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Sample records for alpha 1-adrenergic receptor

  1. Novel arylpiperazines as selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Murray, W V; Jolliffe, L; Pulito, V

    2000-05-15

    A novel series of arylpiperazines has been synthesized and identified as antagonists of alpha1a adrenergic receptor (alpha1a-AR) implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia. These compounds selectively bind to membrane bound alpha1a-AR with K(i)s as low as 0.66 nM. As such, these potentially represent a viable treatment for BPH without the side effects associated with known alpha1-adrenergic antagonists.

  2. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  3. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  4. Alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in canine lower genitourinary tissues: insight into development and function

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1987-10-01

    Radioligand receptor binding methods were used to characterize the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor in the bladder body, bladder base, prostate and urethra of the male dog. Saturation experiments were performed in tissue homogenates using (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat, an alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist of high specific activity (2,200 Ci. per mmol.). The equilibrium dissociation constant Kd for (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat binding in the bladder body (0.56 pM.), bladder base (0.81 +/- 0.11 pM.), prostate (0.86 +/- 0.19 pM.) and urethra (0.55 pM.) was similar, suggesting homogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic binding sites in lower genitourinary tissues. The receptor density in the bladder body, bladder base, prostate and urethra, expressed as fmol. per mg. wet weight, was 0.22 +/- 0.02, 0.82 +/- 0.09, 0.55 +/- 0.06 and 0.27 +/- 0.06, respectively (mean +/- standard error of mean). Competitive binding experiments with (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat and unlabeled prazosin and clonidine confirmed the selectivity of Heat for alpha 1-adrenergic binding sites. Anatomical dissections have revealed that a major component of the smooth muscle of the bladder base and prostate originates from the ureter, whereas a major component of the smooth muscle of the urethra originates from the bladder. The measured alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities support these developmental theories.

  5. Identification of alpha1-adrenergic receptors and their involvement in phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the frog heart.

    PubMed

    Lazou, Antigone; Gaitanaki, Catherine; Vaxevanellis, Spiros; Pehtelidou, Anastasia

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in frog heart and to examine their related signal transduction pathway. alpha(1)-Adrenergic binding sites were studied in purified heart membranes using the specific alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist [(3)H]prazosin. Analysis of the binding data indicated one class of binding sites displaying a K(d) of 4.19 +/- 0.56 nM and a B(max) of 14.66 +/- 1.61 fmol/mg original wet weight. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, or phenylephrine, in the presence of propranolol, competed with [(3)H]prazosin binding with a similar potency and a K(i) value of about 10 microM. The kinetics of adrenaline binding was closely related to its biological effect. Adrenaline concentration dependently increased the production of inositol phosphates in the heart in the presence or absence of propranolol. Maximal stimulation was about 8.5-fold, and the half-maximum effective concentration was 30 and 21 microM in the absence and presence of propranolol, respectively. These data clearly show that alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are coupled to the phosphoinositide hydrolysis in frog heart. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence supporting the presence of functional alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in the frog heart.

  6. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in brown adipose tissue. Thermogenic significance and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Mohell, N

    1984-01-01

    The main function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is to produce heat in response to cold. Norepinephrine (NE), released from sympathetic nerve terminals, activates the tissue via binding to adrenergic receptors. While the role of the classical beta-adrenergic pathways (including cAMP production and lipolysis) in regulation of BAT metabolism is well documented, very little is known about alpha-adrenergic receptors and responses, which are the scope of the present thesis. The results demonstrate that hamster and rat BAT possess a large number of specific (3H)prazosin binding sites (about 100 000 binding sites per cell) with all the characteristics generally expected of physiologically relevant alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The stimulation of these receptors results in at least two physiological responses; increased phosphatidylinositol turnover and increased respiration. About 20% of the NE-stimulated oxygen consumption (i.e. heat production) is due to the activation of (as yet unknown) alpha 1-adrenergic pathways, while 80% originates from beta 1-adrenergic responses. Comparison of agonist and antagonist affinities for alpha 1-receptors with their potencies to regulate the above responses indicates that tight coupling exists between alpha 1-receptor occupation and respiration, and that part of the alpha 1-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover is closely associated with receptor occupation and may thus be related to the mediation of alpha 1-stimulation. Part of the hormone-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover is also Ca2+-independent. Agonist affinity of alpha 1-receptors is regulated by guanine nucleotides, Mg2+, and Na+. This indicates an involvement of a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the transduction of alpha 1-adrenergic signals. However, alpha 1-stimulation does not alter cAMP production (instead changes in cellular Ca2+ dynamics have been demonstrated). Cold acclimation of animals increases alpha 1-receptor density in BAT. As the opposite has been

  7. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor: Binding and phosphoinositide breakdown in human myometrium

    SciTech Connect

    Breuiller-Fouche, M.; Doualla-Bell Kotto Maka, F.; Geny, B.; Ferre, F. )

    1991-07-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were examined in both inner and outer layers of human pregnant myometrium using radioligand binding of (3H)prazosin. (3H)prazosin bound rapidly and reversibly to a single class of high affinity binding sites in myometrial membrane preparations. Scatchard analysis gave similar values of equilibrium dissociation constants in both myometrial layers. In contrast, more alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were detected in the outer layer than in the inner layer. Antagonist inhibited (3H)prazosin binding with an order of potency of prazosin greater than phentolamine greater than idazoxan. Competition experiments have also revealed that a stable guanine nucleotide decreases the apparent affinity of norepinephrine for myometrial (3H)prazosin binding sites. The functional status of these alpha-1 adrenergic receptors was also assessed by measuring the norepinephrine-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates in myometrial tissue. Norepinephrine produced a concentration-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates in both myometrial layers. However, norepinephrine-induced increases in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate were only observed in the outer layer. These results indicate that alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in human myometrium at the end of pregnancy are linked to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and that this response occurs mainly in the outer layer.

  8. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  9. Recent advances in the molecular pharmacology of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guarino, R D; Perez, D M; Piascik, M T

    1996-08-01

    This review is intended to discuss recent developments in the molecular pharmacology of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor (alpha 1-AR) subtypes. After a brief historical development, we will focus on the more contemporary issues having to do with this receptor family. Emphasis will be put on recent data regarding the cloning, nomenclature, signalling mechanisms, and genomic organization of the alpha 1-AR subtypes. We will also highlight recent mutational studies that identify key amino acid residues involved in ligand binding, as well as the role of the alpha 1-AR subtypes in regulating physiologic processes.

  10. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  11. Identification and characterization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the canine prostate using (/sup 125/I)-Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lepor, H.; Baumann, M.; Shapiro, E.

    1987-11-01

    We have recently utilized radioligand receptor binding methods to characterize muscarinic cholinergic and alpha adrenergic receptors in human prostate adenomas. The primary advantages of radioligand receptor binding methods are that neurotransmitter receptor density is quantitated, the affinity of unlabelled drugs for receptor sites is determined, and receptors can be localized using autoradiography on slide-mounted tissue sections. Recently, (/sup 125/I)-Heat, a selective and high affinity ligand with high specific activity (2200 Ci/mmole) has been used to characterize alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the brain. In this study alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the dog prostate were characterized using (/sup 125/I)-Heat. The Scatchard plots were linear indicating homogeneity of (/sup 125/I)-Heat binding sites. The mean alpha 1 adrenergic receptor density determined from these Scatchard plots was 0.61 +/- 0.07 fmol/mg. wet wt. +/- S.E.M. The binding of (/sup 125/I)-Heat to canine prostate alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was of high affinity (Kd = 86 +/- 19 pM). Steady state conditions were reached following an incubation interval of 30 minutes and specific binding and tissue concentration were linear within the range of tissue concentrations assayed. The specificity of (/sup 125/I)-Heat for alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was confirmed by competitive displacement assays using unlabelled clonidine and prazosin. Retrospective analysis of the saturation experiments demonstrated that Bmax can be accurately calculated by determining specific (/sup 125/I)-Heat binding at a single ligand concentration. (/sup 125/I)-Heat is an ideal ligand for studying alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate and its favorable properties should facilitate the autoradiographic localization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate.

  12. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  13. Novel alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways: secreted factors and interactions with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Papay, Robert; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Gaivin, Robert J; de la Motte, Carol A; Plow, Edward F; Perez, Dianne M

    2006-07-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic receptor (alpha1-ARs) subtypes (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D) regulate multiple signal pathways, such as phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases. We employed oligonucleotide microarray technology to explore the effects of both short- (1 h) and long-term (18 h) activation of the alpha1A-AR to enable RNA changes to occur downstream of earlier well characterized signaling pathways, promoting novel couplings. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies confirmed that PKC was a critical regulator of alpha1A-AR-mediated gene expression, and secreted interleukin (IL)-6 also contributed to gene expression alterations. We next focused on two novel signaling pathways that might be mediated through alpha1A-AR stimulation because of the clustering of gene expression changes for cell adhesion/motility (syndecan-4 and tenascin-C) and hyaluronan (HA) signaling. We confirmed that alpha1-ARs induced adhesion in three cell types to vitronectin, an interaction that was also integrin-, FGF7-, and PKC-dependent. alpha1-AR activation also inhibited cell migration, which was integrin- and PKC-independent but still required secretion of FGF7. alpha1-AR activation also increased the expression and deposition of HA, a glycosaminoglycan, which displayed two distinct structures: pericellular coats and long cable structures, as well as increasing expression of the HA receptor, CD44. Long cable structures of HA can bind leukocytes, which this suggests that alpha1-ARs may be involved in proinflammatory responses. Our results indicate alpha1-ARs induce the secretion of factors that interact with the extracellular matrix to regulate cell adhesion, motility and proinflammatory responses through novel signaling pathways.

  14. Modulation of hematopoiesis via alpha 1-adrenergic receptors on bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Maestroni, G J; Conti, A

    1994-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that adrenergic agents can affect hematopoiesis after syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice. In particular, chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and/or administration of the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin were shown to increase the concentration of blood granulocytes, platelets, and bone marrow colony-forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), and to induce a granulocytic hyperplasia of the spleen. Here we show that prazosin can also enhance myelopoiesis and platelet formation in normal mice. Furthermore, noradrenaline and the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine could directly inhibit the in vitro growth of GM-CFU. The effect of noradrenaline was counteracted by prazosin and by other alpha-adrenergic antagonists such as phentolamine and yohimbine, in the following order of potency: prazosin > phentolamine > yohimbine. In line with these results, we were able to demonstrate that 3H-prazosin binds specifically to both bone marrow cell membranes and intact bone marrow cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding to intact cells revealed the presence of two binding sites. A kd of 0.98 +/- 0.32 nM and a B max of 5 +/- 2.9 fM/2 x 10(6) cells characterized the higher affinity site, while the lower affinity site displayed a kd of 55.9 +/- 8.2 nM and a B max of 44 +/- 7.7 fM/mg protein. These saturation studies, together with competition experiments to evaluate the ability of various adrenergic compounds to displace 3H-prazosin binding, classified the higher affinity site as an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor. The remaining low affinity binding site remains to be characterized. Furthermore, separation of bone marrow cells by counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) showed that the high-affinity binding is due to a lymphoid/stem cell fraction with no blasts and no GM-CFU progenitors. The low-affinity site was apparent on the rotor-off fraction, which was enriched with GM-CFU progenitor cells. These findings

  15. Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor subtypes: non-identical triplets with different dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Hague, Chris; Chen, Zhongjian; Uberti, Michelle; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2003-12-12

    Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are one of the three subfamilies of G protein coupled receptors activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine to control important functions in many target organs. Three human subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B), alpha(1D)) are derived from separate genes and are highly homologous in their transmembrane domains but not in their amino or carboxyl termini. Recent advances in our understanding of these "non-identical triplets" include development of knockout mice lacking single or multiple subtypes, new insights into subcellular localization and trafficking, identification of allosteric modulators, and increasing evidence for an important role in brain function. Although all three subtypes activate the same G(q/11) signaling pathway, they also appear to interact with different protein binding partners. Recent evidence suggests they may also form dimers, and may initiate independent signals through pathways yet to be clearly elucidated. Thus, this subfamily represents a common phenomenon of a group of similar but non-identical receptor subtypes activated by the same neurotransmitter, whose individual functional roles remain to be clearly established.

  16. Quantitation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in porcine uterine and mesenteric arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, D.B.; Ford, S.P.; Reynolds, L.P.; Bhatnagar, R.K.; Van Orden, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    The activation of vascular alpha-adrenergic receptors may be involved in the control of uterine blood flow. A radioligand binding assay with the use of the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist /sup 3/H-WB-4101 was established to characterize the alpha-adrenergic receptors in uterine and mesenteric arterial membranes obtained from nonpregnant pigs. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-WB-4101 was rapid, saturable, and exhibited the alpha-adrenergic agonist potency order of (-)-epinephrine inhibition constant (Ki) . 0.6 mumol/L greater than (-)-norepinephrine (Ki . 1.5 mumol/L) much greater than (-)-isoproterenol (Ki . 120 mumol/L). The alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (Ki . 6.0 nmol/L) was 200 times more potent than the beta-adrenergic antagonist (+/-)-propranolol (Ki . 1,200 nmol/L); the alpha 1-selective antagonist prazosin (Ki . 1.2 nmol/L) was 130 times more potent than the alpha 2-selective antagonist yohimbine (Ki . 160 nmol/L). Scatchard analysis, as well as iterative curve-fitting analysis, demonstrated that /sup 3/H-WB-4101 binding by arterial membranes was to a single class of binding sites. Uterine arteries exhibited greater maximal binding capacity (BMax) than that of mesenteric arteries (47.5 +/- 3.2 versus 30.9 +/- 3.6 fmol per milligram of protein, p less than 0.01), but the uterine artery dissociation constant (Kd) was higher, thus indicating a lower affinity, when compared with mesenteric artery (0.43 +/- 0.04 versus 0.33 +/- 0.04 nmol/L, p less than 0.05).

