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Sample records for almacenadas al ambiente

  1. Dynamical stability of the cubic metallic phase of AlH3 at ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duck Young; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2009-03-01

    We have characterized the high-pressure cubic phase of AlH3 using density functional theory to determine mechanical as well as electronic properties and lattice dynamics from the response function method [1]. Metallization in AlH3 under pressure has been studied, which is of great interest not only from a fundamental physics point of view for the study of phenomena related to metallic hydrogen, but also, because metallic AlH3 possesses weaker Al-H bonds than other insulating phases [2]. Our phonon calculations show the softening of a particular mode with decreasing pressure, indicating the onset of a dynamical instability that continues to persist at ambient conditions. We find from analyzing the atomic and electronic interactions using theoretical calculations that finite-temperature effects lead to the desired stabilization of metallic AlH3 at ambient conditions.[0pt] [1] PRB 78, 100102(R) (2008). [0pt] [2] APL 92, 201903 (2008).

  2. Interdiffusion of Al-Ni system enhanced by ultrasonic vibration at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyu; Ji, Hongjun; Wang, Chunqing; Bang, Han Sur; Bang, Hee Seon

    2006-12-01

    At ambient temperature, Al-1%Si wire of 25 microm diameter was bonded successfully onto the Au/Ni/Cu pad by ultrasonic wedge bonding technology. Physical process of the bond formation and the interface joining essence were investigated. It is found that the wire was softened by ultrasonic vibration, at the same time, pressure was loaded on the wire and plastic flow was generated in the bonding wire, which promoted the diffusion for Ni into Al. Ultrasonic vibration enhanced the interdiffusion that resulted from the inner defects such as dislocations, vacancies, voids and so on, which ascribed to short circuit diffusion.

  3. Low cycle fatigue behavior of polycrystalline Ni3Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Graham; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1994-11-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance of polycrystalline Ni3Al has been evaluated at ambient, intermediate (300 °C), and elevated (600 °C) temperatures using strain rates of 10-2/s and 10-4/s. Testing was conducted on a binary and a Cr-containing alloy of similar stoichiometry and B content (hypostoichiometric, 200 wppm B). Test results were combined with electron microscope investigations in order to evaluate microstructural changes during LCF. At ambient and intermediate temperatures, the cyclic constitutive response of both alloys was similar, and the LCF behavior was virtually rate independent. Under these conditions, the alloys rapidly hardened and then gradually softened for the remainder of the life. Initial hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris within the deformed microstructure, whereas softening was related to localized disordering. For these experimental conditions, crack initiation resulted within persistent slip bands (PSBs). At the elevated temperature, diffusion-assisted deformation resulted in a rate-dependent constitutive response and crack-initiation characteristics. At the high strain rate (10-2/s), continuous cyclic hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris. At the low strain rate (10-4/s), the diffusion of dislocation debris to grain boundaries resulted in cyclic softening. The elevated temperature LCF resistance was determined by the effect of the constitutive response on the driving force for environmental embrittlement. Chromium additions were observed to enhance LCF performance only under conditions where crack initiation was environmentally driven.

  4. Effects of Annealing Ambient on the Characteristics of LaAlO3 Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Liu, Hong-xia; Wang, Xing; Fei, Chen-xi; Feng, Xing-yao; Wang, Yong-te

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effects of different annealing ambients on the physical and electrical properties of LaAlO3 films grown by atomic layer deposition. Post-grown rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out at 600 °C for 1 min in vacuum, N2, and O2, respectively. It was found that the chemical bonding states at the interfacial layers (ILs) between LaAlO3 films and Si substrate were affected by the different annealing ambients. The formation of IL was enhanced during the RTA process, resulting in the decrease of accumulation capacitance, especially in O2 ambient. Furthermore, based on the capacitance-voltage characteristics of LaAlO3/Si MIS capacitors, positive V FB shifting tendency could be observed, indicating the decrease of positive oxide charges. Meanwhile, both trapped charge density and interface trap density showed decreased trends after annealing treatments. In addition, RTA process in various gaseous ambients can reduce the gate leakage current due to the enhancement of valence band offset and the reduction of defects in the LaAlO3/Si structure in varying degrees.

  5. Effects of Annealing Ambient on the Characteristics of LaAlO3 Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Liu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Xing; Fei, Chen-Xi; Feng, Xing-Yao; Wang, Yong-Te

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effects of different annealing ambients on the physical and electrical properties of LaAlO3 films grown by atomic layer deposition. Post-grown rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out at 600 °C for 1 min in vacuum, N2, and O2, respectively. It was found that the chemical bonding states at the interfacial layers (ILs) between LaAlO3 films and Si substrate were affected by the different annealing ambients. The formation of IL was enhanced during the RTA process, resulting in the decrease of accumulation capacitance, especially in O2 ambient. Furthermore, based on the capacitance-voltage characteristics of LaAlO3/Si MIS capacitors, positive V FB shifting tendency could be observed, indicating the decrease of positive oxide charges. Meanwhile, both trapped charge density and interface trap density showed decreased trends after annealing treatments. In addition, RTA process in various gaseous ambients can reduce the gate leakage current due to the enhancement of valence band offset and the reduction of defects in the LaAlO3/Si structure in varying degrees.

  6. Type of wear for the pair Ti6Al4V/PCTFE in ambient air and in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozet, J.-L.

    1993-04-01

    The pair Ti6Al4V/polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) on a pin-on-disk tribometer in ambient air and liquid nitrogen with the contact pressure and sliding speed ranging from 3 to 9 MPa and 0.03 to 0.05 m/s, respectively, is evaluated within the framework of a high pressure valves for cryogenic rocket engines project. Results show that an abrasion wear process, which is closely connected with a tribochemical wear process producing fluorides and an abrasive form of carbon, exists when PCTFE is continuously rubbed against Ti6Al4V in ambient air, liquid nitrogen, and gaseous argon. Degradations detected on the Ti6Al4V surface are found to be unacceptable in most cases, but in the real cryotechnic valves this type of wear was not observed. The latter is attributed to the great dwell time between actuations and the low speed of the reciprocating movements which considerably limit the heating.

  7. Observation of Etch-Pits and LAGB Configurations During Ambient Creep of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Singh, A. K.; Raman, S. Ganesh Sundara; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    The present work describes the microstructural features of alloy Ti-6Al-4V during constant stress creep at ambient temperature. Samples tested at 800 and 900 MPa stress levels exhibit the presence of etch-pits and/or voids. The ambient creep strain increases with an increase in applied stress due to higher strain rate sensitivity at higher stresses. A high density of low-angle grain boundaries is noticed in and around etch-pits in the creep-tested specimens due to occurrence of slip. The inverse pole figure obtained by EBSD indicates prismatic texture as the main deformation component in the creep-tested specimens.

  8. Reduced bound exciton and surface exciton emissions in Al-doped ZnO nanorods exposed to ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; He, H. P.; Jin, Y. Z.; Zhao, B. H.; Ye, Z. Z.; Tang, H. P.

    2008-11-01

    Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy is employed to investigate the effects of exposure to ambient air on the optical property of Al-doped ZnO nanorods. Low temperature PL of the as-grown nanorods shows dominant D0X (excitons bound to neutral donors) emission at 3.363 eV and surface state-related emission at 3.310 eV. After exposure to ambient air, both of them vanish and the first LO phonon replica of free exciton is observed instead. It is proposed that surface adsorption and indiffusion of oxygen in ambient air result in surface modification and destruction of D0X complex.

  9. Thermal stability of multilayer Ti2AlN-based ohmic contacts to n-GaN in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiewicz, Michał A.; Myśliwiec, Marcin; Gołaszewska, Krystyna; Jakieła, Rafał; Dynowska, Elżbieta; Kamińska, Eliana; Piotrowska, Anna

    2014-04-01

    A multilayer Ti/Al/TiN/Ti/Al/TiN/Ti/Al/TiN metallization scheme is applied as an ohmic contact to n-GaN (n = 1017 cm-3). After formation of the contact through RTP at 600 °C for 6 min in Ar flow a Ti2AlN layer is created at the interface to n-GaN and Ti/Al layers form AlTi. The specific contact resistance of the as-formed contact is 7.4 × 10-4 Ω cm2. The contact remains ohmic and morphologically unaltered for annealing at 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C in ambient air for 100 h each and its resistivity rises to around 1.1 × 10-3 Ω cm2. This stability on one hand can be attributed to Ti2AlN MAX phase presence at the interface which inhibits excessive decomposition of GaN and thus confines the reaction between n-GaN and the metallization, and on the other to the presence of several TiN films in the metallization scheme, which are known to be diffusion barriers.

  10. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  11. Dynamical stability of the cubic metallic phase of AlH3 at ambient pressure: Density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. Y.; Scheicher, R. H.; Ahuja, R.

    2008-09-01

    We have characterized the high-pressure cubic phase of AlH3 from ab initio using density functional theory to determine mechanical as well as electronic properties and lattice dynamics (phonon-dispersion relations) from the response function method. Our zero-temperature phonon calculations show the softening of a particular mode with decreasing pressure, indicating the onset of a dynamic instability that continues to persist at ambient conditions. This instability can, however, be removed when finite electronic temperature effects are considered in the calculations. We furthermore identify a particular momentum transfer in the phonon-dispersion relation, matching a corresponding momentum transfer in the electronic band structure.

  12. The ambient hydration of the aluminophosphate JDF-2 to AlPO-53(A): insights from NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Daniel M; Walton, Richard I; Wimperis, Stephen; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2017-03-01

    The aluminophosphate (AlPO) JDF-2 is prepared hydrothermally with methylammonium hydroxide (MAH(+)·HO(-), MAH(+) = CH3NH3(+)), giving rise to a microporous AEN-type framework with occluded MAH(+) cations and extra-framework (Al-bound) HO(-) anions. Despite the presence of these species within its pores, JDF-2 can hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture to give AlPO-53(A), an isostructural material whose crystal structure contains one molecule of H2O per formula unit. This hydration can be reversed by mild heating (such as the frictional heating from magic angle spinning). Previous work has shown good agreement between the NMR parameters obtained experimentally and those calculated from the (optimized) crystal structure of JDF-2. However, several discrepancies are apparent between the experimental NMR parameters for AlPO-53(A) and those calculated from the (optimized) crystal structure (e.g. four (13)C resonances are observed, rather than the expected two). The unexpected resonances appear and disappear reversibly with the respective addition and removal of H2O, so clearly arise from AlPO-53(A). We investigate the ambient hydration of JDF-2 using quantitative (31)P MAS NMR to follow the transformation over the course of ∼3 months. The structures of JDF-2 and AlPO-53(A) are also investigated using a combination of multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy to characterize the samples, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations to evaluate a range of possible structural models in terms of calculated NMR parameters and energetics. The published structure of JDF-2 is shown to be a good representation of the dehydrated material, but modification of the published structure of AlPO-53(A) is required to provide calculated NMR parameters that are in better agreement with experiment. This modification includes reorientation of all the MAH(+) cations and partial occupancy of the H2O sites.

  13. Comparative Study of the Oxidation of NiAl(100) by Molecular Oxygen and Water Vapor Using Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Qin, Hailang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-11-08

    The oxidation behavior of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor under a near-ambient pressure of 0.2 Torr is monitored using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O2 exposure leads to the selective oxidation of Al at temperatures ranging from 40 to 500 °C. By contrast, H2O exposure results in the selective oxidation of Al at 40 and 200 °C, and increasing the oxidation temperature above 300 °C leads to simultaneous formation of both Al and Ni oxides. These results demonstrate that the O2 oxidation forms a nearly stoichiometric Al2O3 structure that provides improved protection to the metallic substrate by barring the outward diffusion of metals. By contrast, the H2O oxidation results in the formation of a defective oxide layer that allows outward diffusion of Ni at elevated temperatures for simultaneous NiO formation.

  14. Ambient and elevated temperature fracture and cyclic-fatigue properties in a series of Al-containing silicon carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2004-01-01

    A series of in situ toughened, Al, B and C containing, silicon carbide ceramics (ABC-SiC) has been examined with Al contents varying from 3 to 7 wt%. With increasing Al additions, the grain morphology in the as-processed microstructures varied from elongated to bimodal to equiaxed, with a change in the nature of the grain-boundary film from amorphous to partially crystalline to fully crystalline. Fracture toughness and cyclic fatigue tests on these microstructures revealed that although the 7 wt.% Al containing material (7ABC) was extremely brittle, the 3 and particularly 5 wt.% Al materials (3ABC and 5ABC, respectively) displayed excellent crack-growth resistance at both ambient (25°C) and elevated (1300 C) temperatures. Indeed, no evidence of creep damage, in the form of grain-boundary cavitation, was seen at temperatures at 1300°C or below. The enhanced toughness of the higher Al-containing materials was associated with extensive crack bridging from both interlocking grains (in 3ABC) and uncracked ligaments (in 5ABC); in contrast, the 7ABC SiC showed no such bridging, concomitant with a marked reduction in the volume fraction of elongated grains. Mechanistically, cyclic fatigue-crack growth in 3ABC and 5ABC SiC involved the progressive degradation of such bridging ligaments in the crack wake, with the difference in the degree of elastic vs. frictional bridging affecting the slope, i.e., Paris law exponent, of the crack-growth curve. In addition an investigation of fracture resistance in non-transforming ceramics toughened by grain bridging mechanism is presented using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Linear superposition theorems are used for the superposition of crack opening displacements, as well as stress intensity factors, resulting from the external tractions and the internal compressive bridging stresses. Specifically weight functions are used to relate the CODs, stress intensity factors, and tractions and the bridging stress. Expressions are

  15. Stress and Strain Distributions during Machining of Ti-6Al-4V at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Fahim

    Dry and liquid nitrogen pre-cooled Ti-6Al-4V samples were machined at a cutting speed of 43.2 m/min and at low (0.1 mm/rev) to high (0.4 mm/rev) feed rates for understanding the effects of temperature and strain rate on chip microstructures. During cryogenic machining, it was observed that between feed rates of 0.10 and 0.30 mm/rev, a 25% pressure reduction on tool occurred. Smaller number of chips and low tool/chip contact time and temperature were observed (compared to dry machining under ambient conditions). An in-situ set-up that consisted of a microscope and a lathe was constructed and helped to propose a novel serrated chip formation mechanism when microstructures (strain localization) and surface roughness were considered. Dimpled fracture surfaces observed in high-speed-machined chips were formed due to stable crack propagation that was also recorded during in-situ machining. An instability criterion was developed that showed easier strain localization within the 0.10-0.30mm/rev feed rate range.

  16. Indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks during anneal at different ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, Igor; Winter, Roy; Ritter, Dan; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2014-06-16

    Indium out-diffusion during anneal enhances leakage currents in metal/dielectric/InGaAs gate stacks. In this work, we study the influence of ambient conditions during anneal on indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs structures, prior to the gate metal deposition. Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry, we observed much lower indium concentrations in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer following vacuum and O{sub 2} anneals compared to forming gas or nitrogen anneals. The electrical characteristics of the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack following these pre-metallization anneals as well as after subsequent post metallization anneals are presented. Possible explanations for the role of the annealing ambient conditions on indium out-diffusion are presented.

  17. Palladium nanoparticles dispersed on the hollow aluminosilicate microsphere@hierarchical γ-AlOOH as an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Meng; Cui, Xueliang; Dong, Chunxu; Dong, Zhengping

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel catalyst has been prepared through supporting Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on the surface of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) based hollow aluminosilicate microspheres (HAM@γ-AlOOH). The prepared Pd/HAM@γ-AlOOH catalyst has high catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to their corresponding amino derivatives with high yields at ambient conditions. The high catalytic efficiency is attributed to the large pore size of the flower-like hierarchical flakes structure of HAM@γ-AlOOH, that gives Pd NPs on the support surface easy accessibility. Moreover, the Pd/HAM@γ-AlOOH catalyst can also be easily recycled at least five times without obvious decrease of catalytic activity. This work may provide a useful method for the fabrication of supported noble metal NP-based catalysts on the surface of mesoporous hierarchical structure materials with easy accessibility and superior activity.

  18. Highly Flexible and Transparent Ag Nanowire Electrode Encapsulated with Ultra-Thin Al2O3: Thermal, Ambient, and Mechanical Stabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byungil; An, Youngseo; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Eunha; Becker, Stefan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in the flexible electronics industry for highly robust flexible/transparent conductors that can withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. In this work, outstanding thermal and ambient stability is demonstrated for a highly transparent Ag nanowire electrode with a low electrical resistivity, by encapsulating it with an ultra-thin Al2O3 film (around 5.3 nm) via low-temperature (100 °C) atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3-encapsulated Ag nanowire (Al2O3/Ag) electrodes are stable even after annealing at 380 °C for 100 min and maintain their electrical and optical properties. The Al2O3 encapsulation layer also effectively blocks the permeation of H2O molecules and thereby enhances the ambient stability to greater than 1,080 h in an atmosphere with a relative humidity of 85% at 85 °C. Results from the cyclic bending test of up to 500,000 cycles (under an effective strain of 2.5%) confirm that the Al2O3/Ag nanowire electrode has a superior mechanical reliability to that of the conventional indium tin oxide film electrode. Moreover, the Al2O3 encapsulation significantly improves the mechanical durability of the Ag nanowire electrode, as confirmed by performing wiping tests using isopropyl alcohol.

  19. Highly Flexible and Transparent Ag Nanowire Electrode Encapsulated with Ultra-Thin Al2O3: Thermal, Ambient, and Mechanical Stabilities.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungil; An, Youngseo; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Eunha; Becker, Stefan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-01-27

    There is an increasing demand in the flexible electronics industry for highly robust flexible/transparent conductors that can withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. In this work, outstanding thermal and ambient stability is demonstrated for a highly transparent Ag nanowire electrode with a low electrical resistivity, by encapsulating it with an ultra-thin Al2O3 film (around 5.3 nm) via low-temperature (100 °C) atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3-encapsulated Ag nanowire (Al2O3/Ag) electrodes are stable even after annealing at 380 °C for 100 min and maintain their electrical and optical properties. The Al2O3 encapsulation layer also effectively blocks the permeation of H2O molecules and thereby enhances the ambient stability to greater than 1,080 h in an atmosphere with a relative humidity of 85% at 85 °C. Results from the cyclic bending test of up to 500,000 cycles (under an effective strain of 2.5%) confirm that the Al2O3/Ag nanowire electrode has a superior mechanical reliability to that of the conventional indium tin oxide film electrode. Moreover, the Al2O3 encapsulation significantly improves the mechanical durability of the Ag nanowire electrode, as confirmed by performing wiping tests using isopropyl alcohol.

  20. Highly Flexible and Transparent Ag Nanowire Electrode Encapsulated with Ultra-Thin Al2O3: Thermal, Ambient, and Mechanical Stabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byungil; An, Youngseo; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Eunha; Becker, Stefan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in the flexible electronics industry for highly robust flexible/transparent conductors that can withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. In this work, outstanding thermal and ambient stability is demonstrated for a highly transparent Ag nanowire electrode with a low electrical resistivity, by encapsulating it with an ultra-thin Al2O3 film (around 5.3 nm) via low-temperature (100 °C) atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3-encapsulated Ag nanowire (Al2O3/Ag) electrodes are stable even after annealing at 380 °C for 100 min and maintain their electrical and optical properties. The Al2O3 encapsulation layer also effectively blocks the permeation of H2O molecules and thereby enhances the ambient stability to greater than 1,080 h in an atmosphere with a relative humidity of 85% at 85 °C. Results from the cyclic bending test of up to 500,000 cycles (under an effective strain of 2.5%) confirm that the Al2O3/Ag nanowire electrode has a superior mechanical reliability to that of the conventional indium tin oxide film electrode. Moreover, the Al2O3 encapsulation significantly improves the mechanical durability of the Ag nanowire electrode, as confirmed by performing wiping tests using isopropyl alcohol. PMID:28128218

  1. Comparative study of the oxidation of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qianqian; Qin, Hailang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-10-11

    The oxidation behavior of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor under a near-ambient pressure of 0.2 Torr is monitored using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O2 exposure leads to the selective oxidation of Al at temperatures ranging from 40 to 500 °C. By contrast, H2O exposure results in the selective oxidation of Al at 40 and 200 °C, and increasing the oxidation temperature above 300 °C leads to simultaneous formation of both Al and Ni oxides. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the O2 oxidation forms a nearly stoichiometric Al2O3 structure that provides improved protection to the metallic substrate by barring the outward diffusion of metals. By contrast, the H2O oxidation results in the formation of a defective oxide layer that allows outward diffusion of Ni at elevated temperatures for simultaneous NiO formation.

  2. Comparative study of the oxidation of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qianqian; Qin, Hailang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; ...

    2016-10-11

    The oxidation behavior of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor under a near-ambient pressure of 0.2 Torr is monitored using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O2 exposure leads to the selective oxidation of Al at temperatures ranging from 40 to 500 °C. By contrast, H2O exposure results in the selective oxidation of Al at 40 and 200 °C, and increasing the oxidation temperature above 300 °C leads to simultaneous formation of both Al and Ni oxides. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the O2 oxidation forms a nearly stoichiometric Al2O3 structure that provides improved protection to the metallic substrate by barringmore » the outward diffusion of metals. By contrast, the H2O oxidation results in the formation of a defective oxide layer that allows outward diffusion of Ni at elevated temperatures for simultaneous NiO formation.« less

  3. Effect of aging under ambient conditions on the optical properties of Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited by direct current sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, A.; Leroy, G.; Duponchel, B.; Gest, J.; Guermazi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Transparent and conductive Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were deposited on a glass substrate by direct current sputtering. In a previous study, we noted the influence of time on structural and electrical characteristics of films. In the present paper, the effect of a two-year aging under ambient conditions on the optical properties was investigated. A global improvement of the optical properties of AZO thin films was observed. The optical transmittance spectra revealed a high transmittance more than 90% in the Vis-NIR regions and a high absorption in the ultraviolet range. It is assumed that the crystallinity segregation leads to the decrease of optical scattering. The results from the optical measurements showed a reorganization of the structure leading to the degradation of the structural homogeneity. Nevertheless, the evolution of the figure of merit shows that Al-doped ZnO is a good candidate for the manufacturing and the commercialization of transparent conducting oxide devices.

  4. Multilayer Pt/Al based ohmic contacts for AlGaN/GaN heterostructures stable up to 600°C ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Nitin; Dusari, Srujana; Bardong, Jochen; Medjdoub, Farid; Kenda, Andreas; Binder, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a Pt/Al multilayer stack-based ohmic contact metallization for AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. Circular transmission line method (CTLM) structures were fabricated to assess the electrical properties of the proposed metallization. The fabricated stack shows excellent stability after more than 100 hours of continuous aging at 600°C in air. Measured I-V characteristics of the fabricated samples show excellent linearity after the aging. The Pt/Al-based metallization shows great potential for future device and sensor applications in extreme environment conditions.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of AlCl3 Impregnated Molybdenum Oxide as Heterogeneous Nano-Catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts Acylation Reaction in Ambient Condition.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Arvind H; Chinnappan, Amutha; Hiremath, Vishwanath; Seo, Jeong Gil

    2015-10-01

    Aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) impregnated molybdenum oxide heterogeneous nano-catalyst was prepared by using simple impregnation method. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM imaging, and EDX mapping. The catalytic activity of this protocol was evaluated as heterogeneous catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction at room temperature. The impregnated MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst showed tremendous catalytic activity in Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and mild reaction condition. As a result, 84.0% yield of acyl product with 100% consumption of reactants in 18 h reaction time at room temperature was achieved. The effects of different solvents system with MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst in acylation reaction was also investigated. By using optimized reaction condition various acylated derivatives were prepared. In addition, the catalyst was separated by simple filtration process after the reaction and reused several times. Therefore, heterogeneous MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst was found environmentally benign catalyst, very convenient, high yielding, and clean method for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and ambient reaction condition.

  6. ZnO:Al Doping Level and Hydrogen Growth Ambient Effects on CIGS Solar Cell Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Duenow, J. N.; Gessert, T. A.; Wood, D. M.; Egaas, B.; Noufi, R.; Coutts,T. J.

    2008-05-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) cells require a highly conducting and transparent electrode for optimum device performance. ZnO:Al films grown from targets containing 2.0 wt.% Al2O3 are commonly used for this purpose. Maximum carrier mobilities of these films grown at room temperature are ~20-25 cm2V-1s-1. Therefore, relatively high carrier concentrations are required to achieve the desired conductivity, which leads to free carrier absorption in the near infrared (IR). Lightly doped films (0.05 - 0.2 wt.% Al2O3), which show less IR absorption, reach mobility values greater than 50 cm2V-1s-1 when deposited in H2 partial pressure. We incorporate these lightly doped ZnO:Al layers into CIGS PV cells produced at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Preliminary results show quantum efficiency values of these cells rival those of a past world-record cell produced at NREL that used 2.0 wt.% Al-doped ZnO films. The highest cell efficiency obtained in this trial was 18.1%.

  7. Cyclic deformation of NI/sub 3/(Al,Nb) single crystals at ambient and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bonda, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic tests were performed on Ni/sub 3/(Al,Nb) (..gamma..' phase) single crystals by using a servo-hydraulic machine under fully reversed plastic strain control at a frequency of 0.1-0.2 Hz at room temperature, 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. Since the monotonic behavior is orientation dependent, three orientations were studied. Asymmetry in tensile and compressive stresses was observed in the cyclic hardening curves of specimens tested at these temperatures and they were discussed with regard to the model suggested by Paider et al for monotonic behavior. The stress levels in the cyclic stress-strain curves (CSSC) at room temperature depended on orientation and cyclic history. No CSSCs were established at 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. The deformation in cyclic tests at small plastic strain amplitudes was found to be different from that in monotonic tests in the microplastic regions in which the deformation is believed to be carried by a small density of edge dislocations. But in cyclic deformation, to and from motion of dislocations trap the edge dislocations into dipoles and therefore screw dislocations will be forced to participate in the deformation. Cracks on the surfaces of specimens tested at room temperature and 400/sup 0/C were found to be of stage I type, whereas at 700/sup 0/C, they were of stage II type.

  8. Microtexture Analysis and Modeling of Ambient Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Damages in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Singh, A. K.; Raman, S. Ganesh Sundara; Kumar, Vikas

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, microtexture analysis using electron back-scattered diffraction technique has been performed to study fatigue- and creep-fatigue damages and associated deformation structures in Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Special emphasis has been given to low-angle grain boundary configuration and its possible application as a damage indicator. Damage is mostly present in the form of voids as investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Stored deformation energies have been evaluated for the strain-controlled fatigue-, the stress-controlled fatigue-, and the creep-fatigue-tested samples. Stored deformation energies have also been analyzed vis-à-vis total damage energies to quantify the contribution of damages to various samples. A relation between the stored deformation energy and the applied strain amplitude has been proposed in this study.

  9. A near ambient pressure XPS study of subnanometer silver clusters on Al2O3 and TiO2 ultrathin film supports

    DOE PAGES

    Mao, Bao -Hua; Chang, Rui; Shi, Lei; ...

    2014-10-29

    Here, we have investigated model systems of silver clusters with different sizes (3 and 15 atoms) deposited on alumina and titania supports using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic structures of silver clusters and support materials are studied upon exposure to various atmospheres (ultrahigh vacuum, O2 and CO) at different temperatures. Compared to bulk silver, the binding energies of silver clusters are about 0.55 eV higher on TiO2 and 0.95 eV higher on Al2O3 due to the final state effect and the interaction with supports. No clear size effect of the silver XPS peak is observed on different silvermore » clusters among these samples. Silver clusters on titania show better stability against sintering. Al 2p and Ti 2p core level peak positions of the alumina and titania support surfaces change upon exposure to oxygen while the Ag 3d core level position remains unchanged. We discuss the origin of these core level shifts and their implications for catalytic properties of Ag clusters.« less

  10. Comparison of heterojunction device parameters for pure and doped ZnO thin films with IIIA (Al or In) elements grown on silicon at room ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ahmet; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Mamtaz, Hasina H.; Mayet, Ahmed S.; Islam, M. Saif

    2016-09-01

    In this work, pure and IIIA element doped ZnO thin films were grown on p type silicon (Si) with (100) orientated surface by sol-gel method, and were characterized for comparing their electrical characteristics. The heterojunction parameters were obtained from the current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics at room temperature. The ideality factor (n), saturation current (Io) and junction resistance of ZnO/p-Si heterojunction for both pure and doped (with Al or In) cases were determined by using different methods at room ambient. Other electrical parameters such as Fermi energy level (EF), barrier height (ΦB), acceptor concentration (Na), built-in potential (Φi) and voltage dependence of surface states (Nss) profile were obtained from the C-V measurements. The results reveal that doping ZnO with IIIA (Al or In) elements to fabricate n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction can result in high performance diode characteristics.

  11. [Al

    PubMed

    Purath; Köppe; Schnöckel

    1999-10-04

    A "naked" aluminum atom links two aluminum tetrahedra in the [Al(7){N(SiMe(3))(2)}(6)](-) ion (see picture), which results from the reaction of a metastable AlCl solution with LiN(SiMe(3))(2) and crystallizes with [Li(OEt(2))(3)](+) as cation. This unique structure among molecular metal atom clusters represents a small but characteristic section of cubic close-packed aluminum.

  12. Chondrules of the Very First Generation in Bencubbin/CH-like Meteorites QUE94411 and Hammadah Al Hamra 237: Condensation Origin at High Ambient Nebular Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Meibom, Anders; Russell, Sara S.; Young, Edward; Alexander, Conel M.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Lofgren, Gary; Cuzzi, Jeff; Zipfel, Jutta; Keil, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Chondrules in QUE94411 and HH 237 formed at high ambient T prior to condensation of Fe,Ni-metal following a large scale thermal event that resulted in complete vaporization of a solar nebula region. These chondrules escaped subsequent remelting.

  13. Thermal etching rate of GaN during MOCVD growth interruption in hydrogen and ammonia ambient determined by AlGaN/GaN superlattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Ikeda, Masao; Zhang, Shuming; Liu, Jianping; Tian, Aiqin; Wen, Pengyan; Cheng, Yang; Yang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Thermal etching effect of GaN during growth interruption in the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor was investigated in this paper. The thermal etching rate was determined by growing a series of AlGaN/GaN superlattice structures with fixed GaN growth temperature at 735 °C and various AlGaN growth temperature changing from 900 °C to 1007 °C. It was observed that the GaN layer was etched off during the growth interruption when the growth temperature ramped up to AlGaN growth temperature. The etching thickness was determined by high resolution X-ray diffractometer and the etching rate was deduced accordingly. An activation energy of 2.53 eV was obtained for the thermal etching process.

  14. Effect of outdoor exposure at ambient and elevated temperatures on fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy sheet in the annealed and the solution treated and aged condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Specimens of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy sheet in the annealed and the solution-treated and aged heat-treatment condition were exposed outdoors at ambient and 560 K (550 F) temperatures to determine the effect of outdoor exposure on fatigue life. Effects of exposure were determined by comparing fatigue lives of exposed specimens to those of unexpected specimens. Two procedures for fatigue testing the exposed specimens were evaluated: (1) fatigue tests conducted outdoors by applying 1200 load cycles per week until failure occurred and (2) conventional fatigue tests (continuous cycling until failure occurred) conducted indoors after outdoor exposure under static load. The exposure period ranged from 9 to 28 months for the outdoor fatigue-test group and was 24 months for the static-load group. All fatigue tests were constant-amplitude bending of specimens containing a drilled hole (stress concentration factor of 1.6). The results of the tests indicate that the fatigue lives of solution-treated and aged specimens were significantly reduced by the outdoor exposure at 560 K but not by the exposure at ambient temperature. Fatigue lives of the annealed specimens were essentially unaffected by the outdoor exposure at either temperature. The two test procedures - outdoor fatigue test and indoor fatigue test after outdoor exposure - led to the same conclusions about exposure effects.

  15. Effect of microstructural parameters on the mechanical behavior of TiAlNb(Cr,Mo) alloys with γ+σ microstructure at ambient temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kesler, Michael S.; Goyel, Sonalika; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh; ...

    2016-11-15

    The mechanical properties of novel alloys with two-phase γ-TiAl + σ-Nb2Al microstructures were evaluated under compression at room temperature. Microstructures of varying scales were developed through solutionizing and aging heat treatments and the volume fraction of phases were varied with changes in composition. Ultra-fine, aged γ+σ microstructures were achieved for the alloys which affectively retained high volume fractions of the parent β-phase upon quenching from the solutionizing temperature. The yield strength and compressive strain to failure of these alloys show a strong dependence on the relative scale and volume fraction of phases. Surprisingly, the hard brittle σ-phase particles were notmore » found to control fracture in the refined microstructures.« less

  16. Effect of microstructural parameters on the mechanical behavior of TiAlNb(Cr,Mo) alloys with γ+σ microstructure at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kesler, Michael S.; Goyel, Sonalika; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh; Manuel, Michele V.

    2016-11-15

    The mechanical properties of novel alloys with two-phase γ-TiAl + σ-Nb2Al microstructures were evaluated under compression at room temperature. Microstructures of varying scales were developed through solutionizing and aging heat treatments and the volume fraction of phases were varied with changes in composition. Ultra-fine, aged γ+σ microstructures were achieved for the alloys which affectively retained high volume fractions of the parent β-phase upon quenching from the solutionizing temperature. The yield strength and compressive strain to failure of these alloys show a strong dependence on the relative scale and volume fraction of phases. Surprisingly, the hard brittle σ-phase particles were not found to control fracture in the refined microstructures.

  17. A mechanistic understanding of plagioclase dissolution based on Al occupancy and T-O bond length: from geologic carbon sequestration to ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2013-11-14

    A quantitative description of how the bulk properties of aluminosilicates affect their dissolution kinetics is important in helping people understand the regulation of atmospheric CO2 concentration by silicate weathering and predict the fate and transport of geologically sequestered CO2 through brine-rock interactions. In this study, we employed a structure model based on the C1 space group to illustrate how differences in crystallographic properties of aluminosilicates, such as T-O (Tetrahedral site-Oxygen) bond length and Al/Si ordering, can result in quantifiable variations in mineral dissolution rates. The dissolution rates of plagioclases were measured under representative geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) conditions (90 °C, 100 atm of CO2, 1.0 M NaCl, and pH ∼ 3.1), and used to validate the model. We found that the logarithm of the characteristic time of the breakdown of Al-O-Si linkages in plagioclases follows a good linear relation with the mineral's aluminum content (nAl). The Si release rates of plagioclases can be calculated based on an assumption of dissolution congruency or on the regularity of Al/Si distribution in the constituent tetrahedra of the mineral. We further extended the application of our approach to scenarios where dissolution incongruency arises because of different linkage reactivities in the solid matrix, and compared the model predictions with published data. The application of our results enables a significant reduction of experimental work for determining the dissolution rates of structurally related aluminosilicates, given a reaction environment.

  18. A near ambient pressure XPS study of subnanometer silver clusters on Al2O3 and TiO2 ultrathin film supports

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Bao -Hua; Chang, Rui; Shi, Lei; Zhuo, Qi -Qi; Rani, Sana; Liu, Xiao -Song; Tyo, Eric C.; Vajda, Stefan; Wang, Sui -Dong; Liu, Zhi

    2014-10-29

    Here, we have investigated model systems of silver clusters with different sizes (3 and 15 atoms) deposited on alumina and titania supports using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic structures of silver clusters and support materials are studied upon exposure to various atmospheres (ultrahigh vacuum, O2 and CO) at different temperatures. Compared to bulk silver, the binding energies of silver clusters are about 0.55 eV higher on TiO2 and 0.95 eV higher on Al2O3 due to the final state effect and the interaction with supports. No clear size effect of the silver XPS peak is observed on different silver clusters among these samples. Silver clusters on titania show better stability against sintering. Al 2p and Ti 2p core level peak positions of the alumina and titania support surfaces change upon exposure to oxygen while the Ag 3d core level position remains unchanged. We discuss the origin of these core level shifts and their implications for catalytic properties of Ag clusters.

  19. Manufactured Porous Ambient Surface Simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Elizabeth M.; Peters, Gregory H.; Chu, Lauren; Zhou, Yu Meng; Cohen, Brooklin; Panossian, Lara; Green, Jacklyn R.; Moreland, Scott; Backes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The planetary science decadal survey for 2013-2022 (Vision and Voyages, NRC 2011) has promoted mission concepts for sample acquisition from small solar system bodies. Numerous comet-sampling tools are in development to meet this standard. Manufactured Porous Ambient Surface Simulants (MPASS) materials provide an opportunity to simulate variable features at ambient temperatures and pressures to appropriately test potential sample acquisition systems for comets, asteroids, and planetary surfaces. The original "flavor" of MPASS materials is known as Manufactured Porous Ambient Comet Simulants (MPACS), which was developed in parallel with the development of the Biblade Comet Sampling System (Backes et al., in review). The current suite of MPACS materials was developed through research of the physical and mechanical properties of comets from past comet missions results and modeling efforts, coordination with the science community at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and testing of a wide range of materials and formulations. These simulants were required to represent the physical and mechanical properties of cometary nuclei, based on the current understanding of the science community. Working with cryogenic simulants can be tedious and costly; thus MPACS is a suite of ambient simulants that yields a brittle failure mode similar to that of cryogenic icy materials. Here we describe our suite of comet simulants known as MPACS that will be used to test and validate the Biblade Comet Sampling System (Backes et al., in review).

  20. The future is 'ambient'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugmayr, Artur

    2006-02-01

    The research field of ambient media starts to spread rapidly and first applications for consumer homes are on the way. Ambient media is the logical continuation of research around media. Media has been evolving from old media (e.g. print media), to integrated presentation in one form (multimedia - or new media), to generating a synthetic world (virtual reality), to the natural environment is the user-interface (ambient media), and will be evolving towards real/synthetic undistinguishable media (bio-media or bio-multimedia). After the IT bubble was bursting, multimedia was lacking a vision of potential future scenarios and applications. Within this research paper the potentials, applications, and market available solutions of mobile ambient multimedia are studied. The different features of ambient mobile multimedia are manifold and include wearable computers, adaptive software, context awareness, ubiquitous computers, middleware, and wireless networks. The paper especially focuses on algorithms and methods that can be utilized to realize modern mobile ambient systems.

  1. Dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence on ambient pressure

    PubMed

    Dan; Cheeke; Kondic

    2000-03-01

    Kondic et al.'s theory makes several specific predictions on the dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) on ambient pressure. We have carried out experiments to verify these predictions for air bubbles in a water-glycerine mixture at about 17.5 kHz. The results show an increase in SBSL with reduced ambient pressure down to a critical value below which SBSL is extinguished. The results are all in good agreement with Kondic et al.'s theory and are also compatible with the dissociation hypothesis of Lohse et al.

  2. All inorganic ambient temperature rechargeable lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, H. C.; Dey, A. N.; Schlaikjer, C.; Foster, D.; Kallianidis, M.

    Research and development was carried out on ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium batteries with inorganic SO2 electrolytes. The following solutes in SO2 were studied: tetrachloroaluminates, LiAlCl4, Li2B10Cl10, and LiGaCl4. Copper chloride (CuCl2) was used as one of the electrode materials.

  3. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  4. AMBIENT AIR MONITORING STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to establish national ambient air quality standards and to regulate as necessary, hazardous air pollutants. EPA uses ambient air monitoring to determine current air quality conditions, and to assess progress toward meeting these standards and relat...

  5. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  6. Ambient Temperature and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Moellering, Douglas R.; Smith, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Homeotherms maintain an optimal body temperature that is most often above their environment or ambient temperature. As ambient temperature decreases, energy expenditure (and energy intake) must increase to maintain thermal homeostasis. With the wide spread adoption of climate control, humans in modern society are buffered from temperature extremes and spend an increasing amount of time in a thermally comfortable state where energetic demands are minimized. This is hypothesized to contribute to the contemporary increase in obesity rates. Studies reporting exposures of animals and humans to different ambient temperatures are discussed. Additional consideration is given to the potentially altered metabolic and physiologic responses in obese versus lean subjects at a given temperature. The data suggest that ambient temperature is a significant contributor to both energy intake and energy expenditure, and that this variable should be more thoroughly explored in future studies as a potential contributor to obesity susceptibility. PMID:24707450

  7. Effect of deviation from the stoichiometry on the lattice constants and strength of the L1{sub 0}TiAl-X (X = Cr, V or Nb) alloys at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Equo; Shinmoto, Koichiro; Miura, Seiji; Mishima, Yoshinao; Suzuki, Tomoo

    1995-12-31

    Variations in compressive 0.2% flow stress are measured in binary and ternary L1{sub 0} gamma TiAl alloys with deviation from the stoichiometry and ternary additions of Cr, V and Nb. A special attention is paid in the choice of the ternary compositions so that the effect of Al concentration on the strength of the alloy scan be deduced in each ternary alloys. Also the effect of difference in grain size among the alloys is taken into account to interpret the results. It is found that the strength as measured by 0.2% flow stress decreases with increasing Al concentration not only in binary alloys with more than 50 at%Al but also in ternary alloys across the stoichiometry, which is rather contradictory to the previous findings by hardness tests. For both binary and ternary alloys, variation in lattice constants is also measured by X-ray diffractometry as a function of Al concentration. The results are in good agreement with the previous work, in which c/a increases with increasing Al concentration. The present results should provide useful information on the basic understanding of the mechanical properties of the single phase gamma TiAl alloys.

  8. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  9. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  10. Ocean Remote Sensing Using Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    allows contributions from modal pulses corresponding to different mode numbers to be isolated, even when there is significant overlap in time between...approximation to the transient Green’s function G(xA|xB, t) between locations xA and xB is estimated by cross -correlating records of ambient noise...at 100 m depth are described by Brown et al. (2014). Stable cross -correlation functions are shown to require coherent stacking over a period of

  11. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  12. Ambient temperature recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature data recorder, designated the Ambient Temperature Recorder (ATR-4), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center to meet particular requirements for space life sciences experiments. The small, self-contained, four-channel, battery-powered device records 32 kilobytes of temperature data over a range of -40 to +60 C at four sampling intervals ranging from 1.875 to 15 minutes. Data is stored in its internal electronic memory for later readout by a personal computer.

