening - A Processing Tool to Strengthen Metals or Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H-L; Hackel, L A

    2003-09-01

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals or alloys. This treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress corrosion cracking in structural metals or alloys needed for aerospace, nuclear power plants, and military applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into precise shapes without their yielding, leaving their surfaces in a crack resistant compressive state.

  13. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  14. A comparative evaluation of welding consumables for dissimilar weids between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and Alloy 800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sireesha, M.; Albert, Shaju K.; Shankar, V.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-03-01

    Transition joints in power plants between ferritic steels and austenitic stainless steels suffer from a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) and the migration of carbon during service from the ferritic to the austenitic steel. To overcome these, nickel-based consumables are commonly used. The use of a trimetallic combination with an insert piece of intermediate CTE provides for a more effective lowering of thermal stresses. The current work envisages a trimetallic joint involving modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and 316LN austenitic stainless steel as the base materials and Alloy 800 as the intermediate piece. Of the two joints involved, this paper describes the choice of welding consumables for the joint between Alloy 800 and 316LN. Four consumables were examined: 316, 16-8-2, Inconel 82 and Inconel 182. The comparative evaluation was based on hot cracking tests and estimation of mechanical properties and coefficient of thermal expansion. While 16-8-2 exhibited highest resistance to solidification cracking, the Inconel filler materials also showed adequate resistance; additionally, the latter were superior from the mechanical property and coefficient of thermal expansion view-points. It is therefore concluded that for the joint between Alloy 800 and 316LN the Inconel filler materials offer the best compromise.

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment, Pre-stress and Surface Hardening on Fracture Toughness of Micro-Alloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag Chaudhury, Joydeb

    2014-01-01

    Micro-alloyed steels are being increasingly accepted by industry in various fields of application and are available with a wide variety of microstructures. Extensive literature is available on their microstructure-property relationships. The superior mechanical properties of micro-alloyed steels are caused by fine-grained microstructures and precipitation of micro-alloying elements such as V, Ti and Nb that led to an improvement in yield strength, in the product of tensile strength and total elongation and in Charpy V-notch impact energy as well. The microstructural changes caused by heat treatment or residual stress state caused by surface hardening or mechanical means may influence the fracture toughness of these micro-alloyed steels. It is in this context that the present work begins with experimental determination of quasi-static initiation fracture toughness ( J 1c) of low carbon (0.19%) micro-alloyed steel in as-rolled condition without any heat treatment. The study further explores the effect of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening on fracture toughness of as-rolled steel under study. The normalizing heat treatment, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening—each indicates a positive influence on initiation fracture toughness. Results, when compared, show that cyaniding followed by shot-peening have led to a 2.7 times increase in J 1c. Cyaniding followed by shot-peening may therefore be considered as having the most positive influence on initiation fracture toughness in as-rolled condition for the type of micro-alloyed steel under study. Although initiation fracture toughness is in general known to decrease with increase in yield strength in LEFM arena, the micro-alloyed steel under study when normalized displayed simultaneous improvement in yield strength and J 1c. All these observed effects of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding on initiation fracture toughness (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) were explained

  16. Tool Life Prediction for Ceramic Tools in Intermittent Turning of Hardened Steel Based on Damage Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaobin; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Yonghui; Zheng, Guangming

    2011-07-01

    Al2O3-based ceramic is one of the most widely used materials for tools employed in hardened steel turning applications due to its high hardness, wear resistance, heat resistance and chemical stability. The objective of this work is to predict the lives of Al2O3-(W, Ti)C ceramic tools in intermittent turning of hardened AISI 1045 steel by means of damage evolution model taking into account the mechanical loading and thermal effect in the cutting process. A damage evolution model analyzing the RVE with uniformly distributed interacting cracks is constructed based on micromechanics. The calculated results of the proposed damage evolution model are compared with the lives of two kinds of Al2O3-(W, Ti)C ceramic tools obtained through experiments. It is found that the proposed model can be used to predict the lives of the ceramic cutting tools in intermittent turning operation.

  17. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - Part II: Finite Element Analyses of Nugget Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes work on finite element modeling of nugget growth for resistance spot welding of aluminum alloy to steel. It is a sequel to a previous paper on experimental studies of resistance spot welding of aluminum to steel using a transition material. Since aluminum alloys and steel cannot be readily fusion welded together due to their drastically different thermal physical properties, a cold-rolled clad material was introduced as a transition to aid the resistance welding process. Coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical finite element analyses were performed to simulate the nugget growth and heat generation patterns during the welding process. The predicted nugget growth results were compared to the experimental weld cross sections. Reasonable comparisons of nugget size were achieved. The finite element simulation procedures were also used in the electrode selection state to help reduce weld expulsion and improve weld quality.