  17. Role of supraspinal and spinal alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes in micturition reflex in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Masaru; Matsumoto-Miyai, Kazumasa; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Kawatani, Masahito

    2010-10-01

    α(1)-Adrenergic receptor subtypes are widely distributed in the central nervous system and are involved in autonomic functions such as micturition. We investigated the presence and the role of supraspinal and/or spinal α(1)-adrenergic receptors in modulating the micturition reflex in conscious female Wistar rats. The expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptor subtypes in rat brain and lumbosacral spinal cord was studied using RT-PCR. Continuous-infusion cystometrograms were obtained in conscious rats, and α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists were administered via intracerebroventricular or intrathecal routes. The mRNA expression of α(1A)-, α(1B)-, and α(1D)-adrenergic receptors was detected in rat brain (midbrain and pons) and lumbosacral spinal cord (dorsal and ventral parts of spinal cord). In addition, intracerebroventricular injection of the α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist tamsulosin (1-10 μg), the selective α(1A)-adrenergic receptor antagonist silodosin (1-10 μg), and the selective α(1D)-adrenergic receptor antagonist BMY 7378 (1-10 μg) significantly prolonged the intercontraction interval (ICI) but did not alter maximum voiding pressure (MVP). Although intrathecal injection of BMY 7378 (0.0001-10 μg) did not affect ICI, tamsulosin and silodosin prolonged ICI in a dose-dependent manner. MVP was significantly reduced by intrathecal injection of tamsulosin (10 μg) but not by silodosin or BMY 7378 (0.0001-10 μg). Supraspinal α(1A)- and α(1D)-adrenergic receptors are apparently important for the regulation of reflex-bladder activity in conscious rats. Noradrenergic projection from the brain stem to the lumbosacral spinal cord may promote the afferent limb rather than the efferent limb of the micturition reflex pathway via α(1A)-adrenergic receptors.

  18. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors gate rapid orientation-specific reduction in visual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario; Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α(1)-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α(1)-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α(1)-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α(1)-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior.

  19. Alpha-1 Adrenergic Receptors Gate Rapid Orientation-Specific Reduction in Visual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α1-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α1-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α1-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α1-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior. PMID:22120418

  20. Nonlinear relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and norepinephrine-stimulated calcium flux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, W.S.; Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the relationship between vascular alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and receptor-coupled calcium flux, the authors have studied (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding and l-norepinephrine-induced /sup 45/Ca efflux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from the rabbit aorta. In a crude cellular homogenate, (/sup 3/H)prazosin bound to a single high affinity site, whereas l-norepinephrine (NE) binding was best described by a two-site model. NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was concentration-dependent (EC/sup 50/ = 108 nM) and potently inhibited by prazosin (IC/sup 50/ = 0.15 nM). For the total receptor pool identified by (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding, the relationship between receptor occupancy by NE and NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was markedly nonlinear, such that 50% of maximum NE-stimulated efflux occurred with occupancy of only approximately 7% of receptors. These two experimental approaches provide direct evidence for the presence in cultured rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells of a sizable pool of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in excess of those needed for maximum NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. This evidence of ''spare'' receptors, together with the finding of two affinity states of agonist binding, raises the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in this system.

  1. Solubilization of a guanyl nucleotide-sensitive alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptor from liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.I.; Moss, J.

    1987-05-01

    Rat liver membranes incubated with norepinephrine before solubilization with digitonin yielded a soluble hormone-receptor complex from which the release of tightly bound norepinephrine was facilitated by guanyl nucleotides. Binding of the alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor antagonist, (/sup 3/H)-prazosin, to the soluble preparation was utilized as a gauge of guanyl nucleotide-induced release of receptor-bound agonist. The following potency series was obtained with regard to the ability of guanyl nucleotides to facilitate (/sup 3/H)-prazosin binding to the solubilized preparation: guanosine 5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate)(K/sub 1/2/ = 2.5 nM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ = 10 nM), guanosine triphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ = 34 nM) and adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (K/sub 1/2/ > 1 mM). In the presence of guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (0.4 mM), the receptor population displayed monotonic binding parameters with a K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)-prazosin of 1.16 nM by Scatchard analysis. Competition curves against (/sup 3/H)-prazosin with the antagonists phentolamine and yohimbine revealed respective K/sub i/'s of .089 ..mu..M and 1.8 ..mu..M; curves with the agonists norepinephrine and isoproterenol yielded respective K/sub i/'s of 6.2..mu..M and 360 ..mu..M. Competition curves performed in the absence of guanyl nucleotide were complex demonstrating an apparent increase in affinity for agonists and an apparent decrease in affinity for antagonists. These curve shifts are consistent with the conversion of receptor to and from the guanyl nucleotide-sensitive state as a function of competing ligand concentration.

  2. Stress-induced decrease of uterine blood flow in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Dreiling, Michelle; Bischoff, Sabine; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Kiehntopf, Michael; Schubert, Harald; Witte, Otto W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Schwab, Matthias; Rakers, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal maternal stress can be transferred to the fetus via a catecholamine-dependent decrease of uterine blood flow (UBF). However, it is unclear which group of adrenergic receptors mediates this mechanism of maternal-fetal stress transfer. We hypothesized that in sheep, alpha 1-adrenergic receptors may play a key role in catecholamine mediated UBF decrease, as these receptors are mainly involved in peripheral vasoconstriction and are present in significant number in the uterine vasculature. After chronic instrumentation at 125 ± 1 days of gestation (dGA; term 150 dGA), nine pregnant sheep were exposed at 130 ± 1 dGA to acute isolation stress for one hour without visual, tactile, or auditory contact with their flockmates. UBF, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stress hormones, and blood gases were determined before and during this isolation challenge. Twenty-four hours later, experiments were repeated during alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by a continuous intravenous infusion of urapidil. In both experiments, ewes reacted to isolation with an increase in serum norepinephrine, cortisol, BP, and HR as typical signs of activation of sympatho-adrenal and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Stress-induced UBF decrease was prevented by alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage. We conclude that UBF decrease induced by maternal stress in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Future studies investigating prevention strategies of impact of prenatal maternal stress on fetal health should consider selective blockage of alpha 1-receptors to interrupt maternal-fetal stress transfer mediated by utero-placental malperfusion.

  3. The alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cardiac hypertrophy: signaling mechanisms and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Cotecchia, Susanna; Del Vescovo, Cosmo Damiano; Colella, Matilde; Caso, Stefania; Diviani, Dario

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex remodeling process of the heart induced by physiological or pathological stimuli resulting in increased cardiomyocyte size and myocardial mass. Whereas cardiac hypertrophy can be an adaptive mechanism to stressful conditions of the heart, prolonged hypertrophy can lead to heart failure which represents the primary cause of human morbidity and mortality. Among G protein-coupled receptors, the α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) play an important role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy as demonstrated by numerous studies in the past decades, both in primary cardiomyocyte cultures and genetically modified mice. The results of these studies have provided evidence of a large variety of α1-AR-induced signaling events contributing to the defining molecular and cellular features of cardiac hypertrophy. Recently, novel signaling mechanisms have been identified and new hypotheses have emerged concerning the functional role of the α1-adrenergic receptors in the heart. This review will summarize the main signaling pathways activated by the α1-AR in the heart and their functional implications in cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure.

  5. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptors in Heart Failure: The Adaptive Arm of the Cardiac Response to Chronic Catecholamine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; O'Connell, Timothy D.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the non-failing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and b□eta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain- and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs, to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  6. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  7. Sympathetic denervation does not alter the density or properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, P.W.; Johnson, R.D.; Martin, T.J.; Minneman, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in surgically denervated rat vas deferens were studied using radioligand binding assays of (/sup 125/I) BE 2254 ((/sup 125/I)BE) and contraction measurements. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding showed no change in the affinity or density of binding sites 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of rat vas deferens. The potency of norepinephrine in inhibiting specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding was also unchanged 7 days after denervation of vas deferens. The potency of phenylephrine in causing contractions in vitro did not change 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of vas deferens; however, there was a significant increase in the maximum contractile response to phenylephrine at all time points. After partial inactivation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in vitro with phenoxybenzamine, there was an equivalent reduction in the number of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites in the control and 14-day denervated vas deferens. The equilibrium dissociation constants calculated from contractile measurements for norepinephrine were the same in the control and denervated tissues. However, there was a 2.2-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to norepinephrine 14 days after denervation and a 3.6-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to methacholine 7 days after denervation.

  8. Agonist-promoted desensitization and phosphorylation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors coupled to stimulation of phosphatidylinositol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Cotecchia, S.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    In the DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 hamster vas deferens smooth muscle cell line the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR) agonist norepinephrine (NE) promotes rapid attenuation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) metabolism which is paralleled by rapid phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR. Cells were labeled by incubation with /sup 32/P/sub i/. Coincubation with NE (100 ..mu..M) significantly increases the rate of /sup 32/P-labeling of both PI and phosphatidic acid. Pretreatment of cells with 100 ..mu..M NE (in the presence of 1 ..mu..M propranolol to prevent ..beta..-AR interactions) results in a drastic attenuation of the NE response on PI metabolism. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR from labeled cells can be solubilized and purified by affinity chromatography on Affigel-A55414 and wheat germ agglutinin agarose chromatography. SDS-PAGE of purified ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR shows a NE-promoted increase in phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 80K ligand binding peptide. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation increases from approx. 1 mol phosphate/mol ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR in the basal condition to approx. 2.5 after NE treatment. Both desensitization and phosphorylation are rapid being maximal within 10-20 min of agonist exposure. These results together with previous findings that phorbol esters promote rapid ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR uncoupling and phosphorylation suggest that receptor phosphorylation is an important mechanism of regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR receptor responsiveness.

  9. Stimulation of an alpha1-adrenergic receptor downregulates ecto-5' nucleotidase activity on the apical membrane of RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Reigada, David; Zhang, Xiulan; Crespo, Ana; Nguyen, Johnathan; Liu, Ji; Pendrak, Klara; Stone, Richard A; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire

    2006-09-01

    The purines ATP and adenosine play an important role in the communication between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). While the RPE is known to release ATP into subretinal space, the source of extracellular adenosine is unclear. In other tissues, ecto-nucleotidases mediate the consecutive dephosphorylation of ATP to AMP, and AMP is converted to adenosine by ecto-5' nucleotidase (CD73). This study identifies ecto-5' nucleotidase on RPE cells and investigates modulation of enzyme activity. The RPE was the most active site of 5'AMP dephosphorylation in the posterior rat eye. The ecto-5' nucleotidase inhibitor alphabetamADP prevented the production adenosine by the apical membrane of the bovine RPE. Cultured human ARPE-19 cells expressed mRNA and protein for ecto-5' nucleotidase. The production of phosphate from 5'AMP by ARPE-19 cells was inhibited by alphabetamADP, but the ecto-alkaline phosphatase inhibitor levamisole had no effect. Degradation of 5'AMP was blocked by norepinephrine, epinephrine and phenylephrine, with inhibition by antagonists prazosin and corynanthine implicating the alpha1 adrenergic receptor. The block of enzyme activity by norepinephrine was rapid, occurring within 1 min, and was similar at both 4 and 37 degrees C, consistent with cleavage of the enzyme from its GPI anchor. HPLC measurements indicated norepinephrine reduced levels of adenosine in the bath. In the apical face of the bovine-RPE eyecup, norepinephrine reduced the production of phosphate from 5'AMP, suggesting that both receptor and enzyme face sub-retinal space. In conclusion, RPE cells express ecto-5' nucleotidase, with activity on the apical membrane, and stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors downregulates activity. As epinephrine is released at light onset, and adenosine can inhibit phagocytosis, the corresponding decrease in subretinal adenosine levels may contribute to the enhanced the phagocytosis of rod outer segments that occurs at this time.

  10. Phorbol esters inhibit alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and contraction in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The mechanisms of pharmacomechanical coupling in vascular tissue are at the present time unclear. The authors and others have proposed that receptor-induced activation of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis may be involved. To investigate this possibility they studied the actions of two biologically active phorbol esters: phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) and phorbol myristate diacetate (PMA) on receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis in rat aortic rings. They found both PDB (IC/sub 5//sup 0/ approx. 5nM) and PMA (IC/sub 50/ approx. 30 nM) but not 4-..cap alpha..-phorbol (IC32%/sub 0/ > 10,000 nM) inhibited norepinephrine-stimulated PI hydrolysis. In the presence of the calcium channel antagonist nitrendipine, PDB potently inhibited both the phasic and tonic components of norepinephrine-induced vascular contraction. In the presence of 10/sup -7/M nitrendipine, PDB had an IC/sub 50/ for contraction of approximately 10nM. The results thus suggest a functional coupling between ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis and vascular contraction. The findings further imply a mode of feed-back regulation in vascular tissue involving phorbol ester and receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis.