  13. Ambient Oxygen Promotes Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Starost, Matthew F.; Lago, Cory U.; Lim, Philip K.; Sack, Michael N.; Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53−/− mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53−/− mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo. PMID:21589870

  14. Spectroscopic properties and location of the Ce(3+) energy levels in Y3Al2Ga3O12 and Y3Ga5O12 at ambient and high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Mahlik, S; Lazarowska, A; Ueda, J; Tanabe, S; Grinberg, M

    2016-03-07

    In this study, we present the high pressure spectroscopy of Y3Al2Ga3O12 (YAGG) and Y3Ga5O12 (YGG) ceramics doped with Ce(3+) and Cr(3+). We have found that high hydrostatic pressure recovers the Ce(3+) luminescence in YGG. The pressure-induced shifts of the ground state and the 5d1 excited state of Ce(3+) with respect to the conduction band edge were estimated. Our experimental data allowed us to also obtain the shifts of the conduction and valence band edges, and the ground state and the 5d1 state of Ce(3+) ions have been estimated with respect to the vacuum level. It has been shown that simple equivalence between the external hydrostatic pressure and intrinsic chemical pressure related to different compositions of the isostructural matrices does not exist in garnet lattices.

  15. Multiagent robotic systems' ambient light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iureva, Radda A.; Maslennikov, Oleg S.; Komarov, Igor I.

    2017-05-01

    Swarm robotics is one of the fastest growing areas of modern technology. Being subclass of multi-agent systems it inherits the main part of scientific-methodological apparatus of construction and functioning of practically useful complexes, which consist of rather autonomous independent agents. Ambient light sensors (ALS) are widely used in robotics. But speaking about swarm robotics, the technology which has great number of specific features and is developing, we can't help mentioning that its important to use sensors on each robot not only in order to help it to get directionally oriented, but also to follow light emitted by robot-chief or to help to find the goal easier. Key words: ambient light sensor, swarm system, multiagent system, robotic system, robotic complexes, simulation modelling

  16. Imaging with ambient noise

    SciTech Connect

    Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees

    2010-09-15

    Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

  17. Ambient seismic wave field.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    The ambient seismic wave field, also known as ambient noise, is excited by oceanic gravity waves primarily. This can be categorized as seismic hum (1-20 mHz), primary microseisms (0.02-0.1 Hz), and secondary microseisms (0.1-1 Hz). Below 20 mHz, pressure fluctuations of ocean infragravity waves reach the abyssal floor. Topographic coupling between seismic waves and ocean infragravity waves at the abyssal floor can explain the observed shear traction sources. Below 5 mHz, atmospheric disturbances may also contribute to this excitation. Excitation of primary microseisms can be attributed to topographic coupling between ocean swell and seismic waves on subtle undulation of continental shelves. Excitation of secondary microseisms can be attributed to non-linear forcing by standing ocean swell at the sea surface in both pelagic and coastal regions. Recent developments in source location based on body-wave microseisms enable us to estimate forcing quantitatively. For a comprehensive understanding, we must consider the solid Earth, the ocean, and the atmosphere as a coupled system.

  18. Ambient ion soft landing.

    PubMed

    Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K; Wu, Chunping; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-04-01

    Ambient ion soft landing, a process in which polyatomic ions are deposited from air onto a surface at a specified location under atmospheric pressure, is described. Ions generated by electrospray ionization are passed pneumatically through a heated metal drying tube, their ion polarity is selected using ion deflectors, and the dry selected ions are soft-landed onto a selected surface. Unlike the corresponding vacuum soft-landing experiment, where ions are mass-selected and soft-landed within a mass spectrometer, here the ions to be deposited are selected through the choice of a compound that gives predominantly one ionic species upon ambient ionization; no mass analysis is performed during the soft landing experiment. The desired dry ions, after electrical separation from neutrals and counterions, are deposited on a surface. Characterization of the landed material was achieved by dissolution and analysis using mass spectrometry or spectrofluorimetry. The treated surface was also characterized using fluorescence microscopy, which allowed surfaces patterned with fluorescent compounds to be imaged. The pure dry ions were used as reagents in heterogeneous ion/surface reactions including the reaction of pyrylium cations with d-lysine to form the N-substituted pyridinium cation. The charged microdroplets associated with incompletely dried ions could be selected for soft landing or surface reaction by choice of the temperature of a drying tube inserted between the ion source and the electrical ion deflectors.

  19. Ambient Construction, LLC Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ambient Construction, LLC (the Company) is located in Tallahassee, Florida. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Tallahassee, Florida.

  20. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  1. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  2. Ambient Noise in Shallow Water: A Survey of the Unclassified Literature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    hypothesis which would explain this observation is that the source of noise near the low 7. ..7.. ~~u-~m".. .- - p -~~* - %R -vi w - AlJ’ Wf % --’,Wkz...Shallow water ambient noise surprisingly flat (white) for high wind speed, in contrast to typical ambient noise spectra. p The difference is explained...taken * .. . . . . .. p .-... . . ..-.. :; ..- ..- ... ; .. ’...’~~. ... ".. .. ’.-.-...... . ..... - .... ...... ..... . .. . - 18 Shallow water ambient

  3. A Study of Sea Ice Kinematics and Their Relationship to Arctic Ambient Noise. Part 3. Section 1. Ambient Noise. Section 2. Ambient Noise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    D-R165 384 A STUDY OF SEA ICE KINEMATICS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO 1 /4ARCTIC AMBIENT NO..(U) HONEYWIELL INC DUARTE CA ORDNANCE DIV J K LEWIS ET AL...FEB 86 SAIC-85.񓞾-PT-3 UNCLASSIFIED NB4--B5-C-853F/G8112 NL L4 11111L lAO11 1211111111112.2 L25 [41.6 11111_!11 _____2 5 1 1 1 11111-111-_L6...SECTION 1 - AMBIENT NOISE ,-_f f it m- . 1 Science Applications International Corporation MAR 1 3 1986 ’ Aw ~A STUDY OF SEA ICE KINEMATICS AND THEIR

  4. Estuarine ambient toxicity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, S.I.; Dawson, C.E.; Jordahl, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    This study was to determine if sediment and water column ambient toxicity bioassay results correlate with fish community IBI assessments in tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay watersheds that are impacted by industrial, urban and agricultural land use patterns. A battery of water column and sediment toxicity tests were conducted monthly in coordination with fish community sampling in four sub estuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Fish were sampled with seines and bottom trawls. An association was found between dissolved oxygen and species richness in the trawls. Water column bioassays indicated mild toxicological contamination in industrial watershed estuaries. Results varied by month and species. Water quality in the rural and agricultural watershed estuaries was generally good. Sediment bioassays demonstrated significant toxicity in the industrialized area. Effects were seen in the urbanized estuary, but to a lesser extent. Fish egg survival effects were observed in the agricultural watershed estuary. The rural estuary sediment produced variable, but non-significant results. The industrial and urban sites were contaminated with heavy metals and organics.

  5. Carbone_et_al_2016_ambient_data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data set has two sets of gaseous elemental mercury data. The first column contains all Hg related data some of which may have been affected by the upslope events such as the emissions from the nearby volcano. The next column contain values that were flagged and excluded as being affected by the nearby volcanic events. The flagging method used to eliminate these values was developed using an episode identification scheme using SO2 data. For the years of 2002 through 2004, hourly SO2 data were used to llag the upslope values. For the years of 2005-2009, 5 minute SO2 values were used to flag upslope events.While SO2 and O3 data were collected by EPA as part of this study, the CO2 data were downloaded from NOAA data website along with the flag related information provided below. (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/dv/data/index.php?parameter_name=Carbon%2BDioxide&showall=1&site=MLO)This dataset is associated with the following publication:Carbone, F., M. Landis, C.N. Gencarelli, A. Naccarato, F. Sprovieri, F. De Simone, I.M. Hedgecock, and N. Pirrone. Sea surface temperature variation linked to elemental mercury concentrations measured on Mauna Loa. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS. American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC, USA, online, (2016).

  6. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  7. Ambient Monitoring Technology Information Center (AMTIC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site contains information on ambient air quality monitoring programs, monitoring methods, quality assurance and control procedures, and federal regulations related to ambient air quality monitoring.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (AL-CARS) microscopy that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environment light for field use. CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. Filters in both spectral domain and frequency domain effectively blocked room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated. PMID:27519113

  9. Ambient Noise Tomography at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, A. E.; Ekström, G.; West, M.; Senyukov, S.

    2008-12-01

    Bezymianny Volcano is an active stratovolcano located in the Kluychevskoy volcanic group on the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. Since its dramatic sector collapse eruption in 1956, the volcano's activity has been characterized by nearly twice annual plinian eruptions accompanying ongoing lava-dome growth. Its frequent eruptions and similarity to Mt. St. Helens have made it the target of a multifaceted geologic and geophysical project supported by the NSF Partners in Research and Education (PIRE) program. Since mid- 2006, the volcano has been monitored by a broadband seismic array that is currently composed of 8 stations within 10 kilometers of the active dome. In this project, we use continuous data from these stations to investigate the static and dynamic structure of the volcano. Using methods similar to those used by Brenguier et al. (2007, 2008), we estimate the Green's function for each pair of stations by cross-correlating day-long time series of ambient noise. Paths with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used to estimate group velocity dispersion curves. From these measurements, we work towards constructing the first velocity model of this volcano. Furthermore, we begin to test whether measurements of ambient noise can be used to monitor changes inside the volcano prior to eruptive activity. These problems will continue to be addressed as more data becomes available in future field seasons.

  10. Ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikie, Iain D.; Grain, Angela C.; Sutherland, James; Law, Jamie

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel photoemission technique utilizing a traditional Kelvin probe as a detector of electrons/atmospheric ions ejected from metallic surfaces (Au, Ag, Cu, Fe, Ni, Ti, Zn, Al) illuminated by a deep ultra-violet (DUV) source under ambient pressure. To surmount the limitation of electron scattering in air the incident photon energy is rastered rather than applying a variable retarding electric field as is used with UPS. This arrangement can be applied in several operational modes: using the DUV source to determine the photoemission threshold (Φ) with 30-50 meV resolution and also the Kelvin probe, under dark conditions, to measure contact potential difference (CPD) between the Kelvin probe tip and the metallic sample with an accuracy of 1-3 meV. We have studied the relationship between the photoelectric threshold and CPD of metal surfaces cleaned in ambient conditions. Inclusion of a second spectroscopic visible source was used to confirm a semiconducting oxide, possibly Cu2O, via surface photovoltage measurements with the KP. This dual detection system can be easily extended to controlled gas conditions, relative humidity control and sample heating/cooling.

  11. FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPING AMBIENT WATER ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Currently, Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for aquatic life protection are derived according to the Guidelines for Derivation of Ambient Water Quality Criteria for the Protection of Aquatic Life and Their Uses, published in 1985. To ensure that AWQC are derived from the best available science, Office of Water assessed the need to update the Guidelines and identified issues that should be addressed in the revisions. In December 2002, EPA's Science Advisory Board concurred with EPA's assessment of the need to update the Guidelines as well as with the issues EPA identified to address. Updating the Guidelines is a Priority Strategic Action included in OST's Strategy for Water Quality Standards and Criteria (Next Priority Strategic Action #1). To revise existing methodology for deriving ambient water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life.

  12. Los plaguicidas y la contaminacion del medio ambiente Venezolano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; Stickel, W.H.

    1972-01-01

    RESUMEN DE RECOMENDACIONES Recomendaciones para el Programa de Investigacion: 1. Establecer un sistema de muestreo biologico para detectar los niveles tendencias de los productos quimicos toxicos en un peque?o numero de si tios representativos. 2. Mantener continua vigilancia de la contaminacion ambiental, mediante la seleccion acertadamente dirigida de las zonas afectadas y de las fuentes de contaminacion. 3. Realizar estudios acerca de las poblaciones de animales silvestres, y del exito de los procesos reproductivos de las especies o grupos clayes de animales que se consideran mas gravemente afectados. 4. Preparar recomendaciones para una accion gubernamental de proteccion al hombre, a la fauna silvestre y al medio ambiente. Recomendaciones para la Accion Administrativa: 1. Establecer limites a la tolerancia de los residuos de plaguicidas en los alimentos. Constituye una medida clave para disminuir la contaminacion ambiental. 2. Establecer normas de calidad del agua para las corrientes, represas, la gos y otros cuerpos. Es la segunda medida clave para reducir la contaminacion del ambiente 3. Exigir un tratamiento adecuado de los efluentes industriales, especialmente antes de que se construyan las nuevas plantas. 4. Exigir a los agricultores que en el uso de plaguicidas sigan los consejos tecnicos autorizados y negar a los vendedores el derecho a recomendar productos por su cuenta. 5. Tomar medidas para recoger y eliminar los recipientes y sobrantes de los plaguicidas.

  13. Passivation of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Transistors Against Ambient Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Spencer; Wood, Joshua; Jariwala, Deep; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Cho, Eunkyung; Sangwan, Vinod; Liu, Xiaolong; Lauhon, Lincoln; Marks, Tobin; Hersam, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Unencapsulated exfoliated black phosphorus field-effect transistors are found to rapidly degrade upon exposure to ambient conditions, causing large increases in threshold voltage after only 6 h in ambient, followed by a ~ 103 decrease in FET on/off ratio and mobility after 48 h. Careful investigation into the cause of this degradation suggests that H2O irreversibly reacts with unprotected, exfoliated BP to form oxidized phosphorus species, as observed by AFM, TEM, XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrostatic force microscopy. This interpretation is further supported by the observation that BP degradation occurs more rapidly on hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers as opposed to hydrophilic SiO2, implicating an edge-based intercalation of O2 saturated H2O in BP as the cause of degradation. Atomic layer deposited AlOx overlayers were found to suppress ambient degradation, allowing encapsulated BP FETs to maintain high on/off ratios of ~ 103 and mobilities of ~ 100 cm2/(Vs) for over one month in ambient, demonstrating the effective passivation of BP flakes against ambient degradation. Research supported by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center of Northwestern University (NSF DMR-1121262), the Office of Naval Research (N00014- 14-1-0669), and the Keck Foundation.

  14. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  15. The higher mode of surface wave derived from ambient noise and preliminary application to estimating subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhentao, Y.; Xiaofei, C.; Jiannan, W.

    2016-12-01

    The fundamental mode is the primary component of surface wave derived from ambient noise. It is the basis of the method of structure imaging from ambient noise (e.g. SPAC, Aki 1957; F-K, Lascoss 1968; MUSIC, Schmidt 1986). It is well known, however, that if the higher modes of surface wave can be identified from data and are incorporated in the inversion of dispersion curves, the uncertainty in inversion results will be greatly reduced (e.g., Tokimastu,1997). Actually, the ambient noise indeed contains the higher modes as well in its raw data of ambient noise. If we could extract the higher modes from ambient noise, the structure inversion method of ambient noise would be greatly improved. In the past decade, there are many studies to improve SPAC and analyses the relationship of fundamental mode and higher mode (Ohri et al 2002; Asten et al. 2006; Tashiaki Ykoi 2010 ;Tatsunori Ikeda 2012). In this study, we will present a new method of identifying higher modes from ambient noise data by reprocessing the "surface waves' phases" derived from the ambient noise through cross-correlation analysis, and show preliminary application in structure inversion.

  16. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Air and Radiation's (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as state, local, and tribal air pollution control agencies. Its component data sets have been collected over the years from approximately 10,000 monitoring sites, of which approximately 5,000 are currently active. OAR's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) and other internal and external users, rely on this data to assess air quality, assist in Attainment/Non-Attainment designations, evaluate State Implementation Plans for Non-Attainment Areas, perform modeling for permit review analysis, and other air quality management functions. Air quality information is also used to prepare reports for Congress as mandated by the Clean Air Act. This data covers air quality data collected after 1980, when the Clean Air Act requirements for monitoring were significantly modified. Air quality data from the Agency's early years (1970s) remains available (see OAR PRIMARY DATA ASSET: Ambient Air Quality Data -- Historical), but because of technical and definitional differences the two data assets are not directly comparable. The Clean Air Act of 1970 provided initial authority for monitoring air quality for Conventional Air Pollutants (CAPs) for which EPA has promulgated National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Requirements for monitoring visibility-related parameters were added in 1977. Requiremen

  17. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  18. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  19. Low ambient oxygen prevents atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Amar, Marcelo J; Pryor, Milton; Remaley, Alan T; Allen, Michele D; Noguchi, Audrey C; Springer, Danielle A; Kwon, Jaeyul; Chen, Jichun; Park, Ji-hoon; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Large population studies have shown that living at higher altitudes, which lowers ambient oxygen exposure, is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease mortality. However, hypoxia has also been reported to promote atherosclerosis by worsening lipid metabolism and inflammation. We sought to address these disparate reports by reducing the ambient oxygen exposure of ApoE-/- mice. We observed that long-term adaptation to 10% O2 (equivalent to oxygen content at ∼5000 m), compared to 21% O2 (room air at sea level), resulted in a marked decrease in aortic atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. This effect was associated with increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), known to be anti-atherogenic and regulated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α). Supporting these observations, ApoE-/- mice that were deficient in IL-10 (IL10-/- ApoE-/- double knockout) failed to show reduced atherosclerosis in 10% oxygen. Our study reveals a specific mechanism that can help explain the decreased prevalence of ischemic heart disease in populations living at high altitudes and identifies ambient oxygen exposure as a potential factor that could be modulated to alter pathogenesis. Key messages: Chronic low ambient oxygen exposure decreases atherosclerosis in mice. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels are increased by low ambient O2. This is consistent with the established role of HIF-1α in IL10 transactivation. Absence of IL-10 results in the loss of the anti-atherosclerosis effect of low O2. This mechanism may contribute to decreased atherosclerosis at high altitudes.

  20. Correction: Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-28

    Correction for 'Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control' by Sujoy Sarkar et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6407-6410.

  1. Ambient pressure fuel cell system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2000-01-01

    An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

  2. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  3. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (~4,000-130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions.

  4. The Third Ambient Aspirin Polymorph

    DOE PAGES

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G.; Hu, Chunhua T.; Zhu, Qiang; ...

    2017-05-17

    Polymorphism in aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), one of the most widely consumed medications, was equivocal until the structure of a second polymorph II, similar in structure to the original form I, was reported in 2005. Here, the third ambient polymorph of aspirin is described. Lastly, it was crystallized from the melt and its structure was determined using a combination of X-ray powder diffraction analysis and crystal structure prediction algorithms.

  5. New Codes for Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duret, F.; Mooney, W. D.; Detweiler, S.

    2007-12-01

    In order to determine a velocity model of the crust, scientists generally use earthquakes recorded by seismic stations. However earthquakes do not occur continuously and most are too weak to be useful. When no event is recorded, a waveform is generally considered to be noise. This noise, however, is not useless and carries a wealth of information. Thus, ambient seismic noise analysis is an inverse method of investigating the Earth's interior. Until recently, this technique was quite difficult to apply, as it requires significant computing capacities. In early 2007, however, a team led by Gregory Benson and Mike Ritzwoller from UC Boulder published a paper describing a new method for extracting group and phase velocities from those waveforms. The analysis consisting of recovering Green functions between a pair of stations, is composed of four steps: 1) single station data preparation, 2) cross-correlation and stacking, 3) quality control and data selection and 4) dispersion measurements. At the USGS, we developed a set of ready-to-use computing codes for analyzing waveforms to run the ambient noise analysis of Benson et al. (2007). Our main contribution to the analysis technique was to fully automate the process. The computation codes were written in Fortran 90 and the automation scripts were written in Perl. Furthermore, some operations were run with SAC. Our choices of programming language offer an opportunity to adapt our codes to the major platforms. The codes were developed under Linux but are meant to be adapted to Mac OS X and Windows platforms. The codes have been tested on Southern California data and our results compare nicely with those from the UC Boulder team. Next, we plan to apply our codes to Indonesian data, so that we might take advantage of newly upgraded seismic stations in that region.

  6. Theoretical study of the ambient-pressure dependence of sonochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Iida, Yasuo; Mitome, Hideto

    2003-07-01

    Computer simulations of bubble oscillations are performed for various ambient pressures in order to study the mechanism of the ambient-pressure dependence of sonochemical reactions: sonochemiluminescence of aqueous luminol solutions [T. Tuziuti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 116, 6221 (2002)] and the oxidation of iodide [A. Henglein et al., J. Phys. Chem. 97, 158 (1993)]. It is shown that for air bubbles there exists an optimal bubble temperature for the production of the oxidants such as O, OH, H2O2, and O3 inside bubbles regardless of the ambient pressure because at higher bubble temperature the oxidants are consumed inside bubbles by oxidizing nitrogen. Correspondingly there exists an optimal acoustic amplitude for each ambient pressure, which shifts toward a lower value as the ambient pressure decreases because bubbles expand more. It results in the higher rate of sonochemical reactions for lower ambient pressure at relatively low acoustic amplitude. For oxygen bubbles, the amount of the oxidants created inside bubbles is larger for higher bubble temperature because in this case the oxidants are not consumed inside bubbles due to the absence of nitrogen. Regardless of the species of the gas inside bubbles, the decrease of the ambient pressure works as if the acoustic amplitude increases because bubbles expand more.

  7. Substitutional alloy of Ce and Al

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiao-Shi; Ding, Yang; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Wei; Blomqvist, Andreas; Ahuja, Rajeev; Yang, Wenge; Shu, Jinfu; Sinogeikin, Stas V.; Meng, Yue; Brewe, Dale L.; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2009-01-01

    The formation of substitutional alloys has been restricted to elements with similar atomic radii and electronegativity. Using high-pressure at 298 K, we synthesized a face-centered cubic disordered alloy of highly dissimilar elements (large Ce and small Al atoms) by compressing the Ce3Al intermetallic compound >15 GPa or the Ce3Al metallic glass >25 GPa. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Ce L3-edge absorption spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations revealed that the pressure-induced Kondo volume collapse and 4f electron delocalization of Ce reduced the differences between Ce and Al and brought them within the Hume-Rothery (HR) limit for substitutional alloying. The alloy remained after complete release of pressure, which was also accompanied by the transformation of Ce back to its ambient 4f electron localized state and reversal of the Kondo volume collapse, resulting in a non-HR alloy at ambient conditions. PMID:19188608

  8. Nonlinear Elasticity in a Deforming Ambient Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, Arash; Ozakin, Arkadas; Sadik, Souhayl

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we formulate a nonlinear elasticity theory in which the ambient space is evolving. For a continuum moving in an evolving ambient space, we model time dependency of the metric by a time-dependent embedding of the ambient space in a larger manifold with a fixed background metric. We derive both the tangential and the normal governing equations. We then reduce the standard energy balance written in the larger ambient space to that in the evolving ambient space. We consider quasi-static deformations of the ambient space and show that a quasi-static deformation of the ambient space results in stresses, in general. We linearize the nonlinear theory about a reference motion and show that variation of the spatial metric corresponds to an effective field of body forces.

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  10. Ambient dose equivalents in TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Pincon, Jean-Louis; Trompier, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity [e.g., Briggs et al., JGR, 118, 3805, 2013]. TGFs are associated with initial propagation stages of intracloud lightning, which represent the most frequent type of lightning discharges [e.g., Cummer et al., GRL, 42, 7792, 2015, and references therein]. TGFs are known to be produced inside common thunderclouds [e.g., Splitt et al., JGR, 115, A00E38, 2010] typically at altitudes ranging from 10 to 14 km [e.g., Cummer et al., GRL, 41, 8586, 2014]. The global TGF occurrence rate is estimated to be 400,000 per year concerning TGFs detectable by Fermi-GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) [Briggs et al., 2013], but detailed analysis of satellite measurements [Østgaard et al., JGR, 117, A03327, 2012] and theoretical studies [Celestin et al., JGR, 120, 10712, 2015] suggest that it cannot be excluded that TGFs represent a part of a regular process taking place during the propagation of lightning discharges. It is important to assess the risk induced by TGFs for airline passengers and crews on board aircraft approaching thunderstorms. Dwyer et al. [JGR, 115, D09206, 2010] have estimated that if an aircraft were to find itself in the source electron beam giving rise to a TGF, passengers and crews might receive effective radiation doses above the regulatory limit depending on the beam diameter. Moreover, Tavani et al. [Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1127, 2013] concluded that TGF-associated neutrons produced by photonuclear reactions would cause serious hazard on the aircraft avionics. In this work, we will present detailed simulation-based estimations of effective doses received by humans that would be irradiated by TGFs for various production altitudes and distances from the TGF source.

  11. Ambient Noise in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Pacific Ocean ....... ................. 4-11 4-7 Ambient noise spectra within and below a surface duct . . . . 4-13 5-1 Geometry of a simple model for... suspension system and the barge at the 100-ft hydrophone. The noise gradient tends to be greater at low frequencies than at high. We note from Figure...reflection). Expressing r, k and dr in terms of h and e, we 5-1 "-- -- ’dA / / I0 h I , ŕ"(L•)v ŕŔCOSvn{ PF Figure 5-1. Geometry of a simple model

  12. Ambient Temperature Rechargeable Lithium Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    AD-AI O297 EIC LA BS INC NEWTON MA F/6 10/3 AMB IENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERAU AG(MARHMU)L TI ARI AK IC07 UNCLASSIFIED C-655DEE TB6...036FL -T Research and Development Technical Report -N DELET-TR-81-0378-F AMBIENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERY K. M. Abraham D. L. Natwig...WORDS (Cenimne an revee filf Of ~"#amp Pu l41"lfr bg’ 61WA amober) Rechargeable lithium battery, CrO.5VO.5S2 positive electrode, 2Me-THF/LiAsF6, cell

  13. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  14. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  15. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  16. Crustal Structure of the PARANÁ Basin from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaço, B.; Assumpcao, M.; Rosa, M. L.; Sanchez, G.

    2013-12-01

    Previous surface-wave tomography in South America (SA) (e.g., Feng et al., 2004; 2007) mapped the main large-scale features of the continent, such as the high lithospheric velocities in cratonic areas and low velocities in the Patagonian province. However, more detailed features such as the Paraná Basin, have not been mapped with good resolution because of poor path coverage, i.e. classic surface- wave tomography has low resolution in low-seismicity areas, like Brazil and the Eastern Argentina. Crustal structure in Southern Brazil is poorly known. Most paths used by Feng et al. (2007) in this region are roughly parallel, which prevents good spatial resolution in tomographic inversions. This work is part of a major project that will increase knowledge of crustal structure in Southern Brazil and Eastern Argentina and is being carried out by IAG-USP (Brazil) in collaboration with UNLP and INPRES (Argentina). To improve resolution for the Paraná Basin we used inter-station dispersion curves derived from correlation of ambient noise for new stations deployed with the implementation of the Brazilian Seismic Network (Pirchiner et al. 2011). This technique, known as ambient noise tomography (ANT), was first applied by Shapiro et al. (2005) and is now expanding rapidly, especially in areas with high density of seismic stations (e.g. Bensen et al. 2007, Lin et al. 2008, Moschetti et al. 2010). ANT is a well-established method to estimate short period (< 20s) and intermediate periods (20 - 50s) surface wave speeds both in regional or continental scales (Lin et al. 2008). ANT data processing in this work was similar to the one described by Bensen et al. 2007, in four major steps with addition of a data inversion step. Group velocities between pairs of stations were derived from correlation of two years of ambient noise in the period range 5 to 60 s. The dispersion curves measurements were made using a modified version of PGSWMFA (PGplot Surface Wave Multiple Filter Analysis

  17. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  18. Providing Context for Ambient Particulate Matter and Estimates of Attributable Mortality.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Roger O

    2016-09-01

    Four papers on fine particulate matter (PM2.5 ) by Anenberg et al., Fann et al., Shin et al., and Smith contribute to a growing body of literature on estimated epidemiological associations between ambient PM2.5 concentrations and increases in health responses relative to baseline notes. This article provides context for the four articles, including a historical review of provisions of the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1970, requiring the setting of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria pollutants such as particulate matter (PM). The substantial improvements in both air quality for PM and population health as measured by decreased mortality rates are illustrated. The most recent revision of the NAAQS for PM2.5 in 2013 by the Environmental Protection Agency distinguished between (1) uncertainties in characterizing PM2.5 as having a causal association with various health endpoints, and as all-cause mortality, and (2) uncertainties in concentration--excess health response relationships at low ambient PM2.5 concentrations below the majority of annual concentrations studied in the United States in the past. In future reviews, and potential revisions, of the NAAQS for PM2.5 , it will be even more important to distinguish between uncertainties in (1) characterizing the causal associations between ambient PM2.5 concentrations and specific health outcomes, such as all-source mortality, irrespective of the concentrations, (2) characterizing the potency of major constituents of PM2.5 , and (3) uncertainties in the association between ambient PM2.5 concentrations and specific health outcomes at various ambient PM2.5 concentrations. The latter uncertainties are of special concern as ambient PM2.5 concentrations and health morbidity and mortality rates approach background or baseline rates.

  19. Improving Seismic Velocity Models with Constraints from Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise and Signal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    NOISE AND SIGNAL Ileana M. Tibuleac, et al. Nevada Seismological Laboratory University of Nevada, Reno 1664 N. Virginia Street, MS 174 Reno, Nevada...NUMBER EF127063 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Nevada Seismological Laboratory University of Nevada, Reno 1664 N. Virginia...from ambient noise crosscorrelations and autocorrelations have been developed and are used at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (Tibuleac et al

  20. Ambient air contamination: Characterization and detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nulton, C. P.; Silvus, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to characterize and detect sources of ambient air contamination are described. Chemical techniques to identify indoor contaminants are outlined, they include gas chromatography, or colorimetric detection. Organics generated from indoor materials at ambient conditions and upon combustion are characterized. Piezoelectric quartz crystals are used as precision frequency determining elements in electronic oscillators.

  1. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  2. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  3. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  5. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ambient conditions. 1033.505 Section 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.505 Ambient conditions. This...

  6. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  7. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  8. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  9. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  10. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  11. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  12. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Sandra T.; Lingg, Elisabeth; Heuberger, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman's (Ekman et al., 1983) basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness, and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles/bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate, and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response (SCR) varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the SCR and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles/bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics. PMID:24860522

  13. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    PubMed

    Glass, Sandra T; Lingg, Elisabeth; Heuberger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman's (Ekman et al., 1983) basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness, and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles/bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate, and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response (SCR) varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the SCR and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles/bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  14. Ambient intelligence in health care.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe

    2003-06-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a new paradigm in information technology, in which people are empowered through a digital environment that is aware of their presence and context, and is sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to their needs, habits, gestures and emotions. The most ambitious expression of AmI is Intelligent Mixed Reality (IMR), an evolution of traditional virtual reality environments. Using IMR, it is possible to integrate computer interfaces into the real environment, so that the user can interact with other individuals and with the environment itself in the most natural and intuitive way. How does the emergence of the AmI paradigm influence the future of health care? Using a scenario-based approach, this paper outlines the possible role of AmI in health care by focusing on both its technological and relational nature. In this sense, clinicians and health care providers that want to exploit AmI potential need a significant attention to technology, ergonomics, project management, human factors and organizational changes in the structure of the relevant health service.

  15. Ambient clumsiness in virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanka, Silvia; Behar, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental pursuit of Virtual Reality is the experience of a seamless connection between the user's body and actions within the simulation. Virtual worlds often mediate the relationship between the physical and virtual body through creating an idealized representation of the self in an idealized space. This paper argues that the very ubiquity of the medium of virtual environments, such as the massively popular Second Life, has now made them mundane, and that idealized representations are no longer appropriate. In our artwork we introduce the attribute of clumsiness to Second Life by creating and distributing scripts that cause users' avatars to exhibit unpredictable stumbling, tripping, and momentary poor coordination, thus subtly and unexpectedly intervening with, rather than amplifying, a user's intent. These behaviors are publicly distributed, and manifest only occasionally - rather than intentional, conscious actions, they are involuntary and ambient. We suggest that the physical human body is itself an imperfect interface, and that the continued blurring of distinctions between the physical body and virtual representations calls for the introduction of these mundane, clumsy elements.

  16. Al-Al2O3-Pd junction hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, K.; Takinami, N.; Chiba, Y.; Ohshima, S.; Kambe, S.

    1994-07-01

    Al-Al2O3-Pd MIM (metal insulator metal) junctions fabricated on a glass substrate were tested as hydrogen sensors. The I-V (current versus voltage) characteristics of the junctions were measured at room temperature in a vacuum of 10-5 Torr and in H2 gas of 10-2-100 Torr. A significant increase in the current was observed upon introduction of H2 gas. This phenomenon is believed to occur due to the work function lowering of the hydrogen-absorbed Pd top electrode. The rise time was on the order of minutes, while the recovery time when hydrogen was purged was more than 20 h. However, when the junction was placed in an oxidizing ambient such as air, the recovery time was drastically reduced to the order of minutes, indicating that the device is operative as a hydrogen sensor in the atmospheric ambient. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior of the Pd film was also investigated using a Pd coated quartz microbalance, and the results explained the current response of the Pd MIM junction to hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

  17. Effect of high ambient temperature on feed digestibility in broilers.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, S; Geraert, P A; Lessire, M; Carre, B; Guillaumin, S

    1997-06-01

    The effect of chronic heat exposure on feed digestibility of broilers was investigated. Eighty 4-wk-old male chickens were brooded in individual battery cages in two controlled-environment rooms at a constant ambient temperature (22 or 32 C) until 6 wk of age. They were equally distributed into three treatments: 22 C, ad libitum feed consumption (22AL); 32 C, ad libitum feed consumption (32AL), and 22 C, pair-feeding on the daily feed intake of heat-exposed chickens (22PF). Broilers were fed either a standard corn-soybean meal diet (control diet) or a practical seasonal diet containing several ingredients including wheat, spring pea, and animal fat (summer diet). Digestibility of energy, dry matter, protein, fat, starch, and nitrogen, and total mineral balances were measured between 38 and 42 d of age. Apparent metabolizable energy content of summer diet was significantly decreased in 32AL compared to 22AL, whereas AME of the control diet did not change. Nitrogen retention was significantly reduced in 32AL birds compared to 22AL and 22PF birds, irrespective of the diet. Taking into account these differences in nitrogen balance, AMEn was reduced under hot exposure: -72 and -155 kcal for control and summer diets respectively, in 32AL compared to 22PF chickens. This reduction could be explained by a significant decrease of nutrient digestibility:protein: -4.2 percentage units irrespective of the diet, fat: -1.7 and -5.2 percentage units for control and summer diets respectively, and starch: -4.2 percentage units for summer diet. It thus appears worthwhile to take into account such reduction in digestibility to formulate practical diets for brooding under hot conditions. High quality oil and protein sources should also be used instead of low quality feedstuffs, like animal sources, in such conditions.

  18. Ambient Fluid Entrainment by Vortex Ring Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcay, Ali B.; Krueger, Paul S.

    2004-11-01

    During the formation of a vortex ring from a piston-cylinder mechanism, the roll-up of the ejected shear layer entrains ambient fluid. The resulting vortex ring convects both ejected and ambient fluid downstream. Ambient fluid entrained during the formation phase must be accelerated with the forming ring and can contribute to elevated propulsive effectiveness for pulsed-jet propulsion. In this regard it is of interest to know how much ambient fluid is entrained during vortex ring formation and if the entrainment occurs primarily during jet ejection or afterward. The present investigation evaluates ambient fluid entrainment experimentally using laser induced fluorescence of vortex ring formation from a piston-cylinder vortex ring generator. The fraction of ambient fluid in fully-developed vortex rings is evaluated directly for piston stroke-to-diameter (L/D) ratios in the range 0.25 to 4 for jet Reynolds number in the range 500 to 2000. The results indicate that the ambient fluid fraction is greater than 50% for L/D < 2.0, and the fraction tends to decrease as L/D increases. Time evolution of the entrainment during ring formation will also be presented.

  19. Ambient pressure and single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondic, Ljubinko; Yuan, Chi; Chan, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of ambient pressure on single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). By combining simulations of gas dynamics, mass diffusion theory, and stability analysis we find a narrow region of the parameter space where stable SBSL is possible. In particular, the theory predicts a 200% increase in SL radiation if ambient pressure is decreased only 5%. The results are compared with preliminary experimental data, and a good agreement is found. Variation of ambient pressure provides a simple and interesting test for the validity of various SL theories, diffusive or nondiffusive mass flow ideas, and stability analyses.

  20. 4-D Transdimensional Tomography of Iceland Using Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.

    2012-12-01

    Located at the east of Greenland and immediately south of Arctic Circle, Iceland is the largest volcanic island in the world and represents a unique region of particular interest to geosciences. Various seismological imaging techniques have been deployed to shed light on composition and thickness of the Icelandic crust with serious geodynamic repercussions (for a recent review, see Foulger (2010)). Due to an abundance of active volcanoes, Iceland can be considered a natural laboratory for studying volcanic earthquakes with anomalous seismic radiation (e.g. Tkalcic et al., 2009; Fichtner and Tkalcic, 2010). Temporal changes in the velocity field due to volcanic processes effect seismic waveforms and are important to consider in the context of seismic sources, whose understanding relies on complete understanding of Earth structure. Apart from reflection and refraction studies and teleseismic signals, ambient noise tomography has been recently utilised to image shallow subsurface of Iceland (Gudmundson et al., 2007). The confluence of North Atlantic and Arctic oceans delivers a strong and relatively evenly distributed noise field, therefore making Iceland an ideal place for an ambient noise study. We initially attempt to confirm previous results of Gudmundson et al. (2007) using conventional surface wave tomography derived from Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion, with fast marching method as a method of choice for forward modelling (Rawlinson and Sambridge, 2005). We perform cross-correlation over several three-month time intervals of ambient noise obtained from the HOTSPOT experiment (Foulger et al., 2001) distributed across Iceland and we discuss seasonal variation observed in cross-correlograms. To extend conventional methods of imaging, trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian sampling methods are used to produce a multidimensional posterior probability distribution of seismic velocity field. We use a trans-dimensional Bayesian inverse method, as it has an

  1. Laser-driven plasma jets propagating in an ambient gas studied with optical and proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Koenig, M.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N. C.; Dono, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Bouquet, S.; Falize, E.; Michaut, C.; Nazarov, W.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.

    2010-05-15

    The results of an experiment to propagate laser-generated plasma jets into an ambient medium are presented. The jets are generated via laser irradiation of a foam-filled cone target, the results and characterization of which have been reported previously [Loupias et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 265001 (2007)] for propagation in vacuum. The introduction of an ambient medium of argon at varying density is seen to result in the formation of a shock wave, and the shock front displays perturbations that appear to grow with time. The system is diagnosed with the aid of proton radiography, imaging the perturbed structure in the dense parts of the shock with high resolution.

  2. Ambient air quality in Slovak Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Violova, A.; Cremonini, M.G.; Lombardo, P.; Stenhouse, I.A.; Kocan, A.

    1998-07-01

    The National Government of the Slovak Republic is committed to develop an integrated strategy that will take into account global, regional and local aspects of the national emissions of pollutants. Priority is given to ambient air quality, with particular reference to human health protection. Only limited information on ambient air concentrations of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) was available in Slovakia. A comprehensive ambient air quality project has been recently funded by the European Union Phare Programme. The project was performed under the technical supervision of the Slovak Ministry of the Environment and aimed at monitoring the ambient air quality with respect to Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals (HMs), identifying and evaluating main potential pollution sources, and defining general strategies to reduce impacts.

  3. Timelapse: Webb's Ambient Optical Assembly Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has received a giant structural steel frame called "AOAS," the Ambient Optical Assembly Stand that will be used to assemble t...

  4. SPS emissions and comparison with ambient loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.; Brubaker, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of propulsion injections into the atmosphere due to Satellite Power System (SPS) transportation vehicles, and relates the magnitudes of these injections to the ambient burdens of the different chemical species. The significance of the different injections is discussed in terms of a dimensionless perturbation factor, the magnitude of which is a measure of the expected concentration change relative to the existing ambient concentration.

  5. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  6. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient air...

  7. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient air...

  8. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient air...

  9. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient air...

  10. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient air...

  11. Evidence of the non-extensive character of Earth's ambient noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutalonis, Ioannis; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of dynamical features of ambient seismic noise is one of the important scientific and practical research challenges. In the same time there isgrowing interest concerning an approach to study Earth Physics based on thescience of complex systems and non extensive statistical mechanics which is a generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical physics (Vallianatos et al., 2016).This seems to be a promising framework for studying complex systems exhibitingphenomena such as, long-range interactions, and memory effects. Inthis work we use non-extensive statistical mechanics and signal analysis methodsto explore the nature of ambient noise as measured in the stations of the HSNC in South Aegean (Chatzopoulos et al., 2016). In the present work we analyzed the de-trended increments time series of ambient seismic noise X(t), in time windows of 20 minutes to 10 seconds within "calm time zones" where the human-induced noise presents a minimum. Following the non extensive statistical physics approach, the probability distribution function of the increments of ambient noise is investigated. Analyzing the probability density function (PDF)p(X), normalized to zero mean and unit varianceresults that the fluctuations of Earth's ambient noise follows a q-Gaussian distribution asdefined in the frame of non-extensive statisticalmechanics indicated the possible existence of memory effects in Earth's ambient noise. References: F. Vallianatos, G. Papadakis, G. Michas, Generalized statistical mechanics approaches to earthquakes and tectonics. Proc. R. Soc. A, 472, 20160497, 2016. G. Chatzopoulos, I.Papadopoulos, F.Vallianatos, The Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC): Validation and results of the 2013 aftershock,Advances in Geosciences, 41, 65-72, 2016.

  12. Yellowstone Attenuation Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doungkaew, N.; Seats, K.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to create a tomographic attenuation image for the Yellowstone region by analyzing ambient seismic noise. An attenuation image generated from ambient noise should provide more information about the structure and properties beneath Yellowstone, especially the caldera, which is known to be active. I applied the method of Lawrence & Prieto [2011] to examine lateral variations in the attenuation structure of Yellowstone. Ambient noise data were collected from broadband seismic stations located around Yellowstone National Park from 1999-2013. Noise correlation functions derived from cross correlations of the ambient noise at two stations were used to calculate a distance dependent decay (an attenuation coefficient) at each period and distance. An inversion was then performed to isolate and localize the spatial attenuation coefficients within the study area. I observe high amplitude decay of the ambient noise at the Yellowstone caldera, most likely due to elevated temperature and crustal melts caused by volcanism, geothermal heat flow, and hydrothermal activity such as geysers.