  18. Intermediate layer, microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy/stainless steel butt joint using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Wan, Zhandong; Li, Yuanxing; Xue, Junyu; Hui, Chen

    2017-07-01

    Butt joining of AA6061 aluminum (Al) alloy and 304 stainless steel of 2-mm thickness was conducted using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method with ER4043 filler metal. To promote the mechanical properties of the welding-brazing joints, two kinds of intermediate layers (Al-Si-Mg alloy and Ag-based alloy) are used to adjust the microstructures of the joints. The brazing interface and the tensile strength of the joints were characterized. The results showed that the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel consisted of double layers of Fe2Al5 (near stainless steel) and Fe4Al13 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a total thickness of 3.7 μm, when using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The brazing interface of the joints using Ag-based alloy as intermediate layer also consists of double IMC layers, but the first layer near stainless steel was FeAl2 and the total thickness of these two IMC layers decreased to 3.1 μm. The tensile strength of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer was promoted to 149 MPa, which was 63 MPa higher than that of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The fractures occurred in the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel.

  19. Microstructural Evolution of 11Al-3Mg-Zn Ternary Alloy-Coated Steels During Austenitization Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chao-Sung

    2017-08-01

    This study details the microstructural evolution of a commercial hot-dip 11Al-3Mg-Zn-coated steel during austenitization. After 5 minutes of austenitization at 1173 K (900 °C), the ternary alloy coating transformed to consist of a nearly pure Zn as the major layer, a Fe-Al alloy layer at the interface, and a thin oxide overlay. The Fe-Al alloy layer effectively acted as the inhibition layer to prevent Fe from diffusing and reacting with Zn, which in turn retained the molten Zn layer and the integrity of the surface oxide layer. Moreover, the potential difference between the 11Al-3Mg-Zn coating and the steel substrate remained similar after austenitization, signifying the resulting coating kept its sacrificial protection capability.

  20. Effect of chromium and manganese nitride alloying on the evolution of the fine structure in powder hot-forged steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamonova, A. A.; Baglyuk, G. A.; Kurovskii, V. Ya.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of alloying with chromium and manganese nitrides is studied on a fine crystal structure of powder iron produced by hot forging. The features of the fine structure and the phase composition are found to strongly depend on the kind of alloying nitrides. It has been shown that the introduction of both nitrides in the initial composition of powder mixture causes an increase in the lattice parameter of a matrix, its defectiveness, and the dislocation density, which results in an increase in the hardness of steel alloyed with nitrides. The defectiveness of the matrix crystal lattice, the dislocation density, and the hardness of hot-forged steels are slightly higher when manganese nitride is used as a nitrogen-bearing additive.

  1. Tribological Behavior of Babbitt Alloy Rubbing Against Si3N4 and Steel Under Dry Friction Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xianbing; Chen, Yinxia

    2016-03-01

    The tribological behavior of Babbitt alloy rubbing with Si3N4 ball and steel ball with various sliding speeds at dry friction condition was investigated. It was found that B88 alloy rubbing with Si3N4 ball and steel ball possesses a low sliding wear resistance at dry friction. The wear rate is above 10-4 mm3/Nm, and the friction coefficient is from 0.2 to 0.4. At low sliding speed of 0.05-0.1 m/s, the mainly wear mechanisms are microgroove and fatigue wear, while at high sliding speed of 0.5 m/s, the wear mechanisms depend on plastic deformation and delamination. The high wear rate indicates that it is needed to prevent Babbitt alloy from working at dry friction conditions, while the low friction coefficient suggests that it is not easy to the occurrence of cold weld.

  2. Surface Alloying of SUS 321 Chromium-Nickel Steel by an Electron-Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Teresov, A. D.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Ivanova, O. V.; Shugurov, V. V.; Moskvin, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms of forming nanostructured, nanophase layers are revealed and analyzed in austenitic steel subjected to surface alloying using an electron-plasma process. Nanostructured, nanophase layers up to 30 μm in thickness were formed by melting of the film/substrate system with an electron beam generated by a SOLO facility (Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS), Tomsk), which ensured crystallization and subsequent quenching at the cooling rates within the range 105-108 K/s. The surface was modified with structural stainless steel specimens (SUS 321 steel). The film/substrate system (film thickness 0.5 μm) was formed by a plasma-assisted vacuum-arc process by evaporating a cathode made from a sintered pseudoalloy of the following composition: Zr - 6 at.% Ti - 6 at.% Cu. The film deposition was performed in a QUINTA facility equipped with a PINK hot-cathode plasma source and DI-100 arc evaporators with accelerated cooling of the process cathode, which allowed reducing the size and fraction of the droplet phase in the deposited film. It is found that melting of the film/substrate system (Zr-Ti-Cu)/(SUS 321 steel) using a high-intensity pulsed electron beam followed by the high-rate crystallization is accompanied by the formation of α-iron cellular crystallization structure and precipitation of Cr2Zr, Cr3C2 and TiC particles on the cell boundaries, which as a whole allowed increasing microhardness by a factor of 1.3, Young's modulus - by a factor of 1.2, wear resistance - by a factor of 2.7, while achieving a three-fold reduction in the friction coefficient.