  11. Pharmacological tolerance to alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonism mediated by terazosin in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, J; Dachman, W; Blaschke, T F; Hoffman, B B

    1992-01-01

    Chronic administration of alpha 1-receptor antagonists is associated with loss of clinical efficacy, especially in congestive heart failure, although the mechanism is uncertain. To evaluate changes in venous alpha 1-adrenoceptor responsiveness during chronic alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade, dose-response curves to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were constructed in 10 healthy subjects before, during, and after administration of terazosin 1 mg orally for 28 d. Terazosin initially shifted the dose-response curve of phenylephrine to the right, with a significant increase in ED50 for phenylephrine from a control value of 102 to 759 ng/min on day 1 of terazosin (P < 0.001). However, by day 28, the dose-response curve had shifted back towards baseline with an ED50 of 112 ng/min. After discontinuing terazosin, the ED50 for phenylephrine remained near the baseline value, indicating no evidence of supersensitivity to phenylephrine. There was no change in responsiveness to angiotensin II during the course of treatment with terazosin. Plasma terazosin concentrations were stable throughout the period of drug administration. The mean Kd of terazosin was estimated as 11 +/- 15 nM in the first few days of treatment. This study demonstrates that pharmacological tolerance to the alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking action of terazosin occurs in man and may be responsible for loss in efficacy with chronic therapy. PMID:1358918

  12. The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc-signaling complex mediates alpha1 adrenergic receptor-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Cotecchia, Susanna; Nenniger-Tosato, Monique; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Diviani, Dario

    2007-06-12

    In response to various pathological stresses, the heart undergoes a pathological remodeling process that is associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Because cardiac hypertrophy can progress to heart failure, a major cause of lethality worldwide, the intracellular signaling pathways that control cardiomyocyte growth have been the subject of intensive investigation. It has been known for more than a decade that the small molecular weight GTPase RhoA is involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Although some of the hypertrophic pathways activated by RhoA have now been identified, the identity of the exchange factors that modulate its activity in cardiomyocytes is currently unknown. In this study, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critical for activating RhoA and transducing hypertrophic signals downstream of alpha1-adrenergic receptors (ARs). In particular, our results indicate that suppression of AKAP-Lbc expression by infecting rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes with lentiviruses encoding AKAP-Lbc-specific short hairpin RNAs strongly reduces both alpha1-AR-mediated RhoA activation and hypertrophic responses. Interestingly, alpha1-ARs promote AKAP-Lbc activation via a pathway that requires the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. These findings identify AKAP-Lbc as the first Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocytes hypertrophy.

  13. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Waters, Wendy W.; Ziegler, Michael G.; deBlock, Heidi F.; Mills, Paul J.; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  14. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight.

    PubMed

    Meck, Janice V; Waters, Wendy W; Ziegler, Michael G; deBlock, Heidi F; Mills, Paul J; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L

    2004-04-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  15. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Waters, Wendy W.; Ziegler, Michael G.; deBlock, Heidi F.; Mills, Paul J.; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  16. The alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, benoxathian and prazosin, induce apoptosis and a switch towards megakaryocytic differentiation in human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Robert; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Haas, Helga S; Leitinger, Gerd; Schauenstein, Konrad; Sadjak, Anton

    2009-10-01

    The erythroleukemia cell lines K562 and human erythroleukemia (HEL) are established models to study erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation in vitro. In this study, we show that the alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, benoxathian and prazosin, inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis in K562 and HEL cells. Furthermore, both tested substances induced the expression of the megakaryocytic marker CD41a, whereas the expression of the erythroid marker glycophorin-a was decreased or unchanged. Even though the expression of differentiation markers was similar after benoxathian and prazosin treatment in both cell lines, endomitosis of erythroleukemia cells was observed only after prazosin treatment. So far, benoxathian and prazosin are the first described extracellular ligands, which cause megakaryocytic differentiation in K562 and HEL cells. In summary, these results indicate a possible role of alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling in the regulation of erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation, even though the receptor dependence of the observed effects needs further investigation.

  17. Two alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes regulating the vasopressor response have differential roles in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Oikawa, Ryo; Tomabechi, Takashi; Fukuda, Shinya; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Takeo, Satoshi; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2005-03-01

    To study the functional role of individual alpha1-adrenergic (AR) subtypes in blood pressure (BP) regulation, we used mice lacking the alpha1B-AR and/or alpha1D-AR with the same genetic background and further studied their hemodynamic and vasoconstrictive responses. Both the alpha1D-AR knockout and alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice, but not the alpha1B-AR knockout mice, had significantly (p < 0.05) lower levels of basal systolic and mean arterial BP than wild-type mice in nonanesthetized condition, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. All mutants showed a significantly (p < 0.05) reduced catecholamine-induced pressor and vasoconstriction responses. It is noteworthy that the infusion of norepinephrine did not elicit any pressor response at all in alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice. In an attempt to further examine alpha1-AR subtype, which is involved in the genesis or maintenance of hypertension, BP after salt loading was monitored by tail-cuff readings and confirmed at the endpoint by direct intra-arterial recording. After salt loading, alpha1B-AR knockout mice developed a comparable level of hypertension to wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking alpha1D-AR had significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated BP and lower levels of circulating catecholamines. Our data indicated that alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR subtypes participate cooperatively in BP regulation; however, the deletion of the functional alpha1D-AR, not alpha1B-AR, leads to an antihypertensive effect. The study shows differential contributions of alpha1B- and alpha1D-ARs in BP regulation.

  18. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists modulate ductal secretion of BDL rats via Ca(2+)- and PKC-dependent stimulation of cAMP.

    PubMed

    LeSage, Gene D; Alvaro, Domenico; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Marucci, Luca; Roskams, Tania; Phinizy, Jo Lynne; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Taffetani, Silvia; Barbaro, Barbara; Fava, Giammarco; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2004-11-01

    Acetylcholine potentiates secretin-stimulated ductal secretion by Ca(2+)-calcineurin-mediated modulation of adenylyl cyclase. D2 dopaminergic receptor agonists inhibit secretin-stimulated ductal secretion via activation of protein kinase C (PKC)-gamma. No information exists regarding the effect of adrenergic receptor agonists on ductal secretion in a model of cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). We evaluated the expression of alpha-1A/1C, -1beta and beta-1 adrenergic receptors in liver sections and cholangiocytes from normal and BDL rats. We evaluated the effects of the alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptor agonists (phenylephrine and dobutamine, respectively) on bile and bicarbonate secretion and cholangiocyte IP(3) and Ca(2+) levels in normal and BDL rats. We measured the effect of phenylephrine on lumen expansion in intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in cholangiocytes from BDL rats in the absence or presence of BAPTA/AM and Gö6976 (a PKC-alpha inhibitor). We evaluated if the effects of phenylephrine on ductal secretion were associated with translocation of PKC isoforms leading to increased protein kinase A activity. Alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptors were present mostly in the basolateral domain of cholangiocytes and, following BDL, their expression increased. Phenylephrine, but not dobutamine, increased secretin-stimulated choleresis in BDL rats. Phenylephrine did not alter basal but increased secretin-stimulated IBDU lumen expansion and cAMP levels, which were blocked by BAPTA/AM and Go6976. Phenylephrine increased IP(3) and Ca(2+) levels and activated PKC-alpha and PKC-beta-II. In conclusion, coordinated regulation of ductal secretion by secretin (through cAMP) and adrenergic receptor agonist activation (through Ca(2+)/PKC) induces maximal ductal bicarbonate secretion in liver diseases. (Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http

  19. The alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin reduces heroin self-administration in rats with extended access to heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Walker, Brendan M; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration of dependent rats. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). Thus, prazosin appears to stimulate food intake in extended access rats by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. The data suggest that the alpha1 adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended access.

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in murine atria: phosphatidylinositol breakdown and receptor interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Upon stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, there is a decrease in the force of contraction rate of firing in heart, while stimulation of ..cap alpha.. adrenergic receptors causes an increase in the force of contraction with no change in the heart rate. Yet both receptors stimulate the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Therefore, the breakdown of PI was examined to determine how the process differed between the two receptor systems. Murine atria, prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, were stimulated with the muscarinic cholinergic agonists, carbamylcholine (CARB), and oxotremorine (OXO); and with the ..cap alpha.. adrenergic agonists, norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE); either singly or in combination. Breakdown of PI was assessed by measurement of individual inositol phosphates by anion exchange chromatography. Binding of CARB to atrial muscarinic receptors was measured by competition with (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.

  1. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  2. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  3. Sympathetic nervous system promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating inflammation through activation of alpha1-adrenergic receptors of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Chen, Xue-Jiao; Wu, Lin; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liang; Yang, Da-Peng; Zhang, Xia; Bie, Ping; Qian, Cheng; Xia, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is known to play a significant role in tumor initiation and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) frequently occurs in cirrhotic livers after chronic inflammation, and the SNS is hyperactive in advanced liver cirrhosis. However, it remains unclear whether the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating chronic liver inflammation. In this study, a retrospective pathological analysis and quantification of sympathetic nerve fiber densities (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH(+)) in HCC patients, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats were performed. Our data showed that high density of sympathetic nerve fibers and α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) of Kupffer cells (KCs) were associated with a poor prognosis of HCC. Sympathetic denervation or blocking of α1-ARs decreased DEN-induced HCC incidence and tumor development. In addition, synergistic effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in hepatocarcinogenesis were observed. The suppression of the SNS reduced IL-6 and TGF-β expression, which suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis, and KCs play a key role in this process. After the ablation of KCs, IL-6 and TGF-β expression and the development of HCC were inhibited. This study demonstrates that sympathetic innervation is crucial for hepatocarcinogenesis and that the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by activating α1-ARs of KCs to boost the activation of KCs and to maintain the inflammatory microenvironment. These results indicate that sympathetic denervation or α1-ARs blockage may represent novel treatment approaches for HCC.

  4. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptor blockade modifies insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) activity in rat prostate and modulates oxytocin functions.

    PubMed

    Saníger, Marcela Arrazola; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; de la Chica, Susana; Carrera-González, María Pilar; Mayas, María Dolores; Manuel Martínez-Martos, José

    2011-08-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is one of the important paracrine factors that prostate synthesizes. OT maintains its resting tone and stimulates its contractile activity. However, the involvement of OT in modulating cell proliferation of the prostate is being investigated. In fact, alterations in OT concentrations accompany both benign prostatic hyperplasia/hypertrophy and carcinoma of the prostate. The enzyme Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) is the main responsible of OT levels regulation through its catabolism. To date, the long-acting selective α(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin is widely used to the treatment of BPH. Thus, our aim was to analyze the effects of doxazosin on IRAP specific activity and its putative effects on prostate OT regulation and functions. Fifteen male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with 10 mg/Kg doxazosin during 15 days and fifteen controls were treated with the vehicle only. After the treatment period, prostate was removed to obtain soluble and membrane-bound fractions. Soluble and membrane-bound IRAP specific activities were assayed fluorometrically using leucyl-ß-naphthylamide as substrate. Prostate OT content was assayed by enzyme immunoassay. Doxazosin treatment significantly increased membrane-bound IRAP specific activity in rat prostate by 59.4%, whereas no changes were observed in the soluble fraction. Treatment with doxazosin also significantly increased OT concentration by 26.3%. In vivo administration of doxazosin to male rats modify both prostatic IRAP activity and OT levels. Because there is now evidence that OT plays a physiological role in the regulation of growth and muscular contractility within the gland, more attention should be paid to IRAP activity, which could represent a new target for the regulation of the functions of OT under physiological or pathological conditions such as BPH and prostate cancer.

  5. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in the mass of phosphatidic acid and 1,2-diacylglycerol in ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kurz, T; Schneider, I; Tölg, R; Richardt, G

    1999-04-01

    1,2-Diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are produced by phospholipase C and D activity and play a key role as second messengers in receptor-mediated signal transduction. So far, little is known about alterations of endogenous 1,2-DAG and PA production during myocardial ischemia. Rat isolated perfused hearts were subjected to global ischemia, total lipids were extracted, and separated by thin-layer chromatography. The mass of PA and 1,2-DAG were quantified using laserdensitometric analysis of visualized lipids. Compared to normoxic control values (1,2-DAG 713 +/- 45 ng/mg protein, PA 171 +/- 11 ng/mg protein), the myocardial content of 1,2-DAG and PA was unaltered after 10 min of ischemia. Prolonged myocardial ischemia (20 min), however, which was accompanied by marked overflow of endogenous norepinephrine, significantly increased the mass of both second messengers (1,2-DAG 1062 +/- 100 ng/mg protein, PA 340 +/- 29 ng/mg protein). The increase in PA and 1,2-DAG in response to ischemia was abolished by inhibition of ischemia-induced norepinephrine release as well as by alpha1-adrenergic blockade but unaffected by beta-adrenergic blockade. While inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase did not affect ischemia-induced increase in PA and 1,2-DAG, inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activity significantly suppressed ischemia-induced increase in 1,2-DAG but did not affect endogenous production of PA indicating phospholipase C-independent formation of PA and activation of both, phospholipase C and D, in the ischemic heart. Ischemia elicits an alpha1-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in the mass of myocardial PA and 1,2-DAG. The increase in endogenous PA is suggested to be due to the activation of myocardial phospholipase D, whereas 1,2-DAG is formed predominantly by activation of phospholipase C in the ischemic heart.