  13. Ambient Field Analysis at Groningen Gas Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Z.; Nakata, N.; Beroza, G. C.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze continuous ambient-field data at Groningen gas field (Netherlands) through cross-correlation processing. The Groningen array is composed of 75 shallow boreholes with 6 km spacing, which contain a 3C surface accelerometer and four 5-Hz 3C borehole geophones spaced at 50 m depth intervals. We successfully retrieve coherent waves from ambient seismic field on the 9 components between stations. Results show high SNR signal in the frequency range of 0.125-1 Hz, and the ZZ, ZR, RZ, RR and TT components show much stronger wave energy than other components as expected. This poster discuss the different type of waves retrieved, the utility of the combination of borehole and surface observations, future development as well as the importance to compute the 9 components of the Green's tensor to better understand the wave field propriety with ambient noise.

  14. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  15. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature.

    PubMed

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  16. Care services ecosystem for ambient assisted living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarinha-Matos, Luis M.; Rosas, Joao; Ines Oliveira, Ana; Ferrada, Filipa

    2015-08-01

    Effective provision of care and assistance services in ambient assisted living requires the involvement and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. To support such collaboration, the development of an ecosystem of products and services for active ageing plays an important role. This article introduces a conceptual architecture that supports such care ecosystem. In order to facilitate understanding and better interrelate concepts, a 3-layered model is adopted: Infrastructure layer, Care and assistance services layer and Ambient Assisted Living ecosystem layer. A holistic perspective of ambient assisted living, namely considering four important life settings is adopted: (1) independent living; (2) health and care in life; (3) occupation in life and (4) recreation in life. The proposed architecture is designed in the context of a national Portuguese project and in accordance with the findings of a large European road mapping initiative on ICT and ageing.

  17. Dynamics of dense granular flows of small-and-large-grain mixtures in an ambient fluid.

    PubMed

    Meruane, C; Tamburrino, A; Roche, O

    2012-08-01

    Dense grain flows in nature consist of a mixture of solid constituents that are immersed in an ambient fluid. In order to obtain a good representation of these flows, the interaction mechanisms between the different constituents of the mixture should be considered. In this article, we study the dynamics of a dense granular flow composed of a binary mixture of small and large grains immersed in an ambient fluid. In this context, we extend the two-phase approach proposed by Meruane et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 648, 381 (2010)] to the case of flowing dense binary mixtures of solid particles, by including in the momentum equations a constitutive relation that describes the interaction mechanisms between the solid constituents in a dense regime. These coupled equations are solved numerically and validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurements of the front speed of gravitational granular flows resulting from the collapse, in ambient air or water, of two-dimensional granular columns that consisted of mixtures of small and large spherical particles of equal mass density. Our results suggest that the model equations include the essential features that describe the dynamics of grains flows of binary mixtures in an ambient fluid. In particular, it is shown that segregation of small and large grains can increase the front speed because of the volumetric expansion of the flow. This increase in flow speed is damped by the interaction forces with the ambient fluid, and this behavior is more pronounced in water than in air.

  18. Signal from noise: Insights into volcanic system processes from ambient noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, Sara

    This first section of dissertation concerns the imaging of the crust and upper most mantle structure of the mid-Miocene volcanic provinces of the Northwestern United States using ambient noise tomography. Chapter 1 introduces the complex tectonic history of the northwestern United States and describes the development of volcanism from the ignimbrite sweep that occurred with the extension of the Basin and Range province, initiation and evolution of the mid-Miocene volcanism of the Steens/Columbia River flood basalts, and mirror-image volcanic tracks of the High Lava Plains, Oregon and Yellowstone-Snake River Plains. Chapter 2 describes in detail the concepts and methods for determining the 3D shear velocity structure in the crust and uppermost mantle from ambient noise correlations. Chapter 3 contains the text and supplementary materials of Hanson-Hedgecock et al. [2012] published in the Geophysical Research Letters that describes the application of the ambient noise methods to the imaging of the Western United States. The second section of this work discusses the results of measuring velocity changes associated with three episodes of increased eruptive activity at Tungurahua in 2010 using ambient noise correlations. The third section of this work discusses the results of using the H/V ratio to measure the level of equipartition of the ambient noise wavefield at Tungurahua in 2010.

  19. Gravity Currents Propagating Up a Slope in a Uniform Ambient and a Two-Layer Stratified Ambient Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, Larissa; Flynn, Morris; Sutherland, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Bottom propagating gravity currents resulting from full- and partial-depth lock-release experiments are investigated as they propagate up a slope within a uniform and a two-layer stratified ambient. For the former case we adapt the theory of Shin et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 521, 2004) and derive a relationship for the deceleration of the front as a function of the slope angle and gravity current density. Experimental results show that the shape of the gravity current is self-similar as it decelerates over relatively steep slopes. The evolution of a gravity current in a two-layer ambient is complicated by the excitation of and interaction with a solitary wave. If the initial gravity current speed is subcritical to the wave speed, the current eventually stops abruptly while the wave continues at constant speed. If supercritical, turbulence at the current head is suppressed as it approaches the interface at the leading edge of the wave and the is re-established as the head becomes in direct contact with the upper layer.

  20. Ambient Noise Tomography of the British Isles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, H. J.; Curtis, A.; Baptie, B.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, surface wave tomography using empirical Green’s functions computed via the ambient noise interferometry method has become an established approach to lithospheric imaging problems. To date, ambient noise tomography has been successfully applied to seismometer arrays in the United States, Australia, Iceland, China, South Africa, Europe and the Tibetan Plateau. The basis of the ambient seismic interferometry method is that, by cross-correlating noise data between two seismic stations and stacking over a long enough time period, one can approximate the Green’s Function that would have been recorded at one of the stations if the other had actually been a source. Consequently, one of the main advantages of ambient noise interferometry is that traditional seismic sources such as earthquakes or ballistics are not required; therefore it is ideal for application to seismically quiescent areas such as the British Isles. The British Isles are an archipelago located adjacent to the Eurasian continental shelf in a typically intra-plate setting, formed by a complex amalgamation of several terranes. These range from Laurentian north of the Highland Boundary fault to Avalonian south of the Iapetus Suture and evidence of the regions turbulent geological past can be inferred from its lithospheric structure. Previous studies of the structure of the British Isles considered relatively few seismic stations and/or were limited to using offshore shots, quarry blasts or teleseismic earthquakes as seismic energy sources. We have applied the ambient noise tomography method to noise data recorded on approximately 100 broadband and short period seismometers, including many new stations, in the British Isles and mainland Europe. This dense coverage of the British Isles allows us to image the crust and upper mantle velocity structure with a horizontal resolution in the region of 100km across the North Sea and 30km in the mainland United Kingdom. Here we present the first

  1. Ambient taxes when polluters have multiple choices

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, R.D.; Shortle, J.S.; Abler, D.G.

    1998-09-01

    Economic research on environmental policy design has largely been concerned with the merits of emissions-based economic incentives (e.g., emissions charges, emissions reduction subsidies, transferable discharge permits). Ambient-based tax-subsidy schemes have drawn considerable interest in nonpoint pollution literature as alternatives to emissions-based instruments. Expanding especially on Segerson`s seminal article, this article examines the optimal design and budget-balancing properties of ambient tax-subsidy schemes under more realistic assumptions about the dimensions of firms` choice sets than prior research.

  2. AMBIENT AQUATIC LIFE WATER QUALITY CRITERIA FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nonylphenol is a toxic breakdown product of nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE) surfactants. NPE surfactants are used in industrial cleaning applications and pesticide formulations. EPA published a draft ambient water quality criteria document for nonylphenol in January 2004. This document contains ambient water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic organisms and their uses. Acute and chronic criteria recommendations have been developed for the protection of aquatic life in both freshwater and saltwater. These criteria are published pursuant to Section 304 (a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) and serve as technical information for States for establishing criteria within their State Water Quality Standards.

  3. Ambient odors modulate visual attentional capture.

    PubMed

    Michael, George Andrew; Jacquot, Laurence; Millot, Jean Louis; Brand, Gérard

    2003-12-11

    Sudden visual events capture attention involuntarily because they may signal potential threats. Some theoretical accounts consider that the biological significance of these events is established through the limbic structures. Thus, the manipulation of the limbic activity would affect attentional capture. Since these structures are directly linked to the olfactory system, we have tended to modulate their activity with olfactory stimulations. We have examined behavioral performance in a task of attentional capture by luminance under conditions of ambient odors. Our results show that attentional capture is indeed modulated by ambient odors, and that this modulation may depend on the odor's properties.

  4. Ambient noise analysis of underwater acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Mark A.; Orlin, Pete; Schulte, Annette; Newcomb, Joal

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The buoys recorded frequencies up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days in 2001 and for 72 days in 2002. The acoustic signals recorded include sperm whale vocalizations, seismic airguns, and shipping traffic. The variability of the ambient noise is analyzed using spectrograms, time series, and statistical measurements. Variations in ambient noise before, during, and after tropical storm/hurricane passage are also investigated.

  5. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  6. Materials data handbook. Titanium 6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for Titanium 6Al-4V alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  7. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  8. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS): REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies support a participation of fine particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 0.1 to 2.5 microm in the effects of air pollution particles on human health. The ambient fine particle concentrator is a recently developed technology that can enrich the mass of ambi...

  9. Training Engineers for the Ambient Intelligence Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corno, Fulvio; De Russis, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the new breed of distributed intelligent systems, such as the Internet of Things, which require a diversity of languages and protocols, can only be tamed with design and programming best practices. Interest is also growing for including the human factor, as advocated by the "ambient intelligence" (AmI)…

  10. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS): REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies support a participation of fine particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 0.1 to 2.5 microm in the effects of air pollution particles on human health. The ambient fine particle concentrator is a recently developed technology that can enrich the mass of ambi...

  11. Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

  12. Redox Toxicology of Ambient Air Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air pollution is a leading global cause of morbidity and mortality. Millions of Americans live in areas in which levels of tropospheric ozone exceed air quality standards, while exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5) alone results in 3.2 million excess deaths annually wor...

  13. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  14. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    jihadi doctrine, al-Libi enrolled himself in the recently erected and highly popular al-Faruq 2 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III...February 2008, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7220823.stm. 3 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III,’” Global Terrorism Research Project...5 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III,’” Global Terrorism Research Project. 6 Ibid. The date provided in the video is 1410

  15. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  16. Thermal explosion in oscillating ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozhilov, Vasily

    2016-07-01

    Thermal explosion problem for a medium with oscillating ambient temperature at its boundaries is considered. This is a new problem in thermal explosion theory, not previously considered in a distributed system formulation, but important for combustion and fire science. It describes autoignition of wide range of fires (such as but not limited to piles of biosolids and other organic matter; storages of munitions, explosives, propellants) subjected to temperature variations, such as seasonal or day/night variation. The problem is considered in formulation adopted in classical studies of thermal explosion. Critical conditions are determined by frequency and amplitude of ambient temperature oscillations, as well as by a number of other parameters. Effects of all the parameters on critical conditions are quantified. Results are presented for the case of planar symmetry. Development of thermal explosion in time is also considered, and a new type of unsteady thermal explosion development is discovered where thermal runaway occurs after several periods of temperature oscillations within the medium.

  17. Ambient tectonic stress as fragile geological feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2014-09-01

    seismic waves produce frictional failure within shallow pervasively cracked rocks. Distributed failure preferentially relaxes ambient tectonic stresses, providing a fragility measure of past strong shaking. Relaxation of the regional fault-normal compression appears to have occurred within granite from 768 m down to ˜1000-1600 m depth at the Pilot Hole near Parkfield, California. Subsequent movements on the main fault have imposed strike-slip stress within the relaxed region. Peak ground velocities of ˜2 m s-1 are inferred for infrequent (few 1000 yr recurrence) past earthquakes from stress relaxation within the granite and from the variation of S wave velocity with depth in the overlying sandstone. Conversely, frequent strong shaking in slowly deforming regions relaxes shallow ambient tectonic stress. This situation is expected beneath Whittier Narrows, where strong Love waves from numerous San Andreas events repeatedly produced nonlinear behavior.

  18. Ambient-temperature co-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation catalysts which operate at ambient temperature were developed for the recombination of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2) dissociation products which are formed during carbon dioxide (CO2) laser operation. Recombination of these products to regenerate CO2 allows continuous operation of CO2 lasers in a closed cycle mode. Development of these catalyst materials provides enabling technology for the operation of such lasers from space platforms or in ground based facilities without constant gas consumption required for continuous open cycle operation. Such catalysts also have other applications in various areas outside the laser community for removal of CO from other closed environments such as indoor air and as an ambient temperature catalytic converter for control of auto emissions.

  19. Ambient Intelligence Research Landscapes: Introduction and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitz, Norbert

    This paper starts out by introducing the "Landscapes" category at the Joint International Conference on Ambient Intelligence (AmI-2010) and provides an overview over the two sessions. The main part of the paper presents a framework for the role of Ambient Intelligence in the development of the cities of the future. This includes the integration of real and virtual worlds resulting in Hybrid Cities and their transformation into Smart Cities. In the context, it is argued that the technological development has to be monitored by guidelines and goals for maintaining and improving the quality of life leading to what is called Humane Cities, addressing, e.g., social awareness and privacy, trust and identity. The paper closes with proposals for a future research agenda.

  20. Deep Water Ambient Noise and Mode Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    tomography sources. In 2009 the DVLA also recorded segments of ambient sound during time periods when the tomography sources were not transmitting. In our... designed to null out the largest interferers, 1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Report...Measurements of the vertical structure of ocean noise are important for understanding noise generation and propagation and for designing sonar signal

  1. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  2. Seabed property estimation from ambient noise recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyzert, E.

    2007-12-01

    Processing and imaging of multi-component seismic data requires detailed knowledge of the shear velocity model of the subsurface. The near surface shear velocity is particular difficult to obtain using conventional seismic methods based on the analysis of shot generated data acquired in deep water. An analysis is presented of ambient noise recorded by an ocean bottom seismic cable developed for seismic exploration and monitoring. The data-set consists of 33 minutes of ambient noise recordings acquired in 270 m water depth. The ocean bottom seismic cable system has a hydrophone and three orthogonal geophones spaced at a 12.5 m interval over a total length of 5600 m. Analysis of the data revealed that below the frequency of 0.075 Hz the hydrophone data were found to be dominated by pressure variations due to sea surface waves. However, the corresponding seafloor compliance (the transfer function between pressure and velocity) was not observed on the vertical geophone component due to the limited 33 minutes recording length. Above 4 Hz the data were dominated by waterborne noise. The ambient noise wavefield at frequencies between 0.5 and 3 Hz was dominated by Scholte waves most likely generated by wave interaction. In addition Love waves were also observed but their excitation mechanism remains unexplained. Scholte and Love wave phase-velocities were picked in the frequency-wavenumber domain. In this domain the slowest velocity is apparent for inline propagation. Scholte wave phase-velocities were inverted for a near surface shear velocity model using a linearized inversion method. In an alternative approach, the spectral ratio of the vertical component and total ambient noise wavefield for the Scholte wave band was calculated and inverted for a near shear wave velocity model. This near surface model is in agreement with other published shallow shear velocity models and synthetics for this model fit well with the observed Scholte and Love wave phase velocity and the

  3. Ambulatory measurement of ambient carbon monoxide levels.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Neil B; Courtney, Todd G; Holm, James R

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of air pollutant levels in the environment is traditionally performed using monitors in fixed locations so that changes over time can be directly compared. Such measurements do not necessarily correlate with the level of exposure to the individual because of distance to the monitoring site and other factors. In the case of carbon monoxide (CO), portable personal monitors are available for industrial use, some of which do not just alarm, but also record measured values. First, it was the purpose of this study to test the feasibility of continuously measuring ambient CO levels in an ambulatory fashion. The second objective was to compare measurements made in a country with significant air pollution to one without to determine the degree to which differences might be observed. Ambient CO levels were measured and recorded every 10 minutes during 13 days of travel in Vietnam. A parallel study was performed in the United States for comnarison. Continuous ambient CO levels at an individual level were successfully measured and recorded. Mean ambient CO level throughout Vietnam was 3.5 ± 4.4 ppm, as compared to 0.9 ± 0.8 ppm in the U.S. (p < 0.001). In Vietnam, 36 CO measurements (2% of total) were 15 ppm or greater vs. none in the U.S. Higher mean levels, as well as number and magnitude of peaks, were highly associated with proximity to traffic. Personal exposures to CO can be measured easily over time and may be more relevant to the individual with underlying disease than data from fixed monitoring stations. Such information may prove useful to potential travelers. Additionally, governmental agencies may find ambulatory measurement to be complimentary to data from fixed monitoring stations when attempting to estimate how traditionally collected data relate to exposure of the individual. The technique could also be used for evaluation of vague complaints suggestive of intermittent CO exposure in the home or workplace.

  4. Improved Ambient Pressure Pyroelectric Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kim, Hugh I.; Kanik, Isik; Ryu, Ernest K.; Beckett, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The detection of volatile vapors of unknown species in a complex field environment is required in many different applications. Mass spectroscopic techniques require subsystems including an ionization unit and sample transport mechanism. All of these subsystems must have low mass, small volume, low power, and be rugged. A volatile molecular detector, an ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) that met these requirements, was recently reported by Caltech researchers to be used in in situ environments.

  5. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  6. Deep Water Ambient Noise and Mode Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Deep Water Ambient Noise and Mode Processing Kathleen E. Wage George Mason University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 4400...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) George Mason University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 4400 University...analysis of the Church Opal data set showed that noise levels decreased substantially (on the order of 20 dB) below the critical depth [5]. This project

  7. Ambient temperature sodium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Yu, Xingwen

    2015-05-13

    Ambient- or room-temperature sodium-sulfur batteries (RT Na-S) are gaining much attention as a low-cost option for large-scale electrical energy storage applications. However, their adoption is hampered by severe challenges. This concept paper summarizes first the operating principles, history, recent progress, and challenges of RT Na-S battery technology, and then suggests future directions towards enhancing performance in order for it to be a viable technology.

  8. Work function measurements in gas ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Wilford N.; Johnson, Kendall B.

    1994-09-01

    A simple, practical method for making work function measurements in gas ambient is presented. The method makes use of a Kelvin probe that has been calibrated using a clean solution surface of an electrochemical half-cell. We find that the outer potential of a typical half-cell solution is constant and reproducible, much more so even than gold in air. It is suggested that the concept and definition of work function be extended to electrochemical half-cells.

  9. Exercise and outdoor ambient air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, A; Sharp, N

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To establish by literature survey: (a) levels at which air pollutants are considered damaging to human health and to exercisers in particular; (b) the current ambient levels experienced in the United Kingdom; (c) whether athletes are especially at risk. Methods—Six major urban air pollutants were examined: carbon monoxide (CO); nitrogen oxides (NOX); ozone (O3); particulate matter (PM10); sulphur dioxide (SO2); volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Results—CO is detrimental to athletic performance. NO2 is of concern to human health, but outdoor levels are low. O3 poses a potentially serious risk to exercising athletes. Decrements in lung function result from exposure, and there is evidence that athletic performance may be affected. Detrimental effects may occur at low ambient levels, but there is no scientific consensus on this matter. PM10 is causing concern in the scientific community. Blood lead accumulation during exercise indicates that personal exposure to toxic compounds associated with PM10 may be magnified. Generally, outdoor ambient levels of SO2 are too low to cause a problem to the athlete, except the asthmatic athlete. The few studies on exposure of exercisers to VOCs are reviewed. Conclusions—Athletes and exercisers should avoid exercising by the road side even though levels of the more noxious air pollutants have been controlled in the United Kingdom. O3 is particularly damaging to athletes; it reaches its highest concentrations on hot bright days in rural areas. Key Words: exercise; air pollution PMID:11477012

  10. Characterizing global infrasonic ocean ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, Alexis; Stutzman, Eleonore; Arduin, Fabrice; Sylvain, Leon

    2017-04-01

    The ability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) global infrasound network to detect atmospheric explosions and events of interest strongly depends on station specific ambient noise which includes both incoherent wind noise and real coherent infrasonic waves. To characterize the coherent ambient noise, a broadband array processing was performed on 10 years of continuous recordings at IMS stations. Multi-year comparisons between the observed and modeled directional microbarom amplitude variations at several IMS stations using two-dimensional wave energy spectrum ocean wave products are performed to build of a reference database of infrasound oceanic sources. Microseisms are attributed the same source processes as microbaroms, involving the interaction of standing ocean waves. To further evaluate oceanic wave action models, the infrasound analysis will be supplemented with several other approaches including microseisms collected at seismic instrumentation (single stations and arrays). The expected benefits of such studies concern the use of multi-year complementary data to finely characterize coupling mechanisms at the ocean-atmosphere interface. In return, a better knowledge of the source of the ambient ocean noise opens new perspectives by providing additional integrated constraints on the dynamics of the middle atmosphere and its disturbances where data coverage is sparse.

  11. Quantification of furandiones in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naiema, Ibrahim M.; Roppo, Hannah M.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2017-03-01

    Furandiones are products of the photooxidation of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC), like toluene, and contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Because few molecular tracers of anthropogenic SOA are used to assess this source in ambient aerosol, developing a quantification method for furandiones holds a great importance. In this study, we developed a direct and highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantitative analysis of furandiones in fine particulate matter that is mainly free from interference by structurally-related dicarboxylic acids. Our application of this method in Iowa City, IA provides the first ambient measurements of four furandiones: 2,5-furandione, 3-methyl-2,5-furandione, dihydro-2,5-furandione, and dihydro-3-methyl-2,5-furandione. Furandiones were detected in all collected samples with a daily average concentration of 9.1 ± 3.8 ng m-3. The developed method allows for the accurate measurement of the furandiones concentrations in ambient aerosol, which will support future evaluation of these compounds as tracers for anthropogenic SOA and assessment of their potential health impacts.

  12. Desarrollo curricular, conciencia ambiental y tecnologia para estudiantes de intermedia: Una investigacion en accion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ramos, Teresita

    Se llevó a cabo una investigación en acción con los propósitos de 1) documentar las relaciones de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en las clases de ciencias de escuela intermedia como elemento de apoyo cuando se aborda el tema ambiental y sus conceptos pertinentes, a partir de las observaciones de la investigadora, así como las entrevistas y diarios reflexivos de los estudiantes de una escuela intermedia en la zona metropolitana, y luego 2) diseñar una unidad instruccional sobre el tema ambiental que integre actividades tecnologías para el curso de ciencias de la escuela intermedia según el modelo PROCIC y las observaciones que hayan iniciado los estudiantes participantes. Finalmente, se plantearon las implicaciones educativas para el currículo del Programa de Ciencias al instrumentar este modelo de unidad mediante PROCIC, e integrado la tecnología y el tema ambiental. Los hallazgos se analizaron y se categorizaron de acuerdo con las preguntas de investigación. El hallazgo principal de la investigación aborda las cuatro relaciones centrales en las que se articula la utilización de las tecnologías y sus aplicaciones en la clase de ciencias. Estas cuatro relaciones que recogen la posición de los estudiantes son: 1) Perspectiva de los estudiantes hacia la tecnología. 2) Participación de los estudiantes en los aspectos docentes. 3) Aprendizaje estudiantil sobre el ambiente, y 4) Conciencia ambiental en relación con la vida diaria. Estas relaciones ponen de manifiesto,cómo se plantea en las implicaciones, la necesidad de más investigación en acción en la sala de clases, la importancia—como tema transversal—de la conciencia ambiental mediante la tecnología al construir conocimientos significativos dentro y fuera de la escuela, asó como, valorar la investigación y la dialogicidad en la sala de clases como actividades que obligan al reexamen de la práctica didáctica en su formas curriculares de objetivos, recursos

  13. Persistent photoconductivity in ZnO nanowires: Influence of oxygen and argon ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madel, M.; Huber, F.; Mueller, R.; Amann, B.; Dickel, M.; Xie, Y.; Thonke, K.

    2017-03-01

    ZnO nanowires typically show persistent photoconductivity (PPC), which depends in their temporal behaviour on the ambient. We investigate ZnO nanowires in oxygen and argon ambient and analyze the PPC both on the short and on the long time scale to sort out the underlying mechanisms. Wavelength dependent excitation shows the energy barrier for the PPC to be around 150 meV below the band gap of ZnO, independent of the ambient atmosphere. In photocurrent measurements at constant wavelength, a log-logistic dependence of the conductivity on the partial oxygen pressure is observed. The experimental results are compared to a model of Bonasewicz et al. [J. Electrochem. Soc. 133, 2270 (1986)] and can be explained by oxygen adsorption processes occurring on the surface of the ZnO nanowires. From temperature dependent measurements of the decay times in oxygen and argon ambient, the related activation energies for the fast and slow decay processes are determined. Comparing our results to theoretical calculations of energy levels of intrinsic defects [Janotti and Van de Walle, Phys. Status Solidi B 248, 799 (2011)], we find oxygen vacancies to be related to the fast decay processes, whereas adsorption and desorption processes of oxygen on the ZnO nanowire surface account for the slow part.

  14. Account of ambient turbulence for turbine wakes using a Synthetic-Eddy-Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinon, Grégory; Carlier, Clément; Fur, Arnaud; Gaurier, Benoît; Germain, Grégory; Rivoalen, Élie

    2017-05-01

    The present paper aims at describing the use of a Synthetic-Eddy-Method (SEM), initially proposed by Jarrin et al. [12], in the 3D Lagrangian Vortex method framework. The SEM method is used here in order to generate a far-field incoming flow with a prescribed ambient turbulence intensity. However, for the account of the diffusive term in the Navier-Stokes equations, a classical Particle Strength Exchange model with a LES eddy viscosity is used. Firstly, the general characteristics of the Synthetic-Eddy-Method will be presented together with its integration in the framework of the developed 3D unsteady Lagrangian Vortex software [27]. The capability of the ambient turbulence model to reproduce a perturbed flow that verifies any turbulence intensity I∞ and any anisotropic ratio (σu :σv :σw ) will be discussed and validated. Then, the capability of the presented ambient turbulence model to compute turbine wakes will also be presented together with first results. Finally, comparisons will be made between the obtained numerical results against experimental data [22, 23] for two levels of ambient turbulence, namely I∞ = 3% and I∞ = 15%. Although the present study was initially performed in the framework of tidal energy, its application to wind energy is straightforward.

  15. Estimation of ambient and non-ambient components of particulate matter exposure from a personal monitoring panel study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William E; Brauer, Michael

    2006-05-01

    To provide additional insight into factors affecting exposure to airborne particulate matter and the resultant health effects, we developed a method to estimate the ambient and nonambient components of total personal exposure. The ambient (or outdoor) component of total personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) (called ambient exposure) includes exposure to the ambient PM concentration while outdoors and exposure while indoors to ambient PM that has infiltrated indoors. The nonambient component of total personal exposure to PM (called nonambient exposure) refers to exposure to PM generated by indoor sources and an individual's personal activity. We used data collected from a personal monitoring study in Vancouver, Canada to demonstrate the methodology. In this study, ambient PM(2.5) exposure was 71% of the measured ambient PM(2.5) concentration and was responsible for 44% of the measured total personal PM(2.5) exposure. Regression analysis of the pooled data sets for ambient and total exposure against outdoor concentrations yielded similar slopes (0.76 for ambient and 0.77 for total) but a higher coefficient of determination for ambient exposure (R(2)=0.62) than for total exposure (R(2)=0.072). As expected, the nonambient exposure was not related to the ambient concentration (R(2)<10(-6)). For longitudinal analyses of the relationship between measured personal exposure and ambient concentrations for individual subjects, the correlation of total personal exposure with ambient concentration yielded values of Pearson's r from 0.83 to -0.68 with an average of 0.36. The relationship was statistically significant for only five of the 16 subjects. In contrast, the correlation of the estimated ambient exposure with ambient concentration yielded values of Pearson's r from 0.92 to 0.77 with an average of 0.88; 14 were significant. An example, taken from an epidemiologic analysis using the exposure data from this paper, demonstrates the usefulness of separating total

  16. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Delong, David M.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-15

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L{sub adp}) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L{sub s}). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L{sub adp} values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m{sup 2}) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m{sup 2}) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m{sup 2} luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately

  17. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin J; Chawla, Amarpreet S; Delong, David M; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-01

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L(adp)) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L(s)). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L(adp) values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m2) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m2) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m2 luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to the image L(adp) value of

  18. Ambient air quality monitoring at Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR) Kampar campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Lim Jun; Xinxin, Guo; Ke, Wang

    2017-04-01

    Air Pollutant includes any substance in solid, liquid or gaseous form present in the atmosphere in concentrations which may tend to be injurious to all living creatures, property and environment. In this study, automatic continuous monitoring station was used to monitor concentration of carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ambient air of Kampar Campus, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman. High-volume air sampler was also used to monitor the concentration of PM2.5 and the collected PM2.5 was further analysed for the heavy metal concentration such as Zinc (Zn), Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), Arsenic (As), Aluminium (Al), and Lead (Pb) in PM2.5 using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The overall ambient air quality in the campus area is consider unhealthy as the non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and carbon dioxide (CO2) average concentration obtained were far exceeding the recommended limit concentration set by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Meteorological data was found that it does not show much relationship with the air quality data in this study. The concentration of Zn and Al were found the dominant heavy metal in the ambient air. The enrichment factor analysis also shows that the heavy metals contained in PM2.5 mainly origin from the natural source except for the Zn which it is highly contaminated by human activities.

  19. Crustal Structure of the Paraná Basin from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaco, B.; Rosa, M.; Sanchez, G.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-05-01

    Previous surface-wave tomography in South America (e.g., Feng et al., 2004; 2007) mapped the main large-scale features of the continent, such as the high lithospheric velocities in cratonic areas and low velocities in the Patagonian province. However, more detailed features such as the Chaco and Paraná Basins have not been mapped with good resolution because of poor path coverage. This work is part of a major project to increase knowledge of crustal structure in Southern Brazil and Eastern Argentina, carried out by IAG-USP (Brazil) in collaboration with UNLP and INPRES (Argentina). To improve resolution for the Paraná Basin we used inter-station dispersion curves derived from correlation of ambient noise for new stations deployed with the implementation of the Brazilian Seismic Network (Pirchiner et al. 2011). Ambient noise tomography (ANT), was first applied by Shapiro et al. (2005) and is now expanding rapidly, especially in areas with high density of seismic stations (e.g. Bensen et al. 2007, Lin et al. 2008, Moschetti et al. 2010). ANT is a well-established method to estimate short period (< 20s) and intermediate periods (20 - 50s) surface wave speeds both in regional or continental scales (Lin et al. 2008). The ambient noise data was processed as described by Bensen et al. 2007, in four major steps, with addition of a final data inversion step. Group velocities between pairs of stations were derived from correlation of ambient noise in the period range 5 to 60 s. We used nearly two years of continuous data from INPRES broadband stations, LPA station in La Plata, CPUP in Paraguay, and the recently deployed Brazilian stations in southern Brazil. The dispersion curves were measured with a modified version of PGSWMFA (PGplot Surface Wave Multiple Filter Analysis) code, designed by Chuck Ammon (St. Louis University) and successfully applied by Pasyanos et al. (2001). Our modified version is no more event based and is working now with station pairs. For the

  20. Photosynthesis of H2O2 and O3 in ASW with ambient O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Raut, U.; Loeffler, M.; Kim, J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Tenuous O2 atmospheres are known to exist around icy satellites such as Europa and Ganymede and around Saturn’s rings and satellites [1,2]. These faint atmospheres with pressures estimated in 10-3 to 10-8 mbar range [2] are thought to be produced from photolysis and radiolysis of surface ice. In efforts to simulate closely the conditions on icy satellites and grains, ion irradiation of laboratory ices have been performed while maintaining an ambient O2 pressure in recent experiments, which lead to the discovery of the ion-induced O2 adsorption [3]. In the experiments presented here, we investigated the effect of UV photolysis on the ice films in the presence of ambient O2 pressure. Water ice films vapor-deposited between 40 and 100 K were irradiated using 193 nm photons from an ArF Excimer laser, under a constant ambient gas pressure of 7x10-7 mbar. The changes in the film during laser irradiation were monitored using infrared spectroscopy and quartz crystal microgravimetry. At 50 K, we exposed our film to photolysis under ambient pressure of different gas species: Ar, N2 and O2. Interestingly we find enhanced gas absorption only in the presence of ambient O2. In addition, we find that the dangling bond IR absorption disappears, indicating the collapse of micropores. We note that the dangling bond absorption decreases only ~10% in an ice film subject to UV irradiation in the absence of ambient gas, which suggests that the enhanced O2 absorption is not due to gas trapping during compaction [3], but to photo-chemical reactions between OH and transiently adsorbed O2, forming H2O2 and O3, which we detected with IR spectroscopy. We observed that the formation of these two products increases below 50 K, which is explained by increased O2 adsorption at decreasing temperature. Interestingly, if we increase the ambient O2 pressure, then we can increase the maximum temperature for which we can make O3. O3 has not been identified in photolysis of laboratory ice and only

  1. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  2. Ambient Experience in Restitutive Treatment of Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    McClung, Jill S.; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Nadeau, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges to language rehabilitation is reconciling the fact that the same therapeutic intervention, provided to different individuals with similar types of stroke-induced aphasia, may result in divergent outcomes. In this paper, the authors reviewed existing literature to identify relevant ambient factors – those outside the control of the clinician – that may potentially influence functional language recovery in aphasia and response to treatment. The goal was to develop a clinical history-taking tool to assist clinicians in gathering information germane to each individual's unique circumstances and environment, elements that may have previously been underestimated, to provide a complete inventory of potentially potent prognostic factors. First, two of the authors, speech–language pathologists experienced in aphasia rehabilitation, identified and categorized factors that seemed likely to influence aphasia outcomes. Then, a wide range of literature was reviewed in an effort to identify factors empirically found to be potent influences on aphasia recovery. Where studies relating these factors to aphasia were not found, relevant research from allied fields that examined recovery from brain injury is reported. Moreover, some factors thought to be potentially potent have yet to be examined. Finally, the ambient factors supported by evidence were categorized as facilitators or barriers to functional improvement, and the Ambient Influences on Outcome Checklist (AOC) was developed, including only those factors shown to be potent in the recovery process. It is hoped that this checklist can be used to more broadly assess potential prognostic influences in aphasia restitution, as well as spawn further research. PMID:21103021

  3. Head wave correlations in ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, John; Siderius, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Ambient ocean noise is processed with a vertical line array to reveal coherent time-separated arrivals suggesting the presence of head wave multipath propagation. Head waves, which are critically propagating water waves created by seabed waves traveling parallel to the water-sediment interface, can propagate faster than water-only waves. Such eigenrays are much weaker than water-only eigenrays, and are often completely overshadowed by them. Surface-generated noise is different whereby it amplifies the coherence between head waves and critically propagating water-only waves, which is measured by cross-correlating critically steered beams. This phenomenon is demonstrated both experimentally and with a full wave simulation.

  4. Spontaneous Group Learning in Ambient Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Markus; Jughardt, Achim; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Veith, Patrick

    Spontaneous Group Learning is a concept to form and facilitate face-to-face, ad-hoc learning groups in collaborative settings. We show how to use Ambient Intelligence to identify, support, and initiate group processes. Learners' positions are determined by widely used technologies, e.g., Bluetooth and WLAN. As a second step, learners' positions, tasks, and interests are visualized. Finally, a group process is initiated supported by relevant documents and services. Our solution is a starting point to develop new didactical solutions for collaborative processes.

  5. Detecting Ambient Tectonic Tremor in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. R.; Hough, S. E.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    In every tectonic setting where it is observed, tremor proves difficult to detect due to its long durations and low amplitudes close to the noise band. This is particularly true in southern California where cultural noise sources are both spatially and temporally pervasive. Ambient tectonic tremor in circum-Pacific subduction zones was shown to consist of repeating low-frequency earthquakes and locates at the deep extent of the primary seismogenic zone in a region downdip of historical M 8+ earthquakes. The signals were also shown to have a distinct spectral shape (typically around 1-8 Hz) whose higher frequency falloff differs from that of local noise and ordinary earthquakes. In the strike-slip setting, families of deep ambient tremors near the Parkfield-Cholame segment of the San Andreas fault were considered proxies for deep fault slip. Whether ambient tremor occurs in a similar fashion- or even at all- in southern California remains unclear. We employ a combination of running autocorrelation and matched-filter techniques successfully used in both subduction and strike slip settings to detect and locate tremor/low-frequency earthquakes in southern California. In our case, however, detections are accepted or rejected by calculating their spectral shapes to assure the signals are distinct from local noise sources and earthquakes. We scan continuous seismic recordings of the Southern California Seismic Network near the San Jacinto fault from 2008-2012 to detect tremor-like signals, distinguish their spectral shape from other sources, and subsequently locate it. We target this area on account of the abundance of seismic stations including borehole stations. Also, since tremor (2-8 Hz) was triggered by the passing surface waves of the 2002 M 7.9 Denali earthquake in vicinity of the San Jacinto fault we expect an ambient signal to occur in the same area with a similar spectral shape. The application of a spectral discriminator is particularly needed in this region

  6. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  7. Ambient Noise Monitoring of the Santa Clara and San Gabriel Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, T.; Denolle, M.

    2016-12-01

    Ambient noise cross-correlation is an effective technique to monitor temporal changes in the properties of the solid earth. The technique has had particular success in monitoring over time scales differing by orders of magnitude, with precursors to volcanic eruptions occurring over days [Brenguier, et al., 2008, Nature] and post-seismic relaxation in fault zones occurring over years [Brenguier, et al., 2008, Science]. Recently, the technique was extended to investigate the interaction of the solid earth and climate via ice sheet melt [Mordret et al.,2016]. In that vein, we use ambient noise cross-correlation to monitor basin-scale aquifers. The technique is amenable to studying aquifers, as it has potential for high spatial resolution, on the scale of a basin and can monitor aquifer recharge/draw down on timescales from large, single-day storms to multi-year droughts. Geodetics studies have previously recorded both long term, in the Santa Clara Valley [Chaussard et al., 2014, Schmidt and Burgmann, 2003], and short-term, in the San Gabriel Valley [King et al. 2007], ground uplift due to aquifer recharge. We use the Moving Window Cross Spectral technique [Clarke et al., 2011] to monitor wave-speed perturbation in the Santa Clara valley over the period 2001-2016 and San Gabriel Basin over the period 1995-2016. Preliminary results, using stations from the Berkeley Digital Seismograph Network and the USGS Northern California Regional Network, show that seismic velocities vary 0.1% intra-annually. We explore the temporal variations, along with correlations in observed ground water data, precipitation and geodesic measurements to deduce the poroelastic properties of the aquifers during the last two El-Nino and recent droughts in California.

  8. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Christopher

    In coastal environments, when topographic and bathymetric constrictions are combined with large tidal amplitudes, strong currents (> 2 m/s) can occur. Because such environments are relatively rare and difficult to study, until recently, they have received little attention from the scientific community. However, in recent years, interest in developing tidal hydrokinetic power projects in these environments has motivated studies to improve this understanding. In order to support an analysis of the acoustic effects of tidal power generation, a multi-year study was conducted at a proposed project site in Puget Sound (WA) are analyzed at a site where peak currents exceeded 3.5 m/s. From these analyses, three noise sources are shown to dominate the observed variability in ambient noise between 0.02-30 kHz: anthropogenic noise from vessel traffic, sediment-generated noise during periods of strong currents, and flow-noise resulting from turbulence advected over the hydrophones. To assess the contribution of vessel traffic noise, one calendar year of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship-traffic data was paired with hydrophone recordings. The study region included inland waters of the Salish Sea within a 20 km radius of the hydrophone deployment site in northern Admiralty Inlet. The variability in spectra and hourly, daily, and monthly ambient noise statistics for unweighted broadband and M-weighted sound pressure levels is driven largely by vessel traffic. Within the one-year study period, at least one AIS transmitting vessel is present in the study area 90% of the time and over 1,363 unique vessels are recorded. A noise budget for vessels equipped with AIS transponders identifies cargo ships, tugs, and passenger vessels as the largest contributors to noise levels. A simple model to predict received levels at the site based on an incoherent summation of noise from different vessel types yields a cumulative probability density function of broadband sound pressure

  9. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  10. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miousse, Isabelle R.; Chalbot, Marie-Cécile G.; Aykin-Burns, Nükhet; Wang, Xiaoying; Basnakian, Alexei; Kavouras, Ilias G.; Koturbash, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory mortality and morbidity has been associated with exposure to particulate matter (PM). Experimental evidence suggests involvement of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the development of PM-associated pathological states; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In the current study, we analyzed short-term epigenetic response to PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) exposure in mouse ascitic RAW264.7 macrophages (BALB/C Abelson murine leukemia virus-induced tumor). Ambient PM10 was collected using a high volume sampler in Little Rock, AR. Analysis revealed that PM10 was composed mainly of Al and Fe, and the water soluble organic fraction was dominated by aliphatic and carbohydrate fragments and minor quantities of aromatic components. Exposure to PM10 compromised the cellular epigenome at concentrations 10–200 μg/ml. Specifically, epigenetic alterations were evident as changes in the methylation and expression of repetitive element-associated DNA and associated DNA methylation machinery. These results suggest that epigenetic alterations, in concert with cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation, might contribute to the pathogenesis of PM-associated respiratory diseases. PMID:24535919

  11. Molecular dynamics of itraconazole at ambient and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Tarnacka, M; Adrjanowicz, K; Kaminska, E; Kaminski, K; Grzybowska, K; Kolodziejczyk, K; Wlodarczyk, P; Hawelek, L; Garbacz, G; Kocot, A; Paluch, M

    2013-12-21

    Comprehensive molecular dynamics studies of vitrified and cryogrounded itraconazole (Itr) were performed at ambient and elevated pressure. DSC measurements yielded besides melting and glass transition observed during heating and cooling of both samples two further endothermic events at around T = 363 K and T = 346 K. The nature of these transitions was investigated using X-ray diffraction, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory calculations. The X-ray measurements indicated that extra ordering in itraconazole is likely to occur. Based on calculations and theory derived by Letz et al. the transition observed at T = 363 K was discussed in the context of formation of the nematic mesophase. In fact, additional FTIR measurements revealed that order parameter variation in Itr shows a typical sequence of liquid crystal phases with axially symmetric orientational order; i.e. a nematic phase in the temperature range 361.7 K to 346.5 K and a smectic A phase below 346.5. Moreover, dielectric measurements demonstrated that except for the structural relaxation process, there is also slower mode above the glass transition temperature in both vitrified and cryogrounded samples. We considered the origin of this mode taking into account DFT calculations, rod like shape of itraconazole and distribution of its dipole moment vectors. For the dielectric data collected at elevated pressure, evolution of the steepness index versus pressure was determined. Finally, the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature was evaluated to be equal to 190 K GPa(-1).

