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Sample records for aln ceramic substrates

  1. Preparation of graphite and graphene thick film on AlN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Saijie; Shen, Yue; Gu, Feng; Xu, Mengjie; Wu, Xiafan; Xu, Jindong

    2013-12-01

    High-purity AlN ceramic substrate was prepared by conventional sintering in N2 atmosphere at 1710°C for 3 hours. Measurement results of SEM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) indicated that the AlN substrate was sintered completely, average particle size is about 1-3 μm and the porosity is very low. Graphite and graphene electrodes were obtained by simple doctor-blade coating method on AlN substrate. The samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Sheet resistance is measured by the four-probe method. Annealing at H2 reduction atmosphere can slow down graphitized trend of graphene and protect it's structure. The graphite electrode was applied in typical sandwich-structure DSSCs with ZnO as photoanodes, and the photoelectric conversion efficiency (η) was about 0.78%, which can be optimized and applied in DSSCs by process optimization.

  2. Freestanding Highly Crystalline Single Crystal AlN Substrates Grown by a Novel Closed Sublimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Masayasu; Murata, Kazuki; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Amano, Hiroshi; Azuma, Masanobu

    2011-04-01

    We fabricated thick freestanding AlN films by a novel close-spaced sublimation method. The spacing between a sintered AlN polycrystal and a SiC substrate is 1 mm. A Ta ring was used to control the spacing between the AlN polycrystal and the SiC substrate. In addition, a special AlN adhesive was also used to fill in the gap between the AlN polycrystal, the Ta ring, and the SiC substrate. By a combination of these techniques, an AlN growth rate as high as 600 µm/h was achieved. A freestanding AlN layer was obtained by the sublimation of the SiC substrate during the AlN growth.

  3. AlN homoepitaxial growth on sublimation-AlN substrate by low-pressure HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takuya; Okumura, Kenta; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Eryu, Osamu; Yamada, Yoichi

    2012-07-01

    Crack-free thick AlN layers with low impurity concentrations were grown on free-standing AlN substrates fabricated by a sublimation method. Cracks due to tensile stresses were generated in the overgrowth layer when using on-axis AlN (0 0 0 1) substrates, as indicated by Raman scattering spectroscopy. In contrast, cracks were not generated when using 5° off-angle AlN (0 0 0 1) substrates. High crystalline quality was indicated by X-ray rocking curve (XRC) analysis. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) values of the (0 0 0 2) and (1 0-1 0) diffractions were 277 and 306 arcsec, respectively. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements indicated that the Si and C impurity concentrations were reduced to half of those in the sublimation-grown AlN substrates.

  4. Surface preparation and homoepitaxial deposition of AlN on (0001)-oriented AlN substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A.; Collazo, R.; Tweedie, J.; Dalmau, R.; Mita, S.; Xie, J.; Sitar, Z.

    2010-08-01

    Chemical surface treatments were conducted on mechanically polished (MP) and chemomechanically polished (CMP) (0001)-oriented single crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) substrates to determine a surface preparation procedure for the homoepitaxial deposition of AlN epitaxial layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. MP AlN substrates characterized by atomic force microscopy exhibited 0.5 nm rms roughness and polishing scratches, while CMP AlN substrates exhibited 0.1 nm rms roughness and were scratch-free. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of MP and CMP AlN substrates indicated the presence of a surface hydroxide layer composed of mixed aluminum oxide hydroxide and aluminum trihydroxide. Wet etching with sulfuric and phosphoric acid mixtures reduced the amount of surface hydroxide. Ammonia annealing at 1250 °C converted the substrate hydroxide layer to AlN and increased the rms roughness of MP and CMP AlN substrates to 2.2 nm and 0.2 nm, respectively. AlN epitaxial layers were deposited at 1100-1250 °C under 20 Torr total pressure with a V/III ratio of 180-300 in either N2 or H2 diluent. High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements revealed that AlN epitaxial layers deposited on MP substrates were strained due to nucleation and coalescence of AlN grains on the mechanically damaged surfaces. AlN deposited on CMP substrates was epitaxial and strain-free. Thermodynamic models for nitridation and AlN deposition were also proposed and evaluated.

  5. Structural and Optical Properties of Carbon-Doped AlN Substrates Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy Using AlN Substrates Prepared by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Toru; Kubota, Yuki; Kinoshita, Toru; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Xie, Jinqiao; Collazo, Ramón; Murakami, Hisashi; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Koukitu, Akinori; Sitar, Zlatko

    2012-12-01

    Freestanding AlN substrates with various carbon (C) concentrations were prepared from C-doped thick layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on bulk AlN substrates prepared by physical vapor transport (PVT). The structural properties of the AlN substrates up to a C concentration of 3×1019 cm-3 were the same as those of the nominally undoped substrates, while the absorption coefficient α at 265 nm was increased by C doping from 6.6 to 97 cm-1, when C concentration changed from <2×1017 to 1×1019 cm-3, respectively. Photoluminescence (PL) below 4.0 eV also increased by C doping.

  6. AlN Nanowall Structures Grown on Si (111) Substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yosuke; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    AlN nanowall structures were grown on Si (111) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy at substrate temperature of 700 °C with N/Al flux ratios ranging from 50 to 660. A few types of other AlN nanostructures were also grown under the nitrogen-rich conditions. The AlN nanowalls were ranged typically 60-120 nm in width and from 190 to 470 nm in length by changing N/Al flux ratio. The AlN nanowall structures grown along the c-plane consisted of AlN (0002) crystal with full-width at half maximum of the rocking curve about 5000 arcsec.

  7. Nucleation of AlN on SiC substrates by seeded sublimation growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Edgar, J. H.; Lee, R. G.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2007-03-01

    The nucleation of aluminum nitride (AlN) on silicon carbide (SiC) seed by sublimation growth was investigated. Silicon-face, 8∘ off-axis 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) and on-axis 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) were employed as seeds. Initial growth for 15 min and extended growth for 2 h suggested that 1850 °C was the optimum temperature of AlN crystal growth: on an 8∘ off-axis substrate, AlN grew laterally forming a continuous layer with regular "step" features; on the on-axis substrate, AlN grew vertically as well as laterally, generating an epilayer with hexagonal sub-grains of different sizes. The layer's c-lattice constant was larger than pure AlN, which was caused by the compression of the AlN film and impurities (Si, C) incorporation. Polarity sensitive and defect selective etchings were performed to examine the surface polarity and dislocation density. All the samples had an Al-polar surface and no N-polar inversion domains were observed. Threading dislocations were present regardless of the substrate misorientation. Basal plane dislocations (BPDs) were revealed only on the AlN films on the 8∘ off-axis substrates. The total dislocation density was in the order of 108 cm-2 when the film was 20- 30 μm thick.

  8. Prevention of AlN crystal from cracking on SiC substrates by evaporation of the substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argunova, T. S.; Gutkin, M. Yu.; Mokhov, E. N.; Kazarova, O. P.; Lim, J.-H.; Shcheglov, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of prevention of AlN crystal layers from cracking under action of thermoelastic stresses during growth of these layers on SiC substrates has been studied. Calculation of residual thermoelastic stresses in AlN/SiC double-layer system has shown that cracking of the AlN layer during cooling is inevitable until this layer becomes at least 15 times thicker than a substrate. The required ratio of the thicknesses of the layer and the substrate can be reached by growing an AlN layer with simultaneous evaporation of the SiC substrate. Experimentally performed evaporation of SiC substrates in one process with growing AlN single layers on them using the sublimation sandwich method has made it possible to prevent these layers from cracking. Continuous (non-cracked) plates with 0.2-0.8 mm thickness without substrates have been obtained as a result of these experiments. According to X-ray images obtained in synchrotron radiation, they consist of single crystalline AlN of 2H polytype, contain dislocations, but do not contain cracks. The degree of crystallinity of these thin plates, which was estimated by the full widths at half-maximum of rocking curves of X-ray diffraction reflections, corresponds to the degree of crystallinity of thick (3-5 mm) AlN layers grown on nonevaporated SiC substrates.

  9. Synthesis of c-axis oriented AlN thin films on different substrates: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Iriarte, G.F.

    2010-09-15

    Highly c-axis oriented AlN thin films have been deposited by reactive sputtering on different substrates. The crystallographic properties of layered film structures consisting of a piezoelectric layer, aluminum nitride (AlN), synthesized on a variety of substrates, have been examined. Aluminum nitride thin films have been deposited by reactive pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering using an aluminum target in an Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture. The influence of the most critical deposition parameters on the AlN thin film crystallography has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the rocking curve Full-Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the AlN-(0 0 0 2) peak. The relationship between the substrate, the synthesis parameters and the crystallographic orientation of the AlN thin films is discussed. A guide is provided showing how to optimize these conditions to obtain highly c-axis oriented AlN thin films on substrates of different nature.

  10. Large-area AlN substrates for electronic applications: An industrial perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Mueller, Stephan G.; Morgan, Kenneth E.; Slack, Glen A.; Schujman, Sandra; Wood, Mark C.; Smart, Joseph A.; Schowalter, Leo J.

    2008-08-01

    We report on the status of the vapor growth of high-quality AlN bulk crystals by the sublimation-recondensation technique for the commercial production of AlN wafers up to 2 in diameter. AlN boules and wafers have been characterized by X-ray Laue backscattering, diffraction, and rocking curves measured in double-axis configuration, demonstrating a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 28 and 32 arcsec for the symmetric and asymmetric rocking curves, respectively. The etch pit density (EPD) for different AlN substrate orientations was found to be less than 10 4 cm -2. Impurity levels have been measured by glow discharge mass-spectrometry (GDMS) and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (SIMS). The oxygen content as measured by SIMS shows concentrations <10 18 cm -3. Additionally, a high thermal conductivity of ˜270 W/m K has been measured by the flash method. High-quality homoepitaxial and graded AlGaN layers were grown on the on-axis-oriented AlN substrates. The lack of both piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization fields, for nitride heterostructures grown in non-polar directions, has recently created significant interest in high-quality, non-polar nitride substrates to boost the performance of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes. Initial epitaxial results on non-polar AlN substrates are presented.

  11. Seeded growth of AlN on SiC substrates and defect characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Edgar, J. H.; Cao, C.; Hohn, K.; Dalmau, R.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2008-05-01

    In this study, seeded sublimation growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) on SiC substrates was investigated. Large diameter (15-20 mm) and thick (1-2 mm) AlN layers were demonstrated on Si-face, 3.5° off-axis 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1). A c-axis growth rate of 15-20 μm/h was achieved at 1830 °C, and the surface morphology was highly textured: step features were formed with a single facet on the top of the layer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and molten KOH/NaOH etching were employed to characterize the AlN layers. The AlN crystals grew highly orientated along the c-axis, however, the impurities of Si (3-6 at%) and C (5.9-8 at%) from the SiC changed the lattice constants of AlN and shifted the AlN (0 0 .2) 2 θ value from pure AlN toward SiC. All the growth surfaces had Al-polarity and the dislocation density decreased from 10 8 to 10 6 cm -2 as the film thickness increased from 30 μm to 2 mm.

  12. Cubic AlN thin film formation on quartz substrate by pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biju, Zheng; Wen, Hu

    2016-06-01

    Cubic AlN thin films were obtained on quartz substrate by pulse laser deposition in a nitrogen reactive atmosphere. A Nd-YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used as the laser source. In order to study the influence of the process parameters on the deposited AlN film, the experiments were performed at various technique parameters of laser energy density from 70 to 260 J/cm2, substrate temperature from room temperature to 800 °C and nitrogen pressure from 0.1 to 50 Pa. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were applied to characterize the structure and surface morphology of the deposited AlN films. It was found that the structure of AlN films deposited in a vacuum is rocksalt under the condition of substrate temperature 600-800 °C, nitrogen pressure 10-0.1 Pa and a moderate laser energy density (190 J/cm2). The high quality AlN film exhibited good optical property. Project supported by the Yunnan Provincial Natural of Science Foundation of China (No. KKSY201251089).

  13. AlN texturing and piezoelectricity on flexible substrates for sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smecca, Emanuele; Pellegrino, Giovanna; Alberti, Alessandra; Maita, Francesco; Maiolo, Luca; Fortunato, Guglielmo; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; La Magna, Luigi; Mirabella, Salvo; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.

    2015-06-08

    We show that AlN-based piezocapacitors with relatively high piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33}) values (3–4 pC/N) can be fabricated on polyimide (PI) substrates at 160 °C or even at room temperature by sputtering processes. With respect to PI, a reduction of the piezoelectric performances was observed on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN). With the same approach, a d{sub 33} value as high as 8 pC/N was achieved on rigid substrates (SiO{sub 2}/Si). In all cases, a thin Al buffer layer was deposited, immediately before AlN, without breaking the vacuum in the deposition chamber, in order to preserve the interface from contaminations that would obstruct the optimal atomic stratification with the desired [0001] growth axis. The piezoelectric behavior was thus correlated to the degree of texturing of the AlN layer through the evaluation of the XRD texturing coefficients and to the morphology by means of AFM analyses. We show that a high level of roughness introduced by the PEN substrate, coupled with the effect of the substrate flexibility on the piezoelectric coefficient, reduces the impact of the AlN texturing on the d{sub 33} values.

  14. Adhesion strength and nucleation thermodynamics of four metals (Al, Cu, Ti, Zr) on AlN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuan; Ke, Genshui; Xie, Yan; Chen, Yigang; Shi, Siqi; Guo, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    Devices based on AlN generally require adherent and strong interfaces between AlN and other materials, whereas most metals are known to be nonwetting to AlN and form relatively weak interfaces with AlN. In this study, we selected four representative metals (Al, Cu, Ti, and Zr) to study the adhesion strength of the AlN/metal interfaces. Mathematical models were constructed between the adhesion strength and enthalpy of formation of Al-metal solid solutions, the surface energies of the metals, and the lattice mismatch between the metals and AlN, based on thermodynamic parameters calculated using density functional theory. It appears that the adhesion strength is mainly determined by the lattice mismatch, and is in no linear correlation with either the Al-metal solution's formation enthalpies or the metals' surface energies. We also investigated the nucleation thermodynamics of the four metals on AlN substrates. It was found that Ti forms the strongest interface with AlN, and has the largest driving force for nucleation on AlN substrates among the four metals.

  15. Epitaxial growth of homogeneous single-crystalline AlN films on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Liu, Zuolian; Lin, Yunhao; Zhou, Shizhong; Qian, Huirong; Gao, Fangliang; Yang, Hui; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-03-01

    The homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN thin films have been epitaxially grown on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates with an in-plane alignment of AlN [11-20]//Cu [1-10] by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology with an integrated laser rastering program. The as-grown AlN films are studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarized light microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The spectroscopic ellipsometry reveals the excellent thickness uniformity of as-grown AlN films on the Cu (1 1 1) substrates with a root-mean-square (RMS) thickness inhomogeneity less than 2.6%. AFM and FESEM measurements indicate that very smooth and flat surface AlN films are obtained with a surface RMS roughness of 2.3 nm. The X-ray reflectivity image illustrates that there is a maximum of 1.2 nm thick interfacial layer existing between the as-grown AlN and Cu (1 1 1) substrates and is confirmed by HRTEM measurement, and reciprocal space mapping shows that almost fully relaxed AlN films are achieved only with a compressive strain of 0.48% within ˜321 nm thick films. This work demonstrates a possibility to obtain homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN films on metallic substrates by PLD with optimized laser rastering program, and brings up a broad prospect for the application of acoustic filters that require abrupt hetero-interfaces between the AlN films and the metallic electrodes.

  16. Dynamic high-pressure properties of AlN ceramic as determined by flyer plate impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Brar, N. S.; Bless, S. J.

    1991-07-01

    The dynamic properties of hot-pressed aluminum nitride ceramics were determined in a series of plate impact experiments using longitudinal and transverse in-material manganin gauges. The Hugoniot curve for hot pressed specimens was determined in the range of 0-190 kbar with a value of 94±2 kbar for the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). Using both gauge orientations, the stress deviator in the specimens was determined as the difference between longitudinal and transverse stresses. It was found that the stress deviator remains relatively constant above the HEL, and is about 10% higher than the value at the HEL point. The inferred Hugoniot converges to the extrapolation of the hydrostat. Since the convergence is not due to loss of strength, it may be due to a phase change in the AlN from low-pressure (wurtzite) structure to high-pressure (rocksalt) structure.

  17. Direct Growth and Controlled Coalescence of Thick AlN Template on Micro-circle Patterned Si Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Binh Tinh; Hirayama, Hideki; Maeda, Noritoshi; Jo, Masafumi; Toyoda, Shiro; Kamata, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    High-density micro-circle patterned Si substrates were successfully fabricated for the direct overgrowth of thick AlN templates by using NH3 pulsed-flow multilayer AlN growth and epitaxial lateral overgrowth techniques. The experimental results show that an 8-μm-thick AlN template was grown at a very high growth rate on the substrates. The AlN template had full widths at half maximum of 0.23° and 0.37° for the (002) and (102) reflection planes in X-ray diffraction rocking curves. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the roughness of the surface was low (3.5 nm) and the dislocation density was very low (1.5 × 108 cm−2 (screw), 3.7 × 108 (edge) cm−2). PMID:26439169

  18. Pyroelectric and piezoelectric responses of thin AlN films epitaxy-grown on a SiC/Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.; Sergeeva, O. N.; Kiselev, D. A.; Bogomolov, A. A.; Solnyshkin, A. V.; Kaptelov, E. Yu.; Senkevich, S. V.; Pronin, I. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of pyroelectric and piezoelectric studies of AlN films formed by chloride-hydride epitaxy (CHE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on epitaxial SiC nanolayers grown on Si by the atom substitution method. The surface topography and piezoelectric and pyroelecrtric responses of AlN films have been analyzed. The results of the study have shown that the vertical component of the piezoresponse in CHE-grown AlN films is more homogeneous over the film area than that in MBE-grown AlN films. However, the signal from the MBE-synthesized AlN films proved to be stronger. The inversion of the polar axis (polarization vector) on passage from MBE-grown AlN films to CHE-grown AlN films has been found experimentally. It has been shown that the polar axis in MBE-grown films is directed from the free surface of the film toward the Si substrate while, in CHE-grown films, the polarization vector is directed toward the free surface.

  19. Bulk AlN crystal growth: self-seeding and seeding on 6H-SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, J. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, B.; Zhuang, D.; Chaudhuri, J.; Kuball, M.; Rajasingam, S.

    2002-12-01

    The properties of bulk AlN crystals grown by sublimation recondensation and either randomly nucleated (i.e. self-seeded) or seeded on 6H-SiC substrates or compared. Self-seeding produces crystals of the highest perfection, lowest stress, and low Si and C impurity content, but the crystals grow in random crystallographic orientations. Crystals grown in boron nitride crucibles typically form thin platelets with the fastest growth occurring in the c-axis direction. Growth striations run the length of the crystals in the c-axis direction. Anisotropic etching in aqueous 45 wt% KOH solutions shows that the growth (0 0 0 1) planes exposed to the AlN source predominately have an aluminum polarity. AlN crystals seeded on 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) have a single crystallographic orientation and the largest dimensions are perpendicular to the c-axis, determined by the size of the substrate. Cracking and voids in the AlN layer produced by differences in thermal expansion coefficients of AlN and SiC and decomposition of the SiC were ameliorated by depositing an AlN-SiC alloy layer on the SiC before growing the AlN layer. Raman spectroscopy measurements suggest the AlN and AlN-SiC alloy layer are both under tensile stress. The defect density in AlN crystals grown on composite AlN-SiC/6H-SiC substrates was 3.7×10 5 cm -2, as determined by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography.

  20. Modification of dislocation behavior in GaN overgrown on engineered AlN film-on-bulk Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungare, Mihir; Weng, Xiaojun; Leathersich, Jeffrey M.; Suvarna, Puneet; Redwing, Joan M.; (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.

    2013-04-01

    The changes that the AlN buffer and Si substrate undergo at each stage of our substrate engineering process, previously shown to lead to a simultaneous and substantial reduction in film crack density and dislocation density in overgrown GaN, are presented. Evidence of ion-implantation assisted grain reorientation for AlN islands coupled with physical isolation from the bulk Si substrate prove to be the dominating driving forces. This is further emphasized with x-ray diffraction analysis that demonstrates a reduction in the in-plane lattice constant of AlN from 3.148 Å to 3.113 Å and a relative change in rotation of AlN islands by 0.135° with regard to the Si substrate after substrate engineering. Misfit dislocations at the AlN-Si interface and disorder that is normally associated with formation of amorphous SiNx at this interface are considered to be two of the major contributors to dislocation nucleation within overgrown GaN. Following our technique, the disappearance of disorder at the AlN-Si interface is observed. Extensive ellipsometry and transmission electron microscopy suggests that larger AlN islands with a smoother surface morphology could further reduce the dislocation density below that previously reported. A 1.2 μm GaN layer deposited on an AlN buffer with larger islands and smoother morphology exhibits a 14× reduction in surface pit density after undergoing the ion-implantation assisted substrate modification technique.

  1. Acoustic resonator with Al electrodes on an AlN layer and using a GaAs substrate

    DOEpatents

    Kline, Gerald R.; Lakin, Kenneth M.

    1985-12-03

    A method of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers.

  2. Direct selective metallization of AlN ceramics induced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Kozioł, Paweł E.; Stepak, Bogusz; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-03-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics has a unique characteristic, namely the ability to form conductive structures on its surface directly by laser-induced decomposition of the base material. Various research has been carried out on obtaining low-ohmic structures depending on process parameters such as the laser power, overlap of subsequent pulses and the type of shielding gas (air, nitrogen and argon). This paper focuses on explaining which factors have the greatest impact on the resistance (resistivity) value of obtained structures. In order to explain the effect of the laser fluence (below and above the ablation threshold of aluminum nitride) on the chemical structure of the conductive layers, qualitative EDX analyses were performed. Optimization of the process allowed obtaining a resistivity of the conductive layers at a level of ρ = 0.64·10-6 Ω·m, with a thickness of aluminum up to 10 μm (sheet resistance RS = 10 mΩ/Sr). This technology can be useful in making printed circuit boards (PCB), various types of sensors as well as radio-frequency identification (RFID) and Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC) structures. This technology can also be useful for the production of metamaterials.

  3. Spontaneous detachment of a sublimation-Grown AlN layer from a SiC-6H substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, A. A.

    2009-06-15

    Growth of thick layers and bulk crystals of AlN is a topical problem for modern science and technology. The main way to solve the problem is to use the sublimation method in which AlN is evaporated at a temperature of about 2000{sup o}C and is epitaxially deposited onto a SiC substrate. A severe difficulty in this case is that the coefficients of thermal expansion of these materials are different, which leads to bending, cracking, and pronounced stresses in the AlN layer upon cooling to room temperature. This communication considers the case of a spontaneous detachment of a crack-free AlN layer from a SiC substrate, which points to the real possibility of developing a growth technology in which their separation becomes inevitable. The following reasons for spontaneous separation of the layer and the substrate are probable: (i) formation of a thin Al layer at the interface and (ii) occurrence of the initial growth stage by the previously described scheme, according to which, the layer and substrate are atomically bound only at separate comparatively sparse areas of nucleation of the growing crystal. Upon cooling, these areas disintegrate and the layer is detached from the substrate. It is unclear so far what specific features and anomalies of the growth process give rise to this result.

  4. Effects of AlN buffer layer thickness on the crystallinity and surface morphology of 10-µm-thick a-plane AlN films grown on r-plane sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Tamaki, Shinya; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-08-01

    10-µm-thick a-plane AlN(11\\bar{2}0) films containing a low-temperature AlN (LT-AlN) buffer layer and a high-temperature AlN (HT-AlN) film were prepared on r-plane sapphire (1\\bar{1}02) substrates. The crystallinity of all the samples with different LT-AlN buffer layer thicknesses was improved after thermal annealing and HT-AlN growth, mainly owing to the elimination of domain boundaries and the concurrent suppression of facet formation. The optimum crystallinity of HT-AlN films was obtained with full widths at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curves of 660 arcsec for AlN(11\\bar{2}0)\\parallel [1\\bar{1}00]AlN and 840 arcsec for (0002) using a 200-nm-thick LT-AlN buffer layer.

  5. Substrate Heating Effect on c-Axis Texture and Piezoelectric Properties of AlN Thin Films Deposited by Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminiasari, Masood; Lin, Jianliang

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films with highly preferred (002) orientations have been reactively deposited by a pulsed-closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system using TiN/Ti as the seed/adhesion layer with various substrate temperatures. The texture, orientation and piezoelectric properties of AlN films were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction, rocking curves and laser interferometry. A Michelson laser interferometer was designed and built to obtain the converse piezoelectric response of the deposited AlN thin films. It was found that a slight substrate temperature increase would significantly affect the (002) orientation and the piezoelectric coefficient of AlN thin films compared to the coating obtained with no intentional substrate heating, while higher temperature applications on substrate deteriorated the c-axis texture of the coatings without significant improvement in the piezoelectric response of AlN films.

  6. AlN bulk single crystal growth on 6H-SiC substrates by sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Ichiro; Kato, Tomohisa; Miura, Tomonori; Kamata, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Kunihiro; Sanada, Kazuo; Okumura, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Large and thick AlN bulk single crystals up to 43 mm in diameter and 10 mm in thickness have been successfully grown on 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrates by the sublimation method using a TaC crucible. Raman spectrum indicates that the polytype of the grown AlN single crystals is a Wurtzite-2H type structure, and the crystals do not include any impurity phases. The quality at the top of the crystal improves as crystal thickness increases along the <0 0 0 1> direction during growth: a low etch pit density (7×10 4 cm -2) and a small full width at half maximum for a 0002 X-ray rocking curve (58 arcsec) have been achieved at a thickness of ˜8 mm. The possible mechanism behind the improvement in the AlN crystal quality is also discussed.

  7. Impact of titanium layer and silicon substrate properties on the microstructure of c-axis oriented AlN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wistrela, E.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.

    2015-05-01

    Highly c-axis orientated sputter deposited aluminium nitride (AlN) thin films are widely used as piezoelectric layers in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Therefore, stable and reliable deposition and patterning of the AlN thin films in the fabrication process of such devices is of utmost importance. In this work, we study the wet chemical etching behavior of highly c-axis oriented AlN layers as well as the film-related residuals after the etching procedure. To investigate the impact of the underlying material on the quality of the AlN films they are either deposited on pure silicon (Si) substrates or on Si substrates covered with a sputter-deposited thin titanium (Ti) film. The 620 nm thin AlN layers are synthesized simultaneously onto both substrate types and subsequently wet-chemical etched in a phosphorous acid based etching solution at a temperature of 80°C. We demonstrate a significant difference in surface roughness of the untreated AlN films when sputter-deposited on Ti or pure Si. Furthermore, we analyze the piezoelectric properties of the deposited films. Although the XRD analyses indicate a high c-axis orientated wurtzite structure for all deposited films, the absolute value of the piezoelectric coefficients |d33| of AlN thin films synthesized on Ti are 0.4-4.3 pC/N, whereas corresponding values of 5.2-6 pC/N are determined at those deposited on pure Si substrates,. Finally, after wet chemically etching a porous, but homogeneous AlN microstructure is observed for samples synthesized onto Ti layers, whereas AlN layers deposited directly on Si substrate are either etched very inhomogenously or almost completely with some etch resistant pyramidal-shaped residues. This might be due to a local change in polarity within the AlN layer.

  8. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji; Gerhold, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Optical gain spectra for ∼250 nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150 kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8 nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60 cm{sup −1} when pumped at 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280 nm laser diodes.

  9. Freestanding AlN single crystals enabled by self-organization of 2H-SiC pyramids on 4H-SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, G. R.; Beckers, M.; Giuliani, F.; Syväjärvi, M.; Hultman, L.; Yakimova, R.

    2009-02-01

    A sublimation-recondensation process is presented for high quality AlN (0001) crystals at a high growth rate by employing 4H-SiC substrates with a predeposited epilayer. It is based on the coalescence of well oriented AlN microrods, which evolve from the apex of 2H-SiC pyramids grown out of hexagonal pits formed by thermal etching of the substrate during a temperature ramp up. This process yields stress-free 120-μm-thick AlN single crystals with a dislocation density as low as 2×106cm-2.

  10. Effect of sputtering pressure on crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided sapphire substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hiroto; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for use in applications such as deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. In the present study, the effect of sputtering pressure on the surface morphology, crystalline quality, and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided a-plane sapphire substrates, which have high-crystalline-quality c-plane AlN thin layers, by pulsed DC reactive sputtering was investigated. The c-axis-oriented AlN films were homoepitaxially grown on nitrided sapphire substrates at sputtering pressures of 0.4–1.5 Pa. Surface damage of the AlN sputtered films increased with increasing sputtering pressure because of arcing (abnormal electrical discharge) during sputtering. The sputtering pressure affected the crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN sputtered films because of a change in the number and energy of Ar+ ions and Al sputtered atoms. The crystalline quality of AlN films was improved by deposition with lower sputtering pressure.

  11. Impact of the surface-near silicon substrate properties on the microstructure of sputter-deposited AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Bittner, A.; Patocka, F.; Schmid, U.; Stoeger-Pollach, M.

    2012-11-26

    In micro-/nanomachined devices and systems, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are widely used due to their piezoelectric properties. This work evaluates the potential of modifying the interface between the AlN thin film and the silicon (Si) wafer serving as bottom electrode for optimized crystallographic orientation and, hence, improved electrical and piezoelectric properties. The films were analyzed using temperature-dependant leakage current measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By preconditioning of the Si substrate surface applying sputter etching prior to film deposition, leakage current levels are substantially decreased and an increased (002) orientation of the AlN grains is observed.

  12. Radiative Properties of Ceramic Al2O3, AlN, and Si3N4: I. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Yang, Peiyan; Zhang, Zhuomin

    2016-06-01

    The radiative properties of dense ceramic Al2O3, AlN, and Si3N4 plates are investigated from the visible to the mid-infrared region at room temperature. Each specimen has different surface finishings on different sides of the laminate. A monochromator was used with an integrating sphere to measure the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of these samples at wavelengths from 0.4 μ m to 1.8 μ m. The specular reflectance was obtained by a subtraction technique. A Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer was used to measure the directional-hemispherical or specular reflectance and transmittance with appropriate accessories from about 1.6 μ m to 19 μ m. All measurements were performed at near-normal incidence on either the smooth side or the rough side of the sample. The experimental observations are qualitatively interpreted considering the optical constants, surface roughness, and volume scattering and absorption.

  13. Improvement in the Crystalline Quality of Semipolar AlN(1102) Films by Using ZnO Substrates with Self-Organized Nanostripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kohei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    We have found that self-organized nanostripes structures can be formed on the surface of ZnO(1102) substrates by annealing in the air, and high quality semipolar AlN can be grown on such substrates by growing a room temperature epitaxial AlN buffer layer. The full width at half maximum value of the X-ray rocking curve for AlN 1102 was as low as 500 arcsec. The observed tilt of the AlN(1102) layer grown on ZnO(1102) with self-organized nanostripes is smaller than that on as-received ZnO(1102), indicating that the nanostripes structure suppresses the introduction of misfit dislocations at the heterointerface probably due to the reduced stress field around the nanostripes. This reduction in the density of the misfit dislocations is probably responsible for the improvement in crystalline quality.

  14. Influence of high-temperature processing on the surface properties of bulk AlN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tojo, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Reo; Tanaka, Ryohei; Thieu, Quang Tu; Togashi, Rie; Nagashima, Toru; Kinoshita, Toru; Dalmau, Rafael; Schlesser, Raoul; Murakami, Hisashi; Collazo, Ramón; Koukitu, Akinori; Monemar, Bo; Sitar, Zlatko; Kumagai, Yoshinao

    2016-07-01

    Deep-level luminescence at 3.3 eV related to the presence of Al vacancies (VAl) was observed in room temperature photoluminescence (RT-PL) spectra of homoepitaxial AlN layers grown at 1450 °C by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) and cooled to RT in a mixture of H2 and N2 with added NH3. However, this luminescence disappeared after removing the near surface layer of AlN by polishing. In addition, the deep-level luminescence was not observed when the post-growth cooling of AlN was conducted without NH3. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies revealed that although the point defect density of the interior of the AlN layers remained low, the near surface layer cooled in the presence of NH3 was contaminated by Si impurities due to both suppression of the surface decomposition by the added NH3 and volatilization of Si by decomposition of the quartz reactor walls at high temperatures. The deep-level luminescence reappeared after the polished AlN wafers were heated in presence of NH3 at temperatures above 1400 °C. The surface contamination by Si is thought to generate VAl near the surface by lowering their formation energy due to the Fermi level effect, resulting in deep-level luminescence at 3.3 eV caused by the shallow donor (Si) to VAl transition.

  15. Vapor-liquid-solid growth route to AlN nanowires on Au-coated Si substrate by direct nitridation of Al powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Leshu; Lv, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yiyue; Zou, Ruyi; Zhang, Fan

    2011-11-01

    In the past several decades vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism has been used for constructing one dimensional (1D) AlN nanostructures though the clear observation of metallic catalyst particles on top of individual 1D nanostructure is rare. Using Au thin film on Si substrate as metallic catalyst, fine AlN nanowires were grown through the nitridation of Al powder in this study. The systematic characterizations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) have confirmed the existence of metallic catalyst particles on the top of each AlN nanowire. Therefore the AlN nanowires growth is indeed accomplished via VLS process. The VLS-generated conditions including thickness of Au film and reaction temperature were also explored for the growth of AlN nanowires. Incidentally some other AlN nanostructures such as faceted cross-sectional nanorods, nanobelt and nanocomb were also obtained via vapor-solid growth mechanism on the Si substrate.

  16. Raw materials influence the alpha-particle emission rate of AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, T.G.; Knudsen, A.K.; Guiton, T.A.; Quinn, T.J. III; Mills, L.K.; Dunmead, S.D.; Rigot, W.L.; Wijeyesekera, S.D.

    1996-10-01

    Most electronic devices are packaged in plastic, generally epoxy-based molding compounds. Organic compounds serve as effective barriers for alpha particles. However, sensitive or thermally stressed devices often must be packaged in ceramic packages, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, glass ceramics, BeO and AlN. Therefore, the concentration of alpha-particle-generating elements and the tendency of the material to induce soft errors in the device must be considered when selecting a ceramic package option. AlN is a relatively new packaging material. It offers high thermal conductivity ({ge}170 W/(m{center_dot}K)), dielectric and mechanical properties comparable to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to silicon. AlN substrates and packages are produced via pressureless sintering or hot pressing, using high-purity powders and sintering aids, generally alkaline- and/or rare-earth oxides. The concentration of alpha-particle-emitting elements in AlN ceramics depends on the concentration of these elements in the AlN and additive powders. In the present work, the concentration of alpha-particle-generating elements uranium and thorium in AlN powders is shown to be related to the levels of these elements in the raw materials used in AlN powder synthesis.

  17. Characterization of a smartphone size haptic rendering system based on thin-film AlN actuators on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, F.; Casset, F.; Danel, J. S.; Chappaz, C.; Basrour, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents for the first time the characterization of a smartphone-size haptic rendering system based on the friction modulation effect. According to previous work and finite element modeling, the homogeneous flexural modes are needed to get the haptic feedback effect. The device studied consists of a thin film AlN transducers deposited on an 110  ×  65 mm2 glass substrate. The transducer’s localization on the glass plate allows a transparent central area of 90  ×  49 mm2. Electrical and mechanical parameters of the system are extracted from measurement. From this extraction, the electrical impedance matching reduced the applied voltage to 17.5 V AC and the power consumption to 1.53 W at the resonance frequency of the vibrating system to reach the haptic rendering specification. Transient characterizations of the actuation highlight a delay under the dynamic tactile detection. The characterization of the AlN transducers used as sensors, including the noise rejection, the delay or the output charge amplitude allows detections with high accuracy of any variation due to external influences. Those specifications are the first step to a low-power-consumption feedback-looped system.

  18. Temperature dependence of the crystalline quality of AlN layer grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Hang; Wei, Yong O.; Wang, Shuo; Xie, Hongen; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Satter, Md. Mahbub; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Douglas Yoder, P.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We studied temperature dependence of crystalline quality of AlN layers at 1050-1250 °C with a fine increment step of around 18 °C. The AlN layers were grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) ω-scans and atomic force microscopy (AFM). At 1050-1068 °C, the templates exhibited poor quality with surface pits and higher XRD (002) and (102) full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) because of insufficient Al atom mobility. At 1086 °C, the surface became smooth suggesting sufficient Al atom mobility. Above 1086 °C, the (102) FWHM and thus edge dislocation density increased with temperatures which may be attributed to the shorter growth mode transition from three-dimension (3D) to two-dimension (2D). Above 1212 °C, surface macro-steps were formed due to the longer diffusion length of Al atoms than the expected step terrace width. The edge dislocation density increased rapidly above 1212 °C, indicating this temperature may be a threshold above which the impact of the transition from 3D to 2D is more significant. The (002) FWHM and thus screw dislocation density were insensitive to the temperature change. This study suggests that high-quality AlN/sapphire templates may be potentially achieved at temperatures as low as 1086 °C which is accessible by most of the III-nitride MOCVD systems.

  19. Control over the morphology of AlN during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen on Si (111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerov, A. M. Kladko, P. N.; Nikitina, E. V.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-02-15

    The results of studies of the growth kinetics of AlN layers during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen using Si (111) substrates are presented. The possibility of the growth of individual AlN/Si (111) nanocolumns using growth conditions with enrichment of the surface with metal near the formation mode of Al drops, at a substrate temperature close to maximal, during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen (T{sub s} ≈ 850°C) is shown. The possibility of growing smooth AlN layers on a nanocolumnar AlN/Si (111) buffer with the use of T{sub s} ≈ 750°C and growth conditions providing enrichment with metal is shown.

  20. Synthesis of MgO-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 nanocomposite powder by polymeric complex method as a novel sintering additive of AlN ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwa-Jun; Cho, Woo-Seok; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Pan, Wei; Shahid, Mohammad; Ryu, Sung-Soo

    2016-09-01

    A MgO-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (MCAS) nanocomposite powder with a particle size of 50 nm and a specific surface area of 40.6 m2/g was successfully synthesized via heat-treatment of polymeric precursors containing Mg, Ca, Al and Si in air at 700 °C for 5 h. It was characterized as a novel sintering additive for the densification AlN ceramics at a low temperature below 1600 °C. It was found that the nanosized MCAS powder was suitable for the densification of AlN ceramics. In particular, full densification could be achieved when only 1.0 wt% MCAS additive-doped AlN powder compact was sintered for 1 h at 1600 °C, and a thermal conductivity of 84 W/m·K was attained.

  1. Structural and surface topography analysis of AlN single crystals grown on 6H-SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, R. R.; Barz, R. U.; Straubinger, T.; Gille, P.

    2012-12-01

    Bulk AlN single crystals (3 mm thick and 1 in. diameter) were hetero-epitaxially grown on (0001) 6H-SiC substrates by the sublimation method. Double-crystal x-ray diffraction and micro-Raman results confirm the good crystallinity as well as structural homogeneity of the grown crystals. The presence of low-angle grain boundaries was observed by x-ray diffraction rocking curve analysis and also supported by defect-selective etching analysis. The estimated defect density of the 3 mm thick crystals is about (5-8)×105 cm-2. 3D-microstructures with different morphology were observed on the as-grown crystal surfaces and were interpreted to be originated from screw dislocations. These screw dislocations are decorated by carbon impurities as evidenced by micro-Raman spectroscopic measurements. SiC incorporation in the grown crystals was found to be fairly low with 4 mol% at 2 mm distance from the interface and varies slightly between different sub-grains.

  2. High internal quantum efficiency in AlGaN multiple quantum wells grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji

    2015-04-06

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/AlN and Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/Al{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}N UVC MQW structures was analyzed. The use of bulk AlN substrates enabled us to undoubtedly distinguish the effect of growth conditions, such as V/III ratio, on the optical quality of AlGaN based MQWs from the influence of dislocations. At a high V/III ratio, a record high IQE of ∼80% at a carrier density of 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} was achieved at ∼258 nm. The high IQE was correlated with the decrease of the non-radiative coefficient A and a reduction of midgap defect luminescence, all suggesting that, in addition to dislocations, point defects are another major factor that strongly influences optical quality of AlGaN MQW structures.

  3. Ceramic barrier layers for flexible thin film solar cells on metallic substrates: a laboratory scale study for process optimization and barrier layer properties.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Sanchez, Jose-Maria; Guilera, Nuria; Francesch, Laia; Alba, Maria D; Lopez, Laura; Sanchez, Emilio

    2014-11-12

    Flexible thin film solar cells are an alternative to both utility-scale and building integrated photovoltaic installations. The fabrication of these devices over electrically conducting low-cost foils requires the deposition of dielectric barrier layers to flatten the substrate surface, provide electrical isolation between the substrate and the device, and avoid the diffusion of metal impurities during the relatively high temperatures required to deposit the rest of the solar cell device layers. The typical roughness of low-cost stainless-steel foils is in the hundred-nanometer range, which is comparable or larger than the thin film layers comprising the device and this may result in electrical shunts that decrease solar cell performance. This manuscript assesses the properties of different single-layer and bilayer structures containing ceramics inks formulations based on Al2O3, AlN, or Si3N4 nanoparticles and deposited over stainless-steel foils using a rotogravure printing process. The best control of the substrate roughness was achieved for bilayers of Al2O3 or AlN with mixed particle size, which reduced the roughness and prevented the diffusion of metals impurities but AlN bilayers exhibited as well the best electrical insulation properties.

  4. Mo-Si-B-Based Coatings for Ceramic Base Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John Harry (Inventor); Sakidja, Ridwan (Inventor); Ritt, Patrick (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Alumina-containing coatings based on molybdenum (Mo), silicon (Si), and boron (B) ("MoSiB coatings") that form protective, oxidation-resistant scales on ceramic substrate at high temperatures are provided. The protective scales comprise an aluminoborosilicate glass, and may additionally contain molybdenum. Two-stage deposition methods for forming the coatings are also provided.

  5. Increased upper critical field for nanocrystalline MoN thin films deposited on AlN buffered substrates at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, R.; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Vaidhyanathan, L. S.; Baisnab, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    Molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films have been deposited using reactive DC magnetron sputtering on aluminum nitride buffered oxidized silicon substrates at ambient temperature. GIXRD of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited under similar conditions has revealed the formation of wurtzite phase AlN. GIXRD characterization of molybdenum thin films deposited on AlN buffered oxidized silicon substrates has indicated the formation of nanocrystalline MoN thin films. The electrical resistivity measurements indicate MoN thin films have a superconducting transition temperature of ~8 K. The minimum transition width of the MoN thin film is 0.05 K at 0 T. The inferred upper critical field B c2(0) for these nanocrystalline MoN thin films obtained by fitting the temperature dependence of critical field with Werthamer, Helfand and Hohenberg theory lies in the range of 17-18 T which is the highest reported in literature for MoN thin films.

  6. Growth kinetics of AlN and GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on R-plane sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T. D.; Ozcan, A. S.; Ludwig, K. F.; Zhou, L.; Smith, David J.

    2010-08-15

    This paper reports the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of AlN and GaN thin films on R-plane sapphire substrates. Contrary to previous findings that GaN grows with its (1120) A-plane parallel to the (1102) R-plane of sapphire, our results indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films is strongly dependent on the kinetic conditions of growth for the GaN or AlN buffer layers. Thus, group III-rich conditions for growth of either GaN or AlN buffers result in nitride films having (1120) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, and basal-plane stacking faults parallel to the growth direction. The growth of these buffers under N-rich conditions instead leads to nitride films with (1126) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, with inclined c-plane stacking faults that often terminate threading dislocations. Moreover, electron microscope observations indicate that slight miscut ({approx}0.5 deg. ) of the R-plane sapphire substrate almost completely suppresses the formation of twinning defects in the (1126) GaN films.

  7. Short-period superlattices of AlN/Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nikishin, S.A.; Borisov, B.A.; Chandolu, A.; Kuryatkov, V.V.; Temkin, H.; Holtz, M.; Mokhov, E.N.; Makarov, Yu.; Helava, H.

    2004-11-08

    High-quality short-period superlattices of AlN/Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N have been grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia on Al face of AlN (0001) substrates. A significant reduction was achieved in the dislocation density, down to 3x10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Complete removal of residual Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface oxide is needed in order to obtain low dislocation density in homoepitaxy on AlN. We show that the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} islands with the surface coverage as low as 0.2% results in increased dislocation density.

  8. Deep green emission at 570nm from InGaN/GaN MQW active region grown on bulk AlN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Grandusky, J. R.; Jamil, M.; Jindal, V.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Cheung, M.; Cartwright, A.