  6. GIPC interacts with the beta1-adrenergic receptor and regulates beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liaoyuan A; Chen, Wei; Martin, Negin P; Whalen, Erin J; Premont, Richard T; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2003-07-11

    Beta1-adrenergic receptors, expressed at high levels in the human heart, have a carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif that can directly interact with PDZ domain-containing proteins. Using the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl terminus as bait, we identified the novel beta1-adrenergic receptor-binding partner GIPC in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library. Here we demonstrate that the PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC, co-immunoprecipitates with the beta1-adrenergic receptor in COS-7 cells. Essential for this interaction is the Ser residue of the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif. Our data also demonstrate that beta1-adrenergic receptor stimulation activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2. beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, implicating Gi, and was substantially decreased by the expression of GIPC. Expression of GIPC had no observable effect on beta1-adrenergic receptor sequestration or receptor-mediated cAMP accumulation. This GIPC effect was specific for the beta1-adrenergic receptor and was dependent on an intact PDZ binding motif. These data suggest that GIPC can regulate beta1-adrenergic receptor-stimulated, Gi-mediated, ERK activation while having no effect on receptor internalization or Gs-mediated cAMP signaling.

  7. Evidence from photoaffinity labelling studies for coupling of the alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to a guanine-nucleotide (G) binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.M.; Sena, L.; Schwarz, K.R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-05-01

    In contrast to ..beta..- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors the role of a G-protein in signal transduction at ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors has been difficult to define. Using rat hepatic membranes prepared to avoid retention of endogenous nucleotides and activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive proteases, a Gpp(NH)p shift in agonist ((-)epinephrine) affinity from an IC/sub 50/ 10/sup -6/ to 5 x 10/sup -5/ M was readily demonstrable in competition studies with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-specific radioligand (/sup 3/H)prazosin, but was not observed in membranes prepared without protease inhibitors (PIs). Labelling of these membranes with the photolabile prazosin analog, (/sup 125/I)CP65,526, followed by SDS-PAGE/autoradiography revealed a predominant, specifically labelled protein of M/sub r/ = 80,000, whereas a M/sub r/ = 59,000 peptide was evident with membranes prepared in the absence of PIs. The IC/sub 50/ for inhibition of labelling of the M/sub r/ = 80,000 peptide by (-)epinephrine, as determined by radiochromatogram scanning of autoradiographs of the photolabelled receptor, shifted from 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -6/ in the presence of Gpp(NH)p. However, no shift in agonist affinity at the M/sub r/ = 59,000 peptide was evident in membranes prepared without PIs. This approach provides visual evidence for a G-protein-mediated shift in agonist affinity at the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor and allows a correlation between subunit size analysis and ligand binding.

  8. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  9. Effects of Combination Treatment of Alpha 1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonists on Voiding Dysfunction: Study on Target Organs in Overactive Bladder Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Overactive bladder (OAB) causes urinary urgency, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) antagonists are known to improve lower urinary tract symptoms associated with OAB. The α1-AR antagonists constitute a variety of drugs according to the receptor subtype affinity. This study investigated the efficacy of tamsulosin, naftopidil, and a combination of the two on OAB rats. Methods The OAB rat model was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide for 14 days. The experimental groups were divided into 5 groups: control group, OAB-induction group, OAB-induction and tamsulosin monotherapy group, OAB-induction and naftopidil monotherapy group, and OAB-induction and tamsulosin-naftopidil combination therapy group. For the drug-treated groups, each drug was administrated for 14 days after the OAB induction. Cystometry for urodynamic evaluation and immunohistochemical stain for c-Fos and nerve growth factor (NGF) expressions in the central micturition centers were performed. Results Increased contraction pressure and time with enhanced c-Fos and NGF expressions in the central micturition centers were found in the OAB rats. Tamsulosin suppressed contraction pressure and time while inhibiting c-Fos and NGF expressions. Naftopidil showed no significant effect and combination therapy showed less of an effect on contraction pressure and time. Naftopidil and combination therapy exerted no significant effect on the c-Fos and NGF expressions. Conclusions Tamsulosin showed the most prominent efficacy for the treatment of OAB compared to the naftopidil and combination. The combination of tamsulosin with naftopidil showed no synergistic effects on OAB; however, further studies of addon therapy might provide opportunities to find a new modality. PMID:27915481

  10. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of (/sup 32/P) NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT/sub 1/, MF-2 cells, possibly the ..cap alpha..-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family.

  11. Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists in aircrew for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Andrew K; Tachikawa, Nina J

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects the majority of men later in life. Other than surgery, finasteride (Proscar) is currently the only pharmacologic option available for U.S. Air Force (USAF) aircrew. This article will evaluate the current literature regarding the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy with FDA approved tamsulosin (Flomax) and alfuzosin (Uroxatrol), third-generation alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists. Current literature supports the fact that some third-generation alpha blockers limit the side effects of hypotension when compared to other alpha blockers as a result of the specificity of subtype binding of the receptors and the sustained release formulation. Alpha blockers are currently used almost universally for the treatment of BPH; however, they are currently not approved for USAF aircrew. This article will review the aeromedical implications of the side effects of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists (alfuzosin, tamsulosin), which affect aircrew while performing aeronautical duties, and examine whether alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists should be acceptable medications in certain situations depending on airframe and aeronautical duties.

  12. Impaired gene expression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, but not stimulatory G-protein Gs alpha, in rat ventricular myocardium treated with isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Keiichiro; Momozaki, Masami; Akatsuka, Keiko; Fujimori, Yuuki; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Temma, Kyosuke; Hara, Yukio

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the gene expression of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) and stimulatory G-protein Gsalpha, important signal transduction elements for regulating heart rate and contractility, in ventricle after chronic treatment with isoproterenol (ISO) in rat. Rats were treated with ISO (4 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) twice a day for 4 d. Ventricle weight of the heart and ventricle weight/body weight ratio were increased by 23% and 25% compared with control, respectively. Positive inotropic responses to ISO in left atrial muscle preparations isolated from ISO-treated rats were markedly decreased. Northern blot hybridization showed that the mRNA transcript of beta(1)AR was significantly decreased in ventricle of ISO-treated rats, whereas Gsalpha mRNA level was unchanged. Present results demonstrate that the gene expression of myocardial beta(1)AR, but not Gsalpha, was decreased in rat myocardium of ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and suggesting that decrease in the gene expression of beta(1)AR may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the diminished cardiac function.

  13. Alpha 1-adrenergic agonists selectively suppress voltage-dependent K+ current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Nerbonne, J M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agonists on the waveforms of action potentials and voltage-gated ionic currents were examined in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. After "puffer" applications of either of two alpha 1 agonists, phenylephrine and methoxamine, action-potential durations were increased. In voltage-clamped cells, phenylephrine (5-20 microM) or methoxamine (5-10 microM) reduced the amplitudes of Ca2+-independent voltage-activated outward K+ currents (Iout); neither the kinetics nor the voltage-dependent properties of Iout were significantly affected. The effects of phenylephrine or methoxamine on Iout were larger and longer-lasting at higher concentrations and after prolonged or repeated exposures; in all experiments, however, Iout recovered completely when puffer applications were discontinued. The suppression of Iout is attributed to the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, as neither beta- nor alpha 2-adrenergic agonists had measurable effects on Iout; in addition, the effect of phenylephrine was attenuated in the presence of the alpha antagonist phentolamine (10 microM), but not in the presence of the beta antagonist propranolol (10 microM). Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, in contrast, were not altered measurably by phenylephrine or methoxamine and no currents were activated directly by these agents. Suppression of Iout was also observed during puffer applications of either of two protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM-1 microM) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (60 microM). We conclude that the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in adult rat ventricular myocytes leads to action-potential prolongation as a result of the specific suppression of Iout and that this effect may be mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:2903506

  14. Effects of single and repeated treatment with antidepressants on apomorphine-induced yawning in the rat: the implication of alpha-1 adrenergic mechanisms in the D-2 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Delini-Stula, A; Hunn, C

    1990-01-01

    Acute (10 or 20 mg/kg IP) and subchronic (2 x 5 or 10 mg/kg IP daily for 7 days) effects of desipramine, imipramine, maprotiline, (+)- and (-)-oxaprotiline enantiomers as well as selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors citalopram and ifoxetine on yawning, induced by low doses of apomorphine, were investigated in the rat. In addition, the effects of alpha-1 receptor agonist adrafinil and antagonist prazosin were also tested. After acute treatment, desipramine, the stereoselective NA-uptake inhibiting (+)-enantiomer of oxaprotiline, and the alpha-1 agonist adrafinil, markedly and significantly suppressed yawning. Prazosin, in contrast, clearly potentiated it. This potentiating effect was abolished by the pretreatment with (+)-oxaprotiline and adrafinil. Other drugs were inactive. After subchronic administration, yawning was antagonized by NA-uptake-inhibiting antidepressants, including imipramine and maprotiline. By comparison to the acute treatment, the inhibitory effects of desipramine and (+)-oxaprotiline were considerably enhanced. Neither selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors nor (-)-oxaprotiline (levoprotiline) were active. Antidepressants therefore modulate the functional activity of D-2 receptors, activated by low doses of apomorphine, predominantly by the virtue of their noradrenergic enhancing properties. This modulatory effect appears to be mediated by alpha-1 adrenergic receptors.

  15. Alpha 1-adrenergic blockade and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, E; Hull, S S; Foreman, R D; Ferrari, A; Schwartz, P J

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to test whether selective pharmacologic blockade of alpha 1 receptors, and specifically of the subtype alpha 1a, could prevent ventricular fibrillation (VF) during acute myocardial ischemia. The development of new autonomic interventions is of clinical interest in view of the failure of traditional antiarrhythmic drugs to prevent sudden death. Experimental evidence indicates that alpha 1 receptors, and in particular the subtype alpha 1a, may be involved in the genesis of malignant arrhythmias during acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Despite this evidence, questions have been raised about the actual antifibrillatory efficacy of alpha-adrenergic blockade in the acutely ischemic myocardium. The effects of prazosin and of abanoquil (UK 52,046), a highly selective alpha 1a receptor blocker, were tested and compared with propranolol in a conscious animal preparation for sudden death. Ten dogs with a 1-month-old anterior wall myocardial infarction were studied. These dogs had all developed, in control conditions, VF during a 2-minute occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery while exercising (n = 9) or lying on the table (n = 1). Afterwards, the dogs underwent additional tests with the following intravenously administered drugs: abanoquil (n = 10; 1 micrograms/kg), prazosin (n = 9; 0.1 mg/kg), and propranolol (n = 10; 1 mg/kg). Internal control analysis was used. All dogs tested had recurrence of VF with both alpha-adrenergic blockers. Propranolol significantly reduced heart rate during ischemia and prevented VF in 5 of 10 dogs tested (P < 0.05). When heart rate was kept constant by atrial pacing (n = 3), 2 of the 3 animals remained protected by propranolol. Just prior to onset of VF, heart rate was not significantly different in the control and in the abanoquil tests (237 +/- 45 and 253 +/- 34 beats/min, respectively), whereas it was higher (P < 0.05) with prazosin (288 +/- 40 beats/min). Alpha 1 and alpha 1a receptor

  16. Pharmacophore development for antagonists at α1 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, J. B.; Coban, B.; Griffith, R.

    1996-12-01

    Many receptors, including α1 adrenergic receptors, have a range of subtypes. This offers possibilities for the development of highly selective antagonists with potentially fewer detrimental effects. Antagonists developed for α1A receptors, for example, would have potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. As part of the molecular design process, structural features necessary for the selective affinity for α1A and α1B adrenergic receptors have been investigated. The molecular modelling software (particularly the Apex module) of Molecular Simulations, Inc. was used to develop pharmacophore models for these two subtypes. Low-energy conformations of a set of known antagonists were used as input, together with a classification of the receptor affinity data. The biophores proposed by the program were evaluated and pharmacophores were proposed. The pharmacophore models were validated by testing the fit of known antagonists, not included in the training set. The critical structural feature for selectivity between the α1A and α1B adrenergic receptor sites is the distance between the basic nitrogen atom and the centre of an aromatic ring system. This will be exploited in the design and synthesis of structurally new selective antagonists for these sites.

  17. Binding kinetics and sequencing of hepatic alpha1-adrenergic receptors in two marine teleosts, mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus).