  3. Irradiation damage behavior of low alloy steel wrought and weld materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stofanak, R.J.; Poskie, T.J.; Li, Y.Y.; Wire, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the irradiation damage response of several different types of low alloy steel: vintage type ASTM A302 Grade B (A302B) plates and welds containing different Ni and Cu concentrations, 3.5% Ni steels similar to ASTM A508 Class 4, welds containing about 1% Ni (similar to type 105S), and 3.5% Ni steels with ``superclean`` composition. All materials were irradiated at several different irradiation damage levels ranging from 0.0003 to 0.06 dpa at 232C (450F). Complete Charpy V-notch impact energy transition temperature curves were generated for all materials before and after irradiation to determine transition temperature at 4IJ (30 ft-lb) or 47J (35 ft-lb) and the upper shelf energy. Irradiation damage behavior was measured by shift in Charpy 41J or 47J transition temperature ({Delta}TT4{sub 41J} or {Delta}TT{sub 47J}) and lowering of upper shelf Charpy energy at a given irradiation damage level. It was found that chemical composition greatly influenced irradiation damage behavior; highest irradiation damage (greatest {Delta}TT) was found in an A302B type weld containing 1.28% Ni and 0.20% Cu while the least damage was found in 3.5% Ni, 0.05% Cu, superclean wrought materials. Combination of Ni and Cu was found to affect irradiation damage behavior at higher irradiation damage levels in the A302B welds where the 1.28% Ni, 0.20% Cu weld showed more damage than a 0.60% Ni, 0.31% Cu weld. For the 3.5% Ni steels, fabrication influenced irradiation behavior in that a silicon (Si) killed material showed greater irradiation damage than a low silicon material. In general, the 3.5% Ni materials with low copper showed less irradiation damage than the A302B materials.

  4. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G.L.

    1997-02-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) can cause increases in fatigue crack growth rates of 40 to 100 times the rate in air for low alloy steels. The increased rates can lead to very large predicted crack growth. EAC is activated by a critical level of dissolved sulfides at the crack tip. Sulfide inclusions (MnS) in the steel produce corrosive sulfides in solution following exposure by a growing crack. In stagnant, low oxygen water conditions considered here, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism acting to change the sulfide concentration within the crack. The average crack tip velocity is below the level required to produce the critical crack tip sulfide ion concentration required for EAC. Crack extension analyses also consider the breakthrough of large, hypothetical embedded defects with the attendant large freshly exposed sulfide inventory. Combrade et al. noted that a large inventory of undissolved metallurgical sulfides on crack flanks could trigger EAC, but did not quantify the effects. Diffusion analysis is extended herein to cover breakthrough of embedded defects with large sulfide inventories. The mass transport via diffusion is limited by the sulfide solubility. As a result, deep cracks in high sulfur steels are predicted to retain undissolved sulfides for extended but finite periods of time t{sub diss} which increase with the crack length and the metallurgical sulfide content in the steel. The analysis shows that the duration of EAC is limited to t{sub diss} providing V{sub eac}, the crack tip velocity associated with EAC is less than V{sub In}, the crack tip velocity below which EAC will not occur in an initially sulfide free crack. This condition on V{sub eac} need only be met for a short time following crack cleanup to turn off EAC. The predicted crack extension due to limited duration of EAC is a small fraction of the initial embedded defect size and would not greatly change calculated crack depths.

  5. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high-strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth and of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion were initiated to develop information that is needed for a clearer determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism for hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel were selected for these studies. 18Ni(250) maraging steel, 316 stainless steel, and iron single crystal of (111) orientation were also included in the chemistry studies. Crack growth data on 18Ni(250) maraging steel from another program are included for comparison. No sustained-load crack growth was observed for the Inconel 718 alloy in gaseous hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen assisted crack growth in the 18Ni maraging steels were characterized by K-independent (Stage 2) extension over a wide range of hydrogen pressures (86 to 2000 torr or 12 kN/m2 to 266 kN/m2) and test temperatures (-60 C to +100 C). The higher strength 18Ni(250) maraging steel was more susceptible than the lower strength 200 grade. A transition temperature was observed, above which crack growth rates became diminishingly small.

  7. A comparative study of the in vitro corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of a superferritic stainless steel, a Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy, and an austenitic stainless steel in Hank's solution.

    PubMed

    Assis, S L; Rogero, S O; Antunes, R A; Padilha, A F; Costa, I

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro corrosion resistance of a superferritic stainless steel in naturally aerated Hank's solution at 37 degrees C has been determined to evaluate the steel for use as a biomaterial. The potentiodynamic polarization method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to determine the corrosion resistance. The polarization results showed very low current densities at the corrosion potential and electrochemical behavior typical of passive metals. At potentials above 0.75 V (SCE), and up to that of the oxygen evolution reaction, the superferritic steel exhibited transpassive behavior followed by secondary passivation. The superferritic stainless steel exhibited high pitting resistance in Hank's solution. This steel did not reveal pits even after polarization to 3000 mV (SCE). The EIS results indicated high impedance values at low frequencies, supporting the results obtained from the polarization measurements. The results obtained for the superferritic steel have been compared with those of the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy and an austenitic stainless steel, as Ti alloys are well known for their high corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and the austenitic stainless steel is widely used as an implant material. The cytotoxicity tests indicated that the superferritic steel, the austenitic steel, and the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy were not toxic. Based on corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity results, the superferritic stainless steel can be considered as a potential biomaterial.