    2005-09-01

    Relatively intense deep-green/yellow photoluminescence emission at ~600 nm is observed for InGaN/GaN multi quantum well (MQW) structures grown on bulk AlN substrates, demonstrating the potential to extend commercial III-Nitride LED technology to longer wavelengths. Optical spectroscopy has been performed on InGaN MQWs with an estimated In concentration of greater than 50% grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy at 750oC. Temperature- and power-dependence, time-resolved photoluminescence as well as spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements and transmission electron microscopy have been applied to understand and elucidate the nature of the mechanism responsible for radiative recombination at 600nm as well as higher energy emission band observed in the samples. A comparison between samples grown on bulk AlN and sapphire substrates indicate a lower degree of compositional and/or thickness fluctuation in the latter case. Our results indicate the presence of alloy compositional fluctuation in the active region despite the lower strain expected in the structure contrary to that of low In composition active regions deposited on bulk GaN substrates. Transient photoluminescence measurements signify a stretched exponential followed by a power decay to best fit the luminescence decay indicative of carrier hopping in the active region. Our results point to the fact that at such high In composition (>30%) InGaN compositional fluctuation is still a dominant effect despite lower strain at the substrate-epi interface.

  9. Sol-gel derived ceramic electrolyte films on porous substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kueper, T.W.

    1992-05-01

    A process for the deposition of sol-gel derived thin films on porous substrates has been developed; such films should be useful for solid oxide fuel cells and related applications. Yttria-stabilized zirconia films have been formed from metal alkoxide starting solutions. Dense films have been deposited on metal substrates and ceramic substrates, both dense and porous, through dip-coating and spin-coating techniques, followed by a heat treatment in air. X-ray diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phases formed and the extent of reactions with various substrates which may be encountered in gas/gas devices. Surface coatings have been successfully applied to porous substrates through the control of substrate pore size and deposition parameters. Wetting of the substrate pores by the coating solution is discussed, and conditions are defined for which films can be deposited over the pores without filling the interiors of the pores. Shrinkage cracking was encountered in films thicker than a critical value, which depended on the sol-gel process parameters and on the substrate characteristics. Local discontinuities were also observed in films which were thinner than a critical value which depended on the substrate pore size. A theoretical discussion of cracking mechanisms is presented for both types of cracking, and the conditions necessary for successful thin formation are defined. The applicability of these film gas/gas devices is discussed.

  10. Bonding strength of glass-ceramic trabecular-like coatings to ceramic substrates for prosthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Baino, Francesco; Pugno, Nicola M; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2013-04-01

    A new approach based on the concepts of quantized fracture mechanics (QFM) is presented and discussed in this paper to estimate the bonding strength of trabecular-like coatings, i.e. glass-ceramic scaffolds mimicking the architecture of cancellous bone, to ceramic substrates. The innovative application of glass-derived scaffolds as trabecular-like coatings is proposed in order to enhance the osteointegration of prosthetic ceramic devices. The scaffolds, prepared by polymeric sponge replication, are joined to alumina substrates by a dense glass-ceramic coating (interlayer) and the so-obtained 3-layer constructs are investigated from micro-structural, morphological and mechanical viewpoints. In particular, the fracture strengths of three different crack propagation modes, i.e. glass-derived scaffold fracture, interface delamination or mixed fracture, are predicted in agreement with those of experimental mechanical tests. The approach proposed in this work could have interesting applications towards an ever more rational design of bone tissue engineering biomaterials and coatings, in view of the optimization of their mechanical properties for making them actually suitable for clinical applications.

  11. Effect of initial growth on the quality of GaN on patterned sapphire substrate with ex situ physical vapor deposition AlN seed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbo; Daigo, Yoshiaki; Seino, Takuya; Ishibashi, Sotaro; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2016-10-01

    GaN epitaxy was explored on a cone-patterned sapphire substrate with an ex situ AlN seed layer prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The effect of initial growth on the quality of the GaN epilayer was investigated using both ex situ PVD-AlN seed layers with various thicknesses and various deposition parameters such as temperature and reactor pressure in metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). It was found that the quality of GaN is insensitive to both the thickness of the ex situ PVD-AlN seed layer and the MOVPE growth conditions. A high-quality GaN film was realized, as indicated by room-temperature CL mapping (dark spot density of 1.6 × 108 cm-2), on a patterned sapphire substrate with a wide growth condition window by simply employing an ex situ PVD-AlN seed layer.

  12. Protective glass coatings for circuits on ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovsky, E.

    1993-08-01

    Low-melting glass ceramics were developed to form coatings that protect circuits on alumina substrates from corrosion. The influence of (beta) -eucryptite and nitrides on its thermal expansion and crystallization were studied. The coatings, formed from powdered glass at firing temperatures from 430 degree(s) to 480 degree(s)C, have thermal expansion coefficient in the range (95 -85) X 10-7 degree(s)C. High resistance to thermal shock of coatings is due to the presence of crystal phases: 2PbO.ZnO.B2O3 and (beta) - eucryptite. At the surface of the coatings can be seen `islands' of nitrides hydrophobic thin film.

  13. Computational modeling of thin ceramic tiles backed by thin substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Cox, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Building on the work of Wilkins, Eulerian hydrocode calculations were performed with ceramic models to examine the behavior of thin ceramic tiles backed by a thin substrate. In order to match ballistic limit data it was necessary to include a pressure dependent flow stress for failed ceramic. Reasonable agreement is found between the modified model and ballistic limit data for a simulated armor piercing round impacting an AD-85 alumina/6061T6 aluminum laminate. Based upon this success, the modified model was used to examine the performance of a SiC/6061T6 aluminum laminate when impacted by an M80 ball round (7.62 mm) at muzzle velocity. The projectile undergoes large deformation, as does the aluminum backing sheet. The computational results indicate, for the M80 projectile impacting at muzzle velocity, that the ballistic limit thickness for the SiC/aluminum laminate should weigh 10% less than the ballistic limit thickness for steel. The talk will include a video tape of calculations.

  14. Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Measuring Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Greg; Leiser, Daniel; Bartlett, Jim; Lavine, Adrienne

    2003-01-01

    Hot-film sensors, consisting of a metallic film on an electrically nonconductive substrate, have been used to measure skin friction as far back as 1931. A hot film is maintained at an elevated temperature relative to the local flow by passing an electrical current through it. The power required to maintain the specified temperature depends on the rate at which heat is transferred to the flow. The heat transfer rate correlates to the velocity gradient at the surface, and hence, with skin friction. The hot-film skin friction measurement method is most thoroughly developed for steady-state conditions, but additional issues arise under transient conditions. Fabricating hot-film substrates using low-thermal-conductivity ceramics can offer advantages over traditional quartz or polyester-film substrates. First, a low conductivity substrate increases the fraction of heat convected away by the fluid, thus increasing sensitivity to changes in flow conditions. Furthermore, the two-part, composite nature of the substrate allows the installation of thermocouple junctions just below the hot film, which can provide an estimate of the conduction heat loss.

  15. Influence of strain induced by AlN nucleation layer on the electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si(111) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Christy, Dennis; Watanabe, Arata; Egawa, Takashi

    2014-10-15

    The crack-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrate with modified growth conditions of AlN nucleation layer (NL) and its influence on the electrical and structural properties of conductive GaN layer are presented. From the Hall electrical measurements, a gradual decrease of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration near heterointerface as the function of NL thickness is observed possibly due to the reduction in difference of piezoelectric polarization charge densities between AlGaN and GaN layers. It also indicates that the minimum tensile stress and a relatively less total dislocation density for high pressure grown NL can ensure a 20 % increment in mobility at room temperature irrespective of the interface roughness. The thickness and pressure variations in NL and the subsequent changes in growth mode of AlN contributing to the post growth residual tensile stress are investigated using X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering experiments, respectively. The post growth intrinsic residual stress in top layers of heterostructures arises from lattice mismatches, NL parameters and defect densities in GaN. Hence, efforts to reduce the intrinsic residual stress in current conducting GaN layer give an opportunity to further improve the electrical characteristics of AlGaN/GaN device structures on Si.

  16. Influence of strain induced by AlN nucleation layer on the electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si(111) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Dennis; Watanabe, Arata; Egawa, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The crack-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrate with modified growth conditions of AlN nucleation layer (NL) and its influence on the electrical and structural properties of conductive GaN layer are presented. From the Hall electrical measurements, a gradual decrease of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentration near heterointerface as the function of NL thickness is observed possibly due to the reduction in difference of piezoelectric polarization charge densities between AlGaN and GaN layers. It also indicates that the minimum tensile stress and a relatively less total dislocation density for high pressure grown NL can ensure a 20 % increment in mobility at room temperature irrespective of the interface roughness. The thickness and pressure variations in NL and the subsequent changes in growth mode of AlN contributing to the post growth residual tensile stress are investigated using X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering experiments, respectively. The post growth intrinsic residual stress in top layers of heterostructures arises from lattice mismatches, NL parameters and defect densities in GaN. Hence, efforts to reduce the intrinsic residual stress in current conducting GaN layer give an opportunity to further improve the electrical characteristics of AlGaN/GaN device structures on Si.

  17. Microstrip Gas Chambers on glass and ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.G.; Wieman, H.; Harris, J.W.; Mitchell, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1993-11-01

    We report developments of Microstrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) fabricated on glass and ceramic substrates with various resistivities. Low resistivity of the substrate is found to be critical for achieving stable operation of microstrip gas chambers. The microstrip pattern consists of 10 {mu}m wide anodes and 90 {mu}m wide cathodes with a 200 {mu}m anode-to-anode pitch. High-quality microstrips are fabricated using the dry etch after UV-photolithography. Our chambers are tested in an Ar(90)-CH{sub 4}(10) gas mixture at atmospheric pressure with a 100 {mu}Ci {sup 55}Fe source. An energy resolution (FWHM) of 15% has been achieved for 6 keV soft X-rays. At a rate of 5 {times} 10{sup 4} photons/sec/mm{sup 2}, gas gains are stable within a few percents. Long-term tests of gain stability and rate capability are yet to be pursued.

  18. High-quality, large-area MoSe2 and MoSe2/Bi2Se3 heterostructures on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Tsipas, P.; Aretouli, K. E.; Tsoutsou, D.; Giamini, S. A.; Bazioti, C.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Komninou, Ph.; Brems, S.; Huyghebaert, C.; Radu, I. P.; Dimoulas, A.

    2015-04-01

    Atomically-thin, inherently 2D semiconductors offer thickness scaling of nanoelectronic devices and excellent response to light for low-power versatile applications. Using small exfoliated flakes, advanced devices and integrated circuits have already been realized, showing great potential to impact nanoelectronics. Here, high-quality single-crystal MoSe2 is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111), showing the potential for scaling up growth to low-cost, large-area substrates for mass production. The MoSe2 layers are epitaxially aligned with the aluminum nitride (AlN) lattice, showing a uniform, smooth surface and interfaces with no reaction or intermixing, and with sufficiently high band offsets. High-quality single-layer MoSe2 is obtained, with a direct gap evidenced by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and further confirmed by Raman and intense room temperature photoluminescence. The successful growth of high-quality MoSe2/Bi2Se3 multilayers on AlN shows promise for novel devices exploiting the non-trivial topological properties of Bi2Se3.Atomically-thin, inherently 2D semiconductors offer thickness scaling of nanoelectronic devices and excellent response to light for low-power versatile applications. Using small exfoliated flakes, advanced devices and integrated circuits have already been realized, showing great potential to impact nanoelectronics. Here, high-quality single-crystal MoSe2 is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111), showing the potential for scaling up growth to low-cost, large-area substrates for mass production. The MoSe2 layers are epitaxially aligned with the aluminum nitride (AlN) lattice, showing a uniform, smooth surface and interfaces with no reaction or intermixing, and with sufficiently high band offsets. High-quality single-layer MoSe2 is obtained, with a direct gap evidenced by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and further confirmed by Raman and intense room temperature photoluminescence. The

  19. Mismatch relaxation by stacking fault formation of AlN islands in AlGaN/GaN structures on m-plane GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Grzegory, Izabella

    2011-08-08

    We study the mismatch relaxation of 2-5 nm thin elongated AlN islands formed during growth of AlGaN on bulk m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy. The relaxation of these m-plane AlN layers is anisotropic and occurs through the introduction of stacking faults in [0001] planes during island coalescence, while no relaxation is observed along the perpendicular [1120] direction. This anisotropy in the mismatch relaxation and the formation of stacking faults in the AlN islands are explained by the growth mode of the AlN platelets and their coalescence along the [0001] direction.

  20. Thin-film solar cells on perlite glass-ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, Stepan G.; Babayan, Virab H.; Musayelyan, Ashot S.; Harutyunyan, Levon A.; Zalesski, Valery B.; Kravchenko, Vladimir M.; Leonova, Tatyana R.; Polikanin, Alexander M.; Khodin, Alexander A.

    2013-06-01

    For the first time, thin-film CIGS solar cells have been fabricated by co-evaporation on specially developed non-conducting perlite (an aluminum potassium sodium silicate natural mineral of volcanic origin) glass-ceramic substrates to develop a fully integrated photovoltaic and building element. Such glass-ceramic material can meet the physical requirements to solar cells substrates as well as the cost goals. The preliminary data presented show that CIGS solar cells deposited on ceramic substrates can exhibit efficiency higher than 10%.

  1. Adhesion of Ceramic Coating on Thin and Smooth Metal Substrate: A Novel Approach with a Nanostructured Ceramic Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vert, R.; Carles, P.; Laborde, E.; Mariaux, G.; Meillot, E.; Vardelle, A.

    2012-12-01

    The adhesion of plasma-sprayed coating is, to a large extent, controlled by the cleanness and roughness of the surface on which the coating is deposited. So, most of the plasma spray procedures involve surface pretreatment by grit-blasting to adapt the roughness of the surface to the size of the impacting particles. This preparation process brings about compressive stresses that make it inappropriate for thin substrates. The present works aim to elaborate a thick ceramic coating (about 0.5 mm thick) on a thin metal substrate (1 mm thick) with a smooth surface (Ra of about 0.4 μm). The coating system is intended for use in a Generation-IV nuclear energy system. It must exhibit a good adhesion between the ceramic topcoat and the smooth metal substrate to meet the specifications of the application. Our approach consisted of depositing the ceramic topcoat by air plasma spraying on a few micrometers thick ceramic layer made by suspension plasma spraying. This nanostructured layer played the role of a bond coat for the topcoat and made it possible to deposit it on the as-received substrate. The adhesion of the nanostructured layer was measured by the Vickers indentation cracking technique and that of the ceramic duplex coating system by tensile test.

  2. Strain dependence on polarization properties of AlGaN and AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Mita, Seiji; Tweedie, James

    2015-06-08

    Since the band ordering in AlGaN has a profound effect on the performance of UVC light emitting diodes (LEDs) and even determines the feasibility of surface emitting lasers, the polarization properties of emitted light from c-oriented AlGaN and AlGaN-based laser structures were studied over the whole composition range, as well as various strain states, quantum confinements, and carrier densities. A quantitative relationship between the theoretical valence band separation, determined using k•p theory, and the experimentally measured degree of polarization is presented. Next to composition, strain was found to have the largest influence on the degree of polarization while all other factors were practically insignificant. The lowest crossover point from the transverse electric to transverse magnetic polarized emission of 245 nm was found for structures pseudomorphically grown on AlN substrates. This finding has significant implications toward the efficiency and feasibility of surface emitting devices below this wavelength.

  3. MOCVD growth of N-polar GaN on on-axis sapphire substrate: Impact of AlN nucleation layer on GaN surface hillock density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Jonathan; Leathersich, Jeffrey; Mahaboob, Isra; Bulmer, John; Newman, Neil; (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the impact of growth conditions on surface hillock density of N-polar GaN grown on nominally on-axis (0001) sapphire substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Large reduction in hillock density was achieved by implementation of an optimized high temperature AlN nucleation layer and use of indium surfactant in GaN overgrowth. A reduction by more than a factor of five in hillock density from 1000 to 170 hillocks/cm-2 was achieved as a result. Crystal quality and surface morphology of the resultant GaN films were characterized by high resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy and found to be relatively unaffected by the buffer conditions. It is also shown that the density of smaller surface features is unaffected by AlN buffer conditions.

  4. Mechanism analysis of thermal shock properties for ZrB 2-20%SiCp-10%AlN ultra-high temperature ceramic with the surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Songhe; Jin, Hua; An, Jing; Bai, Guanghui; Xie, Weihua

    2010-09-01

    An indentation-quenching test was used to characterize thermal shock properties of ZrB 2-20%SiCp-10%AlN ceramic with surface defects that arisen from Vickers indentation. It showed that the thermal shock resistance was affected by the length of pre-crack and the thickness of specimen. The critical temperature difference was up to 550 °C and the residual strength approached to a constant in this paper. Thermal stress intensity factor ( KI) was investigated at temperature of 550 °C by the semi-elliptical surface crack physical model, and it indicated that KI ascended firstly and descended afterwards. The crack propagation behavior was characterized by calculating the difference between the crack resistance and KI. The main influencing factors for KI were also discussed and analyzed here.

  5. High-quality, large-area MoSe2 and MoSe2/Bi2Se3 heterostructures on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Xenogiannopoulou, E; Tsipas, P; Aretouli, K E; Tsoutsou, D; Giamini, S A; Bazioti, C; Dimitrakopulos, G P; Komninou, Ph; Brems, S; Huyghebaert, C; Radu, I P; Dimoulas, A

    2015-05-01

    Atomically-thin, inherently 2D semiconductors offer thickness scaling of nanoelectronic devices and excellent response to light for low-power versatile applications. Using small exfoliated flakes, advanced devices and integrated circuits have already been realized, showing great potential to impact nanoelectronics. Here, high-quality single-crystal MoSe2 is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111), showing the potential for scaling up growth to low-cost, large-area substrates for mass production. The MoSe2 layers are epitaxially aligned with the aluminum nitride (AlN) lattice, showing a uniform, smooth surface and interfaces with no reaction or intermixing, and with sufficiently high band offsets. High-quality single-layer MoSe2 is obtained, with a direct gap evidenced by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and further confirmed by Raman and intense room temperature photoluminescence. The successful growth of high-quality MoSe2/Bi2Se3 multilayers on AlN shows promise for novel devices exploiting the non-trivial topological properties of Bi2Se3.

  6. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, John A, Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick, Jr.; Welsh, R. Edward

    1999-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system.

  7. Experimental Evaluation of Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Skin-Friction Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Hamory, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    An investigation has been performed on the use of low-thermal conductivity, ceramic substrates for hot films intended to measure skin friction. Hot films were deposited on two types of ceramic substrates. Four hot films used composite-ceramic substrates with subsurface thermocouples (TCs), and two hot films were deposited on thin Macor(R) substrates. All six sensors were tested side by side in the wall of the NASA Glenn Research Center 8-ft by 6-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). Data were obtained from zero flow to Mach 1.98 in air. Control measurements were made with three Preston tubes and two boundary-layer rakes. The tests were repeated at two different hot film power levels. All hot films and subsurface TCs functioned throughout the three days of testing. At zero flow, the films on the high-thermal conductivity Macor(R) substrates required approximately twice the power as those on the composite-ceramic substrates. Skin-friction results were consistent with the control measurements. Estimates of the conduction heat losses were made using the embedded TCs but were hampered by variability in coating thicknesses and TC locations.

  8. Nanopore fabrication by heating Au particles on ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    de Vreede, Lennart J; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-01-14

    We found that gold nanoparticles, when heated to close to their melting point on substrates of amorphous SiO2 or amorphous Si3N4, move perpendicularly into the substrate. Dependent on applied temperatures, particles can become buried or leave nanopores of extreme aspect ratio (diameter ≅ 25 nm, length up to 800 nm). The process can be understood as driven by gold evaporation and controlled by capillary forces and can be controlled by temperature programming and substrate choice. PMID:25548953

  9. Natural Ceramic Nanotube Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Kopitsyn, Dmitry S.; Kotelev, Mikhail S.; Ivanov, Evgenii V.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Novikov, Andrei A.

    2015-12-01

    Natural halloysite clay nanotubes are cheap and available in large quantities, thus seem superior to the other nanotube-based materials. Halloysite nanotubes are used to form structured substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Specifically, layered aluminum-halloysite- (noble) metal substrates were prepared by deposition of halloysite nanotubes on aluminum foil, followed by thin metal film coatings via vacuum evaporation. The composite substrates required no capping agent on the metal surface and thus avoided background peaks in the Raman spectra, making them well suited for SERS studies. Gold-, silver-, and copper-coated substrates exhibited SERS for p-mercaptobenzoic acid, whereas uncoated and platinum-coated substrates did not. The SERS enhancement factors for the gold-, silver-, and copper-coated substrates were, by a conservative estimate, 1.4 × 105, 3.5 × 104, and 3.5 × 103, respectively. Interestingly enough, the SERS enhancement factors of substrates decrease in a row: Au > Ag > Cu, which differ from those for the corresponding metal nanoparticles.

  10. Absorption of organic compounds and organometallics on ceramic substrates for wear reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, P.J.; Agarwala, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The concept of employing thermally stable compounds (that is, metal oxides) as high temperature vapor phase ceramic lubricants was investigated. A major part of this study was devoted to the development of various calorimetric and tribological techniques that could be used to determine interfacial reactions between thermally stable compounds and ceramic substrates such as zirconia and alumina. This interaction is pivotal in understanding the mechanism of high temperature lubricity. The approach consisted of selecting low sublimation temperature materials and measuring their thermodynamic interactions as vapors with the ceramic substrates. The materials studied included two easily sublimable organic compounds (that is, naphthalene and salicylic acid) and several organometallics (for example, copper phthalocyanine). Thermodynamic data such as heat of adsorption, packing density, and reversibility of the adsorption were obtained on some of these compounds and were related to wear characteristics. All of these compounds provided effective lubrication at room temperature. Copper phthalocyanine was an effective lubricant at temperatures up to 400 C.

  11. Plasma synthesis of alumina films on metal and ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.; Zhi Wang

    1995-04-01

    The authors are exploring the feasibility of the plasma synthesis of highly-adherent films of alumina and chromia on SiC and FeAl substrates. A magnetically-filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition technique is used in which a high density metal plasma (Al or Cr) is formed and deposited on the substrate in the presence of a low pressure gaseous oxygen background. The substrate is simultaneously repetitively pulse biased, providing a means of controlling the incident ion energy. In the early stages of the process the ion energy is held in the keV range so as to produce atomic mixing at the film-substrate interface (ion stitching), and in the latter stages of deposition the energy is reduced to {approximately}200 eV (IBAD range) to provide a means of controlling the film structure and morphology. Films that are dense and highly adherent can be formed in this way. The authors have produced near-stoichiometric films of alumina and chromia on small SiC and FeAl substrates and characterized the films in a number of ways, including RBS, X-ray diffraction and adhesion, and we`ve also done some preliminary temperature cycling experiments. The alumina films are of thickness from 0.2 to 1.5.{micro}, amorphous prior to heat treatment, and show an {alpha}-alumina phase after heat treating at 1,000 C for up to 16 hours. The film substrate adhesion is typically greater then {approximately}70 MPa prior to heating, and initial results indicate that the films maintain their adhesion after repetitive cycling in temperature between ambient and 1,000 C. Here they describe the plasma processing method and outline the experimental results obtained to-date.

  12. Laser surface treatment of porous ceramic substrate for application in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, D. S. A.; Khan, A. A.; Munot, M. A.; Glandut, N.; Labbe, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Laser has offered a large number of benefits for surface treatment of ceramics due to possibility of localized heating, very high heating/cooling rates and possibility of growth of structural configurations only produced under non-equilibrium high temperature conditions. The present work investigates oxidation of porous ZrB2-SiC sintered ceramic substrates through treatment by a 1072 ± 10 nm ytterbium fiber laser. A multi-layer structure is hence produced showing successively oxygen rich distinct layers. The porous bulk beneath these layers remained unaffected as this laser-formed oxide scale and protected the substrate from oxidation. A glassy SiO2 structure thus obtained on the surface of the substrate becomes subject of interest for further research, specifically for its utilization as solid protonic conductor in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs).

  13. Depth distribution of the strain in the GaN layer with low-temperature AlN interlayer on Si(111) substrate studied by Rutherford backscattering/channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Cong, G.W.; Liu, X.L.; Lu, D.C.; Wang, Z.G.; Wu, M.F.

    2004-12-06

    The depth distribution of the strain-related tetragonal distortion e{sub T} in the GaN epilayer with low-temperature AlN interlayer (LT-AlN IL) on Si(111) substrate is investigated by Rutherford backscattering and channeling. The samples with the LT-AlN IL of 8 and 16 nm thickness are studied, which are also compared with the sample without the LT-AlN IL. For the sample with 16-nm-thick LT-AlN IL, it is found that there exists a step-down of e{sub T} of about 0.1% in the strain distribution. Meanwhile, the angular scan around the normal GaN <0001> axis shows a tilt difference about 0.01 deg. between the two parts of GaN separated by the LT-AlN IL, which means that these two GaN layers are partially decoupled by the AlN interlayer. However, for the sample with 8-nm-thick LT-AlN IL, neither step-down of e{sub T} nor the decoupling phenomenon is found. The 0.01 deg. decoupled angle in the sample with 16-nm-thick LT-AlN IL confirms the relaxation of the LT-AlN IL. Thus the step-down of e{sub T} should result from the compressive strain compensation brought by the relaxed AlN interlayer. It is concluded that the strain compensation effect will occur only when the thickness of the LT-AlN IL is beyond a critical thickness.

  14. Experimental and theoretical analysis of sublimation growth of AlN bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Yu. N.; Avdeev, O. V.; Barash, I. S.; Bazarevskiy, D. S.; Chemekova, T. Yu.; Mokhov, E. N.; Nagalyuk, S. S.; Roenkov, A. D.; Segal, A. S.; Vodakov, Yu. A.; Ramm, M. G.; Davis, S.; Huminic, G.; Helava, H.

    2008-03-01

    The current status of sublimation growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk crystals is discussed. Growth of AlN single-crystal layers on silicon carbide (SiC) seeds in pre-carbonized tantalum crucibles in graphite equipment and of AlN bulk crystals on the AlN layers in tungsten crucibles and equipment is considered. All stages of the technology, including pre-growth processing (preparation of durable crucibles, high-purity AlN sources, and high-quality seeds), seeding on SiC and AlN, growth of bulk AlN crystals, and post-growth processing (calibration, slicing, lapping, polishing, and characterization of the crystals) are described. Special attention is given to "scaling" the technology to grow large-diameter (up to 2 in) AlN crystals, in which connection seeding on large-diameter SiC substrates and lateral overgrowth of the crystals are considered.

  15. Nano-Raman mapping of a porous glass-ceramic SERS substrate in collection mode.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, A; Cricenti, A; Generosi, R; Luce, M; Morgan, S; Piston, D

    2008-03-01

    Porous glass-ceramics is an extremely important material to be used in combination with metallic nanolayers as a Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate for biological and chemical analysis, demonstrating excellent biocompatibility and chemical inertness. These materials show their own Raman background signal lateral distribution, mostly from crystalline skeleton, which has to be considered. A nano-Raman setup using the optical fibre of a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope (SNOM), working in collection mode, is described and applied for mapping of such glass-ceramic. The collected Raman signal of Ti and P containing phase distribution in this near-field geometry reaches spatial resolution around 50 nm.

  16. Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

  17. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO.sub.3, YCrO.sub.3 or LaMnO.sub.3 particles (32), on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate (30), (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure (34) between the doped particles (32), (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles (32) as a contact.

  18. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  19. Thermal expansion compatibility of ceramic chip capacitors mounted on alumina substrates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. V.; Caruso, S. V.; Wilson, L. K.; Kinser, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of a representative sample of BaTiO3 and TiO2 ceramic chip capacitors and alumina substrates have been examined. These data have revealed large potential mechanical stresses under thermal cycling. A mathematical analysis of a composite model of the capacitor to predict the thermal expansion and modulus of elasticity and an analysis of the capacitor-substrate system to predict the magnitude of thermally induced stresses have been conducted. In all cases studied, thermally induced stresses great enough to cause capacitor body rupture or termination failure was predicted.

  20. SERS substrates fabricated using ceramic filters for the detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mosier-Boss, P A; Sorensen, K C; George, R D; Obraztsova, A

    2016-01-15

    SERS substrates were fabricated by filtering either Ag or Au colloidal particles onto rigid, ceramic filters - onto which suspensions of bacteria were then filtered. SERS spectra of the bacteria were obtained using a Raman spectrometer that has an 'orbital raster scan' capability. It was shown that bacteria samples prepared in this manner were uniformly distributed onto the surface of the SERS substrate. The effect of common buffer systems on the SERS spectra was investigated and the utility of using the SERS technique for speciation of bacteria was explored.

  1. KOH based selective wet chemical etching of AlN, AlxGa1-xN, and GaN crystals: A way towards substrate removal in deep ultraviolet-light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W; Kirste, R; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Hussey, L; Reddy, P; Tweedie, J; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2015-02-23

    A controllable and smooth potassium hydroxide-based wet etching technique was developed for the AlGaN system. High selectivity between AlN and AlxGa1-xN (up to 12 x) was found to be critical in achieving effective substrate thinning or removal for AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes, thus increasing light extraction efficiency. The mechanism of high selectivity of AlGaN as a function of Al composition can be explained as related to the formation and dissolution of oxide/hydroxide on top of N-polar surface. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopic analysis served as ultimate proof that these hillocks were not related to underlying threading dislocations. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  2. KOH based selective wet chemical etching of AlN, Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, and GaN crystals: A way towards substrate removal in deep ultraviolet-light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W. Kirste, R.; Bryan, I.; Bryan, Z.; Hussey, L.; Reddy, P.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.; Tweedie, J.

    2015-02-23

    A controllable and smooth potassium hydroxide-based wet etching technique was developed for the AlGaN system. High selectivity between AlN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N (up to 12×) was found to be critical in achieving effective substrate thinning or removal for AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes, thus increasing light extraction efficiency. The mechanism of high selectivity of AlGaN as a function of Al composition can be explained as related to the formation and dissolution of oxide/hydroxide on top of N-polar surface. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopic analysis served as ultimate proof that these hillocks were not related to underlying threading dislocations.

  3. Migration of elements in colour layers deposited on a ceramic substrate under the influence of laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewska, Danuta; Synowiec, Barbara; Olszyna, Andrzej; Marczak, Jan; Sarzyński, Antoni; Strzelec, Marek

    This paper summarizes the experimental results in the laser firing of colour agents on ceramic substrates. White glazed and fired ceramic plates were used as the substrate, while the deposited powders were mixtures containing ceramic colours and other colour agents. Various geometric patterns were deposited by a cw fiber Yb:YAG laser with speed controlled by a set of galvanometric scanners. The results, analyzed by means of optical microscopy, SEM EDS and laser profilometry explained the visually observed changes in pattern colours caused by the migration of pigment particles (characteristic elements) and allowed development of proper laser process.

  4. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Eryilmaz, O L; Johnson, J A; Ajayi, O O; Erdemir, A

    2006-08-16

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10(-11)-10(-10) mm(3) N(-1) m(-1), respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour.

  5. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eryilmaz, O. L.; Johnson, J. A.; Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.

    2006-08-01

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10-11-10-10 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour.

  6. Glass-(nAg, nCu) Biocide Coatings on Ceramic Oxide Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram−, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1–2 µg/cm2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10–15 µg/cm2 for the copper nanoparticles. PMID:22427967

  7. Feasibility of synthesizing oxide films on ceramic and metal substrates. Final report, August 1994--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1995-07-01

    Feasibility of synthesizing highly adherent alumina and chromia films on SiC and FeAl substrates using plasma methods was studied. A magnetically filtered, cathodic-arc-produced, metal plasma (Al or Cr) is deposited on the substrate in presence of low pressure oxygen while the substrate is repetitively pulse biased for control of incident ion energy. In the early stages, the ion energy is held in the keV range to produce atomic mixing at the film-substate interface (ion stitching); in the latter stages, the energy is reduced to about 200 eV (IBAD, or ion beam assisted deposition, range) to control the film structure and morphology. Near-stoichiometric films of alumina and chromia were formed on small SiC and FeAl substrates and characterized by RBS, XRD, adhesion, and temperature cycling. The aluminia films were 0.2 to 1.5 {mu} thick, were amorphous prior to heat treatment, and showed an {alpha}-alumina phase after heat treating at 1000 C for up to 16 h. Film substrate adhesion was typically greater than 70 MPa prior to heating, and the thinner films maintained their adhesion even after repetitive cycling in temperature between ambient and 1000 C. It is concluded that the plasma and ion beam techniques developed provide important tools for forming highly adherent and thermally tolerant ceramic films.

  8. Surface modification of graphite and ceramics with metals using induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Imoto, Akiko; Suzumura, Akio; Katori, Mana; Yamazaki, Takahisa; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Sakimichi, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    In order to join metals to graphite or ceramics by soldering or brazing, a new surface modification method using induction heating was developed for graphite and ceramics. Such source metals as Cu, Ni, Cr, etc. were induction-heated in vacuum atmosphere and making deposited films on the deposition substrate, or the target substrate; graphite, AlN, Si3N4. The applicability of this method was investigated and the deposited layer was analysed by SEM observation, Auger electron spectrum analysis, X-ray diffractometry, and EPMA. By comparison of ambient vacuum pressure during deposition and the saturated vaopr pressure of source metals, this method was considered to utilize the sublimation phenomenon.

  9. Growth and morphology of AlN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, G. R.; Syväjärvi, M.; Yakimova, R.

    2006-09-01

    This study focused on growth dependencies, morphological forms and initial nucleation of aluminium nitride (AlN) crystals. Epitaxial layers of AlN have been grown on 4H-SiC substrates by sublimation recondensation in a radio frequency (RF) heated graphite furnace. Both AlN nuclei size and growth rate increased as temperature was increased and decreased as the pressure was increased. The results of these effects are different kinds of surface morphology. We have observed three modes of AlN single crystals: plate-like, columnar and needle-like. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the crystal surface morphology. Cathodoluminescence (CL) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to determine crystal quality and crystallographic orientation of the grown crystals.

  10. Acoustic diagnosis for nondestructive evaluation of ceramic coatings on steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Kihara, Junji; Ito, Manabu

    1995-11-01

    New methodology is proposed and developed to make quantitative nondestructive evaluation of TiN coated SKH steel substrates. Since the measured acoustic structure is in precise correspondence with the multi-layered elastic media, change of elastic properties by degradation and damage can be easily distinguished by the acoustic spectro microscopy. In particular, rather complex acoustic structure can be measured by the present method for ceramic coated steel substrate system, but it is completely described by the two-layer model in two dimensional elasticity. Typical example is the cut-off phenomenon where the dispersion curve for the leaky surface wave velocity is forced to be terminated by alternative activation of shear wave instead of it. The quantitative nondestructive diagnosis was developed on the basis of this predictable acoustic structure. Furthermore, the effect of coating conditions on the acoustic structure is also discussed to make residual stress distribution analysis in coating by the acoustic spectro microscopy with reference to the X-ray stress analysis. Some comments are made on further advancement of the present acoustic spectro microscopy adaptive to precise characterization of ceramic coatings and practical sensing system working in practice.

  11. Self-Separation of Sublimation-Grown AlN with AlSiN Buffer Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Katsushi; Nakauchi, Jun; Hayashi, Kotaro; Tsukihara, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    AlN was grown by a sublimation method on 6H-SiC. We found the grown AlN layer is easily separated from the substrate when Si powder is added to the AlN source powder. The formation of AlSiN layer with the Si content of 15% at the AlN/6H-SiC interface was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). This AlSiN layer causes the separation of AlN.

  12. Sublimation epitaxy of AlN on SiC: growth morphology and structural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Persson, P. O. Å.; Yakimova, R.; Hultman, L.; Janzén, E.

    2004-12-01

    In order to study the development of individual AlN crystallites, sublimation epitaxy of AlN was performed on 4H-SiC, off-axis substrates in an inductively heated setup. Growth process variables like temperature, extrinsic nitrogen pressure and time were changed in an attempt to favor the lateral growth of individual AlN crystallites and thus open possibilities to prepare continuous patterns. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence were used to obtain plan-view and cross-sectional images of the grown patterns and to study their morphology and structural features. The growth at 1900 °C/200 mbar results in AlN pattern consisting of individual single wurzite AlN crystallites with plate-like shape aligned along [ 1 1¯ 0 0] direction. The only defects these AlN crystallites contain are threading dislocations, some of which are terminated by forming half-loops. Because of the uniform distribution of the crystallites and their high structural perfection, this AlN pattern could represent interest as a template for bulk AlN growth. Alternative growth approaches to AlN crystallite formation are possible resulting in variation of the final AlN pattern structure. From a viewpoint of obtaining continuous patterns, the more favorable growth conditions involve applying of increased extrinsic gas pressure, 700 mbar in our case.

  13. Study on the Seeded Growth of AlN Bulk Crystals by Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Krishnan; Iwaya, Motoaki; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Takagi, Takashi; Noro, Tadashi

    2004-11-01

    Seeded growth of AlN single crystals on 6H-SiC substrates by sublimation has been investigated. Pyrocarbon coated graphite crucibles were used. Temperature profile and source-substrate distance have been found to be the most influencing parameters of crystal growth. AlN crystals of maximum dimension 9 mm (length) × 5 mm (width) × 300 μm (thickness) were grown on SiC substrates and the best crystal showed an XRD omega rocking curve FWHM of 4.81 arcmin. AlN nucleated as independent hexagonal islands and coalesced as growth progressed on. Growth rate of AlN grown on C-face SiC has been found to be higher than that on Si-face SiC. Pyrocarbon coated crucibles have been found to be better suited for AlN growth as the impurity incorporation in to crystals due to crucible was less.

  14. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  15. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  16. Athermal fading of luminescence in Al2 O3 ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Ian; Kouroukla, Eftychia; Bailiff, Ian K.

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective dosimetry aims to reconstruct ionising radiation dose to populations following a radiological incident using materials not designed for that purpose. Sintered alumina ceramic can function as a dosimeter with its luminescence properties and related trapped charge storage mechanism. Its widespread use as a substrate in surface mount devices and incorporation in devices such as mobile phones make it a ubiquitous potential dosimeter. We investigated the optically (OSL) and thermally (TL) stimulated luminescence properties of sintered alumina substrates. In contrast to their single crystal analogue developed for personal dosimetry, Al2O3:C, the substrates exhibit a significant loss of trapped charge (fading) within hours following irradiation at RT that seriously limits their utility for dosimetry over an extended timescale. The fading rates of OSL and TL signals of 0402 resistors were analysed under various storage conditions (time and temperature), complemented by a study of their microstructure. The results support a model of athermal loss of trapped charge due to electron tunnelling from trapping states; this contrasting behaviour is attributed to a physical modification of the trap environment arising from the manufacturing process.

  17. Reactions and microstructure at ceramic/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsia, A.P.; Loehman, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Reactions of Ti and Zr with AlN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and mullite were studied. The substrates were selected to represent a simple nitride (AlN), a simple oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and a complex oxide (mullite). The activities of the Ti and Zr were varied by dissolving them at 1 and 5 wt.% in the 72Ag-28Cu eutectic composition, which is otherwise unreactive with the ceramics. Reactions were studied by measuring the variation of the alloy contact angle on the ceramic with time at temperature and by determining the compositions of interfacial reaction products. The reaction products were determined by SEM-EDS, EPMA and XRD hose analysis. Contact angles were lower for Ti alloys than for those containing Zr. Reaction products were primarily the nitrides of Zr and Ti for reaction with AlN and the respective oxides for reaction with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.Complex alloy phases were found in the metal away from the ceramic-metal reaction zone.

  18. Distinctions of the growth and structural-spectroscopic investigations of thin AlN films grown on the GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, P. V.; Kashkarov, V. M.; Arsentyev, I. N.; Bondarev, A. D.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    Using X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscopy, IR and UV spectroscopy, the properties of thin aluminium nitride films (<200 nm) that were obtained by ion-plasma reactive sputtering on GaAs substrates with different orientations were studied. The films of aluminium nitride can have a refractive index within the range of 1.6-4.0 for the wavelength band around ~250 nm and an optical band-gap of ~5 eV. It was shown that the morphology, surface composition and optical functional characteristics of AlN/GaAs heterophase systems can be controlled owing to the use of misoriented GaAs substrates as well choice of the technological parameters used for the film growth.

  19. Development of low dielectric constant alumina-based ceramics for microelectronic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S. J.

    1993-05-01

    The performance of high speed computers depends not only on IC chips, but also on the signal propagation speed between these chips. The signal propagation delay in a computer is determined by the dielectric constant of the substrate material to which the IC chips are attached. In this study, a ceramic substrate with a low dielectric constant (k {approx} 5.0) has been developed. When compared with the traditional alumina substrate (k {approx} 10.0), the new material corresponds to a 37% decrease in the signal propagation delay. Glass hollow spheres are used to introduce porosity (k = 1.0) to the alumina matrix in a controlled manner. A surface coating technique via heterogeneous nucleation in aqueous solution has been used to improve the high temperature stability of these spheres. After sintering at 1,400 C, isolated spherical pores are uniformly distributed in the almost fully dense alumina matrix; negligible amounts of matrix defects can be seen. All pores are isolated from each other. Detailed analyses of the chemical composition find that the sintered sample consists of {alpha}-alumina, mullite and residual glass. Mullite is the chemical reaction product of alumina and the glass spheres. Residual glass exists because current firing conditions do not complete the mullitization reaction. The dielectric constant of the sintered sample is measured and then compared with the predicted value using Maxwell`s model. Mechanical strength is evaluated by a four-point bending test. Although the flexural strength decreases exponentially with porosity, samples with 34% porosity (k {approx} 5.0) still maintain adequate mechanical strength for the proper operation of a microelectronic substrate.

  20. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, A. Stolz, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Rousseau, M.; Bourzgui, N.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Charrier, J.; Mattalah, M.; Barkad, H. A.; Mortet, V.

    2014-04-28

    Optical waveguiding properties of a thick wurtzite aluminum nitride highly [002]-textured hetero-epitaxial film on (001) basal plane of sapphire substrate are studied. The physical properties of the film are determined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, microRaman, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The refractive index and the thermo-optic coefficients are determined by m-lines spectroscopy using the classical prism coupling technique. The optical losses of this planar waveguide are also measured in the spectral range of 450–1553 nm. The lower value of optical losses is equal to 0.7 dB/cm at 1553 nm. The optical losses due to the surface scattering are simulated showing that the contribution is the most significant at near infrared wavelength range, whereas the optical losses are due to volume scattering and material absorption in the visible range. The good physical properties and the low optical losses obtained from this planar waveguide are encouraging to achieve a wide bandgap optical guiding platform from these aluminum nitride thin films.

  1. Thermal expansion of rock-salt cubic AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosik, M.; Todt, M.; Holec, D.; Todt, J.; Zhou, L.; Riedl, H.; Böhm, H. J.; Rammerstorfer, F. G.; Mayrhofer, P. H.

    2015-08-01

    We combine continuum mechanics modeling and wafer curvature experiments to characterize the thermal expansion coefficient of AlN in its metastable cubic rock-salt (B1) structure. The latter was stabilized as nm thin layers by coherency strains in CrN/AlN epitaxial multilayers deposited on Si (100) substrates using reactive magnetron sputtering. The extraction of the B1-AlN thermal expansion coefficient, from experimentally recorded temperature dependent wafer curvature data, is formulated as an inverse problem using continuum mechanics modeling. The results are cross-validated by density functional theory calculations.

  2. Crack Driving Forces in a Multilayered Coating System for Ceramic Matrix Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the top coating thickness, modulus and shrinkage strains on the crack driving forces for a baseline multilayer Yttria-Stabilized-Zirconia/Mullite/Si thermal and environment barrier coating (TEBC) system for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite substrates are determined for gas turbine applications. The crack driving forces increase with increasing modulus, and a low modulus thermal barrier coating material (below 10 GPa) will have no cracking issues under the thermal gradient condition analyzed. Since top coating sintering increases the crack driving forces with time, highly sintering resistant coatings are desirable to maintain a low tensile modulus and maintain a low crack driving force with time. Finite element results demonstrated that an advanced TEBC system, such as ZrO2/HfO2, which possesses improved sintering resistance and high temperature stability, exhibited excellent durability. A multi-vertical cracked structure with fine columnar spacing is an ideal strain tolerant coating capable of reducing the crack driving forces to an acceptable level even with a high modulus of 50 GPa.

  3. Parametric study of Al and Al 2O 3 ceramic coatings deposited by air plasma spray onto polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanhong, Sun; Xiaodong, He; Jiuxing, Jiang; Yue, Sun

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum and ceramic (Al 2O 3) coatings were deposited onto the polymer substrate by air plasma spray (APS) to improve the mechanical properties of the polymer surface. The effect of spray parameters (current and spray distance in this paper) on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated. Shear adhesion strength between the coatings and the substrates was also examined. The results indicate that the deposition parameters have a significant effect on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of as-spayed coatings. The maximum shear adhesion strength of the bond coats was 5.21 MPa with the current of 180 A and 190 mm spray distance.