  12. A smart kitchen for ambient assisted living.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Cirujano, Diego; Picking, Richard

    2014-01-17

    The kitchen environment is one of the scenarios in the home where users can benefit from Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) applications. Moreover, it is the place where old people suffer from most domestic injuries. This paper presents a novel design, implementation and assessment of a Smart Kitchen which provides Ambient Assisted Living services; a smart environment that increases elderly and disabled people's autonomy in their kitchen-related activities through context and user awareness, appropriate user interaction and artificial intelligence. It is based on a modular architecture which integrates a wide variety of home technology (household appliances, sensors, user interfaces, etc.) and associated communication standards and media (power line, radio frequency, infrared and cabled). Its software architecture is based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi), which allows building a complex system composed of small modules, each one providing the specific functionalities required, and can be easily scaled to meet our needs. The system has been evaluated by a large number of real users (63) and carers (31) in two living labs in Spain and UK. Results show a large potential of system functionalities combined with good usability and physical, sensory and cognitive accessibility.

  13. Disseminating Ambient Assisted Living in Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Gerhard; Felfernig, Alexander; Fercher, Anton J.; Hitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The smart home, ambient intelligence and ambient assisted living have been intensively researched for decades. Although rural areas are an important potential market, because they represent about 80% of the territory of the EU countries and around 125 million inhabitants, there is currently a lack of applicable AAL solutions. This paper discusses the theoretical foundations of AAL in rural areas. This discussion is underlined by the achievements of the empirical field study, Casa Vecchia, which has been carried out over a four-year period in a rural area in Austria. The major goal of Casa Vecchia was to evaluate the feasibility of a specific form of AAL for rural areas: bringing AAL technology to the homes of the elderly, rather than moving seniors to special-equipped care facilities. The Casa Vecchia project thoroughly investigated the possibilities, challenges and drawbacks of AAL related to this specific approach. The findings are promising and somewhat surprising and indicate that further technical, interactional and socio-psychological research is required to make AAL in rural areas reasonable in the future. PMID:25068862

  14. Estimating site amplification factors from ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Steven R.; Gerstoft, Peter; Fehler, Michael C.

    2009-05-01

    We present a methodology to obtain frequency-dependent relative site amplification factors using ambient seismic noise. We treat a seismic network or array as a forced damped harmonic oscillator system where each station responds to a forcing function obtained from frequency-wavenumber beams of the ambient noise field. A network or array beam is necessary to estimate the forcing function. Taken over long time periods, each station responds to the forcing function showing a frequency-dependent resonance peak whose amplitude and spectral width depends upon the elastic and anelastic properties of the underlying medium. Our results are encouraging in that hard rock sites show little variability and have narrower resonance peaks with reduced amplitudes relative to soft rock sites in sedimentary basins. There is much more variability observed at soft rock sites and a tendency for spectral peaks to shift to higher frequencies and become broader as the site amplification increases. This could be due to due to lower densities and/or small-strain nonlinearity at stations having high site amplification.

  15. Ambient Noise Tomography in the Eastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaiz-Rodriguez, M. S.; Niu, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the upper mantle velocity structure beneath the eastern Caribbean with ambient seismic noise data recorded by broadband stations deployed around the region. We first compute the Rayleigh wave Green's functions between each pair of stations by cross-correlating ambient seismic noises. We then estimate fundamental mode group velocities with the FTAN analysis technique. The group velocities are further inverted into 0.5x0.5 degrees rectangular mesh grids. Finally, the dispersion curve of each grid point is linearly inverted into shear wave velocity at different depths. The shear wave variations show a high velocity anomaly in the center of the Venezuela Basin that can be related to a previously unreported igneous body. Two different sections of the mantle wedge related to the Atlantic subduction are identified. One is highly developed under the northern portion of the Lesser Antilles Arc. Another one is which is poorly developed on the southern portion of the arc. The differentiation of the mantle wedge could be attributed to segmentation of the slab produced by the Tiburon Transform Fault Zone. Finally, a low velocity anomaly at 100 km depth could be related to a small hydrous cold plume formed on the northern side of the Atlantic slab.

  16. A Smart Kitchen for Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Cirujano, Diego; Picking, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The kitchen environment is one of the scenarios in the home where users can benefit from Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) applications. Moreover, it is the place where old people suffer from most domestic injuries. This paper presents a novel design, implementation and assessment of a Smart Kitchen which provides Ambient Assisted Living services; a smart environment that increases elderly and disabled people's autonomy in their kitchen-related activities through context and user awareness, appropriate user interaction and artificial intelligence. It is based on a modular architecture which integrates a wide variety of home technology (household appliances, sensors, user interfaces, etc.) and associated communication standards and media (power line, radio frequency, infrared and cabled). Its software architecture is based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi), which allows building a complex system composed of small modules, each one providing the specific functionalities required, and can be easily scaled to meet our needs. The system has been evaluated by a large number of real users (63) and carers (31) in two living labs in Spain and UK. Results show a large potential of system functionalities combined with good usability and physical, sensory and cognitive accessibility. PMID:24445412

  17. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  18. Ambient Ammonium Contribution to total Nitrogen Deposition ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There has been a wealth of evidence over the last decade illustrating the rising importance of reduced inorganic nitrogen (NHx = ammonia gas, NH3, plus particulate ammonium, p-NH4) in the overall atmospheric mass balance and deposition of nitrogen as emissions of oxidized nitrogen have decreased throughout a period of stable or increasing NH3 emissions. In addition, the fraction of ambient ammonia relative to p-NH4 generally has risen as a result of decreases in both oxides of nitrogen and sulfur emissions. EPA plans to consider ecological effects related to deposition of nitrogen, of which NHx is a contributing component, in the review of secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for oxides of nitrogen and sulfur (NOx/SOx standard). Although these ecological effects are associated with total nitrogen deposition, it will be important to understand the emissions sources contributing to the total nitrogen deposition and to understand how much of the total nitrogen deposition is from deposition of NHx versus other nitrogen species. Because p-NH4 contributes to nitrogen deposition and can also be a significant component of particulate matter, there is a potential overlap in addressing nitrogen based deposition effects in the secondary PM and NOx/SOx NAAQS. Consequently, there is a policy interest in quantifying the contribution of p-NH4 to total nitrogen deposition. While dry deposition of p-NH4 is calculated through a variety of modeling app

  19. Thermal explosion in oscillating ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Novozhilov, Vasily

    2016-01-01

    Thermal explosion problem for a medium with oscillating ambient temperature at its boundaries is considered. This is a new problem in thermal explosion theory, not previously considered in a distributed system formulation, but important for combustion and fire science. It describes autoignition of wide range of fires (such as but not limited to piles of biosolids and other organic matter; storages of munitions, explosives, propellants) subjected to temperature variations, such as seasonal or day/night variation. The problem is considered in formulation adopted in classical studies of thermal explosion. Critical conditions are determined by frequency and amplitude of ambient temperature oscillations, as well as by a number of other parameters. Effects of all the parameters on critical conditions are quantified. Results are presented for the case of planar symmetry. Development of thermal explosion in time is also considered, and a new type of unsteady thermal explosion development is discovered where thermal runaway occurs after several periods of temperature oscillations within the medium. PMID:27443235

  20. ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for veterans include exposure to lead, pesticides, and other environmental toxins. ALS is recognized as ... from scientific studies suggests that both genetics and environment play a role in the development of ALS. ...

  1. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  2. The influence of ambient light on the driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Karsten D.; Lemmer, Uli

    2008-04-01

    Increasingly, cars are fitted with interior ambient lighting which is switched on while driving. This special kind of interior light emphasizes the interior design of the car, it makes a car look special and gives the buyers a new option to personalize their automobiles. But how does ambient interior light influence the driver? We conducted a series of over 50 tests to study the influence of interior ambient light on contrast perception under different illumination levels, colors and positions of the illuminated areas. Our tests show that in many cases the ambient lighting can improve the visual contrast for seeing objects in the headlamp beam. But the test persons mentioned that the tested brightness looked too bright and that they felt glared. The measured values instead proved that no disability glare exists. Therefore, provided that the drivers can adjust the intensity of the ambient light to avoid glare, the ambient light has no negative effect on the drivers' contrast perception.

  3. Activation of "synthetic ambient" aerosols - Relation to chemical composition of particles <100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, J.; Hitzenberger, R.; Reischl, G.; Bauer, H.; Leder, K.; Puxbaum, H.

    2012-07-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are an important fraction of atmospheric aerosols because of their role in cloud formation. Experimental studies focus either on direct field measurements of complex ambient aerosols or laboratory investigations on well defined aerosols produced from single substances or substance mixtures. In this study, we focussed on the ultrafine aerosol because in terms of number concentration, the majority of the CCN are expected to have sizes in this range. A field study was performed from July 2007 to October 2008 to investigate the activation behaviour of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna (Burkart et al., 2011). Filter samples of the aerosol <0.1 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter were collected, elutriated and used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosol in a nebulizer. Chemical analyses of the ultrafine water soluble material were also performed. The CCN properties of the "synthetic ambient" aerosol were obtained using the University of Vienna CCN counter (Giebl et al., 2002; Dusek et al., 2006b) at a nominal supersaturation (SS) of 0.5%. Activation diameters dact ranged from 54.5 nm to 66 nm, were larger than dact of typical single inorganic salts and showed no seasonal pattern in contrast to the fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which ranged from 44% in spring to 15% in winter. The average hygroscopicity parameter κ (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) obtained from the activation curves ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 (average 0.24), which was significantly lower than κchem calculated from the chemical composition (0.43 ± 0.07).

  4. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Shallow and Deep Water Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Shallow and Deep Water...Siderius.php LONG-TERM GOALS The objective of this research is to study the ocean ambient noise field by means of new physics-based processing... ambient -noise field using a vertical line array has been developed by Harrison and Simons [Harrison, 2002]. The advantages of passive bottom-survey

  5. Study of catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde on Pt/TiO2 alumite catalyst at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Sakurai, Makoto; Kameyama, Hideo

    2009-08-15

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) emitted from buildings, furnishing materials and consumer products is one of the most dominant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an indoor environment. In this work, a Pt/TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst was prepared on an anodic alumite plate and was employed in the catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde at ambient temperature. Firstly, TiO(2) was deposited on the anodic alumite plate with electro-deposition technology. Then, platinum was supported on the anodic alumite plate with wet impregnation method. The developed catalyst exhibits good activity towards the decomposition of HCHO at ambient temperature. TPR (temperature programmed reduction) and TPD (temperature programmed desorption) analysis results indicate that oxygen adsorbed on the Pt/TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst can be activated and generated to O:Pt(surface) species quickly at ambient temperature. Hence, the developed catalyst experiences the high activity towards the catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde at ambient temperature. Moreover, in accordance with the process requirements, the developed catalyst can be formed into various shapes such as a mesh, plate, fin, serrate etc., because aluminum can be formed into any shapes. The serrate type catalyst was prepared in this work and it also exhibits fine activity towards the decomposition of HCHO.

  6. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  7. Characterization of personal exposure concentration of fine particles for adults and children exposed to high ambient concentrations in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Du, Xuan; Kong, Qian; Ge, Weihua; Zhang, Shaojun; Fu, Lixin

    2010-01-01

    In China, the health risk from overexposure to particles is becoming an important public health concern. To investigate daily exposure characteristics to PM2.5 with high ambient concentration in urban area, a personal exposure study was conducted for school children, and office workers in Beijing, China. For all participants (N = 114), the mean personal 24-hr exposure concentration was 102.5, 14.7, 0.093, 0.528, 0.934, 0.174 and 0.703 microg/m3 for PM2.5, black carbon, Mn, Al, Ca, Pb, and Fe. Children's exposure concentrations of PM2.5 were 4-5 times higher than those in related studies. The ambient concentration of PM2.5 (128.5 microg/m3) was significantly higher than the personal exposure concentration (P < 0.05), and exceed the reference concentration (25 microg/m3) of WHO air quality guideline. Good correlation relationships and significant differences were identified between ambient concentration and personal exposure concentration. The relationships indicate that the ambient concentration is the main factor influencing personal exposure concentration, but is not a good indicator of personal exposure concentration. Outdoor activities (commute mode, exposure to heating, workday or weekend travel) influenced personal exposure concentrations significantly, but the magnitude of the influence from indoor activities (exposure to cooking) was masked by the high ambient concentrations.

  8. Heat capacity of α-AlH3 and α-AlD3 at temperatures up to 1000 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Markushkin, Yu E.; Palnichenko, A. V.; Ren, Y.; Sakharov, M. K.

    2008-07-01

    The densest α modification of AlH3 and AlD3 is thermodynamically stable at high hydrogen pressures. At ambient pressure, α-AlH3 and α-AlD3 rapidly and irreversibly decompose to Al and H2 or D2 gas when heated to about 420 and 520 K, respectively. In the present paper, the heat capacities at constant volume (CV) and at constant pressure (CP) are calculated for α-AlH3 and α-AlD3 at a pressure of 1 atm and temperatures 0-1000 K using the phonon densities of states determined earlier by inelastic neutron scattering at helium temperatures (Kolesnikov et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 76 064302). The CP(T) dependence of AlH3 is also measured at temperatures 6-30 K and 130-320 K and that of AlD3 at 130-320 K in order to compensate for the scatter in the literature data and to improve the accuracy of the calculated CV and CP dependences at low temperatures.

  9. Retrieval of Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity from Ambient Vibration Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranò, Stefano; Hobiger, Manuel; Fäh, Donat

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of ambient vibrations is a useful tool in microzonation and geotechnical investigations. Ambient vibrations are composed to a large part of surface waves, both Love and Rayleigh waves. One reason to analyse surface waves is that they carry information about the subsurface. The dispersion curve of Rayleigh waves and Love waves can be retrieved using array processing techniques. The Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation of the particle motion, can also be retrieved using array techniques. These quantities are used in an inversion procedure aimed at obtaining a structural model of the subsurface. The focus of this work is the retrieval of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. We show applications of the (ML) method presented in Maranó et al. (2012) to a number of sites in Switzerland. The sites examined are chosen to reflect a wide range of soil conditions that are of interest in microzonation studies. Using a synthetic wavefield with known structural model, we compare our results with theoretical ellipticity curves and we show the accuracy of the considered algorithm. The sense of rotation of the particle motion (prograde vs. retrograde) is also estimated. In addition, we show that by modelling the presence of both Love and Rayleigh waves it is possible to mitigate the disruptive influence of Love waves on the estimation of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. Using recordings from several real sites, we show that it is possible to retrieve the ellipticity curve over a broad range of frequencies. Fundamental modes and higher modes are retrieved. Singularities of the ellipticity, corresponding to a change of the sense of rotation from prograde to retrograde (or vice versa), are detected with great accuracy. Knowledge of Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation, is useful in several ways. The ellipticity angle allows us to pinpoint accurately the frequency of singularities (i.e., peaks and zeros of the H/V representation of the

  10. Imaging Lithospheric Cascadia Structure with Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Allen, R. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Boyarko, D. C.; O'Driscoll, L.; Zhai, Y.; Levander, A.; Humphreys, E.; Pollitz, F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Imaging Cascadia Lithospheric Structure with Ambient Noise Tomography Along strike variation has been observed throughout the Cascadia Subduction Zone in multiple studies with complementary data sets. Body-wave tomography shows a broad zone in the center of the slab with a weak high velocity signal in an atypically quiescent seismic zone (Obrebski and Allen, 2009). Characteristics of primitive basalts found in the arc volcanoes change along strike defining four distinct magma sources or plumbing systems (Schmidt et al, 2007). However, the most striking variation is in the recurrence rate of episodic tremor and slip throughout the region (Brudzinski and Allen, 2007). Determining the detailed velocity structure of the lithosphere will help to unravel what role it plays in controlling the along strike variation of these separate observations. This study improves on previous observations by analysis of a surface wave model from ambient seismic noise cross-correlations with two Flexible Array deployments in addition to regional networks and the Transportable Array. Longer period bands than typically observed in ANT are recovered via improved statistical analysis resulting in robust group and phase velocity maps from 7-92 seconds. Thus structure is well resolved from the surface to approximately 100km in depth allowing for simultaneous interpretation of crust and uppermost mantle structure. Significant variations are observed along strike in this model. The high velocity mafic Siletzia terrain is observed in the lower-mid crust along the Cascadia forearc. This mafic material coincides with the region of long term tremor recurrence interval (~20 months) from Brudzinski and Allen (2007). The southern border of the Siletzia terrain is marked by a clear velocity variation along the expected Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate boundary. In this southern region, the root of the Klamath mountain is clearly compressing the subducting Gorda plate leading to increased vertical stress where

  11. Retrieval of Rayleigh wave ellipticity from ambient vibration recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranò, Stefano; Hobiger, Manuel; Fäh, Donat

    2017-04-01

    The analysis of ambient vibrations is a useful tool in microzonation and geotechnical investigations. Ambient vibrations are composed to a large part of surface waves, both Love and Rayleigh waves. One reason to analyse surface waves is that they carry information about the subsurface. The dispersion curve of Rayleigh waves and Love waves can be retrieved using array processing techniques. The Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation of the particle motion, can also be retrieved using array techniques. These quantities are used in an inversion procedure aimed at obtaining a structural model of the subsurface. The focus of this work is the retrieval of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. We show applications of the maximum likelihood (ML) method presented in Maranò et al. to a number of sites in Switzerland. The sites examined are chosen to reflect a wide range of soil conditions that are of interest in microzonation studies. Using a synthetic wavefield with known structural model, we compare our results with theoretical ellipticity curves and we show the accuracy of the considered algorithm. The sense of rotation of the particle motion (prograde versus retrograde) is also estimated. In addition, we show that by modelling the presence of both Love and Rayleigh waves it is possible to mitigate the disruptive influence of Love waves on the estimation of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. Using recordings from several real sites, we show that it is possible to retrieve the ellipticity curve over a broad range of frequencies. Fundamental modes and higher modes are retrieved. Singularities of the ellipticity, corresponding to a change of the sense of rotation from prograde to retrograde (or vice versa), are detected with great accuracy. Knowledge of Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation, is useful in several ways. The ellipticity angle allows us to pinpoint accurately the frequency of singularities (i.e. peaks and zeros of the H/V representation of

  12. Ambient ozone and pulmonary innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hegelan, Mashael; Tighe, Robert M.; Castillo, Christian; Hollingsworth, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient ozone is a criteria air pollutant that impacts both human morbidity and mortality. The effect of ozone inhalation includes both toxicity to lung tissue and alteration of the host immunologic response. The innate immune system facilitates immediate recognition of both foreign pathogens and tissue damage. Emerging evidence supports that ozone can modify the host innate immune response and that this response to inhaled ozone is dependent on genes of innate immunity. Improved understanding of the complex interaction between environmental ozone and host innate immunity will provide fundamental insight into the pathogenesis of inflammatory airways disease. We review the current evidence supporting that environmental ozone inhalation: (1) modifies cell types required for intact innate immunity, (2) is partially dependent on genes of innate immunity, (3) primes pulmonary innate immune responses to LPS, and (4) contributes to innate-adaptive immune system cross-talk. PMID:21132467

  13. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  14. Bacterial decontamination using ambient pressure nonthermal discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, J.G.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasmas can efficiently deactivate bacteria in gases, liquids, and on surfaces, as well as can decompose hazardous chemicals. This paper focuses on the changes to bacterial spores and toxic biochemical compounds, such as mycotoxins, after their treatment in ambient pressure discharges. The ability of nonthermal plasmas to decompose toxic chemicals and deactivate hazardous biological materials has been applied to sterilizing medical instruments, ozonating water, and purifying air. In addition, the fast lysis of bacterial spores and other cells has led us to include plasma devices within pathogen detection instruments, where nucleic acids must be accessed. Decontaminating chemical and biological warfare materials from large, high value targets such as building surfaces, after a terrorist attack, are especially challenging. A large area plasma decontamination technology is described.

  15. Wireless Sensor Networks for Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Aquino-Santos, Raúl; Martinez-Castro, Diego; Edwards-Block, Arthur; Murillo-Piedrahita, Andrés Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces wireless sensor networks for Ambient Assisted Living as a proof of concept. Our workgroup has developed an arrhythmia detection algorithm that we evaluate in a closed space using a wireless sensor network to relay the information collected to where the information can be registered, monitored and analyzed to support medical decisions by healthcare providers. The prototype we developed is then evaluated using the TelosB platform. The proposed architecture considers very specific restrictions regarding the use of wireless sensor networks in clinical situations. The seamless integration of the system architecture enables both mobile node and network configuration, thus providing the versatile and robust characteristics necessary for real-time applications in medical situations. Likewise, this system architecture efficiently permits the different components of our proposed platform to interact efficiently within the parameters of this study. PMID:24351665

  16. Ambient Cured Alkali Activated Flyash Masonry Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod M.

    2016-09-01

    Geopolymers belong to a category of non-conventional and non-Portland cement based cementitious binders which are produced using industrial by products like fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This paper reports on the development of geopolymer mortars for production of masonry units. The geopolymer mortars were prepared by mixing various by products with manufactured sand and a liquid mixture of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. After curing at ambient conditions, the masonry units were tested for strength properties such as water absorption, initial rate of absorption, compression, shear- bond, and stress-strain behaviour etc. It was observed that the flexural strength of the blocks is more than 2 MPa and shear bond strength is more than 0.4MPa. It was found that the properties of geopolymer blocks were superior to the traditional masonry units. Hence they can be recommended for structural masonry.

  17. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  18. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, K.; Jannik, T.

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the air monitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  19. Near-ambient solid polymer fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells are extremely attractive for extraterrestrial and terrestrial applications because of their high energy conversion efficiency without noise or environmental pollution. Among the various fuel cell systems the advanced polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells based on sulfonated fluoropolymers (e.g., Nafion) are particularly attractive because they are fairly rugged, solid state, quite conductive, of good chemical and thermal stability and show good oxygen reduction kinetics due to the low specific adsorption of the electrolyte on the platinum catalyst. The objective of this program is to develop a solid polymer fuel cell which can efficiently operate at near ambient temperatures without ancillary components for humidification and/or pressurization of the fuel or oxidant gases. During the Phase 1 effort we fabricated novel integral electrode-membrane structures where the dispersed platinum catalyst is precipitated within the Nafion ionomer. This resulted in electrode-membrane units without interfacial barriers permitting unhindered water diffusion from cathode to anode. The integral electrode-membrane structures were tested as fuel cells operating on H2 and O2 or air at 1 to 2 atm and 10 to 50 C without gas humidification. We demonstrated that cells with completely dry membranes could be self started at room temperature and subsequently operated on dry gas for extended time. Typical room temperature low pressure operation with unoptimized electrodes yielded 100 mA/cm(exp 2) at 0.5V and maximum currents over 300 mA/cm(exp 2) with low platinum loadings. Our results clearly demonstrate that operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at ambient conditions is feasible. Optimization of the electrode-membrane structure is necessary to assess the full performance potential but we expect significant gains in weight and volume power density for the system. The reduced complexity will make fuel cells also attractive for smaller and portable power supplies and as

  20. Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vanessa G; Regiani, Thaís; Dias, Fernanda F G; Romão, Wanderson; Jara, Jose Luis Paz; Klitzke, Clécio F; Coelho, Fernando; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2011-02-15

    The development and illustrative applications of an ambient ionization technique termed Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) is described. Its dual mode of operation with Venturi self-pumping makes V-EASI applicable to the direct mass spectrometric analysis of both liquid (V(L)-EASI) and solid (V(S)-EASI) samples. V-EASI is simple and easy to assemble, operating solely via the assistance of a sonic stream of nitrogen or air. The sonic gas stream causes two beneficial and integrated effects: (a) the self-pumping of solutions via the Venturi effect and (b) sonic-spray ionization (SSI) of analytes either in solution or resting on solid surfaces. In its liquid mode, V(L)-EASI is applicable to analytes in solution, forming negatively and/or positively charged intact molecular species in a soft fashion with little or no fragmentation. In its solid mode, V(S)-EASI relies on Venturi self-pumping of a proper SSI solvent solution in combination with SSI to form a stream of bipolar charged droplets that bombard the sample surface, causing desorption and ionization of the analyte molecules. As for its precursor technique (EASI), V-EASI generates bipolar droplets with considerably lower average charging, which increases selectivity for ionization with high signal-to-noise ratios and clean spectra dominated by single molecular species with minimal solvent ions. V-EASI also operates in a voltage-, heat-, and radiation-free fashion and is therefore free of thermal, electrical, or discharge interferences.

  1. Adjuvant effects of ambient particulate matter monitored by proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuedong; Li, Ning; Wang, Meiying; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Sioutas, Constantinos; Harkema, Jack R; Bramble, Lori A; Nel, Andre E; Loo, Joseph A

    2010-02-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) from air pollution is associated with exacerbation of asthma. The immunological basis for the adjuvant effects of PM is still not well understood. The generation of ROS and the resulting oxidative stress has been identified as one of the major mechanisms. Using a new intranasal sensitization model in which ambient PM is used as an adjuvant to enhance allergic inflammation (Li et al., Environ. Health Perspect. 2009, 117, 1116-1123), a proteomics approach was applied to study the adjuvant effects of ambient PM. The enhanced in vivo adjuvant effect of ultrafine particles correlates with a higher in vitro oxidant potential and a higher content of redox-cycling organic chemicals. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from normal and sensitized mice were resolved by 2-DE, and identified by MS. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, complement C3, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, chitinase 3-like protein 3, chitinase 3-like protein 4, and acidic mammalian chitinase demonstrated significantly enhanced up-regulation by UFP with a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content and a higher oxidant potential. These proteins may be the important specific elements targeted by PM in air pollution through the ability to generate ROS in the immune system, and may be involved in allergen sensitization and asthma pathogenesis.

  2. Adjuvant Effects of Ambient Particulate Matter Monitored by Proteomics of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xuedong; Li, Ning; Wang, Meiying; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Sioutas, Constantinos; Harkema, Jack R.; Bramble, Lori A.; Nel, Andre E.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) from air pollution is associated with exacerbation of asthma. The immunological basis for the adjuvant effects of PM is still not well understood. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting oxidative stress has been identified as one of the major mechanisms. Using a new intranasal sensitization model in which ambient PM is used as an adjuvant to enhance allergic inflammation (Li et al., Environ. Health Perspect. 2009, 117, 1116-1123), a proteomics approach was applied to study the adjuvant effects of ambient PM. The enhanced in vivo adjuvant effect of ultrafine particles (UFP) correlates with a higher in vitro oxidant potential and a higher content of redox-cycling organic chemicals. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from normal and sensitized mice were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and identified by mass spectrometry. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, complement C3, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, chitinase-3-like protein 3, chitinase-3-like protein 4, and acidic mammalian chitinase demonstrated significantly enhanced up-regulation by UFP with a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content and a higher oxidant potential. These proteins may be the important specific elements targeted by PM in air pollution through the ability to generate ROS in the immune system, and may be involved in allergen sensitization and asthma pathogenesis. PMID:20029843

  3. Laser plasma plume structure and dynamics in the ambient air: The early stage of expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cirisan, M.; Jouvard, J. M.; Lavisse, L.; Hallo, L.; Oltra, R.

    2011-05-15

    Laser ablation plasma plume expanding into the ambient atmosphere may be an efficient way to produce nanoparticles. From that reason it would be interesting to study the properties of these laser induced plasmas formed under conditions that are known to be favorable for nanoparticles production. In general, plume behavior can be described as a two-stage process: a 'violent' plume expansion due to the absorption of the laser beam energy (during the laser pulse) followed by a fast adiabatic expansion in the ambient gas (after the end of the laser pulse). Plasma plume may last a few microseconds and may have densities 10{sup -6} times lower than the solid densities at temperatures close to the ambient temperature. Expansion of the plasma plume induced by the impact of a nanosecond laser beam ({lambda} 1064 nm) on the surface of metallic samples in the open air has been investigated by means of fast photography. Spatio-temporal evolution of the plume at the early stage of its expansion (first 330 ns) has been recorded. Structure and dynamics of the plasma plume have been investigated and compared to numerical simulations obtained with a hydro-code, as well as some scaling laws. In addition, measurements using different sample materials (Al, Fe, and Ti) have been performed in order to analyze the influence of target material on plume expansion.

  4. Modeling Photosensitized Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Laboratory and Ambient Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Tsui, William G; Rao, Yi; Dai, Hai-Lung; McNeill, V Faye

    2017-07-05

    Photosensitized reactions involving imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) have been experimentally observed to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) growth. However, the extent of photosensitized reactions in ambient aerosols remains poorly understood and unaccounted for in atmospheric models. Here we use GAMMA 4.0, a photochemical box model that couples gas-phase and aqueous-phase aerosol chemistry, along with recent laboratory measurements of the kinetics of IC photochemistry, to analyze IC-photosensitized SOA formation in laboratory and ambient settings. Analysis of the laboratory results of Aregahegn et al. (2013) suggests that photosensitized production of SOA from limonene, isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene, and toluene by (3)IC* occurs at or near the surface of the aerosol particle. Reactive uptake coefficients were derived from the experimental data using GAMMA 4.0. Simulations of aqueous aerosol SOA formation at remote ambient conditions including IC photosensitizer chemistry indicate less than 0.3% contribution to SOA growth from direct reactions of (3)IC* with limonene, isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene, and toluene, and an enhancement of less than 0.04% of SOA formation from other precursors due to the formation of radicals in the bulk aerosol aqueous phase. Other, more abundant photosensitizer species, such as humic-like substances (HULIS), may contribute more significantly to aqueous aerosol SOA production.

  5. Estimating amplitude uncertainty for normalized ambient seismic noise cross-correlation with examples from southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Beroza, G. C.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We estimate the frequency-dependent amplitude error of ambient noise cross-correlations based on the method of Liu et al. (2016) for different normalizations. We compute the stacked cross spectrum of noise recorded at station pairs in southern California by averaging the cross spectrum of evenly spaced windows of the same length, but offset in time. Windows with signals (e.g. earthquakes) contaminating the ambient seismic noise are removed as statistical outliers. Standard errors of the real and imaginary parts of the stacked cross-spectrum are estimated assuming each window is independent. The autocorrelation of the sequence of cross-spectrum values at a given frequency obtained from different windows are used to test the independence of cross-spectrum values in neighboring time windows. For frequencies below 0.2 Hz, we find temporal correlation in the noise data. We account for temporal correlation in computation of errors using a block bootstrap resampling method. The stacked cross-spectrum and associated amplitude are computed under different normalization methods including deconvolution and whitening applied before or after ensemble average of cross-spectrum values. We estimate the amplitude errors based on error propagation from errors of stacked cross-spectrum and verified by bootstrap method. We propose to use this characterization of amplitude uncertainty to constrain uncertainties in ground motion predictions based on ambient-field observations.

  6. Equation of state of α-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, A.; Torrent, M.

    2013-08-01

    The ambient temperature equation of state of ruby in the corundum phase (α-Al2O3) has been measured up to 165 GPa in a diamond anvil cell, using a soft pressure transmitting medium. No clear sign of phase transformation or amorphization has been observed in this range, which could affect its luminescence signal. The equation of state of α-Al2O3 has also been calculated within density functional theory, with two different approximations of the exchange-correlation energy (local density and generalized gradient). With suitable correction, these equations of state are predictive within ΔP/P=2.5%.

  7. Ultrafine ambient particulate matter enhances cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a consistent link between exposure to ambient particulate air pollutant (PM) and the incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of ambient PM. Mice were exposed to 1...

  8. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than a...

  9. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than a...

  10. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than a...

  11. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than a...

  12. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than a...

  13. 77 FR 64244 - Revision to Ambient Nitrogen Dioxide Monitoring Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 58 RIN 2060-AR59 Revision to Ambient Nitrogen Dioxide Monitoring Requirements AGENCY... deadlines established in the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) for...

  14. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  15. Ultrafine ambient particulate matter enhances cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a consistent link between exposure to ambient particulate air pollutant (PM) and the incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of ambient PM. Mice were exposed to 1...

  16. RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of an ambient aerosol sample can be directly related to the fraction of the sample's total carbon mass contributed by natural (biogenic) sources. Such knowledge is difficult to determine by other means, and important for devising ambient PM contro...

  17. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  18. RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of an ambient aerosol sample can be directly related to the fraction of the sample's total carbon mass contributed by natural (biogenic) sources. Such knowledge is difficult to determine by other means, and important for devising ambient PM contro...

  19. Ambient temperature that induces maximum sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deependra; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2009-08-04

    Changes in sleep and body temperature in rats at ambient temperatures below and above the self-selected temperature zone, are lacking in literature. In this report, the temperature preferred by the rats was first assessed before studying the changes in their sleep and body temperature, when they were exposed to ambient temperatures ranging from 18 degrees C to 36 degrees C. The rats preferred to stay at 27 degrees C when they were allowed to select their own ambient temperature, but maximum sleep was recorded when the rats were maintained at 30 degrees C. The ambient temperature-related changes in rapid eye movement sleep and deep slow wave sleep followed a bell-shaped curve, with a maximum at 30 degrees C. Of all the sleep parameters, rapid eye movement sleep showed a more marked ambient temperature-related change. Ambient temperatures above 33 degrees C and below 24 degrees C produced a significant reduction in sleep. Increase in sleep at 30 degrees C was associated with a slight elevation in body temperature, but a steep increase in body temperature at very high ambient temperature was associated with a decrease in sleep. Decrease in sleep at ambient temperatures below 24 degrees C was not related to any significant decrease in body temperature. Though maximum sleep was recorded at 30 degrees C, the sleep regulatory and thermoregulatory systems were at a functional equilibrium at 27 degrees C.

  20. Ambiente e formação estelar em galáxias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, A., Jr.; Sodré, L., Jr.

    2003-08-01

    Estudamos o ambiente de galáxias com formação estelar inicialmente a partir de uma amostra limitada em volume proveniente do 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. Discriminamos as galáxias com formação estelar com base em distintas classes espectrais, utilizando para esta classificação as larguras equivalentes das linhas [OII]l3727 e Hd. O ambiente é caracterizado pela densidade espacial local de galáxias. Mostramos que a fração de galáxias com formação estelar é bastante reduzida em ambientes densos, enquanto a de galáxias passivas aumenta nestas regiões. Por outro lado, quando analisamos a fração de galáxias que apresentam um surto recente de formação estelar, notamos que ela independe do ambiente, sendo que em regiões mais densas alguns destes objetos apresentam distorções em sua morfologia. Estes resultados são confrontados com a análise da dependência ambiental da taxa de formação estelar, estimada pela emissão em Ha, de uma amostra extraída do Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Um declínio gradual da formação estelar também é observado nesta análise, sugerindo que as interações por efeitos de maré sejam responsáveis pela redução da formação estelar em ambientes densos através da remoção do reservatório de gás das galáxias. No entanto, estas interações também podem induzir surtos de formação estelar nas galáxias, além de peculiaridades morfológicas observadas nos objetos que habitam regiões mais densas.

  1. Effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuziuti, Toru; Hatanaka, Shin-ichi; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Mitome, Hideto

    2002-04-01

    The effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence (MBSCL) is studied experimentally with a luminol solution through measurements of MBSCL intensity as a function of ultrasound irradiation time, applied voltage to a transducer and ultrasonic frequencies to accomplish high efficiency in chemical reactions. From the measurement of ambient-pressure dependence, it is shown that there is an ambient pressure that produces the maximum intensity of the MBSCL and the maximum intensity appears at higher ambient pressure as the applied voltage to the transducer increases. The highest intensity of MBSCL is obtained by appropriate reduction of ambient pressure both for various applied voltages and frequencies. This is caused by both the number of bubbles induced with supersaturation of the gas in a luminol solution and the variation in bubble dynamics.

  2. Towards Full-Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, e.g. wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, or the isotropic distribution of both mono- and dipolar uncorrelated noise sources. These assumptions are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations in order to constrain Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation, we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for the distribution of noise sources, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics. This is intended to improve the resolution of tomographic images, to refine noise source distribution, and thereby to contribute to a better understanding of both Earth structure and noise generation. First, we develop an inversion strategy based on a 2D finite-difference code using adjoint techniques. To enable a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we investigate the following aspects: i) the capability of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution and ii) possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure can be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa. In anticipation of real-data applications, we present an extension of the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus (http://salvus.io). It allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface and the corresponding sensitivity kernels for the distribution of noise sources and Earth structure. By studying the effect of noise sources on correlation functions in 3D, we validate the aforementioned inversion strategy and prepare the

  3. National review of ambient air toxics observations.

    PubMed

    Strum, Madeleine; Scheffe, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Ambient air observations of hazardous air pollutant (HAPs), also known as air toxics, derived from routine monitoring networks operated by states, local agencies, and tribes (SLTs), are analyzed to characterize national concentrations and risk across the nation for a representative subset of the 187 designated HAPs. Observations from the National Air Toxics Trend Sites (NATTS) network of 27 stations located in most major urban areas of the contiguous United States have provided a consistent record of HAPs that have been identified as posing the greatest risk since 2003 and have also captured similar concentration patterns of nearly 300 sites operated by SLTs. Relatively high concentration volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, formaldehyde, and toluene exhibit the highest annual average concentration levels, typically ranging from 1 to 5 µg/m(3). Halogenated (except for methylene chloride) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and metals exhibit concentrations typically 2-3 orders of magnitude lower. Formaldehyde is the highest national risk driver based on estimated cancer risk and, nationally, has not exhibited significant changes in concentration, likely associated with the large pool of natural isoprene and formaldehyde emissions. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and 1,3-butadiene are ubiquitous VOC HAPs with large mobile source contributions that continue to exhibit declining concentrations over the last decade. Common chlorinated organic compounds such as ethylene dichloride and methylene chloride exhibit increasing concentrations. The variety of physical and chemical attributes and measurement technologies across 187 HAPs result in a broad range of method detection limits (MDLs) and cancer risk thresholds that challenge confidence in risk results for low concentration HAPs with MDLs near or greater than risk thresholds. From a national monitoring network perspective, the ability of the HAPs observational database to characterize the multiple

  4. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al. (2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions, on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ΔHvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20

  5. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al.~(2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions; on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ΔHvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20

  6. X-ray and optical crystallographic parameters investigations of high frequency induction melted Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, A; Draissia, M; Bedboudi, H; Boulkhessaim, S; Debili, M Y

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the microstructural strengthening mechanisms of aluminium by means of hard alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina fine particles. A broad of understanding views covering materials preparations, elaboration process, characterization techniques and associated microstructural characteristic parameters measurements is given. In order to investigate the microstructural characteristic parameters and the mechanical strengthening mechanisms of pure aluminium by hard fine particles, a set of Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys samples were made under vacuum by high fusion temperature melting, the high frequency (HF) process, and rapidly solidified under ambient temperature from a mixture of cold-compacted high-pure fine Al and alpha-Al(2)O(3) powders. The as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, optical microscopy observations and Vickers microhardness tests in both brut and heat-treated states. It was found that the as-solidified HF Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys with compositions below 4 wt.% (alpha-Al(2)O(3)) are single-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al phase and over two-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al and the Rhombohedral alpha-Al(2)O(3) phases. The optical micrographs reveal the presence of a grain size refinement in these alloys. Vickers microhardness of the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) is increased by means of pure fine alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles. These combined effects of strengthening and grain size refinement observed in the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys are essentially due to a strengthening of Al by the alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles insertion in the (HF) melted and rapidly solidified alloys.

  7. The State of Ambient Air Quality of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. M.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Khwaja, H. A.; Siddique, A.; Nayebare, S. R.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient air pollution in major cities of Saudi Arabia is a substantial environmental and health concern. A study was undertaken to assess the air quality of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia by the analysis of respirable particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), trace metals (Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, Cd, Sb, and Pb), and water-soluble ions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, C2O42-, and NH42+). Sulfur and BC mass concentration ranged 0.99 - 7.39 μg/m3 and 0.70 - 3.09 μg/m3, respectively, while the PM2.5 mass concentration ranged 23 - 186 μg/m3. Maximum BC contribution to PM2.5 was 5.6%. Atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations were well above the 24 h WHO guideline of 20 μg/m3. Air Quality Index (AQI) indicates that there were 8% days of moderate air quality, 28% days of unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups, 55% days of unhealthy air quality, and 9% days of very unhealthy air quality during the study period. Sulfate SO42- dominated the identifiable components. The major contributors to PM2.5 were soil and crustal material; vehicle emissions (black carbon factor); and fuel oil combustion in industries (sulfur factor), according to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). This study highlights the importance of focusing control strategies not only on reducing PM concentration, but also on the reduction of toxic components of the PM, to most effectively protect human health and the environment.

  8. Elastocaloric effect in CuAlZn and CuAlMn shape memory alloys under compression.

    PubMed

    Qian, Suxin; Geng, Yunlong; Wang, Yi; Pillsbury, Thomas E; Hada, Yoshiharu; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Fujimoto, Kenjiro; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Cui, Jun; Yuki, Yoji; Toyotake, Koutaro; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2016-08-13

    This paper reports the elastocaloric effect of two Cu-based shape memory alloys: Cu68Al16Zn16 (CuAlZn) and Cu73Al15Mn12 (CuAlMn), under compression at ambient temperature. The compression tests were conducted at two different rates to approach isothermal and adiabatic conditions. Upon unloading at a strain rate of 0.1 s(-1) (adiabatic condition) from 4% strain, the highest adiabatic temperature changes (ΔTad) of 4.0 K for CuAlZn and 3.9 K for CuAlMn were obtained. The maximum stress and hysteresis at each strain were compared. The stress at the maximum recoverable strain of 4.0% for CuAlMn was 120 MPa, which is 70% smaller than that of CuAlZn. A smaller hysteresis for the CuAlMn alloy was also obtained, about 70% less compared with the CuAlZn alloy. The latent heat, determined by differential scanning calorimetry, was 4.3 J g(-1) for the CuAlZn alloy and 5.0 J g(-1) for the CuAlMn alloy. Potential coefficients of performance (COPmat) for these two alloys were calculated based on their physical properties of measured latent heat and hysteresis, and a COPmat of approximately 13.3 for CuAlMn was obtained.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 58 - Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Methodology

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ambient Air Quality Monitoring... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Pt. 58, App. C Appendix C to Part 58—Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Methodology 1.0 Purpose 2.0 SLAMS Ambient Air Monitoring Stations 3.0 NCore Ambient...