  8. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  9. Study of corrosion behavior of high strength low alloy steel reinforcing bars in industrial and marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Hocking, M.G.; Jha, R.; Chatterjee, A.; Mukherjee, T.

    1996-11-01

    Mild steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete exposed to marine environment are prone to severe corrosion leading to serious damage to the structures. The various technologies developed and adopted to reduce the corrosion of steel reinforcement, have been discussed in this paper along with a new high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel reinforcing bar. The bare HSLA rebars have been tested extensively along with mild steel rebars for comparative study in saline and sulfurous electrolytes in the laboratory by Potentiodynamic tests as well as in natural marine and industrial environments. The HSLA and mild steel rebars embedded in concrete were also tested in saline water by alternate immersion test and by impressed anodic current methods. The bare HSLA rebars showed 2--3 and 1.5--1.9 times better corrosion resistance to mild steel rebars in laboratory and field exposure tests respectively. The HSLA rebars embedded in concrete and exposed to saline water with impressed anodic current of 200 {micro}A/sq. cm showed 2.5 times better corrosion resistance to mild steel rebars. The XRD analysis of the rust formed on the samples of field exposure tests conducted in marine and industrial environments, clearly showed the formation of compounds which reduce the corrosion rate of steel.

  10. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  11. Release of nickel ions from stainless steel alloys used in dental braces and their patch test reactivity in nickel-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christian Stab; Lisby, Steen; Baadsgaard, Ole; Byrialsen, Kirsten; Menné, Torkil

    2003-06-01

    Nickel ions leached in sufficient quantities from nickel-containing alloys may induce nickel sensitization or elicit allergic contact dermatitis. Nickel-containing stainless steel alloys are generally considered safe for nickel-sensitive individuals to use. The study summarized in this paper investigated 3 parameters. First, the release of nickel was estimated in artificial saliva and sweat from 4 different stainless steel alloys frequently used in dental braces. Second, in a pilot study, oral mucosa cells harvested from 3 dental patients before and after the attachment of dental braces were analysed for possible nickel content. Third, patch test reactivity of the 4 stainless steel alloys was tested on 31 nickel-sensitive subjects. All 4 stainless steel alloys released small amounts of nickel ions into artificial saliva (<0.13 micro g/cm2/week) and artificial sweat (<0.05 micro g/cm2/week), but no measurable amounts of nickel were found in any of the oral mucosa samples. None of the 31 nickel-sensitive subjects reacted to patch testing with the 4 stainless steel alloys, indicating that these stainless steel alloys would be safe to use in direct and prolonged contact with the skin.

  12. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2009-04-27

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  13. Morphology, Structure, and Chemistry of Nanoclusters in a Mechanically-Alloyed Nanostructured Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, Matthew C; Kovarik, L.; Miller, Michael K; Mills, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic steels have excellent elevated temperature strengths, creep resistances, and radiation tolerances due to the presence of a high density of Ti-Y-O-enriched nanoclusters. The compositions, morphologies, and structures of the smallest of these nanoclusters with maximum dimensions of {approx}2-4 nm were investigated in alloy 14YWT by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Nanoclusters are found to be coherent with truncated rhombic dodecahedron morphologies defined by the {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes in the Fe matrix. Particles have compositions rich in Ti, O, Y, and Cr that are inconsistent with known oxide structures. The smallest nanoclusters appear to lack an identifiable crystal structure. Both nano-diffraction and focal series imaging through the sample thickness suggest that they are amorphous.

  14. Steel Alloy Hot Roll Simulations and Through-Thickness Variation Using Dislocation Density-Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen Van Rensburg, G. J.; Kok, S.; Wilke, D. N.

    2017-07-01

    Different roll pass reduction schedules have different effects on the through-thickness properties of hot-rolled metal slabs. In order to assess or improve a reduction schedule using the finite element method, a material model is required that captures the relevant deformation mechanisms and physics. The model should also report relevant field quantities to assess variations in material state through the thickness of a simulated rolled metal slab. In this paper, a dislocation density-based material model with recrystallization is presented and calibrated on the material response of a high-strength low-alloy steel. The model has the ability to replicate and predict material response to a fair degree thanks to the physically motivated mechanisms it is built on. An example study is also presented to illustrate the possible effect different reduction schedules could have on the through-thickness material state and the ability to assess these effects based on finite element simulations.

  15. Oxidation Characteristics of Fe–18Cr–18Mn-Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James

    2010-10-01

    Air oxidation studies of Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steels were conducted at 525°C, 625°C, and 725°C. Alloys were evaluated with respect to changes in oxidation properties as a result of interstitial additions of nitrogen and carbon and of minor solute additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel. Interstitial concentrations possibly had a small, positive effect on oxidation resistance. Minor solute additions significantly improved oxidation resistance but could also reduce interstitial solubility resulting in formation of chromium carbides. Loss of solute chromium resulted in a slight reduction in oxidation protection. Oxidation lasting over 500 hours produced a manganese rich, duplex oxide structure: an outer sesquioxide and an inner spinel oxide.