  4. AlN hollow-nanofilaments by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerges, Tony; Salles, Vincent; Bernard, Samuel; Journet, Catherine; Jaurand, Xavier; Chiriac, Rodica; Ferro, Gabriel; Brioude, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    We present for the first time an original method to elaborate AlN nanofilaments (NFs) by using a preceramic-based electrospinning process. Initially, an Al-containing precursor (poly(ethylimino)alane) is mixed with an organic spinnable polymer to be electrospun and generate polymeric filaments with a homogeneous diameter. A ceramization step at 1000 °C under ammonia and a crystallization step at 1400 °C under nitrogen are performed to get the final product made of AlN NFs with a diameter ranging from 150 to 200 nm. Studies carried out by high resolution electron microscopy and 3D tomography show their regular morphology, with high chemical purity and polycrystalline nature.

  5. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    de MENDONÇA, Luana Menezes; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; LANZA, Marcos Daniel Septímio; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; de CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2014-01-01

    Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin), after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10) according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal) and R (resin)- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5) were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001) and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007). Conclusion The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the cement properties

  6. Study on deposition technique and properties of Pd/Ag alloy film sensor supported on ceramic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Z. T.; He, Q.; Jin, C. G.

    2016-07-01

    Developing high-quality hydrogen sensitive material is the core part of hydrogen sensor, whose performance is determined by the sensitive response, reproducibility and recovery of hydrogen material etc. In order to overcome the defects of hydrogen embrittlement in previous hydrogen sensor which were based on the pure palladium, sliver as the second component added to the palladium was studied. Using photochemical etching technology to produce a bent metal mask, the mask is put on the ceramic substrate. Firstly, the thin film of Ta2O5 as a transition layer grew on the ceramic substrate. Then, a series of Pd/Ag alloy film sensors were prepared, and each performance characterization of Pd/Ag alloy film was studied. Testing results indicated that the thin film had a good linear output performance at 0∼⃒30% hydrogen concentration range, and demonstrates a high responsiveness and good repeatability. With temperature increasing, the strength of the responsive signal of the Pd/Ag alloy film decreases and its responsive time was also shortened.

  7. Influence of hydrogen and hydrogen/methane plasmas on AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pobedinskas, P. Hardy, A.; Van Bael, M. K.; Haenen, K.; Degutis, G.; Dexters, W.

    2014-02-24

    Polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are exposed to hydrogen and hydrogen/methane plasmas at different conditions. The latter plays an indispensable role in the subsequent deposition of nanocrystalline diamond thin films on AlN. The changes of AlN properties are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies as well as atomic force microscopy. The E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup 2} phonon mode frequencies blue-shift after the exposure to plasmas. The damping constant of E{sub 1}(TO) phonon, calculated from FTIR transmission spectra using the factorized model of a damped oscillator, and the width of E{sub 2}{sup 2} peak in Raman spectra decrease with increasing substrate temperature till the decomposition of AlN thin film becomes notable. It is proven that these changes are driven by the plasmas as annealing in vacuum does not induce them.

  8. Orientation of the nanocrystallites in AlN thin film determined by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, K.; Szekeres, A.; Duta, L.; Stan, GE; Mihailescu, N.; Mihailescu, IN

    2016-02-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) films were deposited at 450°C in nitrogen ambient at a pressure of 0.1 Pa and at a laser incident fluence of ∼3 J/cm2 and pulse repetition rate of 40 Hz. Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction patterns evidenced the presence of nanocrystallites in the amorphous AlN matrix. In the FTIR spectra the characteristic Reststrahlen band of AlN crystal with a hexagonal lattice is observed but it is quite broadened (950-550 cm-1). The angular dependence of the reflectance spectra in p-polarised incidence radiation demonstrates the sensitivity of the A1LO phonon mode of the AlN nanocrystallites to their orientation toward the normal to the substrate surface. With decrease of the incidence beam angle the intensity of the A1LO phonon mode diminishes and softening of the resonance frequency occurs.

  9. Influence of hydrogen and hydrogen/methane plasmas on AlN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobedinskas, P.; Degutis, G.; Dexters, W.; Hardy, A.; Van Bael, M. K.; Haenen, K.

    2014-02-01

    Polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are exposed to hydrogen and hydrogen/methane plasmas at different conditions. The latter plays an indispensable role in the subsequent deposition of nanocrystalline diamond thin films on AlN. The changes of AlN properties are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies as well as atomic force microscopy. The E1(TO) and E22 phonon mode frequencies blue-shift after the exposure to plasmas. The damping constant of E1(TO) phonon, calculated from FTIR transmission spectra using the factorized model of a damped oscillator, and the width of E22 peak in Raman spectra decrease with increasing substrate temperature till the decomposition of AlN thin film becomes notable. It is proven that these changes are driven by the plasmas as annealing in vacuum does not induce them.

  10. Super Smooth Modification of Al2O3 Ceramic Substrate by High Temperature Glaze of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jihua; Zhen, Shanxue; Yang, Lijun; Lou, Feizhi; Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Chuanren

    2011-01-01

    The rough surface of ceramic substrate is an obstacle for the scale down of line-width for thin film passive integrated devices (PID). In this paper, a modification method for Al2O3 ceramic substrate with super smooth in surface was proposed. Coating a layer of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CAS) glass was performed to flat the rough surface of alumina substrate by sol-gel method. It was found that addition of 0.06% V2O5 can inhibit the recrystallization of the glaze. The root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the glazed substrates reached a surprising flatness as small as 0.5 nm, and its melting temperature is higher than 1300 °C. This substrate with super flatness and high temperature endurance may be promising for high performance thin film devices.

  11. High-voltage thin-film GaN LEDs fabricated on ceramic substrates: the alleviated droop effect at 670 W/cm(2).

    PubMed

    Tsai, M L; Liao, J H; Yeh, J H; Hsu, T C; Hon, S J; Chung, T Y; Lai, K Y

    2013-11-01

    High-voltage thin-film GaN LEDs with the emission wavelength of 455 nm were fabricated on ceramic substrates (230 W/m · K). The high-voltage operation was achieved by three cascaded sub-LEDs with dielectric passivation and metal bridges conformally deposited on the side walls. Under the driving power of 670 W/cm(2), the high-voltage LEDs exhibit much alleviated efficiency droop and the operative temperature below 80 °C. The excellent performances were attributed to the improved current spreading within each sub-LED and the superior heat sinking of the ceramic substrate.

  12. Comparison of AlN films grown by RF magnetron sputtering and ion-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J.; Fu, T.; Cheung, N.W.; Ross, J.; Newman, N.; Rubin, M.

    1993-04-01

    Crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were formed on various substrates by using RF magnetron sputtering of an A1 target in a nitrogen plasma and also by ion-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (IAMBE). Basal-oriented AlN/(111) Si showed a degradation of crystallinity with increased substrate temperature from 550 to 770 C, while the crystallinity of AlN/(0001) A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples improved from 700 to 850 C. The optical absorption characteristics of the AlN/(0001) A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} films as grown by both deposition methods revealed a decrease in subbandgap absorption with increased substrate temperature.

  13. The characterisation of lead-free thick-film resistors on different low temperature Co-fired ceramics substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hrovat, Marko; Kielbasinski, Konrad; Makarovič, Kostja; Belavič, Darko; Jakubowska, Malgorzata

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Lead free thick film resistors based on ruthenium oxide were developed. ► The compatibility of resistors with different LTCC substrates was evaluated. ► The interactions between resistors and glassy LTCC substrates were not detected. ► Electrical characteristics were comparable with commercial thick film resistors. -- Abstract: Lead-free thick-film resistors were synthesised and investigated. The thick-film resistor materials with nominal sheet resistivities from 50 ohm/sq. to 50 kohm/sq. were prepared using combinations of two lead-free glasses with reflow temperatures at 940 °C and 1240 °C, respectively, and two RuO{sub 2} powders (fine-grained and coarse-grained RuO{sub 2}). The thick-film resistors were printed and fired on alumina and on low temperature co-fired ceramics substrates and fired at 850 °C and 950 °C. The fired resistors were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, by scanning electron microscopy and by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The sheet resistivities, temperature coefficients of resistivity, gauge factors and noise indices were measured.

  14. Structures and stabilities of Aln+, Aln, and Aln- (n=13-34) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Andrés; López, José M.

    2009-02-01

    Putative global minima of neutral (Aln) and singly charged (Aln+ and Aln-) aluminum clusters with n =13-34 have been located from first-principles density functional theory structural optimizations. The calculations include spin polarization and employ the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof to describe exchange-correlation electronic effects. Our results show that icosahedral growth dominates the structures of aluminum clusters for n =13-22. For n =23-34, there is a strong competition between decahedral structures, relaxed fragments of a fcc crystalline lattice (some of them including stacking faults), and hexagonal prismatic structures. For such small cluster sizes, there is no evidence yet for a clear establishment of the fcc atomic packing prevalent in bulk aluminum. The global minimum structure for a given number of atoms depends significantly on the cluster charge for most cluster sizes. An explicit comparison is made with previous theoretical results in the range n =13-30: for n =19, 22, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30 we locate a lower energy structure than previously reported. Sizes n =32, 33 are studied here for the first time by an ab initio technique.

  15. On the use, characterization and performance of silane coupling agents between organic coatings and metallic or ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ooij, W. J.; Zhang, B. C.; Conners, K. D.; Hörnström, S.-E.

    1996-01-01

    Examples are given of the use of organofunctional silane coupling agents for promoting bonding between organic coatings and metallic or ceramic (i.e. oxide) substrates. The orientation of the silane molecules and the type of bonding with the metal oxide can be determined successfully by Time-of-Flight SIMS. Oriented films of aminosilanes are demonstrated to be unstable in air. A prerinse with an inorganic silicate is introduced as a suitable method for masking the ubiquitous carbonaceous contamination at the metal surface, thus promoting the proper orientation and covalent bonding. Some practical applications are described, such as the pretreatment of Galvalume■ surfaces as a replacement of existing chromate treatments in coil coating applications. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is shown to be a powerful tool for studying the performance of the silane treatment under a paint.

  16. Characterization of bulk grown GaN and AlN single crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghothamachar, Balaji; Bai, Jie; Dudley, Michael; Dalmau, Rafael; Zhuang, Dejin; Herro, Ziad; Schlesser, Raoul; Sitar, Zlatko; Wang, Buguo; Callahan, Michael; Rakes, Kelly; Konkapaka, Phanikumar; Spencer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Sublimation method, spontaneously nucleated as well as seeded on SiC substrates, has been employed for growing AlN bulk crystals. For GaN growth, in addition to the sublimation method using sapphire substrates, ammonothermal growth (analogous to the hydrothermal method) on HVPE GaN seeds is also being used. Thick plates/films of AlN and GaN grown by these methods have been characterized by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). Results from a recent set of growth experiments are discussed.

  17. Characterization of Bulk Grown GaN and AlN Single Crystal Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raghothamachar,B.; Bai, J.; Dudley, M.; Dalmau, R.; Zhuang, D.; Herro, Z.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.; Wang, B.; Callahan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimation method, spontaneously nucleated as well as seeded on SiC substrates, has been employed for growing AlN bulk crystals. For GaN growth, in addition to the sublimation method using sapphire substrates, ammonothermal growth (analogous to the hydrothermal method) on HVPE GaN seeds is also being used. Thick plates/films of AlN and GaN grown by these methods have been characterized by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). Results from a recent set of growth experiments are discussed.

  18. Sublimation growth of AlN bulk crystals in Ta crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, E. N.; Avdeev, O. V.; Barash, I. S.; Chemekova, T. Yu.; Roenkov, A. D.; Segal, A. S.; Wolfson, A. A.; Makarov, Yu. N.; Ramm, M. G.; Helava, H.

    2005-07-01

    AlN single crystals of 0.5 in diameter and up to 10-12 mm long have been grown by sublimation/recondensation in pre-treated tantalum crucibles. Growth of 45 mm diameter and 4 mm long polycrystalline AlN boules has also been demonstrated. After high-temperature pre-treatment in a carbon-containing atmosphere, the tantalum crucibles can be used for 300-400 h of AlN sublimation growth at 2200-2300 °C, without Ta impurities or additional C impurities in concentrations higher than 100 ppm appearing in the crystals. Both self-seeded growth of polycrystalline AlN on the crucible lid and seeded growth of single-crystal AlN on (0 0 0 1) SiC plates and AlN/SiC templates are demonstrated. X-ray diffractometry and topography of the grown crystals show a block structure with the characteristic block size >200 nm and the scatter of FWHMs of ω-scans in the range of 60-750 arcsec. Test slicing and polishing of the crystals and test MBE growth of AlGaN/AlN structures on the obtained AlN substrates have been successfully performed.

  19. Graphene-assisted growth of high-quality AlN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qing; Chen, Zhaolong; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Tongbo; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Yun; Yuan, Guodong; Li, Jinmin

    2016-08-01

    High-quality AlN films were directly grown on graphene/sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The graphene layers were directly grown on sapphire by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD), a low-cost catalyst-free method. We analyzed the influence of the graphene layer on the nucleation of AlN at the initial stage of growth and found that sparse AlN grains on graphene grew and formed a continuous film via lateral coalescence. Graphene-assisted AlN films are smooth and continuous, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) values for (0002) and (10\\bar{1}2) reflections are 360 and 622.2 arcsec, which are lower than that of the film directly grown on sapphire. The high-resolution TEM images near the AlN/sapphire interface for graphene-assisted AlN films clearly show the presence of graphene, which kept its original morphology after the 1200 °C growth of AlN.

  20. Epitaxial Ba-Y-Cu-O ceramic superconducting film on perovskite structure substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, B.H.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a superconducting structure. It comprises a crystal substrate having a superconducting film epitaxially deposited thereon, wherein the substrate is a crystal selected from the group consisting of LaAlO{sub 3}, LaGaO{sub 3}, PrGaO{sub 3} and NdGaO{sub 3}, and wherein the superconducting film is a Ba- Y- Cu- O superconductor.

  1. Deposition and thermal characterization of nano-structured aluminum nitride thin film on Cu-W substrate for high power light emitting diode package.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Min; Kim, Min-Sun

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed AlN thick film on metal substrate for hybrid type LED package such as chip on board (COB) using metal printed circuit board (PCB). Conventional metal PCB uses ceramic-polymer composite as electrical insulating layer. Thermal conductivities of such type dielectric film are typically in the range of 1~4 W/m · K depending on the ceramic filler. Also, Al or Cu alloy are mainly used for metal base for high thermal conduction to dissipate heat from thermal source mounted on metal PCB. Here we used Cu-W alloy with low thermal expansion coefficient as metal substrate to reduce thermal stress between insulating layer and base metal. AlN with polyimide (PI) powder were used as starting materials for deposition. We could obtain very high thermal conductivity of 28.3 W/m · K from deposited AlN-PI thin film by AlN-3 wt% PI powder. We made hybrid type high power LED package using AlN-PI thin film. We tested thermal performance of this film by thermal transient measurement and compared with conventional metal PCB substrate. PMID:25936009

  2. Deposition and thermal characterization of nano-structured aluminum nitride thin film on Cu-W substrate for high power light emitting diode package.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Min; Kim, Min-Sun

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed AlN thick film on metal substrate for hybrid type LED package such as chip on board (COB) using metal printed circuit board (PCB). Conventional metal PCB uses ceramic-polymer composite as electrical insulating layer. Thermal conductivities of such type dielectric film are typically in the range of 1~4 W/m · K depending on the ceramic filler. Also, Al or Cu alloy are mainly used for metal base for high thermal conduction to dissipate heat from thermal source mounted on metal PCB. Here we used Cu-W alloy with low thermal expansion coefficient as metal substrate to reduce thermal stress between insulating layer and base metal. AlN with polyimide (PI) powder were used as starting materials for deposition. We could obtain very high thermal conductivity of 28.3 W/m · K from deposited AlN-PI thin film by AlN-3 wt% PI powder. We made hybrid type high power LED package using AlN-PI thin film. We tested thermal performance of this film by thermal transient measurement and compared with conventional metal PCB substrate.

  3. Tunable p-type conductivity and transport properties of AlN nanowires via Mg doping.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong-Bing; Bo, Xiang-Hui; Xu, Jun; Cao, Yu-Lin; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Song, Hai-Sheng; Liu, Chao-Ping; Hung, Tak-Fu; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Bello, Igor; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2011-05-24

    Arrays of well-aligned AlN nanowires (NWs) with tunable p-type conductivity were synthesized on Si(111) substrates using bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (Cp(2)Mg) vapor as a doping source by chemical vapor deposition. The Mg-doped AlN NWs are single-crystalline and grow along the [001] direction. Gate-voltage-dependent transport measurements on field-effect transistors constructed from individual NWs revealed the transition from n-type conductivity in the undoped AlN NWs to p-type conductivity in the Mg-doped NWs. By adjusting the doping gas flow rate (0-10 sccm), the conductivity of AlN NWs can be tuned over 7 orders of magnitude from (3.8-8.5) × 10(-6) Ω(-1) cm(-1) for the undoped sample to 15.6-24.4 Ω(-1) cm(-1) for the Mg-doped AlN NWs. Hole concentration as high as 4.7 × 10(19) cm(-3) was achieved for the heaviest doping. In addition, the maximum hole mobility (∼6.4 cm(2)/V s) in p-type AlN NWs is much higher than that of Mg-doped AlN films (∼1.0 cm(2)/V s). (2) The realization of p-type AlN NWs with tunable electrical transport properties may open great potential in developing practical nanodevices such as deep-UV light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. PMID:21480640

  4. Highly piezoelectric co-doped AlN thin films for wideband FBAR applications.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Tsuyoshi; Iwazaki, Yoshiki; Onda, Yosuke; Nishihara, Tokihiro; Sasajima, Yuichi; Ueda, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    We report piezoelectric materials composed of charge-compensated co-doped (Mg, β)(x)Al(1-x)N (β = Zr or Hf) thin films. The effect of the dopant element into AlN on the crystal structure, and piezoelectric properties of co-doped AlN was determined on the basis of a first-principles calculation, and the theoretical piezoelectric properties were confirmed by experimentally depositing thin films of magnesium (Mg) and zirconium (Zr) co-doped AlN (Mg-Zr-doped AlN). The Mg-Zrdoped AlN thin films were prepared on Si (100) substrates by using a triple-radio-frequency magnetron reactive co-sputtering system. The crystal structures and piezoelectric coefficients (d33) were investigated as a function of the concentrations, which were measured by X-ray diffraction and a piezometer. The results show that the d33 of Mg-Zr-doped AlN at total Mg and Zr concentrations (both expressed as β) of 0.35 was 280% larger than that of pure AlN. The experimentally measured parameter of the crystal structure and d33 of Mg-Zr-doped AlN (plotted as functions of total Mg and Zr concentrations) were in very close agreement with the corresponding values obtained by the first-principle calculations. Thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (FBAR) employing (Mg,Zr)0.13Al0.87N and (Mg, Hf)0.13 Al0.87N as a piezoelectric thin film were fabricated, and their resonant characteristics were evaluated. The measured electromechanical coupling coefficient increased from 7.1% for pure AlN to 8.5% for Mg-Zr-doped AlN and 10.0% for Mg- Hf-doped AlN. These results indicate that co-doped (Mg, β)(x)Al(1-x)N (β = Zr or Hf) films have potential as piezoelectric thin films for wideband RF applications.

  5. Nanoindentation of a hard ceramic coating formed on a soft substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmeneva, M. A.; Surmenev, R. A.; Tyurin, A. I.; Pirozhkova, T. S.; Shuvarin, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    The hardness and Young's modulus of the thin hydroxyapatite-based coatings deposited by RF magnetron sputtering onto magnesium alloy, titanium, and steel substrates are studied. As the penetration depth increases, the hardness and Young's modulus of these coatings are found to tend toward the values that are characteristic of the substrates. It is shown that the difference between the values of hardness and Young's modulus at small penetration depths ( h < 80-100 nm) can be caused by the difference between the physicomechanical properties inside the coatings and that this difference at large penetration depths ( h > 100 nm) can be induced by an additional effect of the strength properties of the substrate material.

  6. High-quality AlN layers grown by hot-wall MOCVD at reduced temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Nilsson, D.; Janzén, E.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a growth of AlN at reduced temperatures of 1100 °C and 1200 °C in a horizontal-tube hot-wall metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor configured for operation at temperatures of up to 1500-1600 °C and using a joint delivery of precursors. We present a simple route—as viewed in the context of the elaborate multilayer growth approaches with pulsed ammonia supply—for the AlN growth process on SiC substrates at the reduced temperature of 1200 °C. The established growth conditions in conjunction with the particular in-situ intervening SiC substrate treatment are considered pertinent to the accomplishment of crystalline, relatively thin, ˜700 nm, single AlN layers of high-quality. The feedback is obtained from surface morphology, cathodoluminescence and secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization.

  7. LPE growth of AlN from Cu-Al-Ti solution under nitrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, K.; Inoue, S.; Shirai, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Okada, N.; Yauchi, A.

    2006-05-01

    Synthesis of single crystalline AlN has long been the subjects of intensive studies since it has exceptional properties suitable for the substrate materials for optoelectronic and electronic devices. The solution growth technique has some advantages over the sublimation growth technique. Its growth temperature is generally much lower than that of the sublimation growth. The obtained crystal is believed to show superior crystallinity since it is grown under nearly equilibrium condition. In the present study we have developed a new solution growth technique using Cu and Ti as solvents under atmospheric pressure of nitrogen. By using this solution, we have grown AlN single crystalline layer on 6H-SiC substrate at relatively low growth temperatures such as 1600-1800 °C. The thickness of the grown layer was larger than 30 μm. TEM observation revealed the fairly low dislocation density such as 105/cm2 in the obtained AlN layers.

  8. Nucleation and growth of (10͞11) semi-polar AlN on (0001) AlN by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Zhang, Jicai; Su, Xujun; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2016-05-01

    Wurtzite AlN is widely used for deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices (DUV), which are generally grown along the [0001]-direction of the wurtzite structure on currently available substrates. However, huge internal electrostatic fields are presented within the material along [0001] axis induced by piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization, which has limited the internal quantum efficiency of AlN based DUV LEDs dramatically. The internal fields can be strongly reduced by changing the epitaxial growth direction from the conventional polar c-direction into less polar crystal directions. Twinned crystal is a crystal consisting of two or more domains with the same crystal lattice and composition but different crystal orientations. In other words, twins can be induced to change crystal directions. In this work we demonstrated that the epitaxial growth of () semi-polar AlN on (0001) AlN by constructing () and () twin structures. This new method is relative feasible than conventional methods and it has huge prospect to develop high-quality semi-polar AlN.

  9. Nucleation and growth of (10¯11) semi-polar AlN on (0001) AlN by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Zhang, Jicai; Su, Xujun; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Wurtzite AlN is widely used for deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices (DUV), which are generally grown along the [0001]-direction of the wurtzite structure on currently available substrates. However, huge internal electrostatic fields are presented within the material along [0001] axis induced by piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization, which has limited the internal quantum efficiency of AlN based DUV LEDs dramatically. The internal fields can be strongly reduced by changing the epitaxial growth direction from the conventional polar c-direction into less polar crystal directions. Twinned crystal is a crystal consisting of two or more domains with the same crystal lattice and composition but different crystal orientations. In other words, twins can be induced to change crystal directions. In this work we demonstrated that the epitaxial growth of () semi-polar AlN on (0001) AlN by constructing () and () twin structures. This new method is relative feasible than conventional methods and it has huge prospect to develop high-quality semi-polar AlN. PMID:27185345

  10. Nucleation and growth of (10͞11) semi-polar AlN on (0001) AlN by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Zhang, Jicai; Su, Xujun; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Wurtzite AlN is widely used for deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices (DUV), which are generally grown along the [0001]-direction of the wurtzite structure on currently available substrates. However, huge internal electrostatic fields are presented within the material along [0001] axis induced by piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization, which has limited the internal quantum efficiency of AlN based DUV LEDs dramatically. The internal fields can be strongly reduced by changing the epitaxial growth direction from the conventional polar c-direction into less polar crystal directions. Twinned crystal is a crystal consisting of two or more domains with the same crystal lattice and composition but different crystal orientations. In other words, twins can be induced to change crystal directions. In this work we demonstrated that the epitaxial growth of () semi-polar AlN on (0001) AlN by constructing () and () twin structures. This new method is relative feasible than conventional methods and it has huge prospect to develop high-quality semi-polar AlN. PMID:27185345

  11. Effect of YSZ thin film coating thickness on the strength of a ceramic substrate.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica C; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Stoner, Brian R; Thompson, Jeffrey Y

    2007-11-01

    Although ceramics are used for many different biomedical applications they are brittle materials that can be compromised by surface defects when under stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin film coating on the strength of a machinable dental ceramic. Fifty bars (2 mm x 2 mm x 15 mm) were cut from ProCAD (Ivoclar-Vivadent) blocks. Specimens were wet-polished through 1200-grit SiC abrasive. One surface of each bar was sandblasted with 50 microm Al(2)O(3) abrasive (0.34 MPa). Specimens were further modified through the deposition of a sputtered YSZ thin film on the sandblasted surface. Different thin film thicknesses were evaluated: 1, 3, 5, and 7 microm. Depositions were performed using a radio frequency magnetron sputter system (working pressure of 15 mT, 150 degrees C, 30:1 Ar/O(2) gas ratio). Flexural strength measurements were carried out by three-point bending (span = 10 mm) in a servo-electric material testing system in DI water (37 degrees C). The results showed that the strength of porcelain significantly increased with the deposition of a 3-microm YSZ thick coating. A nonlinear relationship was observed between film thickness and strength. Strengthening of porcelain is shown through the application of a sputtered YSZ thin film. It is presumed that the strengthening mechanism is due to modification of surface flaws and/or surface residual stress by the applied thin film.

  12. Structure Evolution and Electric Properties of TaN Films Deposited on Al2O3-BASED Ceramic and Glass Substrates by Magnetron Reactive Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan Ming; Ma, Yang Zhao; Xie, Zhong; He, Ming Zhi

    2014-03-01

    Structure evolution and electric properties of tantalum nitride (TaN) films deposited on Al2O3-based ceramic and glass substrates by magnetron reactive sputtering were carried out as a function of the N2-to-Ar flow ratio. The TaN thin films on Al2O3-based ceramic substrates grow with micronclusters composed of numerous nanocrystallites, contains from single-phase of Ta2N grains to TaN, and exhibits high defect density, sheet resistance and negative TCR as the N2-to-Ar flow ratio continuously increases. However, the films on the glass substrates grow in the way of sandwich close-stack, contains from single-phase of Ta2N grains to TaN and Ta3N5 phases with the increase of N2-to-Ar flow ratio. These results indicate that the N2-to-Ar flow ratio and surface characteristic difference of substrates play a dominant effect on the structure and composition of the TaN films, resulting in different electrical properties for the films on Al2O3-based ceramic and the samples on glass substrates.

  13. Evaluation of AlN single-crystal grown by sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyanaga, Michimasa; Mizuhara, Naho; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Shimazu, Mitsuru; Nakahata, Hideaki; Kawase, Tomohiro

    2007-03-01

    AlN single crystals with thicknesses from 3 μm to 4 mm were grown on SiC substrates by the sublimation method. Evaluations of crystalline quality were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and etch pit density (EPD) measurement. The FWHM of the XRD rocking curve for AlN (1 0 1¯ 0) reflection was as small as 26 arcsec for the sample of 4 mm thickness, and the dislocation density was estimated to be less than 10 6 cm -2 by EPD measurement in spite of the large lattice mismatch of 1% between AlN and SiC. TEM observation was conducted to investigate the mechanism of the improvement of the crystalline quality. We observed the significant reduction of dislocations above the interface, allowing growth of 3 μm-4 mm thick AlN with high crystalline quality. These results show that the commercial production of large-sized, high-quality substrates of AlN single crystal is possible using the sublimation technique.

  14. Epitaxial growth of 2 inch diameter homogeneous AlN single-crystalline films by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Wang, Wenliang; Liu, Zuolian; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-03-01

    2 inch diameter homogeneous AlN films are epitaxially grown on sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). By optimizing laser rastering and PLD growth conditions, the 2 inch diameter single-crystalline AlN films exhibit excellent thickness uniformity with root-mean-square (RMS) inhomogeneity less than 4.5% and very smooth surface with RMS roughness less than 1.53 nm. There is a maximum of 1.5 nm thick interfacial layer, if there is any, existing between the as-grown AlN and the pre-nitrided sapphire substrate, and the as-grown AlN films are almost fully relaxed only with a 0.26% in-plane compressive strain. The achievement of high-quality large-scale AlN films with uniform thickness and atomically abrupt interface is of great interest for the commercial development of AlN-based devices, particularly acoustic filters where abrupt heterointerfaces with substrates and flat surfaces for AlN films are highly desired.

  15. Effect of thermal cycling on stress in metallic films on ceramic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen maser is the most stable frequency standard currently available for averaging intervals of hours to weeks. A major contributor to maser frequency variations is the maser's microwave resonant cavity: by means of the cavity pulling effect, a change in the cavity's resonance frequency produces a proportional change in the maser's output frequency. To minimize variations in the cavity's dimensions, and thus in its resonance frequency, maser cavities are often constructed of a low-expansivity glass-ceramic material coated on its surface with a conductive metallic film. It was previously shown that silver films like those used in SAO maser cavities develop tensile stress when cooled to room temperature after being fired onto the cavity, and that the stress in such films relaxes with time at a rate proportional to the level of stress. Stress relaxation in maser cavity coatings can alter the shape, and hence the resonance frequency, of the cavity, resulting in a slow variation in the maser's output frequency. The possibility was investigated of reversing the initial tensile stress by precooling the coated cavity material. It was hypothesized that cooling the material well below its normal working temperature and then warming it to its normal temperature would result in a lower tensile stress or even a compressive stress. Under such a condition stress relaxation, and thus any consequent frequency drifts, might be reduced or reversed.

  16. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward.

  17. MOCVD of ceramic and metallic films on porous substrates for dense membrane applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Changfeng

    Fabrication of thin, dense films on porous substrates is of interest for gas separation membranes, membrane reactor, gas sensors and solid oxide fuel cells. In this study, Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) was used to deposit CeOsb2-doped Ysb2Osb3-stabilized ZrOsb2, perovskite SrCosb1-xFesbxOsb{3-delta} and copper films on porous substrates for the purposes of fabricating dense inorganic membranes and studying membrane fabrication process. Aerosol-assisted precursor delivery was employed to overcome the drawbacks of conventional precursor delivery and to provide better control in film composition of multicomponent membrane materials. Thin membrane films of CeOsb2-doped Ysb2Osb3-stabilized ZrOsb2 were grown under atmospheric and reduced pressures from the toluene solutions of the precursors of Zr, Y and Ce 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate (tmhd). The effects of system pressure on film morphology, structure and gas-tightness were investigated. The film composition was controlled by selecting the right ratios of precursors in the solutions. Thin membrane films of perovskite SrCosb1-xFesbxOsb{3-delta} were grown under atmospheric pressure and reduced pressure from Sr, Co and Fe tmhd precursors. The relationship between film composition and the composition of precursor solution was developed. The effects of deposition pressure on film morphology, structure and gas-tightness were also studied. The influence of phase purity of SrCosb1-xFesbxOsb{3-delta} films by the system total pressure was also studied. Copper films were deposited on porous substrates for the purpose of investigating the membrane fabrication process using Cu as a model material. The film morphology, microstructure, gas-tightness and other physical properties were characterized in a systematic manner. The copper deposition rates were investigated at different precursor concentrations and the deposition temperatures by using Aerosol-Assisted CVD (AACVD) of toluenen solutions of Cu(hfac)sb2 (hfac

  18. InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well and LED growth on wafer-bonded sapphire-on-polycrystalline AlN substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Olson, S. M.; Banas, M.; Park, Y. -B.; Ladous, C.; Russell, Michael J.; Thaler, Gerald; Zahler, J. M.; Pinnington, T.; Koleske, Daniel David; Atwater, Harry A.

    2008-06-01

    We report growth of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) and LED structures on a novel composite substrate designed to eliminate the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch problems which impact GaN growth on bulk sapphire. To form the composite substrate, a thin sapphire layer is wafer-bonded to a polycrystalline aluminum nitride (P-AlN) support substrate. The sapphire layer provides the epitaxial template for the growth; however, the thermo-mechanical properties of the composite substrate are determined by the P-AlN. Using these substrates, thermal stresses associated with temperature changes during growth should be reduced an order of magnitude compared to films grown on bulk sapphire, based on published CTE data. In order to test the suitability of the substrates for GaN LED growth, test structures were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using standard process conditions for GaN growth on sapphire. Bulk sapphire substrates were included as control samples in all growth runs. In situ reflectance monitoring was used to compare the growth dynamics for the different substrates. The material quality of the films as judged by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was similar for the composite substrate and the sapphire control samples. Electroluminescence was obtained from the LED structure grown on a P-AlN composite substrate, with a similar peak wavelength and peak width to the control samples. XRD and Raman spectroscopy results confirm that the residual strain in GaN films grown on the composite substrates is dramatically reduced compared to growth on bulk sapphire substrates.

  19. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy of AlN using a high temperature hot-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Troy; Mayo, Ashley; Veisi, Zeinab; Lu, Peng; Schmitt, Jason

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) was grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The experiments utilized a two zone inductively heated hot-wall reactor. The surface morphology, crystal quality, and growth rate were investigated as a function of growth temperature in the range of 1450-1575 °C. AlN templates grown to a thickness of 1 μm were optimized with double axis X-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve full width half maximums (FWHMs) of 135″ for the (002) and 513″ for the (102).

  20. Tribological properties of Ag/Ti films on Al2O3 ceramic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1991-01-01

    Ag solid lubricant films, with a thin Ti interlayer for enhanced adhesion, were sputter deposited on Al2O3 substrate disks to reduce friction and wear. The dual Ag/Ti films were tested at room temperature in a pin-on-disk tribometer sliding against bare, uncoated Al2O3 pins under a 4.9 N load at a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The Ag/Ti films reduced the friction coefficient by 50 percent to about 0.41 compared to unlubricated baseline specimens. Pin wear was reduced by a factor of 140 and disk wear was reduced by a factor of 2.5 compared to the baseline. These films retain their good tribological properties including adhesion after heat treatments at 850 C and thus may be able to lubricate over a wide temperature range. This lubrication technique is applicable to space lubrication, advanced heat engines, and advanced transportation systems.

  1. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  2. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  3. Atomic scattering spectroscopy for determination of the polarity of semipolar AlN grown on ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Ueno, Kohei; Oshima, Masaharu; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2013-11-04

    Determination of the polarity of insulating semipolar AlN layers was achieved via atomic scattering spectroscopy. The back scattering of neutralized He atoms on AlN surfaces revealed the atomic alignment of the topmost layers of semipolar AlN and the ZnO substrate. Pole figures of the scattering intensity were used to readily determine the polarity of these wurtzite-type semipolar materials. In addition, we found that +R-plane AlN epitaxially grows on −R-plane ZnO, indicating that the polarity flips at the semipolar AlN/ZnO interface. This polarity flipping is possibly explained by the appearance of −c and m-faces on the −R ZnO surfaces, which was also revealed by atomic scattering spectroscopy.

  4. AlN thin films grown on epitaxial 3C-SiC (100) for piezoelectric resonant devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Senesky, Debbie G.; Pisano, Albert P.; Lien, Wei-Cheng; Felmetsger, Valery V.; Hopcroft, Matthew A.

    2010-10-04

    Highly c-axis oriented heteroepitaxial aluminum nitride (AlN) films were grown on epitaxial cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) layers on Si (100) substrates using alternating current reactive magnetron sputtering at temperatures between approximately 300-450 deg. C. The AlN films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. A two-port surface acoustic wave device was fabricated on the AlN/3C-SiC/Si composite structure, and an expected Rayleigh mode exhibited a high acoustic velocity of 5200 m/s. The results demonstrate the potential of utilizing AlN films on epitaxial 3C-SiC layers to create piezoelectric resonant devices.

  5. Method for improving the toughness of silicon carbide-based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Tein, T.Y.; Hilmas, G.E.

    1996-12-03

    Method of improving the toughness of SiC-based ceramics is disclosed. SiC, , AlN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and optionally {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are hot pressed to form a material which includes AlN polytypoids within its structure. 1 fig.

  6. Method for improving the toughness of silicon carbide-based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Tein, Tseng-Ying; Hilmas, Gregory E.

    1996-01-01

    Method of improving the toughness of SiC-based ceramics. SiC, , AlN, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and optionally .alpha.-Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are hot pressed to form a material which includes AlN polytypoids within its structure.

  7. Effect of AC target power on AlN film quality

    SciTech Connect

    Knisely, Katherine Grosh, Karl

    2014-09-01

    The influence of alternating current (AC) target power on film stress, roughness, and x-ray diffraction rocking curve full width half maximum (FWHM) was examined for AlN films deposited using S-gun magnetron sputtering on insulative substrates consisting of Si wafers with 575 nm thermal oxide. As the AC target power was increased from 5 to 8 kW, the deposition rate increased from 9.3 to 15.9 A/s, film stress decreased from 81 to −170 MPa, and the rocking curve FWHM increased from 0.98 to 1.03°. AlN film behavior is observed to change with target life; films deposited at 200 kWh target life were approximately 40 MPa more compressive and had 0.02° degree higher rocking curve FWHM values than films deposited at 130 kWh. AlN films deposited in two depositions were compared with films deposited in a single deposition, in order to better characterize the growth behavior and properties of AlN films deposited on an existing AlN film, which is not well understood. Two deposition films, when compared with single deposition films, showed no variation in residual stress trends or grain size behavior, but the average film roughness increased from 0.7 to 1.4 nm and rocking curve FWHM values increased by more than 0.25°.

  8. Influence of AlN thickness on AlGaN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasakthi, M.; Juillaguet, S.; Peyre, H.; Konczewicz, L.; Baskar, K.; Contreras, S.

    2016-10-01

    AlGaN/AlN layers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. The AlN buffer thickness was varied from 400 nm to 800 nm. The AlGaN layer thickness was 1000 nm. The crystalline quality, thickness and composition of AlGaN were determined using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The threading dislocation density (TDD) was found to decrease with increase of AlN layer thickness. Reciprocal space mapping (RSM) was used to estimate the strain and relaxation between AlGaN and AlN. The optical properties of AlGaN layers were investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL). PL intensities of AlGaN layers increases with increasing the AlN thickness. The surface morphology of AlGaN was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were found to be decreased while increase of AlN thickness.

  9. Thermal annealing effects on ultra-violet luminescence properties of Gd doped AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Takashi; Ishizu, Yuta; Tsuji, Kazuma; Harada, Yukihiro; Chigi, Yoshitaka; Nishimoto, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Mikihiro; Ishihara, Tsuguo; Izumi, Hirokazu

    2015-04-28

    We studied energy transfer from AlN to doped Gd{sup 3+} ions as a function of the post-thermal annealing temperature. Gd-doped AlN thin films were deposited on fused-silica substrates using a reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The film is a c-axis oriented polycrystal. The intra-orbital electron transition in Gd{sup 3+} showed an atomically sharp luminescence at 3.9 eV (318 nm). The photoluminescence (PL) excitation spectrum exhibited a resonant peak, indicating efficient energy transfer from the host AlN crystal to Gd{sup 3+} ions. The PL intensity increases approximately ten times by thermal annealing. The PL decay lifetime becomes long with annealing, and mid-gap luminescence relating to the crystal defects in AlN was also found to be reduced by annealing. These results suggest that energy dissipation of excited carriers in AlN was suppressed by annealing, and the efficiency of energy transfer into Gd{sup 3+} was improved.

  10. Development of Energy-Efficient Cryogenic Leads with High Temperature Superconducting Films on Ceramic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. V.; Fedoseev, S. A.; Shcherbakova, O. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Zhou, S.; Dou, S. X.; Webber, R. J.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Yamashita, T.; Taylor, R.

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) material can be used for the implementation of high-speed low-heat conduction data links to transport digital data from 4 K superconductor integrated circuits to higher-temperature parts of computing systems. In this work, we present a conceptual design of energy efficient interface and results in fabricating such HTS leads. Initial calculations have shown that the microstrip line cable geometry for typical materials employed in production of HTS thin films can be a two-layered film for which the two layers of about 10 cm long are separated by an insulation layer with as low permittivity as possible. With this architecture in mind, the pulsed laser deposition process has been designed in a 45 cm diameter vacuum chamber to incorporate an oscillating sample holder with homogeneous substrate heating up to 900°C, while the laser plume is fixed. This design has allowed us to produce 200 nm to 500 nm thick, 7 cm to 10 cm long YBa2Cu3O7 thin films with the homogeneous critical temperature (Tc) of about 90 K. The critical current density (Jc) of the short samples obtained from the long sample is of (2 ± 1) × 1010 A/m2. Lines of 3-100 μm wide have been successfully patterned along the length of the samples in order to directly measure the Tc and Jc values over the entire length of the samples, as well as to attempt the structuring of multichannel data lead prototype.

  11. Supported growth of polycrystalline silicon sheet on low-cost ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrate. Quarterly report No. 1, September 26-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.W.; Heaps, J.D.; Schuldt, S.B.; Zook, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    The overall objective of this program is to identify and develop high-throughput, supported-growth methods for producing low-cost, large-area polycrystalline silicon sheet on ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrates. The first method being investigated is the SCIM coating technique. (SCIM is an acronym for Silicon Coating by Inverted Meniscus.) With this technique, a low-cost ceramic substrate is silicon-coated in a continuous manner by passing the substrate over a molten silicon meniscus which is contained in a narrow fused-silica trough. During this reporting period, several mullite substrates were silicon-coated with this method. The best coatings were approximately 100 ..mu..m thick with large columnar grains up to 0.5 cm wide and several cm long. Structural characterization of these coatings shows that these large grains are heavily twinned with boundaries perpendicular to the surface of the layer. Minority-carrier diffusion length measurements made on photodiodes fabricated from these coatings indicate diffusion lengths of about 25 ..mu..m. The short-circuit current densities of the diodes were about 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, with open-circuit voltages of approximately 0.49 V. With the substrates positioned horizontally as they pass over the meniscus trough, instability usually occurs, causing a buildup of molten silicon immediately downstream from the trough. This solicon eventually spills over onto key parts of the coater. By tilting the substrate at angles of 10, 15, and 20/sup 0/, stability can be achieved. A theoretical study of meniscus shapes conducted during this reporting period suggests that with an appropriate trough design and the right pressure and substrate height, a SCIM-coating with horizontal substrates should also be possible.

  12. Impact of high-temperature annealing of AlN layer on sapphire and its thermodynamic principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Hideto; Nishio, Gou; Suzuki, Shuhei; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    The N2-CO gas annealing technique was demonstrated to improve the crystalline quality of the AlN layer on sapphire. 300-nm-thick AlN layers were fabricated on sapphire substrates by a metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy method. The AlN layers were annealed in N2 and/or N2-CO gas atmosphere at 1923-1973 K for 0.5-4 h. Many pits and voids were observed on the AlN surface annealed in N2 atmosphere at 1973 K for 2 h. The rough surface was, however, much improved for the AlN annealed in N2-CO gas atmosphere. The thermodynamic principle of the N2-CO gas annealing technique is explained in this paper on the basis of the phase stability diagram of the Al2O3-AlN-C-N2-CO system. Voids and γ-aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) at the AlN/sapphire interface formed during the annealing, which is also explained on the basis of the phase stability diagram. The in-plane epitaxial relationships among AlN, γ-AlON, and sapphire are presented, and misfits among them are discussed.

  13. Low Cost Glass and Glass-Ceramic Substrates for Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 25 January 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ast, D.; Nemchuk, N.; Krasula, S.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes how Cornell University researchers developed several low-cost and simple barrier layers and tested their effectiveness both analytically (by SIMS) and by evaluating the electrical characteristics of devices fabricated on barrier-coated substrates. Devices fabricated included both majority-carrier devices (thin-film transistors) and minority-carrier devices (p-i-n junction diodes simulating solar cells) using various deposition techniques including the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon from silane at low pressures (at Cornell University) and from dichlorosilane at atmospheric pressure (cooperation with Neudeck at Purdue University). The structure of the films deposited was investigated by using TEM and X-ray analysis. The performance of the minority- and majority-carrier devices fabricated on barrier-coated glass ceramic substrates was found to be identical to devices fabricated on control substrates of oxidized silicon and fused silica.

  14. Microstructure of GaN epitaxy on SiC using AlN buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, F.A.; Krusor, B.S.; Major, J.S. Jr.; Plano, W.E.; Welch, D.F.