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elena; Chen, Xi; Capuzzo, Antonio; Moon, Thomas W

    2008-03-01

    Liver alpha(1)-adrenoceptors (ARs) are demonstrated, or at least hypothesized, in freshwater and brackish-water teleosts, whereas no data are available for marine teleosts. This study evaluates the presence of alpha(1)-ARs in the liver of two marine teleosts, the anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus and the mackerel Scomber scombrus, and examines on a broad scale the possibility that habitats posing different challenges also influence phenotypic trait selection. Binding assays were performed also on liver membranes from the carp Cyprinus carpio as a direct comparison with a freshwater species. Scatchard analysis of [(3)H]prazosin binding to purified liver membranes from anchovy, mackerel and carp resulted in K(d) values of 1.51+/-0.085, 1.26+/-0.098, and 2.61+/-0.22 nM, and B(max) values of 87.4+/-9.12, 77+/-8.29, and 115.22+/-3.31 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Thus, alpha(1)-ARs of the two marine teleosts showed higher [(3)H]prazosin affinity compared with those of the freshwater/brackish-water fish studied thus far, whereas the number of liver binding sites did not differ significantly from that of carp, eel or trout. A preliminary phylogeny based on amino acid sequence analysis indicated the presence of at least an alpha(1A)-AR in mackerel and an alpha(1D)-AR in both anchovy and mackerel. This is the first indication of alpha(1)-AR subtypes in any marine species, but further studies are needed to ascertain the physiological role of these alpha(1)-ARs in these two marine species.

  18. Effect of aging on alpha-1 adrenergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, D.M.; Bowyer, J.F.; Masserano, J.M.; Zahniser, N.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The effects of aging were examined on the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in three brain regions. Tissue minces of thalamus, cerebral cortex and hippocampus from 3-, 18- and 28-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol. Exposure of these prelabeled minces to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine revealed that accumulation of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates was selectively reduced by 20 to 30% in the thalamus and cerebral cortex of the oldest age group. Analysis of concentration-response and competition binding curves indicated that this decrease was due to diminished agonist efficacy rather than diminished receptor affinity. The reduction in responsiveness to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex and the lack of any changes in the hippocampus parallel previously reported changes in the density of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors with aging. These data indicate that the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis is reduced in some, but not all, brain regions of aged Fischer 344 rats.

  19. Developmental changes in the role of a pertussis toxin sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein in the rat cardiac alpha sub 1 -adrenergic system

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    During development, the cardiac alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic chronotropic response changes from positive in the neonate to negative in the adult. This thesis examined the possibility of a developmental change in coupling of a PT-sensitive G-protein to the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor. Radioligand binding experiments performed with the iodinated alpha{sub 1}-selective radioligand ({sup 125}I)-I-2-({beta}-(4-hydroxphenyl)ethylaminomethyl)tetralone (({sup 125}I)-IBE 2254) demonstrated that the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to a G-protein in both neonatal and adult rat hearts. However, in the neonate the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to a PT-insensitive G-protein, whereas in the adult the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to both a PT-insensitive and a PT-sensitive G-protein. Consistent with the results from binding experiments, PT did not have any effect on the alpha{sub 1}-mediated positive chronotropic response in the neonate, whereas in the adult the alpha{sub 1}-mediated negative chronotropic response was completely converted to a positive one after PT-treatment. This thesis also examined the possibility of an alteration in coupling of the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor to its effector under certain circumstances such as high potassium (K{sup +}) depolarization in nerve-muscle (NM) co-cultures, a system which has been previously shown to be a convenient in vitro model to study the mature inhibitory alpha{sub 1}-response.

  20. Diaphragm arterioles are less responsive to alpha1- adrenergic constriction than gastrocnemius arterioles.

    PubMed

    Aaker, Aaron; Laughlin, M H

    2002-05-01

    The sympathetic nervous system has greater influence on vascular resistance in low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle than in high-oxidative skeletal muscle (17). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that arterioles isolated from low-oxidative, fast-twitch skeletal muscle [the white portion of gastrocnemius (WG)] possess greater responsiveness to adrenergic constriction than arterioles isolated from high-oxidative skeletal muscle [red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle (RG) and diaphragm (Dia)]. Second-order arterioles (2As) were isolated from WG, RG, and Dia of rats and reactivity examined in vitro. Results reveal that Dia 2As constrict less to norepinephrine (NE) (10(-9) to 10 (-4) M) than 2As from RG and WG, which exhibited similar NE-induced constrictions. This difference was not endothelium dependent, because responses of denuded 2As were similar to those of intact arterioles. The blunted NE-induced constrictor response of Dia 2As appears to be the result of differences in alpha1-receptor effects because 1) arterioles from Dia also responded less to selective alpha1-receptor stimulation with phenylephrine than RG and WG arterioles; 2) arterioles from Dia, RG, and WG dilated similarly to isoproterenol (10(-9) to 10(-4) M) and did not respond to selective alpha2-receptor stimulation with UK-14304; and 3) endothelin-1 produced similar constriction in 2As from Dia, RG, and WG. We conclude that differences in oxidative capacity and/or fiber type composition of muscle tissue do not explain different NE responsiveness of Dia 2As compared with 2As from gastrocnemius muscle. Differences in alpha1-adrenergic constrictor responsiveness among arterioles in skeletal muscle may contribute to nonuniform muscle blood flow responses observed during exercise and serve to maintain blood flow to Dia during exercise-induced increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  1. Nuclear Compartmentalization of α1-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Adult Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Although convention dictates that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at the plasma membrane, accumulating evidence suggests that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at intracellular membranes, most notably the nucleus. In fact, there is now significant evidence indicating that endogenous alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) localize to and signal at the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes. Cumulatively, the data suggest that α1-ARs localize to the inner nuclear membrane, activate intranuclear signaling, and regulate physiologic function in adult cardiac myocytes. Although α1-ARs signal through Gαq, unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, α1-ARs mediate important cardioprotective functions including adaptive/physiologic hypertrophy, protection from cell death (survival signaling), positive inotropy, and preconditioning. Also unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, most, if not all, functional α1-ARs localize to the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes, as opposed to the sarcolemma. Together, α1-AR nuclear localization and cardioprotection might suggest a novel model for compartmentalization of Gq-coupled receptor signaling in which nuclear Gq-coupled receptor signaling is cardioprotective. PMID:25264754

  2. Vgl-4, a novel member of the vestigial-like family of transcription cofactors, regulates alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Huei; Mullett, Steven J; Stewart, Alexandre F R

    2004-07-16

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle genes are regulated by the transcriptional enhancer factor (TEF-1) family of transcription factors. In skeletal muscle, TEF-1 factors interact with a skeletal muscle-specific cofactor called Vestigial-like 2 (Vgl-2) that is related to the Drosophila protein Vestigial. Here, we characterize Vgl-4, the only member of the Vestigial-like family expressed in the heart. Unlike other members of the Vgl family that have a single TEF-1 interaction domain called the tondu (TDU) motif, Vgl-4 has two TDU motifs in its carboxyl-terminal domain. Like other Vgl factors, Vgl-4 physically interacts with TEF-1 in an immunoprecipitation assay. Vgl-4 functionally interacts with TEF-1 and also with myocyte enhancer factor 2 in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Overexpression of Vgl-4 in cardiac myocytes interfered with the basal expression and alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of a TEF-1-dependent skeletal alpha-actin promoter. In cardiac myocytes cultured in serum and in serum-free medium, a myc-tagged Vgl-4 protein was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm but was exported from the nucleus when cells were treated with alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist. A chimeric nuclear-retained Vgl-4 protein inhibited alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation. In contrast, deletion of the TDU motifs of Vgl-4 prevented Vgl-4 nuclear localization, relieved Vgl-4 interference of basal activity, and enhanced alpha1-adrenergic up-regulation of the skeletal alpha-actin promoter. Nuclear export of Vgl-4 is dependent on the nuclear exportin CRM-1. These results suggest that Vgl-4 modulates the activity of TEF-1 factors and counteracts alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

  3. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a new model of arylpiperazines. 5. Study of the physicochemical influence of the pharmacophore on 5-HT(1a)/alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor affinity: synthesis of a new derivative with mixed 5-HT(1a)/d(2) antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, M L; Morcillo, M J; Fernández, E; Porras, E; Orensanz, L; Beneytez, M E; Manzanares, J; Fuentes, J A

    2001-01-18

    In this paper we have designed and synthesized a test series of 32 amide arylpiperazine derivatives VI in order to gain insight into the physicochemical influence of the pharmacophores of 5-HT(1A) and alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors. The training set was designed applying a fractional factorial design using six physicochemical descriptors. The amide moiety is a bicyclohydantoin or a diketopiperazine (X = -(CH(2))(3)-, -(CH(2))(4)-; m = 0, 1), the spacer length is 3 or 4 methylene units, which are the optimum values for both receptors, and the aromatic substituent R occupies the ortho- or meta-position and has been selected from a database of 387 substituents using the EDISFAR program. The 5-HT(1A) and alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor binding affinities of synthesized compounds VI (1-32) have been determined. This data set has been used to derive classical quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and neural networks models for both receptors (following paper). A comparison of these models gives information for the design of the new ligand EF-7412 (46) (5-HT(1A): K(i) = 27 nM; alpha(1): K(i) > 1000 nM). This derivative displays affinity for the dopamine D(2) receptor (K(i) = 22 nM) and is selective versus all other receptors examined (5-HT(2A), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4) and Bz; K(i) > 1000 nM). EF-7412 (46) acts as an antagonist in vivo in pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptor sites and as an antagonist in the dopamine D(2) receptor. Thus, EF-7412 (46) is a derivative with mixed 5-HT(1A)/D(2) antagonist properties and this derivative could be useful as a pharmacological tool.

  4. Alpha-1-adrenergic modulation of K and Cl transport in bovine retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode techniques were used to characterize the electrical responses of the bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)- choroid to epinephrine (EP) and several other catecholamines that are putative paracrine signals between the neural retina and the RPE. Nanomolar amounts of EP or norepinephrine (NEP), added to the apical bath, caused a series of conductance and voltage changes, first at the basolateral or choroid-facing membrane and then at the apical or retina- facing membrane. The relative potency of several adrenergic agonists and antagonists indicates that EP modulation of RPE transport begins with the activation of apical alpha-1-adrenergic receptors. The membrane-permeable calcium (Ca2+) buffer, amyl-BAPTA (1,2-bis(o- aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid) inhibited the EP- induced voltage and conductance changes by approximately 50-80%, implicating [Ca2+]i as a second messenger. This conclusion is supported by experiments using the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, which mimics the effects of EP. The basolateral membrane voltage response to EP was blocked by lowering cell Cl, by the presence of DIDS (4,4'- diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid) in the basal bath, and by current clamping VB to the Cl equilibrium potential. In the latter experiments the EP-induced conductance changes were unaltered, indicating that EP increases basolateral membrane Cl conductance independent of voltage. The EP-induced change in basolateral Cl conductance was followed by a secondary decrease in apical membrane K conductance (approximately 50%) as measured by delta [K]o-induced diffusion potentials. Decreasing apical K from 5 to 2 mM in the presence of EP mimicked the effect of light on RPE apical and basolateral membrane voltage. These results indicate that EP may be an important paracrine signal that provides exquisite control of RPE physiology. PMID:1319462

  5. Aging increases cytochrome P450 4A modulation of alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Berezan, Dellice J; Dunn, Kathryn M J; Falck, John R; Davidge, Sandra T

    2008-03-01

    Aging is associated with peripheral vascular dysfunction. In vascular smooth muscle, cytochrome P450 4A (CYP4A) enzymes form the vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). 20-HETE acts as an intracellular messenger to modulate vasoconstriction induced by various agonists, including the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) and endothelin-1 (ET-1). Eicosanoids produced by CYP4A contribute to the elevated vascular tone in hypertension, but the effects of advanced age on CYP4A modulation of vasoconstriction are unknown. Mesenteric arteries were isolated from young (3 to 4 months) and aged (17 to 18 months) Sprague-Dawley rats. Vasoconstriction was induced with PE or ET-1 in the absence or presence of the CYP4A inhibitor DDMS and/or the ETA inhibitor BQ123. CYP4A inhibition with DDMS significantly reduced PE sensitivity in aged rats, but it had no effect in young. Furthermore, in aged rats only, ETA inhibition reduced PE sensitivity while combined inhibition of CYP4A and ETA had no additional effect, suggesting that the pathways work in concert in aging. Exogenous ET-1 constriction was not altered by DDMS in young or aged rats. Overall, our data indicate that aging increases the contribution of CYP4A to alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in systemic arteries. Understanding aging-related changes in vascular function is important for development of novel targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Intracellular mechanisms for alpha 1-adrenergic regulation of the transient outward current in rabbit atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A P; Fedida, D; Clark, R B; Giles, W R

    1990-01-01

    1. The intracellular mechanism(s) underlying the decrease of a transient outward K+ current (It) induced by alpha 1-adrenergic agonists was studied in isolated adult rabbit atrial myocytes using whole-cell voltage clamp and cell-attached patch clamp techniques. Experiments were carried out at 22-23 degrees C. 2. Application of the specific alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, methoxamine, produced a decrease in It which was irreversible after the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, GTP gamma S and Gpp(NH)p, had been introduced into cells via the recording micropipette. 3. Pre-treatment of cells with 0.1-0.15 microgram/ml pertussis toxin (PT) for 8-9 h at 30-34 degrees C did not prevent the alpha 1-induced decrease in It. Yet, this protocol, as measured by the PT-catalysed incorporation of [32P]ADP-ribose in membrane-associated 40 and 41 kDa proteins, effectively caused the ADP-ribosylation of approximately 70% of the PT-sensitive GTP-binding proteins (i.e. Gi) in these treated cells. After taking into account the proportion of non-viable cells (20-30%), the effectiveness of this treatment probably approaches 100% in the viable myocytes from which electrophysiological recordings were made. 4. Cell-attached patch recordings showed that bath application of methoxamine altered the single-channel events underlying It by decreasing their opening probability. Averaged currents from ensemble single-channel openings recorded in the presence of 0.2 mM-methoxamine outside the patch reproduced the features of alpha 1-adrenergic modulation of the macroscopic It observed during whole-cell voltage clamp measurements. This observation provides evidence for the involvement of a diffusible intracellular second messenger in the alpha 1-adrenergic modulation of It. 5. The protein kinase C (PKC) activators, 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) increased It, when included in the bath perfusate, whereas the inactive analogues, 4 alpha-phorbol and 4 alpha