  16. Study of Different Vacuum Heat Treatments on the Strength of a Low Alloyed Sintered Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidulský, Róbert; Grande, Marco Actis; Bidulská, Jana; Kvačkaj, Tibor

    2011-06-01

    The present paper deals with the evaluation of different vacuum heat treatments on the microstructure of a low alloyed sintered Fe-[1.5 Cr-0.2 Mo]-0.6 C steel. Different gas pressures were applied on the material during cooling from the sintering temperature. The average cooling rates were calculated in the range of 1453 K to 673 K and were varying from 0.1 to 6 K/s, according to the gas pressure applied (0 to 600 kPa). Mechanical properties have been evaluated in terms of toughness, plasticity and hardness. The results show that increasing the nitrogen pressure resulted in an increased amount of bainite/martensite microstructure with high level of properties achieved.

  17. Steel Alloy Hot Roll Simulations and Through-Thickness Variation Using Dislocation Density-Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen Van Rensburg, G. J.; Kok, S.; Wilke, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Different roll pass reduction schedules have different effects on the through-thickness properties of hot-rolled metal slabs. In order to assess or improve a reduction schedule using the finite element method, a material model is required that captures the relevant deformation mechanisms and physics. The model should also report relevant field quantities to assess variations in material state through the thickness of a simulated rolled metal slab. In this paper, a dislocation density-based material model with recrystallization is presented and calibrated on the material response of a high-strength low-alloy steel. The model has the ability to replicate and predict material response to a fair degree thanks to the physically motivated mechanisms it is built on. An example study is also presented to illustrate the possible effect different reduction schedules could have on the through-thickness material state and the ability to assess these effects based on finite element simulations.

  18. Special Features of Fracture of a Solid-State Titanium Alloy - Nickel - Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazgaliev, R. G.; Mukhametrakhimov, M. Kh.; Imaev, M. F.; Shayakhmetov, R. U.; Mulyukov, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure, nanohardness, and special features of fracture of three-phase titanium alloy and stainless steel joint through a nanostructural nickel foil are investigated. Uniformly distributed microcracks are observed in Ti2Ni and TiN3 layers joined at temperatures above T = 700°C, whereas no microcracks are observed in the TiNi layer. This suggests that the reason for microcracking is an anomalously large change in the linear expansion coefficient of the TiNi layer during austenitic-martensitic transformation. Specimens subjected to mechanical tests at T = 20°C are fractured along different layers of the material, namely, in the central part of the specimen they are fractured along the Ti2Тi/TiNi interface, whereas at the edge they are fractured along the TiNi/TiNi3 interface.

  19. Optimization of welded stainless steel and nickel alloy structures for elevated temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Tillack, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The fabrication of materials such as the austenitic stainless steels and the nickel-base alloys, all of which share a face-centered-cubic structure, presents problems that the ferritic materials do not have. A large difference is the tendency for the austenitic materials to suffer from hot cracking, or solidification cracking, during welding. This characteristic can be dealt with d proper welding procedures are used, such as control of weld heat input and travel speed to obtain a properly contoured weld pool. Residual stresses, caused by fabrication and welding, can be a problem in certain service conditions, such as intermediate temperature exposure where there is little stress relief and the residual stresses are higher than the rupture strength of the material. In this case, it is important to give a stress relief heat treatment prior to putting the component into service.

  20. Statistical analysis of fatigue strain-life data for carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Keisler, J.; Chopra, O.K.

    1995-03-01

    The existing fatigue strain vs life (S-N) data, foreign and domestic, for carbon and low-alloy steels used in the construction of nuclear power plant components have been compiled and categorized according to material, loading, and environmental conditions. A statistical model has been developed for estimating the effects of the various test conditions on fatigue life. The results of a rigorous statistical analysis have been used to estimate the probability of initiating a fatigue crack. Data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the effects of size, geometry, and surface finish of a component on its fatigue life. The fatigue S-N curves for components have been determined by applying design margins for size, geometry, and surface finish to crack initiation curves estimated from the model.

  1. Investigation of the efficiency process during CO2 laser welding of low-alloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Peter; Apostolova, Tzveta

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports results from the theoretical and experimental study of the energy transfer during CO2 laser beam welding of 10 mm low-alloyed steels square butt joints. The laser beam power and the welding speed are varied systematically from 9 kW to 32 kW and from 1 m/min to 5 m/min, respectively. The observed weld depth penetration is up to 10 mm and the width of weld seams is between 0.8 and 1.25 mm. The joining efficiency during the laser welding was in the range of 11.8 to 32 mm2/kJ. Melting efficiency is determined from the measured welding seams cross section for a specified laser power and travel speed. Theoretically, predicted values of melting efficiency are calculated using Rosenthal's and Rycalin moving heat sources equation in 2D (line source).