    1995-07-17

    The crystalline structure of GaN epilayers on (0001) SiC substrates has been studied using x-ray diffraction and transmission microscopy. The films were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, using AlN buffer layers. X-ray diffraction measurements show negligible strain in the epilayer, and a long-range variation in orientation. Transmission electron lattice images show that the AlN buffer layer consists of small crystallites. The nature of the buffer layer and its interfaces with the substrate and the GaN film is discussed. The defect structure of the GaN film away from the substrate consists mostly of threading dislocations with a density of {similar_to}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Characterization and Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Grown on AlN Thin Film

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, Ramin; Kamaluddin, Burhanuddin; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Hajakbari, Fatemeh

    2009-07-07

    In this paper, we report ZnO nanowires grown on AlN thin film deposited on glass as substrate by physical vapour deposition. The temperature of substrates was kept between 600 deg. C and 500 deg. C during the growth. The typical average diameters of the obtained nanowires on substrate at 600 deg. C and 500 deg. C was about 57 nm and 22 nm, respectively with several micrometers in lengths. X-ray diffraction and Auger spectroscopy results showed Al diffused from AlN thin film into ZnO nanowires for sample at high temperature zone. In the photoluminescence spectra two emission bands appeared, one related to ultraviolet emission with a strong peak at 380-382 nm, and another related to deep level emission with a weak peak at 510 nm.

  16. Interface magnetoelectric effect in the layered heterostructures with Co layers on the polished and ion-beam planarized ceramic PZT substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stognij, Alexandre I.; Novitskii, Nickolaj; Poddubnaya, Natalia; Sharko, Sergei; Ketsko, Valerij; Mikhailov, Vladimir; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Szymczak, Henryk

    2015-01-01

    The low-frequency room temperature interface magnetoelectric (ME) effect was observed in the layered heterostructures comprising the ferromagnetic (FM) Co layers and ferroelectric (FE) ceramic substrates on the base of lead zirconate titanate PbZr0.45Ti0.55O3 (PZT). The Co films 1-12 μm in thickness were deposited by ion-beam sputtering/deposition technics onto the 400 μm PZT substrates. Results of X-ray, magnetic and ME experiments have shown the existence of ME effect in Co/PZT/Co and (Co/PZT/Co)3 heterostructures obtained by the above mentioned techniques being independent on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interface roughness. The values of ME voltage coefficient in heterostructures with ion-beam planarized PZT surfaces are much higher than that in heterostructures with mechanochemically polished ceramic substrate surfaces. The heterostructures possess ME effect of the same order as those obtained by means of the mechanical bonding of FM and FE sheets with organic binders and have the typical ME hysteresis curves. The structures obtained are perspective for application as energy-independent elements in magnetic field sensors and magnetic memory.

  17. Excimer laser modification of thin AlN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, D. G.; Rosenberger, L. W.; Danylyuk, Y. V.; Baird, R. J.; Newaz, G.; Shreve, G.; Auner, G.

    2005-08-01

    The potential of excimer laser micro-processing for surface modification of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films was studied. Thin films of AlN were deposited by plasma-source molecular beam epitaxy (PSMBE) on silicon and sapphire substrates. These films were then exposed to different fluence levels of KrF ( λ = 248 nm) excimer laser radiation in an ambient air environment, and the changes in the film surface were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical spectrophotometry. The results show that there is a narrow range of laser fluences, just above 1.0 J/cm 2, within which mostly photochemical transformations of the film surface take place. These transformations consist of both oxidation and decomposition to metallic Al of the original film within a very thin sub-surface layer with thickness of several tens of nanometers. No changes were observed at fluences below 1.0 J/cm 2. Above a fluence of 1.0 J/cm 2, severe photomechanical damage consisting of film cracking and detachment was found to accompany the photochemical and photothermal changes in the film.

  18. Method for preparing thin-walled ceramic articles of configuration

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Powell, G.L.

    1975-11-01

    A method for preparing a hollow thin-walled ceramic product is described. Ceramic powder is plasma-sprayed onto a concave surface of a substrate having a coefficient of thermal expansion less than that of the ceramic. The coated substrate is heated to sinter the ceramic and then cooled to effect a separation of the ceramic product from the substrate. (auth)

  19. Structural and optical properties of low temperature grown AlN films on sapphire using helicon sputtering system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Meei-Ru; Chen, Hou-Guang; Kao, Hui-Ling Wu, Ming-Guei; Tzou, An-Jye; Chen, Jyh Shin; Chou, Hsiung

    2015-05-15

    AlN thin films have been deposited directly on c-plane sapphire substrates at low temperatures by a helicon sputtering system. The structural quality of AlN epitaxial films was characterized by x-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy. The films exhibit smooth surface with root-mean-square roughness as small as 0.7 nm evaluated by atomic force microscope. The optical transmittance spectra show a steep absorption edge at the wavelength of 200 nm and a high transmittance of over 80% in the visible range. The band-edge transition (6.30 eV) of AlN film was observed in the cathodoluminescence spectrum recorded at 11 K. The spectral response of metal–semiconductor–metal photodetectors constructed with AlN/sapphire reveals the peak responsivity at 200 nm and a UV/visible rejection ratio of about two orders of magnitude. The results of this low temperature deposition suggest the feasibility of the epitaxial growth of AlN on sapphire substrates and the incorporation of the AlN films in the surface acoustic wave devices and the optical devices at deep ultraviolet region.

  20. Microstructure and nonbasal-plane growth of epitaxial Ti2AlN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, M.; Schell, N.; Martins, R. M. S.; Mücklich, A.; Möller, W.; Hultman, L.

    2006-02-01

    Thin films of the Mn+1AXn (MAX) phase (M: early transition metal; A:A-group element; X: C and/or N; n=1-3) Ti2AlN were epitaxially grown onto single-crystal MgO(111) and MgO(100) substrates by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering from Ti and Al targets in an Ar/N2 gas mixture at a temperature of 690 °C. To promote the nucleation of the MAX phase, a fcc (Ti0.63Al0.37)N seed layer was deposited before changing to Ti2AlN growth parameters. The nucleation processes have been studied by real-time in situ specular x-ray reflectivity. Independent of substrate orientation, the seed layer shows no roughening until its final thickness of approximately 100 A˚, indicating pseudomorphic layer-by-layer growth. The MAX phase shows heteroepitaxial layer-by-layer growth on MgO(111), with increased surface roughening up to approximately 200 A˚, whereas on MgO(100) the growth mode changes to Volmer-Weber-type already after three monolayers. X-ray scattering in Bragg-Brentano geometry of the final, approximately 1000 A˚ thick, Ti2AlN film reveals lattice parameters of c=13.463 A˚ and a=2.976 A˚ on the MgO(111) substrate and c=13.740 A˚ and a=2.224 A˚ on the MgO(100) substrate. From pole figure measurements the orientational relationship between film and substrate lattice was determined to be MgO{111}<110>//Ti2AlN{1012}<1210>, regardless of the substrate orientation. This tilted, nonbasal-plane growth leads to a threefold grain orientation of Ti2AlN along the MgO<110> directions and a polycrystalline morphology confirmed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The growth can be assumed to take place in a lateral step-flow mode, i.e., emerging low surface free-energy (0001) planes, on which arriving atoms can diffuse until finding a step where they are bound to A facets. This growth process is irrespective of orientational relationship between substrate and film. However, in the present low-temperature case the partitioning of arriving Al and Ti atoms during

  1. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  2. Effect of firing conditions on thick film microstructure and solder joint strength for low-temperature, co-fired ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, C.L.; Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    2000-01-04

    Low-temperature, co-fired ceramics (LTCC) are the substrate material-of-choice for a growing number of multi-chip module (MCM) applications. Unlike the longer-standing hybrid microcircuit technology based upon alumina substrates, the manufacturability and reliability of thick film solder joints on LTCC substrates have not been widely studied. An investigation was undertaken to fully characterize solder joints on these substrates. A surface mount test vehicle with Daisy chain electrical connections was designed and built with Dupont{trademark} 951 tape. The Dupont{trademark} 4569 thick film ink (Au76-Pt21-Pd3 wt.%) was used to establish the surface conductor pattern. The conductor pattern was fired onto the LTCC substrate in a matrix of processing conditions that included: (1) double versus triple prints, (2) dielectric window versus no window, and (3) three firing temperatures (800 C, 875 C and 950 C). Sn63-Pb37 solder paste with an RMA flux was screen printed onto the circuit boards. The appropriate packages, which included five sizes of chip capacitors and four sizes of leadless ceramic chip carriers, were placed on the circuit boards. The test vehicles were oven reflowed under a N{sub 2} atmosphere. Nonsoldered pads were removed from the test vehicles and the porosity of their thick film layers was measured using quantitative image analysis in both the transverse and short transverse directions. A significant dependence on firing temperature was recorded for porosity. The double printed substrates without a dielectric window revealed a thick film porosity of 31.2% at 800 C, 26.2% at 875 C and 20.4% at 950 C. In contrast, the thick film porosity of the triple printed substrates with a dielectric window is 24.1% at 800 C, 23.2% at 875 C and 17.6% at 950 C. These observations were compared with the shear strength of the as-fabricated chip capacitor solder joints to determine the effect of firing conditions on solder joint integrity. The denser films from the higher

  3. Getting Better: ALN and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Janet C.; Sener, John; Fetzner, Marie

    2009-01-01

    In the U.S., only 38 of every 100 ninth graders enroll in college; of these 38, only 18 complete bachelors' degrees within six years. Asynchronous learning networks (ALN)--asynchronous, highly interactive, instructor-led, resource-rich, cohort-based learning--can yield high success rates. Growing demand for online education and the expectation…

  4. Resonant indirect excitation of Gd{sup 3+} in AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizu, Yuta; Tsuji, Kazuma; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi; Chigi, Yoshitaka; Nishimoto, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Mikihiro; Ishihara, Tsuguo; Izumi, Hirokazu

    2014-05-07

    We studied the efficient indirect excitation of Gd{sup 3+} ions in AlN thin films. C-axis oriented polycrystalline thin films of Al{sub 0.997}Gd{sub 0.003}N/AlN were grown on fused silica substrates using a reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The intra-orbital electron transition in Gd{sup 3+} showed a narrow luminescence line at 3.9 eV. The photoluminescence (PL) excitation (PLE) spectrum exhibited a peak originating from efficient indirect energy transfer from the band edge of AlN to Gd{sup 3+} ions. The PLE peak shifted and the PL intensity showed a dramatic change when the AlN band gap was varied by changing the temperature. Energy scanning performed by changing the band-gap energy of AlN with temperature revealed several resonant channels of energy transfer into the higher excited states of Gd{sup 3+}.

  5. Growth of bulk AlN and GaN single crystals by sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Balkas, C.M.; Sitar, Z.; Zheleva, T.; Bergman, L.; Shmagin, I.K.; Muth, J.F.; Kolbas, R.; Nemanich, R.; Davis, R.F.

    1997-12-31

    Single crystals of AlN to 1 mm thickness were grown in the range 1,950--2,250 C on 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} {alpha}(6H)-SiC(0001) substrates via sublimation-recondensation method. Hot pressed polycrystalline AlN was used as the source material. The color varied from transparent to dark green/blue. The crystal morphology varied with growth conditions. Most crystals were 0.3 mm--1 mm thick transparent layers which completely covered the substrates. Raman, optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results are presented. Single crystals of gallium nitride (GaN) were also grown by subliming powders of this material under an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) flow. Optical microscopy, Raman and photoluminescence results are shown.

  6. Dependence of the growth rate of an AlN layer on nitrogen pressure in a reactor for sublimation growth of AlN crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, A. A. Mokhov, E. N.

    2010-10-15

    The dependence of the layer growth rate on nitrogen pressure in a reactor has been examined in order to analyze the conditions of growth of AlN thick layers and bulk crystals by the sublimation sandwich method. It is shown that the layer growth rate steadily increases as the pressure in the reactor is lowered within the range 1-0.02 bar. This suggests that a key role in the layer growth kinetics is played by the source-to-substrate transfer of the components (Al, N), rather than by their adsorption (desorption) on the substrate surface.

  7. Effect of Thick Film Firing Conditions on the Solderability and Structure of Au-Pt-Pd Conductor for Low-Temperature, Co-Fired Ceramic Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, C.L; Vianco, P.T.

    1999-03-16

    Low-temperature, co-fired ceramics (LTCC) are the substrate material-of-choice for a growing number of multi-chip module (MCM) applications. Unlike the longer-standing hybrid microcircuit technology based upon alumina substrates, the manufacturability and reliability of thick film solder joints on LTCC substrates have not been widely studied. An investigation was undertaken to fully characterize such solder joints. A surface mount test vehicle with Daisy chain electrical connections was designed and built with Dupont{trademark} 951 tape. The Dupont{trademark} 4569 thick film ink (Au76-Pt21 -Pd3 wt.%) was used to establish the surface conductor pattern. The conductor pattern was fired onto the LTCC substrate in a matrix of process conditions that included: (1) double versus triple prints, (2) dielectric frame versus no frame, and (3) three firing temperatures (800 C, 875 C and 950 C). Pads were examined from the test vehicles. The porosity of the thick film layers was measured using quantitative image analysis in both the transverse and short transverse directions. A significant dependence on firing temperature was recorded for porosity. Solder paste comprised of Sn63-Pb37 powder with an RMA flux was screen printed onto the circuit boards. The appropriate components, which included chip capacitors of sizes 0805 up to 2225 and 50 mil pitch, leadless ceramic chip carriers having sizes of 16 I/O to 68 I/O, were then placed on the circuit boards. The test vehicles were oven reflowed under a N{sub 2} atmosphere. The solderability of the thick film pads was also observed to be sensitive to the firing conditions. Solderability appeared to degrade by the added processing steps needed for the triple print and dielectric window depositions. However, the primary factor in solderability was the firing temperature. Solderability was poorer when the firing temperature was higher.

  8. Single-crystal Ti2AlN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joelsson, T.; Hörling, A.; Birch, J.; Hultman, L.

    2005-03-01

    We have produced pure thin-film single-crystal Ti2AlN(0001), a member of the Mn +1AXn class of materials. The method used was UHV dc reactive magnetron sputtering from a 2Ti:Al compound target in a mixed Ar -N2 discharge onto (111) oriented MgO substrates. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to establish the hexagonal crystal structure with c and a lattice parameters of 13.6 and 3.07Å, respectively. The hardness H, and elastic modulus E, as determined by nanoindentation measurements, were found to be 16.1±1GPa and 270±20GPa, respectively. A room-temperature resistivity for the films of 39μΩcm was obtained.

  9. Modified pulse growth and misfit strain release of an AlN heteroepilayer with a Mg-Si codoping pair by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid Soomro, Abdul; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Zheng, Tongchang; Wang, Huachun; Chen, Hangyang; Li, Jinchai; Li, Shuping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, Junyong

    2016-03-01

    We report the modified pulse growth method together with an alternating introduction of larger-radius impurity (Mg) for the quality improvement and misfit strain release of an AlN epitaxial layer by the metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method. Various pulse growth methods were employed to control the migration of Al atoms on the substrate surface. The results showed that the pulse time and overlapping of V/III flux is closely related with the enhancement of the 2D and 3D growth mode. In order to reduce the misfit strain between AlN and sapphire, an impurity of larger atomic radius (e.g. Mg) was doped into the AlN lattice to minimize the rigidity of the AlN epilayer. It was found that the codoping of Mg-Si ultrathin layers could significantly minimize the residual strain as well as the density of threading dislocations.

  10. Significant improvement of GaN crystal quality with ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo-Wei; Yang, Young; Wen, Wei-Chih; Li, Heng; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layer has been demonstrated effective to significantly improve crystal quality and electrical properties of GaN epitaxy layers for GaN based Light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In this report, we have successfully reduced X-ray (102) FWHM from 240 to 110 arcsec, and (002) FWHM from 230 to 101 arcsec. In addition, reverse-bias voltage (Vr) increased around 20% with the sputtered AlN nucleation layer. Furthermore, output power of LEDs grown on sputtered AlN nucleation layer can be improved around 4.0% compared with LEDs which is with conventional GaN nucleation layer on pattern sapphire substrate (PSS).

  11. Process for producing advanced ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing

    1996-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

  12. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  13. Aligned AlN nanowires by self-organized vapor-solid growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, G. R.; Persson, P. O. Å.; Gogova, D.; Fornari, R.; Hultman, L.; Syväjärvi, M.; Yakimova, R.

    2009-12-01

    Highly oriented AlN single crystal nanowires with aspect ratio up to 600, diameter in the range of 40-500 nm, and 100 µm lengths, have been synthesized via a vapor-solid growth mechanism. The results were obtained at 1750 °C and 850 mbar nitrogen pressure on vicinal SiC substrates pretreated by SiC sublimation epitaxy in order to attain distinguishable terraces. It was found that the nanowires change in thickness after they have reached a critical length, and this fact contributes to an understanding of the growth mechanism of AlN nanowires. The nanowires are hexagonally shaped and perfectly aligned along the [0001] direction with a small tilt given by the substrate vicinality. Under nitrogen excess a preferential growth along the c-axis of the wurtzite structure takes place while below some critical value of nitrogen pressure the growth mode switches to lateral. The AlN nanowires are shown to have a dislocation free wurtzite crystal structure. Some possible applications are discussed.

  14. Aligned AlN nanowires by self-organized vapor-solid growth.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, G R; Persson, P O A; Gogova, D; Fornari, R; Hultman, L; Syväjärvi, M; Yakimova, R

    2009-12-01

    Highly oriented AlN single crystal nanowires with aspect ratio up to 600, diameter in the range of 40-500 nm, and 100 microm lengths, have been synthesized via a vapor-solid growth mechanism. The results were obtained at 1750 degrees C and 850 mbar nitrogen pressure on vicinal SiC substrates pretreated by SiC sublimation epitaxy in order to attain distinguishable terraces. It was found that the nanowires change in thickness after they have reached a critical length, and this fact contributes to an understanding of the growth mechanism of AlN nanowires. The nanowires are hexagonally shaped and perfectly aligned along the [0001] direction with a small tilt given by the substrate vicinality. Under nitrogen excess a preferential growth along the c-axis of the wurtzite structure takes place while below some critical value of nitrogen pressure the growth mode switches to lateral. The AlN nanowires are shown to have a dislocation free wurtzite crystal structure. Some possible applications are discussed.

  15. An array of Eiffel-tower-shape AlN nanotips and its field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongbing; Cong, Hongtao; Chen, Zhigang; Cheng, Huiming

    2005-06-01

    An array of Eiffel-tower-shape AlN nanotips has been synthesized and assembled vertically with Si substrate by a chemical vapor deposition method at 700 °C. The single-crystalline AlN nanotips along [001] direction, including sharp tips with 10-100 nm in diameter and submicron-sized bases, are distributed uniformly with density of 106-107tips/cm2. Field emission (FE) measurements show that its turn on field is 4.7 V/μm, which is comparable to that of carbon nanotubes, and the fluctuation of FE current is as small as 0.74% for 4 h. It is revealed this nanostructure is available to optimize the FE properties and make the array a promising field emitter.

  16. Surface kinetics in AlN growth: A universal model for the control of surface morphology in III-nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Mita, Seiji; Rice, Anthony; Tweedie, James; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko

    2016-03-01

    AlN epitaxial thin films were grown on both vicinal (0001)-oriented native single crystal AlN substrates and AlN templates grown on vicinal (0001)-oriented sapphire to develop a surface kinetic framework for the control of surface morphology. A Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) theory-based model is formulated and utilized to understand the dependence of the surface kinetics on the vapor supersaturation, σ, and substrate misorientation angle, α. The surface energy of the Al-polar surface of AlN was experimentally determined using BCF theory to be 149±8 meV/Å2. The critical misorientation angle for the onset of step-bunching was determined to be ~0.25° for a growth rate of 500 nm/h and temperature of 1250 °C. Transitioning from a surface with 2D nuclei to one with bilayer steps required a decrease in σ or an increase in α, whereas the suppression of step-bunching required an increase in σ or a decrease in α.

  17. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire InAs, AlN, and BeO polymorphs from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wu; Mingo, Natalio

    2013-11-14

    We compute the thermal conductivity of the alternative zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases of InAs, AlN, and BeO. The bulk thermal conductivity of the ZB phase of BeO is predicted to be even higher than that of its WZ phase (the highest amongst all ceramics used in electronic technology). Our calculations agree well with the available experimental measurements for bulk ZB InAs, WZ AlN, WZ BeO, and WZ and ZB InAs nanowires, and we provide predictions for the remaining cases. The predicted good thermal conductor ZB BeO might have interesting applications in improved heat sinks for high performance semiconductor electronics.

  18. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; Lee, Woo Y.

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

  19. Ceramic coatings on smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Inventor); Brindley, W. J. (Inventor); Rouge, C. J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A metallic coating is plasma sprayed onto a smooth surface of a metal alloy substitute or on a bond coating. An initial thin ceramic layer is low pressure sprayed onto the smooth surface of the substrate or bond coating. Another ceramic layer is atmospheric plasma sprayed onto the initial ceramic layer.

  20. Multi-modality computer-aided diagnosis system for axillary lymph node (ALN) staging: segmentation of ALN on ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbash Meinel, Lina; Bergtholdt, Martin; Abe, Hiroyuki; Huo, D.; Buelow, Thomas; Carlsen, Ingwer; Newstead, Gillian

    2009-02-01

    Our goal was to develop and evaluate a reliable segmentation method to delineate axillary lymph node (ALN) from surrounding tissues on US images as the first step of building a multi-modality CADx system for staging ALN. Ultrasound images of 24 ALN from 18 breast cancer patients were used. An elliptical model algorithm was used to fit ALNs boundaries using the following steps: reduce image noise, extract image edges using the Canny edge detector, select edge pixels and fit an ellipse by minimizing the quadratic error, Find the best fitting ellipse based on RANSAC. The segmentation was qualitatively evaluated by 3 expert readers using 4 aspects: Orientation of long axis (OLA): within +- 45 degrees, or off by +-45 degrees, overlap (OV): the fitted ellipse completely included ALN, partially included ALN, or missed the ALN, size (SZ): too small, good within 20% error margin, or too large, and aspect ratio (AR): correct or wrong. Nightly six % of ALNs were correctly evaluated by all readers in terms of OLA and AR, 90.2% in terms of OV and 86.11 in terms of SZ. Readers agreed that the segmentation was correct in 70% of the cases in all aspects. Due to small sample size and small variation among readers, we don't have power to show the accuracy of them is different.

  1. Lattice parameters of AlN bulk, homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, D.; Janzén, E.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.

    2016-05-01

    Homoepitaxial layers of AlN and heteroepitaxial layers of AlN on 4H-SiC substrates were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition at high temperatures up to 1400 °C, and with various thicknesses. From high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of a set of homoepitaxial layers of high structural quality, the following mean value of the lattice constants was determined: a  =  3.111 31  ±  0.000 16 Å, and c  =  4.980 79  ±  0.000 11 Å. The structural quality of the heteroepitaxial layers was demonstrated, for example, by extracting the full width at a half maximum of the (0002) and (10-12) rocking curves of 25 arcsec and 372 arcsec, respectively, associated with a crack-free heteroepitaxial layer with a thickness of 1.3 μm grown at 1240 °C. From measuring a set of AlN heteroepitaxial layers, the following value of the biaxial strain relaxation coefficient was determined: R B  =  -0.556.

  2. Deep SiO2 etching with Al and AlN masks for MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliznetsov, Vladimir; Mao Lin, Hua; Zhang, Yue Jia; Johnson, David

    2015-08-01

    Silicon oxide-based materials such as quartz and silica are widely used in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). One way to enhance the capability of their deep plasma etching is to increase selectivity by the use of hard masks. Although this approach was studied previously, information on the use of hard masks for the etching of silicon-oxide based materials on 200 mm substrates is scarce. We present the results of etching process development for amorphous silicon oxide using Al and AlN masks with a view of the application of the results for the etching of silica and quartz. Three gas chemistries (C4F8/O2, CF4 and SF6) and their mixtures were compared in an industrial reactive ion etch (RIE) chamber with two plasma sources. It was established that pure SF6 is the best etchant and AlN is a better mask than Al for providing higher selectivity and a sidewall angle close to vertical. A range of etching parameters for micromasking-free etching was established and etched structures of up to a 4 : 1 aspect ratio were created in 21 μm-thick oxide using the process with an etch rate of 0.32-0.36 μm min-1 and a selectivity to AlN mask of (38-49) : 1.

  3. CVD of SiC and AlN using cyclic organometallic precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, L. V.; Larkin, D. J.; Amato, C.

    1992-01-01

    The use of cyclic organometallic molecules as single-source MOCVD precursors is illustrated by means of examples taken from our recent work on AlN and SiC deposition, with particular focus on SiC. Molecules containing (AlN)3 and (SiC)2 rings as the 'core structure' were employed as the source materials for these studies. The organoaluminum amide, (Me2AlNH2)3, was used as the AlN source and has been studied in a molecular beam sampling apparatus in order to determine the gas phase species present in a hot-wall CVD reactor environment. In the case of SiC CVD, a series of disilacyclobutanes (Si(XX')CH2)2 (with X and X' = H, CH3, and CH2SiH2CH3), were examined in a cold-wall, hot-stage CVD reactor in order to compare their relative reactivities and prospective utility as single-source CVD precursors. The parent compound, disilacyclobutane, (SiH2CH2)2, was found to exhibit the lowest deposition temperature (ca. 670 C) and to yield the highest purity SiC films. This precursor gave a highly textured, polycrystalline film on the Si(100) substrates.

  4. Current transport mechanisms in plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Altuntas, Halit E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-04-21

    Here, we report on the current transport mechanisms in AlN thin films deposited at a low temperature (i.e., 200 °C) on p-type Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. Structural characterization of the deposited AlN was carried out using grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, revealing polycrystalline films with a wurtzite (hexagonal) structure. Al/AlN/ p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structures were fabricated and investigated under negative bias by performing current-voltage measurements. As a function of the applied electric field, different types of current transport mechanisms were observed; i.e., ohmic conduction (15.2–21.5 MV/m), Schottky emission (23.6–39.5 MV/m), Frenkel-Poole emission (63.8–211.8 MV/m), trap-assisted tunneling (226–280 MV/m), and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (290–447 MV/m). Electrical properties of the insulating AlN layer and the fabricated Al/AlN/p-Si MIS capacitor structure such as dielectric constant, flat-band voltage, effective charge density, and threshold voltage were also determined from the capacitance-voltage measurements.

  5. Tunable thermal conductivity of thin films of polycrystalline AlN by structural inhomogeneity and interfacial oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Fernandez, J; Ordonez-Miranda, J; Ollier, E; Volz, S

    2015-03-28

    The effect of the structural inhomogeneity and oxygen defects on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates is experimentally and theoretically investigated. The influence of the evolution of crystal structure, grain size, and out-of plane disorientation along the cross plane of the films on their thermal conductivity is analyzed. The impact of oxygen-related defects on thermal conduction is studied in AlN/AlN multilayered samples. Microstructure, texture, and grain size of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The measured thermal conductivity obtained with the 3-omega technique for a single and multiple layers of AlN is in fairly good agreement with the theoretical predictions of our model, which is developed by considering a serial assembly of grain distributions. An effective thermal conductivity of 5.92 W m(-1) K(-1) is measured for a 1107.5 nm-thick multilayer structure, which represents a reduction of 20% of the thermal conductivity of an AlN monolayer with approximately the same thickness, due to oxygen impurities at the interface of AlN layers. Our results show that the reduction of the thermal conductivity as the film thickness is scaled down, is strongly determined by the structural inhomogeneities inside the sputtered films. The origin of this non-homogeneity and the effect on phonon scattering are also discussed.

  6. Improved output power of GaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with sputtered AlN nucleation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C. H.; Lin, Y. W.; Tsai, M. T.; Lin, B. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Tu, P. M.; Huang, S. C.; Hsu, Earl; Uen, W. Y.; Lee, W. I.; Kuo, H. C.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) at 380 nm were grown on patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (AP-MOCVD). A sputtered AlN nucleation layer was utilized on the PSS to enhance the quality of the epitaxial layer. By using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, the full-width at half-maximum of the rocking curve shows that the UV-LEDs with sputtered AlN nucleation layer had better crystalline quality when compared to conventional GaN nucleation samples. From the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, it can be observed that the tip and sidewall portion of the pattern was smooth using the sputtered AlN nucleation layer. The threading dislocation densities (TDDs) are reduced from 6×107 cm-2 to 2.5×107 cm-2 at the interface between the u-GaN layers for conventional and AlN PSS devices, respectively. As a result, a much higher light output power was achieved. The light output power at an injection current of 20 mA was enhanced by 30%. Further photoluminescence (PL) measurement and numerical simulation confirm that this increase of output power can be attributed to the improvement of material quality and light extraction.

  7. Cu-doped AlN: A possible spinaligner at room-temperature grown by molecular beam epitaxy?

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, P. R.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2011-12-23

    Cu-doped AlN was prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on C-plane sapphire substrates. The growth conditions were investigated for different Cu to Al flux ratios from 1.0% to 4.0%. The formation of Cu-Al alloys on the surface was observed for all doping level. In contrast to Cu-doped GaN, all samples showed diamagnetic behavior determined by SQUID measurements.

  8. In vitro hemocompatibility on thin ceramic and hydrogel films deposited on polymer substrate performed in arterial flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Major, Roman; Trembecka-Wójciga, Klaudia; Kot, Marcin; Lackner, Juergen M; Wilczek, Piotr; Major, Boguslaw

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogel coatings were stabilized by titanium carbonitride a-C:H:Ti:N buffer layers deposited directly onto the polyurethane (PU) substrate beneath a final hydrogel coating. Coatings of a-C:H:Ti:N were deposited using a hybrid method of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and magnetron sputtering (MS) under high vacuum conditions. The influence of the buffer a-C:H:Ti:N layer on the hydrogel coating was analysed by means of a multi-scale microstructure study. Mechanical tests were performed at an indentation load of 5 mN using Berkovich indenter geometry. Haemocompatible analyses were performed in vitro using a blood flow simulator. The blood-material interaction was analysed under dynamic conditions. The coating fabrication procedure improved the coating stability due to the deposition of the amorphous titanium carbonitride buffer layer. PMID:26838818

  9. Investigation of AlN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on vicinal Si(111) as templates for GaN quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Benaissa, M.; Vennegues, P.; Tottereau, O.; Nguyen, L.; Semond, F.

    2006-12-04

    The use of AlN epitaxial films deposited on vicinal Si(111) as templates for the growth of GaN quantum dots is investigated by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. It is found that the substrate vicinality induces both a slight tilt of the AlN (0001) direction with respect to the [111] direction and a step bunching mechanism. As a consequence, a dislocation dragging behavior is observed giving rise to dislocation-free areas well suited for the nucleation of GaN quantum dots.

  10. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  11. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  12. Natural growth habit of bulk AlN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, B. M.; Seitz, C.; Magerl, A.; Bickermann, M.; Winnacker, A.

    2004-05-01

    Growth conditions for self-nucleation and subsequent growth of bulk AlN crystals by sublimation are presented. With increasing growth temperature, the natural habit of AlN crystals changes from needle-like to prismatic and then turns to thick asymmetric platelet. The best-formed platelet crystals up to 14×7×2 mm 3 in size exhibit a number of atomically smooth surfaces. Growth morphology and crystal quality were found to be strongly influenced by the polar nature of AlN. Al-terminated faces produce mirror-like facets and transparent material of high crystalline quality, whereas development of N-terminated faces leads to opaque and defective sectors in grown crystals. It is suggested that the most successful seeded growth of AlN can be achieved along Al-terminated (0 0 0 1) , ( 1¯ 0 1 2) and non-polar ( 1¯ 0 1 0) faces.

  13. Growth of AlN single crystals by modified PVT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglei; Zheng, Ruisheng; Meng, Shu; Guo, Yuan

    2008-11-01

    Growth of AlN single crystals is achieved by physical vapor transport (PVT) in the reverse cone tungsten crucible, which is induction-heated, for obtaining proper sublimation rate and ensuring effective heat and mass transport. In the experiment, there is a little hole at the center of crucible lid where the temperature is lower than the periphery, and there is a tungsten cover on the lid. A self-seeded AlN single crystal is grown due to the anisotropic growth property of AlN crystals and limitation of the hole. During the following growth, the crystal as a seed becomes a large size and high quality single crystal. By modified PVT, separate AlN single crystals with diameters of larger than 2mm on the crucible lid have been obtained successfully for the first time.

  14. Mechanism for persistent hexagonal island formation in AlN buffer layer during growth on Si (111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.-Y.; Chung, H.-C.; Liu, C.-P.; Tu, L.-W.

    2007-05-21

    The characteristics of structure and morphology of AlN grown by a growth interruption method on Si (111) with plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. It is found that the growth interruption method would improve the surface flatness of the AlN layer without the formation of Al droplets. However, AlN hexagonal islands were present and persistent throughout the entire growth owing to effective strain relaxation and Eherlich-Schowebel barrier effect of preexistent surface islands grown on higher terraces of the Si substrate. The density of threading dislocations underneath the hexagonal islands is much less than elsewhere in the film, which is presumably due to dislocation annihilation during the island growth process.

  15. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ˜5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density-voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz-5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole-Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  16. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ∼5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density–voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz–5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole–Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  17. Microstructure and dielectric properties of (Ba 0.6Sr 0.4)TiO 3 thin films grown on super smooth glazed-Al 2O 3 ceramics substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Chuanren; Zheng, Shanxue; Zhang, Jihua; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Lei, Guanhuan; Lou, Feizhi; Yang, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    Modified substrates with nanometer scale smooth surface were obtained via coating a layer of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CaAlSi) high temperature glaze with proper additives on the rough-95% Al2O3 ceramics substrates. (Ba0.6Sr0.4)TiO3 (BST) thin films were deposited on modified Al2O3 substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The microstructure, dielectric, and insulating properties of BST thin films grown on glazed-Al2O3 substrates were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), and dielectric properties measurement. These results showed that microstructure and dielectric properties of BST thin films grown on glazed-Al2O3 substrates were almost consistent with that of BST thin films grown on LaAlO3 (1 0 0) single-crystal substrates. Thus, the expensive single-crystal substrates may be substituted by extremely cheap glazed-Al2O3 substrates.

  18. Growth and Characterization of Polyimide-Supported AlN Films for Flexible Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Gen; Zeng, Fei; Pan, Feng; Luo, Jingting; Qian, Lirong

    2016-06-01

    Highly c-axis oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) films, which can be used in flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, were successfully deposited on polyimide (PI) substrates by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering without heating. The sputtering power, film thickness, and deposition pressure were optimized. The characterization studies show that at the optimized conditions, the deposited AlN films are composed of columnar grains, which penetrate through the entire film thickness (~2 μm) and exhibit an excellent (0002) texture with a full width at half maximum value of the rocking curve equal to 2.96°. The film surface is smooth with a root mean square value of roughness of 3.79 nm. SAW prototype devices with a center frequency of about 520 MHz and a phase velocity of Rayleigh wave of about 4160 m/s were successfully fabricated using the AlN/PI composite structure. The obtained results demonstrate that the highly c-axis oriented AlN films with a smooth surface and low stress can be produced on relatively rough, flexible substrates, and this composite structure can be possibly used in flexible SAW devices.

  19. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  20. Deep-UV sensors based on SAW oscillators using low-temperature-grown AlN films on sapphires.

    PubMed

    Laksana, Chipta; Chen, Meei-Ru; Liang, Yen; Tzou, An-Jyeg; Kao, Hui-Ling; Jeng, Erik; Chen, Jyh; Chen, Hou-Guang; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2011-08-01

    High-quality epitaxial AlN films were deposited on sapphire substrates at low growth temperature using a helicon sputtering system. SAW filters fabricated on the AlN films exhibited excellent characteristics, with center frequency of 354.2 MHz, which corresponds to a phase velocity of 5667 m/s. An oscillator fabricated using AlN-based SAW devices is presented and applied to deep-UV light detection. A frequency downshift of about 43 KHz was observed when the surface of SAW device was illuminated by a UV source with dominant wavelength of around 200 nm. The results indicate the feasibility of developing remote sensors for deep-UV measurement using AlN-based SAW oscillators. PMID:21859589

  1. Deep-UV sensors based on SAW oscillators using low-temperature-grown AlN films on sapphires.

    PubMed

    Laksana, Chipta; Chen, Meei-Ru; Liang, Yen; Tzou, An-Jyeg; Kao, Hui-Ling; Jeng, Erik; Chen, Jyh; Chen, Hou-Guang; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2011-08-01

    High-quality epitaxial AlN films were deposited on sapphire substrates at low growth temperature using a helicon sputtering system. SAW filters fabricated on the AlN films exhibited excellent characteristics, with center frequency of 354.2 MHz, which corresponds to a phase velocity of 5667 m/s. An oscillator fabricated using AlN-based SAW devices is presented and applied to deep-UV light detection. A frequency downshift of about 43 KHz was observed when the surface of SAW device was illuminated by a UV source with dominant wavelength of around 200 nm. The results indicate the feasibility of developing remote sensors for deep-UV measurement using AlN-based SAW oscillators.

  2. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  3. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. PMID:27104932

  4. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements.

  5. Preliminary study on the effect of wear process on drug release of ALN-loaded UHMWPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Qu, Shuxin; Lin, Sunzhong; Huang, Jie; Fu, Rong; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2012-12-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) for anti-osteolysis was developed in our previous study. As a potential material of artificial joints, ALN-loaded UHMWPE is subjected to friction and wear which probably affect the ALN release in vivo. This study aims to explore the influence of friction and wear on the ALN release rate. For comparison, the specimens of control group, immersed motionlessly in distilled water, were not applied any friction. The morphological change of worn surface of ALN-loaded UHMWPE was observed through an independent wear test and was compared with that of control UHMWPE. The ALN release rate in the friction and wear process was higher than that of non-friction test. The cumulative mass of ALN increased slowly at the onset of wear process and then speeded up. The fibrils-like wear debris accumulated on the worn surface of ALN-loaded UHMWPE but did not appear on that of UHMWPE. The micro-pores formed during wear process, were probably favorable of the dissolution of ALN. It indicated that the ALN release of ALN-loaded UHMWPE was affected by the friction and wear. The frictional factors should be taken into account in predicting the ALN release rate of ALN-loaded UHMWPE.

  6. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  7. Electrical properties of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal-organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  8. Growth dynamics of reactive-sputtering-deposited AlN films

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.A.; Vazquez, L.; Sanchez, O.; Jergel, M.; Cuerno, R.; Castro, M.

    2005-06-15

    We have studied the surface kinetic roughening of AlN films grown on Si(100) substrates by dc reactive sputtering within the framework of the dynamic scaling theory. Films deposited under the same experimental conditions for different growth times were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The AlN films display a (002) preferred orientation. We have found two growth regimes with a crossover time of 36 min. In the first regime, the growth dynamics is unstable and the films present two types of textured domains, well textured and randomly oriented, respectively. In contrast, in the second regime the films are homogeneous and well textured, leading to a relative stabilization of the surface roughness characterized by a growth exponent {beta}=0.37{+-}0.03. In this regime a superrough scaling behavior is found with the following exponents: (i) Global exponents: roughness exponent {alpha}=1.2{+-}0.2 and {beta}=0.37{+-}0.03 and coarsening exponent 1/z=0.32{+-}0.05; (ii) local exponents: {alpha}{sub loc}=1, {beta}{sub loc}=0.32{+-}0.01. The differences between the growth modes are found to be related to the different main growth mechanisms dominating their growth dynamics: sticking anisotropy and shadowing, respectively.

  9. Inversion domains in AlN grown on (0001) sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Paduano, Q.S.; Weyburne, D.W.

    2003-08-25

    Al-polarity inversion domains formed during AlN layer growth on (0001) sapphire were identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They resemble columnar inversion domains reported for GaN films grown on (0001) sapphire. However, for AlN, these columns have a V-like shape with boundaries that deviate by 2 {+-} 0.5{sup o} from the c-axis. TEM identification of these defects agrees with the post-growth surface morphology as well as with the microstructure revealed by etching in hot aqueous KOH.

  10. AlN/air distributed Bragg reflector by GaN sublimation from microcracks of AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunari, T.; Tanikawa, T.; Honda, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Amano, H.

    2013-05-01

    We report the fabrication of a four-period AlN/air distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) by in-situ GaN sublimation from microcracks of AlN. The GaN/AlN multilayer structure was grown on a stripe-patterned and dot-patterned Si substrate, and subsequently annealed at 1200 °C in H2 and NH3 atmosphere. Microcracks were observed on the surface and side face of the A1N/air DBRs. We achieved an AlN/air structure by the decomposition of GaN from the microcracks of AlN. Partially crack-free AlN layers were observed over a 5×5 μm area in the c-plane of AlN/air DBRs. The root mean square (RMS) values of the surface and back surface of stripe-patterned AlN/air DBRs were 0.94 and 3.3 nm, respectively. The relative reflectivity was measured using a He-Cd laser (442 nm). In some areas, stripe-patterned and dot-patterned AlN/air DBRs showed a high reflectivity of 83.7% and 90.7%, respectively, at the wavelength of 442 nm.

  11. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoPt AlN composite film with nano-fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. C.; Toyoshima, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Shi, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    2005-06-01

    Co Pt AlN films were prepared by sputtering a Co Pt Al composite target in Ar+N2 atmosphere. Upon thermal annealing at elevated temperatures, fcc CoPt and a-AlN are formed in the films as phases separated from one other. Both phases develop as fiber-like columnar grains vertical to the substrate and with their lateral size less than 10 nm. Because of the shape anisotropy of the magnetic fiber grains the CoPt AlN film shows a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at a thickness equal to or larger than about 25 nm while the Co TiN [6] and CoPt TiO2 [11] films do not unless their thicknesses reach 50 and 100 nm, respectively. This suggests that both the shape anisotropy of the CoPt magnetic fiber grains and their mutual separation in an a-AlN medium work more effectively in the formation with the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Such a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the CoPt AlN film associated with the nano-scale feature makes it a very promising candidate for future recording media with ultra-high area density.

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy study of AlN films grown on n-type 6H-SiC by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, F.; Chen, P.; Zhao, D. G.; Jiang, D. S.; Zhao, Z. J.; Liu, Z. S.; Zhu, J. J.; Yang, J.; Liu, W.; He, X. G.; Li, X. J.; Li, X.; Liu, S. T.; Yang, H.; Liu, J. P.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhang, Y. T.; Du, G. T.

    2016-09-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy has been employed to analyze the content and chemical states of the elements on the surface of AlN films with different thickness, which are synthesized by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on the n-type SiC substrates under low pressure. It is found that, besides the carbon and gallium on the AlN surface, the atom percentage of surface oxygen increases from 4.9 to 8.4, and the electron affinity also increases from 0.36 to 0.97 eV, when the thickness of AlN films increase from 50 to 400 nm. Furthermore, accompanying with the high-resolution XPS spectra of the O 1s, it is speculated that surface oxygen may be the major influence on the electron affinity, where the surface oxygen changes the surface chemical states through replacing N to form Al-O bond and Ga-O bond, although there are also a few of Ga and C contaminations in the chemical sate of Ga-O and C-C, respectively.

  13. Compliant sleeve for ceramic turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hongda; Narasimhan, Dave; Strangman, Thomas E.; Easley, Michael L.; Schenk, Bjoern

    2000-01-01

    A compliant sleeve for attaching a ceramic member to a metal member is comprised of a superalloy substrate having a metal contacting side and a ceramic contacting side. The ceramic contacting side is plated with a layer of nickel followed by a layer of platinum. The substrate is then oxidized to form nickel oxide scale on the ceramic contacting side and a cobalt oxide scale on the metal contacting side. A lubricious coating of boron nitride is then applied over the metal contacting side, and a shear-stress limiting gold coating is applied over the ceramic contacting side.

  14. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

  15. Refractory Oxidative-Resistant Ceramic Carbon Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature, lightweight, ceramic carbon insulation is prepared by coating or impregnating a porous carbon substrate with a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of an organodialkoxy silane and an organotrialkoxy silane in an acid or base medium in the presence of the carbon substrate. The siloxane gel is subsequently dried on the carbon substrate to form a ceramic carbon precursor. The carbon precursor is pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the ceramic insulation containing carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The carbon insulation is characterized as a porous, fibrous, carbon ceramic tile which is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft.

  16. Selective area growth of high-density GaN nanowire arrays on Si(111) using thin AlN seeding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. H.; Lee, P. Y.; Chen, K. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Wang, Y. L.; Cheng, K. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Selective area growth (SAG) of high-density (2.5×109 cm-2) GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The effects of morphology and thickness of the AlN seeding layer on the quality of SAG GaN NWs are investigated. A thin AlN seeding layer of 30 nm thick with a surface roughness of less than 0.5 nm is suitable for high quality SAG GaN NWs growth. High-density AlN nanopedestal arrays used as seeds for SAG GaN NWs are fabricated from thin AlN seeding layers using soft nanoimprint lithography. By adjusting the growth temperature and Ga/N flux ratio, hexagonal shaped SAG GaN NWs are realized. The quality of SAG GaN NWs is evaluated by low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Three major groups of PL peaks at 3.47, 3.45, and 3.41 eV are identified. The peak at 3.471 eV is related to the neutral donor-bound exciton emission, and the 3.41 eV broadband emission is attributed to stacking faults or structural defects. The 3.45 eV peak is identified as the emission due to exciton recombination at polar inversion domain boundaries of NWs.