  7. Pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy in beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptor double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Palazzesi, Sergio; Musumeci, Marco; Catalano, Liviana; Patrizio, Mario; Stati, Tonino; Michienzi, Simona; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Vitelli, Luigi; Marano, Giuseppe

    2006-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy arises as an adaptive response to increased afterload. Studies in knockout mice have shown that catecholamines, but not alpha1-adrenergic receptors, are necessary for such an adaptation to occur. However, whether beta-adrenergic receptors are critical for the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload is not known at this time. Pressure overload was induced by transverse aortic banding in beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptor double knockout (DbetaKO) mice, in which the predominant cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor subtypes are lacking. Chronic pressure overload for 4 weeks induced cardiac hypertrophy in both DbetaKO and wild-type mice. There were no significant differences between banded mice in left ventricular weight to body weight ratio, in the left ventricular wall thickness, in the cardiomyocyte size or in the expression levels of the load-sensitive cardiac genes such as ANF and beta-MHC. Additionally, the left ventricular systolic pressure, an index of afterload, and cardiac contractility, evaluated as dp/dtmax, the maximal slope of systolic pressure increment, and Ees, end-systolic elastance, were increased at a similar level in both wild-type and DbetaKO banded mice, and were significantly greater than in sham controls. Despite chronic activation of the cardiac beta-adrenergic system being sufficient to induce a pathological hypertrophy, we show that beta1-adrenergic and beta2-adrenergic receptors are not an obligatory component of the signaling pathway that links the increased afterload to the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Successful treatment of retrograde ejaculation with the alpha1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine: case study.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, P A; Fanciulli, G; Delitala, G

    2005-01-01

    We treated two patients affected by retrograde ejaculation (RE) with the pure alpha1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine; the drug was self-administered intramuscularly by the patients 30 min prior to intercourse or masturbation. A previous trial with oral imipramine had been ineffective in both patients. Sperm count increased substantially, particularly in the first patient who had insulin-dependent diabetes and was seeking fertility. In this patient, total ejaculated sperm increased from 22 millions to 488 and 419.5 millions on two different occasions, with good motility; two clinical pregnancies were obtained in the partner of this patient after 3 and 4 months of treatment, respectively. The second patient did not desire fertility. In both patients, no side effects were seen except for slight piloerection; blood pressure values increased slightly, and heart rate was unchanged. We conclude that self-administered methoxamine can be a useful, noninvasive and inexpensive treatment of RE, when oral agents are ineffective.

  9. The protein acyl transferase ZDHHC21 modulates α1 adrenergic receptor function and regulates hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ethan P.; Jozsef, Levente; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Held, Kara F.; Luciano, Amelia K.; Melendez, Jonathan; Milstone, Leonard M.; Velazquez, Heino; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Palmitoylation, the reversible addition of the lipid palmitate to a cysteine, can alter protein localization, stability, and function. The ZDHHC family of protein acyl transferases catalyzes palmitoylation of numerous proteins. The role of ZDHHC enzymes in intact tissue and in vivo is largely unknown. Herein, we characterize vascular functions in a mouse that expresses a nonfunctional ZDHHC21 (“F233Δ”). Approach and Results Physiological studies of isolated aortae and mesenteric arteries from F233Δ mice revealed an unexpected defect in responsiveness to phenylephrine, an α1 adrenergic receptor agonist. In vivo, F233Δ mice displayed a blunted response to infusion of phenylephrine and were found to have elevated catecholamine levels and elevated vascular α1 adrenergic receptor gene expression. Telemetry studies showed that the F233Δ mice were tachycardic and hypotensive at baseline, consistent with diminished vascular tone. In biochemical studies, ZDHHC21 was shown to palmitoylate the α1D adrenoceptor, and to interact with it in a molecular complex, thus suggesting a possible molecular mechanism by which the receptor can be regulated by ZDHHC21. Conclusions Together the data support a model in which ZDHHC21 F233Δ diminishes the function of vascular α1 adrenergic receptors, leading to reduced vascular tone which manifests in vivo as hypotension and tachycardia. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of a ZDHHC isoform affecting vascular function in vivo and identifies a novel molecular mode of regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. PMID:26715683

  10. Discovery of Quinazoline-Based Fluorescent Probes to α1-Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    α1-Adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs), as the essential members of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can mediate numerous physiological responses in the sympathetic nervous system. In the current research, a series of quinazoline-based small-molecule fluorescent probes to α1-ARs (1a–1e), including two parts, a pharmacophore for α1-AR recognition and a fluorophore for visualization, were well designed and synthesized. The biological evaluation results displayed that these probes held reasonable fluorescent properties, high affinity, accepted cell toxicity, and excellent subcellular localization imaging potential for α1-ARs. PMID:26005522

  11. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glina, F.P.; Castro, P.M.V.; Monteiro, G.G.R.; Guerra, G.C. Del; Glina, S.; Mazzurana, M.; Bernardo, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers as medical expulsive treatment in children with distal ureterolithiasis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and LILACS databases. We further searched manually the references of the primary studies. Searches were concluded on October 4th, 2014. Articles were selected, independently and in pairs, by the respective titles and summaries. Any divergence was resolved by consensus. Evidence Synthesis: Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists increased the probability of calculus expulsion by 27% (NNT=4). Calculi smaller than 5mm, increased by 33% (NNT=3). Larger than 5mm, increased by 34% (NNT=3). Conclusion: Alpha-1 adrenergic blocker use is related with a greater incidence of expulsion of ureteral calculi, smaller or greater than 5mm, and fewer episodes of pain when compared to ibuprofen. However it is necessary larger samples to enhance the power analysis of the expulsion of ureteral calculi larger than 5mm and the episodes of pain. Patient Summary: This review analyzed the outcome of alpha adrenergic antagonist in children with ureteral calculi. We conclude that it is the best medicine for use, since it helps the expulsion of the stone. PMID:26717117

  12. Evidence for β1-adrenergic receptor involvement in amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression: implications for cocaine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Rudoy, Carla A.; Reyes, Arith-Ruth S.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that betaxolol, a selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, administered during early phases of cocaine abstinence, ameliorated withdrawal-induced anxiety and blocked increases in amygdalar β1-adrenergic receptor expression in rats. Here, we report the efficacy of betaxolol in reducing increases in gene expression of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide known to be involved in mediating ‘anxiety-like’ behaviors during initial phases of cocaine abstinence. We also demonstrate attenuation of an amygdalar β1-adrenergic receptor-mediated cell signaling pathway following this treatment. Male rats were administered betaxolol at 24 and 44 hours following chronic cocaine administration. Animals were euthanized at the 48 hour time-point and the amygdala was micro-dissected and processed for quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and/or Western blot analysis. Results showed that betaxolol treatment during early cocaine withdrawal attenuated increases in amygdalar CRF gene expression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory and catalytic subunit (nuclear fraction) protein expression. Our data also reveal that β1-adrenergic receptors are on amygdalar neurons which are immunoreactive for CRF. The present findings suggest that the efficacy of betaxolol treatment on cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety may be related, in part, to its effect on amygdalar β1-adrenergic receptor, modulation of its downstream cell signaling elements and CRF gene expression. PMID:18596687

  13. Evidence for beta1-adrenergic receptor involvement in amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression: implications for cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rudoy, Carla A; Reyes, Arith-Ruth S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2009-04-01

    We previously showed that betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, administered during early phases of cocaine abstinence, ameliorated withdrawal-induced anxiety and blocked increases in amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor expression in rats. Here, we report the efficacy of betaxolol in reducing increases in gene expression of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide known to be involved in mediating 'anxiety-like' behaviors during initial phases of cocaine abstinence. We also demonstrate attenuation of an amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-mediated cell-signaling pathway following this treatment. Male rats were administered betaxolol at 24 and 44 h following chronic cocaine administration. Animals were euthanized at the 48-h time point and the amygdala was microdissected and processed for quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and/or western blot analysis. Results showed that betaxolol treatment during early cocaine withdrawal attenuated increases in amygdalar CRF gene expression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase regulatory and catalytic subunit (nuclear fraction) protein expression. Our data also reveal that beta(1)-adrenergic receptors are on amygdalar neurons, which are immunoreactive for CRF. The present findings suggest that the efficacy of betaxolol treatment on cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety may be related, in part, to its effect on amygdalar beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, modulation of its downstream cell-signaling elements and CRF gene expression.

  14. Immobility from administration of the alpha1-adrenergic antagonist, terazosin, in the IVth ventricle in rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, Eric A; Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David

    2003-12-26

    Brain alpha1-adrenoceptors have been shown to be essential for motor activity and movement in mice using intraventricular injection of alpha1-antagonists. To facilitate subsequent neuroanatomical mapping of these receptors, the present study was undertaken to replicate these effects in the rat. Rats were administered the alpha1-antagonist, terazosin, in the absence and presence of the alpha1-agonist, phenylephrine, in the IVth ventricle and were tested for their motor activity responses to an environmental change. Terazosin was found to produce a dose-dependent, virtually complete cessation of behavioral activity that was reversed by coinfusion of phenylephrine. The results could not be explained by sedation. It is concluded that central alpha1-adrenoceptors are essential for behavioral activation in rats as in mice.

  15. Iron-56 irradiation diminishes muscarinic but not {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Joseph, J.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Dalton, T.K.; Roth, G.S.

    1994-12-01

    Initial findings from our laboratory have indicated that muscarinic enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked release of dopamine from perifused striatal slices is reduced after exposure to {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. This finding suggested that there is a radiation-induced deficit in muscarinic receptor sensitivity. Subsequent findings have indicated that at least part of the loss in sensitivity may occur as a result of alterations in the initial steps of the signal transduction process and involve muscarinic receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. The present study was carried out to localize this deficit further by determining carbachol-stimulated low-K{sub m} guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity in striatal and hippocampal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0, 0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. In addition, to examine the specificity of the effect of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation, {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase activity was also examined in these tissues. The results showed that there was a high degree of specificity in the effects of {sup 56}Fe particles. Decrements were observed in muscarinic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in striatum but not in hippocampus, and {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation did not affect {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic low-K{sub m} GTPase activity in either brain tissue. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  16. The structural basis for agonist and partial agonist action on a β(1)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Warne, Tony; Moukhametzianov, Rouslan; Baker, Jillian G; Nehmé, Rony; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-01-13

    β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate intracellular G proteins upon binding catecholamine agonist ligands such as adrenaline and noradrenaline. Synthetic ligands have been developed that either activate or inhibit βARs for the treatment of asthma, hypertension or cardiac dysfunction. These ligands are classified as either full agonists, partial agonists or antagonists, depending on whether the cellular response is similar to that of the native ligand, reduced or inhibited, respectively. However, the structural basis for these different ligand efficacies is unknown. Here we present four crystal structures of the thermostabilized turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) β(1)-adrenergic receptor (β(1)AR-m23) bound to the full agonists carmoterol and isoprenaline and the partial agonists salbutamol and dobutamine. In each case, agonist binding induces a 1 Å contraction of the catecholamine-binding pocket relative to the antagonist bound receptor. Full agonists can form hydrogen bonds with two conserved serine residues in transmembrane helix 5 (Ser(5.42) and Ser(5.46)), but partial agonists only interact with Ser(5.42) (superscripts refer to Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering). The structures provide an understanding of the pharmacological differences between different ligand classes, illuminating how GPCRs function and providing a solid foundation for the structure-based design of novel ligands with predictable efficacies.

  17. β1-adrenergic receptor activation enhances memory in Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Coutellier, Laurence; Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    Deficits in social recognition and learning of social cues are major symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we studied the role of β1-noradrenergic signaling in cognitive function to determine whether it could be used as a potential therapeutic target for AD. Using pharmacological, biochemical and behavioral tools, we assessed social recognition and the β1-adrenergic receptor (ADR) and its downstream PKA/phospho-CREB (pCREB) signaling cascade in the medial amygdala (MeA) in Thy1-hAPP(Lond/Swe+)(APP) mouse model of AD. Our results demonstrated that APP mice display a significant social recognition deficit which is dependent on the β1-adrenergic system. Moreover, betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist, impaired social but not object/odor learning in C57Bl/6 mice. Our results identifies activation of the PKA/pCREB downstream of β1-ADR in MeA as responsible signaling cascade for learning of social cues in MeA. Finally, we found that xamoterol, a selective β1-ADR partial agonist, rescued the social recognition deficit of APP mice by increasing nuclear pCREB. Our data indicate that activation of β1-ADR in MeA is essential for learning of social cues, and that an impairment of this cascade in AD may contribute to pathogenesis and cognitive deficits. Therefore, selective activation of β1-ADR may be used as a therapeutic approach to rescue memory deficits in AD. Further safety and translational studies will be needed to ensure the safety of this approach.