  2. Alloying element losses in pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding of stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandaghi, M.; Parvin, P.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2008-12-01

    Experimental studies of pulsed laser welding of stainless steel 316 in keyhole mode were done to examine a vaporization model based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. Undesirable loss of volatile elements affects the weld metal composition and properties. The profile of the keyhole was simulated as a function of time from a 'hydrodynamic' physical model. The power density and pulse duration were the main investigated variables. The model predicts that loss of alloying elements increases at higher peak powers and longer pulse durations. Accordingly, the concentrations of iron, chromium, nickel and manganese were determined in the weld pool by means of the proton-induced x-ray emission and energy dispersive x-ray/wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis. It was shown that the composition alteration, predicted by the model due to varying laser parameters, accords well with the corresponding experimental data.

  3. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Suchkov, A. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti bal-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe bal-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 °C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  4. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2007-04-18

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  5. Iodine sorption/desorption from low-alloy steel and graphite. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P.; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Briggs, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Tests have been performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the sorptive behavior of iodine on two prominent HTGR primary circuit materials - type H-451 graphite, which is the selected core graphite, and a low-alloy steel (T-22), a type which is employed in the lower temperature regions of the primary system. The main emphasis of the work is the determination of equilibrium sorptive capacities for very low iodine partial pressures. Toward this goal, the test procedures allow on-line determination of sorptive capacity down to iodine partial pressures of approx. 10/sup -11/ bar in helium at a total pressure of 1 atm. The apparatus employed is of the helium flow-through type. Detectors monitor the degree of sorption on specimens and traps, which, together with the helium flowrate and source vapor pressure, yield a continuous determination of iodine mass transport.

  6. Tribological and mechanical properties of deep cryogenically treated medium carbon micro alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Esad; Ulutan, Mustafa

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the effects of deep cryogenic treatment (sub-zero treatments at -196 °C) on the microstructural, mechanical, and tribological behaviours of commercial Vanadium-Titanium micro-alloyed 38MnVS6+Ti steel was investigated. The samples were quenched (conventionally heat treated), deep cryogenically treated and then tempered at 250 °C for 1 h. Deep cryogenic treatments were applied for three different soaking times (namely 8 h, 12 h, and 24 h). The effects of deep cryogenic treatment on the specimens were evaluated in terms of impact toughness, hardness, wear resistance, and microstructure. The results indicated that the application of longer deep cryogenic treatment times significantly improved wear resistance, and improved the hardness slightly (1 to 3 HRC). However, deep cryogenic treatment also reduced the impact toughness compared to that of the conventionally heat treated sample, due to the precipitation of carbides and increasing hardness.

  7. Investigation of laser metal deposited Alloy 718 onto an EN 1.4401 stainless steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerstark, Andreas; Andersson, Joel; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on how process parameters affect the deposition of Alloy 718 onto an EN 1.4401 stainless steel substrate in terms of secondary phase formation, dilution and hardness. A columnar solidification structure with elongated grains growing in the direction normal to the substrate was observed for all parameters. In the interdendritic regions, phases with a high content of Niobium were identified. Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy measurements revealed these phases to most likely be Laves phase and Nb-carbides. Temperature measurements indicated no significant aging in the deposits. Considerable enrichment of iron was found in the initially deposited layers due to dilution from the substrate. The increased content of iron seemed to aid in forming constituents rich in niobium which, in turn, influenced the hardness. The highest mean hardness was noted in the sample with the lowest area fraction of Nb-rich constituents.

  8. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  9. The fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized cold work tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman

    2003-06-15

    In this study, the fracture toughness of boride layers of two borided cold work tool steels have been investigated. Boriding was carried out in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, ferro-silicon and aluminum. Boriding was performed at 850 and 950 deg. C for 2 to 7 h. The presence of boride phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and fracture toughness of borides were measured via Vickers indenter. Increasing of boriding time and temperature leads to reduction of fracture toughness of borides. Metallographic examination showed that boride layer formed on cold work tool steels was compact and smooth.

  10. High Speed Turning of H-13 Tool Steel Using Ceramics and PCBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer, Usama

    2012-09-01

    H-13 is the toughest tool steel used in machined die casting and forging dies. Due to its extreme hardness and poor thermal conductivity high speed cutting results in high temperature and stresses. This gives rise to surface damage of the workpiece and accelerated tool wear. This study evaluates the performance of different tools including ceramics and PCBN using practical finite element simulations and high speed orthogonal cutting tests. The machinability of H-13 was evaluated by tool wear, surface roughness, and cutting force measurements. From the 2D finite element model for orthogonal cutting, stresses and temperature distributions were predicted and compared for the different tool materials.