  17. Observation of surface Dirac cone in high-quality ultrathin epitaxial Bi2Se3 topological insulator on AlN(0001) dielectric.

    PubMed

    Tsipas, Polychronis; Xenogiannopoulou, Evangelia; Kassavetis, Spyridon; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Golias, Evangelos; Bazioti, Calliope; Dimitrakopulos, George P; Komninou, Philomela; Liang, Hu; Caymax, Matty; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2014-07-22

    Bi2Se3 topological insulators (TIs) are grown on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. In a one-step growth at optimum temperature of 300 °C, Bi2Se3 bonds strongly with AlN without forming interfacial reaction layers. This produces high epitaxial quality Bi2Se3 single crystals with a perfect registry with the substrate and abrupt interfaces, allowing thickness scaling down to three quintuple layers (QL) without jeopardizing film quality. It is found by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that, remarkably, Bi2Se3 films maintain the 3D TI properties at very low thickness of 3QL (∼2.88 nm), exhibiting top surface gapless metallic states in the form of a Dirac cone.

  18. Optimisation of a smooth multilayer nickel silicide surface for ALN growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. M.; Enlund, J.; Yantchev, V.; Olsson, J.; Katardjiev, I.

    2008-03-01

    For use in thin film electroacoustic (TEA) technology a few hundred nanometre thick nickel silicide (NiSi) electrode would need to be fabricated. A complete fabrication process for the formation of over 200 nm thick silicide films has been optimised for use as an electroacoustic electrode. Optimisation of silicidation temperature and identification of the mono phase of silicide is demonstrated. Thick electrodes are formed by depositing multilayers of silicon and nickel pairs onto silicon (Si) substrates before rapid thermal annealing. The numbers of multilayers and relative material thicknesses are optimized for both surface roughness and electrical resistivity. The growth of textured aluminium nitride (AlN) has been investigated on the optimised surfaces.

  19. Deposition of highly textured AlN thin films by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Milena A.; Törndahl, Tobias; Katardjiev, Ilia; Kubart, Tomas

    2015-03-15

    Aluminum nitride thin films were deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and pulsed direct-current on Si (100) and textured Mo substrates, where the same deposition conditions were used for both techniques. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results show a pronounced improvement in the AlN crystalline texture for all films deposited by HiPIMS on Si. Already at room temperature, the HiPIMS films exhibited a strong preferred (002) orientation and at 400 °C, no contributions from other orientations were detected. Despite the low film thickness of only 200 nm, an ω-scan full width at half maximum value of 5.1° was achieved on Si. The results are attributed to the high ionization of sputtered material achieved in HiPIMS. On textured Mo, there was no significant difference between the deposition techniques.

  20. Seeded growth of bulk AlN crystals and grain evolution in polycrystalline AlN boules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noveski, V.; Schlesser, R.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Mahajan, S.; Beaudoin, S.; Sitar, Z.

    2005-05-01

    Large AlN crystals were grown by powder sublimation in a nitrogen atmosphere at low supersaturation and growth rates of 0.1-0.3 mm/h. The starting deposition surface was a sintered TaC disc. An appropriate adjustment of the system pressure and source-seed temperature gradient during the early stages of growth allowed epitaxial re-growth on AlN seeds that had been exposed to air. Single-crystalline AlN grains of 1 cm in size were achieved through multiple sublimation growth runs conducted at P=500 Torr and growth temperatures of 2050-2150 °C. Elemental analysis of impurities in the grown AlN boules confirmed low oxygen contamination levels of ˜10 19/cm 3. No discontinuities were introduced in the structural defect distribution in the individual single-crystalline grains by the multiple re-growth steps. Absence of preferred growth directions of grains suggest the epitaxial re-growth process is suitable for seeded single-crystal growth in any orientation.

  1. Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and properties of dense AlN sintered with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Dutta, G.; Dutta, I.

    1995-09-01

    The secondary phase constitution in two sintered AlN ceramics (1.8% and 4.2% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions) was studied as a function of heat treatment temperatures between 1,750 and 1,900 C under pure nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of the phase constitution on the physical properties, such ad density, thermal conductivity (K), and lattice constants, and on the mechanical properties in three-point bending, was also investigated. Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} was found to getter dissolved oxygen from the AlN lattice below 1,850 C, but evaporated at 1,850 C and above. Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} appeared to sublimate below 1,850 C in the atmosphere used in this study. Depending on the secondary phase constitution, heat treatment affected thermal conductivity favorably or adversely. Occasionally, samples with similar lattice oxygen contents were found to have different thermal conductivities, suggesting that factors besides dissolved oxygen can also influence K. Lattice parameter measurements indicated that, within the small range of lattice oxygen concentrations in the AlN samples studied, the c-axis was more sensitive than the a-axis to oxygen content.

  2. Transient effects of ionizing and displacive radiation on the dielectric properties of ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Zinkle, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Stoller, R. E.

    1996-03-01

    A resonant cavity technique was used to measure the dielectric constant and loss tangent of ceramic insulators at a frequency near 100 MHz during pulsed fission reactor irradiation near room temperature. Tests were performed on single crystal and several different grades of polycrystalline Al2O3, MgAl2O4, AlN, and Si3N4. Lead shielding experiments were performed for some of the irradiations in order to examine the importance of gamma ray versus neutron irradiation effects. With the exception of AlN, the dielectric constant of all of the ceramics decreased slightly (<0.2% change) during the pulsed fission reactor irradiation. The dielectric constant of AlN was observed to slightly increase during irradiation. Significant transient increases in the loss tangent to values as high as 6×10-3 occurred during pulsed reactor irradiation with peak ionizing and displacements per atom (dpa) radiation fields of 4.2×104 Gy/s and 2.4×10-6 dpa/s, respectively. The loss tangent measured during irradiation for the different ceramics did not show any correlation with the preirradiation or postirradiation values. Analysis of the results indicates that the transient increases in loss tangent are due to radiation induced increases in the electrical conductivity. The loss tangent increases were proportional to the ionizing dose rate in all materials except for AlN, which exhibited a dose rate exponent of ˜1.6.

  3. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  4. Preparation and characterization of single-crystal aluminum nitride substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, L.J.; Rojo, J.C.; Yakolev, N.; Shusterman, Y.; Dovidenko, K.; Wang, R.; Bhat, I.; Slack, G.A.

    2000-07-01

    Large (up to 10mm diameter) aluminum nitride (AlN) boules have been grown by the sublimation-recondensation method to study the preparation of high-quality single crystal substrates. The growth mechanism of the boules has been studied using AFM. It has been determined that large single crystal grains in those boules grow with a density of screw dislocations below 5 x 10{sup 4} cm{sup {minus}3} while edge dislocations are at lower density (none were observed). High-quality AlN single crystal substrates for epitaxial growth have been prepared and characterized using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) and AFM imaging, respectively. Also, the differential etching effect of KOH solutions on the N and Al-terminated faces of AlN on vicinal c-faces has been investigated. In order to identify the N or Al-terminated face, convergent beam electron diffraction has been used.

  5. Dielectric properties of spark plasma sintered AlN/SiC composite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Jia, Cheng-chang; Cao, Wen-bin; Wang, Cong-cong; Liang, Dong; Xu, Guo-liang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we have investigated how the dielectric loss tangent and permittivity of AlN ceramics are affected by factors such as powder mixing methods, milling time, sintering temperature, and the addition of a second conductive phase. All ceramic samples were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) under a pressure of 30 MPa. AlN composite ceramics sintered with 30wt%-40wt% SiC at 1600°C for 5 min exhibited the best dielectric loss tangent, which is greater than 0.3. In addition to AlN and β-SiC, the samples also contained 2H-SiC and Fe5Si3, as detected by X-ray difraction (XRD). The relative densities of the sintered ceramics were higher than 93%. Experimental results indicate that nano-SiC has a strong capability of absorbing electromagnetic waves. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of AlN-SiC ceramics with the same content of SiC decreased as the frequency of electromagnetic waves increased from 1 kHz to 1 MHz.

  6. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range. PMID:26370999

  7. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-09-08

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range.

  8. Effects of AlN interlayer on the transport properties of nearly lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, JunShuai; Zhang, JinCheng; Zhang, Wei; Li, Liang; Meng, FanNa; Lu, Ming; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2012-03-01

    The effects of AlN interlayer thickness on the transport properties of nearly lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied in detail. A very high electron mobility of approximately 1425 cm2/V s at room temperature and 5308 cm2/V s at 77 K together with a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density of 1.75×1013 cm-2 were obtained for nearly lattice-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructures with an optimum ˜1.2 nm thick AlN interlayer. For comparison, InAlN/GaN heterostructure without AlN interlayer exhibited a 2DEG density of 1.61×1013 cm-2 with low electron mobility of 949 and 2032 cm2/V s at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. This significant enhancement of electron mobility is mainly attributed to an optimized AlN interlayer, which provides a smooth interface between InAlN barrier layer and GaN buffer layer and hence remarkably reduces the alloy disorder scattering by suppressing carrier penetration from the GaN channel into the InAlN barrier layer. Simultaneously, a best surface morphology with a root mean square roughness value of 0.24 nm is obtained with the optimized AlN interlayer.

  9. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  10. Coating MCPs with AlN and GaN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhakim; Starikov, David; Boney, Chris

    2006-01-01

    A development effort underway at the time of reporting the information for this article is devoted to increasing the sensitivity of microchannel plates (MCPs) as detectors of photons and ions by coating the MCPs with nitrides of elements in period III of the periodic table. Conventional MCPs are relatively insensitive to slowly moving, large-mass ions for example, ions of biomolecules under analysis in mass spectrometers. The idea underlying this development is to coat an MCP to reduce its work function (decrease its electron affinity) in order to increase both (1) the emission of electrons in response to impingement of low-energy, large-mass ions and (2) the multiplying effect of secondary electron emission. Of particular interest as coating materials having appropriately low or even negative electron affinities are gallium nitride, aluminum nitride, and ternary alloys of general composition Al(x)Ga(1-x)N (where 0AlN and GaN both undoped and doped with Si were deposited on commercial MCPs by radio-frequency molecular-beam epitaxy (also known as plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy) at temperatures <200 C. This deposition technique is particularly suitable because (1) MCPs cannot withstand the higher deposition-substrate temperatures used to decompose constituent compounds in some other deposition techniques and (2) in this technique, the constituent Al, Ga, and N

  11. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  12. AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, E.; Freitas, J. A.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.

    2008-08-01

    In the present work we report on the AlN gap energy temperature dependence studied through the optical properties of high-quality large bulk AlN single crystals grown by a sublimation-recondensation technique. The cathodoluminescence, transmission/absorption as well as optical reflectance measurements at low temperature show a clear feature at about 6.03 eV, which could be attributed to the free exciton A. Even using a rather thick sample it was possible to observe the absorption due to the free exciton A in this energy range due to its large binding energy. We followed the temperature evolution of these features up to room temperature and inferred the gap energy temperature dependence using the exciton binding energy obtained by our group in the past.

  13. THE THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF OXYGEN PERMEABILITY IN SOL-GEL DERIVED CGO-COFE2O4 THIN FILMS ON POROUS CERAMIC SUBSTRATES: A SPUTTERED BLOCKING LAYER FOR THICKNESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K

    2009-01-08

    Mixed conductive oxides are a topic of interest for applications in oxygen separation membranes as well as use in producing hydrogen fuel through the partial oxidation of methane. The oxygen flux through the membrane is governed both by the oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the material's electronic conductivity; composite membranes like Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} (CGO)-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) use gadolinium doped ceria oxides as the ionic conducting material combined with cobalt iron spinel which serves as the electronic conductor. In this study we employ {approx} 50 nm sputtered CeO{sub 2} layers on the surface of porous CGO ceramic substrates which serve as solution 'blocking' layers during the thin film fabrication process facilitating the control of film thickness. Films with thickness of {approx} 2 and 4 microns were prepared by depositing 40 and 95 separate sol-gel layers respectively. Oxygen flux measurements indicated that the permeation increased with decreasing membrane thickness; thin film membrane with thickness on the micron level showed flux values an order of magnitude greater (0.03 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2} s) at 800 C as compared to 1mm thick bulk ceramic membranes (0.003 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2}).

  14. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.; Seals, Roland D.; Morrell, Jonathan S.

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  15. Similarities and differences in sublimation growth of SiC and AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, B. M.; Bickermann, M.; Nagata, S.; Heimann, P.; Filip, O.; Winnacker, A.

    2007-07-01

    The similarities and differences in development of crystal growth of bulk silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminum nitride (AlN) are discussed. It is concluded that AlN is going to become the second crystal grown in production scale using PVT technique. The growth technology of AlN may take advantage of learning from SiC technology as the latter is based on significant advances achieved in the course of last 20 years. The main differences between two materials are in incongruent evaporation of SiC and in poor compatibility of AlN with regular high-temperature crucible materials.

  16. Enhanced quality of epitaxial AlN thin films on 6H-SiC by ultra-high-vacuum ion-assisted reactive dc magnetron sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungasmita, S.; Birch, J.; Persson, P. O. A.˚.; Järrendahl, K.; Hultman, L.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial AlN thin films have been grown on 6H-SiC substrates by ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) ion-assisted reactive dc magnetron sputtering. The low-energy ion-assisted growth (Ei=17-27 eV) results in an increasing surface mobility, promoting domain-boundary annihilation and epitaxial growth. Domain widths increased from 42 to 135 nm and strained-layer epitaxy was observed in this energy range. For Ei>52 eV, an amorphous interfacial layer of AlN was formed on the SiC, which inhibited epitaxial growth. Using UHV condition and very pure nitrogen sputtering gas yielded reduced impurity levels in the films (O: 3.5×1018cm-3). Analysis techniques used in this study are in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction, secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy, atomic-force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and cross-section high-resolution electron microscopy.

  17. Sublimation Growth of Aluminum Ntride on Silicon Carbide Substrate with Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Transition Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gu,Z.; Edgar, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Zhuang, D.; Sitar, Z.; Coffey, D.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages of depositing AlN-SiC alloy transition layers on SiC substrates before the seeded growth of bulk AlN crystals were examined. The presence of AlN-SiC alloy layers helped to suppress the SiC decomposition by providing vapor sources of silicon and carbon. In addition, cracks in the final AlN crystals decreased from {approx}5 x 106/mm2 for those grown directly on SiC substrates to less than 1 x 106/mm2 for those grown on AlN-SiC alloy layers because of the intermediate lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficient of AlN-SiC. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of pure single-crystalline AlN upon both AlN-SiC alloys and SiC substrates. X-ray topography (XRT) demonstrated that strains present in the AlN crystals decreased as the AlN grew thicker. However, the XRT for AlN crystals grown directly on SiC substrates was significantly distorted with a high overall defect density compared to those grown on AlN-SiC alloys.

  18. Electrical properties of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor structure comprising Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal–organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Takeshi Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-15

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce D{sub it} to below 2 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  19. High-T sub c fluorine-doped YBa2Cu3O(y) films on ceramic substrates by screen printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1991-01-01

    Thick films of fluorine-doped YBa2Cu3O(y) were screen printed on highly polished alumina, magnesia spinel, strontium titanate, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. They were annealed at 1000 C and soaked in oxygen at 450 C, followed by slow cooling to room temperature. The films were characterized by electrical resistivity measurements as a function of temperature and x-ray diffraction. The film on YSZ showed the best characteristics with a T sub c (onset) of 91 K, T sub c (R equals 0) of 88.2 K, and a transition width, delta T sub c (10-90 percent), of approximately 1.7 K. The film adhesion, probably controlled by interdiffusion of cations between the film and the substrate, was good in all cases except on strontium titanate where the film completely detached from the substrate.

  20. Development of Field-Controlled Smart Optic Materials (ScN, AlN) with Rare Earth Dopants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop the fundamental materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics that are essential for industry, NASA, and DOD applications such as: membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras, flat-panel displays, etc. ScN and AlN thin films were fabricated on c-axis Sapphire (0001) or quartz substrate with the RF and DC magnetron sputtering. The crystal structure of AlN in fcc (rocksalt) and hcp (wurtzite) were controlled. Advanced electrical characterizations were performed, including I-V and Hall Effect Measurement. ScN film has a free carrier density of 5.8 x 10(exp 20)/per cubic centimeter and a conductivity of 1.1 x 10(exp 3) per centimeter. The background ntype conductivity of as-grown ScN has enough free electrons that can readily interact with the photons. The high density of free electrons and relatively low mobility indicate that these films contain a high level of shallow donors as well as deep levels. Also, the UV-Vis spectrum of ScN and AlN thin films with rare earth elements (Er or Ho) were measured at room temperature. Their optical band gaps were estimated to be about 2.33eV and 2.24eV, respectively, which are obviously smaller than that of undoped thin film ScN (2.4eV). The red-shifted absorption onset gives direct evidence for the decrease of band gap (Eg) and the energy broadening of valence band states are attributable to the doping. As the doped elements enter the ScN crystal lattices, the localized band edge states form at the doped sites with a reduction of Eg. Using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer, the decrease in refractive index with applied field is observed with a smaller shift in absorption coefficient.

  1. Effect of impurity incorporation on crystallization in AlN sublimation epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Gueorguiev, G. K.; Yakimova, R.; Janzén, E.

    2004-11-01

    We have implemented graphite, graphite-tantalum (Ta), and Ta growth environment to the sublimation epitaxy of aluminum nitride (AlN) and have studied development, morphological, and cathodoluminescence emission properties of AlN crystallites. Three apparently different types of crystallites form in the three different types of growth environment, which presumably manifests the relationship between crystallite-habit-type and impurities. Comparison between the cathodoluminescence spectra reveals certain dynamics in the incorporation into AlN of the main residual dopants, oxygen and carbon, when the growth environment changes. At high temperatures, in addition to Al and N2, which constitute the vapor over AlN, vapor molecules of CN, NO, Al2C, and many more can be present in the vapor from which AlN grows and both oxygen and carbon can be incorporated into AlN in varying ratios. Involving calculations of the cohesive energy per atom of such vapor molecules and also of Ta containing molecules, we have considered possible mechanisms how oxygen and carbon get incorporated into AlN and how this kinetics interferes with the growth environment. The positive effect of Ta consists in the marked reduction of residual oxygen and carbon impurities in the vapor from which AlN is growing. However, on the account of this reduction, the overall composition of the vapor changes. We speculate that during AlN nucleation stage small impurity levels may be beneficial in order to provide a better balance between the AlN crystallites development and impurity incorporation issues. We have shown that some impurity containing vapor molecules are acting as essential transport agents and suppliers of nitrogen for the AlN growth.

  2. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  3. Peridynamic simulation of the effects of coatings, substrate properties, incident angle, and tilt on sand impact damage in transparent ceramic windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Shanna; Schultz, Robert; Guven, Ibrahim; Zelinski, Brian J.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical durability of the external electromagnetic window or dome of a sensor often limits the environments in which the sensor or seeker system can be deployed. More durable window and dome materials will allow platforms to fly longer and faster and sustain lower maintenance and replacement costs. Unfortunately, no good models exist for predicting the performance of window and dome materials under harsh erosion environments, especially when the aperture substrates are protected by advanced coating systems. Recently, Peridynamic (PD) models of sand impact damage have been shown to produce the same phenomenological damage as is observed experimentally in zinc sulfide (ZnS). This paper discusses improvements in the PD impact simulation model which now allow it to simulate coated substrates and non-parallel impact events (where the flat impactor face is no longer parallel to the substrate but tilted by some small impact angle.) Two different substrates are considered, one with the properties of ZnS and another which is twice as strong and stiff as ZnS. Finally, the variation in damage as a function of impact angle is discussed. These modeling results demonstrate the versatility of the peridynamic model of sand impact damage and its potential for identifying trade space and providing design guidance during the development of more durable apertures.

  4. Methods of repairing a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  5. Pressure-density behavior for AlN, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SiO/sub 2/, TiB/sub 2/ and TiC powders up to 3. 5 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, H C

    1984-06-01

    As part of a program to model the behavior of ceramic bodies suitable for high-strength, low-density applications, the pressure-density characteristics are determined for AlN, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SiO/sub 2/, TiB/sub 2/, and TiC powders at 20/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 2 x 10/sup -4//sec. The pressure range is 0.11 MPa to 3.5 GPa. Both the loading and unloading cycles are examined. The pressure-density behavior can be represented by an empirical equation of state similar in functional form to the Birch-Murnaghan equation. The logarithm of the net compaction decreases linearly with the initial density ratio for AlN powder, and may do so for the others. The results constitute a database for testing models of powder behavior such as the P-..cap alpha.. model.

  6. Ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Ceramic burner

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, W.; Hebel, R.; Artelt, P.; Esfeld, G.; Jacob, A.

    1981-03-31

    Improvements in the mixing body and supporting structure of a molded-ceramic-brick burner enable the burner to withstand the vibrations induced during its operation. Designed for the combustion chambers of air heaters, the burner has a mixing body composed of layers of shaped ceramic bricks that interlock and are held together vertically by a ceramic holding bar. The mixing body is shaped like a mushroom - the upper layers have a larger radius than the lower ones.

  8. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  9. Evidence for graphite-like hexagonal AlN nanosheets epitaxially grown on single crystal Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsipas, P.; Kassavetis, S.; Tsoutsou, D.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Giamini, S. A.; Grazianetti, C.; Chiappe, D.; Molle, A.; Fanciulli, M.; Dimoulas, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrathin (sub-monolayer to 12 monolayers) AlN nanosheets are grown epitaxially by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Ag(111) single crystals. Electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy provide evidence that AlN on Ag adopts a graphite-like hexagonal structure with a larger lattice constant compared to bulk-like wurtzite AlN. This claim is further supported by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy indicating a reduced energy bandgap as expected for hexagonal AlN.

  10. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  11. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  12. Effects of AlN Coating Layer on High Temperature Characteristics of Langasite SAW Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lin; Peng, Bin; Cui, Yilin; Gong, Dongdong; Yang, Zhengbing; Liu, Xingzhao; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    High temperature characteristics of langasite surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with an AlN thin film have been investigated in this work. The AlN films were deposited on the prepared SAW devices by mid-frequency magnetron sputtering. The SAW devices coated with AlN films were measured from room temperature to 600 °C. The results show that the SAW devices can work up to 600 °C. The AlN coating layer can protect and improve the performance of the SAW devices at high temperature. The SAW velocity increases with increasing AlN coating layer thickness. The temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) of the prepared SAW devices decrease with increasing thickness of AlN coating layers, while the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K²) of the SAW devices increases with increasing AlN film thickness. The K² of the SAW devices increases by about 20% from room temperature to 600 °C. The results suggest that AlN coating layer can not only protect the SAW devices from environmental contamination, but also improve the K² of the SAW devices. PMID:27608027

  13. Effects of AlN Coating Layer on High Temperature Characteristics of Langasite SAW Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Lin; Peng, Bin; Cui, Yilin; Gong, Dongdong; Yang, Zhengbing; Liu, Xingzhao; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    High temperature characteristics of langasite surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with an AlN thin film have been investigated in this work. The AlN films were deposited on the prepared SAW devices by mid-frequency magnetron sputtering. The SAW devices coated with AlN films were measured from room temperature to 600 °C. The results show that the SAW devices can work up to 600 °C. The AlN coating layer can protect and improve the performance of the SAW devices at high temperature. The SAW velocity increases with increasing AlN coating layer thickness. The temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) of the prepared SAW devices decrease with increasing thickness of AlN coating layers, while the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K2) of the SAW devices increases with increasing AlN film thickness. The K2 of the SAW devices increases by about 20% from room temperature to 600 °C. The results suggest that AlN coating layer can not only protect the SAW devices from environmental contamination, but also improve the K2 of the SAW devices. PMID:27608027

  14. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  15. The sublimation growth of AlN fibers: transformations in morphology & fiber direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, H. Q.; Chen, X. L.; Li, H.; Wang, G.; Song, B.; Wang, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The growth of AlN fibers using sublimation method was investigated in the temperature range from 1600 °C to 2000 °C. Large-scale AlN fibers are obtained with diameters from 100 nm to 50 μm and lengths up to several millimeters. The fiber morphology and growth direction are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman scattering. The fibers change from wire-like to prism-like in morphology and increase in diameter as rising temperatures, accompanying a transformation in axial direction from [10 bar{1}0 ] to [0001]. The transformation in the growth direction is discussed in terms of AlN structure and supersaturation of AlN gas species. These results provide useful information for controlling the growth of large-scale AlN fibers.

  16. Microstructure of nitrides grown on inclined c-plane sapphire and SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, M.; Honshio, A.; Miyake, Y.; Nakano, K.; Tsuchiya, N.; Tsuda, M.; Okadome, Y.; Balakrishnan, K.; Iwaya, M.; Kamiyama, S.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2006-04-01

    High-quality (1 1 2bar 0) GaN layers with atomically flat surface have been grown on a precisely offset-angle-controlled (1 1bar 0 2) sapphire substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Insertion of AlGaN layer between underlying AlN layer and GaN was found to improve crystalline quality of upper GaN layer. In addition, a combination of high growth condition followed and epitaxial lateral overgrowth has been employed for the growth of GaN and this helped in reducing the dislocation density in the resultant layers. GaN and AlN were grown on (3 0 3bar 8) SiC substrates by MOVPE and sublimation methods, respectively. The crystal orientation of GaN and AlN could be just aligned to that of the substrate. Microstructure analysis of the layers was also carried out by transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Influence of aluminium nitride as a foaming agent on the preparation of foam glass-ceramics from high-titanium blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huan; Feng, Ke-qin; Wang, Hai-bo; Chen, Chang-hong; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2016-05-01

    To effectively reuse high-titanium blast furnace slag (TS), foam glass-ceramics were successfully prepared by powder sintering at 1000°C. TS and waste glass were used as the main raw materials, aluminium nitride (AlN) as the foaming agent, and borax as the fluxing agent. The influence of the amount of AlN added (1wt%-5wt%) on the crystalline phases, microstructure, and properties of the produced foam glass-ceramics was studied. The results showed that the main crystal phases were perovskite, diopside, and augite. With increasing AlN content, a transformation from diopside to augite occurred and the crystallinity of the pyroxene phases slightly decreased. Initially, the average pore size and porosity of the foam glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased; similarly, their bulk density and compressive strength decreased and subsequently increased. The optimal properties were obtained when the foam glass-ceramics were prepared by adding 4wt% AlN.

  18. Robust, high temperature-ceramic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Berchtold, Kathryn A.; Young, Jennifer S.

    2014-07-29

    A method of making ceramic membranes, and the ceramic membranes so formed, comprising combining a ceramic precursor with an organic or inorganic comonomer, forming the combination as a thin film on a substrate, photopolymerizing the thin film, and pyrolyzing the photopolymerized thin film.

  19. Surfactant effect of gallium during molecular-beam epitaxy of GaN on AlN (0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mula, Guido; Adelmann, C.; Moehl, S.; Oullier, J.; Daudin, B.

    2001-11-01

    We study the adsorption of Ga on (0001) GaN surfaces by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. It is shown that a dynamically stable Ga bilayer can be formed on the GaN surface for appropriate Ga fluxes and substrate temperatures. The influence of the presence of this Ga film on the growth mode of GaN on AlN(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy is studied. It is demonstrated that under nearly stoichiometric and N-rich conditions, the GaN layer relaxes elastically during the first stages of epitaxy. At high temperatures the growth follows a Stranski-Krastanov mode, whereas at lower temperatures kinetically formed flat platelets are observed. Under Ga-rich conditions-where a Ga bilayer is rapidly formed due to excess Ga accumulating on the surface-the growth follows a Frank-van der Merwe layer-by-layer mode at any growth temperature and no initial elastic relaxation occurs. Hence, it is concluded that excess Ga acts as a surfactant, effectively suppressing both Stranski-Krastanov islanding and platelet formation. It is further demonstrated that the Stranski-Krastanov transition is in competition with elastic relaxation by platelets, and it is only observed when relaxation by platelets is inefficient. As a result, a growth mode phase diagram is outlined for the growth of GaN on AlN(0001).

  20. Characterization of AlInN/AlN/GaN Heterostructures with Different AlN Buffer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çörekçi, S.; Dugan, S.; Öztürk, M. K.; Çetin, S. Ş.; Çakmak, M.; Özçelik, S.; Özbay, E.

    2016-07-01

    Two AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructures with 280-nm- and 400-nm-thick AlN buffer grown on sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL) and Hall-effect measurements. The symmetric (0002) plane with respect to the asymmetric (10bar{1}2) plane in the 280-nm-thick AlN buffer has a higher crystal quality, as opposed to the 400-nm-thick buffer. The thinner buffer improves the crystallinity of both (0002) and (10bar{1}2) planes in the GaN layers, it also provides a sizeable reduction in dislocation density of GaN. Furthermore, the lower buffer thickness leads to a good quality surface with an rms roughness of 0.30 nm and a dark spot density of 4.0 × 108 cm-2. The optical and transport properties of the AlInN/AlN/GaN structure with the relatively thin buffer are compatible with the enhancement in its structural quality, as verified by XRD and AFM results.

  1. Impact of anharmonic effects on the phase stability, thermal transport, and electronic properties of AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulumba, Nina; Raza, Zamaan; Hellman, Olle; Janzén, Erik; Abrikosov, Igor A.; Odén, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    Wurtzite aluminium nitride (AlN) is a technologically important wide-band-gap semiconductor with an unusually high thermal conductivity, used in optical applications and as a heatsink substrate. Explaining many of its properties depends on an accurate description of its lattice dynamics, which have thus far only been captured in the quasiharmonic approximation. In this work, we show that anharmonic effects have a considerable impact on its phase stability and transport properties, since they are much stronger in the rocksalt phase. We construct a theoretical pressure-temperature phase diagram of AlN, demonstrating that the rocksalt phase is stabilized by increasing temperature, with respect to the wurtzite phase. We recover the thermal conductivity of the wurtzite phase (320 Wm-1K-1 under ambient conditions) and compute the hitherto unknown thermal conductivity of the rocksalt phase (81 Wm-1K-1 ). We also show that the electronic band gap decreases with temperature. These findings provide further evidence that anharmonic effects cannot be ignored in simulations of materials intended for high-temperature applications.

  2. On the feasibility of silicene encapsulation by AlN deposited using an atomic layer deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bui, H. E-mail: M.P.deJong@utwente.nl; Wiggers, F. B.; Kovalgin, A. Y.; Jong, M. P. de E-mail: M.P.deJong@utwente.nl; Friedlein, R.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.

    2015-02-14

    Since epitaxial silicene is not chemically inert under ambient conditions, its application in devices and the ex-situ characterization outside of ultrahigh vacuum environments require the use of an insulating capping layer. Here, we report on a study of the feasibility of encapsulating epitaxial silicene on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films grown on Si(111) substrates by aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) precursors. By in-situ high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical modifications of the surface due to subsequent exposure to TMA and NH{sub 3} molecules, at temperatures of 300 °C and 400 °C, respectively, have been investigated. While an AlN-related layer can indeed be grown, silicene reacts strongly with both precursor molecules resulting in the formation of Si–C and Si–N bonds such that the use of these precursors does not allow for the protective AlN encapsulation that leaves the electronic properties of silicene intact.

  3. On the feasibility of silicene encapsulation by AlN deposited using an atomic layer deposition process.

    PubMed

    Van Bui, H; Wiggers, F B; Friedlein, R; Yamada-Takamura, Y; Kovalgin, A Y; de Jong, M P

    2015-02-14

    Since epitaxial silicene is not chemically inert under ambient conditions, its application in devices and the ex-situ characterization outside of ultrahigh vacuum environments require the use of an insulating capping layer. Here, we report on a study of the feasibility of encapsulating epitaxial silicene on ZrB2(0001) thin films grown on Si(111) substrates by aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and ammonia (NH3) precursors. By in-situ high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical modifications of the surface due to subsequent exposure to TMA and NH3 molecules, at temperatures of 300 °C and 400 °C, respectively, have been investigated. While an AlN-related layer can indeed be grown, silicene reacts strongly with both precursor molecules resulting in the formation of Si-C and Si-N bonds such that the use of these precursors does not allow for the protective AlN encapsulation that leaves the electronic properties of silicene intact.

  4. Effects of misfit dislocations and AlN buffer layer on the GaInN/GaN phase diagram of the growth mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Ujihara, Toru; Miyashita, Satoru; Sazaki, Gen

    2001-01-01

    The thickness-composition phase diagrams of the growth modes were determined for the GaInN-on-GaN (GaInN/GaN) and the GaInN-on-AlN-on-GaN (GaInN/AlN/GaN) structures. For this determination, the strain energy was calculated by considering the stress relaxation due to introduction of misfit dislocations, the surface energy was estimated from bonding enthalpy of the nearest-neighbor bonds on the surface, and the interface energy was estimated by considering both effects of the dangling bonds due to lattice misfit and the abrupt transition of bonding species at the heterointerface. From these phase diagrams, it was found that the layer-by-layer growth such as the Frank-van der Merwe mode was very difficult to obtain for the epitaxial growth of GaInN on GaN when the InN fraction is large. The Volmer-Weber mode is dominant in the phase diagram of the GaInN/GaN structures. The influence of an AlN buffer layer with a larger surface energy was studied by introducing an AlN layer between the GaInN layer and the GaN substrate. It was known that the layer-by-layer growth could be more easily obtained if misfit dislocations were introduced and an AlN layer was used as a buffer.

  5. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-02-10

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11-22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1-100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting.

  6. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11–22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-01-01

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11–22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11–22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1–100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting. PMID:26861595

  7. GHz spurious mode free AlN lamb wave resonator with high figure of merit using one dimensional phononic crystal tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoqiang; Zhu, Yao; Merugu, Srinivas; Wang, Nan; Sun, Chengliang; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    This letter reports a spurious mode free GHz aluminum nitride (AlN) lamb wave resonator (LWR) towards high figure of merit (FOM). One dimensional gourd-shape phononic crystal (PnC) tether with large phononic bandgaps is employed to reduce the acoustic energy dissipation into the substrate. The periodic PnC tethers are based on a 1 μm-thick AlN layer with 0.26 μm-thick Mo layer on top. A clean spectrum over a wide frequency range is obtained from the measurement, which indicates a wide-band suppression of spurious modes. Experimental results demonstrate that the fabricated AlN LWR has an insertion loss of 5.2 dB and a loaded quality factor (Q) of 1893 at 1.02 GHz measured in air. An impressive ratio of the resistance at parallel resonance (Rp) to the resistance at series resonance (Rs) of 49.8 dB is obtained, which is an indication of high FOM for LWR. The high Rp to Rs ratio is one of the most important parameters to design a radio frequency filter with steep roll-off.

  8. Unique high temperature microwave sintering of aluminum nitride based ceramics with high thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gengfu

    High temperature microwave sintering is one of the most challenging areas in microwave processing of ceramics. In this dissertation, for the first time, stable, controlled "ultra" high temperature (up to 2100°C) microwave sintering was achieved by development of a unique insulation system based on BN/ZrO2 fiber composite powder synthesized by a unique processing route. It uses a system approach to mitigate the tendency of all insulation materials to interfere with specimen coupling. This insulation system allows stable, controlled ultra high microwave sintering and could be modified to microwave process materials with different thermal, dielectric properties with improved properties. In addition, unlike other high temperature microwave insulation schemes that must be replaced after each run, the insulation system is robust enough for repeated use. Using the insulation design, high density and very high thermal conductivity (˜225 W/m·K) AlN ceramics were fabricated much more efficiently (≤6 hours versus 10's to 100's of hours at high temperature) by microwave sintering than by comparable conventional sintering. A detailed data study of densification, grain growth and thermal conductivity in microwave sintered AlN indicated that there were two time regimes in the development of high thermal conductivity AlN and that oxygen removal was more important to the development of high thermal conductivity than removal of the liquid phase sintering phase. While there have been many previous studies examining processing of high thermal conductivity AlN, this was the first study of microwave processing of high thermal conductivity AlN. AlN-TiB2 composites, which had previously only been successfully densified with pressure-assisted techniques such as HIPing or hot pressing, were successfully microwave sintered in this dissertation. The effect of TiB 2 on the densification behavior and thermal, mechanical, and dielectric properties of microwave sintered AlN based composites

  9. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X.-Y.

    2016-06-01

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. The formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamically driven process.

  10. Modeling & processing of ceramic and polymer precursor ceramic matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin

    Synthesis and processing of novel materials with various advanced approaches have attracted much attention of engineers and scientists for the past thirty years. Many advanced materials display a number of exceptional properties and can be produced with different novel processing techniques. For example, AlN is a promising candidate for electronic, optical and opto-electronic applications due to its high thermal conductivity, high electrical resistivity, high acoustic wave velocity and large band gap. Large bulk AlN crystal can be produced by sublimation of AlN powder. Novel nonostructured multicomponent refractory metal-based ceramics (carbides, borides and nitrides) show a lot of exceptional mechanical, thermal and chemical properties, and can be easily produced by pyrolysis of suitable preceramic precursors mixed with metal particles. The objective of this work is to study sublimation and synthesis of AlN powder, and synthesis of SiC-based metal ceramics. For AlN sublimation crystal growth, we will focus on modeling the processes in the powder source that affect significantly the sublimation growth as a whole. To understand the powder porosity evolution and vapor transport during powder sublimation, the interplay between vapor transport and powder sublimation will be studied. A physics-based computational model will be developed considering powder sublimation and porosity evolution. Based on the proposed model, the effect of a central hole in the powder on the sublimation rate is studied and the result is compared to the case of powder without a hole. The effect of hole size on the sublimation rate will be studied. The effects of initial porosity, particle size and driving force on the sublimation rate are also studied. Moreover, the optimal growth condition for large diameter crystal quality and high growth rate will be determined. For synthesis of SiC-based metal ceramics, we will focus on developing a multi-scale process model to describe the dynamic behavior

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  12. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-12-22

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs.

  13. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Brown, Ian G.; Wei, Bo; Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Bhatia, C. Singh

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article.

  14. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  15. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  16. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  17. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  18. Electrical characterization of Si doped AlN films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Simeon; Bakalova, Silvia; Szekeres, Anna; Minkov, Ivaylo; Socol, Gabriel; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion

    2015-04-01

    The electrical properties of thin AlN films doped with Si (AlN:Si) have been investigated. The films were synthesized on Si substrates at 800 °C by pulsed laser deposition in low-pressure nitrogen ambient. The AlN:Si films exhibit non-ohmic I-V characteristics and the current through these films is controlled by space charge limited current. The C-V dependence of metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) structures with AlN:Si films exhibits an excess capacitance around zero bias voltage. This excess capacitance indicates the presence of deep acceptor levels situated at the boundaries of adjacent grains in the AlN:Si films. The Si donor density in the AlN:Si films, estimated from the 1 MHz C-V characteristics, is of the order of 1018 cm-3. The impedance measurements of these AlN:Si structures at different test voltage frequencies reveal that the charge transport mechanism is dominated by either thermally-activated hopping or electron tunneling from occupied to nearest unoccupied deep levels.

  19. Surfactant effect of gallium during the growth of GaN on AlN(0001xAF) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogneau, N.; Sarigiannidou, E.; Monroy, E.; Monnoye, S.; Mank, H.; Daudin, B.

    2004-08-01

    The growth mode of N-face GaN deposited on AlN(0001¯) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated. Based on reflection high-energy electron diffraction experiments, we demonstrate that for appropriate Ga fluxes and substrate temperature, a self-regulated 1-ML-thick Ga excess film can be formed on the growing surface. Depending on the presence of this Ga monolayer, the growth can proceed following either the Stranski-Krastanow or the Frank Van der Merwe growth modes, hence enabling the synthesis of either quantum dots or quantum wells.

  20. A Microstructural Analysis of Orientation Variation in Epitaxial AlN on Si, Its Probable Origin, and Effect on Subsequent GaN Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beye, R.; George, T.; Yang, J. W.; Khan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    A structural examination of aluminum nitride growth on [111] silicon was carried out using transmission electron microscopy. Electron diffraction indicates that the basal planes of the wurtzitic overlayer mimic the orientation of the close-packed planes of the substrate. However, considerable, random rotation in the basal plane and random out-of-plane tilts were evident. This article examines these issues with a structural examination of AlN and GaN/AlN on silicon and compares the findings to those reported in the literature.

  1. Structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Douglas F.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief history of the field of materials sciences and goes on to expound the advantages of the fastest growing area in that field, namely ceramics. Since ceramics are moving to fill the demand for lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant materials, advancements will rely more on processing and modeling from the atomic scale up which is made possible by advanced analytical, computer, and processing techniques. All information is presented in viewgraph format.

  2. Multilayer coatings on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Coronado, C.A.; Bennett, W.D.; Stewart, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    Thin-film optical and non-optical multilayer coatings are deposited onto flexible substrates using a vacuum web coater developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The coater`s primary application is rapid prototyping of multilayer (1) polymer coatings, (2) polymer/metal coatings, (3) ceramic/metal coatings, and (4) hybrid polymer, ceramic, and metal coatings. The coater is fully automated and incorporates polymer evaporation and extrusion heads, high-rate magnetron sputtering cathodes, and e-beam evaporation sources. Polymer electrolytes are deposited by extrusion techniques. Flexible plastic, metal, and ceramic substrates can be coated using roll-to-roll or closed-loop configurations. Examples of multilayer optical coatings demonstrated to date are solar reflectors, heat mirrors, Fabry-Perot filters, and alpha particle sensors. Nonoptical coatings include multilayer magnetic metal/ceramic and lamellar composites.

  3. Ceramic composite coating

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.

    1997-01-01

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  4. Ceramic composite coating

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  5. Laser machining of ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Laudel, A.

    1980-01-01

    The Kansas City Division of The Bendix Corporation manufactures hybrid microcircuits (HMCs) using both thin film and thick film technologies. Laser machining is used to contour the ceramic substrates and to drill holes in the ceramic for frontside-backside interconnections (vias) and holes for mounting components. A 1000 W CO/sub 2/ type laser is used. The laser machining process, and methods used for removing protruding debris and debris from holes, for cleaning the machined surfaces, and for refiring are described. The laser machining process described consistently produces vias, component holes and contours with acceptable surface quality, hole locations, diameter, flatness and metallization adhesion. There are no cracks indicated by dipping in fluorescent dye penetrant and the substances are resistant to repeated thermal shock.

  6. Ceramic composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    1991-12-31

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  7. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  8. Seeded growth of AlN bulk single crystals by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesser, R.; Dalmau, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2002-06-01

    AlN bulk single crystals were grown by sublimation of AlN powder at temperatures of 2100-2300°C in an open crucible geometry in a 400 Torr nitrogen atmosphere. Small, single crystalline AlN c-platelets, prepared by vaporization of Al in a nitrogen atmosphere, were used as seeds. Seeded growth occurred preferentially in the crystallographic c-direction, with growth rates exceeding 500 μm/h, while the seed crystals grew only marginally in the c-plane. Transparent, centimeter-sized AlN single crystals were grown within 24 h. Characterization by X-ray diffraction showed that rocking curves around the (0 0 0 2) reflection were very narrow (25 arcsec full-width at half-maximum), thus indicating very high crystalline quality of the material grown on the seeds.

  9. The Oxidation of AlN in Dry and Wet Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth; Humphrey, Donald; Jacobson, Nathan; Yoshio, Tetsuo; Oda, Kohei

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of AlN containing 3.5 wt% Y2O3 were studied by thermogravimetric analysis in dry oxygen and 10% H2O/balance oxygen at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 C for times between 48 and 100 h. The oxidation kinetics for AlN in dry oxygen were parabolic and of approximately the same magnitude and temperature dependence as other alumina forming materials. In this case, diffusion of oxygen and/or aluminum through the alumina scale is the rate limiting mechanism. The oxidation kinetics for AlN in wet oxygen were nearly linear and much more rapid than rates observed in dry oxygen. Numerous micropores were observed in the alumina formed on AIN in wet oxygen. These pores provide a fast path for oxygen transport. The linear kinetics observed in this case suggest that the interface reaction rate of AlN with wet oxygen is the oxidation rate limiting step.

  10. Vacuum outgassing of artificial dielectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Viet Nguyen-Tuong

    1994-05-01

    A special aluminum nitride (AlN)-glassy carbon artificial dielectric ceramic for microwave absorption at low temperature has been developed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to manufacture the higher order mode (HOM) loads used in the superconducting cavities of the machine. As the HOM loads share the same ultrahigh vacuum as the superconducting cavities, very tight vacuum requirements are imposed on the HOM load's material. Vacuum outgassing rates have been measured and compared for AlN-15% glassy carbon artificial ceramic in fully degassed condition produced by heating to high temperature in a vacuum furnace. In addition, the effect of exposure to air, nitrogen gas, and isopropanol is discussed. A typical outgassing rate at room temperature is 2.5 x 10{sup -11} Torr l/s/cm{sup 2}, 24 h after initial pump down. Baking 24 h at 150 C was sufficient to attain an outgassing rate of less than 4 x 10{sup -12} Torr l/s/cm2. However, when the ceramic has a lower bulk density or a higher apparent porosity, the outgassing rates can be two orders of magnitude higher.