  18. β1-adrenergic receptor activation enhances memory in Alzheimer's disease model

    PubMed Central

    Coutellier, Laurence; Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deficits in social recognition and learning of social cues are major symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we studied the role of β1-noradrenergic signaling in cognitive function to determine whether it could be used as a potential therapeutic target for AD. Methods Using pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools, we assessed social recognition and the β1-adrenergic receptor (ADR) and its downstream protein kinase A (PKA)/phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) signaling cascade in the medial amygdala (MeA) in Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe+(APP) mouse model of AD. Results Our results demonstrated that APP mice display a significant social recognition deficit which is dependent on the β1-adrenergic system. Moreover, betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist, impaired social but not object/odor learning in C57Bl/6 mice. Our results identifies activation of the PKA/pCREB downstream of β1-ADR in MeA as responsible signaling cascade for learning of social cues in MeA. Finally, we found that xamoterol, a selective β1-ADR partial agonist, rescued the social recognition deficit of APP mice by increasing nuclear pCREB. Interpretation Our data indicate that activation of β1-ADR in MeA is essential for learning of social cues, and that an impairment of this cascade in AD may contribute to pathogenesis and cognitive deficits. Therefore, selective activation of β1-ADR may be used as a therapeutic approach to rescue memory deficits in AD. Further safety and translational studies will be needed to ensure the safety of this approach. PMID:24883337

  19. Anti-β1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Labovsky, V; Smulski, C R; Gómez, K; Levy, G; Levin, M J

    2007-01-01

    Chronic Chagas heart disease (cChHD), a chronic manifestation of the Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is characterized by high antibody levels against the C-terminal region of the ribosomal P proteins (i.e. peptide R13, EEEDDDMGFGLFD) which bears similarity with the second extracellular loop of β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR, peptide H26R HWWRAESDEARRCYNDPKCCDFVTNR). Because it has not been demonstrated clearly that IgGs from cChHD patients bind to native human β1-AR, the aim of this study was to investigate further the physical interaction between cChHD IgGs and the human β1-AR. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated the binding of these antibodies to the receptor expressed on stably transfected cells, together with a β1-AR agonist-like effect. In addition, immunoadsorption of the serum samples from cChHD patients with a commercially available matrix, containing peptides representing the first and the second extracellular loop of the β1-AR, completely abolished reactivity against the H26R peptide and the physiological response to the receptor. The follow-up of this specificity after in vitro immunoadsorption procedures suggests that this treatment might be used to diminish significantly the serum levels of anti-β1-AR antibodies in patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:17419712

  20. β(1) Adrenergic receptor is key to cold- and diet-induced thermogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Cintia B; Fernandes, Gustavo W; Capelo, Luciane P; Fonseca, Tatiane L; Maculan, Flávia D'Angelo; Gouveia, Cecilia H A; Brum, Patrícia C; Christoffolete, Marcelo A; Aoki, Marcelo S; Lancellotti, Carmen L; Kim, Brian; Bianco, Antonio C; Ribeiro, Miriam O

    2012-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is predominantly regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the adrenergic receptor signaling pathway. Knowing that a mouse with triple β-receptor knockout (KO) is cold intolerant and obese, we evaluated the independent role played by the β(1) isoform in energy homeostasis. First, the 30  min i.v. infusion of norepinephrine (NE) or the β(1) selective agonist dobutamine (DB) resulted in similar interscapular BAT (iBAT) thermal response in WT mice. Secondly, mice with targeted disruption of the β(1) gene (KO of β(1) adrenergic receptor (β(1)KO)) developed hypothermia during cold exposure and exhibited decreased iBAT thermal response to NE or DB infusion. Thirdly, when placed on a high-fat diet (HFD; 40% fat) for 5 weeks, β(1)KO mice were more susceptible to obesity than WT controls and failed to develop diet-induced thermogenesis as assessed by BAT Ucp1 mRNA levels and oxygen consumption. Furthermore, β(1)KO mice exhibited fasting hyperglycemia and more intense glucose intolerance, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia when placed on the HFD, developing marked non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, the β(1) signaling pathway mediates most of the SNS stimulation of adaptive thermogenesis.

  1. Thermostabilization of the β1-adrenergic receptor Correlates with Increased Entropy of the Inactive State

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Michiel JM; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Grisshammer, Reinhard; Tate, Christopher G; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of GPCRs is a major hurdle in their purification and crystallization, but thermostabilization can facilitate structure determination, as has been shown by the structure of the thermostabilized β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) mutant, m23-β1AR, which has been thermostabilized in the inactive state. However, it is unclear from the structure how the six thermostabilizing mutations in m23-β1AR affect receptor dynamics. We have used molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to compare the conformational ensembles for both wild type β1AR (wt-β1AR) and m23-β1AR. Thermostabilization results in an increase in the number of accessible microscopic conformational states within the inactive state ensemble, effectively increasing the side chain entropy of the inactive state at room temperature, while suppressing large-scale main chain conformational changes that lead to activation. We identified several diverse mechanisms of thermostabilization upon mutation. These include, decrease of long range correlated movement between residues in the G-protein coupling site to the extracellular region (Y227A5.58, F338M7.48), formation of new hydrogen bonds (R68S), and reduction of local stress (Y2275.58, F3277.37 and F3387.48). This study provides insights into microscopic mechanisms underlying thermostability that leads to an understanding of the effect of these mutations on the structure of the receptor. PMID:23697892

  2. The Specific α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Influences the Urine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Wu, Jianqiang; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine, reflecting many changes in the body, is a better source than blood for biomarker discovery. However, even under physiological conditions, the urine proteome often varies. Understanding how various regulating factors affect urine proteome helps link changes to urine proteome with urinary biomarkers of physiological conditions as well as corresponding diseases. To evaluate the possible impact of α1-adrenergic receptor on urine proteome, this study investigated effects of the specific inhibitor prazosin on the urine proteome in a rat model by using tandem mass tagging and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 775 proteins were identified, approximately half of which were influenced by prazosin treatment, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system exerts a significant impact on urine proteome. Eight significantly changed proteins were previously annotated as urinary candidate biomarkers. Angiotensinogen, haptoglobin, and beta-2 microglobulin, which were reported to be associated with blood pressure, were validated via Western blot. Prazosin is widely used in clinical practice; thus, these protein changes should be considered when studying corresponding diseases such as hypertension, post-traumatic stress disorder and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The related physiological activities of α1-receptors, controlling blood pressure and fear response might significantly affect the urine proteome and warrant further biomarker studies. PMID:27780262

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for the human. beta. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Frielle, T.; Collins, S.; Daniel, K.W.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a human placenta lambdagt11 library has led to the isolation of the cDNA for the human ..beta../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 1/AR). Used as the probe was the human genomic clone termed G-21. This clone, which contains an intronless gene for a putative receptor, was previously isolated by virtue of its cross hybridization with the human ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 2/AR). The 2.4-kilobase cDNA for the human ..beta../sub 1/AR encodes a protein of 477 amino acid residues that is 69% homologous with the avian ..beta..AR but only 54% homologous with the human ..beta../sub 2/AR. This suggests that the avian gene encoding ..beta..AR and the human gene encoding ..beta../sub 1/AR evolved from a common ancestral gene. RNA blot analysis indicates a message of 2.5 kilobases in rat tissues, with a pattern of tissue distribution consistent with ..beta../sub 1/AR binding. This pattern is quite distinct from the pattern obtained when the ..beta../sub 2/AR cDNA is used as a probe. Expression of receptor protein in Xenopus laevis oocytes conveys adenylate cyclase responsiveness to catecholamines with a typical ..beta../sub 1/AR specificity. This contrasts with the typical ..beta../sub 2/ subtype specificity observed when the human ..beta../sub 2/AR cDNA is expressed in this system. Mammalian ..beta../sub 1/AR and ..beta../sub 2/AR are thus products of distinct genes, both of which are apparently related to the putative G-21 receptor.

  4. Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders with the Alpha-1 Adrenergic Antagonist Prazosin.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe Yves Rémy; Rousseau, Pierre-François

    2017-03-01

    The present review aims to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of the α-1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin as primary pharmacologic treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A systematic review was performed using keywords (i.e., prazosin, α-1-adrenergic antagonist, α-1-blocker, post-traumatic stress disorder) in the databases PubMed/Medline (1966-May 2016), Embase (1966-May 2016), ScienceDirect (1823-May 2016), OvidSP (1946-May 2016) and Nature (1845-May 2016). To be considered for inclusion, studies had to test the efficacy of prazosin either alone or added to ongoing treatment in adults with PTSD, use validated tools to assess and monitor the disorders, allow comparisons on the basis of univariate analyses (i.e., p-values of t-tests and effect sizes) and list the identified adverse reactions. 12 studies were included: 5 randomized controlled trials, 4 open-label prospective trials and 3 retrospective file reviews. The evaluation concerned 276 patients exposed to civilian trauma (19%) or war trauma (81%). Prazosin significantly decreases trauma nightmares, avoidance, hypervigilance and improves patient status in all studies. No significant difference of blood pressure was observed at the end of trials. Beyond the methodological and clinical biases of these studies, the present review not only confirms the effectiveness and good tolerability of prazosin, but also suggests its possible use as primary pharmacologic treatment for PTSD. Uncertainties remain, however, regarding the prescription modalities and dosages.

  5. β1-Adrenergic receptor deficiency in ghrelin-expressing cells causes hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Bharath K.; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Vijayaraghavan, Prasanna; Hepler, Chelsea; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic gastric peptide hormone secreted when caloric intake is limited. Ghrelin also regulates blood glucose, as emphasized by the hypoglycemia that is induced by caloric restriction in mouse models of deficient ghrelin signaling. Here, we hypothesized that activation of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) localized to ghrelin cells is required for caloric restriction–associated ghrelin release and the ensuing protective glucoregulatory response. In mice lacking the β1AR specifically in ghrelin-expressing cells, ghrelin secretion was markedly blunted, resulting in profound hypoglycemia and prevalent mortality upon severe caloric restriction. Replacement of ghrelin blocked the effects of caloric restriction in β1AR-deficient mice. We also determined that treating calorically restricted juvenile WT mice with beta blockers led to reduced plasma ghrelin and hypoglycemia, the latter of which is similar to the life-threatening, fasting-induced hypoglycemia observed in infants treated with beta blockers. These findings highlight the critical functions of ghrelin in preventing hypoglycemia and promoting survival during severe caloric restriction and the requirement for ghrelin cell–expressed β1ARs in these processes. Moreover, these results indicate a potential role for ghrelin in mediating beta blocker–associated hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals, such as young children. PMID:27548523

  6. Norepinephrine regulates cocaine-primed reinstatement via α1-adrenergic receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Karl T; Schroeder, Jason P; Foster, Stephanie L; Squires, Katherine; Smith, Brilee M; Pitts, Elizabeth G; Epstein, Michael P; Weinshenker, David

    2017-06-01

    Drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats is thought to reflect relapse-like behavior and is mediated by the integration of signals from mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic projections and corticostriatal glutamatergic innervation. Cocaine-primed reinstatement can also be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitors, which prevent norepinephrine (NE) synthesis, or by α1-adrenergic receptor (α1AR) antagonists, indicating functional modulation by the noradrenergic system. In the present study, we sought to further discern the role of NE in cocaine-seeking behavior by determining whether α1AR activation can induce reinstatement on its own or is sufficient to permit cocaine-primed reinstatement in the absence of all other AR signaling, and identifying the neuroanatomical substrate within the mesocorticolimbic reward system harboring the critical α1ARs. We found that while intracerebroventricular infusion of the α1AR agonist phenylephrine did not induce reinstatement on its own, it did overcome the blockade of cocaine-primed reinstatement by the DBH inhibitor nepicastat. Furthermore, administration of the α1AR antagonist terazosin in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell, attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement. Combined, these data indicate that α1AR activation in the mPFC is required for cocaine-primed reinstatement, and suggest that α1AR antagonists merit further investigation as pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rab11a and its binding partners regulate the recycling of the β1-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lidia A.; Hajjhussein, Hassan; Frederick, Katherine C.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2010-01-01

    β1-adrenergic receptors (β1-AR) are internalized in response to agonists and then recycle back for another round of signaling. The serine 312 to alanine mutant of the β1-AR (S312A) is internalized but does not recycle. We determined that WT β1-AR and S312A were internalized initially to an early sorting compartment because they colocalized by >70% with the early endosomal markers rab5a and early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1). Subsequently, the WT β1-AR trafficked via rab4a-expressing sorting endosomes to recycling endosomes. In recycling endosomes WT β1-AR were colocalized by >70% with the rab11 GTPase. S312A did not colocalize with either rab4a or rab11, instead they exited from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes in which they were degraded. Rab11a played a prominent role in recycling of the WT β1-AR because dominant negative rab11a inhibited, while constitutively active rab11a accelerated the recycling of the β1-AR. Next, we determined the effect of each of the rab11-intercating proteins on trafficking of the WT β1-AR. The recycling of the β1-AR was markedly inhibited when myosin Vb, FIP2, FIP3 and rabphillin were knocked down. These data indicate that rab11a and a select group of its binding partners play a prominent role recycling of the human β1-AR. PMID:20727405