  11. Comparison of spring characteristics of titanium-molybdenum alloy and stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Anahita; Asatourian, Armen

    2017-01-01

    Background Titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) and stainless steel (SS) wires are commonly used in orthodontics as arch-wires for tooth movement. However, plastic deformation phenomenon in these arch-wires seems to be a major concern among orthodontists. This study aimed to compare the mechanical properties of TMA and SS wires with different dimensions. Material and Methods Seventy-two wire samples (36 TMA and 36 SS) of three different sizes (19×25, 17×25 and 16×22) were analyzed in vitro, with 12 samples in each group. Various mechanical properties of the wires, including spring-back, bending moment and stiffness were determined using a universal testing machine. Student’s t-test showed statistically significant differences in the mean values of all the groups. In addition, metallographic comparison of SS and TMA wires was conducted under an optical microscope. Results The degree of stiffness of 16×22-sized SS and TMA springs was found to be 12±2 and 5±0.4, respectively, while the bending moment was estimated to be 1927±352 (gm-mm) and 932±16 (gm-mm), respectively; the spring-back index was determined to be 0.61±0.2 and 0.4±.09, respectively (p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in spring-back index in larger dimensions of the wires. Conclusions Systematic analysis indicated that springs made of TMA were superior compared to those made of SS. Although both from economic and functionality viewpoints the use of TMA is suggested, further clinical investigations are recommended. Key words:Bending moment, optical microscope, spring-back, stainless steel, stiffness, titanium‒molybdenum alloy. PMID:28149469

  12. The Tribological Difference between Biomedical Steels and CoCrMo-Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Alfons; Weiß, Sabine; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery different self-mating metal couples are used for sliding wear applications. Despite the fact that in mechanical engineering self-mating austenitic alloys often lead to adhesion and seizure in biomedical engineering the different grades of Co-base alloys show good clinical results e.g. as hip joints. The reason stems from the fact that they generate a so-called tribomaterial during articulation, which consists of a mixture of nanometer small metallic grains and organic substances from the interfacial medium, which act as boundary lubricant. Even though stainless steels also generate such a tribomaterial they were ruled out from the beginning already in the 1950 as “inappropriate”. On the basis of materials with a clinical track record this contribution shows that the cyclic creep characteristics within the shear zone underneath the tribomaterial are another important criterion for a sufficient wear behavior. By means of sliding wear and torsional fatigue tests followed by electron microscopy it is shown, that austenitic materials generate wear particles of either nano- or of microsize. The latter are produced by crack initiation and propagation within the shear fatigue zone which is related to the formation of subsurface dislocation cells and, therefore, by the fact that a Ni-containing CrNiMo solid solution allows for wavy-slip. In contrast to this a Ni-free CrMnMo solid solution with further additions of C and N only shows planar slip. This leads to the formation of nanosize wear particles and distinctly improves the wear behavior. Still the latter does not fully achieve that of CoCrMo, which also shows solely planar-slip behavior. This explains why for metallurgical reasons the Ni-containing 316L-type of steels had to fail in such boundary lubricated sliding wear tribosystems. PMID:22498283

  13. Influence of annealing conditions on microstructure and phase occurrence in high-alloy CrMnN steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajova, Jana; Domankova, Maria; Cicka, Roman; Eglsaeer, Sabine; Janovec, Jozef

    2010-10-15

    The influence of annealing at 750, 800, 850, 900 and 950 deg. C for 4 h on the microstructure and the phase occurrence in two high-alloy CrMnN austenitic stainless steels was investigated using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and thermodynamic calculations. Austenite, {sigma}, and Cr{sub 2}N were identified in both steels experimentally. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with the thermodynamic predictions. In one of the steels, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} as a non-equilibrium probably residual phase was found. Cr{sub 2}N appeared in the steels either in the form of discrete particles or as a part of cells consisting of alternate lamellae of Cr{sub 2}N and austenite.

  14. Influence of pre-heating on the surface modification of powder-metallurgy processed cold-work tool steel during laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šturm, Roman; Štefanikova, Maria; Steiner Petrovič, Darja

    2015-01-01

    In this study we determine the optimal parameters for surface modification using the laser surface melting of powder-metallurgy processed, vanadium-rich, cold-work tool steel. A combination of steel pre-heating, laser surface melting and a subsequent heat treatment creates a hardened and morphologically modified surface of the selected high-alloy tool steel. The pre-heating of the steel prior to the laser surface melting ensures a crack- and pore-free modified surface. Using a pre-heating temperature of 350 °C, the extremely fine microstructure, which typically evolves during the laser-melting, became slightly coarser and the volume fraction of retained austenite was reduced. In the laser-melted layer the highest values of microhardness were achieved in the specimens where a subsequent heat treatment at 550 °C was applied. The performed thermodynamic calculations were able to provide a very valuable assessment of the liquidus temperature and, especially, a prediction of the chemical composition as well as the precipitation and dissolution sequence for the carbides.