  11. Vacuum outgassing of artificial dielectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Tuong, V. )

    1994-07-01

    A special aluminum nitride (AlN)--glassy carbon artificial dielectric ceramic for microwave absorption at low temperature has been developed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to manufacture the higher order mode (HOM) loads used in the superconducting cavities of the machine. As the HOM loads share the same ultrahigh vacuum as the superconducting cavities, very tight vacuum requirements are imposed on the HOM load's material. Vacuum outgassing rates have been measured and compared for AlN--15% glassy carbon artificial ceramic in fully degassed condition produced by heating to high temperature in a vacuum furnace. In addition, the effect of exposure to air, nitrogen gas, and isopropanol is discussed. A typical outgassing rate at room temperature is 2.5[times]10[sup [minus]11] Torr l/s/cm[sup 2], 24 h after initial pump down. Baking 24 h at 150 [degree]C was sufficient to attain an outgassing rate of less than 4[times]10[sup [minus]12] Torr l/s/cm[sup 2]. However, when the ceramic has a lower bulk density or a higher apparent porosity, the outgassing rates can be two orders of magnitude higher.

  12. Transient effects of ionizing and displacive radiation on the dielectric properties of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1996-03-01

    A resonant cavity technique was used to measure the dielectric constant and loss tangent of ceramic insulators at a frequency near 100 MHz during pulsed fission reactor irradiation near room temperature. Tests were performed on single crystal and several different grades of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, AlN, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Lead shielding experiments were performed for some of the irradiations in order to examine the importance of gamma ray versus neutron irradiation effects. With the exception of AlN, the dielectric constant of all of the ceramics decreased slightly ({lt}0.2{percent} change) during the pulsed fission reactor irradiation. The dielectric constant of AlN was observed to slightly increase during irradiation. Significant transient increases in the loss tangent to values as high as 6{times}10{sup {minus}3} occurred during pulsed reactor irradiation with peak ionizing and displacements per atom (dpa) radiation fields of 4.2{times}10{sup 4} Gy/s and 2.4{times}10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s, respectively. The loss tangent measured during irradiation for the different ceramics did not show any correlation with the preirradiation or postirradiation values. Analysis of the results indicates that the transient increases in loss tangent are due to radiation induced increases in the electrical conductivity. The loss tangent increases were proportional to the ionizing dose rate in all materials except for AlN, which exhibited a dose rate exponent of {approximately}1.6. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  14. Nickel oxide, ceramic insulated, high temperature coating

    SciTech Connect

    Aprigliano, L.F.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes a corrosion, oxidation, and heat resistant layered coating for a substrate material in a high temperature, corrosive environment, consisting of: a base layer selected from the group consisting of Aluminide and MCrAlY, wherein M is a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel, cobalt, and a combination thereof; a ceramic layer, impermeable to the metallic elements of the substrate material and the MCrAlY layer, and bonded to the substrate material by the MCrAlY layer; and, a nickel oxide layer, applied to the ceramic layer.

  15. Far-infrared transmission in GaN, AlN, and AlGaN thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, J.; Hernandez, S.; Alarcon-Llado, E.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T.; Calleja, E.

    2008-08-01

    We present a far-infrared transmission study on group-III nitride thin films. Cubic GaN and AlN layers and c-oriented wurtzite GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x<0.3) layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs and Si(111) substrates, respectively. The Berreman effect allows us to observe simultaneously the transverse optic and the longitudinal optic phonons of both the cubic and the hexagonal films as transmission minima in the infrared spectra acquired with obliquely incident radiation. We discuss our results in terms of the relevant electromagnetic theory of infrared transmission in cubic and wurtzite thin films. We compare the infrared results with visible Raman-scattering measurements. In the case of films with low scattering volumes and/or low Raman efficiencies and also when the Raman signal of the substrate material obscures the weaker peaks from the nitride films, we find that the Berreman technique is particularly useful to complement Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Structural properties and transfer characteristics of sputter deposition AlN and atomic layer deposition Al2O3 bilayer gate materials for H-terminated diamond field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banal, Ryan G.; Imura, Masataka; Liu, Jiangwei; Koide, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    Significant improvements in electrical properties are achieved from AlN/Al2O3 stack gate H-terminated diamond metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFETs) upon improving the structural quality of an AlN insulating layer. The 5-nm-thick Al2O3 layer and 175-nm-thick AlN film are successively deposited by atomic layer deposition and sputter deposition techniques, respectively, on a (100) H-diamond epitaxial layer substrate. The AlN layer exhibits a poly-crystalline structure with the hexagonal wurtzite phase. The crystallite growth proceeds along the c-axis direction and perpendicular to the substrate surface, resulting in a columnar grain structure with an average grain size of around ˜40 nm. The MIS diode fabricated provides a leak current density as low as ˜10-5 A/cm2 at gate voltage bias in the range of -8 V and +4 V. The MISFET fabricated shows normally off enhancement mode transfer characteristic. The drain-source current maximum, threshold voltage, and maximum extrinsic conductance of the FET with 4 μm gate length are -8.89 mA/mm, -0.22 V, and 6.83 mS/mm, respectively.

  17. Stable ferromagnetic state in Si-doped AlN with cation vacancies: Ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintalapati, Sandhya; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic property of Si-doped AlN with Al-vacancy is studied using first principles calculations based on spin polarized density functional theory. The Si dopant alone does not introduce the magnetic moment in AlN. However, the doping of Si in AlN reduces the formation energy caused by Al-vacancy, and stabilizes the spin polarized state. The magnetic moments are mainly localized on N atoms surrounding the defect. The strong ferromagnetic state is obtained in AlN due to the combined role of Al-vacancy and Si-dopant.

  18. First-principles study on stability, and growth strategies of small AlnZr (n=1-9) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhou, Zhonghao; Wang, Hongbin; Li, Shengli; Zhao, Zhen

    2016-09-01

    The geometries, relative stability as well as growth strategies of the AlnZr (n=1-9) clusters are investigated with spin polarized density functional theory: BLYP. The results reveal that the AlnZr clusters are more likely to form the dense accumulation structures than the AlN (N=1-10) clusters. The average binding energies of AlnZr are higher than those of AlN clusters. The AlnZr (n=3, 5, and 7) clusters are more stable than others by the differences of the total binding energies. Mülliken population analysis for the AlnZr clusters shows that the electron's adsorption ability of Zr is slightly lower than that of Al except for AlZr cluster. Local peaks of the HOMO-LUMO gap curve are found at n=3, 5, and 7. The reaction energies of AlnZr are higher, which means that AlnZr clusters are easier to react with Al clusters. Zr atom preferential reacts with Al2 cluster. Local peaks of the magnetic dipole moments are found at n=2, 5, and 8.

  19. Light extraction enhancement of 265 nm deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with over 90 mW output power via an AlN hybrid nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Naoki, Tamari; Kinoshita, Toru; Obata, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-30

    Deep-ultraviolet (DUV) aluminum gallium nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on transparent aluminum nitride (AlN) substrates with high light extraction efficiency and high power are proposed and demonstrated. The AlN bottom side surface configuration, which is composed of a hybrid structure of photonic crystals and subwavelength nanostructures, has been designed using finite-difference time-domain calculations to enhance light extraction. We have experimentally demonstrated an output power improvement of up to 196% as a result of the use of the embedded high-light-extraction hybrid nanophotonic structure. The DUV-LEDs produced have demonstrated output power as high as 90 mW in DC operation at a peak emission wavelength of 265 nm.

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of GaN/(0001)AlN and AlN/(0001)GaN growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. W.; Carlson, E. P.; Therrien, R. J.; Christman, J. A.; Nemanich, R. J.; Davis, R. F.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanisms of growth of GaN on AlN and AlN on GaN via gas source-molecular beam epitaxy with NH3 as the nitrogen source have been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The growth of GaN on AlN at low temperatures (650-750 °C) occurs via a Stranski-Krastanov 2D→3D type mechanism with the transition to 3D growth occurring at ≈10-15 Å. The mechanism changes to Frank van der Merwe (FM)/layer-by-layer growth above 800 °C. The growth of AlN on GaN occurred via a FM layer-by-layer mechanism within the 750-900 °C temperature range investigated. We propose a model based on the interaction of ammonia and atomic hydrogen with the GaN/AlN surfaces which indicates that the surface kinetics of hydrogen desorption and ammonia decomposition are the factors that determine the GaN growth mechanism.

  1. Native oxide and hydroxides and their implications for bulk AlN crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, J. H.; Du, L.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2008-08-01

    Oxygen degrades the properties of AlN, thus producing bulk single crystals with low oxygen concentrations is an important goal. Most of the oxygen in bulk AlN single crystals grown by the sublimation-recondensation method originates from the hydroxides and oxides that spontaneously form on the surfaces of the AlN source powder. For a typical AlN powder with an average particle size of 1-2 μm, a 1-3 nm thick oxide and/or hydroxide can account for most of its oxygen (generally in the order of 1.0 wt%) and hydrogen (200-300 ppm). Heating the AlN powder source at 1950 °C for 10 h in a nitrogen atmosphere reduced its surface area by a factor of 160 (due to sintering), the oxygen concentration by 16 and the hydrogen concentration by 67. The difference in these reduction factors suggests some of the oxygen is dissolved into the bulk AlN with this heat treatment. Firstly annealing the AlN powder at a low temperature (950-1000 °C) for several hours before sintering at 1950 °C, the oxygen and hydrogen concentrations were reduced to lower levels. The low-temperature treatment is effective in eliminating oxygen and hydrogen from the surface of the powder, while high-temperature sintering reduces the specific surface area of the source. The combination of heat treatments produced a source with oxygen and hydrogen concentrations as low as 0.015 wt% O (1.9×10 19 atoms O cm -3) and 1.7 ppm H (3.4×10 18 atoms H cm -3). Annealing becomes less effective at removing oxygen and hydrogen with longer heat treatments, suggesting there is a minimum oxygen concentration that can be produced by this method.

  2. High-Temperature Electromechanical Characterization of AlN Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyang; Kim, Jinwook; Dalmau, Rafael; Schlesser, Raoul; Preble, Edward; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-10-01

    Hexagonal AlN is a non-ferroelectric material and does not have any phase transition up to its melting point (>2000°C), which indicates the potential use of AlN for high-temperature sensing. In this work, the elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants of AlN single crystals were investigated at elevated temperatures up to 1000°C by the resonance method. We used resonators of five different modes to obtain a complete set of material constants of AlN single crystals. The electrical resistivity of AlN at elevated temperature (1000°C) was found to be greater than 5 × 10(10) Ω · cm. The resonance frequency of the resonators, which was mainly determined by the elastic compliances, decreased linearly with increasing temperature, and was characterized by a relatively low temperature coefficient of frequency, in the range of -20 to -36 ppm/°C. For all the investigated resonator modes, the elastic constants and the electromechanical coupling factors exhibited excellent temperature stability, with small variations over the full temperature range, <11.2% and <17%, respectively. Of particular significance is that due to the pyroelectricity of AlN, both the dielectric and the piezoelectric constants had high thermal resistivity even at extreme high temperature (1000°C). Therefore, high electrical resistivity, temperature independence of electromechanical properties, as well as high thermal resistivity of the elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric properties, suggest that AlN single crystals are a promising candidate for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing applications. PMID:26759848

  3. Adhesion, friction and micromechanical properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ceramics, both in monolithic and coating form, are reviewed. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials, and metals. For the simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. The first part discusses the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces. The role of chemical bonding in adhesion and friction, and the effects of surface contaminant films and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are discussed. The second part deals with abrasion of ceramics. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of ceramic deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  4. Electronic structures, elastic properties, and minimum thermal conductivities of cermet M{sub 3}AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin; Chen, ZhiQian; Li, ChunMei; Li, Feng; Nie, ChaoYin

    2014-08-15

    The electronic structures and elastic anisotropies of cubic Ti{sub 3}AlN, Zr{sub 3}AlN, and Hf{sub 3}AlN are investigated by pseudopotential plane-wave method based on density functional theory. At the Fermi level, the electronic structures of these compounds are successive with no energy gap between conduct and valence bands, and exhibit metallicity in ground states. In valence band of each partial density of states, the different orbital electrons indicate interaction of corresponding atoms. In addition, the anisotropy of Hf{sub 3}AlN is found to be significantly different from that of Ti{sub 3}AlN and Zr{sub 3}AlN, which involve the differences in the bonding strength. It is notable that Hf{sub 3}AlN is a desired thermal barrier material with the lowest thermal conductivity at high temperature among the three compounds. - Graphical abstract: 1.Young's moduli of anti-perovskite Ti{sub 3}AlN, Zr{sub 3}AlN, and Hf{sub 3}AlN in full space. 2.Electron density differences on crystal planes (1 0 0), (2 0 0), and (1 1 0) of anti-perovskite Zr{sub 3}AlN. - Highlights: • We calculated three anti-perovskite cermets with first-principles theory. • We illustrated 3D Young modulus and found the anomalous anisotropy. • We explained the anomaly and calculated the minimum thermal conductivities.

  5. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  6. Magnetic properties of transition metal doped AlN nanosheet: First-principle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Changmin; Qin, Hongwei Zhang, Yongjia; Hu, Jifan; Ju, Lin

    2014-02-07

    We carry out our first-principles calculations within density functional theory to study the 3d transition metal (TM) doped AlN nanosheets. The calculated results indicate that a stoichiometric AlN nanosheet is graphene-like structure and nonmagnetic. The TM impurities can induce magnetic moments, localized mainly on the 3d TM atoms and neighboring N atoms. Our calculated results of TM-doped nanosheet systems indicate a strong interaction between 3d orbit of TM atom and the 2p orbit of N atoms. In addition, the Mn- and Ni-doped AlN nanosheet with half-metal characters seems to be good candidates for spintronic applications. When substituting two Al atoms, the relative energies of the states between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling are investigated sufficiently. The exchange coupling of Co- and Ni-doped AlN nanosheets exhibits a transformation with different distances of two TM atoms and that of Cr-, Mn-, and Fe-doped AlN nanosheets is not changed.

  7. YAG laser surface densification of a zircon refractory by adding AlN nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.Y.; Wang, A.H. . E-mail: pmahwang@public.wh.hb.cn; Zeng, D.W.; Bai, Z.K.; Xie, C.S.; Song, W.L.; Zhu, X.C.

    2006-04-15

    A zircon refractory zirconium silicate was surface melted with a pulsed YAG laser to introduce AlN nanoparticles, with the aim of improving its surface density and modifying the corresponding microstructure. The microstructure and phase structure features of the refractory induced by the laser beam were studied by scanning transmission microscopy, incorporating energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analysis. Results show that the addition of AlN nanoparticles into the refractory surface significantly reduced the laser beam energy required to melt the surface of the refractory. The laser-melted depth was increased with an increase of laser power from 133 to 200 W. The microstructure of the laser-treated zone with the addition of AlN nanoparticles has a much finer dendritic structure with undeveloped primary dendrite arms while without the addition of AlN nanoparticles, a coarser dendrite with much long primary dendrite arms was observed. The phase structure of the laser-treated layer with the addition of AlN nanoparticles was found to be composed of m-ZrO{sub 2}, c-ZrO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4} and H-AlN.

  8. Raman characterization and stress analysis of AlN grown on SiC by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Liu, B.; Edgar, J. H.; Rajasingam, S.; Kuball, M.

    2002-11-01

    The stress distribution in bulk AlN crystals seeded on 6H-SiC was theoretically modeled and also determined experimentally from Raman peak positions. The full width at half maximum of the AlN Raman peaks showed the crystal quality improved as its thickness increased. The theoretical frequency shifts of the E1 (transverse optical) mode calculated from model-predicted stress were in good agreement with experimental values taken along the edges of crystal samples. The stress was linearly distributed along the depth of the samples, and changed from compressive at the growing surface to tensile at the interface between AlN and SiC for thickness range of several hundred micrometers. Large tensile stresses, up to 0.6 GPa, were detected in the AlN at the interface. The effects of growth temperature and sample thickness were investigated. It is predicted that the AlN on 6H-SiC must be at least 2 mm thick to prevent it from cracking while cooling down the sample from a growth temperature of 2000 degC.

  9. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in

  10. Method for improving the performance of oxidizable ceramic materials in oxidizing environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improved adhesion of thermal barrier coatings to nonmetallic substrates using a dense layer of ceramic on an underlying nonmetallic substrate that includes at least one oxidizable component. The improved adhesion occurs because the application of the dense ceramic layer forms a diffusion barrier for oxygen. This diffusion barrier prevents the oxidizable component of the substrate from decomposing. The present invention applies ceramic by a process that deposits a relatively thick and dense ceramic layer on the underlying substrate. The formation of the dense layer of ceramic avoids the problem of void formation associated with ceramic formation by most prior art thermal decomposition processes. The formation of voids has been associated with premature spalling of thermal barrier layers and other protective layers applied to substrates.

  11. First-principles calculations for point defects in MAX phases Ti2AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaowen; Yang, Shutong; Wang, Canglong

    2016-04-01

    This paper outlines general physical issues associated with performing computational numerical simulations of primary point defects in MAX phases Ti2AlN. First-principles solutions are possible due to the development of computational resources of software and hardware. The calculation accuracy is a good agreement with the experimental results. As an important application of our simulations, the results could provide a theoretical guidance for future experiments and application of Ti2AlN. For example, the N mono-vacancy is the most difficult to form. On the contrary, the mono-vacancy formation in Ti2AlN is energetically most favorable for the Al atom. The essence of the phenomena is explained by the calculated density of state (DOS).

  12. Raman, photoluminescence and absorption studies on high quality AlN single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senawiratne, J.; Strassburg, M.; Dietz, N.; Haboeck, U.; Hoffmann, A.; Noveski, V.; Dalmau, R.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2005-05-01

    High quality AlN single crystals grown by physical vapour transport and by sublimation of AlN powder were investigated by Raman, photoluminescence (PL) and absorption spectroscopy. Absorption edges of the AlN single crystals varying from 4.1 eV to 5.9 eV as determined by transmission measurements. Near band edge absorption, PL and glow discharge mass spectroscopy identified impurities such as oxygen, silicon, carbon, and boron that contribute to the absorption and emission bands below the bandgap. The absorption coefficients were derived from UV (6 eV) to FIR (60 meV) spectral range. The exact crystal orientation of the samples, and their low carrier density were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence of a homoepitaxial AlN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, E.; Freitas, J. A.; Slack, G. A.; Schowalter, L. J.; Kneissl, M.; Treat, D. W.; Johnson, N. M.

    2005-07-01

    In the present work we will report on the optical properties of an AlN film homoepitaxially grown on a high-quality large bulk AlN single crystal. The latter was grown by a sublimation-recondensation technique, while the film was grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Cathodoluminescence measurements were performed using electron beam energies between 2 and 10 keV in order to excite the sample and so to probe different sample depths, making it possible to differentiate between different features which originate in the AlN homoepitaxial film. The penetration depth has been determined through the calculation of the Bohr-Bethe maximum range of excitation using the approximation to the Everhart-Hoff expression for the energy loss within a solid.

  14. Growth of AlN nanostructure on GaN using MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, R.; Ramesh, R.; Jayasakthi, M.; Prabakaran, K.; Kuppulingam, B.; Sankaranarayanan, M.; Balaji, M.; Arivazhagan, P.; Singh, Subra; Baskar, K.

    2015-06-24

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) nanowalls have been epitaxially grown on dislocation assisted GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} template by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) without any help of metal catalysts. A large number of nanowalls with thicknesses of 1.5-2.0 µm and height 400 nm have been deposited. The AlN nanowalls were found to have a preferred c-axis oriented with a hexagonal crystal structure. The AlN nanowalls and GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} template have been characterize at room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD)

  15. Loss of Ductility Caused by AlN Precipitation in Hadfield Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radis, Rene; Schlacher, Christian; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Mayr, Peter; Enzinger, Norbert; Schröttner, Hartmuth; Sommitsch, Christof

    2012-04-01

    Two modified X120Mn12 Hadfield steels, differing in the amount of the alloying elements Al and N, are analyzed with respect to AlN precipitation and its effects on ductility. Charpy impact tests are performed, demonstrating the loss of ductility in the one grade containing a high density of AlN precipitates. The characterization of the precipitates is carried out by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). Depending on chemical composition, primary and secondary AlN precipitates are detected on prior austenite grain boundaries and within the bulk volume. The experimental observations are confirmed by thermokinetic simulations, using the software package MatCalc (Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria).

  16. Ab initio modeling of zincblende AlN layer in Al-AlN-TiN multilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yadav, S. K.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2016-06-13

    An unusual growth mechanism of metastable zincblende AlN thin film by diffusion of nitrogen atoms into Al lattice is established. Using first-principles density functional theory, we studied the possibility of thermodynamic stability of AlN as a zincblende phase due to epitaxial strains and interface effect, which fails to explain the formation of zincblende AlN. We then compared the formation energetics of rocksalt and zincblende AlN in fcc Al through direct diffusion of nitrogen atoms to Al octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. Furthermore, the formation of a zincblende AlN thin film is determined to be a kinetically driven process, not a thermodynamicallymore » driven process.« less

  17. Guanidine Soaps As Vehicles For Coating Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H.; Veitch, Lisa C.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    1994-01-01

    Soaps made from strong organic base guanidine and organic fatty acids serve as vehicles and binders for coating ceramic fibers, various smooth substrates, and other problematic surfaces with thin precious-metal or metal-oxide films. Films needed to serve as barriers to diffusion in fiber/matrix ceramic composite materials. Guanidine soaps entirely organic and burn off, leaving no residues.

  18. Sintering of corundum ceramics based on aluminum hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Afoninia, G.A.; Leonov, V.G.

    1995-09-01

    The possibility of using aluminum hydroxide obtained by the precipitation method for synthesis of corundum ceramics with additives forming a liquid phase during firing and without additives, is investigated. The optimum parameters of the manufacturing process and the main properties of the material recommended for testing in the production of glass ceramic substrates for integrated circuits are investigated.

  19. Competitive growth mechanisms of AlN on Si (111) by MOVPE

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuxia; Wei, Hongyuan; Yang, Shaoyan; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Lianshan; Kong, Susu; Zhao, Guijuan; Liu, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    To improve the growth rate and crystal quality of AlN, the competitive growth mechanisms of AlN under different parameters were studied. The mass transport limited mechanism was competed with the gas-phase parasitic reaction and became dominated at low reactor pressure. The mechanism of strain relaxation at the AlN/Si interface was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Improved deposition rate in the mass-transport-limit region and increased adatom mobility were realized under extremely low reactor pressure. PMID:25231628

  20. Elastic and piezoelectric properties of AlN and LiAlO2 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, Andrey; Schmidt, Hagen; Weihnacht, Manfred; Smirnova, Elena; Chemekova, Tatiana; Makarov, Yuri

    2010-04-01

    We have successfully grown high-quality AlN piezoelectric single crystal using the sublimation technique. Transparent crack-free boules of approximately 15 mm in diameter and 25 mm in length along the [0001] direction were obtained, with coloring from amber to dark brown depending on growth temperature. Full sets of material parameters of grown AlN and commercially available LiAlO(2) bulk crystals were measured at room temperature. Temperature coefficients of the material parameters of LiAlO(2) were also obtained in a temperature range from -70 to +50 degrees C.

  1. First Principles Prediction of the Gas-Phase Precursors for AlN Sublimation Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanxin; Brenner, Donald W.

    2004-02-01

    Using a new, parameter-free first principles strategy for modeling sublimation growth, we show that while Al and N2 dominate gas concentrations in AlN sublimation growth chambers under typical growth conditions, N2 is undersaturated with respect to the crystal and therefore cannot be a growth precursor. Instead, our calculations predict that the nitrogen-containing precursors are AlnN (n=2,3,4), in stark contrast to assumptions used in all previous modeling studies of this system.

  2. Low oxidation state aluminum-containing cluster anions: Cp∗AlnH-, n = 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan; Mayo, Dennis; Sawyer, William H.; Gill, Ann F.; Kandalam, Anil K.; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-01

    Three new, low oxidation state, aluminum-containing cluster anions, Cp*AlnH-, n = 1-3, were prepared via reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions, AlnHm-, and Cp*H ligands. These were characterized by mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory based calculations. Agreement between the experimentally and theoretically determined vertical detachment energies and adiabatic detachment energies validated the computed geometrical structures. Reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions and ligands provide a new avenue for discovering low oxidation state, ligated aluminum clusters.

  3. Observation of positive and small electron affinity of Si-doped AlN films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on n-type 6H–SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang; Ping, Chen; De-Gang, Zhao; De-Sheng, Jiang; Zhi-Juan, Zhao; Zong-Shun, Liu; Jian-Jun, Zhu; Jing, Yang; Wei, Liu; Xiao-Guang, He; Xiao-Jing, Li; Xiang, Li; Shuang-Tao, Liu; Hui, Yang; Li-Qun, Zhang; Jian-Ping, Liu; Yuan-Tao, Zhang; Guo-Tong, Du

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the electron affinity of Si-doped AlN films (N Si = 1.0 × 1018–1.0 × 1019 cm‑3) with thicknesses of 50, 200, and 400 nm, synthesized by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under low pressure on the n-type (001)6H–SiC substrates. The positive and small electron affinity of AlN films was observed through the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) analysis, where an increase in electron affinity appears with the thickness of AlN films increasing, i.e., 0.36 eV for the 50-nm-thick one, 0.58 eV for the 200-nm-thick one, and 0.97 eV for the 400-nm-thick one. Accompanying the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on the surface contaminations, it suggests that the difference of electron affinity between our three samples may result from the discrepancy of surface impurity contaminations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61574135, 61574134, 61474142, 61474110, 61377020, 61376089, 61223005, and 61321063), the One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Basic Research Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130362).

  4. Proceedings of the AD HOC Workshop on Ceramics for Li/FeS{sub 2} batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Representatives from industry, the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), DOE, national laboratories, and other govt agencies met to develop recommendations and actions for accelerating the development of ceramic components critical to the successful introduction of the Li/FeS{sub 2} bipolar battery for electric vehicles. Most of the workshop is devoted to electrode materials, bipolar designs, separators, and bipolar plates. The bulk of this document is viewographs and is divided into: ceramics, USABC overview, SAFT`s Li/FeS{sub 2} USABC program, bipolar Li/FeS{sub 2} component development, design requirements for bipolar plates, separator design requirements, compatibility of ceramic insulators with lithium, characterization of MgO for use in separators, resistivity measurements of separators, sintered AlN separators for LiMS batteries, etc.

  5. Using laser radiation for the formation of capillary structure in flat ceramic heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaenko, Yu. E.; Rotner, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of using laser radiation with a wavelength of 1.064 μm for the formation of a capillary structure in the evaporation zone of flat ceramic heat pipes has been experimentally confirmed. Using a technological regime with established parameters, a capillary structure was formed in AlN and Al2O3 ceramic plates with a thickness of 1-2 mm and lateral dimensions of 48 × 60 and 100 × 100 mm, which ensured absorption of heat-transfer fluids (distilled water, ethyl alcohol, acetone) to a height of 100 mm against gravity forces. The thermal resistance of flat ceramic heat pipes with this capillary structure reaches 0.07°C/W, which is quite acceptable for their use as heat sinks in systems of thermal regime control for electronic components and as heat exchange plates for large-size thermoelectric conversion units.

  6. Durability of ceramic catalytic converters for motorcycles

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.P.; Scott, P.L.; Hwang, H.S.; Mooney, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Motorcycle exhaust emission standards throughout the world are becoming more stringent. Emission control systems utilizing the catalytic converter are already in production in Taiwan for 2-stroke engine motorcycles. Catalysts designed for 2-stroke engines encounter a more severe exhaust environment than do those designed for 4-stroke engines. The two aspects of increased severity are the higher temperatures and higher stresses due to engine vibrations. Precious metal catalysts have been designed to operate in the thermal environment of 2-stroke engines and such catalysts have been successfully applied to both metal and ceramic substrates. However, until now, only the metal substrate catalysts have been utilized in motorcycle application. Ceramic based catalysts have not been considered because the mounting material that holds the catalyst substrate in place did not have enough durability to withstand the thermal/vibrational forces encountered in 2-stroke engine exhaust. Ceramic substrates have many advantages such as superior high temperature strength, which is especially important for the 2-stroke engine application, flexibility in cell shape and density, and lower cost. To realize these benefits, efforts were made in this study to develop better mounting systems. The results of this effort indicate that the durability requirements of 2-stroke engine can be met with the ceramic catalyst substrates if the improved mounting designs reported in the present study are employed.

  7. Monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  8. Experimental study of ceramic coated tip seals for turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Klann, G. A.; Lassow, E. S.; Mchenry, M.; Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic gas-path seals were fabricated and successfully operated over 1000 cycles from flight idle to maximum power in a small turboshaft engine. The seals were fabricated by plasma spraying zirconia over a NiCoCrAlX bond boat on the Haynes 25 substrate. Coolant-side substrate temperatures and related engine parameters were recorded. Post-test inspection revealed mudflat surface cracking with penetration to the ceramic bond-coat interface.

  9. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioh, E. L.; Tok, A. I. Y.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  10. Environmental durability of ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the current understanding of the environmental durability of both monolithic ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites, with a view to the prospective development of methods for the characterization, prediction, and improvement of ceramics' environmental durability. Attention is given to the environmental degradation behaviors of SiC, Si3N4, Al2O3, and glass-ceramic matrix compositions. The focus of corrosion prevention in Si-based ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 is on the high and low sulfur fuel combustion-product effects encountered in heat engine applications of these ceramics; sintering additives and raw material impurities are noted to play a decisive role in ceramics' high temperature environmental response.

  11. The effect of macroscopic polarization on intrinsic and extrinsic thermal conductivities of AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedam, Vikas; Pansari, Anju; Sinha, Arvind Kumar; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The effect of macroscopic polarization on thermal conductivity of bulk wurtzite AlN has been theoretically investigated. Our results show that macroscopic polarization modifies the phonon group velocity, Debye frequency and Debye temperature of the AlN. Using revised phonon velocity and Debye temperature, various phonon scattering rates and combined scattering rate are calculated as functions of the phonon frequency at room temperature. The intrinsic and extrinsic thermal conductivities of AlN have been estimated using these modified parameters. The theoretical analysis shows that up to a certain temperature the polarization effect acts as negative effect and reduces the intrinsic and extrinsic thermal conductivities. However, after this temperature both thermal conductivities are significantly enhanced. High phonon velocity and Debye temperature are the reason of this enhancement which happens due to the polarization effect. The revised thermal conductivities at room temperature are found to be increased by more than 20% in AlN due to macroscopic polarization phenomenon. The method we have developed can be taken into account during the simulation of heat transport in optoelectronic nitride devices to minimize the self heating processes.

  12. Early and Late Retrieval of the ALN Removable Vena Cava Filter: Results from a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, O.; Barral, F. G.; Lions, C.; Novelli, L.; Beregi, J. P.; Sapoval, M.

    2008-09-15

    Retrieval of removable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in selected patients is widely practiced. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the feasibility and results of percutaneous removal of the ALN removable filter in a large patient cohort. Between November 2003 and June 2006, 123 consecutive patients were referred for percutaneous extraction of the ALN filter at three centers. The ALN filter is a removable filter that can be implanted through a femoral/jugular vein approach and extracted by the jugular vein approach. Filter removal was attempted after an implantation period of 93 {+-} 15 days (range, 6-722 days) through the right internal jugular vein approach using the dedicated extraction kit after control inferior vena cavography. Following filter removal, vena cavograms were obtained in all patients. Successful extraction was achieved in all but one case. Among these successful retrievals, additional manipulation using a femoral approach was needed when the apex of the filter was close to the IVC wall in two patients. No immediate IVC complications were observed according to the postimplantation cavography. Neither technical nor clinical differences between early and late filter retrieval were noticed. Our data confirm the safety of ALN filter retrieval up to 722 days after implantation. In infrequent cases, additional endovenous filter manipulation is needed to facilitate extraction.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of a single Si chain doped zigzag AlN nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2015-04-01

    The first-principles projector-augmented wave (PAW) potentials within the density function theory (DFT) framework have been used to determine the geometry structures and electronic properties of the zigzag edge AlN nanoribbons (ZAlNNRs) doped with a single Si chain under generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The average Al-Si, Si-Si, Al-N, Si-N, Al-H and N-H bond lengths are 2.39, 2.16, 1.83, 1.74, 1.59 and 1.03 Å, respectively. Pure 7-ZAlNNR is an indirect semiconductor with a large band gap of 2.235 eV, while a semiconductor to metal transformation is taken place after a single Si chain substituting for a single Al-N chain at various positions. In pure 7-ZAlNNR, the HVB and LCB are mainly attributed to the edge N and Al atoms, respectively, while in a single Si chain substituting doped 7-ZAlNNR, the HVB and LCB are mainly attributed to the Si atoms. The Al-N, Al-H and Al-Si bonds are ionic bond, the Si-Si and Si-H bonds are covalent bond, the N-H and N-Si bonds are covalent bond modified ionic bond.

  14. Reactive Plasma Spraying of Fine Al2O3/AlN Feedstock Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for in situ formation of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings. Recently, AlN-based coatings were fabricated by RPS of alumina (Al2O3) powder in N2/H2 thermal plasma. This study investigated the feasibility of RPS of a fine Al2O3/AlN mixture and the influence of the plasma gases (N2, H2) on the nitriding conversion, and coating microstructure and properties. Thick AlN/Al2O3 coatings with high nitride content were successfully fabricated. The coatings consist of h-AlN, c-AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and a small amount of α-Al2O3. Use of fine particles enhanced the nitriding conversion and the melting tendency by increasing the surface area. Furthermore, the AlN additive improved the AlN content in the coatings. Increasing the N2 gas flow rate improved the nitride content and complete crystal growth to the h-AlN phase, and enhanced the coating thickness. On the other hand, though the H2 gas is required for plasma nitriding of the Al2O3 particles, increasing its flow rate decreased the nitride content and the coating thickness. Remarkable influence of the plasma gases on the coating composition, microstructure, and properties was observed during RPS of the fine particles.

  15. Stepwise conversion of a single source precursor into crystalline AlN by transamination reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Stephan Bauer, Tillmann; Hoffbauer, Wilfried; Schmedt auf der Guenne, Joern; Doerr, Markus; Marian, Christel M.; Assenmacher, Wilfried

    2008-03-15

    Ammonolysis of the monomeric, base-stabilized trisaminoalane Me{sub 3}N-Al[N(H)Dipp)]{sub 3} (Dipp=2,6-{sup i}Pr{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 3}) yielded Al-N oligomers, which were characterized in detail by solid state NMR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 27}Al) and TGA/DTA. Pyrolysis of as-prepared oligomers at different temperatures in an argon steam yielded carbon-containing black solids, whereas pyrolysis under a steady flow of NH{sub 3} produced pure aluminum nitride (AlN). The role of the pyrolysis temperature and the influence of NH{sub 3} on the formation of crystalline materials were investigated. As-prepared AlN was characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy ({sup 15}N, {sup 27}Al), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Theoretical calculations were performed in order to identify potential reaction intermediates. - Graphical abstract: Ammonolysis reactions of Me{sub 3}N-Al(NHDipp){sub 3} in liquid NH{sub 3} yielded Al-N oligomers, which can be transformed into nanocrystalline aluminum nitride particles under thermolysis conditions at 1000 deg. C. Theoretical calculations were performed in order to identify potential reaction intermediates.

  16. On the origin of laser-induced surface activation of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Pedraza, A.J.; Park, J.W.; Cao, S.; Allen, W.R.; Lowndes, D.H.; Allen, W.R.

    1996-02-01

    Pulsed-laser irradiation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and AlN surfaces promotes Cu deposition when the irradiated substgrates are immersed in an electroless bath. In this paper, the nature of the surface modification is analyzed using Auger emission spectroscopy (AES) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. During irradiation, AlN thermaly decomposes, leaving a discontinuous metallic film on the surface. A film of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is detected at the surface of the irradiated AlN substrate, much thicker when the irradiation is done in an oxidizing atmosphere than in a reducing one. Nanoparticles of metallic Al are generated during laser irradiation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a reducing atmosphere. When the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradiation is done in an oxidizing atmosphere, regions containing Al or substoichiometric alumina are detected by AES. It is concluded that the presence of metallic Al is the main reason why electroless deposition can occur in both AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deposition kinetics are consistent with this conclusion. It is likely that also substoichiometric alumina helps to catalyze the electroless deposition.

  17. Density functional theory study of the adsorption and incorporation of Sc and Y on the AlN(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Hernández, Rafael; González-Garcia, Alvaro; López-Perez, William

    2016-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out in order to study the adsorption and incorporation of scandium and yttrium atoms on the AlN(0001) surface aiming to gain insight into epitaxial growth of ScxAl1-x N and YxAl1-x N layers on AlN. The adsorption energy, geometry, formation energy, band structure and density of states of Sc (and Y) adatom/AlN(0001) systems are calculated. The calculations showed that the interaction between Sc (and Y) adatom and the AlN(0001) surface is strong (~ 3.9 eV) and it prefers to adsorb on N-top site (T4). However, formation energy calculations reveal that the incorporation of Sc and Y atoms in the Al-substitutional site is energetically more favorable compared with the adsorption on the top layers, which can be attributed to the lower enthalpy of formation of ScN and YN with respect to that of AlN. The results also suggest that the Sc and Y atoms prefer to incorporate in top AlN surface layers. At full coverage, calculations show the formation of metallic ScxN and YxAl1-x N layers on the AlN polar surface over the entire range of Al chemical potentials, in agreement with experimental observations. In addition, we found that for high coverage Sc atoms couple ferromagnetically in the Al-substitutional sites on the AlN(0001) surface.

  18. Investigation of Donor and Acceptor Ion Implantation in AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Osinsky, Andrei

    2015-09-16

    AlGaN alloys with high Al composition and AlN based electronic devices are attractive for high voltage, high temperature applications, including microwave power sources, power switches and communication systems. AlN is of particular interest because of its wide bandgap of ~6.1eV which is ideal for power electronic device applications in extreme environments which requires high dose ion implantation. One of the major challenges that need to be addressed to achieve full utilization of AlN for opto and microelectronic applications is the development of a doping strategy for both donors and acceptors. Ion implantation is a particularly attractive approach since it allows for selected-area doping of semiconductors due to its high spatial and dose control and its high throughput capability. Active layers in the semiconductor are created by implanting a dopant species followed by very high temperature annealing to reduce defects and thereby activate the dopants. Recovery of implant damage in AlN requires excessively high temperature. In this SBIR program we began the investigation by simulation of ion beam implantation profiles for Mg, Ge and Si in AlN over wide dose and energy ranges. Si and Ge are implanted to achieve the n-type doping, Mg is investigated as a p-type doping. The simulation of implantation profiles were performed in collaboration between NRL and Agnitron using a commercial software known as Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). The simulation results were then used as the basis for ion implantation of AlN samples. The implanted samples were annealed by an innovative technique under different conditions and evaluated along the way. Raman spectroscopy and XRD were used to determine the crystal quality of the implanted samples, demonstrating the effectiveness of annealing in removing implant induced damage. Additionally, SIMS was used to verify that a nearly uniform doping profile was achieved near the sample surface. The electrical characteristics

  19. Formation of (Ti,Al)N/Ti{sub 2}AlN multilayers after annealing of TiN/TiAl(N) multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Dolique, V.; Jaouen, M.; Cabioc'h, T.; Pailloux, F.; Guerin, Ph.; Pelosin, V.

    2008-04-15

    By using ion beam sputtering, TiN/TiAl(N) multilayers of various modulation wavelengths ({lambda}=8, 13, and 32 nm) were deposited onto silicon substrates at room temperature. After annealing at 600 deg. C in vacuum, one obtains for {lambda}=13 nm a (Ti,Al)N/Ti{sub 2}AlN multilayer as it is evidenced from x-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy filtered electron imaging experiments. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments show that the as-deposited TiAl sublayers contain a noticeable amount of nitrogen atoms which mean concentration varies with the period {lambda}. They also evidenced the diffusion of aluminum into TiN sublayers after annealing. Deduced from these observations, we propose a model to explain why this solid-state phase transformation depends on the period {lambda} of the multilayer.

  20. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  1. Shock-Induced Structural Phase Transition, Plasticity, and Brittle Cracks in Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-02-17

    Atomistic mechanisms of fracture accompanying structural phase transformation (SPT) in AlN ceramic under hypervelocity impact are investigated using a 209x10{sup 6} atom molecular-dynamics simulation. The shock wave generated by the impact splits into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase. The interaction between the reflected elastic wave and the SPT wave front generates nanovoids and dislocations into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode II cracking.

  2. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, D.H.; Pedraza, A.J.; DeSilva, M.J.; Kumar, R.A.

    1997-12-30

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials are disclosed. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon. 7 figs.

  3. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; Pedraza, Anthony J.; DeSilva, Melvin J.; Kumar, Rajagopalan A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon.

  4. Self-organization of dislocation-free, high-density, vertically aligned GaN nanocolumns involving InGaN quantum wells on graphene/SiO2 covered with a thin AlN buffer layer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Konno, Yuta; Kishino, Katsumi

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated the self-organization of high-density GaN nanocolumns on multilayer graphene (MLG)/SiO2 covered with a thin AlN buffer layer by RF-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. MLG/SiO2 substrates were prepared by the transfer of CVD graphene onto thermally oxidized SiO2/Si [100] substrates. Employing the MLG with an AlN buffer layer enabled the self-organization of high-density and vertically aligned nanocolumns. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that no threading dislocations, stacking faults, or twinning defects were included in the self-organized nanocolumns. The photoluminescence (PL) peak intensities of the self-organized GaN nanocolumns were 2.0-2.6 times higher than those of a GaN substrate grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Moreover, no yellow luminescence or ZB-phase GaN emission was observed from the nanocolumns. An InGaN/GaN MQW and p-type GaN were integrated into GaN nanocolumns grown on MLG, displaying a single-peak PL emission at a wavelength of 533 nm. Thus, high-density nitride p-i-n nanocolumns were fabricated on SiO2/Si using the transferred MLG interlayer, indicating the possibility of developing visible nanocolumn LEDs on graphene/SiO2.

  5. Modeling of the effects of different substrate materials on the residual thermal stresses in the aluminum nitride crystal grown by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2009-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical finite element modeling method is applied to compare interfacial residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystals grown by using different substrates such as silicon carbide, boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum carbide, and niobium carbide. A dimensionless coordinate system is used which reduces the numbers of computations and hence simplifies the stress analysis. All components of the stress distribution, both in the film and in the substrate, including the normal stress along the growth direction as well as in-plane normal stresses and shear stresses are fully investigated. This information about the stress distribution provides insight into understanding and controlling the AlN single crystal growth by the sublimation technique. The normal stress in the film at the interface along the growth direction and the shear stresses are zero except at the edges, whereas in-plane stresses are nonzero. The in-plane stresses are compressive when TaC and NbC substrates are used. A small compressive stress might be beneficial in prohibiting crack growth in the film. The compressive stress in the AlN is lower for the TaC substrate than that for the NbC. Tensile in-plane stresses are formed in the AlN for 6H-SiC, BN, and W substrates. This tensile stress in the film is detrimental as it will assist in the crack growth. The stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film at the interface is compressive in nature when TaC and NbC are used as a substrate. This causes the film to bend downward (i.e., convex shape) and assist it to adhere to the substrate. The AlN film curves upward or in a concave shape when SiC, BN, and W substrates are used since the stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film is tensile at the interface and this may cause detachment of the film from the substrate.

  6. Dental ceramics: An update.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Arvind; Shenoy, Nina

    2010-10-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examples of the microstructure property relationships for these ceramic materials will also be addressed.

  7. Shear mode bulk acoustic wave resonator based on c-axis oriented AlN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyutin, Evgeny; Gentil, Sandrine; Muralt, Paul

    2008-10-01

    A shear mode resonator based on bulk waves trapped in c-axis oriented AlN thin films was fabricated, simulated, and tested. The active 1.55 μm thick AlN layer was deposited on top of an acoustic Bragg reflector composed of SiO2/AlN λ /4 layer pairs. The resonance was excited by means of interdigitated electrodes consisting of 150 nm thick Al lines. Analytical and simulation calculations show that the in-plane electric field excites bulk acoustic wave shear modes that are trapped in such an AlN film slab. The experimental frequency corresponds well to the theoretical one. The evaluated resonance of the fundamental shear mode at 1.86 GHz revealed a coupling of 0.15% and Q-factor of 870 in air and 260 in silicon oil.

  8. Improved performance of GaN based light emitting diodes with ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo-Wei; Li, Heng; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-04-01

    The crystal quality, electrical and optical properties of GaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs) with ex-situ sputtered physical vapor deposition (PVD) aluminum nitride (AlN) nucleation layers were investigated. It was found that the crystal quality in terms of defect density and x-ray diffraction linewidth was greatly improved in comparison to LEDs with in-situ low temperature GaN nucleation layer. The light output power was 3.7% increased and the reverse bias voltage of leakage current was twice on LEDs with ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers. However, larger compressive strain was discovered in LEDs with ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers. The study shows the potential and constrain in applying ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers to fabricate high quality GaN crystals in various optoelectronics.