  10. Ambient air pollution: a cause of COPD?

    PubMed

    Schikowski, Tamara; Mills, Inga C; Anderson, H Ross; Cohen, Aaron; Hansell, Anna; Kauffmann, Francine; Krämer, Ursula; Marcon, Alessandro; Perez, Laura; Sunyer, Jordi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino

    2014-01-01

    The role of ambient air pollution in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is considered to be uncertain. We review the evidence in the light of recent studies. Eight morbidity and six mortality studies were identified. These were heterogeneous in design, characterisation of exposure to air pollution and methods of outcome definition. Six morbidity studies with objectively defined COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio) were cross-sectional analyses. One longitudinal study defined incidence of COPD as the first hospitalisation due to COPD. However, neither mortality nor hospitalisation studies can unambiguously distinguish acute from long-term effects on the development of the underlying pathophysiological changes. Most studies were based on within-community exposure contrasts, which mainly assess traffic-related air pollution. Overall, evidence of chronic effects of air pollution on the prevalence and incidence of COPD among adults was suggestive but not conclusive, despite plausible biological mechanisms and good evidence that air pollution affects lung development in childhood and triggers exacerbations in COPD patients. To fully integrate this evidence in the assessment, the life-time course of COPD should be better defined. Larger studies with longer follow-up periods, specific definitions of COPD phenotypes, and more refined and source-specific exposure assessments are needed.

  11. Compressive geoacoustic inversion using ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Traer, James

    2014-03-01

    Surface generated ambient noise can be used to infer sediment properties. Here, a passive geoacoustic inversion method that uses noise recorded by a drifting vertical array is adopted. The array is steered using beamforming to compute the noise arriving at the array from various directions. This information is used in two different ways: Coherently (cross-correlation of upward/downward propagating noise using a minimum variance distortionless response fathometer), and incoherently (bottom loss vs frequency and angle using a conventional beamformer) to obtain the bottom properties. Compressive sensing is used to invert for the number of sediment layer interfaces and their depths using coherent passive fathometry. Then the incoherent bottom loss estimate is used to refine the sediment thickness, sound speed, density, and attenuation values. Compressive sensing fathometry enables automatic determination of the number of interfaces. It also tightens the sediment thickness priors for the incoherent bottom loss inversion which reduces the search space. The method is demonstrated on drifting array data collected during the Boundary 2003 experiment.

  12. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  13. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, G.

    1988-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  14. Induced infiltration in aquifers with ambient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John L.

    1993-10-01

    Well water quality depends on the relative amounts of water drawn from the pumped aquifer and nearby surface water bodies, such as streams, lakes, and wetlands. Although a surface water body may normally gain water from the aquifer, pumping can reverse gradients, causing it to lose water near the well. Surface water then enters the well by induced infiltration. Two-dimensional vertically integrated models of induced infiltration are developed for various combinations of aquifer geometry and sources of recharge. The models, which have applications in wellhead protection, aquifer pollution characterization, and aquifer remediation, are presented graphically. They show that the propensity for and rate of induced infiltration are enhanced by higher pumping rates, proximity of the well to the stream, and the presence of nearby barrier boundaries. The propensity and rate are reduced by the presence of other surface water bodies. Ambient groundwater discharge rate to the surface water body also plays a role, but not its source, whether it is from local vertical recharge, lateral inflow, or both. The results are also largely indifferent to whether the aquifer transmissivity is assumed to be a constant, or a function of water table elevation. Finally, if the well is close enough to the surface water body, say, less than 5% of the aquifer width, then the aquifer acts as if it were semi-infinite.

  15. Does ambient temperature affect foodborne disease?

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Rennie M; Becker, Niels G; Hall, Gillian; Moodie, Keith B A

    2004-01-01

    Foodborne illness is a significant public health issue in most countries, including Australia. We examined the association between temperature and salmonellosis notifications, and compared these associations for 5 Australian cities. Log-linear models describing monthly salmonellosis notifications in terms of calendar time and monthly average temperatures were fitted over the period 1991 to 2001 for each city. We used a negative binomial chance model to accommodate overdispersion in the counts. The long-term trend showed an increase in salmonellosis notifications in each of the 5 cities. There was a positive association between monthly salmonellosis notifications and mean monthly temperature of the previous month in every city. Seasonal patterns in salmonellosis notifications were fully explained by changes in temperature. The strength of the association, the consistency across 5 cities, and a plausible biologic pathway suggest that higher ambient temperatures are a cause of higher salmonellosis notifications. The lag of 1 month suggests that temperature might be more influential earlier in the production process rather than at the food preparation stage. This knowledge can help to guide policy on food preparation and distribution. It also suggests a basis for an early warning system for increased risk from salmonellosis, and raises yet another possible health problem with global warming.

  16. Tritium monitoring system for near ambient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.G.; Bauer, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of research on an improved tritium measurement system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Navy. Present tritium-in-air monitoring systems installed by the Navy can reliably measure to less than 10 {mu}Ci/m{sup 3}, but medical and safety issues are pushing measurement needs to below 1 {mu}Ci/m{sup 3}, which is equivalent to 1--10 nCi/ml in liquid samples, using calcium metal converter. A significant effort has been expended over the past 10 years by the Navy RADIAC Development Program at ORNL on various schemes to improve the detection of tritium in both air and liquid at near ambient levels. One such scheme includes a liquid flow-through system based on an NE102 sponge scintillator with dual photomultiplier tubes for the tube noise rejection. (This document also contains copies of the slides used for presentation of this paper to the IEEE 1991 Nuclear Science Symposium). 4 refs., 17 figs.

  17. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  18. Perchlorate Formation on Mineral Surfaces under Ambient Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Perchlorate(ClO4-) was first discovered in the northern polar region of mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and was also recently detected by the Mars Science Laboratory in Gale crater, indicating a possible planet-wide distribution [1,2]. The discovery of perchlorate on mars has led to numerous questions regarding its formation pathways, intermediate oxychlorine species that may be present, and their capacity to oxidize organics that may be present in the surface and sub-surface. If perchlorate is formed photochemically in the atmosphere as on earth, it would be expected that the large amount of perchlorate on mars (~0.6% by weight detected by Phoenix) would have been formed mainly in the distant past when volcanic activity on mars was more prevalent and more chlorine was available in the atmosphere, however recent research shows that perchlorate is broken down over time by gamma rays, suggesting an ongoing source of perchlorate production [3]. This suggests an ongoing mechanism for perchlorate formation. Our current research is aimed at understanding different mechanisms for perchlorate formation on mineral surfaces under ambient mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV fluence found on mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and various minerals that are known to be present on mars, as well as Cl-, OCl-, ClO2- or ClO3- and exposed in the MSC for varying lengths of time. Samples are subsequently analyzed for perchlorate formation using ion chromatography. To date, perchlorate has been shown to be formed relatively easily under simulated martian conditions from both ClO2- and ClO3- starting materials without invoking an atmospheric source of chlorine. References: [1] Hecht et al, Science, Vol. 325, p. 64-67, 2009 [2] Kerr, Science, Vol. 340, p. 138, 2013 [3] Quinn et al, Astrobiology, Vol. 13(6) p. 515-20, 2013

  19. On Short Period Ambient Noise of Taiwan (1) Ambient Noise Tomography (2) Probing Source of Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Gung, Y.; You, S.; Chiao, L.; Liang, W.; Lin, C.

    2009-12-01

    Retrieving empirical Green functions (EGF) between stations by cross-correlating continuous seismic records has quickly become a popular technique in seismology for its operational simplicity and various advantages over traditional surface wave tomography; in particular, the derived short period Green’s functions of surface waves are usually inaccessible from seismic record caused by nature earthquakes. We apply this technique to three component continuous seismic data recorded at 88 short period stations in Taiwan. The data are collected from three seismic networks, including the island-wide Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network, and two temporary local seismic arrays, Tatun Volcanic Area array and Hsinchu array, for the time period from Jan, 2006 to Dec, 2006. For each station pairs, we derive Love waves from T-T (transverse) component cross-correlation functions (CCF), and Rayleigh waves from Z-Z (vertical) and R-R (radial) component CCF respectively. We measure group and phase velocities for the period range from 1 to 5 seconds. The achieved dense path coverage together with the retrieved short period EGF provide an unprecedented resolving power to the shallow crust structure of Taiwan island. With the qualified dispersion curves, we apply a multi-scale inversion technique to derive two dimensional phase, group velocity maps for both Rayleigh and Love waves, and three dimensional Vs structure of shallow crust. Besides tomographic study, we also attempt to probe the sources of ambient noise by several approaches: (1) analyzing the relative strength between the causal and acausal empirical Green’s functions (EGF); (2) measuring the relative strength of CCF amplitudes with respect to their own annual average as a function of time and azimuth to determine the background energy flow; and (3) computing power spectra density of continuous record for representative costal stations. With the results, we are able to characterize the spatial and temporal variations

  20. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  1. Cancrinite-group minerals behavior at non-ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Paolo; Gatta, G. Diego; Kahlenberg, Volker; Merlini, Marco; Alvaro, Matteo; Cámara, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Cancrinite-group minerals occur in the late stages of alkaline (SiO2)-undersaturated magmatism and in related effusive or contact rocks. So far only few studies have been devoted to the description of the thermo-elastic behavior, phase-stability and P /T -structure evolution (at the atomic scale) of this mineral group. Cancrinite-group minerals have an open-framework structure characterized by the [CAN]-topology. The [CAN]-framework shows large 12-ring channels, parallel to the c crystallographic axis, bound by columns of cages, the so-called can units. While very limited chemical variation is observed in the framework composition (the composition is almost always [Si6Al6O24]) a remarkable chemical variability is reported for the extraframework components in the cancrinite-group minerals. Two subgroups can be identified according to the extraframework content of the can units: the cancrinite- and the davyne-subgroups, showing Na-H2O and Ca-Cl chains, respectively. The channels are stuffed by cations, anions and molecules. We aimed to model the thermo-elastic behavior and the mechanisms of the (P ,T)-induced structure evolution of cancrinite-group minerals, with special interest on the role played by the extraframework population. The study was restricted to the following (CO3)-rich and (SO4)-rich end-members: cancrinite sensu stricto {[(Na,Ca)6(CO3)1.2-1.7][Na2(H2O)2][Al6Si6O24]}, vishnevite {[(Na,Ca,K)6(SO4)][Na2(H2O)2][Al6Si6O24]}, balliranoite {[(Na,Ca)6(CO3)1.2-1.7][Ca2Cl2][Al6Si6O24]} and davyne {[(Na,Ca,K)6((SO4),Cl)][Ca2Cl2][Al6Si6O24]}. Their high-P and low-T (T < 293 K) behavior was investigated by means of in-situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction, using diamond-anvil cells and (N2)-cryosystems, respectively. The high-T behavior of cancrinite has also been studied by means of in-situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction with a resistive heater. Cancrinite minerals share a similar volume compressibility and thermal expansivity at ambient conditions (cancrinite

  2. Wash-out of ambient air contaminations for breath measurements.

    PubMed

    Maurer, F; Wolf, A; Fink, T; Rittershofer, B; Heim, N; Volk, T; Baumbach, J I; Kreuer, S

    2014-06-01

    In breath analysis, ambient air contaminations are ubiquitous and difficult to eliminate. This study was designed to investigate the reduction of ambient air background by a lung wash-out with synthetic air. The reduction of the initial ambient air volatile organic compound (VOC) intensity was investigated in the breath of 20 volunteers inhaling synthetic air via a sealed full face mask in comparison to inhaling ambient air. Over a period of 30 minutes, breath analysis was conducted using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a multi-capillary column. A total of 68 VOCs were identified for inhaling ambient air or inhaling synthetic air. By treatment with synthetic air, 39 VOCs decreased in intensity, whereas 29 increased in comparison to inhaling ambient air. In total, seven VOCs were significantly reduced (P-value < 0.05). A complete wash-out of VOCs in this setting was not observed, whereby a statistically significant reduction up to 65% as for terpinolene was achieved. Our setting successfully demonstrated a reduction of ambient air contaminations from the airways by a lung wash-out with synthetic air.

  3. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  4. Towards Full-Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, K.; Ermert, L. A.; Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, e.g. wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, or the isotropic distribution of both mono- and dipolar uncorrelated noise sources. These assumptions are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations in order to constrain Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation, we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for the distribution of noise sources, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics. This is intended to improve the resolution of tomographic images, to refine noise source location, and thereby to contribute to a better understanding of noise generation. We introduce an operator-based formulation for the computation of correlation functions and apply the continuous adjoint method that allows us to compute first and second derivatives of misfit functionals with respect to source distribution and Earth structure efficiently. Based on these developments we design an inversion scheme using a 2D finite-difference code. To enable a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we investigate the following aspects: The capability of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution. Possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure can be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa. In anticipation of real-data applications, we present an extension of the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus, which allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface.

  5. Ambient intelligence systems for personalized sport training.

    PubMed

    Vales-Alonso, Javier; López-Matencio, Pablo; Gonzalez-Castaño, Francisco J; Navarro-Hellín, Honorio; Baños-Guirao, Pedro J; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco J; Martínez-Álvarez, Rafael P; González-Jiménez, Daniel; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Duro-Fernández, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Several research programs are tackling the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) at specific fields, such as e-Health, e-Inclusion or e-Sport. This is the case of the project "Ambient Intelligence Systems Support for Athletes with Specific Profiles", which intends to assist athletes in their training. In this paper, the main developments and outcomes from this project are described. The architecture of the system comprises a WSN deployed in the training area which provides communication with athletes' mobile equipments, performs location tasks, and harvests environmental data (wind speed, temperature, etc.). Athletes are equipped with a monitoring unit which obtains data from their training (pulse, speed, etc.). Besides, a decision engine combines these real-time data together with static information about the training field, and from the athlete, to direct athletes' training to fulfill some specific goal. A prototype is presented in this work for a cross country running scenario, where the objective is to maintain the heart rate (HR) of the runner in a target range. For each track, the environmental conditions (temperature of the next track), the current athlete condition (HR), and the intrinsic difficulty of the track (slopes) influence the performance of the athlete. The decision engine, implemented by means of (m, s)-splines interpolation, estimates the future HR and selects the best track in each fork of the circuit. This method achieves a success ratio in the order of 80%. Indeed, results demonstrate that if environmental information is not take into account to derive training orders, the success ratio is reduced notably.

  6. Relationship Between Vortex Meander and Ambient Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Meyn, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    Efforts are currently underway to increase the capacity of airports by use of closely-spaced parallel runways. If such an objective is to be achieved safely and efficiently during both visual and instrument flight conditions, it will be necessary to develop more precise methods for the prediction of the motion and spread of the hazard posed by the lift-generated vortex-wakes of aircraft, and their uncertainties. The purpose of the present study is to relate the motion induced in vortex filaments by turbulence in the ambient flow field to the measured turbulence in the flow field. The problem came about when observations made in the two largest NASA wind tunnels indicated that extended exposure of vortex wakes to the turbulence in the wind tunnel air stream causes the centers of the vortices to meander about with time at a given downstream station where wake measurements are being made. Although such a behavior was expected, the turbulence level based on the maximum amplitude of meander was much less than the root-mean-squared value measured in the free-stream of the wind tunnel by use of hot-film anemometers. An analysis of the time-dependent motion of segments of vortex filaments as they interact with an eddy, indicates that the inertia of the filaments retards their motion enough in the early part of their travel to account for a large part of the difference in the two determinations of turbulence level. Migration of vortex filaments from one turbulent eddy to another (probably with a different orientation), is believed to account for the remainder of the difference. Methods that may possibly be developed for use in the measurement of the magnitude of the more intense eddies in turbulent flow fields and how they should be adjusted to predict vortex meander are then discussed.

  7. Ambient air pollution and population health: overview.

    PubMed

    Krewski, Daniel; Rainham, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    In November 2003 approximately 200 researchers, stakeholders, and policymakers from more than 40 countries gathered to discuss the science and policy implications of air pollution and human health as part of the AIRNET/NERAM Strategies for Clean Air and Health initiative. The purpose of this paper is to review the more than 35 research posters presented at the conference, including exposure, toxicological, and epidemiological studies of air pollution. Collectively, these papers support previous evidence that both short- and long-term exposures to particulate air pollution have adverse population health impacts, including effects on children. Cellular studies also suggest that air pollution can cause mutagenic and oxidative effects, raising concerns about carcinogenicity and cellular regeneration. Studies of biomarkers, such as Clara-cell proteins and lymphocyte damage assessment, provide further evidence of air pollution effects at the cellular level. Other studies have focused on improvements to measurement and sources of air pollution. These studies suggest that particle mass rather than particle composition may be a more useful indicator of potential human health risk. It is well known that emissions from transportation sources are a major contributor to ambient air pollution in large urban centres. Epidemiologic researchers are able to reduce bias due to misclassification and improve exposure assessment models by allocating air pollution exposure according to distance from traffic sources or land-use patterns. The close association between traffic patterns and air pollution concentrations provides a potential basis for the development of transport policies and regulations with population health improvements as a primary objective. The results of the research presented here present opportunities and challenges for the development of policies for improvements to air quality and human health. However, there remains the challenge of how best to achieve these

  8. Ambient Intelligence Systems for Personalized Sport Training

    PubMed Central

    Vales-Alonso, Javier; López-Matencio, Pablo; Gonzalez-Castaño, Francisco J.; Navarro-Hellín, Honorio; Baños-Guirao, Pedro J.; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco J.; Martínez-Álvarez, Rafael P.; González-Jiménez, Daniel; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Duro-Fernández, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Several research programs are tackling the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) at specific fields, such as e-Health, e-Inclusion or e-Sport. This is the case of the project “Ambient Intelligence Systems Support for Athletes with Specific Profiles”, which intends to assist athletes in their training. In this paper, the main developments and outcomes from this project are described. The architecture of the system comprises a WSN deployed in the training area which provides communication with athletes’ mobile equipments, performs location tasks, and harvests environmental data (wind speed, temperature, etc.). Athletes are equipped with a monitoring unit which obtains data from their training (pulse, speed, etc.). Besides, a decision engine combines these real-time data together with static information about the training field, and from the athlete, to direct athletes’ training to fulfill some specific goal. A prototype is presented in this work for a cross country running scenario, where the objective is to maintain the heart rate (HR) of the runner in a target range. For each track, the environmental conditions (temperature of the next track), the current athlete condition (HR), and the intrinsic difficulty of the track (slopes) influence the performance of the athlete. The decision engine, implemented by means of (m, s)-splines interpolation, estimates the future HR and selects the best track in each fork of the circuit. This method achieves a success ratio in the order of 80%. Indeed, results demonstrate that if environmental information is not take into account to derive training orders, the success ratio is reduced notably. PMID:22294931

  9. Recognizing the impact of ambient air pollution on skin health.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, S E; Wang, S Q

    2015-12-01

    Ambient air pollution is a known public health hazard that negatively impacts non-cutaneous organs; however, our knowledge regarding the effects on skin remains limited. Current scientific evidence suggests there are four mechanisms by which ambient air pollutants cause adverse effects on skin health: (i) generation of free radicals, (ii) induction of inflammatory cascade and subsequent impairment of skin barrier, (iii) activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and (iv) alterations to skin microflora. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on ambient air pollutants and their relevant sources, and highlight current evidence of the effects on skin. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Secondary organic aerosol formation from photo-oxidation of toluene with NOx and SO2: Chamber simulation with purified air versus urban ambient air as matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Zhang, Yanli; Situ, Shuping; Hu, Qihou; He, Quanfu; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xuemei; Boreave, Antoinette; George, Christian; Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xinming

    2017-02-01

    Chamber studies on the formation of secondary aerosols are mostly performed with purified air as matrix, it is of wide concern in what extent they might be different from the situations in ambient air, where a variety of gaseous and particulate components preexist. Here we compared the photo-oxidation of "toluene + NOx + SO2" combinations in a smog chamber in real urban ambient air matrix with that in purified air matrix. The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mass concentrations and yields from toluene in the ambient air matrix, after subtracted ambient air background primary and secondary organic aerosols, were 9.0-34.0 and 5.6-12.9 times, respectively, greater than those in purified air matrix. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 were enhanced in ambient air matrix experiments with observed 2.0-7.5 times higher SO2 degradation rates and 2.6-6.8 times faster sulfate formation than that in purified air matrix, resulting in higher in-situ particle acidity and consequently promoting acid-catalyzed SOA formation. In the ambient air experiments although averaged OH radical levels were elevated probably due to heterogeneous formation of OH on particle surface and/or ozonolysis of alkenes, non-OH oxidation pathways of SO2 became even more dominating. Under the same organic aerosol mass concentration, the SOA yields of toluene in purified air matrix experiments matched very well with the two-product model curve by Ng et al. (2007), yet the yields in ambient air on average was over two times larger. The results however were much near the best fit curve by Hildebrandt et al. (2009) with the volatility basis set (VBS) approach.

  11. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  12. Effects of ambient exposure, refrigeration, and icing on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus abundances in oysters.

    PubMed

    Jones, J L; Lydon, K A; Kinsey, T P; Friedman, B; Curtis, M; Schuster, R; Bowers, J C

    2017-07-17

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp) illnesses are typically acquired through the consumption of raw molluscan shellfish, particularly oysters. As Vibrio spp. are naturally-occurring bacteria, one means of mitigation of illness is achieved by limiting post-harvest growth. In this study, effects of ambient air storage, refrigeration, and icing of oysters on Vibrio spp. abundances were examined at two sites in Alabama (AL) [Dog River (DR) and Cedar Point (CP)] and one site in Delaware Bay, New Jersey (NJ). As the United States shellfish program recommendations include testing for total these organisms and gene targets, Vv and total (tlh) and pathogenic (tdh+ and trh+) Vp were enumerated from samples using MPN-real-time-PCR approaches. Mean Vv and Vp abundances in oysters from AL-DR were lowest in immediately iced samples (2.3 and -0.1 log MPN/g, respectively) and highest in the 5h ambient then refrigerated samples (3.4 and 0.5 log MPN/g, respectively). Similarly, in AL-CP Vv and Vp mean levels in oysters were lowest in immediately iced samples (3.6 and 1.2 log MPN/g, respectively) and highest in 5h ambient then refrigerated samples (5.1 and 3.2 log MPN/g, respectively). Mean levels of pathogenic Vp from AL sites were frequently below the limit of detection (<0.3 MPN/g). In NJ, Vv and Vp mean abundances in oysters were highest in samples which were held for 7h in the shade (5.3 and 4.8 log MPN/g, respectively). Mean pathogenic Vp levels in oysters at initial harvest were also highest in oysters 7h in the shade (2.1 and 2.2 log MPN/g for tdh+ and trh+ Vp). Regardless of sampling location, Vibrio spp. levels were generally significantly (p<0.05) greater in oysters exposed to 5h of air storage compared to the initially harvested samples. In addition, the data demonstrated that the use of layered ice resulted in lower Vibrio spp. levels in oysters, compared to those that were refrigerated post-harvest. These results suggest vibriosis risk can be mitigated

  13. [Research on Raman spectra of isooctane at ambient temperature and ambient pressure to 1. 2 GPa].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei-fei; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-03-01

    The experimental study of the Raman spectral character for liquid isooctane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane, ATM) was con ducted by moissanite anvil cell at the pressure of 0-1.2 GPa and the ambient temperature. The results show that the Raman peaks of the C-H stretching vibration shift to higher frenquencies with increasing pressures. The relations between the system pressure and peaks positions is given as following: v2 873 = 0.002 8P+2 873.3; v2 905 = 0.004 8P+2 905.4; v2 935 = 0.002 7P+ 2 935.0; v2 960 = 0.012P+2 960.9. The Raman spectra of isooctane abruptly changed at the pressure about 1.0 GPa and the liquid-solid phase transition was observed by microscope. With the freezing pressure at ambient temperature and the melting temperature available at 1 atm, the authors got the liquid-solid phase diagram of isooctane. According to Clapeyron equation, the authors obtained the differences of volume and entropy for the liquid-solid phase transition of isooctane: deltaV(m) = 4.46 x 10(-6) m3 x mol-1 and deltaS = -30.32 J x K(-1) x mol(-1).

  14. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combine your passion and commitment to finding a cure for ALS while achieving physical challenges through athletic events Register ... - 1275 K Street NW - Suite 250 - Washington, DC 20005 All content and works posted on this website are owned ...

  15. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some medical centers may require a neurological exam, psychological assessment and counseling before predictive testing. If a person in the family with ALS has a negative genetic test result (no identified genetic mutation), testing family members ...

  16. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  17. Rub al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-08-08

    NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Rub al Khali, one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula; it includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

  18. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  19. Aluminum coordinations for aluminosilicate glasses at 1 atm. and 3GPa: a 27Al MAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwardt, J. R.; Stebbins, J. F.; Withers, A. C.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    In this study, we used 27Al MAS NMR to investigate the distribution of different aluminum coordinations in ambient pressure and moderate pressure (3GPa) aluminosilicate glasses with compositions of Mx+(9-3x)Al2Si6O18, where M= Ca2+, Na+, and K+. These spectra were collected at 18.8 Tesla to minimize the peak broadening due to second-order quadrupolar effects, which causes overlapping peaks for different coordinations of Al. Aluminum is thought to be mostly tetrahedrally coordinated in ambient-pressure aluminosilicate glasses where M+(2-x)O >= Al2O3, but 27Al NMR studies have shown that small concentrations of high-coordinated Al are present in both charge balanced (Toplis et al. 2000; Stebbins et al. 2001) and "depolymerized" (M+(2-x)O > Al2O3) aluminosilicate glasses (Stebbins and Farnan 1992). The 27Al spectra of samples of this study show that these ambient pressure glasses all contain [5]Al. Interestingly, the NAS (Na-aluminosilicate) glass contains more [5]Al than the KAS glass (0.6 vs. 0.3, respectively), which is opposite of that observed for SiO[5] groups in binary silicate glasses (Stebbins and McMillan 1993). The CAS glass spectrum shows a shoulder at 25 ppm, but the [4]Al peak is too broad to assign a reliable percentage for the amount of [5]Al. Previous studies of high-pressure glasses have shown that Al transforms to higher coordinations with increasing pressures (Yarger et al. 1995). In this study, we observe that the 27Al MAS spectrum of the 3 GPa NAS glass shows that 7% [5]Al and 1% [6]Al species exist. Additionally, the spectra of the KAS glass shows that 2% [5]Al and possibly some [6]Al are present at 3 GPa. These spectra clearly show for the first time that pressure induced Al-coordination changes occur in aluminosilicate glasses at pressures of 3 GPa. Recent 27Al NMR spectra of high-pressure "depolymerized" aluminosilicate glasses with different fictive temperatures have shown that the amount of high-coordinated Al increases with increasing

  20. Effect of ambient particulate matter expousre on hemostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked levels of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air to cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Thrombus formation plays a primary role in potentiating acute cardiovascular events, and this study was...

  1. Developing a thermoacoustic sensor adaptive to ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Ang, Woon; Lim, Allan; Yu, Xiaojian; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a simple and adaptive thermoacoustic sensor was designed to measure Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS). Compared to other thermoacoustic sensor designs, our novelty lies in (i) integrating an ultrasound medium layer during the measurement to simplify the complicated set-up procedures and (ii) taking the effect of ambient temperatures into design consideration. After measuring temperature increases with various ambient temperatures under different ultrasound intensities, a relationship among ultrasound intensities, ambient temperatures and coefficients of temporal temperature changes was calculated. Our improved design has made the sensor easy to operate and its performance more accurate and consistent than the thermoacoustic sensor designs without considering ambient temperatures. In all, our improved design greatly enhances the thermoacoustic sensor in practical ultrasound calibration.

  2. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  3. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  4. Cross-correlations of ambient noise recorded by accelerometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rábade García, S. E.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the ambient noise cross-correlations obtained by using properly corrected accelerometric recordings, and determine velocity structure in central Mexico based on a dispersion analysis. The data used comprise ten months of continuous recordings - from April 2013 to January 2014 - of ambient seismic noise at stations operated by the National Seismological Service of Mexico and the Engineering Strong Ground Motion Network of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The vertical component of ambient noise was base-line corrected, filtered, and properly integrated before extracting Green's functions (GF), which were compared successfully against GF obtained using recordings from broadband velocity sensors. In order to obtain dispersion curves, we estimated group and phase velocities applying the FTAN analysis technique and obtained s-wave velocity profiles at selected regions. We conclude and highlight that the use of widely deployed accelerographs to conduct regional studies using ambient noise tomography is feasible

  5. 40 CFR 610.60 - Non-standard ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dynamometer, in ambient temperatures outside the 60° to 90° range specified in § 610.64 as determined by the... or dynamometer as determined by the Administrator. One test location, at an elevation of no less...

  6. Draft Final Ambient Air Monitoring Plan July 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This work plan describes the ambient air sampling program for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site and presents the locations, sampling strategies, and exposure limits for monitoring remedial activities in the Harbor.

  7. [Ambient and enclosed space air sampling for determination of contaminants].

    PubMed

    Dorogova, V B

    2010-01-01

    The paper touches upon the issues how to correctly and maximally take single and average daily samples of ambient, residential and public building, and enclosed space air for further tests for the content of hazardous substances. The paper is debated.

  8. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  9. Effect of ambient particulate matter expousre on hemostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked levels of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air to cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Thrombus formation plays a primary role in potentiating acute cardiovascular events, and this study was...

  10. THE GENOTOXICITY OF AMBIENT OUTDOOR AIR, A REVIEW: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genotoxicity of ambient outdoor air, a review: Salmonella mutagenicity

    Abstract
    Mutagens in urban air pollution come from anthropogenic sources (especially combustion sources) and are products of airborne chemical reactions. Bacterial mutation tests have been used ...

  11. High pressure studies of A2Mo3O12 negative thermal expansion materials (A2=Al2, Fe2, FeAl, AlGa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Lindsay; Gadient, Jennifer; Gao, Xiaodong; Lind, Cora

    2016-05-01

    High pressure powder X-ray diffraction studies of several A2Mo3O12 materials (A2=Al2, Fe2, FeAl, and AlGa) were conducted up to 6-7 GPa. All materials adopted a monoclinic structure under ambient conditions, and displayed similar phase transition behavior upon compression. The initial isotropic compressibility first became anisotropic, followed by a small but distinct drop in cell volume. These patterns could be described by a distorted variant of the ambient pressure polymorph. At higher pressures, a distinct high pressure phase formed. Indexing results confirmed that all materials adopted the same high pressure phase. All changes were reversible on decompression, although some hysteresis was observed. The similarity of the high pressure cells to previously reported Ga2Mo3O12 suggested that this material undergoes the same sequence of transitions as all materials investigated in this paper. It was found that the transition pressures for all phase changes increased with decreasing radius of the A-site cations.

  12. Elasticity of single-crystal SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay D.

    1984-12-01

    The adiabatic single-crystal elastic moduli of SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3, all with the orthorhombic perovskite structure, have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy under ambient conditions. These 3 compounds display various degrees of crystallographic distortion from the ideal cubic perovskite structure. We find that longitudinal moduli in directions parallel to the axes of a pseudocubic subcell are nearly equal and insensitive to distortions of the crystal structure from cubic symmetry, whereas, the moduli C 11 and C 22, parallel to the orthorhombic axes, display pronounced anisotropy with the exception of ScAlO 3. The shear moduli also correlate with distortion from cubic symmetry, as measured by rotation, or tilt angles, of the AlO 6 octahedra. Our data support the observations of Liebermann et al. that perovskite-structure compounds define consistent elasticity trends relating bulk modulus and molar volume, and sound speed and mean atomic weight. These relationships have been used to estimate bulk and shear moduli for the high-pressure polymorphs of CaSiO 3 and MgSiO 3 with the perovskite structure.

  13. Assessment of selected metals in the ambient air PM10 in urban sites of Bangkok (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Iijima, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the atmospheric concentrations of PM10-bounded selected metals in urban air is crucial for evaluating adverse health impacts. In the current study, a combination of measurements and multivariate statistical tools was used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on variations in the contents of 18 metals (i.e., Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce and Pb) in ambient air. The concentrations of PM10-bounded metals were measured simultaneously at eight air quality observatory sites during a half-year period at heavily trafficked roads and in urban residential zones in Bangkok, Thailand. Although the daily average concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Mn and Fe were almost equivalent to those of other urban cities around the world, the contents of the majority of the selected metals were much lower than the existing ambient air quality guidelines and standard limit values. The sequence of average values of selected metals followed the order of Al > Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mn > Ba > V > Sb > Ni > As > Cr > Cd > Se > Ce > La > Co > Sc. The probability distribution function (PDF) plots showed sharp symmetrical bell-shaped curves in V and Cr, indicating that crustal emissions are the predominant sources of these two elements in PM10. The comparatively low coefficients of divergence (COD) that were found in the majority of samples highlight that site-specific effects are of minor importance. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 37.74, 13.51 and 11.32 % of the total variances represent crustal emissions, vehicular exhausts and the wear and tear of brakes and tires, respectively.

  14. Ambient lead measurements in Cairo, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, J.E. Jr.; Labib, M.; Samaha, N.; Sabry, M.; Araby, H.E.

    1999-07-01

    The Cairo Air Improvement Project (CAIP) has established a network of 36 stations to monitor airborne lead levels in the Greater Cairo Area. Data obtained during the first 4 months of the monitoring program indicates that lead levels in ambient air significantly exceed the Government of Egypt's (GOE) Law Number 4 (1994) limit of 1 {micro} g/m{sup 3} (annual mean) in areas downwind of secondary lead smelters and in heavily trafficked areas. The highest mean and single sampling event lead levels were observed in the heavily industrialized areas of Shoubra el-Kheima and Tebbin. At two sites in Shoubra el-Kheima, mean and maximum lead levels were determined to be approximately 20 {micro} g/m{sup 3} and 79 {micro} g/m{sup 3}, respectively. At three sites located in areas of high motor vehicle traffic in the central part of the city, the mean lead level was about 4 {micro} g/m{sup 3} and the maximum levels ranged from approximately 10 x 20 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. Of the remainder of the sites, the mean lead concentrations were 2fd3 {micro} g/m{sup 3} at three sites, 1 P2 {mu} g/m{sup 3} at 16 sites, and below 1 {micro} g/m{sup 3} at eight sites. Lead levels in areas devoted primarily to residential use were generally less than 2 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. The maximum mean monthly PM{sub 10} lead value measured at fugitive emission monitoring sites near lead smelters was approximately 73 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. The maximum lead concentration measured during a single sampling event was 180 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. Generally lower lead levels were observed in December due to regulation action that resulted in some suspension of smelting operations and to approximately 180-degree wind direction shifts that typically occur during this period of the year. The GOE is working vigorously to eliminate the lead problem in Egypt through implementation of the Lead Exposure Action Plan (LEAP). A major component of LEAP is the Lead Smelter Action Plan (LSAP).

  15. Effect of Ambient Temperature on the Human Tear Film.

    PubMed

    Abusharha, Ali A; Pearce, E Ian; Fagehi, Raied

    2016-09-01

    During everyday life, the tear film is exposed to a wide range of ambient temperatures. This study aims to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on tear film physiology. A controlled environment chamber was used to create different ambient temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C) at a constant relative humidity of 40%. Subjects attended for two separate visits and were exposed to 25, 20, and 15°C at one visit and to 10 and 5°C at the other visit. The subjects were exposed to each room temperature for 10 min before investigating tear film parameters. The order of the visits was random. Tear physiology parameters assessed were tear evaporation rate, noninvasive tear break-up time (NITBUT), lipid layer thickness (LLT), and ocular surface temperature (OST). Each parameter was assessed under each condition. A threefold increase in tear evaporation rate was observed as ambient temperature increased to 25°C (P=0.00). The mean evaporation rate increased from 0.056 μL/min at 5°C to 0.17 μL/min at 25°C. The mean NITBUT increased from 7.31 sec at 5°C to 12.35 sec at 25°C (P=0.01). A significant change in LLT was also observed (P=0.00), LLT median ranged between 20 and 40 nm at 5 and 10°C and increased to 40 and 90 nm at 15, 20, and 25°C. Mean reduction of 4°C OST was observed as ambient temperature decreased from 25 to 5°C. Ambient temperature has a considerable effect on human tear film characteristics. Tear evaporation rate, tear LLT, tear stability, and OST were considerably affected by ambient temperature. Chronic exposure to low ambient temperature would likely result in symptoms of dry eye and ultimately ocular surface disorders.

  16. Postural orientation modifications in autism in response to ambient lenses.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Carmody, D P; Gaydos, A

    1996-01-01

    Autistic children often display abnormal postures, head tilts, and other spatial management dysfunctions. Methods were introduced to measure spatial orientation in tasks in a group of fourteen autistic children in Montreal, Canada. Ambient lenses were found to improve posture, correct head tilts, and improve ball catching abilities. A model of spatial orientation is described and recommendations are made to incorporate ambient lenses in treatment programs.

  17. The ROSCOE Manual. Volume 15. ambient geomagnetic field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-13

    Continue on reverse side it necessary and identify by bloc;, number) ROSCOE\\ ~ Ambient Geomagnetic Model .3 ABSTRACT fC.-ntinue on re.erse side if...necesAary end idrnttlyhr block number) A preliminary model of the ambient geomagnetic field has been adopted for use in ROSCOE. The model fits a locally...presented derivations, flow d’,%rams, Fortran listings, and a test problem and evaluation. The model is found to he both fast and accurate. ream DD I

  18. Propagation and Ambient Noise Studies for Ocean Acoustics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    artifacts could be due to array mismatch. Diagonal loading was used to stabilize the CSD matrices with respect to inversion, but artifacts were still...GEOACOUSTIC INVERSION THROUGH BOTTOM-LOSS ESTIMATE USING AMBIENT NOISE Use of the minimum-variance distortionless-response (MVDR) beamformer ...of adaptive beamforming techniques can improve ambient-noise inversion results (the claim in [3] is actually restricted to grazing angles below the

  19. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... long do people with familial ALS live? Do clusters of ALS possibly exist? (I have been told ... related?) What are the problems with studying possible clusters of ALS? What are motor neuron (nerve cell) ...

  20. ESTIMATED HOURLY PERSONAL EXPOSURES TO AMBIENT AND NON-AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER AMONG SENSITIVE POPULATIONS IN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies of particulate matter (PM) routinely use concentrations measured with stationary outdoor monitors as surrogates for personal exposure. Despite the frequently reported poor correlations between ambient concentrations and total personal exposure, the epidemi...

  1. ESTIMATED HOURLY PERSONAL EXPOSURES TO AMBIENT AND NON-AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER AMONG SENSITIVE POPULATIONS IN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies of particulate matter (PM) routinely use concentrations measured with stationary outdoor monitors as surrogates for personal exposure. Despite the frequently reported poor correlations between ambient concentrations and total personal exposure, the epidemi...

  2. Epidemiology of ALS.

    PubMed

    Nelson, L M

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology. ALS onset is rare before age 40 and increases with age thereafter. Men are at higher risk than women (ratio 1.3:1). Other than age and gender, the only indisputable risk factor for ALS is genetic susceptibility, with familial cases occurring in about 10% of most case series. Genetic linkage studies have provided evidence that a mutant form of the gene that codes for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, an endogenous free radical scavenger, is important in 15-20% of familial cases. Epidemiologic studies have identified associations of sporadic ALS with work in occupations that involve toxicant exposure. Environmental toxicants may act against a background of increased genetic susceptibility; however, genetically acquired biochemical defects have not been identified in sporadic ALS patients. Other epidemiologic theories of disease etiology have emphasized the potential role of physical trauma, electrical shock, and vigorous physical exertion, but evidence regarding these factors is inconsistent.

  3. Near-infrared cut-off filters based on CMOS nanostructures for ambient light sensors and image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junger, Stephan; Verwaal, Nanko; Tschekalinskij, Wladimir; Weber, Norbert

    2014-02-01

    Silicon based photodiodes provide spectral response in the visible wavelength range (VIS) but also in the near-infrared (NIR). For ambient light sensors (ALS) and image sensors with high color reproducibility the sensitivity in the NIR is unwanted as it impairs the sensing performance. Typically, external thin film filters are applied as near-infrared cut-off filters added to the photodiode or image sensor. We demonstrate plasmonic nanostructures fabricated directly within an extended CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) process. Designs in one and two metal layers are used and enable ambient light sensors as well as image sensors with pixel level NIR-blocking filters for color vision and additional NIR-sensitive pixels for simultaneous acquisition of VIS and NIR images.

  4. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the aluminum hydride anions: AlH2-, AlH3-, Al2H6-, Al3H9-, and Al4H12-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Collins, Evan; Lim, Alane; Ganteför, Gerd; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2013-03-01

    We report measurements of the negative ion photoelectron spectra of the simple aluminum hydride anions: AlH2-, AlH3-, Al2H6-, Al3H9-, and Al4H12-. From these spectra, we measured the vertical detachment energies of the anions, and we estimated the electron affinities of their neutral counterparts. Our results for AlH2-, AlH3-, and Al2H6- were also compared with previous predictions by theory.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the aluminum hydride anions: AlH2(-), AlH3(-), Al2H6(-), Al3H9(-), and Al4H12(-).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Collins, Evan; Lim, Alane; Ganteför, Gerd; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2013-03-28

    We report measurements of the negative ion photoelectron spectra of the simple aluminum hydride anions: AlH2(-), AlH3(-), Al2H6(-), Al3H9(-), and Al4H12(-). From these spectra, we measured the vertical detachment energies of the anions, and we estimated the electron affinities of their neutral counterparts. Our results for AlH2(-), AlH3(-), and Al2H6(-) were also compared with previous predictions by theory.