  15. Effects of processing parameters on the friction stir spot joining of Al5083-O aluminum alloy to DP590 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Back-Sub; Bang, Hee-Seon; Jeong, Su-Ok; Choi, Woo-Seong; Kwon, Yong-Hyuk; Bang, Han-Sur

    2017-05-01

    Two dissimilar materials, aluminum alloy Al5083-O and advanced high strength steel DP590, were successfully joined by using friction stir spot joining (FSSJ). Satisfactory joint strengths were obtained at a rotational speed of 300 rpm and a plunge depth of 0.7 mm. Resulting joints were welded without a non-welded zone. This may be attributed to the enhanced smooth material flow owing to sufficient stirring effect and tool down force between the upper Al5083-O side and the lower DP590 side. The maximum tensile shear strength was 6.5 kN, which was higher than the joint strength required by the conventional method of resistance spot welding. The main fracture mode was plug fracture in the tensile shear test of joints. An intermetallic compound (IMC) layer with <6 μm thickness was formed at the joint interface, which meets the allowance value of <10 μm for the dissimilar material Al-Fe joints. Thus, the use of FSSJ to weld the dissimilar materials Al5083-O and DP590 resulted in mechanically and metallurgically sound joints.

  16. Thermal fatigue resistance of hot work die steel repaired by partial laser surface remelting and alloying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Dalong; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Zhenan; Zhang, Haifeng; Ren, Luquan; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei

    2014-03-01

    In this study, AISI H13 steel was processed using laser surface remelting and alloying with Co-based and iron-based powders for thermal fatigue resistance enhancement. The precracks were produced on the samples before laser treatment. The microstructures of laser treated zones were examined by scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in molten/alloying zones. Microhardness was measured and the thermal fatigue resistance was investigated with self-controlled thermal fatigue test method. The results indicate that laser surface remelting and alloying can repair a large proportion of thermal cracks. Meanwhile, the strengthening network obtains ultrafine microstructure and super thermal fatigue resistance, which restrains the propagation of thermal cracks. Compared with samples treated with laser surface remelting and laser surface alloying with iron-base powder, samples treated with Co-based powder produce lower cracking susceptibility and higher thermal fatigue resistance.

  17. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh; Shassere, Benjamin; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  18. Structure and Properties of High-Temperature Multilayer Hybrid Material Based on Vanadium Alloy and Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaykina, Tatyana A.; Nikulin, Sergey A.; Rozhnov, Andrey B.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.

    2017-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the development of new structural composite material having the unique complex of properties for operating in ultrahard conditions that combine high temperatures, radiation, and aggressive environments. A new three-layer composite tube material based on vanadium alloy (V-4Ti-4Cr) protected by stainless steel (Fe-0.2C-13Cr) has been obtained by co-extrusion. Mechanism and kinetics of formation as well as structure, composition, and mechanical properties of "transition" area between vanadium alloy and stainless steel have been studied. The transition area (13- to 22-µm thick) of the diffusion interaction between vanadium alloy and steel was formed after co-extrusion. The microstructure in the transition area was rather complicated comprising different grain sizes in components, but having no defects or brittle phases. Tensile strength of the composite was an average 493 ± 22 MPa, and the elongation was 26 ± 3 pct. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) increased the thickness of transition area up to 1.2 times, homogenized microstructure, and slightly changed mechanical properties. Annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C) further increased the thickness of transition area and also lead to intensive grain growth in steel and sometimes to separation between composite components during tensile tests. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) is proposed as appropriate heat treatment after co-extrusion of composite providing balance between diffusion interaction thickness and microstructure and monolithic-like behavior of composite during tensile tests.

  19. Structure and Properties of High-Temperature Multilayer Hybrid Material Based on Vanadium Alloy and Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaykina, Tatyana A.; Nikulin, Sergey A.; Rozhnov, Andrey B.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.

    2017-03-01

    The present work is devoted to the development of new structural composite material having the unique complex of properties for operating in ultrahard conditions that combine high temperatures, radiation, and aggressive environments. A new three-layer composite tube material based on vanadium alloy (V-4Ti-4Cr) protected by stainless steel (Fe-0.2C-13Cr) has been obtained by co-extrusion. Mechanism and kinetics of formation as well as structure, composition, and mechanical properties of "transition" area between vanadium alloy and stainless steel have been studied. The transition area (13- to 22- µm thick) of the diffusion interaction between vanadium alloy and steel was formed after co-extrusion. The microstructure in the transition area was rather complicated comprising different grain sizes in components, but having no defects or brittle phases. Tensile strength of the composite was an average 493 ± 22 MPa, and the elongation was 26 ± 3 pct. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) increased the thickness of transition area up to 1.2 times, homogenized microstructure, and slightly changed mechanical properties. Annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C) further increased the thickness of transition area and also lead to intensive grain growth in steel and sometimes to separation between composite components during tensile tests. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) is proposed as appropriate heat treatment after co-extrusion of composite providing balance between diffusion interaction thickness and microstructure and monolithic-like behavior of composite during tensile tests.

  20. Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, D. A.; McCoy, T.; Thadhani, N. N.; Cochran, J.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6 mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with high-speed imaging. For purpose of comparison, the response of 25% dense hollow cylinders of same density as the 9-cell LCA was also studied. Analysis of observed states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation. In comparison, the simple hollow cylinder undergoes significant radial lipping, eventually producing larger sized, external fragments. DTRA Grant No. HDTRA1-07-1-0018 and NDSEG Fellowship Program.