  9. Different evolutionary pathways from B4 to B1 phase in AlN and InN: metadynamics investigations.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yifeng; Qin, Lixia; Liu, Hanyu

    2016-05-25

    Pressure-induced B4-B1 phase transitions of AlN and InN at ambient temperature are systematically investigated using density functional-based metadynamics simulations. A homogeneous deformation path, which is energetically favorable, is through a hexagonal structure for AlN, and through a tetragonal structure for InN. Furthermore, the dynamical stability, instead of the mechanical stability, is crucial to determining the phase-transition paths: the intermediate hexagonal structure can remain stable, whereas the tetragonal structure is always unstable. The B4 phase always shows the direct band gap before the occurrence of structure transition, while the band gap of stable intermediate hexagonal phase is indirect for AlN. Finally, the band gap of the ultimate cubic phase is direct for AlN and indirect for InN, due to the strong p-d repulsion at the R point. PMID:27120439

  10. Simulation and performance study of ceramic THGEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Xie, Yu-Guang; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2015-06-01

    THGEMs based on a ceramic substrate have been successfully developed for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade, of 200 μm hole diameter, 600 μm pitch, 200 μm thickness, 80 μm rim, and 50 mm×50 mm sensitive area. FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used as a reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures using 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of a single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6×104 and 1.5×104 at Ne+CH4=95:5 and Ar + i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. Good gain stability was obtained during a more than 100 hour continuous test in Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using a 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of the ceramic THGEM were measured. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205173) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (H9294206TD)

  11. Porous AlN with a Low Dielectric Constant Synthesized Based on the Physical Vapor Transport Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua-Jie; Liu, Xue-Chao; Kong, Hai-Kuan; Xin, Jun; Gao, Pan; Shi, Er-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Porous AlN with low dielectric constant has been synthesized by the sacrificial template method based on the physical vapor transport principle. It is quite different from the traditional method that mixes the matrix with a pore-forming agent and utilizes liquid-phase sintering. The method consists of two parts. Firstly, AlN powder is placed in a graphite crucible. C/AlN composite can be formed by mixing decomposed AlN vapor and volatile carbon originated from a crucible at high temperature. Secondly, pores are formed after removing carbon from the C/AlN composite by an annealing process. The structure, morphology, porosity and properties of porous AlN are characterized. It is shown the obtained porous AlN has a thermal conductivity of 37.3 W/(m K) and a reduced dielectric constant of 5.5-6.1 (at 1 MHz). The porosity measured by a mercury porosimeter is 24.09%. It has been experimentally proved that porous AlN with a sufficiently porous structure and properties can be synthesized based on the vapor-phase principle.

  12. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  13. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  14. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  15. Single-crystal growth of aluminum nitride on 6H-SiC substrates by an open-system sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Kunihiro; Sanada, Kazuo; Ichinose, Noboru

    2009-02-01

    Single-crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) has successfully been grown on 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrates by sublimation using an open-system crucible at 2273 K within 30 h. The thickness of the AlN single-crystal layer is about 1 mm. The dislocation density in the vicinity of the crystal surface has been calculated to be less than 10 7 cm -2 from transmission electron microscopy observation and etch pit density measurement of the crystal. Single-crystal growth of AlN has been carried out by varying supersaturation of Al vapor and employing on- and off-axis SiC substrates. Supersaturation of Al vapor has critically influenced the crystalline quality and morphology, while it has not affected the growth rate so much. Thus, precise control of supersaturation is a key to ensuring the quality of AlN single crystals. The quality of the crystals grown on off-axis SiC substrates is superior to that grown on on-axis SiC substrates. Moreover, the quality has been improved as the thickness of the crystals has increased.

  16. Boron as an anti-surfactant in sublimation growth of AlN single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, M.; Wollweber, J.; Rossberg, M.; Schmidbauer, M.; Hartmann, C.; Fornari, R.

    2006-05-01

    We study the influence of B evaporating from BN crucible walls on the nucleation and growth of AlN by a physical vapor transport. An experimental analysis by means of electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy shows that B incorporation and surface segregation depends on the orientation of the respective surface facet. Surface segregation is found to be predominant on {11-20} facets. This leads to the formation of wurtzite BN nuclei on these facets which extend over the whole surface and may form closed layers. Both boron surface segregation and growth of BN nuclei influence Al and N adsorption and surface diffusion, and in consequence reduce the growth rate. The differences in surface segregation of B on different facets can be understood in terms of incorporation kinetics of boron adatoms into the AlN crystal. B thus acts as a facet selective antisurfactant.

  17. Structures of Aln, its anions and cations up to n=34: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebov, Nedko; Ahlrichs, Reinhart

    2010-04-01

    A systematic density functional study has been performed for neutral and singly charged clusters of aluminum with up to 34 atoms. A thorough search for global minimum structures has been carried out for Aln employing genetic algorithm and basin-hopping procedures. For Aln this confirms results of previous investigations up to n =22; new global minima have been located for n =23-31, 33. Structures for singly charged cations and anions have been obtained by reoptimization of the pool of 40 low-energy structures of the neutral clusters. The global minima of charged and neutral clusters are always low-spin states with the possible exception of a triplet state of Al28, which is isoenergetic with a singlet. The cluster structures are mostly quite irregular and do not resemble fractions of the fcc bulk phase. High symmetries are found only for the global minimum of Al23 and the triplet state of Al28.

  18. Investigation on the photoconductive behaviors of an individual AlN nanowire under different excited lights

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-long AlN nanowire arrays are prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and the photoconductive performances of individual nanowires are investigated in our self-built measurement system. Individual ultra-long AlN nanowire (UAN) exhibits a clear photoconductive effect under different excited lights. We attribute the positive photocurrent response of individual UAN to the dominant molecular sensitization effect. It is found that they have a much faster response speed (a rise and decay time of about 1 ms), higher photocurrent response (2.7×106), and more reproductive working performance (the photocurrent fluctuation is lower than 2%) in the air environment. Their better photoconductive performances are comparable to many nanostructures, which are suggested to be a candidate for building promising photosensitive nanodevices in the future. PMID:22883472

  19. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Kim, Anthony Y.; Virden, Jud W.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors.

  20. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Liu, J.; Kim, A.Y.; Virden, J.W.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors. 21 figs.

  1. Modeling and simulation of AlN bulk sublimation growth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bei; Ma, Ronghui; Zhang, Hui; Prasad, Vish

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, we have developed a numerical model to simulate two AlN sublimation growth systems. Temperature distributions in the growth cell for resistance and induction heating systems are presented and compared. The growth rate has been predicted and compared with experimental data. An anisotropic thermomechanical stress model is also developed to predict the thermal stress distribution in the as-grown crystal, with or without contact with the crucible wall.

  2. Nqrs Data for C22H19AlN6 (Subst. No. 1563)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C22H19AlN6 (Subst. No. 1563)

  3. PROTON-CONDUCTING DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y.S. Lin

    2001-11-30

    This project is aimed at preparation of thin (1-10? m) membranes of a modified strontium ceramic material with improved hydrogen permeance on mesoporous substrates. The research work conducted in this reporting period was focused on the following three aspects: (1) preparation of thick proton-conducting ceramic membranes and synthesis of porous substrates as support for thin proton-conducting ceramic film, (2) setting up RF sputter deposition unit for deposition of thin ceramic films and performing deposition experiments with the sputter deposition unit, and (3) modeling hydrogen permeation through the proton-conducting ceramic membranes. Proton-conducting thulium doped strontium cerate membranes were reproducibly prepared by the citrate method. Mesoporous ceria membranes were fabricated by a sol-gel method. The membranes will be used as the substrate for coating thin strontium cerate films. A magnetron sputter deposition unit was set up and good quality thin metal alloy films were formed on the mesoporous substrates by an alternative deposition method with the sputter deposition unit. A theoretical model has been developed for hydrogen permeation through proton conducting ceramic membranes. This model can be used to quantitatively describe the hydrogen permeation data.

  4. Implantable devices having ceramic coating applied via an atomic layer deposition method

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Xinhua; Weimer, Alan W.; Bryant, Stephanie J.

    2016-03-08

    Substrates coated with films of a ceramic material such as aluminum oxides and titanium oxides are biocompatible, and can be used in a variety of applications in which they are implanted in a living body. The substrate is preferably a porous polymer, and may be biodegradable. An important application for the ceramic-coated substrates is as a tissue engineering scaffold for forming artificial tissue.

  5. Characteristics of an Elevated Temperature ALN Particulate Reinforced NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    High energy milling of NiAl in liquid nitrogen (cryomilling) leads to the formation of a discontinuously AlN particle reinforced aluminide which has shown good potential as a high strength oxidation resistant material. Experiments have demonstrated that cryomilling is repeatable, and materials with reproducible chemistries and mechanical properties result. Furthermore, it is possible to vary the AlN content through control of the milling parameters. Tensile creep as well as compressive creep testing has been undertaken on a lot of NiAl-AlN. While this material is weaker in tension than compression, the tensile strength is respectable: for example, the creep rupture life exceeds 2700 h at 1300 K, 50 MPa. Heat treatment of the particulate reinforced aluminide at 1600 K promotes AlN growth which weakens the material but does not change the deformation mechanism. Cyclic oxidation testing of lots of NiAl-AlN which were cryomilled with and without yttria reveal that Y2O3 promotes better oxidation resistance. However, the presence or absence of yttria had no affect on the mechanical properties.

  6. Selective Epitaxial Graphene Growth on SiC via AlN Capping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Farhana; Rubio-Roy, Miguel; Moseley, Michael; Lowder, Jonathan; Doolittle, William; Berger, Claire; Dong, Rui; Meindl, James; de Heer, Walt; Georgia Institute of Technology Team

    2011-03-01

    Electronic-quality graphene is epitaxially grown by graphitization of carbon-face silicon carbide (SiC) by the sublimation of silicon atoms from selected regions uncapped by aluminum nitride (AlN). AlN (deposited by molecular beam epitaxy) withstands high graphitization temperatures of 1420o C, hence acting as an effective capping layer preventing the growth of graphene under it. The AlN is patterned and etched to open up windows onto the SiC surface for subsequent graphitization. Such selective epitaxial growth leads to the formation of high-quality graphene in desired patterns without the need for etching and lithographic patterning of graphene itself. No detrimental contact of the graphene with external chemicals occurs throughout the fabrication-process. The impact of process-conditions on the mobility of graphene is investigated. Graphene hall-bars were fabricated and characterized by scanning Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and transport measurements. This controlled growth of graphene in selected regions represents a viable approach to fabrication of high-mobility graphene as the channel material for fast-switching field-effect transistors.

  7. Homoepitaxial seeding and growth of bulk AlN by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Carsten; Wollweber, Jürgen; Seitz, Christoph; Albrecht, Martin; Fornari, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    AlN boules, 35 mm in diameter and up to 25-mm long, were grown on TaC crucible lid in an inductively heated reactor. The growth rates range between 100 and 300 μm/h. The boules grown on TaC show a columnar structure mostly composed of <0 0 0 1> grains. The largest grains (4-5 mm in diameter) were sliced and used for subsequent growth runs. Successful epitaxial seeding and growth on the starting AlN wafer was demonstrated and confirmed by electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Crystals were grown on both Al and N surfaces of the seeds up to a maximum diameter of about 9 mm so far. Formation of oxy-nitride layers, very detrimental to the further AlN deposition, could be avoided when starting from pre-sintered source powder. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements on axial cuts revealed a relatively low oxygen content, with variable distribution along the growth direction (290 ppm near seed, 100 ppm near external surface).

  8. Sublimation growth of AlN crystals: Growth mode and structure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimova, R.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Yazdi, G. R.; Gueorguiev, G. K.; Syväjärvi, M.

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study has been to realize growth conditions suitable for seeded sublimation growth of AlN and to understand the relationship between external growth parameters and the initial stages of growth with respect to growth mode and structure evolution. Close space sublimation growth geometry has been used in a RF-heated furnace employing high-purity graphite coated by TaC with a possibility to change the growth environment from C- to Ta-rich. Influence of certain impurities on the initially formed crystallites with respect to their shape, size and population has been considered. It is shown that some impurity containing vapor molecules may act as transport agents and suppliers of nitrogen for the AlN growth. SiC seeds, both bare and with MOCVD AlN buffer, have been employed. By varying the process conditions we have grown crystals with different habits, e.g. from needles, columnar- and plate-like, to freestanding quasi-bulk material. The growth temperature ranged 1600-2000 °C whereas the optimal external nitrogen pressure varied from 200 to 700 mbar. There is a narrow parameter window in the relationship temperature-pressure for the evolution of different structural forms. Growth modes with respect to process conditions are discussed.

  9. Enhanced actuation of nanocrystalline diamond microelectromechanical disk resonators with AlN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Taro; Reusch, Markus; Holc, Katarzyna; Iankov, Dimitre; Zuerbig, Verena; Zukauskaite, Agne; Nebel, Christoph E.; Ambacher, Oliver; Lebedev, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    A great potential of the use of aluminum nitride (AlN) to enhance the actuation of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) microelectromechanical system disk resonators is revealed. A disk resonator with a unimorph (AlN/NCD) structure is fabricated by depositing a c-axis oriented AlN on a capacitive NCD disk resonator. The unimorph resonator is piezoelectrically actuated with flexural whispering gallery modes with a relatively large electrode gap spacing, i.e., the spacing which is greater than 1 μm, although this is not possible for the capacitive NCD disk resonator. This result is explained by a finite element method simulation where the piezoelectric actuation turns out to be more effective than the capacitive actuation when the electrode gap spacing is >0.8 μm. The simulation also shows that the electrode gap spacing required for the capacitive actuation to be more effective than the piezoelectric actuation exponentially decreases when the resonator dimension is scaled down for higher frequency operations. Our study indicates that the use of AlN is promising to decrease impedance levels of NCD disk resonators especially for their higher frequency operations.

  10. Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of AlN Coatings: Influence of Aluminum Feedstock Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-03-01

    Feedstock powder characteristics (size distribution, morphology, shape, specific mass, and injection rate) are considered to be one of the key factors in controlling plasma-sprayed coatings microstructure and properties. The influence of feedstock powder characteristics to control the reaction and coatings microstructure in reactive plasma spraying process (RPS) is still unclear. This study, investigated the influence of feedstock particle size in RPS of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings, through plasma nitriding of aluminum (Al) feedstock powders. It was possible to fabricate AlN-based coatings through plasma nitriding of all kinds of Al powders in atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The nitriding ratio was improved with decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder, due to improving the nitriding reaction during flight. However, decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder suppressed the coatings thickness. Due to the loss of the powder during the injection, the excessive vaporization of fine Al particles and the completing nitriding reaction of some fine Al particles during flight. The feedstock particle size directly affects on the nitriding, melting, flowability, and the vaporization behaviors of Al powders during spraying. It concluded that using smaller particle size powders is useful for improving the nitriding ratio and not suitable for fabrication thick AlN coatings in reactive plasma spray process. To fabricate thick AlN coatings through RPS, enhancing the nitriding reaction of Al powders with large particle size during spraying is required.

  11. Sublimation in Growth of Aluminum Nitride-silicon carbide Alloy Crystals on SiC (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z; Edgar, J H; Payzant, E Andrew; Meyer III, Harry M; Walker, Larry R; Sarua, A; Kuball, M

    2005-06-01

    Thick (up to 1 mm) AlN-SiC alloy crystals were grown on off-axis Si-face 6H-SiC (0001) substrates by the sublimation-recondensation method from a mixture of AlN and SiC powders at 1860-1990 C in a N2 atmosphere. The color of the crystals changed from clear to dark green with increasing growth temperature. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed an AlN-SiC alloy was formed with the wurtzite structure and good homogeneity. Three broad peaks were detected in the Raman spectra, with one of those related to an AlN-like and another one to a SiC-like mode, both shifted relative to their usual positions in the binary compounds, and the third with possible contributions from both AlN and SiC. Scanning Auger microanalysis (SAM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) demonstrated the alloy crystals had an approximate composition of (AlN)0.75(SiC)0.25 with a stoichiometric ratio of Al:N and Si:C. The substrate misorientation ensured a two-dimensional growth mode confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  12. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  13. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  14. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  15. Environmental Effects on Non-oxide Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1997-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are promising materials for a wide range of high temperature applications. These include such diverse applications as components for heat engines, high temperature electronics, and re-entry shields for space vehicles. Table I lists a number of selected applications. Most of the emphasis here will be on SiC and Si3N4. Where appropriate, other non-oxide materials such as aluminum nitride (AlN) and boron nitride (BN) will be discussed. Proposed materials include both monolithic ceramics and composites. Composites are treated in more detail elsewhere in this volume, however, many of the oxidation/corrosion reactions discussed here can be extended to composites. In application these materials will be exposed to a wide variety of environments. Table I also lists reactive components of these environments.It is well-known that SiC and Si3N4 retain their strength to high temperatures. Thus these materials have been proposed for a variety of hot-gas-path components in combustion applications. These include heat exchanger tubes, combustor liners, and porous filters for coal combustion products. All combustion gases contain CO2, CO, H2, H2O, O2, and N2. The exact gas composition is dependent on the fuel to air ratio or equivalence ratio. (Equivalence ratio (EQ) is a fuel-to-air ratio, with total hydrocarbon content normalized to the amount of O2 and defined by EQ=1 for complete combustion to CO2 and H2O). Figure 1 is a plot of equilibrium gas composition vs. equivalence ratio. Note that as a general rule, all combustion atmospheres are about 10% water vapor and 10% CO2. The amounts of CO, H2, and O2 are highly dependent on equivalence ratio.

  16. Nd:AlN polycrystalline ceramics: A candidate media for tunable, high energy, near IR lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieg, A. T.; Grossnickle, M. J.; Kodera, Y.; Gabor, N. M.; Garay, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present processing and characterization of Nd-doped aluminum nitride (Nd:AlN) polycrystalline ceramics. We compare ceramics with significant segregation of Nd to those exhibiting minimal segregation. Spatially resolved photoluminescence maps reveal a strong correlation between homogeneous Nd doping and spatially homogeneous light emission. The spectroscopically resolved light emission lines show excellent agreement with the expected Nd electronic transitions. Notably, the lines are significantly broadened, producing near IR emission (˜1077 nm) with a remarkable ˜100 nm bandwidth at room temperature. We attribute the broadened lines to a combination of effects: multiple Nd-sites, anisotropy of AlN and phonon broadening. These broadened, overlapping lines in a media with excellent thermal conductivity have potential for Nd-based, tunable lasers with high average power.

  17. Effect of AlN content on the lattice site location of terbium ions in Al x Ga1-x N compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialho, M.; Rodrigues, J.; Magalhães, S.; Correia, M. R.; Monteiro, T.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2016-03-01

    Terbium lattice site location and optical emission in Tb implanted Al x Ga1-x N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) samples grown by halide vapour phase epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates are investigated as a function of AlN content. The samples were implanted with a fluence of 5 × 1014 cm-2 of terbium ions and an energy of 150 keV. Lattice implantation damage is reduced using channelled ion implantation performed along the <0001> axis, normal to the sample surface. Afterwards, thermal annealing treatments at 1400 °C for GaN and 1200 °C for samples with x > 0 were performed to reduce the damage and to activate the optical emission of Tb3+ ions. The study of lattice site location is achieved measuring detailed angular ion channelling scans across the <0001>, < 10\\bar{1}1> and < \\bar{2}113> axial directions. The precise location of the implanted Tb ions is obtained by combining the information of these angular scans with simulations using the Monte Carlo code FLUX. In addition to a Ga/Al substitutional fraction and a random fraction, a fraction of Tb ions occupying a site displaced by 0.2 Å along c-axis from the Ga/Al substitutional site was considered, giving a good agreement between the experimental results and the simulation. Photoluminescence studies proved the optical activation of Tb3+ after thermal annealing and the enhancement of the 5D4 to 7F6 transition intensity with increasing AlN content.

  18. Light emitting ceramic device and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2004-11-30

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, and alternative methods of fabrication for the same are claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  19. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  20. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  1. Thickness dependence of magnetoelectric response for composites of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films on CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing Zhu, Kongjun; Wu, Xia; Deng, Chaoyong; Peng, Renci; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-08-15

    Using chemical solution spin-coating we grew Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films of different thicknesses on highly dense CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics. X-ray diffraction revealed no other phases except Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In many of these samples we observed typical ferroelectric hysteresis loops, butterfly-shaped piezoelectric strains, and the magnetic-field-dependent magnetostriction. These behaviors caused appreciable magnetoelectric responses based on magnetic-mechanical-electric coupling. Our results indicated that the thickness of the Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} film was important in obtaining strong magnetoelectric coupling.

  2. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  3. Quasi-transverse optical phonon mode in self-generated semipolar AlN grains embedded in c-oriented AlN matrix grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Y.; Zhou, T. F.; Zheng, S. N.; Liu, X. H.; Zhao, J. J.; Su, X. J.; Huang, J.; Qiu, Y. X.; Zhang, J. C.; Xu, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we present a microspectroscopic investigation on the quasi-transverse optical phonon modes Q(TO) in some self-generated aluminum nitride (AlN) grains grown on sapphire using hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, these grains were confirmed to be embedded in (0001)-AlN (c-AlN) epitaxial matrix with an appearance plane of (10 1 ¯ 1 ) (s-plane). Two beam bright field images further showed that the AlN grains were free of dislocation. In-plane phonon anisotropy of the AlN grains was discussed in detail using angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of pure Raman phonons intensity on rotation angle agrees well with the calculation. The Q(TO) phonon intensity exhibited similar behavior to that of A1(TO) phonon, which can be explained by Loudon's formula. However, the observed frequency fluctuation for the Q(TO) phonon differs from that of the pure phonon modes, which cannot be directly understood from the classic Loudon's formula. A modified Loudon's formula appropriate to non-normal incidence was presented to explain the observed Q(TO) phonon frequency fluctuation. Combining with the angular-dependent Raman spectra, we proposed that a small inclination of s-plane along with the various in-plane orientations in c-AlN matrix lead to the frequency fluctuation of Q(TO) in these embedded semipolar AlN grains.

  4. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  5. Structural evolution of Ag-Cu nano-alloys confined between AlN nano-layers upon fast heating.

    PubMed

    Janczak-Rusch, J; Chiodi, M; Cancellieri, C; Moszner, F; Hauert, R; Pigozzi, G; Jeurgens, L P H

    2015-11-14

    The structural evolution of a Ag-Cu/AlN nano-multilayer (NML), as prepared by magnetron-sputtering on a α-Al2O3 substrate, was monitored during fast heating by real-time in situ XRD analysis (at the synchrotron), as well as by ex situ microstructural analysis using SEM, XPS and in-house XRD. The as-deposited NML is constituted of alternating nano-layers (thickness ≈ 10 nm) of a chemically inert AlN barrier and a eutectic Ag-Cu(40at%) nano-alloy. The nano-alloy in the as-deposited state is composed of a fcc matrix of Ag nano-grains (≈6 nm), which are supersaturated by Cu, and some smaller embedded Cu rich nano-grains (≈4 nm). Heating up to 265 °C activates segregation of Cu out of the supersaturated Ag nano-grains phase, thus initiating phase separation. At T > 265 °C, the phase-separated Cu metal partially migrates to the top NML surface, thereby relaxing thermally-accumulated compressive stresses in the confined alloy nano-layers and facilitating grain coarsening of (still confined) phase-separated nano-crystallites. Further heating and annealing up to 420 °C results in complete phase separation, forming extended Ag and Cu domains with well-defined coherent Ag/AlN interfaces. The observed outflow of Cu well below the eutectic melting point of the bulk Ag-Cu alloy might provide new pathways for designing low-temperature nano-structured brazing materials.

  6. Chemical compatibility of a TiAl-Nb melt with oxygen-free crucible ceramics made of aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, A. V.; Cherdyntsev, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    The problem of uncontrolled oxygen contamination of intermetallic TiAl ingots is considered for the application of crucibles and molds based on traditional oxide ceramics. A synthesized Ti-45.9Al-8Nb (at %) alloy is solidified in alternative oxygen-free crucibles made of high-purity aluminum nitride (99.99% AlN) upon holding at 1670°C for 5, 12, and 25 min and subsequent quenching in a high-purity argon atmosphere. The initial material and the solidified ingots are studied by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron-probe microanalysis, and gas-content chemical analysis. The key features of the interaction of the TiAl-Nb melt with AlN ceramics are revealed. Partial thermal dissociation of the crucible material according to the reaction AlN → Al + N and the reaction of atomic nitrogen with the melt lead to the formation of a solid 6.4-μm-thick TiN coating on the ingot surface and provide perfect wettability of the crucible by the melt and easy removal of solidified casting items from the mold. The TiN coating serves as a diffusion barrier that hinders the diffusion of nitrogen and residual oxygen from the pores in the crucible toward the melt. As a result, no oxide particles are detected in the ingots. However, few single microprecipitates of two nitride phases ((Ti,Al) x N y , NbN) are detected in the near-bottom region, 300 μm thick, in the alloy after holding at 1670°C for 25 min. The total oxygen contamination in a two-phase α2 + γ ingot does not exceed 1100 wt ppm, which is 1.5-2 times lower than that obtained in the experiments performed with modern advanced oxide crucibles made of yttrium ceramics Y2O3. AlN is shown to be a promising crucible material that can be considered as an alternative to oxide ceramics in the metallurgy of TiAl intermetallics.

  7. Digitally Alloyed Modulated Precursor Flow Epitaxial Growth of Ternary AlGaN with Binary AlN and GaN Sub-Layers and Observation of Compositional Inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Suk; Yoo, Dongwon; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2010-05-01

    We report the growth of ternary aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers on AlN/sapphire template/substrates by digitally alloyed modulated precursor flow epitaxial growth (DA-MPEG), which combined an MPEG AlN sub-layer with a conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN sub-layer. The overall composition in DA-MPEG Al x Ga1- x N was controlled by adjustment of the growth time (i.e., the thickness) of the GaN sub-layer. As the GaN sub-layer growth time increased, the Al composition in AlGaN decreased to 50%, but the surface morphology of the AlGaN layer became rough, and a three-dimensional structure with islands appeared for the DA-MPEG AlGaN with relatively thick GaN sub-layers, possibly resulting from the Ga adatom surface migration behavior and/or the strain built up from lattice mismatch between AlN and GaN sub-layers with increasing GaN sub-layer growth time. Through strain analysis by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, reciprocal space mapping, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, it was found that there was compositional inhomogeneity in the DA-MPEG AlGaN with AlN and GaN binary sub-layers for the case of the layer with relatively thick GaN sub-layers.

  8. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  9. Observation of stimulated emission from a single Fe-doped AlN triangular fiber at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liangbao; Jin, Shifeng; Wang, Wenjun; Zuo, Sibin; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Shunchong; Zhu, Kaixing; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a well known wide-band gap semiconductor that has been widely used in fabricating various ultraviolet photo-electronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate that a fiber laser can be achieved in Fe-doped AlN fiber where Fe is the active ion and AlN fiber is used as the gain medium. Fe-doped single crystal AlN fibers with a diameter of 20-50 μm and a length of 0.5-1 mm were preparated successfully. Stimulated emission (peak at about 607 nm and FWHM ~0.2 nm) and a long luminescence lifetime (2.5 ms) were observed in the fibers by a 532 nm laser excitation at room temperature. The high quality long AlN fibers are also found to be good optical waveguides. This kind of fiber lasers may possess potential advantages over traditional fiber lasers in enhancing power output and extending laser wavelengths from infrared to visible regime. PMID:26647969

  10. Observation of stimulated emission from a single Fe-doped AlN triangular fiber at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liangbao; Jin, Shifeng; Wang, Wenjun; Zuo, Sibin; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Shunchong; Zhu, Kaixing; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a well known wide-band gap semiconductor that has been widely used in fabricating various ultraviolet photo-electronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate that a fiber laser can be achieved in Fe-doped AlN fiber where Fe is the active ion and AlN fiber is used as the gain medium. Fe-doped single crystal AlN fibers with a diameter of 20–50 μm and a length of 0.5–1 mm were preparated successfully. Stimulated emission (peak at about 607 nm and FWHM ~0.2 nm) and a long luminescence lifetime (2.5 ms) were observed in the fibers by a 532nm laser excitation at room temperature. The high quality long AlN fibers are also found to be good optical waveguides. This kind of fiber lasers may possess potential advantages over traditional fiber lasers in enhancing power output and extending laser wavelengths from infrared to visible regime. PMID:26647969

  11. Observation of stimulated emission from a single Fe-doped AlN triangular fiber at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liangbao; Jin, Shifeng; Wang, Wenjun; Zuo, Sibin; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Shunchong; Zhu, Kaixing; Wei, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a well known wide-band gap semiconductor that has been widely used in fabricating various ultraviolet photo-electronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate that a fiber laser can be achieved in Fe-doped AlN fiber where Fe is the active ion and AlN fiber is used as the gain medium. Fe-doped single crystal AlN fibers with a diameter of 20-50 μm and a length of 0.5-1 mm were preparated successfully. Stimulated emission (peak at about 607 nm and FWHM ~0.2 nm) and a long luminescence lifetime (2.5 ms) were observed in the fibers by a 532nm laser excitation at room temperature. The high quality long AlN fibers are also found to be good optical waveguides. This kind of fiber lasers may possess potential advantages over traditional fiber lasers in enhancing power output and extending laser wavelengths from infrared to visible regime.

  12. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  13. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  14. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  15. Development and Progress in Bulk c-Plane AlN Single-Crystalline Template Growth for Large-Area Native Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan Sumathi, R.; Gille, Peter

    2013-08-01

    28-mm diameter free-standing AlN substrates were obtained from single crystalline templates grown hetero-epitaxially on (0001) SiC substrates by the sublimation method. The grown template crystals have fairly high structural quality with X-ray rocking curve FWHM values of 120 and 200 arcsec for symmetric and asymmetric reflections, respectively and an average etch pit density of about 5×105 cm-2. In Raman spectroscopy, the E2(high) phonon mode peak FWHM is 18 cm-1 and its position shift shows a very low tensile strain of ˜1.5×10-4 in the crystals. The presence of Si and C impurity-related local vibrational modes is observed. These impurities might be responsible for lowering the optical absorption band edge to 4.3 eV. Homo-epitaxial growth of 5-mm-thick bulk crystals, using 10 mm diameter seeds prepared from these templates demonstrates their suitability as native seeds for further growth.

  16. Development and Progress in Bulk c-Plane AlN Single-Crystalline Template Growth for Large-Area Native Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, R. Radhakrishnan; Gille, Peter

    2013-08-01

    28-mm diameter free-standing AlN substrates were obtained from single crystalline templates grown hetero-epitaxially on (0001) SiC substrates by the sublimation method. The grown template crystals have fairly high structural quality with X-ray rocking curve FWHM values of 120 and 200 arcsec for symmetric and asymmetric reflections, respectively and an average etch pit density of about 5× 105 cm-2. In Raman spectroscopy, the E2(high) phonon mode peak FWHM is 18 cm-1 and its position shift shows a very low tensile strain of ˜1.5× 10-4 in the crystals. The presence of Si and C impurity-related local vibrational modes is observed. These impurities might be responsible for lowering the optical absorption band edge to 4.3 eV. Homo-epitaxial growth of 5-mm-thick bulk crystals, using 10 mm diameter seeds prepared from these templates demonstrates their suitability as native seeds for further growth.

  17. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  18. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-11-17

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density. 2 figs.

  19. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  20. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  1. Ceramic brush seals development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this viewgraph presentation: ceramic brush seals, research and development, manufacturing, brazed assembly development, controlling braze flow, fiber selection, and braze results.

  2. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  3. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  4. Emittance and absorptance of NASA ceramic thermal barrier coating system. [for turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral emittance measurements were made on a two-layer ceramic thermal barrier coating system consisting of a metal substrate, a NiCrAly bond coating and a yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic coating. Spectral emittance data were obtained for the coating system at temperatures of 300 to 1590 K, ceramic thickness of zero to 0.076 centimeter, and wavelengths of 0.4 to 14.6 micrometers. The data were transformed into total hemispherical emittance values and correlated with respect to ceramic coating thickness and temperature using multiple regression curve fitting techniques. The results show that the ceramic thermal barrier coating system is highly reflective and significantly reduces radiation heat loads on cooled gas turbine engine components. Calculation of the radiant heat transfer within the nonisothermal, translucent ceramic coating material shows that the gas-side ceramic coating surface temperature can be used in heat transfer analysis of radiation heat loads on the coating system.

  5. Optoelectronic and structural characteristics of Er-doped amorphous AlN films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.; Jahn, U.

    2005-11-01

    This work reports on the optical, electronic, and structural properties of aluminum-nitrogen (AlN) films doped with Er. The films were deposited by conventional radio-frequency sputtering at 200 deg. C in an atmosphere of pure nitrogen. Their main characteristics have been investigated by experimental techniques such as optical transmission, photo- and cathodoluminescence, Raman scattering, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All films exhibit Er{sup 3+}-related optical emissions in the visible and infrared regions, which are considerably enhanced after thermal annealing and on measurements at low temperature. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy indicates that the films remain amorphous even after thermal treatment at 900 deg. C. Based on the composition and on the structural and luminescent properties of these Er-doped amorphous AlN films it was possible to conclude that energy excitation of Er{sup 3+} ions takes place according to different routes when electrons or photons are used. In the former case, energy is transferred from the amorphous host to the Er{sup 3+} ions by carrier-mediated processes. As a result, relatively strong Er{sup 3+}-related optical transitions can be observed in the {approx}400-1600 nm range. Excitation with 488.0 nm photons also produces visible and infrared Er{sup 3+}-related luminescence, but most of the optical excitation occurs through direct excitation of the {sup 4}F{sub 7/2} level of Er{sup 3+}. Finally, the role played by nitrogen atoms and thermal treatments on the achievement of light emission from the present AlN films is discussed and compared with the existing literature.

  6. An ab initio study of the size-dependent mechanical behavior of single-walled AlN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Yu-Fang; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jiang, Run; Wang, Yun-Feng; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Employing ab initio electronic structure calculations combined with the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) we have investigated a size dependence of mechanical behavior in single-walled AlN nanotubes with armchair and zigzag forms. A simple procedure of nanotubes construction based on the wurtzite (0 0 1) slab with monolayer rolling and subsequent cylindrical coordinate system introduction is suggested. The present calculations indicate that the Young's modulus and electronic band gap of these tubes are increased monotonically as the radius increases, but decreases with the Al-N bond length. In addition, the amount of charge transfer calculated by the Mulliken's population analysis is introduced to explain clearly the strength of bonding between Al and N atoms in single-walled AlN nanotubes.

  7. Optical and electrical properties of Mg-doped AlN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Connie, Ashfiqua Tahseen; Zhao, Songrui; Sadaf, Sharif Md.; Shih, Ishiang; Mi, Zetian; Du, Xiaozhang; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing

    2015-05-25

    In this paper, the optical and electrical properties of Mg-doped AlN nanowires are discussed. At room temperature, with the increase of Mg-doping concentration, the Mg-acceptor energy level related optical transition can be clearly measured, which is separated about 0.6 eV from the band-edge transition, consistent with the Mg activation energy in AlN. The electrical conduction measurements indicate an activation energy of 23 meV at 300 K–450 K temperature range, which is significantly smaller than the Mg-ionization energy in AlN, suggesting the p-type conduction being mostly related to hopping conduction. The free hole concentration of AlN:Mg nanowires is estimated to be on the order of 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}, or higher.

  8. Stability of a Planar-Defect Structure of the Wurtzite AlN (1010) Surface: Density Functional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, H.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Zhu, Y.; Wei, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    The formation energy of a structure is usually increased by the appearance of a defect. A stoichiometric planar defect structure of the wurtzite AlN (10{bar 1}0) surface, however, is found to be lower in energy than the ideally truncated surface by first-principles calculations. The intriguing phenomenon is directly attributed to the large scale surface relaxation induced by the defect structure and the intrinsic reason is pointed to the strong ionicity and small c/a (lattice constant ratio) of AlN. A suggested growth mode shows that the defect surface structure is compatible with the growth of the correct wurtzite AlN film on the (10{bar 1}0) plane.

  9. First principles studies of ideal strength and bonding nature of AlN polymorphs in comparison to TiN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. F.; Sheng, S. H.; Veprek, S.

    2007-07-01

    The stress-strain relationships under tensile and shear loads and bonding nature of fcc (rocksalt)-, hcp (wurtzite)-AlN, and fcc (rocksalt)-TiN are calculated by first principles method. Compared to fcc-TiN, fcc-AlN shows similar anisotropy of tensile strengths, but lower shear strength is found in both AlN polymorphs. Based on the calculated electronic density of states, bonding nature for both AlN polymorphs is discussed. The hardness enhancement in TiN /AlN heterostructures and nanocomposites cannot be attributed to the difference of the ideal strength and bonding nature between fcc-AlN and hcp-AlN, but to the formation of semicoherent fcc-TiN/fcc-AlN interface.

  10. Eliminating stacking faults in semi-polar GaN by AlN interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dadgar, A.; Ravash, R.; Veit, P.; Schmidt, G.; Mueller, M.; Dempewolf, A.; Bertram, F.; Wieneke, M.; Christen, J.; Krost, A.

    2011-07-11

    We report on the elimination of stacking faults by the insertion of low-temperature AlN interlayers in nearly (1016) and (1104) oriented semi-polar GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on Si(112) and Si(113), respectively. The elimination of these defects is visualized by cathodoluminescence (CL) as well as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and STEM-CL. A possible annihilation mechanism is discussed which leads to the conclusion that the elimination mechanism is most likely valid for all layers with (1101) surfaces, enabling heteroepitaxial semi- and non-polar GaN free from stacking faults.

  11. Thermal reaction of polycrystalline AlN with XeF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Morimichi; Mori, Yukimasa; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroaki; Iida, Takashi; Akiyama, Keijiro; Narita, Shogo; Sawabe, Kyoichi; Shobatake, Kosuke

    2005-11-15

    Detailed studies on the thermal reaction behavior of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) with effusive xenon difluoride (XeF{sub 2}) have been carried out over the sample temperature (T{sub s}) range from 300 to 920 K using molecular beam mass spectrometry combined with a time-of-flight technique and ex situ surface analyses, i.e., X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The species desorbed from the AlN/XeF{sub 2} system were monitored using molecular beam mass spectrometry, as a function of sample temperature. Above T{sub s}=800 K, the desorbed reaction products were identified as N{sub 2} and AlF{sub 3}, and their flux intensities increase monotonically as the sample temperature is increased. The flux intensity of XeF{sub 2} desorbed after physisorption to the AlN surface is found to decrease as T{sub s} is raised above T{sub s}=800 K, and approximately one half of the incoming XeF{sub 2} is consumed by the thermal reaction at 920 K. The results of surface analyses show that the thermal reaction of AlN with XeF{sub 2} starts at approximately T{sub s}=700 K, forming a reaction layer composed of AlF{sub 3}. The AlF{sub 3} layer becomes thick as T{sub s} is increased from T{sub s}=700-800 K. Above T{sub s}=800 K, however, as a result of fast desorption of AlF{sub 3} and F atoms from the AlF{sub 3} layer, only partially fluorinated AlF{sub x} (x=1 and/or 2) layers are formed and the bulk AlN is revealed again. The SEM photographs indicate that the surfaces exposed above T{sub s}=850 K are strongly etched but a slight change is observed at T{sub s}{<=}800 K. On the basis of these results, three reaction stages are proposed for the AlN/XeF{sub 2} reaction depending on the sample temperature range: Stage 1 (300{<=}T{sub s}<700 K); no reaction, stage 2 (700{<=}T{sub s}<800 K); surface fluorination, and stage 3 (800{<=}T{sub s}); etching. At stage 3, AlF{sub 3} formed on the surface starts to evaporate and

  12. Thermal reaction of polycrystalline AlN with XeF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Morimichi; Mori, Yukimasa; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroaki; Iida, Takashi; Akiyama, Keijiro; Narita, Shogo; Sawabe, Kyoichi; Shobatake, Kosuke

    2005-11-01

    Detailed studies on the thermal reaction behavior of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) with effusive xenon difluoride (XeF2) have been carried out over the sample temperature (Ts) range from 300 to 920 K using molecular beam mass spectrometry combined with a time-of-flight technique and ex situ surface analyses, i.e., X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The species desorbed from the AlN/XeF2 system were monitored using molecular beam mass spectrometry, as a function of sample temperature. Above Ts=800 K, the desorbed reaction products were identified as N2 and AlF3, and their flux intensities increase monotonically as the sample temperature is increased. The flux intensity of XeF2 desorbed after physisorption to the AlN surface is found to decrease as Ts is raised above Ts=800 K, and approximately one half of the incoming XeF2 is consumed by the thermal reaction at 920 K. The results of surface analyses show that the thermal reaction of AlN with XeF2 starts at approximately Ts=700 K, forming a reaction layer composed of AlF3. The AlF3 layer becomes thick as Ts is increased from Ts=700-800 K. Above Ts=800 K, however, as a result of fast desorption of AlF3 and F atoms from the AlF3 layer, only partially fluorinated AlFx (x=1 and/or 2) layers are formed and the bulk AlN is revealed again. The SEM photographs indicate that the surfaces exposed above Ts=850 K are strongly etched but a slight change is observed at Ts<=800 K. On the basis of these results, three reaction stages are proposed for the AlN/XeF2 reaction depending on the sample temperature range: Stage 1 (300<=Ts<700 K) no reaction, stage 2 (700<=Ts<800 K) surface fluorination, and stage 3 (800<=Ts) etching. At stage 3, AlF3 formed on the surface starts to evaporate and fast etching proceeds, since the vapor pressure of AlF3 is high enough in this temperature range.

  13. Growth of High Quality AlN Single Crystals and Their Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassburg, M.; Senawiratne, J.; Dietz, N.; Haboeck, U.; Hoffmann, A.; Noveski, V.; Dalmau, R.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2005-06-01

    Growth and optical properties of high quality AlN single crystals grown by physical vapor transport using powder sublimation is presented. Crystallinity, incorporated impurities and their effects on the optical properties are evaluated for different crucible materials and growth environments. A significant reduction of impurity incorporation was achieved using a two-step growth process in a TaN crucible. Crystal defects and the effect of incorporated impurities on the optical properties have been analyzed by their characteristic photoluminescence and absorption, Raman- and glow discharge mass spectroscopy.

  14. Compensating defects in Si-doped AlN bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmscher, K.; Schulz, T.; Albrecht, M.; Hartmann, C.; Wollweber, J.; Fornari, R.

    2007-12-01

    The rather low n-type conductivity observed in Si-doped sublimation-grown AlN bulk crystals is explained by the formation of high concentrations of compensating defects. The model is based on the experimental verification of a shallow impurity band formed by Si donors and the presence of acceptor-like electron traps within 1 eV below the conduction band edge. Further it is suggested that the majority of the Si donors is compensated by deep acceptors in the lower half of the band gap. This compensation model is an alternative to the controversially discussed assumption of Si DX center formation.

  15. First principles prediction of the gas-phase precursors for AlN sublimation growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanxin; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-02-20

    Using a new, parameter-free first principles strategy for modeling sublimation growth, we show that while Al and N2 dominate gas concentrations in AlN sublimation growth chambers under typical growth conditions, N2 is undersaturated with respect to the crystal and therefore cannot be a growth precursor. Instead, our calculations predict that the nitrogen-containing precursors are Al(n)N (n=2,3,4), in stark contrast to assumptions used in all previous modeling studies of this system.

  16. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in AlnTi+ clusters and their interaction with Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. B.; Vega, A.; Aguilera-Granja, F.; Balbás, L. C.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, AlnTi+ [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > nc determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally AlnTi+, experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, AlnTi+ (n = 16-21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at nc = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (nc = 21) and their neutral counterparts (nc = 20). For the {Al_nTi^+ {\\cdot} Ar} complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the AlnTi+ clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support to the experimental technique used. For nc = 21, the smallest size of

  17. Stable In-defect complexes in GaN and AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, J.; Niederhausen, J.; Penner, J.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Vianden, R.

    2009-12-01

    Perturbed angular correlation measurements in Indium implanted GaN and AlN have shown that after annealing up to 50% of the In probes occupy relatively undisturbed substitutional group III sites at 293 K while the remaining fraction traps a nearest neighbor point defect. Above 293 K this fraction decreases strongly until, at 1100 K, all In probes are found in undisturbed substitutional sites. The effect is completely reversible. A model involving an Indium-nitrogen vacancy complex is suggested to explain this behavior. Possibly this complex can act as radiative recombination center or as seed for phase segregation during growth.

  18. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  19. Some ceramic options

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.M.; Aguilar, P.C.; Zievers, E.C.