  7. Experimental Demonstration of Collisionless Particle Acceleration Mechanisms and Entrainment of Ambient Plasma Ions by a Rapidly Expanding Diamagnetic Cavity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde, J.; Vincena, S. T.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    The collisionless coupling of an expanding diamagnetic cavity to a magnetized, ambient plasma is studied in a laboratory environment using a laser-produced plasma (LPP). The seed LPP rapidly expands with velocities up to the background Alfvén speed, vexp ≤ vA. The boundary layer of the expansion is characterized with in situ diagnostics as a cylindrical version of the Ferraro-Rosenbluth current sheath. Maintenance of quasi-neutrality in this sheath forms an electric field opposing the cross-field expansion which simultaneously drives the electron current that forms the diamagnetic cavity, decelerates the LPP ions to stagnation, and accelerates ambient ions inward. The field topology across the background magnetic field is identical to that described by Bernhardt, et al. [1] for the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases. The boundary along the magnetic field, however, is shown to contain an electric field with E·B ≠ 0, which is absent in simple fluid models of diamagnetic cavities. The electric fields at this boundary help explain previous observations in the experiment of the ejection of suprathermal electrons and return currents that generated whistler- and Alfvén-wave radiation in the ambient plasma. Magnetic loops and an emissive probe measure the magnetic field and electrostatic potential along 3 dimensions while a laser-induced fluorescence scheme measures the cross-field flow of the ambient argon ions as they penetrate the diamagnetic cavity. Particle orbit solvers employing the measured fields corroborate the flow diagnostic and predict strong outflows of ambient ions with higher charge to mass ratios after diamagnetic cavity collapse. This experiment was conducted in the Large Plasma Device at the Basic Plasma Science Facility and funded by grants from the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. [1] P.A. Bernhardt, R.A. Roussel-Dupre, M.B. Pongratz, J. Geophys. Res. 92, 57777 (1987).

  8. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  9. Ambient Temperature and Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Eliot, Melissa N.; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Sorond, Farzaneh A.; Wellenius, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Some prior studies have linked ambient temperature with risk of cerebrovascular events. If causal, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this putative association remain unknown. Temperature-related changes in cerebral vascular function may play a role, but this hypothesis has not been previously evaluated. Methods We evaluated the association between ambient temperature and cerebral vascular function among 432 participants ≥65 years old from the MOBILIZE Boston Study with data on cerebrovascular blood flow, cerebrovascular resistance, and cerebrovascular reactivity in the middle cerebral artery. We used linear regression models to assess the association of mean ambient temperature in the previous 1 to 28 days with cerebrovascular hemodynamics adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results A 10°C increase in the 21-day moving average of ambient temperature was associated with a 10.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2%, 17.3%) lower blood flow velocity, a 9.0% (95% CI, 0.7%, 18.0%) higher cerebrovascular resistance, and a 15.3% (95%CI, 2.7%, 26.4%) lower cerebral vasoreactivity. Further adjustment for ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) did not materially alter the results. However, we found statistically significant interactions between ambient temperature and PM2.5 such that the association between temperature and blood flow velocity was attenuated at higher levels of PM2.5. Conclusions In this elderly population, we found that ambient temperature was negatively associated with cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular vasoreactivity and positively associated with cerebrovascular resistance. Changes in vascular function may partly underlie the observed associations between ambient temperature and risk of cerebrovascular events. PMID:26258469

  10. Ground motion prediction for the Vienna Basin area using the ambient seismic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippkus, Sven; Zigone, Dimitri; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray Working Group

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is one of the most seismically active regions in Austria. Because of the population density and sensitive infrastructure, seismic hazard assessment in this area is of critical importance. An important part of seismic hazard analysis is ground motion prediction, which can in principle be done using either empirical studies to derive ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) or using a physics-based approach to simulate ground motion by modelling surface wave propagation. Recently a new method has been presented that is based on the emergence of the inter-station Green's function from ambient noise cross-correlations (Denolle et al. 2013), which provides the impulse response of the Earth from a point source at the surface (from the site of one of the two receivers to the other). These impulse responses are dominated by surface waves, which would, in the case of a real earthquake, cause the major damages. The Green's function can in principle be modified to simulate a double couple dislocation at depth, i.e., a virtual earthquake. Using an adapted pre-processing method, the relative amplitudes of the ambient noise records of different inter-station paths are preserved in the correlation functions, and effects like attenuation and amplification of surface waves in sedimentary basins can be studied. This provides more precise information that will help improve seismic hazard evaluations. Here we present a preliminary study of such ground motion prediction for the Vienna Basin using about two dozen broadband stations from available networks in the area, e.g., stations from the University of Vienna (AlpArray) and Vienna Technical University. References Denolle, M. A., E. M. Dunham, G. A. Prieto, and G. C. Beroza (2013), Ground motion prediction of realistic earthquake sources using the ambient seismic field, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, 2102-2118, doi:10.1029/2012JB009603.

  11. Extending Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography to Continental Scales: Application Across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensen, G. D.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Shapiro, N. M.; Levshin, A. L.

    2005-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of surface wave energy from which the Rayleigh wave Green function between pairs of stations can be extracted by cross-correlating long noise sequences. Surface wave tomography based on group velocities obtained on the estimated Green functions has been shown to produce high-resolution short-period (7-18 s) surface wave dispersion maps that image the principal crustal geological units in Southern California (Shapiro et al., Science, 307, 1615, 2005). In this study, we extend ambient noise tomography both in band-width (from 10 sec to 150 sec period) and geographical extent (across the entire United States). We have used data from about 125 stations (many of which constitute the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS)) which together produce about 7500 inter-station paths across North America, providing much different data sampling than traditional teleseismic surface wave dispersion measurements. Cross-correlations are computed in five period bands between 10 and 150 seconds using at least one year of data. Temporal sub-setting provides uncertainty estimates on the group velocity measurements. The resulting group velocity maps have better resolution than those obtained by traditional methods based on earthquake waves, and demonstrate significant agreement with know geologic and tectonic features. They provide tighter constraints on crustal and upper mantle shear wave speeds and help to bridge the gap between global and regional scale 3-D models. Finally, the resulting cross-correlations are being used to constrain the source location, temporal variability,and frequency dependence of the ambient noise on which the tomographic method depends.

  12. Imaging Subsurface Structure of Tehran/Iran region using Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzad Iraj, Taghi; Shmomali, Z. Hossein

    2013-04-01

    Tehran, capital of Iran, is surrounded by many active faults (including Mosha, North Tehran and North and/or South Rey faults), however our knowledge about the 3D velocity structure of the study area is limited. Recent developments in seismology have shown that cross-correlation of a long time ambient seismic noise recorded by pair of stations, contain information about the Green's function between the stations. Thus ambient seismic noise carries valuable information of propagation path which can be extracted. We obtained 2D model of shear wave velocity (Vs) for Tehran/Iran area using seismic ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. In this study, we use continuous vertical component of data recorded by TDMMO (Tehran Disaster Mitigation and Management Organization) and IRSC (Iranian Seismological Center) networks in the Tehran/Iran area. The TDMMO and IRSC networks are equipped with CMG-5TD Guralp sensor and SS-1 Kinemetrics sensor respectively. We use data from 25 stations for 12 months from 2009/Oct. to 2010/Oct. Data processing is similar to that explained in detail by Bensen et al. (2007) including processed daily base data. The mean, trend, and instrument response were removed and the data were decimated to 10 sps. One-bit time-domain normalization was then applied to suppress the influence of instrument irregularities and earthquake signals followed by spectral normalization between 0.1-1.0 Hz (period 1-10 sec). After cross-correlation processing, we implement a new stacking method to stack many cross-correlation functions bases on the highest energy in a time interval which we expect to receive the Rayleigh wave fundamental mode. We then obtained group velocity of Rayleigh wave by using phase match filtering and frequency-time analysis techniques. Finally, we applied iterative inversion method to extract Vs model of shallow structure in the Tehran/Iran area.

  13. Interfacial structures of LaAlO3 films on Si(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. B.; Liu, Z. G.; Shi, G. H.; Ling, H. Q.; Zhou, H. W.; Wang, X. P.; Nguyen, B. Y.

    This paper investigates the interfacial characteristics of LaAlO3 (LAO) and LaAlOxNy (LAON) films deposited directly on silicon substrates by the pulsed-laser deposition technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) pictures indicate that an interfacial reaction between LAO and Si often exists. The interfacial layer thickness of LAO films deposited in a nitrogen ambient atmosphere is smaller than that of LAO films deposited in an oxygen ambient atmosphere. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to study the composition of the interfacial layer. The shift of the La 3d photoelectron peak to a higher binding energy compared to LaAlO3, the shift of the Al 2p peak to a higher binding energy compared to LaAlO3, the shift of the Si 2p peak to a lower binding energy compared to SiO2 and the intermediate location of the O 1s peak compared to LaAlO3 and SiO2 indicate the existence of a La-Al-Si-O bonding structure, which was also proved by the AES depth profile of LAO films. It can be concluded that the interfacial layer is not simply SiO2 but a compound of La-Al-Si-O.

  14. Thermal, solution and reductive decomposition of Cu-Al layered double hydroxides into oxide products

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Sylvia; Vishnu Kamath, P.

    2009-05-15

    Cu-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with [Cu]/[Al] ratio 2 adopt a structure with monoclinic symmetry while that with the ratio 0.25 adopt a structure with orthorhombic symmetry. The poor thermodynamic stability of the Cu-Al LDHs is due in part to the low enthalpies of formation of Cu(OH){sub 2} and CuCO{sub 3} and in part to the higher solubility of the LDH. Consequently, the Cu-Al LDH can be decomposed thermally (150 deg. C), hydrothermally (150 deg. C) and reductively (ascorbic acid, ambient temperature) to yield a variety of oxide products. Thermal decomposition at low (400 deg. C) temperature yields an X-ray amorphous residue, which reconstructs back to the LDH on soaking in water or standing in the ambient. Solution decomposition under hydrothermal conditions yields tenorite at 150 deg. C itself. Reductive decomposition yields a composite of Cu{sub 2}O and Al(OH){sub 3}, which on alkali-leaching of the latter, leads to the formation of fine particles of Cu{sub 2}O (<1 {mu}m). - Graphical abstract: SEM image of (a) the Cu{sub 2}O-Al(OH){sub 3} composite obtained on reductive decomposition of CuAl{sub 4}-LDH and (b) Cu{sub 2}O obtained on leaching of Al(OH){sub 3} from (a).

  15. A first principles study of structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of beryllium alanate BeAlH5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Kanagaprabha, S.; Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of BeAlH5 for monoclinic crystal structures with two different types of space group namely P21 and C2/c. Among the considered structures monoclinic (P21) phase is found to be the most stable at ambient condition. The structural phase transition from monoclinic (P21) to monoclinic (C2/c) phase is observed in BeAlH5. The electronic structure reveals that this compound is insulator. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this material is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  16. 75 FR 51039 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... new equivalent methods for measuring concentrations of PM 10 and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) in the ambient... concentrations of those ambient air pollutants for which EPA has established National Ambient Air Quality... measuring concentrations of PM 10 and SO 2 in the ambient air. These designations are made under the...

  17. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  18. Impacts on ambient air quality due to flaring activities in one of Oman's oilfields.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah; Ali, Sappurd; Sardar, Sabir; Irfan, Naseem

    2012-01-01

    This work was conducted to assess the impacts on workplace and ambient air quality due to release of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) into the atmosphere at Al-Noor production station, located in southern desert of Sultanate of Oman. The SO(2) is released because of oxidation of H(2)S to SO(2) on flaring of H(2)S rich off gas at the Al-Noor. In the first phase of the study, CALPUFF modeling system was used to predict the ground level concentrations of SO(2) emissions from the flare stacks. The evaluation of the modeling system was carried out by comparing the predicted results with that of the measured. In the second stage of the study, the estimated results were compared with the air quality standards/guidelines set by Omani regulatory authorities as well as by World Health Organization (WHO). It was concluded on the basis of current study that the sensitive individuals in the workplace of the Al-Noor could experience adverse health effects due to short-term exposure of SO(2).

  19. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  20. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) Chemical Assessment Summary U.S . Environmental Protection Agency National Center for Environmental Assessment This IRIS Summary has been removed from the IRIS database and is available for historical reference purposes . ( July 2016 ) Fosetyl - al ; CASRN

  1. California Surface Wave Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise: Tracking the Progress of the USArray Transportable Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2005-12-01

    We have extended the application of high resolution ambient noise surface wave tomography across all of California by incorporating emerging data from the USArray Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope. Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of Rayleigh wave energy from which the Green function between pairs of stations can be extracted by cross-correlating long noise sequences. Surface wave group velocities are then measured on the estimated Green functions. Early efforts were applied to records from USArray TA stations in Southern California and resulted in the construction of high-resolution short-period (7-18 s) surface wave dispersion maps and the imaging of the principal crustal geological units in Southern California (Shapiro et al., Science, 307, 1615, 2005). As the spatial coverage of the USArray TA in Northern California has improved over the past year, the number of potential receiver pairs and their resulting sampled paths have increased proportionately. We have extended surface wave tomography across California by computing cross-correlations to obtain short period (7-25 s) surface wave group velocity measurements for paths across the state. The majority of the paths in Northern California result from the recent emplacement of USArray TA instruments. Cross-correlations of three month time windows, starting in October 2004 and continuing through September 2005, result in evolving maps of the surface wave group velocities in Northern California. Newly imaged tomographic features are seen to emerge as the resolution improves.

  2. Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2011-06-08

    This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

  3. [Physico-chemical characteristics of ambient particles settling upon leaf surface of six conifers in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hasi, Eerdun; Liu, Lian-You; Gao, Shang-Yu

    2007-03-01

    The study on the density of ambient particles settling upon the leaf surface of six conifers in Beijing, the micro-configurations of the leaf surface, and the mineral and element compositions of the particles showed that at the same sites and for the same tree species, the density of the particles settling upon leaf surface increased with increasing ambient pollution, but for various tree species, it differed significantly, with the sequence of Sabina chinensis and Platycladus orientalis > Cedrus deodara and Pinus bungeana > P. tabulaeformis and Picea koraiensis. Due to the effects of road dust, low height leaf had a larger density of particles. The density of the particles was smaller in summer than in winter because of the rainfall and new leaf growth. The larger the roughness of leaf surface, the larger density of the particles was. In the particles, the overall content of SiO2, CaCO3, CaMg(CO3,), NaCl, 2CaSO4 . H2O, CaSO4 . 2H2O and Fe2O3 was about 10%-30%, and the main minerals were montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite and feldspar. The total content of 21 test elements in the particles reached 16%-37%, among which, Ca, Al, Fe, Mg, K, Na and S occupied 97% or more, while the others were very few and less affected by sampling sites and tree species.

  4. The relationship between body and ambient temperature and corneal temperature.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Line; Johnson, Leif; Arvidsson, Henrik; Larsen, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to elevated ambient temperatures has been mentioned as a risk factor for common eye diseases, primarily presbyopia and cataract. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship among ambient, cornea, and body core temperature. The relation between corneal temperature and ambient temperature was examined in 11 human volunteers. Furthermore, corneal temperature was measured using a thermal camera during elevation of body core temperature in three human volunteers and four rats. A linear relationship between corneal temperature and body temperature was found in the rat. For humans there was an initial linear increase in corneal temperature with increasing body temperature, but corneal temperature seemed to plateau at 36.5°C to 37.0°C despite a continued increase of body core temperature. A linear relationship between ambient and corneal temperature was found in humans but with a less steep slope than that between corneal and body core temperature. Corneal temperature is estimated to reach the maximum of 36.5°C to 37.0°C at ambient temperatures between 32.0°C and 34.5°C. If there is a causal relationship between elevated eye temperature, cataract, and presbyopia, the incidence of these eye diseases is predicted to increase with global warming. Importantly, the strong association between corneal temperature and body core temperature indicates that frequent infections could also be considered a risk factor for age-related lens disorders.

  5. Ambient temperature and morbidity: a review of epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan; Tong, Shilu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature-morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature-morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable.

  6. Ambient Temperature and Morbidity: A Review of Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. Data sources and data extraction: We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Data synthesis: Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature–morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature–morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. Conclusions: There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable. PMID:21824855

  7. Low temperature laser molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of AlGaN epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prashant; Ch., Ramesh; Kushvaha, S. S.; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2017-05-01

    We have grown AlGaN (0001) epitaxial layers on sapphire (0001) by using laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) technique. The growth was carried out using laser ablation of AlxGa1-x liquid metal alloy under r.f. nitrogen plasma ambient. Before epilayer growth, the sapphire nitradation was performed at 700 °C using r.f nitrogen plasma followed by AlGaN layer growth. The in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was employed to monitor the substrate nitridation and AlGaN epitaxial growth. High resolution x-ray diffraction showed wurtzite hexagonal growth of AlGaN layer along c-axis. An absorption bandgap of 3.97 eV is obtained for the grown AlGaN layer indicating an Al composition of more than 20 %. Using ellipsometry, a refractive index (n) value of about 2.19 is obtained in the visible region.

  8. Proton irradiation studies on Al and Al5083 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Gayathri, N.; Bhattacharya, M.; Gupta, A. Dutta; Sarkar, Apu; Dhar, S.; Mitra, M. K.; Mukherjee, P.

    2017-10-01

    The change in the microstructural parameters and microhardness values in 6.5 MeV proton irradiated pure Al and Al5083 alloy samples have been evaluated using different model based techniques of X-ray diffraction Line Profile Analysis (XRD) and microindendation techniques. The detailed line profile analysis of the XRD data showed that the domain size increases and saturates with irradiation dose both in the case of Al and Al5083 alloy. The corresponding microstrain values did not show any change with irradiation dose in the case of the pure Al but showed an increase at higher irradiation doses in the case of Al5083 alloy. The microindendation results showed that unirradiated Al5083 alloy has higher hardness value compared to that of unirradiated pure Al. The hardness increased marginally with irradiation dose in the case of Al5083, whereas for pure Al, there was no significant change with dose.

  9. Associations between summertime ambient pollutants and respiratory morbidity in New York City: Comparison of results using ambient concentrations versus predicted exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological analyses of air quality often estimate human exposure from ambient monitoring data, potentially leading to exposure misclassification and subsequent bias in estimated health risks. To investigate this, we conducted a case-crossover study of summertime ambient ozon...

  10. Associations between summertime ambient pollutants and respiratory morbidity in New York City: Comparison of results using ambient concentrations versus predicted exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological analyses of air quality often estimate human exposure from ambient monitoring data, potentially leading to exposure misclassification and subsequent bias in estimated health risks. To investigate this, we conducted a case-crossover study of summertime ambient ozon...

  11. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  12. MOVPE growth of laser structures for high-power applications at different ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, F.; Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Knigge, S.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Weyers, M.

    2016-10-01

    Laser structures for different operating temperatures were developed. Higher temperatures need an increase in barrier height to reduce carrier leakage. Best results for an emission wavelength of ≈800 nm were obtained using an asymmetric structure containing an n-InGaP and a p-Al0.5Ga0.5As waveguide. Such structures show 10 W output power for a single laser diode and >100 W for a laser bar at 50 °C ambient temperature and also a good aging behavior. Lower operating temperatures permit lower barrier heights which results in a lower series resistance and therefore higher conversion efficiency at high power. Carrier concentration and mobility for different AlxGa1-xAs compositions were estimated in dependence on temperature. An optimized structure reached 20 W for a single laser diode and 2 kW for a laser bar in QCW mode at -70 °C.

  13. Galvanic Manufacturing in the Cities of Russia: Potential Source of Ambient Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Golokhvast, Kirill S.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Galvanic manufacturing is widely employed and can be found in nearly every average city in Russia. The release and accumulation of different metals (Me), depending on the technology used can be found in the vicinities of galvanic plants. Under the environmental protection act in Russia, the regulations for galvanic manufacturing do not include the regulations and safety standards for ambient ultrafine and nanosized particulate matter (PM). To assess whether Me nanoparticles (NP) are among environmental pollutants caused by galvanic manufacturing, the level of Me NP were tested in urban snow samples collected around galvanic enterprises in two cities. Employing transmission electronic microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a laser diffraction particle size analyzer, we found that the size distribution of tested Me NP was within 10–120 nm range. This is the first study to report that Me NP of Fe, Cr, Pb, Al, Ni, Cu, and Zn were detected around galvanic shop settings. PMID:25329582

  14. Impact of combustion products from Space Shuttle launches on ambient air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bowers, J. F.; Cramer, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes some multilayer diffusion models and a computer program for these models developed to predict the impact of ground clouds formed during Space Shuttle launches on ambient air quality. The diffusion models are based on the Gaussian plume equation for an instantaneous volume source. Cloud growth is estimated on the basis of measurable meteorological parameters: standard deviation of the wind azimuth angle, standard deviation of wind elevation angle, vertical wind-speed shear, vertical wind-direction shear, and depth of the surface mixing layer. Calculations using these models indicate that Space Shuttle launches under a variety of meteorological regimes at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg AFB are unlikely to endanger the exposure standards for HCl; similar results have been obtained for CO and Al2O3. However, the possibility that precipitation scavenging of the ground cloud might result in an acidic rain that could damage vegetation has not been investigated.

  15. Impact of combustion products from Space Shuttle launches on ambient air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bowers, J. F.; Cramer, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes some multilayer diffusion models and a computer program for these models developed to predict the impact of ground clouds formed during Space Shuttle launches on ambient air quality. The diffusion models are based on the Gaussian plume equation for an instantaneous volume source. Cloud growth is estimated on the basis of measurable meteorological parameters: standard deviation of the wind azimuth angle, standard deviation of wind elevation angle, vertical wind-speed shear, vertical wind-direction shear, and depth of the surface mixing layer. Calculations using these models indicate that Space Shuttle launches under a variety of meteorological regimes at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg AFB are unlikely to endanger the exposure standards for HCl; similar results have been obtained for CO and Al2O3. However, the possibility that precipitation scavenging of the ground cloud might result in an acidic rain that could damage vegetation has not been investigated.

  16. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, E.; Socoliuc, A.; Maier, S.; Gessler, J.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  17. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, E; Socoliuc, A; Maier, S; Gessler, J; Glatzel, T; Baratoff, A; Meyer, E

    2009-01-14

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  18. Novel high-pressure phases of AlP from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Meng; Luo, Kun; Yu, Dongli; Zhao, Zhisheng; He, Julong

    2016-05-01

    By utilizing a crystal structure prediction software via particle swarm optimization, this study proposes three new high-pressure phases of aluminum phosphide (AlP) with high density and high hardness, in addition to previously proposed phases (wz-, zb-, rs-, NiAs-, β-Sn-, CsCl-, and Cmcm-AlP). These new phases are as follows: (1) an I 4 ¯ 3d symmetric structure (cI24-AlP) at 55.2 GPa, (2) an R 3 ¯ m symmetric structure (hR18-AlP) at 9.9 GPa, and (3) a C222 symmetric structure (oC12-AlP) at 20.6 GPa. Based on first-principle calculations, these phases have higher energetic advantage than CsCl- and β-Sn-AlP at ambient pressure. The independent elastic constants and phonon dispersion spectra are calculated to check the mechanical and dynamic stabilities of these phases. According to mechanical property studies, these new AlP phases have higher hardness than NiAs-AlP, and oC12-AlP has the highest hardness of 7.9 GPa. Electronic band structure calculations indicate that NiAs- and hR18-AlP have electrical conductivity. Additionally, wz-, zb-, and oC12-AlP possess semiconductive properties with indirect bandgaps, and cI24-AlP has a semiconductive property with a direct bandgap.

  19. Source apportionment of ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Shao, Min; Liu, Ying; Lu, Sihua; Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul; Xie, Shaodong

    2007-06-15

    The ambient air quality standard for ozone is frequently exceeded in Beijing in summer and autumn. Source apportionments of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are precursors of ground-level ozone formation, can be helpful to the further study of tropospheric ozone formation. In this study, ambient concentrations of VOCs were continuously measured with a time resolution of 30 min in August 2005 in Beijing. By using positive matrix factorization (PMF), eight sources for the selected VOC species were extracted. Gasoline-related emissions (the combination of gasoline exhaust and gas vapor), petrochemicals, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contributed 52, 20, and 11%, respectively, to total ambient VOCs. VOC emissions from natural gas (5%), painting (5%), diesel vehicles (3%), and biogenic emissions (2%) were also identified. The gasoline-related, petrochemical, and biogenic sources were estimated to be the major contributors to ozone formation potentials in Beijing.

  20. Transdimensional Bayesian seismic ambient noise tomography across SE Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, DingChang; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil; Ge, Zengxi; Min, Zhaoxu; Cipta, Athanasius; Yang, Runhai

    2017-02-01

    We analyze seismic ambient noise data recorded at a set of permanent and temporary stations across southeastern Tibet to image crustal structure. High-resolution phase velocity maps are presented based on Transdimensional Bayesian seismic ambient noise tomography. Seismic images exhibit more apparent horizontal heterogeneities and show more detailed information compared to previous studies based on traditional ambient noise tomography. As noted from the phase velocity image at 25 s, the rigid high velocity anomalies beneath the Sichuan Basin and the South China Fold System act as a blockage to crustal material expansion, and the distribution of velocity anomalies contributes to the interpretation of a surface clockwise rotation pattern. Our results imply a more complex distributed low-velocity zone rather than two isolated channels beneath SE Tibet.

  1. Ambient pyrite in precambrian chert: new evidence and a theory.

    PubMed

    Knoll, A H; Barghoorn, E S

    1974-06-01

    Ambient pyrites of two distinct types were described from middle Precambrian rocks of the Lake Superior area. A new class of this phenomenon is here described from middle Precambrian chert from western Australia. The newly found ambient pyrites are quite minute and characteristically occur in groups forming a "starburst" pattern. All three types of ambient pyrite may be explained in terms of pressure solution initiated by gas evolution from organic material attached to the pyrite. Thermal degradation of the kerogen produces the gases which, due to the impermeability of the encompassing chert, build up the pressures necessary to initiate solution. Pyrite appendages bear a striking resemblance to micro-organisms and, thus, constitute the smallest pseudofossils known.

  2. Deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Ma, N.; Liu, H. J.; Bian, Y. X.; Tao, J. C.; Hu, Min

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report that the deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain are frequently observed using a humidified nephelometer system. The deliquescence relative humidity (RH) primarily ranges from 73% to 81%, with an average of 76.8%. The observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols exhibit distinct diurnal patterns and are highly correlated with ammonium sulfate. The diurnal variations of ammonium and nitrate may play significant roles on occurrences of observed deliquescent phenomena. The frequently observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols in this paper imply that current parameterization schemes that describe the RH dependence of particle light scattering may result in a significant bias when estimating aerosol effects on climate.

  3. Designing for Persuasion: Toward Ambient Eco-Visualization for Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tanyoung; Hong, Hwajung; Magerko, Brian

    When people are aware of their lifestyle's ecological consequences, they are more likely to adjust their behavior to reduce their impact. Persuasive design that provides feedback to users without interfering with their primary tasks can increases the awareness of neighboring problems. As a case study of design for persuasion, we designed two ambient displays as desktop widgets. Both represent a users' computer usage time, but in different visual styles. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative study of two ambient displays. We discuss the gradual progress of persuasion supported by the ambient displays and the differences in users' perception affected by the different visualization styles. Finally, Our empirical findings lead to a series of design implications for persuasive media.

  4. Ambient plasma treatment of silicon wafers for surface passivation recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jia; Prinz, Markus; Markert, Thomas; Aberle, Armin G.; Mueller, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effect of an ambient plasma treatment powered by compressed dry air on the passivation quality of silicon wafers coated with intrinsic amorphous silicon sub-oxide is investigated. While long-time storage deteriorates the effective lifetime of all samples, a short ambient plasma treatment improves their passivation qualities. By studying the influence of the plasma treatment parameters on the passivation layers, an optimized process condition was identified which even boosted the passivation quality beyond its original value obtained immediately after deposition. On the other hand, the absence of stringent requirement on gas precursors, vacuum condition and longtime processing makes the ambient plasma treatment an excellent candidate to replace conventional thermal annealing in industrial heterojunction solar cell production.

  5. Ambient Pyrite in Precambrian Chert: New Evidence and a Theory

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Andrew H.; Barghoorn, Elso S.

    1974-01-01

    Ambient pyrites of two distinct types were described from middle Precambrian rocks of the Lake Superior area. A new class of this phenomenon is here described from middle Precambrian chert from western Australia. The newly found ambient pyrites are quite minute and characteristically occur in groups forming a “starburst” pattern. All three types of ambient pyrite may be explained in terms of pressure solution initiated by gas evolution from organic material attached to the pyrite. Thermal degradation of the kerogen produces the gases which, due to the impermeability of the encompassing chert, build up the pressures necessary to initiate solution. Pyrite appendages bear a striking resemblance to micro-organisms and, thus, constitute the smallest pseudofossils known. Images PMID:16592159

  6. Health Effects of Ambient Air Pollution in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Franchini, Massimo

    2017-09-12

    The deleterious effects of ambient air pollution on human health have been consistently documented by many epidemiologic studies worldwide, and it has been calculated that globally at least seven million deaths are annually attributable to the effects of air pollution. The major air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere by a number of natural processes and human activities include nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter. In addition to the poor ambient air quality, there is increasing evidence that indoor air pollution also poses a serious threat to human health, especially in low-income countries that still use biomass fuels as an energy resource. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ambient air pollution in financially deprived populations.

  7. Expanding uses of ambient noise for imaging, detection, and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, John R.; Malod, Laurent

    2002-11-01

    The use of ambient noise to sense the marine environment has a human history of only two decades. Starting with incoherent processing inspired by optical analogies such as Acoustic Daylight (TM), the exploration of the potential for ambient noise to provide useful information about the environment has blossomed into many related areas and diverse algorithms with connections to multistatic active sonar, classic passive sonar, communications, matched field processing and others. This presentation will introduce some recent work in these areas and attempt to draw together how the use of ambient noise, both by mankind and marine animals, is beginning to form a more complete picture of the potential of this exciting area of research. [Work supported by the Defence Science and Technology Agency, Singapore.

  8. Health Effects of Ambient Air Pollution in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Franchini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The deleterious effects of ambient air pollution on human health have been consistently documented by many epidemiologic studies worldwide, and it has been calculated that globally at least seven million deaths are annually attributable to the effects of air pollution. The major air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere by a number of natural processes and human activities include nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter. In addition to the poor ambient air quality, there is increasing evidence that indoor air pollution also poses a serious threat to human health, especially in low-income countries that still use biomass fuels as an energy resource. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ambient air pollution in financially deprived populations. PMID:28895888

  9. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  10. Retinal output changes qualitatively with every change in ambient illuminance

    PubMed Central

    Seitter, Hartwig; Hovhannisyan, Anahit; Procyk, Christopher A.; Allen, Annette E.; Schenk, Martin; Lucas, Robert J.; Münch, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    The collective activity pattern of retinal ganglion cells, the retinal code, underlies higher visual processing. How does the ambient illuminance of the visual scene influence this retinal output? We recorded from isolated mouse and pig retina and from mouse dLGN in-vivo at up to seven ambient light levels covering the scotopic to photopic regimes. Across each luminance transition, the majority of ganglion cells exhibited qualitative response changes, while maintaining stable responses within each luminance. Strikingly, we commonly observed the appearance and disappearance of ON responses in OFF cells and vice versa. Such qualitative response changes occurred for a variety of stimuli, including full-field and localized contrast steps, and naturalistic movies. Our results suggest that the retinal code is not fixed but varies with every change of ambient luminance. This finding raises new questions about signal processing within the retina and has intriguing implications for visual processing in higher brain areas. PMID:25485757

  11. Source apportionment of ambient PM10 and PM2.5 in Haikou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaozhen; Bi, Xiaohui; Xu, Hong; Wu, Jianhui; Zhang, Yufen; Feng, Yinchang

    2017-07-01

    In order to identify the sources of PM10 and PM2.5 in Haikou, 60 ambient air samples were collected in winter and spring, respectively. Fifteen elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb), water-soluble ions (SO42 - and NO3-), and organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were analyzed. It was clear that the concentration of particulate matter was higher in winter than in spring. The value of PM2.5/PM10 was > 0.6. Moreover, the proportions of TC, ions, Na, Al, Si and Ca were more high in PM10 and PM2.5. The SOC concentration was estimated by the minimum OC/EC ratio method, and deducted from particulate matter compositions when running CMB model. According to the results of CMB model, the resuspended dust (17.5-35.0%), vehicle exhaust (14.9-23.6%) and secondary particulates (20.4-28.8%) were the major source categories of ambient particulate matter. Additionally, sea salt also had partial contribution (3-8%). And back trajectory analysis results showed that particulate matter was greatly affected by regional sources in winter, while less affected in spring. So particulate matter was not only affected by local sources, but also affected by sea salt and regional sources in coastal cities. Further research could focuses on establishing the actual secondary particles profiles and identifying the local and regional sources of PM at once by one model or analysis method.

  12. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  13. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent.

    PubMed

    Toet, Alexander; van Schaik, Martin G

    2013-01-01

    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism, and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material) or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material) ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent evidence that odors reflexively direct visual attention to (either semantically or affectively) congruent visual objects, we hypothesized that participants would notice more signs of disorder in the presence of ambient tar odor (since this odor may bias attention to unpleasant and negative features), and less signs of disorder in the presence of ambient grass odor (since this odor may bias visual attention toward the vegetation in the environment and away from the signs of disorder). Contrary to our expectations the results provide no indication that the presence of an ambient odor affected the participants' visual attention for signs of disorder or their emotional response. However, the paradigm used in present study does not allow us to draw any conclusions in this respect. We conclude that a closer affective, semantic, or spatiotemporal link between the contents of a desktop VE and ambient scents may be required to effectively establish diagnostic associations that guide a user's attention. In the absence of these direct links, ambient scent may be more diagnostic for the physical environment of the observer as a whole than for the particular items in that environment (or, in this case, items represented in the VE).

  14. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  15. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent

    PubMed Central

    Toet, Alexander; van Schaik, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism, and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material) or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material) ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent evidence that odors reflexively direct visual attention to (either semantically or affectively) congruent visual objects, we hypothesized that participants would notice more signs of disorder in the presence of ambient tar odor (since this odor may bias attention to unpleasant and negative features), and less signs of disorder in the presence of ambient grass odor (since this odor may bias visual attention toward the vegetation in the environment and away from the signs of disorder). Contrary to our expectations the results provide no indication that the presence of an ambient odor affected the participants’ visual attention for signs of disorder or their emotional response. However, the paradigm used in present study does not allow us to draw any conclusions in this respect. We conclude that a closer affective, semantic, or spatiotemporal link between the contents of a desktop VE and ambient scents may be required to effectively establish diagnostic associations that guide a user’s attention. In the absence of these direct links, ambient scent may be more diagnostic for the physical environment of the observer as a whole than for the particular items in that environment (or, in this case, items represented in the VE). PMID:24324453

  16. Distribution and speciation of ambient selenium in contrasted soils, from mineral to organic rich.

    PubMed

    Tolu, Julie; Thiry, Yves; Bueno, Maïté; Jolivet, Claudy; Potin-Gautier, Martine; Le Hécho, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Selenium adsorption onto oxy-hydroxides mainly controls its mobility in volcanic soils, red earths and soils poor in organic matter (OM) while the influence of OM was emphasized in podzol and peat soils. This work aims at deciphering how those solid phases influence ambient Se mobility and speciation under less contrasted conditions in 26 soils spanning extensive ranges of OM (1-32%), Fe/Al oxy-hydroxides (0.3-6.1%) contents and pH (4.0-8.3). The soil collection included agriculture, meadow and forest soils to assess the influence of OM quality as well. Trace concentrations of six ambient Se species (Se(IV), Se(VI) and 4 organo-Se compounds) were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS in three extractants (ultrapure water, phosphate and sodium hydroxide) targeting Se associated to different soil phases. The Kd values determined from ultrapure water extraction were higher than those reported in commonly used short-term experiments after Se-spiking. Correlations of ambient Se content and distribution with soil parameters explained this difference by an involvement of slow processes in Se retention in soils. The 26 Kd values determined here for a wide variety of soils thus represent a relevant database for long-term prediction of Se mobility. For soils containing less than 20% OM, ambient Se solubility is primarily controlled by its adsorption onto crystalline oxy-hydroxides. However, OM plays an important role in Se mobility by forming organo-mineral associations that may protect adsorbed Se from leaching and/or create anoxic zones (aggregates) where Se is immobilized after its reduction. Although for the first time, inorganic Se(IV), Se(VI) and organo-Se compounds were simultaneously investigated in a large soil collection, high Se proportions remain unidentified in each soil extract, most probably due to Se incorporation and/or binding to colloidal-sized OM. Variations of environmental factors regulating the extent of OM-mineral associations/aggregation may thus lead to changes

  17. Ambient Metrics for n-Dimensional pp-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistner, Thomas; Nurowski, Pawel

    2010-06-01

    We provide an explicit formula for the Fefferman-Graham ambient metric of an n-dimensional conformal pp-wave in those cases where it exists. In even dimensions we calculate the obstruction explicitly. Furthermore, we describe all 4-dimensional pp-waves that are Bach-flat, and give a large class of Bach-flat examples which are conformally Cotton-flat, but not conformally Einstein. Finally, as an application, we use the obtained ambient metric to show that even-dimensional pp-waves have vanishing critical Q-curvature.

  18. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  19. Implicit Interaction: A Modality for Ambient Exercise Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; O'Grady, M. J.; O'Hare, G. M. P.

    Ambient Exercise refers to the implicit exercise that people undertake in the course of their everyday duties - a simple example being climbing stairs. Increasing awareness of the potential health benefits of such activities may well contribute to an increase in a person’s well-being. Initially, it is necessary to monitor and quantify such exercise so that personalized fitness plans may be constructed. In this paper, the implicit interaction modality is harnessed to enable the capturing of ambient exercise activity thereby facilitating its subsequent quantification and interpretation. The novelty of the solution proposed lies in its ubiquity and transparency.

  20. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate an ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environmental light for field use. The CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. The filters in both the spectral domain and the frequency domain effectively blocked the room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under real ambient pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yasumasa; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yu, Liwei; Chaveanghong, Suwilai; Sekizawa, Oki; Sakata, Tomohiro; Uruga, Tomoya; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Toshihiko

    2017-07-01

    We have developed an ambient pressure hard-X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic system equipped with a differential pumping system at BL36XU of SPring-8. Photoelectron spectra from a Au(111) surface were recorded using excitation light of 8 keV focused to 20 × 20 µm2 and adopting an aperture diameter of 30 µm at the entrance of the electron lens and a working distance of 60 µm. The Au 4f and 3d5/2 spectra were measured by increasing the ambient pressure from 1 Pa to atmospheric pressure and demonstrated that the instrument is capable of measuring the photoelectron spectrum under atmospheric pressure.

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE: Sensor communication technology towards ambient intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsing, J.; Lindgren, P.

    2005-04-01

    This paper is a review of the fascinating development of sensors and the communication of sensor data. A brief historical introduction is given, followed by a discussion on architectures for sensor networks. Further, realistic specifications on sensor devices suitable for ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing are given. Based on these specifications, the status and current frontline development are discussed. In total, it is shown that future technology for ambient intelligence based on sensor and actuator devices using standardized Internet communication is within the range of possibilities within five years.

  3. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-10-01

    This report summarizes observations and tentative conclusions drawn from evaluations of the data captured to date from the operation of the ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data.

  4. The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Jochen; Stahl, Christoph; Röfer, Thomas; Krieg-Brückner, Bernd; Alexandersson, Jan

    The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL). Our demonstrators range from multimodal speech dialog systems to fully instrumented environments allowing the development of intelligent assistant systems, for instance an autonomous wheelchair, or the recognition and processing of everyday activities in a smart home. These innovative technologies are then tested, evaluated and demonstrated in DFKI's living labs.

  5. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  6. Influence of sample processing parameters on thermal boundary conductance value in an Al/AlN system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachon, Christian; Hojeij, Mohamad; Weber, Ludger

    2011-02-01

    The influence of sample processing parameters on the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between aluminum and aluminum nitride has been investigated by transient thermoreflectance. An evaporated Al layer on the polished substrate yielded a TBC at ambient of roughly 47 MW m-2 K-1. The largest improvement (by a factor of 5) was obtained by plasma-etching of the substrate and subsequent evaporation of the metal layer. Electron microscopy suggests that the differences in TBC were mainly due to the (partial) elimination of the native oxide layer on the substrate. The importance of an adequate model for data extraction on measured TBC is highlighted.

  7. Compression, bend, and tension studies on forged Al67Ti25Cr8 and Al66Ti25Mn(g) L1(2) compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Brown, S. A.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Cast, homogenized, and isothermally forged aluminum-rich L1(2) compounds Al67Ti25Cr8 and Al66Ti25Mn(g) were tested in compression as a function of temperature and as a function of strain rate at elevated temperatures (1000 K and 1100 K). Three-point bend specimens were tested as a function of temperature in the range 300 K to 873 K. Strain gages glued on the tensile side of the ambient and 473 K specimens enabled direct strain measurements. A number of 'buttonhead' tensile specimens were electro-discharge machined, fine polished, and tested between ambient and 1073 K for yield strength and ductility as a function of temperature. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of fracture surfaces from both the bend and tensile specimens revealed a gradual transition from transgranular cleavage to intergranular failure with increasing temperature.

  8. Compression, bend, and tension studies on forged Al67Ti25Cr8 and Al66Ti25Mn(g) L1(2) compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Brown, S. A.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Cast, homogenized, and isothermally forged aluminum-rich L1(2) compounds Al67Ti25Cr8 and Al66Ti25Mn(g) were tested in compression as a function of temperature and as a function of strain rate at elevated temperatures (1000 K and 1100 K). Three-point bend specimens were tested as a function of temperature in the range 300 K to 873 K. Strain gages glued on the tensile side of the ambient and 473 K specimens enabled direct strain measurements. A number of 'buttonhead' tensile specimens were electro-discharge machined, fine polished, and tested between ambient and 1073 K for yield strength and ductility as a function of temperature. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of fracture surfaces from both the bend and tensile specimens revealed a gradual transition from transgranular cleavage to intergranular failure with increasing temperature.