    1993-06-01

    Ceramic candle filters have proven to be an effective means of removing particulates to levels exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) in high temperature applications. The traditional {open_quotes}hard{close_quotes} ceramic filter elements, typically formed form granules however, have shown to be susceptible to failure from physical shock, thermal stress, and chemical attack. Additionally, these hard, dense candles can be costly and present internal filter design problems due to their relatively high weight. A good deal has been written about to use to porous ceramics in the filtration of high temperature gases for removal of particulate matter. Unlike the dense, granular ceramic filter elements, vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCF) filters represent an attractive alternative. Composed of commercially available chopped ceramic fibers and utilizing existing vacuum forming technology, low cost filter elements with excellent physical and thermal shock resistance are now available. The ceramic fiber filter {open_quotes}skeleton{close_quotes} can be {open_quotes}post-treated{close_quotes} with refractory materials to enhance strength and chemical resistance, as well as to change permeability to suit a particular application. Also, because the ceramic fiber skeleton has greater porosity and is composed of low density materials, the final product is significantly lighter in weight than the traditional dense ceramic elements, making overall filter design an easier task. The use of ceramics extends beyond that of filter elements, however. Ceramics in the form of refractory have long been used to protect metal structures from high temperature and abrasion, and an extensive body of literature deals with this subject.

  20. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  1. Substrate-dependent thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride thin-films processed at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Belkerk, B. E.; Bensalem, S.; Soussou, A.; Carette, M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Scudeller, Y.; Al Brithen, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on investigation concerning the substrate-dependent thermal conductivity (k) of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin-films processed at low temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity of AlN films grown at low temperature (<200 °C) on single-crystal silicon (Si) and amorphous silicon nitride (SiN) with thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 4000 nm was measured with the transient hot-strip technique. The k values for AlN films on SiN were found significantly lower than those on Silicon consistently with their microstructures revealed by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The change in k was due to the thermal boundary resistance found to be equal to 10 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on SiN against 3.5 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on Si. However, the intrinsic thermal conductivity was determined with a value as high as 200 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} whatever the substrate.

  2. Constrained ceramic-filled polymer armor

    DOEpatents

    Sandstrom, Donald J.; Calkins, Noel C.; Gac, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    An armor system in which a plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material, which is a ceramic material in particulate form dispersed in a polymeric matrix.

  3. Constrained ceramic-filled polymer armor

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, D.J.; Calkins, N.C.; Gac, F.D.

    1990-11-13

    An armor system is disclosed in which a plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material, which is a ceramic material in particulate form dispersed in a polymeric matrix. 5 figs.

  4. GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ≤ 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Nanoporous AlN particle production from a solid-state metathesis reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guo-Jun; Chen, Guang-De; Wu, Ye-Long

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports that nanoporous AlN particles are synthesized from solid-state metathesis reactions using AlCl3 and Mg3N2 as reactants. The samples are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that samples with walls 10 nm in thickness and pores between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter were produced successfully from these reactions, and their band gap and vibration modes agree with those of AlN bulk crystal.

  6. Low oxidation state aluminum-containing cluster anions: Cp(∗)AlnH(-), n = 1-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan; Mayo, Dennis; Sawyer, William H; Gill, Ann F; Kandalam, Anil K; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-21

    Three new, low oxidation state, aluminum-containing cluster anions, Cp*AlnH(-), n = 1-3, were prepared via reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions, AlnHm (-), and Cp*H ligands. These were characterized by mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory based calculations. Agreement between the experimentally and theoretically determined vertical detachment energies and adiabatic detachment energies validated the computed geometrical structures. Reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions and ligands provide a new avenue for discovering low oxidation state, ligated aluminum clusters. PMID:27544103

  7. Organometallic vapor phase epitaxial growth of GaN on ZrN /AlN/Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Mark H.; Schroeder, Jeremy L.; Ewoldt, David A.; Wildeson, Isaac H.; Rawat, Vijay; Colby, Robert; Cantwell, Patrick R.; Stach, Eric A.; Sands, Timothy D.

    2008-07-01

    An intermediate ZrN /AlN layer stack that enables the epitaxial growth of GaN on (111) silicon substrates using conventional organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at substrate temperatures of ˜1000°C is reported. The epitaxial (111) ZrN layer provides an integral back reflector and Ohmic contact to n-type GaN, whereas the (0001) AlN layer serves as a reaction barrier, as a thermally conductive interface layer, and as an electrical isolation layer. Smooth (0001) GaN films less than 1μm thick grown on ZrN /AlN/Si yield 0002 x-ray rocking curve full width at half maximum values as low as 1230arcsec.

  8. Interfacial adhesion of dental ceramic-resin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Bona, Alvaro

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promotes micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this study is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters of the dental ceramic-resin systems as a function of ceramic surface treatment. The analytical procedures focused on characterizing the microstructure and fracture properties of EmpressRTM ceramics (a leucite-based core ceramic, two lithia disilicate-based core ceramics, and a glass veneer) and determining the ceramic-resin adhesion zone bond strength characteristics. Microstructure and composition are controlling factors in the development of micromechanical retention produced by etching. Silane treated ceramics negated the effect of surface roughening produced by etching, inducing lower surface energy of the ceramic and, reduced bonding effectiveness. There was a positive correlation between WA, tensile bond strength (a), and KA, i.e., higher mean WA value, and higher mean sigma and KA values. This study suggests that (1) the sigma and KA values for ceramic bonded to resin are affected by the ceramic microstructure and the ceramic surface treatments; (2) the definition of the adhesion zone is essential to classify the modes of failure, which should be an integral component of all failure analyses; (3) the microtensile test may be preferable to conventional shear or flexural tests as an indicator of composite-ceramic bond quality; and (4) careful microscopic analysis of fracture surfaces and an x-ray dot map can produce a more consistent and complete description of the fracture process and interpretation of the modes of failure. The mode of failure and fractographic analyses

  9. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  10. Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Billy L.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Stinton, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

  11. Fabrication of UV devices on various plane substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaya, Motoaki; Kawashima, Takeshi; Iida, Kazuyoshi; Honshio, Akira; Miyake, Yasuto; Kasugai, Hideki; Balakrishnan, Krishnan; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2005-04-01

    We have fabricated UV-emitters such as UV-light emitting diode (UV-LED) and UV-laser diode (UV-LD) on sapphire substrates. The combination of low-temperature-deposited AlN interlayer and lateral seeding epitaxy (Hetero-ELO) yielded crack-free and low-dislocation-density AlGaN. The light output power of GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum wells active layer based UV-LED monotonically decreased with the increase of threading dislocations. Moreover, we have demonstrated a UV-LD grown on this low-dislocation-density AlGaN. The lasing wavelength under pulsed current injection at room temperature was 350.9 nm. We also present violet and UV-LEDs grown on ZrB2 substrate. The violet LED exhibits excellent linearity of L-I characteristic and sharp single spectrum, and vertical conduction through nitride and ZrB2 interface has been confirmed in the UV-LED. We also present the growth of AlN single crystals by sublimation method.

  12. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOEpatents

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  13. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  14. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  15. RETRACTED: P-type Zno thin films fabricated by Al-N co-doping method at different substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guodong; Ye, Zhizhen; Qian, Qing; Zhu, Liping; Huang, Jingyun; Zhao, Binghui

    2005-01-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief. Please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). The editors and publisher would like to confirm the retraction of this paper at the request of the author Guodong Yuan. Reason: The SIMS profile published in this paper had already been included in articles published in Mater. Lett., 58 (2004) 3741-3744, and Thin Solid Films, 484 (2005) 420-425 describing a sample prepared under different conditions. The author did not notify either the Journal of Crystal Growth Editors or the coauthors of this fact. The author apologizes sincerely to the readers, referees, and Editors for violating the guidelines of ethical publication.Also the author apologizes to the coauthors for mishandling of the manuscript.

  16. Ultrahigh-Temperature Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Ellerby, Donald T.; Beckman, Sarah E.; Irby, Edward; Gasch, Matthew J.; Gusman, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs) are a class of materials that include the diborides of metals such as hafnium and zirconium. The materials are of interest to NASA for their potential utility as sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles. Such an application requires that the materials be capable of operating at temperatures, often in excess of 2,000 C. UHTCs are highly refractory and have high thermal conductivity, an advantage for this application. UHTCs are potentially applicable for other high-temperature processing applications, such as crucibles for molten-metal processing and high-temperature electrodes. UHTCs were first studied in the 1960 s by the U.S. Air Force. NASA s Ames Research Center concentrated on developing materials in the HfB2/SiC family for a leading-edge application. The work focused on developing a process to make uniform monolithic (2-phase) materials, and on the testing and design of these materials. Figure 1 shows arc-jet models made from UHTC materials fabricated at Ames. Figure 2 shows a cone being tested in the arc-jet. Other variations of these materials being investigated elsewhere include zirconium based materials and fiber-reinforced composites. Current UHTC work at Ames covers four broad topics: monoliths, coatings, composites, and processing. The goals include improving the fracture toughness, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance of monolithic UHTCs and developing oxidation-resistant UHTC coatings for thermal-protection-system substrates through novel coating methods. As part of this effort, researchers are exploring compositions and processing changes that have yielded improvements in properties. Computational materials science and nanotechnology are being explored as approaches to reduce materials development time and improve and tailor properties.

  17. Rapid silicon outdiffusion from SiC substrates during molecular-beam epitaxial growth of AlGaN/GaN/AlN transistor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, W.E.; Torabi, A.; Mosca, J.J.; Hallock, R.B.; Kennedy, T.D.

    2005-10-15

    AlGaN/GaN/AlN transistor structures were grown onto SiC substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. Under aluminum-rich growth conditions for the AlN nucleation layer, undesirable n-type conduction is observed near the GaN/AlN interface for even thick (>1000 A) AlN layers. Silicon is identified as the unwanted dopant from secondary-ion mass spectroscopy measurements. Atomic force microscopy surface maps reveal free aluminum metal on AlN surfaces grown under modest aluminum-rich conditions. It is proposed that rapid silicon migration is caused by molten aluminum reacting with the SiC substrate resulting in dissolved silicon that rapidly migrates through the growing AlN layer. This behavior is significantly reduced using a growth flux ratio of aluminum to reactive nitrogen close to unity. The resulting buffer leakage current of the GaN high electron mobility transistor structure is reduced by more than four orders of magnitude.

  18. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S G; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth's crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  19. First principles study of structural and electronic properties of AlN (n=1 19) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qiugui; Song, Bin; Hou, Jinyu; He, Pimo

    2008-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of AlN ( n=1-19) clusters have been investigated using generalized gradient approximation to the density functional theory. The lowest-energy structures of AlN clusters are given based on the extensive search of the local minima of the potential energy surface. The results indicate that the nitrogen atom tends to occupy an inside position for n≦10, but prefers a peripheral position with a bulklike coordination beyond n=10. As cluster size increases, an icosahedral-like motif emerges, and the cluster grows based on the mechanism of capping N and extra Al atoms on the icosahedron of Al 13. It is found that Al 3N and Al 7N exhibit particularly high stability. The Al sbnd N bonds may simultaneously possess the ionic and covalent bonding characteristics. The calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps exhibit odd-even oscillations as n increases. The vertical ionization potential of the clusters tends to decrease as the cluster size increases, while the vertical electron affinity tends to increase as cluster size increases.

  20. Search for magnetic interaction in In doped AlN using perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ishita; Kessler, Patrick; Vianden, Reiner

    2013-05-01

    The possible presence of a large magnetic field due to spin polarization of a Cd nucleus (decay product of 111In) at an Al substitutional site in AlN is investigated with perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. The PAC spectra of 111In/111Cd in AlN show two probe environments: a weak quadrupole interaction (quadrupole interaction constant, ν _Q^{ lattice} = 30 MHz) due to 111In probes at a defect free Al substitutional site and an unknown large interaction (ν _Q^{ complex} = 300 MHz) tentatively attributed to a nearest neighbour pair between 111In and a nitrogen vacancy (VN) aligned along the c-axis. Surprisingly, in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, such a large electric field gradient (EFG) could not be reproduced. However, an inclusion of spin polarization in the calculations indicates a strong magnetic field at 50 % of the 111In/111Cd site. An attempt to verify the presence of the strong magnetic field and to explain the origin of the strong interaction is made. Orientation measurements show, the large interaction is not characterised by a magnetic interaction and is predominantly due to the EFG. However, in the presence of an external magnetic field, the strong interaction probe environment becomes more uniform and the EFG increases by 10 %. This definitely hints towards some sort of magnetic interaction at the strong interaction probe site.

  1. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  2. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics.

  3. Electronic and atomic structure of the AlnHn+2 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, J. I.; Alonso, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    The electronic and atomic structure of the family of hydrogenated Al clusters AlnHn+2 with n=4-11 has been studied using the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation. All these clusters have substantial gaps between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO) and, consequently, they are chemically very stable. The largest gap of 2.81 eV occurs for Al6H8. Five clusters of the family, Al4H6, Al5H7, Al6H8, Al7H9, and Al10H12, fulfill the Wade-Mingos rule. That is, in AlnHn+2, the Al matrix forms a polyhedron of n vertices and n H atoms form strong H-Al terminal bonds; one pair of electrons is involved in each of those bonds. The remaining n+1 electron pairs form a delocalized cloud over the surface of the Al cage. The clusters fulfilling the Wade-Mingos rule have wider HOMO-LUMO gaps and are chemically more stable. The trends in the gap have some reflections in the form of the photoabsorption spectra, calculated in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory using the GGA single-particle energies and orbitals and a local density approximation exchange-correlation kernel.

  4. Thermal-mechanical modeling of single crystal AlN and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvanirabori, Payman

    In this work, thermal-mechanical models are being developed, based on underlying micromechanical behavior of III-nitride single crystals at growth temperatures, for use in process design. A crystal plasticity model that is capable of capturing the underlying mechanisms of dislocation motion, multiplication, and interactions in wurtzite structure (hexagonal) crystals is defined to accurately model the elastic-plastic behavior of GaN and AlN crystals at elevated temperatures. The model for AlN is extended from relations developed for GaN based on available experimental data. Algorithms for integrating the constitutive model and computing the consistent tangent modulus are formulated, and the material model is implemented into a crystal plasticity finite element framework. Finite element models of crystal growth for different processing conditions are simulated. The simulation predicts cracking and dislocation defect density in order to improve the yield and reduce the manufacturing cost of high quality III-nitride semiconductors. Furthermore, the resulting simulation capability can be used in conjunction with relevant experiments to backout key thermal-mechanical material properties at high temperatures.

  5. First-principles structures and stabilities of AlN+ (N = 46-62) clusters.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Andrés; López, José M

    2006-07-27

    We present plausible candidates for the global minimum structures of Al(N)(+) (N = 46-62) cluster ions, determined by pseudopotential density functional theory static calculations under the spin-polarized generalized gradient approximation. Our calculations provide a first important step toward the rationalization of recent calorimetric experiments on the meltinglike transition of Al(N)(+). Most clusters with N > or = 48 clearly adopt fragments of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline lattice, although with significant distortions and a substantial proportion of defects in some cases. Another important driving force for stabilization comes from (111)-like surfaces, as the clusters often prefer to adopt less compact structures in order to keep the proportion of (100)-like surfaces at a minimum level. Al(46)(+) and Al(47)(+) adopt rather disordered structures instead. We find indications of enhanced stabilities for N = 51, 57, and 61 and of a substantial structural change between Al(55)(+) and Al(56)(+). These features correlate, albeit qualitatively, with the experimental observations.

  6. Origins of optical absorption and emission lines in AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Qimin; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-09-15

    To aid the development of AlN-based optoelectronics, it is essential to identify the defects that cause unwanted light absorption and to minimize their impact. Using hybrid functional calculations, we investigate the role of native defects and their complexes with oxygen, a common impurity in AlN. We find that Al vacancies are the source of the absorption peak at 3.4 eV observed in irradiated samples and of the luminescence signals at 2.78 eV. The absorption peak at ∼4.0 eV and higher, and luminescence signals around 3.2 and 3.6 eV observed in AlN samples with high oxygen concentrations are attributed to complexes of Al vacancies and oxygen impurities. We also propose a transition involving Al and N vacancies and oxygen impurities that may be a cause of the absorption band peaked at 2.9 eV.

  7. Ceramic composite liner material for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercegovic, D. B.; Walker, C. L.; Norgren, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced commercial and military gas turbine engines may operate at combustor outlet temperatures in excess of 1920 K (3000 F). At these temperatures combustors liners experience extreme convective and radiative heat fluxes. The ability of a plasma sprayed ceramic coating to reduce liner metal temperature has been recognized. However, the brittleness of the ceramic layer and the difference in thermal expansion with the metal substrate has caused cracking, spalling and some separation of the ceramic coating. Research directed at turbine tip seals (or shrouds) has shown the advantage of applying the ceramic to a compliant metal pad. This paper discusses recent studies of applying ceramics to combustor liners in which yttria stabilized zirconia plasma sprayed on compliant metal substrates which were exposed to near stoichiometric combustion, presents performance and durability results, and describes a conceptual design for an advanced, small gas turbine combustor. Test specimens were convectively cooled or convective-transpiration cooled and were evaluated in a 10 cm square flame tube combustor at inlet air temperatures of 533 K (500 F) and at a pressure of 0.5 MPa (75 psia). The ceramics were exposed to flame temperatures in excess of 2000 K (3320 F). Results appear very promising with all 30 specimens surviving a screening test and one of two specimens surviving a cyclic durability test.

  8. A ceramic damage model for analyses of multi-layered ceramic-core sandwich panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keejoo

    2005-11-01

    A damage model for ceramic materials is developed and incorporated into the geometrically nonlinear solid shell element formulation for dynamic analyses of multi-layered ceramic armor panels under blast wave pressure loading. The damage model takes into account material behaviors observed from multi-axial dynamic tests on Aluminum Nitride (AlN) ceramic. The ceramic fails in a brittle or gradual fashion, depending upon the hydrostatic pressure and applied strain-rate. In the model, the gradual failure is represented by two states: the initial and final failure states. These states are described by two separate failure surfaces that are pressure-dependent and strain-rate-dependent. A scalar damage parameter is defined via using the two failure surfaces, based on the assumption that the local stress state determines material damage and its level. In addition, the damage model accounts for the effect of existing material damage on the new damage. The multi-layered armor panel of interest is comprised of an AlN-core sandwich with unidirectional composite skins and a woven composite back-plate. To accommodate the material damage effect of composite layers, a composite failure model in the open literature is adopted and modified into two separate failure models to address different failure mechanisms of the unidirectional and woven composites. In addition, the effect of strain-rates on the material strengths is incorporated into the composite failure models. For finite element modeling, multiple eighteen-node elements are used in the thickness direction to properly describe mechanics of the multi-layered panel. Dynamic analyses of a multi-layered armor panel are conducted under blast wave pressure loadings. The resulting dynamic responses of the panel demonstrate that dynamic analyses that do not take into account material damage and failure significantly under-predict the peak displacement. The under-prediction becomes more pronounced as the blast load level increases

  9. Separation of Hydrogen Using an Electroless Deposited Thin-Film Palladium-Ceramic Composite Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ilias, S.; King, F.G.; Fan, Ting-Fang; Roy, S.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to prepare and characterize a hydrogen permselective palladium-ceramic composite membrane for high temperature gas separations and catalytic membrane reactors. Electroless plating method was used to deposit a thin palladium film on microporous ceramic substrate. The objective of this paper is to discuss the preparation and characterization of a thin-film palladium-ceramic composite membrane for selective separation of hydrogen at elevated temperatures and pressures. In this paper, we also present a model to describe the hydrogen transport through the palladium-ceramic composite membrane in a cocurrent flow configuration.

  10. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  11. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  12. Ceramics for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, James D.; Levine, Stanley R.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Structural ceramics were under nearly continuous development for various heat engine applications since the early 1970s. These efforts were sustained by the properties that ceramics offer in the areas of high-temperature strength, environmental resistance, and low density and the large benefits in system efficiency and performance that can result. The promise of ceramics was not realized because their brittle nature results in high sensitivity to microscopic flaws and catastrophic fracture behavior. This translated into low reliability for ceramic components and thus limited their application in engines. For structural ceramics to successfully make inroads into the terrestrial heat engine market requires further advances in low cost, net shape fabrication of high reliability components, and improvements in properties such as toughness, and strength. These advances will lead to very limited use of ceramics in noncritical applications in aerospace engines. For critical aerospace applications, an additional requirement is that the components display markedly improved toughness and noncatastrophic or graceful fracture. Thus the major emphasis is on fiber-reinforced ceramics.

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies on magnetic tunnel junctions with AlO and AlN tunnel barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, B. S.; Moon, J. C.; Hong, S. W.; Kang, K. S.; Kim, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ju, H. L.

    2006-04-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of the optimized magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with AlO and AlN barriers have been performed to study the chemical structures of the barrier and the underlying layer. These MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers exhibited increased tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) after annealing at 200 deg. C from 27% to 45% and from 25% to 33%, respectively. Surprisingly, the XPS and XAS measurements confirmed that both the as-grown and the annealed MTJs had metallic Co and Fe at the interface between the barrier and the underlying CoFe layer. After annealing, under-stoichiometric AlO{sub x} and AlN{sub x} phases in MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers partially transformed into stoichiometric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and AlN phases, respectively. Thus the increase in TMR after annealing for MTJs with clean interface between the barrier and the underlying layer is believed due to the anion redistribution inside the barrier layer, not from back diffusion from pinned magnetic layer to barrier layer.

  14. A comparative study on magnetism in Zn-doped AlN and GaN from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Lingling E-mail: xiaowenzhi@hnu.edu.cn; Huang, Weiqing; Xiao, Wenzhi E-mail: xiaowenzhi@hnu.edu.cn; Xiao, Gang

    2014-09-14

    First-principles calculations have been used to comparatively investigate electronic and magnetic properties of Zn-doped AlN and GaN. A total magnetic moment of 1.0 μB{sub B} induced by Zn is found in AlN, but not in GaN. Analyses show that the origin of spontaneous polarization not only depend on the localized atomic orbitals of N and sufficient hole concentration, but also the relative intensity of the covalency of matrix. The relatively stronger covalent character of GaN with respect to AlN impedes forming local magnetic moment in GaN matrix. Our study offers a fresh sight of spontaneous spin polarization in d⁰ magnetism. The much stronger ferromagnetic coupling in c-plane of AlN means that it is feasible to realize long-range ferromagnetic order via monolayer delta-doping. This can apply to other wide band-gap semiconductors in wurtzite structure.

  15. AlGaN/GaN MISHEMTs with AlN gate dielectric grown by thermal ALD technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Sheng-Xun; Zhang, Lin-Qing; Huang, Hong-Fan; Shi, Jin-Shan; Zhang, Chun-Min; Lu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Peng-Fei; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, AlN plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) passivation technique had been proposed and investigated for suppressing the dynamic on-resistance degradation behavior of high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). In this paper, a novel gate dielectric and passivation technique for GaN-on-Si AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors (MISHEMTs) is presented. This technique features the AlN thin film grown by thermal ALD at 400°C without plasma enhancement. A 10.6-nm AlN thin film was grown upon the surface of the HEMT serving as the gate dielectric under the gate electrode and as the passivation layer in the access region at the same time. The MISHEMTs with thermal ALD AlN exhibit enhanced on/off ratio, reduced channel sheet resistance, reduction of gate leakage by three orders of magnitude at a bias of 4 V, reduced threshold voltage hysteresis of 60 mV, and suppressed current collapse degradation.

  16. Synthesis of Nano-Size AlN Powders by Carbothermal Reduction from Plasma-Assisted Ball Milling Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhijie; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Wang, Sen; Dai, Leyang

    2016-07-01

    Nano-size aluminum nitride (AlN) powders have been successfully synthesized with a high efficiency method through annealing from milling assisted by discharge plasma (p-milling) alumina (Al2O3) precursors. The characterization of the p-milling Al2O3 powders and the synthesized AlN are investigated. Compared to conventional ball milling (c-milling), it can be found that the precursors by p-milling have a finer grain size with a higher specific surface area, which lead to a faster reaction efficiency and higher conversion to AlN at lower temperatures. The activation energy of p-milling Al2O3 is found to be 371.5 kJ/mol, a value that is much less than the reported value of the unmilled and the conventional milled Al2O3. Meanwhile, the synthesized AlN powders have unique features, such as an irregular lamp-like morphology with uniform particle distribution and fine average particle size. The results are attributed to the unique synergistic effect of p-milling, which is the effect of deformation, fracture, and cold welding of Al2O3 powders resulting from ball milling, that will be enhanced due to the introduction of discharge plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51177008)

  17. Coating system to permit direct brazing of ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Hosking, F. Michael

    2003-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a ceramic component that enables direct brazing using a non-active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a ceramic component to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by using this brazing method. The ceramic can be high purity alumina. The method comprises applying a first coating of a silicon-bearing oxide material (e.g. silicon dioxide or mullite (3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.2SiO.sub.2) to the ceramic. Next, a thin coating of active metal (e.g. Ti or V) is applied. Finally, a thicker coating of a non-active metal (e.g. Au or Cu) is applied. The coatings can be applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Alternatively, the active and non-active metals can be co-deposited (e.g. by sputtering a target made of mullite). After all of the coatings have been applied, the ceramic can be fired at a high temperature in a non-oxidizing environment to promote diffusion, and to enhance bonding of the coatings to the substrate. After firing, the metallized ceramic component can be brazed to other components using a conventional non-active braze alloy. Alternatively, the firing and brazing steps can be combined into a single step. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  18. First principles calculations of formation energies and elastic constants of inclusions α-Al2O3, MgO and AlN in aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Huang, Yuanchun; Xiao, Zhengbing; Yang, Chuge; Reng, Xianwei

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the formation energies and elastic constants of α-Al2O3, MgO and AlN in both rock salt (cubic) and wurtzite (hexagonal) structures were investigated by first principles calculations. The results show that the formation energy being -17.8, -6.3, -3.06 and -3.46 eV/formula unit for α-Al2O3, MgO, AlN (rock salt) and AlN (wurtzite). It suggests that in the ground state, α-Al2O3 is relatively more stable than MgO and AlN. The elastic properties for a polycrystalline in the ground state were calculated with the obtained elastic constants, the elastic properties reveal the rock salt structure AlN is the hardest particles among all the inclusions, and all of these inclusions are classified as brittle materials, which is detrimental to the ductile nature of aluminum matrix. The calculated anisotropy index shows that the AlN (wurtzite) and α-Al2O3 have a lower degree of anisotropy compared with MgO and AlN (rock salt). The calculated results are in good agreement with the values of experimental and other works.

  19. Study on the neotype zirconia's implant coated nanometer hydroxyapatite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. W.; Yang, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, biologic ceramics is a popular material of implants and bioactive surface modification of dental implant became a research emphasis, which aims to improve bioactivity of implants materials and acquire firmer implants-bone interface. The zirconia ceramic has excellent mechanical properties and nanometer HA ceramics is a bioceramic well known for its bioactivity, therefore, nanometer HA ceramics coating on zirconia, allows combining the excellent mechanical properties of zirconia substrates with its bioactivity. This paper shows a new method for implant shape design and bioactive modification of dental implants surface. Zirconia's implant substrate was prepared by sintered method, central and lateral tunnels were drilled in the zirconia hollow porous cylindrical implants by laser processing. The HA powders and needle-like HA crystals were made by a wet precipitation and calcining method. Its surface was coated with nanometer HA ceramics which was used brush HA slurry and vacuum sintering. Mechanical testing results revealed that the attachment strength of nanometer HA ceramics coated zirconia samples is high. SEM and interface observation after inserted experiment indicated that calcium and phosphor content increased and symmetrically around coated implant-bone tissue interface. A significantly higher affinity index was demonstrated in vivo by histomorphometric evaluation in coated versus uncoated implants. SEM analysis demonstrated better bone adhesion to the material in coated implant at any situation. In addition, the hollow porous cylindrical implant coated with nanometer HA ceramics increase the interaction of bone and implant, the new bone induced into the surface of hollow porous cylindrical implant and through the most tunnels filled into central hole. The branch-like structure makes the implant and bone a body, which increased the contact area and decreased elastic ratio. Therefore, the macroscopical and microcosmic nested structure of

  20. Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kreider, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

  1. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Fukui, T.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  2. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  3. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  4. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  5. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  6. Experiments with ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, E. K.; Rollins, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes the procedures and techniques used in the application of a ceramic coating and the evaluation of test parts through observation of the cracks that occur in this coating due to loading.

  7. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Ceramic heat pipe development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrigan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Ceramic materials used in conventional brickwork heat exchanger configurations increase allowable temperatures; however, joint leakage problems limit use of these designs. Ceramic tube heat exchanger designs reduce these problems but still require sliding joints and compliant tube end seals. Ceramic heat pipe based recuperator designs eliminate the sealing problems that limited the high temperature heat recovery installations. Heat pipe recuperators offer high corrosion and abrasion resistance, high temperature capability, reduced leakage, element redundancy, and simplified replacement and cleaning. The development of ceramic heat pipe recuperator elements involves the selection and test of materials and fabrication techniques having production potential, evaluation of technology in subscale tests, design and test of components for full scale recuperator applications, and demonstration of heat pipes in subscale and full scale recuperator installation.

  9. Super Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Video Gallery

    New technology being developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center creates super thin ceramic coatings on engine components. The Plasma Spray – Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) rig uses a powerful ...

  10. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  11. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  12. Fibrous ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the reusable heat shielding materials used to protect the Space Shuttles, their manufacturing processes, properties, and applications are discussed. Emphases is upon ceramic materials. Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles are discussed.

  13. Fibrous ceramic insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.E.

    1982-11-01

    Some of the reusable heat shielding materials used to protect the Space Shuttles, their manufacturing processes, properties, and applications are discussed. Emphasis is upon ceramic materials. Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles are discussed.

  14. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  16. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1996-01-01

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  17. Dynamics of metal/ceramic interface formation.

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Kevin F.

    2003-12-01

    We summarize the work of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 'Dynamics of Metal/Ceramic Interface Formation.' Low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) was used to monitor in real time how the metal/ceramic interface between the alloy NiAl and its oxide formed. The interfaces were synthesized by exposing the clean alloy to oxygen at either low or high temperature. During low-temperature exposure, an initially amorphous oxide formed. With annealing, this oxide crystallizes into one type of alumina that has two orientational domains. While the oxide is relatively uniform, it contained pinholes, which coarsened with annealing. In marked contrast, high-temperature exposure directly produced rod-shaped islands of crystalline oxide. These rods were all aligned along the substrate's [001] direction and could be many microns in length. Real-time observations showed that the rods can both grow and shrink by addition and subtraction, respectively, at their ends.

  18. Forming YBa2Cu3O7-x Superconductors On Copper Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, J. Devin; Young, Stanley G.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental process forms layer of high-critical-temperature ceramic superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x on surface of copper substrate. Offers possible solution to problem of finishing ceramic superconductors to required final sizes and shapes (difficult problem because these materials brittle and cannot be machined or bent). Further research necessary to evaluate superconducting qualities of surface layers and optimize process.

  19. Properties of AlN films deposited by reactive ion-plasma sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, N. A.; Bondarev, A. D.; Zolotarev, V. V.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Lubyanskiy, Ya. V.; Lyutetskiy, A. V.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A. Ayusheva, K. R.; Arsentyev, I. N.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The properties of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and AlN dielectric coatings deposited by reactive ion-plasma sputtering are studied. The refractive indices of the dielectric coatings are determined by optical ellipsometry. It is shown that aluminum nitride is the optimal material for achieving maximum illumination of the output mirror of a semiconductor laser. A crystalline phase with a hexagonal atomic lattice and oxygen content of up to 10 at % is found by transmission electron microscopy in the aluminum-nitride films. It is found that a decrease in the concentration of residual oxygen in the chamber of the reactive ion-plasma sputtering installation makes it possible to eliminate the appearance of vertical pores in the bulk of the aluminum-nitride film.

  20. Mass transfer in AlN crystal growth at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noveski, V.; Schlesser, R.; Mahajan, S.; Beaudoin, S.; Sitar, Z.

    2004-03-01

    A one-dimensional mass transfer model based on equilibrium sublimation and gas phase diffusion was developed for high-temperature sublimation growth of AlN in an RF heated reactor and validated with growth results. The model predicted the apparent activation energy for growth to be close to the energy of sublimation. Using the model-predicted growth conditions, a 25 mm diameter polycrystalline boule was grown at a rate of 1 mm/h. Growth was performed at short source-to-seed distances (˜10 mm), nitrogen pressure of 600 Torr, nitrogen flow-rate of 100 sccm, and source temperatures ranging from 2000°C to 2400°C. Fast grain size development was achieved in the growth direction. The grown material was transparent and virtually colorless.

  1. Relationship between appearance crystalline planes and growth temperatures during sublimation growth of AlN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Hu, Xiaobo; Jiang, Shouzhen; Ning, Lina; Wang, Yingmin; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Xiangang; Wang, Jiyang; Jiang, Minhua

    2006-07-01

    Self-seeded growth of aluminum nitride single crystals in BN crucible was conducted by sublimation method. It was found that the growth temperature played a critical role in the determination of the crystal morphologies and the appearance crystalline planes. The (0 0 0 1) and pseudo ( 1 1 2¯ 0) planes were often present at low and high temperature, respectively. The self-seeded crystals possess high structural quality which were assessed by high resolution X-ray diffractometry with a full-width at half-maximum of 35.76 arcsec. Step flow mechanism for the growth of AlN similar to SiC growth was confirmed with the aid of atomic force microscopy.

  2. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  3. High temperature electrical transport study of Si-doped AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Sylvie; Konczewicz, Leszek; Ben Messaoud, Jaweb; Peyre, Hervé; Al Khalfioui, Mohamed; Matta, Samuel; Leroux, Mathieu; Damilano, Benjamin; Brault, Julien

    2016-10-01

    Electrical transport (resistivity and Hall Effect) have been studied in silicon doped aluminum nitride (AlN) thick epitaxial layers from 250 K up to 1000 K. The investigated samples, grown by molecular beam epitaxy were characterized by n-type conduction with an ambient temperature free carrier concentration of about ∼ 1 × 1015 cm-3. The donor level, situated about 250 meV below the conduction band edge, was found to be responsible for the experimentally observed increase of free carrier concentration with temperature. The temperature dependence of carrier mobility has been analyzed in the framework of a multimode scattering model. In the investigated samples the main scattering mechanism is supposed to be dislocation scattering.

  4. Compositions and chemical bonding in ceramics by quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.; Tanaka, S.; Davis, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry was applied to a range of ceramic materials at a spatial resolution of <5 nm. Analysis of Fe L{sub 23} white lines indicated a low-spin state with a charge transfer of {approximately}1.5 electrons/atom onto the Fe atoms implanted into (amorphized) silicon carbide. Gradients of 2 to 5% in the Co:O stoichiometry were measured across 100-nm-thick Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic, with the highest O levels near the ZrO{sub 2}. The energy-loss near-edge structures were dramatically different for the two cobalt oxides; those for CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been incorrectly ascribed to CoO in the published literature. Kinetically stabilized solid solubility occurred in an AlN-SiC film grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on {alpha}(6H)-SiC, and no detectable interdiffusion occurred in couples of MBE-grown AlN on SiC following annealing at up to 1750C. In diffusion couples of polycrystalline AlN on SiC, interfacial 8H sialon (aluminum oxy-nitride) and pockets of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rich {beta}{prime} sialon in the SiC were detected.

  5. 3D magnetotelluric modelling of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite ring complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Andersson, Magnus; Kalscheuer, Thomas; García Juanatey, María A.; Malehmir, Alireza; Shan, Chunling; Pedersen, Laust B.; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-four broadband magnetotelluric stations were deployed across the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite ring intrusion in central Sweden. The measurements were designed such that both 2D models along existing seismic profiles and a 3D model can be constructed. Alnö Island and surrounding areas are densely populated and industrialized and in order to reduce the effect of noise, the remote reference technique was utilized in time series processing. Strike and dimensionality analyses together with the induction arrows show that there is no homogeneous regional strike direction in this area. Therefore, only the determinant of the impedance tensor was used for 2D inversion whereas all elements of the impedance tensor were used for 3D inversion. Representative rock samples were collected from existing outcrops and their resistivities were measured in the laboratory to facilitate interpretation of the inversion models. The results from these measurements show that coarse-grained (sövite, white color) and fine-grained (dark color) carbonatites are the most conductive and resistive rock types, respectively. In accordance with the interpretation of the reflection seismic images, the 2D and 3D resistivity models depict the caldera-related ring-type fault system and updoming faulted and fractured systems as major 10-500 Ωm conductors, extending down to about 3 km depth. A central ~ 4000 Ωm resistive unit at about 3 km depth appears to correspond to a solidified fossil magma chamber as speculated from the reflection seismic data and earlier field geological studies.

  6. Schottky contact formation on polar and non-polar AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Pramod; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Tweedie, James; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko

    2014-11-21

    The interfaces of m- and c-plane AlN with metals of different work functions and electro-negativities were characterized and the Schottky barrier heights were measured. The Schottky barrier height was determined by measuring the valence band maximum (VBM) with respect to the Fermi level at the surface (interface) before (after) metallization. VBM determination included accurate modeling and curve fitting of density of states at the valence band edge with the XPS data. The experimental behavior of the barrier heights could not be explained by the Schottky-Mott model and was modeled using InterFace-Induced Gap States (IFIGS). A slope parameter (S{sub X}) was used to incorporate the density of surface states and is a measure of Fermi level pinning. The experimental barriers followed theoretical predictions with a barrier height at the surface Fermi level (Charge neutrality level (CNL)) of ∼2.1 eV (∼2.7 eV) on m-plane (c-plane) and S{sub X} ∼ 0.36 eV/Miedema unit. Slope parameter much lower than 0.86 implied a surface/interface states dominated behavior with significant Fermi level pinning and the measured barrier heights were close to the CNL. Titanium and zirconium provided the lowest barriers (1.6 eV) with gold providing the highest (2.3 eV) among the metals analyzed on m-plane. It was consistently found that barrier heights decreased from metal polar to non-polar surfaces, in general, due to an increasing CNL. The data indicated that charged IFIGS compensate spontaneous polarization charge. These barrier height and slope parameter measurements provided essential information for designing Schottky diodes and other contact-based devices on AlN.

  7. Spectra and energy levels of Tm3+ (4 f12 ) in AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, John B.; Vetter, Ulrich; Hofsäss, Hans; Zandi, Bahram; Reid, Michael F.

    2004-12-01

    We report a detailed analysis of the cathodoluminescence spectra of Tm3+ -implanted 2H-aluminum nitride (AlN) covering the wavelength range between 290 and 820nm at temperatures between 12 and 60K . More than 200 transitions are observed, of which more than 100 of these transitions can be identified from emitting multiplet manifolds I61 , D21 , and G41 . Although the emitting levels are not observed directly, emission is also attributed to the P23 and P13 multiplet manifolds based on analyses of transitions to terminal levels F43 , H53 , and F33 . The observed crystal-field splitting of the ground-state multiplet manifold, H63 , and manifolds F43 , H53 , H43 , F33 , F23 , and G41 is established from an analysis based on matching repeated energy differences between transitions. This method is similar to one used in analyzing arc and spark spectra. Temperature-dependent spectra also establish the crystal-field splitting of the P13 and part of the manifold splitting of emitting levels such as I61 . To establish an initial set of crystal-field splitting parameters, Bnm , that can be related to a physical model, we carried out a lattice-sum calculation by computing the crystal-field components, which are the coefficients in a multipolar expansion of the crystal field about the Al3+ sites that have C3v symmetry in the lattice. Emission channeling experiments indicate that the Al3+ sites serve as the substitutional sites for Tm3+ in AlN. With only minor adjustments to the calculated centroids to account for J -mixing, the calculated crystal-field splitting of most multiplet manifolds, LJ2S+1 , of Tm3+(4f12) based on the Bnm obtained from the lattice-sum calculations, is in good agreement with the reported experimental splitting.

  8. Schottky contact formation on polar and non-polar AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Tweedie, J; Kirste, R; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-11-21

    The interfaces of m-and c-plane AlN with metals of different work functions and electro-negativities were characterized and the Schottky barrier heights were measured. The Schottky barrier height was determined by measuring the valence band maximum (VBM) with respect to the Fermi level at the surface (interface) before (after) metallization. VBM determination included accurate modeling and curve fitting of density of states at the valence band edge with the XPS data. The experimental behavior of the barrier heights could not be explained by the Schottky-Mott model and was modeled using InterFace-Induced Gap States (IFIGS). A slope parameter (S-X) was used to incorporate the density of surface states and is a measure of Fermi level pinning. The experimental barriers followed theoretical predictions with a barrier height at the surface Fermi level (Charge neutrality level (CNL)) of similar to 2.1 eV (similar to 2.7 eV) on m-plane (c-plane) and S-X similar to 0.36 eV/Miedema unit. Slope parameter much lower than 0.86 implied a surface/interface states dominated behavior with significant Fermi level pinning and the measured barrier heights were close to the CNL. Titanium and zirconium provided the lowest barriers (1.6 eV) with gold providing the highest (2.3 eV) among the metals analyzed on m-plane. It was consistently found that barrier heights decreased from metal polar to non-polar surfaces, in general, due to an increasing CNL. The data indicated that charged IFIGS compensate spontaneous polarization charge. These barrier height and slope parameter measurements provided essential information for designing Schottky diodes and other contact-based devices on AlN. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  9. Industry turns to ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Constance, J.

    1990-03-01

    Developments in the area of ceramic composites, which can be used to construct stronger, lighter weight, and more fuel-efficient aircraft, are examined. Ceramic composites are applicable aircraft braking systems, hypersonic fuselage skins, engine parts, and missile guidance fins. The production and testing of new ceramic composites are discussed. Consideration is given to the production of ceramic composites of an alumina or aluminum nitride matrix; developing glass ceramic matrix composites and silicon nitride matrix composites; and improving synthesis and processing technology to enhance the reliability of ceramic composites.

  10. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  11. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  12. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2011-01-01

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing. PMID:22709611

  13. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2012-01-10

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  15. All-ceramic alternatives to conventional metal-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E A

    1998-03-01

    In the search for the ultimate esthetic restorative material, many new all-ceramic systems have been introduced to the market. One such system, In-Ceram, is primarily crystalline in nature, whereas all other forms of ceramics used in dentistry consist primarily of a glass matrix with a crystalline phase as a filler. In-Cream can be used to make all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial denture frameworks. Three forms of In-Ceram, based on alumina, spinal (a mixture of alumina and magnesia), or zirconia, make it possible to fabricate frameworks of various translucencies by using different processing techniques. This article discusses clinical indications and contraindications for the use of In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Spinell all-ceramic restorations. Particular attention is given to cement considerations using several clinical examples.

  16. AlN and Al oxy-nitride gate dielectrics for reliable gate stacks on Ge and InGaAs channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Li, H.; Robertson, J.

    2016-05-01

    AlN and Al oxy-nitride dielectric layers are proposed instead of Al2O3 as a component of the gate dielectric stacks on higher mobility channels in metal oxide field effect transistors to improve their positive bias stress instability reliability. It is calculated that the gap states of nitrogen vacancies in AlN lie further away in energy from the semiconductor band gap than those of oxygen vacancies in Al2O3, and thus AlN might be less susceptible to charge trapping and have a better reliability performance. The unfavourable defect energy level distribution in amorphous Al2O3 is attributed to its larger coordination disorder compared to the more symmetrically bonded AlN. Al oxy-nitride is also predicted to have less tendency for charge trapping.

  17. Atomic Structures of Oxygen-associated Defects in Sintered Aluminum Nitride Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yan; Pennycook; Terauchi; Tanaka

    1999-09-01

    : Convergent-beam electron diffraction and Z-contrast imaging are used to study oxygen-associated defects, flat inversion domain boundaries, dislocations, and interfaces in sintered AlN ceramics. The structures of these defects are directly derived from atomic-resolution Z-contrast images. The flat inversion domain boundaries contain a single Al-O octahedral layer and have a stacking sequence of.bAaB-bAc-CaAc., where -cAb- indicates the single octahedral layer. The expansion at the flat inversion domain boundaries is measured to be 0.06 (+/-0.02) nm. The interfaces between 2H- and polytypoid-AlN are found to be also inversion domain boundaries but their stacking sequence differs from that of the flat inversion domain boundaries. PMID:10473680

  18. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for Harsh Environments: Identification of Candidate Thin Film Ceramics to Test for Viability for Static Strain Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. In order to have a more passive method of negating changes of resistance due to temperature, an effort is underway at NASA GRC to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines, specifically in the fan and compressor modules on blades. Other applications include on aircraft hot section structures and on thermal protection systems. The near-term interim goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials to test for viability and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. This goal was achieved by a thorough literature search for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges, reviewing potential candidate materials for chemical & physical compatibility with NASA GRC's microfabrication procedures and substrates.

  19. Fundamental tribological properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with itself, another ceramic, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. Adhesion between a ceramic and itself or another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to the interface resulting from solid state contact. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid-state contact are discussed as they relate to friction and wear. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Lubrication is found to increase the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics with sliding or rubbing contact.

  20. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)