  9. Imaging Subsurface Structure of Central Zagros Zone/Iran Using Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidravesh, Shaghayegh; Pakzad, Mehrdad, ,, Dr.; Hatami, Mohammad Reza, ,, Dr.

    2017-04-01

    The Central Zagros zone, of west Iran & east Iraq, is surrounded by many active faults (including Main Zagros Reversed Fault, Main Recent Fault, High Zagros Fault, Zagros Fold, & Thrust Belt). Recent studies show that cross-correlation of a long-term ambient seismic noise data recorded in station-pair, includes important information regarding empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between stations. Hence, ambient seismic noise carries valuable information of the wave propagation path (which can be extracted). The 2D model of surface waves (Rayleigh & Love) velocities for the studied area is obtained by seismic ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. Throughout this research, we use continuous records of all three vertical, radial, and tangential components (obtained by rotation) recorded by IRSC (Iranian Seismological Center) and IIEES (International Institute of Earthquake Engineering) networks for this area of interest. The IRSC & IIEES networks are equipped by SS-1 kinematics and Guralp CMG-3T sensors respectively. Data of 20 stations were used for 12 months from 2014/Nov. to 2015/Nov. The performed data processing is similar to the one, put into words in detail by Bensen et al. (2007) including the processed daily base data. Mean, trend, and instrument response were removed and the data were decimated to 5 sps (sample per second) to reduce the amount of storage space and computational time required. We then applied merge to handle data gaps. One-bit time-domain normalization was also applied to suppress the influence of instrument irregularities and earthquake signals followed by spectral (frequency-domain) normalization between 0.05-0.2 Hz (period 5-20 sec). After cross-correlation (processing step), we perform rms stacking (new approach of stacking) to stack many cross-correlation functions based on the highest energy in a time interval which we accordingly anticipate to receive Rayleigh & Love waves fundamental modes. To evaluate quality of the stacking process

  10. Implications of a reducing and warm (not hot) Archaean ambient mantle for ancient element cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable uncertainty regarding the oxygen partial pressure (fO2) and potential temperature (TP) of the ambient convecting mantle throughout Earth's history. Rare Archaean eclogite suites have elemental and isotopic compositions indicative of formation of crustal protoliths in oceanic spreading ridges, hence unaffected by continental sources. These include some eclogite xenoliths derived from cratonic mantle lithosphere and orogenic eclogites marking the exhumation of oceanic crust at Pacific-type margins. Their compositions may retain a memory of the thermal and redox state of the Archaean convecting mantle sources that gave rise to their low-pressure protoliths. Archaean eclogites have TiO2-REE relationships consistent with fractional crystallisation of olivine±plagioclase and cpx during formation of picritic protoliths from a melt that separated from a garnet-free peridotite source, implying intersection of the solidus at ≤2.5 to 3.0 GPa [1]. Low melt fractions (<0.25) inferred from samples with the least fractionated (lowest TiO2) protoliths further argue against deep intersection of the mantle solidus. This suggests a moderately elevated TP ~ 1420-1470 degrees C (lower than some estimates for the ambient convecting mantle at that time [2]), which would support an early onset of plate tectonics [3] and emergence of continents [4], heralding a transition to modern chemical cycles. Moderate TP further indicates that deep recycling of carbon and water, though reduced compared to today, may have been possible in the Archaean [5,6]. Carefully screened eclogites have V/Sc (reflecting the redox state of the ambient mantle during protolith formation [7]) corresponding to ΔFMQ corrected to 1 GPa as low as -1.7 at 3 Ga [1]. Such low oxygen fugacities have consequences for the location of the peridotite solidus and for the types of melts generated during redox melting [5,8]. They also modulate the redox state of volatiles liberated at oceanic spreading

  11. Comparison of the neutron ambient dose equivalent and ambient absorbed dose calculations with different GEANT4 physics lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Rosane Moreira; Souza-Santos, Denison

    2017-10-01

    A comparison between neutron physics lists given by GEANT4, is made in the calculation of the ambient dose equivalent, and ambient absorbed dose, per fluence conversion coefficients (H* (10) / ϕ and D* (10) / ϕ) for neutrons in the range of 10-9 MeV to 15 MeV. Physics processes are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles. Results obtained for QBBC, QGSP_BERT, QGSP_BIC and Neutron High Precision physics lists are compared with values published in ICRP 74 and previously published articles. Neutron high precision physics lists showed the best results in the studied energy range.

  12. Diffusivity in Alumina Scales Grown on Al-MAX Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Ti3AlC2, Ti2AlC, and Cr2AlC are oxidation resistant MAX phase compounds distinguished by the formation of protective Al2O3 scales with well controlled kinetics. A modified Wagner treatment was used to obtain interfacial grain boundary diffusivity, deltaD(sub gb,O,int.), from scale growth rates and corresponding grain size. It is based on the p(O2)(exp -1/6) dependency of the double charged oxygen vacancy and oxygen diffusivity, coupled with the effective diffusion constant for short circuit grain boundary paths. Data from the literature for MAX phases was analyzed accordingly, and deltaD(sub gb,O,int.) was found to nearly coincide with the Arrhenius line developed for Zr-doped FeCrAl, where: deltaD(sub gb,O,int.) = 1.8x10(exp -10) exp(-375 kJ/RT) cubic meters/s. Furthermore, this oxidation relation suggests the more general format applicable to bulk samples under ambient conditions: deltaD(sub gb,O) = 7.567x10(exp -8) exp(-544 kJ/RT) p(O2)(exp -1/6) cubic meters/[s x Pa(exp -1/6)]. Data from many other FeCrAl(X) studies were similarly assessed to show general agreement with the relation for deltaD(sub gb,O,int.). This analysis reinforces the view that protective alumina scales grow by similar mechanisms for these Al-MAX phases and oxidation resistant FeCrAl alloys.

  13. Resolving Rupture Directivity of Moderate Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Sparse Network with Ambient Noise Location: A Case Study with the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture directivity is essential for improving reliability of shakemap and understanding seismogenic processes by resolving the ruptured fault. Compared with field geological survey and InSAR technique, rupture directivity analysis based on seismological data provides rapid characterization of the rupture finiteness parameters or is almost the only way for resolving ruptured fault for earthquakes weaker than M5. In recent years, ambient seismic noise has been widely used in tomography and as well as earthquake location. Barmin et al. (2011) and Levshin et al. (2012) proposed to locate the epicenter by interpolating the estimated Green's functions (EGFs) determined by cross-correlation of ambient noise to arbitrary hypothetical event locations. This method does not rely on an earth model, but it requires a dense local array. Zhan et al. (2011) and Zeng et al. (2014) used the EGFs between a nearby station and remote stations as calibration for 3D velocity structure and then obtained the centroid location. In contrast, the hypocenter can be determined by P wave onsets. When assuming unilateral rupture, we can resolve the rupture directivity with relative location of the centroid location and hypocenter. We apply this method to the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma earthquake. One M4.8 foreshock and one M4+ aftershock are chosen as reference event to calibrate the systematic bias of ambient noise location. The resolved rupture plane strikes southwest-northeast, consistent with the spatial distribution of aftershocks (McNamara et al., 2015) and finite fault inversion result (Sun et al., 2014). This method works for unilaterally ruptured strike-slip earthquakes, and more case studies are needed to test its effectiveness.

  14. Local-Scale Ambient Noise Tomography In and Around the Naruko Volcano, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, J.; Okada, T.

    2014-12-01

    The 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake (M7.2) occurred along a fault in northeastern Japan. The focal area is surrounded with four quaternary volcanoes: Yakeishi, Kurikoma, Onikobe caldera, and Naruko volcano. In a previous study of Okada et al. (2014), they conducted seismic tomography in and around the focal area, and found low velocity zones (LVZ) with high Vp/Vs beneath the volcanoes. They suggest that those LVZs could correspond to areas with over-pressurized fluids, which promoted the occurrence of the earthquake. One of their remaining issues in their study, however, is that a possible LVZ was not clearly found beneath the Naruko volcano, which is located on the south edge of aftershock distribution. In this study, we performed ambient noise tomography in an attempt to identify the possible LVZ beneath Naruko using seismic stations, which are densely deployed in the Naruko volcanic area. After the pre-processing (Bensen et al. 2007) to obtain Rayleigh-wave Green's function, we measure phase velocity dispersion curves as described in Lin et al. (2008). Then, surface-wave tomography (Barmin et al. 2001) is performed from 0.15 Hz to 0.5 Hz with a frequency step of 0.05 Hz. As a final step, we invert phase velocities for a 1-D Vs model at each grid point by nonlinear inversion(Tarantola and Valette, 1982). The Vs structure shows two LVZs beneath Naruko and Onikobe. The LVZ of Naruko, however, is merged into that of Onikobe at around 4 km depths and is not resolved in deeper crust.

  15. A search in strainmeter data for slow slip associated with triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, E.F.; Gomberg, J.

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that, as in subduction zones, slow slip facilitates triggered and ambient tremor in the transform boundary setting of California. Our study builds on the study of Peng et al. (2009) of triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California during time intervals surrounding 31, potentially triggering, M ≥ 7.5 teleseismic earthquakes; waves from 10 of these triggered tremor and 29 occurred in periods of ambient tremor activity. We look for transient slow slip during 3-month windows that include 11 of these triggering and nontriggering teleseisms, using continuous strain data recorded on two borehole Gladwin tensor strainmeters (GTSM) located within the distribution of tremor epicenters. We model the GTSM data assuming only tidal and “drift” signals are present and find no detectable slow slip, either ongoing when the teleseismic waves passed or triggered by them. We infer a conservative detection threshold of about 5 nanostrain for abrupt changes and about twice this for slowly evolving signals. This could be lowered slightly by adding analyses of other data types, modeled slow slip signals, and GTSM data calibration. Detection of slow slip also depends on the slipping fault's location and size, which we describe in terms of equivalent earthquake moment magnitude, M. In the best case of the GTSM above a very shallow slipping fault, detectable slip events must exceed M~2, and if the slow slip is beneath the seismogenic zone (below ~15 km depth), even M~5 events are likely to remain hidden.

  16. Modifications of exposure to ambient particulate matter: Tackling bias in using ambient concentration as surrogate with particle infiltration factor and ambient exposure factor.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shanshan; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies explored health risks attributed to outdoor particle pollution. However, a number of these studies routinely utilized ambient concentration as a surrogate for personal exposure to ambient particles. This simplification ignored the difference between indoor and outdoor concentrations of outdoor originated particles and may bias the estimate of particle-health associations. Intending to avoid the bias, particle infiltration factor (Finf), which describes the penetration of outdoor particles in indoor environment, and ambient exposure factor (α), which represents the fraction of outdoor particles people are truly exposed to, are utilized as modification factors to modify outdoor particle concentration. In this study, the probabilistic distributions of annually-averaged and seasonally-averaged Finf and α were assessed for residences and residents in Beijing. Finf of a single residence and α of an individual was estimated based on the mechanisms governing particle outdoor-to-indoor migration and human time-activity pattern. With this as the core deterministic model, probabilistic distributions of Finf and α were estimated via Monte Carlo Simulation. Annually-averaged Finf of PM2.5 and PM10 for residences in Beijing tended to be log-normally distributed as lnN(-0.74,0.14) and lnN(-0.94,0.15) with geometric mean value as 0.47 and 0.39, respectively. Annually-averaged α of PM2.5 and PM10 for Beijing residents also tended to be log-normally distributed as lnN(-0.59,0.12) and lnN(-0.73,0.13) with geometric mean value as 0.55 and 0.48, respectively. As for seasonally-averaged results, Finf and α of PM2.5 and PM10 were largest in summer and smallest in winter. The obvious difference between these modification factors and unity suggested that modifications of ambient particle concentration need to be considered in epidemiological studies to avoid misclassifications of personal exposure to ambient particles. Moreover, considering the inter

  17. Al+ optical clocks for fundamental physics, geodesy, and quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen

    2011-05-01

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ ``quantum-logic'' clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6 ×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37 +/- 17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4 ×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant. This work is done in collaboration with D. B. Hume, M. J. Thorpe, D. J. Wineland, and T. Rosenband. Work supported by ONR, AFOSR, DARPA, NSA, and IARPA.

  18. Phase Stability and Elasticity of TiAlN.

    PubMed

    Abrikosov, Igor A; Knutsson, Axel; Alling, Björn; Tasnádi, Ferenc; Lind, Hans; Hultman, Lars; Odén, Magnus

    2011-09-15

    We review results of recent combined theoretical and experimental studies of Ti1-xAlxN, an archetypical alloy system material for hard-coating applications. Theoretical simulations of lattice parameters, mixing enthalpies, and elastic properties are presented. Calculated phase diagrams at ambient pressure, as well as at pressure of 10 GPa, show a wide miscibility gap and broad region of compositions and temperatures where the spinodal decomposition takes place. The strong dependence of the elastic properties and sound wave anisotropy on the Al-content offers detailed understanding of the spinodal decomposition and age hardening in Ti1-xAlxN alloy films and multilayers. TiAlN/TiN multilayers can further improve the hardness and thermal stability compared to TiAlN since they offer means to influence the kinetics of the favorable spinodal decomposition and suppress the detrimental transformation to w-AlN. Here, we show that a 100 degree improvement in terms of w-AlN suppression can be achieved, which is of importance when the coating is used as a protective coating on metal cutting inserts.

  19. Al+ Optical Clocks for Fundamental Physics and Geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, James Chin-wen

    2011-07-13

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ “quantum-logic” clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37±17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant.

  20. Phase Stability and Elasticity of TiAlN

    PubMed Central

    Abrikosov, Igor A.; Knutsson, Axel; Alling, Björn; Tasnádi, Ferenc; Lind, Hans; Hultman, Lars; Odén, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    We review results of recent combined theoretical and experimental studies of Ti1−xAlxN, an archetypical alloy system material for hard-coating applications. Theoretical simulations of lattice parameters, mixing enthalpies, and elastic properties are presented. Calculated phase diagrams at ambient pressure, as well as at pressure of 10 GPa, show a wide miscibility gap and broad region of compositions and temperatures where the spinodal decomposition takes place. The strong dependence of the elastic properties and sound wave anisotropy on the Al-content offers detailed understanding of the spinodal decomposition and age hardening in Ti1−xAlxN alloy films and multilayers. TiAlN/TiN multilayers can further improve the hardness and thermal stability compared to TiAlN since they offer means to influence the kinetics of the favorable spinodal decomposition and suppress the detrimental transformation to w-AlN. Here, we show that a 100 degree improvement in terms of w-AlN suppression can be achieved, which is of importance when the coating is used as a protective coating on metal cutting inserts. PMID:28824159

  1. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    González-Fandos, Elena; Simón, Ana

    2016-03-25

    Se ha estudiado el efecto de la cocción en agua sobre la capacidad antioxidante y calidad sensorial de coliflor que previamente ha sido cortada, envasada en atmósfera modificada (5,7-2,3% de CO 2 y 17,6-19,7% de O 2 ) y almacenada a 5 oC durante 13 días, comparándola con la coliflor recién recolectada. Se ha observado un aumento de ácido ascórbico (18%), polifenoles (74%) y actividad antioxidante (21%) en la coliflor almacenada cruda. La cocción produjo pérdidas de estos compuestos por lixiviación, que fueron mayores en la coliflor almacenada respecto a la inicial (19% y 13% res- pectivamente para el ácido ascórbico y 31% y 28% respectivamente para los polifenoles. Sin embargo, no se observaron variaciones en la actividad antioxidante de la coliflor inicial cocida respecto a la coliflor inicial fresca, mientras que en la coliflor almacenada dicha variación fue del 16%. Como resultado, la actividad antioxidante de la coliflor almacenada y cocida ha resultado similar a la de la coliflor inicial fresca. El almacenamiento produjo pequeños cambios en color (un aumento del parámetro b* de 19 a 20,9) y de la textura (un aumento de la fuerza de cizallamiento de 1948 N a 2375 N). La valoración sensorial del color y sabor de la coliflor cocida almacenada fue inferior al de la coliflor cocida inicial, pero dentro de niveles aceptables. El aumento de la dureza en la coliflor fresca almacenada no fue detectado por el panel de catadores en la coliflor cocida. Se observó una ligera incidencia de mohos en la coliflor almacenada 13 días, por lo que se recomienda realizar un tratamiento de lavado.

  2. Warmer ambient temperatures depress liver function in a mammalian herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kurnath, Patrice; Dearing, M Denise

    2013-10-23

    Diet selection in mammalian herbivores is thought to be mainly influenced by intrinsic factors such as nutrients and plant secondary compounds, yet extrinsic factors like ambient temperature may also play a role. In particular, warmer ambient temperatures could enhance the toxicity of plant defence compounds through decreased liver metabolism of herbivores. Temperature-dependent toxicity has been documented in pharmacology and agriculture science but not in wild mammalian herbivores. Here, we investigated how ambient temperature affects liver metabolism in the desert woodrat, Neotoma lepida. Woodrats (n = 21) were acclimated for 30 days to two ambient temperatures (cool = 21°C, warm = 29°C). In a second experiment, the temperature exposure was reduced to 3.5 h. After temperature treatments, animals were given a hypnotic agent and clearance time of the agent was estimated from the duration of the hypnotic state. The average clearance time of the agent in the long acclimation experiment was 45% longer for animals acclimated to 29°C compared with 21°C. Similarly, after the short exposure experiment, woodrats at 29°C had clearance times 26% longer compared with 21°C. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver function is reduced at warmer environmental temperatures and may provide a physiological mechanism through which climate change affects herbivorous mammals.

  3. Warmer ambient temperatures depress liver function in a mammalian herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Kurnath, Patrice; Dearing, M. Denise

    2013-01-01

    Diet selection in mammalian herbivores is thought to be mainly influenced by intrinsic factors such as nutrients and plant secondary compounds, yet extrinsic factors like ambient temperature may also play a role. In particular, warmer ambient temperatures could enhance the toxicity of plant defence compounds through decreased liver metabolism of herbivores. Temperature-dependent toxicity has been documented in pharmacology and agriculture science but not in wild mammalian herbivores. Here, we investigated how ambient temperature affects liver metabolism in the desert woodrat, Neotoma lepida. Woodrats (n = 21) were acclimated for 30 days to two ambient temperatures (cool = 21°C, warm = 29°C). In a second experiment, the temperature exposure was reduced to 3.5 h. After temperature treatments, animals were given a hypnotic agent and clearance time of the agent was estimated from the duration of the hypnotic state. The average clearance time of the agent in the long acclimation experiment was 45% longer for animals acclimated to 29°C compared with 21°C. Similarly, after the short exposure experiment, woodrats at 29°C had clearance times 26% longer compared with 21°C. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver function is reduced at warmer environmental temperatures and may provide a physiological mechanism through which climate change affects herbivorous mammals. PMID:24046878

  4. 75 FR 81126 - Revisions to Lead Ambient Air Monitoring Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 58 RIN 2060-AP77 Revisions to Lead Ambient Air Monitoring Requirements AGENCY... Quality Standards (NAAQS) for lead and associated monitoring requirements. On December 30, 2009, EPA proposed revisions to the lead monitoring requirements. This action promulgates revisions to the monitoring...

  5. Seasonal association between ambient ozone and mortality in Zhengzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lijie; Gu, Jianqin; Liang, Shijie; Fang, Fang; Bai, Weimin; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Tao; Walline, Joseph; Zhang, Shenglong; Cui, Yingjie; Xu, Yaxin; Lin, Hualiang

    2016-12-01

    Different seasonal health effects of ambient ozone (O3) have been reported in previous studies. This might be due to inappropriate adjustment of temperature in different seasons. We used daily data on non-accidental mortality and ambient air pollution in Zhengzhou from January 19, 2013 to June 30, 2015. Season-stratified analyses using generalized additive models were conducted to evaluate the seasonal associations with adjustment of temperature with different lagged days (lag0-1 for warm season, lag0-14 for cold season). We recorded a total of 70,443 non-accidental deaths in Zhengzhou during the study period. Significant associations were observed between ambient O3 and mortality in cold season. Every 10-μg/m3 increment of 24-h O3 of 1-day lagged time was associated with a 1.38% (95% CI 0.60, 2.16%) increase in all cause mortality, 1.35% (95% CI 0.41, 2.30%) increase in cardiovascular mortality, and 1.78% (95% CI 0.43, 3.14%) increase in respiratory mortality. Similar associations were observed when using daily 1- and 8-h maximum concentrations of O3. No significant association was found during warm season. This study suggests a more pronounced ozone-mortality association in cold season in Zhengzhou, and we suggest that different lagged temperatures should be considered when examining the seasonal health effects of ambient ozone.

  6. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the photochemical...

  7. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the photochemical...

  8. Time to harmonize national ambient air quality standards.

    PubMed

    Kutlar Joss, Meltem; Eeftens, Marloes; Gintowt, Emily; Kappeler, Ron; Künzli, Nino

    2017-05-01

    The World Health Organization has developed ambient air quality guidelines at levels considered to be safe or of acceptable risk for human health. These guidelines are meant to support governments in defining national standards. It is unclear how they are followed. We compiled an inventory of ambient air quality standards for 194 countries worldwide for six air pollutants: PM2.5, PM10, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and carbon monoxide. We conducted literature and internet searches and asked country representatives about national ambient air quality standards. We found information on 170 countries including 57 countries that did not set any air quality standards. Levels varied greatly by country and by pollutant. Ambient air quality standards for PM2.5, PM10 and SO2 poorly complied with WHO guideline values. The agreement was higher for CO, SO2 (10-min averaging time) and NO2. Regulatory differences mirror the differences in air quality and the related burden of disease around the globe. Governments worldwide should adopt science based air quality standards and clean air management plans to continuously improve air quality locally, nationally, and globally.

  9. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the photochemical...

  10. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the photochemical...

  11. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the photochemical...

  12. 75 FR 2938 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ...Based on its reconsideration of the primary and secondary national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone (O3) set in March 2008, EPA proposes to set different primary and secondary standards than those set in 2008 to provide requisite protection of public health and welfare, respectively. With regard to the primary standard for O3, EPA proposes that the level of......

  13. Entrainment of circadian rhythm by ambient temperature cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Much is known about how environmental light-dark cycles synchronize circadian rhythms in animals. The ability of environmental cycles of ambient temperature to synchronize circadian rhythms has also been investigated extensively but mostly in ectotherms. In the present study, the synchronization of the circadian rhythm of running-wheel activity by environmental cycles of ambient temperature was studied in laboratory mice. Although all mice were successfully entrained by a light-dark cycle, only 60% to 80% of the mice were entrained by temperature cycles (24-32 degrees C or 24-12 degrees C), and attainment of stable entrainment seemed to take longer under temperature cycles than under a light-dark cycle. This suggests that ambient temperature cycles are weaker zeitgebers than light-dark cycles, which is consistent with the results of the few previous studies using mammalian species. Whereas 80% of the mice were entrained by 24-h temperature cycles, only 60% were entrained by 23-h cycles, and none was entrained by 25-h cycles. The results did not clarify whether entrainment by temperature cycles is caused directly by temperature or indirectly through a temperature effect on locomotor activity, but it is clear that the rhythm of running-wheel activity in mice can be entrained by ambient temperature cycles in the nonnoxious range.

  14. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  15. Design of Affectively Evocative Smart Ambient Media for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Ron Chi-Wai; Cheng, Shuk Han; Ip, Horace Ho-Shing; Kong, Joseph Siu-Lung

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a teaching and research initiative, named SAMAL (Smart AMbience for Affective Learning) that will provide a unique ambient mediated environment for integrating cognitive and affective approaches to enhance learning. Also, this study illustrates a design of SAMAL classroom with affectively evocative scenarios for learning de…

  16. Three Mile Island ambient-air-temperature sensor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, M.O.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the ambient-air-temperature sensors in Three Mile Island-Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor containment building are analyzed. The data were for the period of the hydrogen burn that was part of the TMI-2 accident. From the temperature data, limits are placed on the duration of the hydrogen burn.

  17. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  18. ARE MALES MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO AMBIENT PM THAN FEMALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent epidemiologic studies of modern air pollution show statistically significant relationships between fluctuations of daily non-trauma mortality and fluctuations of daily ambient particulate matter (PM) levels at low concentrations. A review of historic smoke-fog (smog)episo...

  19. A Survey on Ambient Intelligence in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Acampora, Giovanni; Cook, Diane J; Rashidi, Parisa; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2013-12-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a new paradigm in information technology aimed at empowering people's capabilities by the means of digital environments that are sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to human needs, habits, gestures, and emotions. This futuristic vision of daily environment will enable innovative human-machine interactions characterized by pervasive, unobtrusive and anticipatory communications. Such innovative interaction paradigms make ambient intelligence technology a suitable candidate for developing various real life solutions, including in the health care domain. This survey will discuss the emergence of ambient intelligence (AmI) techniques in the health care domain, in order to provide the research community with the necessary background. We will examine the infrastructure and technology required for achieving the vision of ambient intelligence, such as smart environments and wearable medical devices. We will summarize of the state of the art artificial intelligence methodologies used for developing AmI system in the health care domain, including various learning techniques (for learning from user interaction), reasoning techniques (for reasoning about users' goals and intensions) and planning techniques (for planning activities and interactions). We will also discuss how AmI technology might support people affected by various physical or mental disabilities or chronic disease. Finally, we will point to some of the successful case studies in the area and we will look at the current and future challenges to draw upon the possible future research paths.

  20. Potential Ambient Energy-Harvesting Sources and Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Ambient energy harvesting is also known as energy scavenging or power harvesting, and it is the process where energy is obtained from the environment. A variety of techniques are available for energy scavenging, including solar and wind powers, ocean waves, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity, and physical motions. For example, some systems…

  1. ARE MALES MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO AMBIENT PM THAN FEMALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent epidemiologic studies of modern air pollution show statistically significant relationships between fluctuations of daily non-trauma mortality and fluctuations of daily ambient particulate matter (PM) levels at low concentrations. A review of historic smoke-fog (smog)episo...

  2. Acclimatization of plantlets from in vitro to the ambient environment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acclimatizing, hardening-off, or conditioning plantlets from the in vitro to the ambient environment can be a challenge that may result in death or damage to a large percentage of micropropagated plants. When grown in the high humidity, low light environment often encountered in vitro, leaves have a...

  3. ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES IN THE AMBIENT AIR OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent and past use of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in Mexico has resulted in concentrations in ambient air that are 1-2 orders of magnitude above levels in the Great Lakes region. Atmospheric transport from Mexico and Central America may be contributing significant amounts ...

  4. Composing in Public: The Ambient Audiences of a Writing Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Although scholars have investigated the ways youths individually enact composing practices and the impact of audience on these practices, this study examines the impact of an audience physically present while composing in a shared, public space--an ambient audience. Blurring the line between traditional notions of audience and collaborator through…

  5. Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing for controlling ambient TSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Min; Chou, Chih-Mei; Su, Kuo-Tung; Tseng, Chao-Heng

    Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing (S/W) for controlling ambient "total suspended particles (TSP)" was evaluated by TSP measurements and determining silt load from active traffic streets. A modified regenerative-air vacuum sweeper (RAVS) and a washer were used in this study. The sweeper made a pass followed by the washer. The S/W efficiencies (η,η) were obtained based on the experimental data of silt loading and TSP. It was found that the direct impact of sweeping on ambient TSP emissions was short-lived lasting no more than 3-4 h. When a vacuum sweeper and a washer, respectively, did a good job collecting or cleaning the visible fine particles on roads, the method of S/W tested in this work was effective at removing the sources of the road dust particles. This paper concludes that street sweeping followed by washing was found to offer a measurable reduction in TSP emission potentials. Typically, the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP is up to 30%. Finally, correlated with η (based on silt loading), a useful equation is proposed to estimate the S/W efficiency, η (based on TSP) with a standard error of ±20%. It seems feasible to predict the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP controlled by the regenerative-air vacuum sweeper and washer used in this work for engineering applications. Effects of traffic volume and wind velocity on the S/W efficiencies are also discussed in the paper.

  6. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements can p...

  7. METHODOLOGY OF AMBIENT AIR MONITORING FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade, several studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ambient air in the U.S. specifically investigated (1) the sampling efficiency of two sorbents for PAH in air: XAD-2 and polyurethane foam (PUP); (2) the storage stability of PAH on quartz fiber fil...

  8. Design of Affectively Evocative Smart Ambient Media for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Ron Chi-Wai; Cheng, Shuk Han; Ip, Horace Ho-Shing; Kong, Joseph Siu-Lung

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a teaching and research initiative, named SAMAL (Smart AMbience for Affective Learning) that will provide a unique ambient mediated environment for integrating cognitive and affective approaches to enhance learning. Also, this study illustrates a design of SAMAL classroom with affectively evocative scenarios for learning de…

  9. Cognitions and 'placebos' in behavioral research on ambient noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcum, E. R.; Monti, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of noise on visual and psychomotor tasks, with special attention to influences of certain cognitive variables. The results include the finding that 100-dB ambient noise has no effects per se, though cognitive variables in the testing situation affect both performance and ratings of disturbance.

  10. Performance testing and analysis of vertical ambient air vaporizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. S.; Singh, V. N.; Shah, M. I.; Acharya, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient air vaporizers are used to regasify cryogenic liquids at extremely low temperature (below -153°C). Frost formation occurs on it due to large temperature difference between ambient air and cryogenic fluid. Frosting induces additional load on equipment and reduces its heat transfer effectiveness. Hence, mechanical and thermal design of vaporizers account for frosting. An experimental set-up has been designed and effects of flow rate and ground clearance on the performance of ambient air vaporizers are evaluated. The flow rate is increased from the rated capacity of 500 Nm3/h to 640 Nm3/h and ground clearance is reduced from 500 mm to 175 mm. The above variations reduce the time duration for which gaseous nitrogen is delivered at temperature higher than 10.1°C (desired). Hence duty cycle reduces from eight hours to five hours. The other factors affecting performance such as fin configuration, fluid type, fluid pressure, intermittent flow nature and climatic conditions are assumed to be constant over the test duration. The decrement in outlet gas temperature (from 38 °C to 10.1°C) with corresponding increment in frost thickness leads to deterioration of performance of ambient air vaporizers.

  11. Phosphorescence within benzotellurophenes and color tunable tellurophenes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Gang; Wiltshire, Benjamin D; Choi, Paul; Savin, Aliaksandr; Sun, Shuai; Mohammadpour, Arash; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Farsinezhad, Samira; Brown, Alex; Shankar, Karthik; Rivard, Eric

    2015-03-28

    The zirconium-mediated syntheses of pinacolboronate (BPin) appended benzo[b]tellurophenes and two phenyl/BPin substituted tellurophene isomers with different colors of emission have been achieved. These species are new additions to an emerging class of inorganic heterocycles that display visible phosphorescence in the solid state under ambient conditions.

  12. VOCS IN AMBIENT AIR NEAR WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beginning on September 22, 2001 and continuing through February 2002, ambient air samples were collected at three sites within a block of ground zero and at a fourth site on the 16th floor of a building at 290 Broadway. Grab samples were collected in evacuated, electro-polished...

  13. An Ambient Awareness Tool for Supporting Supervised Collaborative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, H. S.; Dillenbourg, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an ambient awareness tool, named "Lantern", designed for supporting the learning process in recitation sections, (i.e., when students work in small teams on the exercise sets with the help of tutors). Each team is provided with an interactive lamp that displays their work status: the exercise they are working on, if they have…

  14. METHODOLOGY FOR SITING AMBIENT AIR MONITORS AT THE NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In siting a monitor to measure compliance with U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter (PM), there is a need to characterize variations in PM concentration within a neighborhood-scale region in order to achieve monitor siting objectives.

    We p...

  15. ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES IN THE AMBIENT AIR OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent and past use of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in Mexico has resulted in concentrations in ambient air that are 1-2 orders of magnitude above levels in the Great Lakes region. Atmospheric transport from Mexico and Central America may be contributing significant amounts ...

  16. 49 CFR 325.55 - Ambient conditions; stationary test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MOTOR CARRIER NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS Measurement of Noise Emissions; Stationary Test § 325.55 Ambient... point shall be measured, in the absence of motor vehicle noise emanating from within the clear zone... site at the time of testing. (b) Wind. The wind velocity at the test site shall be measured at the...

  17. Songs as Ambient Language Input in Phonology Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2013-01-01

    Children cannot learn to speak a language simply from occasional noninteractive exposure to native speakers' input (e.g., by hearing television dialogues), but can they learn something about its phonology? To answer this question, the present study varied ambient hearing experience for 126 5- to 7-year-old native Cantonese-Chinese speakers…

  18. Songs as Ambient Language Input in Phonology Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2013-01-01

    Children cannot learn to speak a language simply from occasional noninteractive exposure to native speakers' input (e.g., by hearing television dialogues), but can they learn something about its phonology? To answer this question, the present study varied ambient hearing experience for 126 5- to 7-year-old native Cantonese-Chinese speakers…

  19. An Ambient Awareness Tool for Supporting Supervised Collaborative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, H. S.; Dillenbourg, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an ambient awareness tool, named "Lantern", designed for supporting the learning process in recitation sections, (i.e., when students work in small teams on the exercise sets with the help of tutors). Each team is provided with an interactive lamp that displays their work status: the exercise they are working on, if they have…

  20. VOCS IN AMBIENT AIR NEAR WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beginning on September 22, 2001 and continuing through February 2002, ambient air samples were collected at three sites within a block of ground zero and at a fourth site on the 16th floor of a building at 290 Broadway. Grab samples were collected in evacuated, electro-polished...

  1. Adaptive Ambient Illumination Based on Color Harmony Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ayano; Hirai, Keita; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    We investigated the relationship between ambient illumination and psychological effect by applying a modified color harmony model. We verified the proposed model by analyzing correlation between psychological value and modified color harmony score. Experimental results showed the possibility to obtain the best color for illumination using this model.

  2. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters.

  3. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  4. Ocean ambient sound south of Bermuda and Panama Canal traffic.

    PubMed

    Širović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A; McDonald, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Comparisons of current and historic ocean ambient noise levels are rare, especially in the North Atlantic. Recent (2013-2014) monthly patterns in ocean ambient sound south of Bermuda were compared to those recorded at the same location in 1966. Additionally, trends in ocean traffic, in particular, Panama Canal traffic, over this time were also investigated. One year of ocean ambient noise measurements were collected in 1966 using cabled, omnidirectional hydrophones at the U.S. Navy Tudor Hill Laboratory in Bermuda, and repeat measurements were collected at the same location from June 2013-May 2014 using a High-frequency Acoustic Recording Package. Average monthly pressure spectrum levels at 44 Hz increased 2.8 ± 0.8 dB from 1966 to 2013, indicating an average increase of 0.6 dB/decade. This low level of increase may be due to topographic shielding at this site, limiting it to only southern exposure, and the limit in the number of ship transits through the Panama Canal, which did not change substantially during this time. The impending expansion of the Canal, which will enable the transit of larger ships at twice the current rate, is likely to lead to a substantial increase in ocean ambient sound at this location in the near future.

  5. METHODOLOGY OF AMBIENT AIR MONITORING FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade, several studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ambient air in the U.S. specifically investigated (1) the sampling efficiency of two sorbents for PAH in air: XAD-2 and polyurethane foam (PUP); (2) the storage stability of PAH on quartz fiber fil...

  6. A Survey on Ambient Intelligence in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Giovanni; Cook, Diane J.; Rashidi, Parisa; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a new paradigm in information technology aimed at empowering people’s capabilities by the means of digital environments that are sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to human needs, habits, gestures, and emotions. This futuristic vision of daily environment will enable innovative human-machine interactions characterized by pervasive, unobtrusive and anticipatory communications. Such innovative interaction paradigms make ambient intelligence technology a suitable candidate for developing various real life solutions, including in the health care domain. This survey will discuss the emergence of ambient intelligence (AmI) techniques in the health care domain, in order to provide the research community with the necessary background. We will examine the infrastructure and technology required for achieving the vision of ambient intelligence, such as smart environments and wearable medical devices. We will summarize of the state of the art artificial intelligence methodologies used for developing AmI system in the health care domain, including various learning techniques (for learning from user interaction), reasoning techniques (for reasoning about users’ goals and intensions) and planning techniques (for planning activities and interactions). We will also discuss how AmI technology might support people affected by various physical or mental disabilities or chronic disease. Finally, we will point to some of the successful case studies in the area and we will look at the current and future challenges to draw upon the possible future research paths. PMID:24431472

  7. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Ma, L.M.; Li, Y.Y.

    2004-06-28

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  8. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Ma, L. M.; Li, Y. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  9. Probing atmospheric structure with infrasonic ambient noise interferometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Evers, L. G.; Fricke, J.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient noise interferometry attempts to reconstruct the impulse response of a linear system undergoing excitations by a random forcing. The method has proven to be quite general, finding applications in diverse fields such as ultrasonics, helioseismology, regional and global seismology, ocean acoustics, and exploration seismology. Due to the pervasive random forcing of microbaroms, the study of atmospheric infrasound can benefit from approaches developed in the field of interferometry as well. Moreover, continuous noise sources, such as microbaroms, provide a means to quantify the strong time-dependent changes inherent in the structure of the atmosphere. For pairs of infrasonic sensors separated by distances between 1 and 15 km, direct arrivals have been observed in long-time correlations of ambient noise from stations within 3 different networks: the network operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the I53US array, and the Utah 07 experiment. As in seismic ambient noise studies, these interferometric arrivals show dispersive properties characteristic of guided wave propagation. As a result, infrasonic ambient noise interferometry can provide information on the gross structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. At Fourpeaked Volcano, Alaska, a surface-based temperature inversion produced a strong waveguide between two infrasound sensors. The propagation time of the interferometric arrivals shifted over the course of several days in close correspondence with regional temperature trends at nearby meteorological stations. Independent ECMWF data confirms the existence of a temperature inversion during this time period. Analysis of 4 infrasound sensors near Park City, Utah, further demonstrates the ability of infrasonic ambient noise interferometry to retrieve guided waves between stations separated by 5 to 10 km. Among the 4 stations, we observe strong interferometric arrivals on different station pairs at different times, attesting to variable atmospheric

  10. Insights into electrochemical reactions from ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A; Hong, Wesley T; Crumlin, Ethan J; Bluhm, Hendrik; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-11-17

    The understanding of fundamental processes in the bulk and at the interfaces of electrochemical devices is a prerequisite for the development of new technologies with higher efficiency and improved performance. One energy storage scheme of great interest is splitting water to form hydrogen and oxygen gas and converting back to electrical energy by their subsequent recombination with only water as a byproduct. However, kinetic limitations to the rate of oxygen-based electrochemical reactions hamper the efficiency in technologies such as solar fuels, fuel cells, and electrolyzers. For these reactions, the use of metal oxides as electrocatalysts is prevalent due to their stability, low cost, and ability to store oxygen within the lattice. However, due to the inherently convoluted nature of electrochemical and chemical processes in electrochemical systems, it is difficult to isolate and study individual electrochemical processes in a complex system. Therefore, in situ characterization tools are required for observing related physical and chemical processes directly at the places where and while they occur and can help elucidate the mechanisms of charge separation and charge transfer at electrochemical interfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), also known as ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis), has been used as a quantitative spectroscopic technique that measures the elemental composition, as well as chemical and electronic state of a material. Building from extensive ex situ characterization of electrochemical systems, initial in situ studies were conducted at or near ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions (≤10(-6) Torr) to probe solid-state electrochemical systems. However, through the integration of differential-pumping stages, XPS can now operate at pressures in the torr range, comprising a technique called ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS). In this Account, we briefly review the working principles and current status of AP-XPS. We use several recent

  11. Impinging jet atomization at elevated and supercritical ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yunbiao

    This thesis presents an experimental study of the atomization of two impinging jets at elevated pressure and temperature conditions up to the supercritical ambient states. This problem is of central importance to the modeling of the mixing and combustion processes in modern liquid propellant rocket engines. Liquid nitrogen, as well as water, ethanol and 59% water glycerol solution are used as the test fluids. Sprays of various fluid properties are injected into the specially designed test chambers at temperatures as high as 600 K and elevated pressures up to the critical pressure of nitrogen. The thickness of a spreading sheet formed by the impingement of low speed jets is measured by real time interferometry. The results verified previous theoretical prediction. Double pulse, two reference beam holography is improved and applied in the droplet size and velocity measurements. Experiments indicate that in elevated but subcritical ambient conditions, the increase of ambient temperature will generally improve the fineness and uniformity of the spray. However, increase of the ambient pressure initially deteriorates the atomization quality. Further increase in the pressure improves the atomization quality. At supercritical ambient conditions, droplet formation is no longer the ultimate reason of spray atomization. The mechanism of spray mixing is found to be 'diffusion controlled' rather than 'evaporation controlled' as in subcritical conditions. Explanations of the experimental results are provided through the temperature and pressure dependence of the aerodynamic disturbances on the spray surface, heat and mass transport, aerodynamic drag and surface tension. The effects of jet diameter, impingement angle and jet velocity are also investigated in both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The atomization quality is found to be generally improved by smaller jet diameter, larger impingement angle and higher jet velocity.

  12. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  13. Effects of Ambient Air Pollution Exposure on Olfaction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ajmani, Gaurav S; Suh, Helen H; Pinto, Jayant M

    2016-11-01

    Olfactory dysfunction affects millions of people worldwide. This sensory impairment is associated with neurodegenerative disease and significantly decreased quality of life. Exposure to airborne pollutants has been implicated in olfactory decline, likely due to the anatomic susceptibility of the olfactory nerve to the environment. Historically, studies have focused on occupational exposures, but more recent studies have considered effects from exposure to ambient air pollutants. To examine all relevant human data evaluating a link between ambient pollution exposure and olfaction and to review supporting animal data in order to examine potential mechanisms for pollution-associated olfactory loss. We identified and reviewed relevant articles from 1950 to 2015 using PubMed and Web of Science and focusing on human epidemiologic and pathophysiologic studies. Animal studies were included only to support pertinent data on humans. We reviewed findings from these studies evaluating a relationship between environmental pollutant exposure and olfactory function. We identified and reviewed 17 articles, with 1 additional article added from a bibliography search, for a total of 18 human studies. There is evidence in human epidemiologic and pathologic studies that increased exposure to ambient air pollutants is associated with olfactory dysfunction. However, most studies have used proxies for pollution exposure in small samples of convenience. Human pathologic studies, with supporting animal work, have also shown that air pollution can contact the olfactory epithelium, translocate to the olfactory bulb, and migrate to the olfactory cortex. Pollutants can deposit at each location, causing direct damage and disruption of tissue morphology or inducing local inflammation and cellular stress responses. Ambient air pollution may impact human olfactory function. Additional studies are needed to examine air pollution-related olfactory impacts on the general population using measured

  14. Effects of ambient conditions on fuel cell vehicle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraldsson, K.; Alvfors, P.

    Ambient conditions have considerable impact on the performance of fuel cell hybrid vehicles. Here, the vehicle fuel consumption, the air compressor power demand, the water management system and the heat loads of a fuel cell hybrid sport utility vehicle (SUV) were studied. The simulation results show that the vehicle fuel consumption increases with 10% when the altitude increases from 0 m up to 3000 m to 4.1 L gasoline equivalents/100 km over the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC). The increase is 19% on the more power demanding highway US06 cycle. The air compressor is the major contributor to this fuel consumption increase. Its load-following strategy makes its power demand increase with increasing altitude. Almost 40% of the net power output of the fuel cell system is consumed by the air compressor at the altitude of 3000 m with this load-following strategy and is thus more apparent in the high-power US06 cycle. Changes in ambient air temperature and relative humidity effect on the fuel cell system performance in terms of the water management rather in vehicle fuel consumption. Ambient air temperature and relative humidity have some impact on the vehicle performance mostly seen in the heat and water management of the fuel cell system. While the heat loads of the fuel cell system components vary significantly with increasing ambient temperature, the relative humidity did not have a great impact on the water balance. Overall, dimensioning the compressor and other system components to meet the fuel cell system requirements at the minimum and maximum expected ambient temperatures, in this case 5 and 40 °C, and high altitude, while simultaneously choosing a correct control strategy are important parameters for efficient vehicle power train management.

  15. Collisionless Coupling between Explosive Debris Plasma and Magnetized Ambient Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anton

    2016-10-01

    The explosive expansion of a dense debris plasma cloud into relatively tenuous, magnetized, ambient plasma characterizes a wide variety of astrophysical and space phenomena, including supernova remnants, interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and ionospheric explosions. In these rarified environments, collective electromagnetic processes rather than Coulomb collisions typically mediate the transfer of momentum and energy from the debris plasma to the ambient plasma. In an effort to better understand the detailed physics of collisionless coupling mechanisms in a reproducible laboratory setting, the present research jointly utilizes the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Phoenix laser facility at UCLA to study the super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of laser-produced carbon (C) and hydrogen (H) debris plasma through preformed, magnetized helium (He) ambient plasma via a variety of diagnostics, including emission spectroscopy, wavelength-filtered imaging, and magnetic field induction probes. Large Doppler shifts detected in a He II ion spectral line directly indicate initial ambient ion acceleration transverse to both the debris plasma flow and the background magnetic field, indicative of a fundamental process known as Larmor coupling. Characterization of the laser-produced debris plasma via a radiation-hydrodynamics code permits an explicit calculation of the laminar electric field in the framework of a ``hybrid'' model (kinetic ions, charge-neutralizing massless fluid electrons), thus allowing for a simulation of the initial response of a distribution of He II test ions. A synthetic Doppler-shifted spectrum constructed from the simulated velocity distribution of the accelerated test ions excellently reproduces the spectroscopic measurements, confirming the role of Larmor coupling in the debris-ambient interaction.

  16. High Mortality of Red Sea Zooplankton under Ambient Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M. O.; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h−1, five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h−1% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:25309996

  17. New ionic liquids based on complexation of dipropylsulfide and AlCl3 for electrochodeposition of aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Fang, Youxing; Jiang, Xueguang; Dai, Sheng; ...

    2015-01-01

    A new kind of ionic liquid based on complexation of dipropyl sulfide (DPS) and AlCl3 has been prepared. The equivalent concentration of AlCl3 in the ionic liquid is as high as 2.3 M. More importantly, it is highly fluidic and exhibits an ambient ionic conductivity of 1.25 x 10-4 S cm-1. This new ionic liquid can be successfully used as an electrolyte for electrodeposition of aluminum.

  18. New ionic liquids based on the complexation of dipropyl sulfide and AlCl3 for electrodeposition of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Fang, Youxing; Jiang, Xueguang; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-04

    A new kind of ionic liquid based on the complexation of dipropyl sulfide (DPS) and AlCl3 has been prepared. The equivalent concentration of AlCl3 in the ionic liquid is as high as 2.3 M. More importantly, it is highly fluidic and exhibits an ambient ionic conductivity of 1.25 × 10(-4) S cm(-1). This new ionic liquid can be successfully used as an electrolyte for electrodeposition of aluminum.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Strengthening Mechanisms of Al-15 Pct B4C Composites with Sc and Zr at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jian; Zhang, Zhan; Chen, X.-Grant

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties at ambient and elevated temperatures of two Al-15 vol pct B4C composites, S40 with 0.4 wt pct Sc and SZ40 with 0.4 wt pct Sc and 0.24 wt pct Zr, are investigated during long-term thermal annealing. The presence of large B4C particles in the microscale has a moderate but stable strengthening effect on Al-B4C composites at ambient and elevated temperatures, while the precipitation of nanoscale Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr) in the composite matrix provides a predominate contribution to the composite strength, which is varied by tested temperatures. The Al3Sc precipitates in S40 remain coarsening resistant at 523 K (250 °C), whereas the Al3(Sc, Zr) precipitates in SZ40 are thermally stable at 573 K (300 °C) over 2000 hours of annealing. At higher annealing temperatures (573 K (300 °C) for S40 and 623 K (350 °C) for SZ40), both Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr) precipitates become coarsening with prolonged annealing time. The yield strength of S40 and SZ40 at ambient temperature decreases with the increasing precipitate size, which can be explained by the classical precipitate shearing and Orowan bypass mechanisms. At elevated temperatures [523 K to 623 K (250 °C to 350 °C)], considerably lower yield stresses are observed compared to those at ambient temperature, which invokes a dislocation climb mechanism. The predicted yield strengths at elevated temperatures by the combination of dislocation climb and Orowan models are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  1. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Epicenter Location of Regional Seismic Events Using Love Wave and Rayleigh Wave Ambient Seismic Noise Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Moschetti, M. P.; Mendoza, C.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a novel method to locate regional seismic events based on exploiting Empirical Green's Functions (EGF) that are produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long time-series of ambient noise recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh waves on the vertical-vertical cross-correlations and Love waves on the transverse-transverse cross-correlations. Earlier work (Barmin et al., "Epicentral location based on Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions from ambient seismic noise", Geophys. J. Int., 2011) showed that group time delays observed on Rayleigh wave EGFs can be exploited to locate to within about 1 km moderate sized earthquakes using USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations. The principal advantage of the method is that the ambient noise EGFs are affected by lateral variations in structure similarly to the earthquake signals, so the location is largely unbiased by 3-D structure. However, locations based on Rayleigh waves alone may be biased by more than 1 km if the earthquake depth is unknown but lies between 2 km and 7 km. This presentation is motivated by the fact that group time delays for Love waves are much less affected by earthquake depth than Rayleigh waves; thus exploitation of Love wave EGFs may reduce location bias caused by uncertainty in event depth. The advantage of Love waves to locate seismic events, however, is mitigated by the fact that Love wave EGFs have a smaller SNR than Rayleigh waves. Here, we test the use of Love and Rayleigh wave EGFs between 5- and 15-sec period to locate seismic events based on the USArray TA in the western US. We focus on locating aftershocks of the 2008 M 6.0 Wells earthquake, mining blasts in Wyoming and Montana, and small earthquakes near Norman, OK and Dallas, TX, some of which may be triggered by hydrofracking or injection wells.

  3. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  4. Effect of ambient temperature on the efficiency of the PCPDTBT: PC71BM BHJ solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Touati, Farid; Muhammad, Fahmi F.; Najeeb, Mansoor Ani; Shakoor, R. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this research article, the influence of environment temperature on the performance of the organic bulk heterojunction organic solar cells has been investigated. We describe the effect of ambient temperature on the efficiency of poly-[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta-[2,1-b;3,4-b']dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT) and [6, 6]-phenylC71-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PC71BM)-based bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells. The current-voltage characteristics of the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PCPDTBT:PC71BM/Al solar cells are recorded in the temperature range of 25-60 °C under 100 mW/cm2 solar irradiation. The short-circuit current ( J sc) of the solar cells increased from 4.28 to 9.23 mAcm-2 when the temperature elevated from 25 to 55 °C. However, the open-circuit voltage ( V oc) and fill factor (FF) of the cells almost remained unchanged over the whole investigated temperature range. The values of V oc and FF are found to be 0.58 ± 01 and 0.60 ± 0.12 V, respectively. The results clearly indicate that the maximum efficiency of the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PCPDTBT:PC71BM/Al solar cells can be achieved in the range of 52-58 °C.

  5. Van der Waals effects in ab initio water at ambient and supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Jonchiere, Romain; Seitsonen, Ari P; Ferlat, Guillaume; Saitta, A Marco; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2011-10-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is known to poorly reproduce the experimental properties of liquid water. The poor description of the dispersion forces in the exchange correlation functionals is one of the possible causes. Recent studies have demonstrated an improvement in the simulated properties when they are taken into account. We present here a study of the effects on liquid water of the recently proposed semi-empirical correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The difference between standard and corrected DFT-GGA simulations is rationalized with a detailed analysis upon modifying an accurate parameterised potential. This allows an estimate of the typical range of dispersion forces in water. We also show that the structure and diffusivity of ambient-like liquid water are sensitive to the fifth neighbor position, thus highlighting the key role played by this neighbor. Our study is extended to water at supercritical conditions, where experimental and theoretical results are much more scarce. We show that the semi-empirical correction by Grimme et al. improves significantly, although somewhat counter-intuitively, both the structural and the dynamical description of supercritical water.

  6. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  7. Surface-wave tomography of Ireland and surroundings using ambient noise and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadio, Raffaele; Arroucau, Pierre; Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew; Licciardi, Andrea; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Ireland's geology is dominated by northeast-southwest structural trends and suture zones, mostly inferred from geological mapping and a few active source seismic experiments. However, their geometry and extent at depth and their continuity across the Irish Sea are still poorly known. Important questions also remain unanswered regarding the thickness and bulk properties of the sedimentary cover at the regional scale, the deformation and flow of the deep crust during the formation of Ireland, the thickness of Ireland's lithosphere today, and the thermal structure and dynamics of the asthenosphere beneath Ireland. In this work, we take advantage of abundant, newly available broadband data from temporary array deployments and permanent seismic networks in Ireland and Great Britain to produce high-resolution models of seismic velocity structure and anisotropy of the lithosphere. We combine Rayleigh and Love phase velocity measurements from waveform cross-correlation using both ambient noise and teleseismic data in order to produce high-quality dispersion curves for periods ranging from 1 to 300 s. The phase velocity measurement procedures are adapted from Meier et al.[2], Lebedev et al.[1] and Soomro et al.[3] and are automated in order to deal with the large amount of data and ensure consistency and reproducibility. For the nearly 200 stations used in this study, we obtain a very large number of dispersion curves from both ambient noise and teleseimic data. Dispersion measurements are then inverted in a tomographic procedure for surface-wave phase velocity maps in a very broad period range. The maps constrain the 3D seismic-velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle underlying Ireland and the Irish Sea. {9} Lebedev, S., T. Meier, R. D. van der Hilst. Asthenospheric flow and origin of volcanism in the Baikal Rift area, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 249, 415-424, 2006. Meier, T., K. Dietrich, B. Stockhert, H.P. Harjes, One-dimensional models of shear wave velocity for

  8. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  9. Interaction between the Supernova Remnant CTB 80 and the Ambient Interstellar Medium: H i and CO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Yun, Min-Su; Ho, Paul T. P.; Lee, Youngung

    1993-11-01

    We performed VLA H I 21 cm line and 12CO J = 1-0 line observations of the old supernova remnant (SNR) CTB 80. The clumpy structure of the fast, υexp ˜ 72 km s-1, expanding SNR shell detected by Koo et al. (1990) is found to be due to fast-moving H I clumps, which have a dense, nH ˜ 100 cm-3, core surrounded by a relatively diffuse envelope. These clumps are most likely the preexisting "cold clouds" in the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) that had been swept-up and accelerated by the SN blast wave. CO observations show that most of the molecular gas in this region is confined into two large filamentary clouds. There is no certain evidence for the interaction between the SNR and the molecular cloud. By analyzing the Arecibo H I data of Koo et al., we found that the ISM around CTB 80 is far from being uniform and homogeneous. Instead, it seems to be composed of a large cold cloud, a warm neutral medium pervaded by small cold clouds, and a tenuous hot tunnel, which is close to the McKee & Ostriker's three-phase ISM model. We discuss how the ambient ISM shaped the morphology of CTB 80 in H I, infrared, and radio continuum.

  10. Adjoint Tomography of 3-D Crustal Structure Beneath Northeast China Using Ambient Noise Derived Empirical Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Chen, M.; Niu, F.; Guo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We construct a new 3-D shear wavespeed model of the crust beneath northeast China based upon ambient noise adjoint tomography method [Chen et al., 2014]. Without intermediate steps of measuring phase dispersions, adjoint tomography method inverts for shear wavespeeds of the crust directly from 6 s - 40 s waveforms of Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) of Rayleigh waves, which are derived from interferometry of two years of ambient noise data recorded by 127 NECESSArray stations. With an initial model derived from traditional asymptotic surface wave tomography method [Guo et al., 2015], adjoint tomography updates 3-D model by iteratively minimizing the frequency-dependent traveltime misfits between EGFs and synthetic Green's functions in four pass bands: 6 s - 15 s, 10 s - 20 s, 15 s - 30 s, and 20 s - 40 s. Our new model show shear wavespeed anomalies well correlated with known tectonic units such as Xing'an-Mongolia Orogenic Belt, Changbai Mountain Range, and the basins of Songliao, Erlian, Hailer, and Sanjiang. The new model also reveals a distinct structure beneath the Tan-Lu Fault Zone - a significant low-wavespeed anomaly located in the mid-lower crust and uppermost mantle. Model resolution tests are presented for a few regions of interest for further tectonic interpretations of imaged new features in our model.

  11. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of aluminum and characterization of the recovered AlH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Machida, A.; Katayama, Y.; Aoki, K.

    2010-03-01

    Pristine aluminum was hydrogenated to form AlH3 at 8.9 GPa and 600 °C. The cyclic formation and decomposition of the hydride were measured by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement. AlH3 synthesized under high pressure and temperature was recovered at ambient conditions. The recovered AlH3 was characterized by conventional powder X-ray diffraction measurement and Raman spectroscopy. The results of the characterization were consistent with that obtained for chemically prepared AlH3 and indicated that single phase α-AlH3 was obtained.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

    2010-06-30

    Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement

  13. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  14. Continuous passive seismic monitoring by ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic arrays permanently installed over a hydrocarbon reservoir can record data continuously, even in the absence of active seismic shooting. Here we use a 5 day long recording of ambient seismic noise over a producing oil reservoir to study ambient-seismic noise tomography as a tool for continuous monitoring by passive seismic interferometry. This is of interest for both monitoring production-related changes over a long time scale (years), and changes associated with hazards such as over-burden pressure changes on a short time scale (days to weeks. A correlation coefficient is computed between cross-correlations of partial recordings and cross-correlations of the full recording, as a quality factor for how long recordings should be made. The partial recording is varied as a function of absolute recording time, recording length, inter-station distance and frequency. The correlations converge faster for nearby receiver pairs and lower. The convergence rate also improves with the strength of the microseism energy in the ambient seismic field, but deteriorates when the microseism energy in the ambient seismic field is strongly inhomogeneous with direction. We use straight-ray tomography to image the virtual-seismic sources for travel times picked after band passes for various frequencies. Buried channels visible in ambient-seismic noise tomography images of Scholte wave group-velocity are identified and compared with their position and depth in a P wave velocity cube obtained from full waveform inversion of active seismic data. We determined that the Scholte wave group-velocity between 0.15-0.75 Hz forms an image up to a depth of 240 meters. This study shows the feasibility of ambient-seismic noise tomography monitoring of the near surface and indicates how long recordings should be made. Correlation rate studies shows that high quality virtual seismic sources can be obtained with from as little as 1 day of recorded data at very low frequencies, 0.15-0.75 Hz, and up

  15. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere als Mineralisationstemplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Pavla

    2002-07-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und den Eigenschaften von doppelthydrophilen Blockcopolymeren und ihrer Anwendung in einem biomimetischen Mineralisationsprozeß von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere bestehen aus einem hydrophilen Block, der nicht mit Mineralien wechselwirkt und einem zweiten Polyelektrolyt-Block, der stark mit Mineraloberflächen wechselwirkt. Diese Blockcopolymere wurden durch ringöffnende Polymerisation von N-carboxyanhydriden (NCA's) und a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 als Initiator hergestellt. Die hergestellten Blockcopolymere wurden als effektive Wachstumsmodifikatoren für die Kristallisation von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat Mineralien eingesetzt. Die so erhaltenen Mineralpartikel (Kugeln, Hantel, eiförmige Partikel) wurden durch Lichtmikroskopie in Lösung, SEM und TEM charakterisiert. Röntgenweitwinkelstreuung (WAXS) wurde verwendet, um die Modifikation von Calciumcarbonat zu ermitteln und die Größe der Calciumcarbonat- und Bariumsulfat-Nanopartikel zu ermitteln. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of double hydrophilic block copolymers and their use in a biomimetic mineralization process of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate. Double hydrophilic block copolymers consist of a hydrophilic block that does not interact with minerals and another hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block that strongly interacts with mineral surfaces. These polymers were synthesised via ring opening polymerisation of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), and the first hydrophilic block a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 was used as an initiator. The prepared block copolymers were used as effective crystal growth modifiers to control the crystallization of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate minerals. The resulting mineral particles (spheres, dumbbells, egg-like particles) were characterised by light microscopy in solution, by SEM, and by TEM. X-Ray scattering

  16. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF OIL FLY ASH AND RELEVANCE TO AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle bur...

  17. The effects of ambient particulate matter on human alveolar machrophage oxidative and inflammatory responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies demonstrate that ambient PM and DEP have deleterious effects on human cardiopulmonary health including exacerbation of pre-existing lung disease and development of respiratory infections. The effects of ambient PM on lung cell responsivenes...

  18. 78 FR 34964 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... proposed rule ``Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State... proposed rulemaking proposes to implement the 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standards...

  19. 75 FR 9894 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... new equivalent method for measuring concentrations of lead (Pb) in total suspended particulate matter... monitoring the concentrations of those ambient air pollutants for which EPA has established National Ambient...

  20. 75 FR 45627 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... new equivalent method for measuring concentrations of lead (Pb) in total suspended particulate matter... monitoring the concentrations of those ambient air pollutants for which EPA has established National Ambient...

  1. 77 FR 38760 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Particulate Matter; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... revise the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM). This action...: Questions concerning the ``National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter'' proposed rule...

  2. The effects of ambient particulate matter on human alveolar machrophage oxidative and inflammatory responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies demonstrate that ambient PM and DEP have deleterious effects on human cardiopulmonary health including exacerbation of pre-existing lung disease and development of respiratory infections. The effects of ambient PM on lung cell responsivenes...

  3. 40 CFR 50.16 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., arithmetic mean concentration over a 3-month period, measured in the ambient air as Pb either by: (1) A... primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for Pb are met when the maximum arithmetic 3-month...

  4. 40 CFR 50.16 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., arithmetic mean concentration over a 3-month period, measured in the ambient air as Pb either by: (1) A... primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for Pb are met when the maximum arithmetic 3-month...

  5. 40 CFR 50.16 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., arithmetic mean concentration over a 3-month period, measured in the ambient air as Pb either by: (1) A... primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for Pb are met when the maximum arithmetic 3-month...

  6. Submicron Nb-Al/Al oxide-Nb tunnel junctions sandwiched between Al films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, D.; Rothermel, H.; Gundlach, K. H.; Zimmermann, R.

    1996-02-01

    A process has been developed to embed Nb-Al/Al oxide-Nb junctions in planar structures of Al films. The submicron junctions are defined by photoresist lines. Motivation for this effort is a possible application of Nb junctions confined between normal conducting Al films as mixers above 700 GHz where Nb films loose their superconductive properties and tuning circuits made out of Nb therefore exhibit losses. First mixer results at 816 GHz are presented.

  7. Relationships of slip morphology, microcracking, and fracture resistance in a lamellar TiAl-alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S. ); Kim, Y.W. . Materials Research Div.)

    1994-06-01

    The fracture resistance of a lamellar TiAl-alloy was investigated by J-testing under various displacement rates at ambient temperature. Possible relationships between slip morphology, microcracking, and fracture toughness were studied via optical electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the lamellar TiAl-alloy exhibited a resistance-curve fracture behavior that was relatively rate insensitive in air at ambient temperature. Both interlamellar and translamellar deformation lines were observed in the crack-tip region and in the crack-wake ligaments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the interlamellar deformation lines were likely due to [l brace]111[r brace][110] easy slip, and the translamellar deformation lines were probably produced by both [l brace]111[r brace][110] easy slip and [l brace]111[r brace][11[bar 2

  8. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  9. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  10. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  11. Accelerated and Ambient Abundances in RHESSI Gamma-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Shih, A. Y.; Lin, R. P.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Tolbert, A. K.

    2005-05-01

    The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has detected nuclear gamma-ray line emission from at least eleven solar flares over the past three years. These gamma-ray lines are produced when flare-accelerated ions collide with the ambient solar medium. In this paper, we use gamma-ray line ratios and Doppler profiles to constrain the relative fluxes of accelerated protons, alphas, and heavier nuclei in the brighter RHESSI gamma-ray flares. We also study the relative fluxes of narrow lines to compare our conclusions about ambient solar abundances in the interaction region to earlier work from the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma-Ray Spectrometer. The work at the University of California was supported by NASA contract NAS 5-98033.

  12. Ambient acceleration dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charles R; Roy, Ronald A; Holt, R Glynn

    2011-11-01

    Much of the research performed to study SBSL deals with the influence of external parameters (e.g., the host water temperature, the ambient pressure, the type and amount of dissolved gas in the liquid, to name a few) on the bubble dynamics and light emission. In the current paper, work carried out to study the influence of another external parameter-ambient acceleration-is described. The experiments described here were performed on the NASA KC-135 which provided both periods of reduced gravity (10(-3) g) and increased gravity (1.8 g) by flying repeated parabolic maneuvers. The resulting measurements are compared with the predictions of a numerical model and can be understood in the context of the changing hydrostatic head pressure and buoyant force acting on the bubble.

  13. Ambient-Light-Canceling Camera Using Subtraction of Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morookian, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    The ambient-light-canceling camera (ALCC) is a proposed near-infrared electronic camera that would utilize a combination of (1) synchronized illumination during alternate frame periods and (2) subtraction of readouts from consecutive frames to obtain images without a background component of ambient light. The ALCC is intended especially for use in tracking the motion of an eye by the pupil center corneal reflection (PCCR) method. Eye tracking by the PCCR method has shown potential for application in human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological deficiencies. In the PCCR method, an eye is illuminated by near-infrared light from a lightemitting diode (LED). Some of the infrared light is reflected from the surface of the cornea. Some of the infrared light enters the eye through the pupil and is reflected from back of the eye out through the pupil a phenomenon commonly observed as the red-eye effect in flash photography. An electronic camera is oriented to image the user's eye. The output of the camera is digitized and processed by algorithms that locate the two reflections. Then from the locations of the centers of the two reflections, the direction of gaze is computed. As described thus far, the PCCR method is susceptible to errors caused by reflections of ambient light. Although a near-infrared band-pass optical filter can be used to discriminate against ambient light, some sources of ambient light have enough in-band power to compete with the LED signal. The mode of operation of the ALCC would complement or supplant spectral filtering by providing more nearly complete cancellation of the effect of ambient light. In the operation of the ALCC, a near-infrared LED would be pulsed on during one camera frame period and off during the next frame period. Thus, the scene would be illuminated by both the LED (signal) light and the ambient (background) light

  14. Ambient Intelligence 2.0: Towards Synergetic Prosperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Emile; Grotenhuis, Frits

    Ten years of research in Ambient Intelligence have revealed that the original ideas and assertions about the way the concept should develop no longer hold and should be substantially revised. Early scenario's in Ambient Intelligence envisioned a world in which individuals could maximally exploit personalized, context aware, wireless devices thus enabling them to become maximally productive, while living at an unprecedented pace. Environments would become smart and proactive, enriching and enhancing the experience of participants thus supporting maximum leisure possibly even at the risk of alienation. New insights have revealed that these brave new world scenarios are no longer desirable and that people are more in for a balanced approach in which technology should serve people instead of driving them to the max. We call this novel approach Synergetic Prosperity, referring to meaningful digital solutions that balance mind and body, and society and earth thus contributing to a prosperous and sustainable development of mankind.

  15. Annealing ambient controlled deep defect formation in InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. W.; Dong, Z. Y.; Duan, M. L.; Sun, W. R.; Zeng, Y. P.; Sun, N. F.; Sun, T. N.

    2004-07-01

    Deep defects in annealed InP have been investigated by deep level transient capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS), photo induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS) and thermally stimulated current spectroscopy (TSC). Both DLTS results of annealed semiconducting InP and PICTS and TSC results of annealed semi-insulating InP indicate that InP annealed in phosphorus ambient has five defects, while InP annealed in iron phosphide ambient has two defects. Such a defect formation phenomenon is explained in terms of defect suppression by the iron atom diffusion process. The correlation of the defects and the nature of the defects in annealed InP are discussed based on the results.

  16. Ambient-pressure thermodynamic measurements on UGe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.; Meingast, C.; von Loehneysen, H.; Flouquet, J.; Huxley, A.; Lashley, J.; Fisher, R. A.; Phillips, N. E.

    2008-03-01

    The pairing interaction leading to the formation of the Cooper pairs remains unidentified in the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2. Nevertheless, there is strong experimental evidence that superconductivity is not mediated by the magnetic fluctuations that drive TCurie (p) to zero; it rather appears closely related to another phase boundary Tx (p) that occurs at lower pressure. Theoretical works suggested that this additional phase boundary could arise either from a coupling between SDW and CDW orderings or from a peak in the electronic density of states. Although the existence of this anomaly is experimentally incontestable between 0.6 and 1.2 GPa, the situation at ambient pressure remains ambiguous. We discuss the aforementioned scenarios in the light of recent high-resolution thermal expansion and calorimetric measurements realized under high magnetic fields at ambient pressure.

  17. The Operator Guide: An Ambient Persuasive Interface in the Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Pöhr, Florian; Tscheligi, Manfred

    In this paper we introduce the context of a semiconductor factory as a promising area for the application of innovative interaction approaches. In order to increase efficiency ambient persuasive interfaces, which influence the operators' behaviour to perform in an optimized way, could constitute a potential strategy. We present insights gained from qualitative studies conducted in a specific semiconductor factory and provide a description of typical work processes and already deployed interfaces in this context. These findings informed the design of a prototype of an ambient persuasive interface within this realm - the "Operator Guide". Its overall aim is to improve work efficiency, while still maintaining a minimal error rate. We provide a detailed description of the Operator Guide along with an outlook of the next steps within a user-centered design approach.

  18. Damage localization under ambient vibration using changes in flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yong; Spencer, B. F.

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has emerged as a new research area in civil engineering. Most existing health monitoring methodologies require direct measurement of input excitation for implementation. However, in many cases, there is no easy way to measure these inputs - or alternatively to externally excite the structure. Therefore, SHM methods based on ambient vibration have become important in civil engineering. In this paper, an approach is proposed based on the Damage Location Vector (DLV) method to handle the ambient vibration case. Here, this flexibility-matrix-based damage localization method is combined with a modal expansion technique to eliminate the need to measure the input excitation. As a by-product of this approach, in addition to determining the location of the damage, an estimate of the damage extent also can be determined. Finally, a numerical example analyzing a truss structure with limited sensors and noisy measurement is provided to verify the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  19. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes.

  20. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-04-30

    This is the third semi-annual technical progress report summarizing observations and tentative conclusions drawn from evaluations of the data captured to date from the operation of the ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. In order to provide a ''stand alone'' document, this report contains updated versions of Section 1 (Introduction) and Section 2 (Experimental) in their entirety from the first report.

  1. Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry in bioanalytical sciences.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques are gaining growing interest due to their specific features, such as the need for little or no sample preparation, its high analysis speed, and the ambient experimental conditions. Samples can be analyzed in gas, liquid, or solid forms. These techniques allow for a wide range of applications, like warfare agent detection, chemical reaction control, mass spectrometry imaging, polymer identification, and food safety monitoring, as well as applications in biomedical science, e.g., drug and pharmaceutical analysis, medical diagnostics, biochemical analysis, etc. Until now, the main drawback of plasma-based techniques is their quantitative aspect, but a lot of efforts have been done to improve this obstacle.

  2. Contrasting Ambient Brown Carbon from Primary Emissions and Secondary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Zhang, X.; Russell, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of particulate light absorption in wintertime Fresno, CA indicate a substantial contribution of light absorbing organic carbon (aka brown carbon) to the total ambient absorption. Two key brown carbon sources are identified and characterized in terms of their spectral absorption properties: residential combustion of wood and secondary production, most likely related to fog processing. The two brown carbon sources exhibit distinct diurnal profiles, indicating differences in their local and regional climate impacts. The derived wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients indicate that the primary wood-combustion derived brown carbon is more absorbing than the secondary brown carbon, by about a factor of two, while the secondary has a stronger wavelength dependence. The ambient observations will be contrasted with results from controlled laboratory burns of various biofuels from the FIREX study. This study provides constraints on the atmospheric sources and properties of brown carbon and their contribution to total absorption relative to black carbon.

  3. Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: Practical considerations and experimental frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotochaud, Lena; Head, Ashley R.; Karslıoğlu, Osman; Kyhl, Line; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2017-02-01

    Over the past several decades, ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) has emerged as a powerful technique for in situ and operando investigations of chemical reactions under relevant ambient atmospheres far from ultra-high vacuum conditions. This review focuses on exemplary cases of APXPS experiments, giving special consideration to experimental techniques, challenges, and limitations specific to distinct condensed matter interfaces. We discuss APXPS experiments on solid/vapor interfaces, including the special case of 2D films of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates with intercalated gas molecules, liquid/vapor interfaces, and liquid/solid interfaces, which are a relatively new class of interfaces being probed by APXPS. We also provide a critical evaluation of the persistent limitations and challenges of APXPS, as well as the current experimental frontiers.

  4. Ambient ultraviolet radiation causes mortality in salamander eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, A.R.; Edmond, B.; Kiesecker, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    Previous research has shown that amphibian species have differential sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. In some anuran species, ambient levels of UV-B cause mortality in embryonic stages and hatching success is significantly reduced. Projected increases in UV-B may affect an increasing number of species. The adverse effects of UV-B may eventually be manifested at the population level and may ultimately contribute to population declines. Using field experiments, we investigated the effects of ambient UV-B on salamander (Ambystoma gracile) embryos developing at natural oviposition sites. We show that the hatching success of eggs of A. gracile shielded from UV-B is significantly higher than those not shielded from UV-B. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Ambient Temperature Compensation of Thin Film Pirani Vacuum Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Hiroshi; Kimura, Mitsuteru

    A thin film Pirani vacuum sensor having a single microheater and two diode-thermistors (Th-A and Th-B) composed of pn junction diodes on the micro-air-bridge (MAB) is fabricated by micromachining technologies. A method to eliminate the ambient temperature effects based on double pulse-heating (pulse duration: 125ms) up to two different temperatures, Th and Tl, above the room temperature in vacuum sensing is proposed. Pulse-heating has also a merit to prevent temperature increase of the sensor chip. It is demonstrated that the Pirani gauge with a cantilever type MAB structure can almost compensate the ambient temperature effects by double pulse-heating. A method to correct the errors due to the non-linearity in the I-T relationship of the diode-thermistor as a very sensitive temperature sensor is also described.

  6. Formaldehyde and other carbonyls in Los Angeles ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.

    1982-05-01

    From selective sampling and liquid chromatography analysis, ambient levels of carbonyl compounds as 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones have been measured in the Los Angeles area during severe photochemical pollution episodes. Gas-phase concentrations and diurnal profiles are presented for six carbonyls: formaldehyde (up to 48 ppb), acetaldehyde (less than or equal to 35 ppb), propanal (less than or equal to 14 ppb), butanal (less than or equal to 7 ppb), 2-butanone (less than or equal to 14 ppb), and benzaldehyde (less than or equal to 1 ppb). Also presented are particulate-phase concentrations and particle/gas distribution ratios for five carbonyls. Ambient carbonyl levels are discussed with respect to anthropogenic emissions and to photochemical production and removal in polluted air. Advantages and current limitations of the method employed are briefly discussed.

  7. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-04-30

    This is the third semi-annual technical progress report summarizing observations and tentative conclusions drawn from evaluations of the data captured to date from the operation of the ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. In order to provide a ''stand alone'' document, this report contains updated versions of Section 1 (Introduction) and Section 2 (Experimental) in their entirety from the first report.

  8. Cognitions and 'placebos' in behavioral research on ambient noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcum, E. R.; Monti, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The study investigated effects of noise on visual and psychomotor tasks, with particular concern for influences of certain cognitive variables. A first experiment, using visual and card-sorting tasks, found no effects of 100 dB ambient noise per se, although cognitive variables in the testing situation affected both performance and ratings of disturbance. In two subsequent experiments some of the subjects were told that a noise was extraneous to their task of reproducing tachistoscopic patterns, and others were told that effects of the noise were being studied. It appears that in the absence of an adequate 'placebo' to control for cognitive factors, deceptive instructions may always be necessary in studies of ambient noise.

  9. Influence of ambient air pressure on effervescent atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, S. K.; Lefebvre, A. H.; Rollbuhler, J.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of ambient air pressure on the drop-size distributions produced in effervescent atomization is examined in this article. Also investigated are the effects on spray characteristics of variations in air/liquid mass ratio, liquid-injection pressure, and atomizer discharge-orifice diameter at different levels of ambient air pressure. It is found that continuous increase in air pressure above the normal atmospheric value causes the mean drop-size to first increase up to a maximum value and then decline. An explanation for this characteristic is provided in terms of the various contributing factors to the overall atomization process. It is also observed that changes in atomizer geometry and operating conditions have little effect on the distribution of drop-sizes in the spray.

  10. High pressure studies of A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} negative thermal expansion materials (A{sub 2}=Al{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}, FeAl, AlGa)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lindsay; Gadient, Jennifer; Gao, Xiaodong; Lind, Cora

    2016-05-15

    High pressure powder X-ray diffraction studies of several A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} materials (A{sub 2}=Al{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}, FeAl, and AlGa) were conducted up to 6–7 GPa. All materials adopted a monoclinic structure under ambient conditions, and displayed similar phase transition behavior upon compression. The initial isotropic compressibility first became anisotropic, followed by a small but distinct drop in cell volume. These patterns could be described by a distorted variant of the ambient pressure polymorph. At higher pressures, a distinct high pressure phase formed. Indexing results confirmed that all materials adopted the same high pressure phase. All changes were reversible on decompression, although some hysteresis was observed. The similarity of the high pressure cells to previously reported Ga{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} suggested that this material undergoes the same sequence of transitions as all materials investigated in this paper. It was found that the transition pressures for all phase changes increased with decreasing radius of the A-site cations. - Graphical abstract: Overlay of variable pressure X-ray diffraction data of Al{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} collected in a diamond anvil cell. Both subtle and discontinuous phase transitions are clearly observed. - Highlights: • The high pressure behavior of A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} (A=Al, Fe, (AlGa), (AlFe)) was studied. • All compounds undergo the same sequence of pressure-induced phase transitions. • The phase transition pressures correlate with the average size of the A-site cation. • All transitions were reversible with hysteresis. • Previously studied Ga{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} undergoes the same sequence of transitions.

  11. Thermomechanical Behavior of Thin Metal Films under Different Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebben, T.; Dehm, G.; Arzt, E.

    2006-02-07

    We present measurements on the thermomechanical properties of thin copper and gold films on substrates tested under vacuum and in a nitrogen flow ambient. The differences observed can be attributed to a native oxide layer on the copper surface that is removed under vacuum conditions but is present during experiments in inert atmosphere. This result hints to the importance of surface properties for thin film mechanics.

  12. Characterization of an Outdoor Ambient Radio Frequency Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    July 2013. e. AR 5-12, Management, Army Use of the Electromagnetic Spectrum , 15 February 2013. f. AR 25-52, Information Management: Records Management... spectrum analyzer, ambient RF noise floor, RF interference 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...available equipment such as the spectrum analyzer commonly used at test facilities. This TOP assumes that someone with a basic understanding of RF, and who

  13. Stirling, near-ambient temperature refrigerators - Innovative compact designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, G.; Reader, G.; Fauvel, R.; Bingham, E. R.

    Opportunities for the development and application of 'near-ambient' temperature refrigerating systems in connection with public concern over the impact of Freon refrigerants on the earth's ozone layer are examined. Previous work is reviewed, and recent innovative concepts and designs for compact Stirling refrigerators that could be the basis for alternatives for Freon-free refrigeration are presented. The advantages offered by Stirling refrigerators are high thermodynamic performance, simplicity, compactness, low weight and low cost.

  14. Composition for producing polyurethane resin at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatani, Y.; Nishino, K.; Tanaka, M.; Yamazaki, K.

    1984-06-26

    Disclosed is a composition for polyurethane resins which is ordinarily of two-package type and curable at ambient temperature and which comprises an isocyanate component having oxadiazinetrione ring as a curing agent and a polyol component, having in the molecule, at least one of a tertiary amino group, a quaternary ammonium group and a salt-formed carboxyl group as a main component. The composition has excellent curability and provides cured products excellent in adhesiveness and physical properties.

  15. Surface Wave Attenuation in the Tibetan Plateau from Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-31

    is unlimited. 16 DISTRIBUTION LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM... AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2015-0150 AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2015-0150 SURFACE WAVE ATTENUATION IN THE TIBETAN PLATEAU FROM AMBIENT NOISE University of Illinois at...DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR

  16. Imaging Turkey's Crust with Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubuk, Y.; Vanacore, E. A.; Saygin, E.; Taymaz, T.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present preliminary results detailing the crustal structure of Turkey from a combination of receiver function and ambient seismic noise tomography analysis. We use over 250 3-component broadband stations from permanent and temporary networks in Turkey and surrounding regions to image structure in Turkey from a combination of receiver function and ambient seismic noise tomography from crust to upper-mantle. To date, receiver functions for teleseismic events between the period between 2008 and 2009 have been calculated using frequency domain deconvolution for approximately 120 of the available stations. Using the methodology of Niu and James (2002), the receiver functions are analyzed to joint solve for Vp/Vs ratio and Moho conversion depth. The resulting maps show a highly variable Moho with depths ranging between ~35 km and 58 km depth as well as a variable but generally high average Vp/Vs ratio. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities extracted from the cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise are used in a nonlinear iterative tomographic inversion. Then the velocity models from the tomographic inversions are used in a joint inversion to create the Moho depth map of the region. We combine the receiver function results with results from ambient noise tomography to generate a comprehensive interpretation of the Moho and crustal structure of Turkey. The results mark the complex structure of the region. The seismic images from western Turkey show low velocities possibly linked to the elevated temperatures or fluid content. The images for central Turkey show low velocities for shallow depths but seismic velocity increases with depth; this also coincides with the geothermal potential of the region. The complex wavespeed images for eastern Turkey marks the effects of the ongoing geological processes such as the active collision of Anatolian block and Arabian plate.

  17. Analysis of Anions in Ambient Aerosols by Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; MacDonald, David A.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Hering, Susanne V.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a microchip capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of nitrate and sulfate in ambient aerosols. Investigating the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles is essential for understanding their sources and effects. Significant progress has been made towards developing mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for rapid qualitative analysis of aerosols. Alternative methods for rapid quantification of selected high abundance compounds are needed to augment the capacity for widespread routine analysis. Such methods could provide much higher temporal and spatial resolution than can be achieved currently. Inorganic anions comprise a large percentage of particulate mass with nitrate and sulfate among the most abundant species. While ion chromatography has proven very useful for analyzing extracts of time-integrated ambient aerosol samples collected on filters and for semi-continuous, on-line particle composition measurements, there is a growing need for development of new compact, inexpensive approaches to routine on-line aerosol ion analysis for deployment in spatially dense, atmospheric measurement networks. Microchip capillary electrophoresis provides the necessary speed and portability to address this need. In this report, on-column contact conductivity detection is used with hydrodynamic injection to create a simple microchip instrument for analysis of nitrate and sulfate. On-column contact conductivity detection was achieved using a Pd decoupler placed upstream from the working electrodes. Microchips containing two Au or Pd working electrodes showed a good linear range (5-500 µM) and low limits-of-detection for sulfate and nitrate with Au providing the lowest detection limits (1 µM) for both ions. The completed microchip system was used to analyze ambient aerosol filter samples. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations measured by the microchip matched the concentrations measured by ion chromatography.

  18. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    close collaboration with Michael Porter and Paul Hursky (HLS Research) with support from the ONR Ocean Acoustics Program and the ONR PLUSNet Project...Siderius, Chris Harrison and Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer for determining bottom depth and imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J...noise processing for estimation of seabed layering”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., (2007) [submitted, refereed]. [8] Martin Siderius and Michael Porter , “Modeling

  19. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    has done in close collaboration with Michael Porter and Paul Hursky (HLS Research) also supported by ONR. We have also been collaborating with Steve... Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer technique for imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 120, 1315-1323, (September...Siderius and Michael Porter , “Modeling broadband ocean acoustic transmissions with time- varying sea surfaces”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 124 (1), 137-150

  20. Multi-Agent Ambient Intelligence for Elderly Care and Assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Fariba

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we explore the application of an agent based model to designing ambient intelligence for use by the elderly in their own homes. The agent model used is based on abductive logic programming. It utilises personalised knowledge, interacts with the user and other agents and devices, and, while autonomous, incorporates user preferences when deciding whether or not to act, and what action to take.