  8. Crosstalk between adenosine A1 and β1-adrenergic receptors regulates translocation of PKCε in isolated rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Satoshi; Dobson, James G.; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Shea, Lynne G.; Fenton, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-induced translocation of PKCε to transverse (t) tubular membranes in isolated rat cardiomyocytes is associated with a reduction in β1-adrenergic-stimulated contractile function. The PKCε-mediated activation of protein kinase D (PKD) by endothelin-1 is inhibited by β1-adrenergic stimulated protein kinase A (PKA) suggesting a similar mechanism of A1R signal transduction modulation by adrenergic agonists may exist in the heart. We have investigated the influence of β1-adrenergic stimulation on PKCε translocation elicited by A1R. Immunofluorescence imaging and Western blotting with PKCε and β-COP antibodies were used to quantify the co-localization of PKCε and t-tubular structures in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. The A1R agonist CCPA increased the co-localization of PKCε and t-tubules as detected by imaging. The β1-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) inhibited this effect of CCPA. Forskolin, a potent activator of PKA, mimicked, and H89, a pharmacological PKA inhibitor, and PKI, a membrane-permeable PKA peptide PKA inhibitor, attenuated the negative effect of ISO on the A1R-mediated PKCε translocation. Western blotting with isolated intact hearts revealed an increase in PKCε/β-COP co-localization induced by A1R. This increase was attenuated by the A1R antagonist DPCPX and ISO. The ISO-induced attenuation was reversed by H89. It is concluded that adrenergic stimulation inhibits A1R-induced PKCε translocation to the PKCε anchor site RACK2 constituent of a coatomer containing β-COP and associated with the t-tubular structures of the heart. In that this translocation has been previously associated with the antiadrenergic property of A1R, it is apparent that the interactive effects of adenosine and β1-adrenergic agonists on function are complex in the heart. PMID:22105697

  9. Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders with the Alpha-1 Adrenergic Antagonist Prazosin

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present review aims to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of the α-1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin as primary pharmacologic treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: A systematic review was performed using keywords (i.e., prazosin, α-1-adrenergic antagonist, α-1-blocker, post-traumatic stress disorder) in the databases PubMed/Medline (1966–May 2016), Embase (1966–May 2016), ScienceDirect (1823–May 2016), OvidSP (1946–May 2016) and Nature (1845–May 2016). To be considered for inclusion, studies had to test the efficacy of prazosin either alone or added to ongoing treatment in adults with PTSD, use validated tools to assess and monitor the disorders, allow comparisons on the basis of univariate analyses (i.e., p-values of t-tests and effect sizes) and list the identified adverse reactions. Results: 12 studies were included: 5 randomized controlled trials, 4 open-label prospective trials and 3 retrospective file reviews. The evaluation concerned 276 patients exposed to civilian trauma (19%) or war trauma (81%). Prazosin significantly decreases trauma nightmares, avoidance, hypervigilance and improves patient status in all studies. No significant difference of blood pressure was observed at the end of trials. Conclusions: Beyond the methodological and clinical biases of these studies, the present review not only confirms the effectiveness and good tolerability of prazosin, but also suggests its possible use as primary pharmacologic treatment for PTSD. Uncertainties remain, however, regarding the prescription modalities and dosages. PMID:27432823

  10. α(1) adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, actively contracts early rat rib fracture callus ex vivo.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Stuart J; Dooley, Philip C; McDonald, Aaron C; Djouma, Elvan; Schuijers, Johannes A; Ward, Alex R; Grills, Brian L

    2011-05-01

    Early, soft fracture callus that links fracture ends together is smooth muscle-like in nature. We aimed to determine if early fracture callus could be induced to contract and relax ex vivo by similar pathways to smooth muscle, that is, contraction via α(1) adrenergic receptor (α(1) AR) activation with phenylephrine (PE) and relaxation via β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2) AR) stimulation with terbutaline. A sensitive force transducer quantified 7 day rat rib fracture callus responses in modified Krebs-Henseliet (KH) solutions. Unfractured ribs along with 7, 14, and 21 day fracture calluses were analyzed for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR gene expression using qPCR, whilst 7 day fracture callus was examined via immunohistochemistry for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR- immunoreactivity. In 7 day callus, PE (10(-6)  M) significantly induced an increase in force that was greater than passive force generated in calcium-free KH (n = 8, mean 51% increase, 95% CI: 26-76%). PE-induced contractions in calluses were attenuated by the α(1) AR antagonist, prazosin (10(-6)  M; n = 7, mean 5% increase, 95% CI: 2-11%). Terbutaline did not relax callus. Gene expression of α(1) ARs was constant throughout fracture healing; however, β(2) AR expression was down-regulated at 7 days compared to unfractured rib (p < 0.01). Furthermore, osteoprogenitor cells of early fibrous callus displayed considerable α(1) AR-like immunoreactivity but not β(2) AR-like immunoreactivity. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that early fracture callus can be pharmacologically induced to contract. We propose that increased concentrations of α(1) AR agonists such as noradrenaline may tonically contract callus in vivo to promote osteogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Pharmacological Analysis and Structure Determination of 7-Methylcyanopindolol–Bound β1-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomomi; Baker, Jillian; Warne, Tony; Brown, Giles A.; Leslie, Andrew G.W.; Congreve, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Comparisons between structures of the β1-adrenergic receptor (AR) bound to either agonists, partial agonists, or weak partial agonists led to the proposal that rotamer changes of Ser5.46, coupled to a contraction of the binding pocket, are sufficient to increase the probability of receptor activation. (RS)-4-[3-(tert-butylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (cyanopindolol) is a weak partial agonist of β1AR and, based on the hypothesis above, we predicted that the addition of a methyl group to form 4-[(2S)-3-(tert-butylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-7-methyl-1H-indole-2-carbonitrile (7-methylcyanopindolol) would dramatically reduce its efficacy. An eight-step synthesis of 7-methylcyanopindolol was developed and its pharmacology was analyzed. 7-Methylcyanopindolol bound with similar affinity to cyanopindolol to both β1AR and β2AR. As predicted, the efficacy of 7-methylcyanopindolol was reduced significantly compared with cyanopindolol, acting as a very weak partial agonist of turkey β1AR and an inverse agonist of human β2AR. The structure of 7-methylcyanopindolol–bound β1AR was determined to 2.4-Å resolution and found to be virtually identical to the structure of cyanopindolol-bound β1AR. The major differences in the orthosteric binding pocket are that it has expanded by 0.3 Å in 7-methylcyanopindolol–bound β1AR and the hydroxyl group of Ser5.46 is positioned 0.8 Å further from the ligand, with respect to the position of the Ser5.46 side chain in cyanopindolol-bound β1AR. Thus, the molecular basis for the reduction in efficacy of 7-methylcyanopindolol compared with cyanopindolol may be regarded as the opposite of the mechanism proposed for the increase in efficacy of agonists compared with antagonists. PMID:26385885

  12. Structural Insights into Conformational Stability of Wild-Type and Mutant β1-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Balaraman, Gouthaman S.; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recent experiments to derive a thermally stable mutant of turkey beta-1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) have shown that a combination of six single point mutations resulted in a 20°C increase in thermal stability in mutant β1AR. Here we have used the all-atom force-field energy function to calculate a stability score to detect stabilizing point mutations in G-protein coupled receptors. The calculated stability score shows good correlation with the measured thermal stability for 76 single point mutations and 22 multiple mutants in β1AR. We have demonstrated that conformational sampling of the receptor for various mutants improve the prediction of thermal stability by 50%. Point mutations Y227A5.58, V230A5.61, and F338M7.48 in the thermally stable mutant m23-β1AR stabilizes key microdomains of the receptor in the inactive conformation. The Y227A5.58 and V230A5.61 mutations stabilize the ionic lock between R1393.50 on transmembrane helix3 and E2856.30 on transmembrane helix6. The mutation F338M7.48 on TM7 alters the interaction of the conserved motif NPxxY(x)5,6F with helix8 and hence modulates the interaction of TM2-TM7-helix8 microdomain. The D186-R317 salt bridge (in extracellular loops 2 and 3) is stabilized in the cyanopindolol-bound wild-type β1AR, whereas the salt bridge between D184-R317 is preferred in the mutant m23. We propose that this could be the surrogate to a similar salt bridge found between the extracellular loop 2 and TM7 in β2AR reported recently. We show that the binding energy difference between the inactive and active states is less in m23 compared to the wild-type, which explains the activation of m23 at higher norepinephrine concentration compared to the wild-type. Results from this work throw light into the mechanism behind stabilizing mutations. The computational scheme proposed in this work could be used to design stabilizing mutations for other G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:20643076

  13. Adrenergic regulation of gluconeogenesis: possible involvement of two mechanisms of signal transduction in alpha 1-adrenergic action.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M

    1985-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agents on hepatocyte metabolism involve two mechanisms: (i) a calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process that is modulated by glucocorticoids and (ii) a calcium-dependent insulin-insensitive process that is modulated by thyroid hormones. We have studied the effect of epinephrine (plus propranolol) on gluconeogenesis from lactate and dihydroxyacetone. It was observed that the adrenergic stimulation of gluconeogenesis from lactate seemed to occur through both mechanisms, whereas when the substrate was dihydroxyacetone the action took place exclusively through the calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process. This effect was absent in hepatocytes from adrenalectomized rats, suggesting that it is modulated by glucocorticoids. PMID:2995981

  14. Impairment of contextual conditioned fear extinction after microinjection of alpha-1-adrenergic blocker prazosin into the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Do-Monte, Fabrício H M; Allensworth, Melody; Carobrez, Antônio P

    2010-07-29

    Long-lasting memories of aversive or stressful events have been associated with the noradrenergic system activation. Alpha-1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin has successfully been used in the last years to treat anxiety disorders related to aversive memories recurrence in humans. Contextual conditioned fear extinction paradigm in rats has been used to better understand the mechanisms involved in the attenuation of defensive behaviour after a traumatic situation. Here we investigated the effects of systemic administration of prazosin in the fear extinction processes. Rats were previously paired in a contextual fear conditioning box (1 footshock, 1 mA, 2s duration), further returning to the same box during three consecutive days receiving an intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or prazosin 30 min before (acquisition of extinction; 0.1 or 0.5mg/kg) or immediately after (consolidation of extinction, 0.5 or 1.5mg/kg) each extinction session (10 min). On the last day, all animals were re-exposed undrugged to the apparatus. Since the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been described as a key structure in the modulation of conditioned fear extinction, the effects of intra-mPFC microinjection (0.2 microl per side) of vehicle (PBS) or prazosin (0.75 or 2.5 nmol) in the acquisition of fear extinction (10 min before extinction session 1) were further evaluated. Subjects were drug-free re-exposed to the same box in the next day (extinction session 2). The percentage of freezing time was used as the memory retention parameter. The results showed that either systemic or intra-mPFC-alpha-1-adrenergic blockade increased the freezing time in the last extinction sessions, suggesting impairment of the extinction of contextual conditioned fear in rats.

  15. Polymorphisms of the beta1-adrenergic receptor predict exercise capacity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Lynne E; Craft, Laura L; Zengel, Paul; McGuire, Nancy; Rathz, Deborah A; Dorn, Gerald W; Liggett, Stephen B

    2002-11-01

    Exercise performance in patients with congestive heart failure is partially dependent on cardiac beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1AR) function. There are 2 common polymorphisms of the beta1AR gene that alter the encoded amino acids at positions 49 (Ser or Gly) and 389 (Gly or Arg) and alter receptor function in vitro. Their relevance to modification of cardiac function in heart failure is not known. Exercise testing was performed in 263 patients with idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction approximately 25%). Potential associations were sought between beta1AR genotypes and the primary outcome variables of peak oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate response, and exercise time. The major determinants of exercise capacity were the polymorphisms at position 389, where patients homozygous for Gly389 had significantly lower peak VO2 compared with those with Arg389 (14.5 +/- 0.6 vs 17.7 +/- 0.4 mL/kg/min, P =.006), despite similar clinical characteristics including left ventricular ejection fraction. Consistent with a gene dose-response, heterozygosity was associated with an intermediate response (16.9 +/- 0.6 mL/kg/min, P <.05). When position 49 genotypes were included, a graded relationship between the 5 2-locus haplotypes and VO2 was found. Two haplotypes displayed the most divergent peak VO2: homozygous Gly389/Ser49, and homozygous Arg389/Gly49 carriers (14.4 +/- 0.5 vs 18.2 +/- 0.8 mL/kg/min, P =.001). Genotype did not predict the heart rate response. The above results were independent of beta-blocker or other medication use, left ventricular ejection fraction, beta2AR genotype, or other demographic and clinical characteristics. beta1AR polymorphisms are a significant determinant of exercise capacity in patients with congestive heart failure. Early identification, by genetic testing for these polymorphisms, of heart failure patients at risk for development of depressed exercise capacity may be useful for initiation of specific therapy

  16. Beta1-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and clinical efficacy of betaxolol hydrochloride in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Puckett, Brian J; Allen, Robert C; Castillo, Ivan G; Leffler, Christopher T

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between polymorphisms in the gene encoding the beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) and clinical response to betaxolol hydrochloride 0.25% in a small pilot study of normal volunteers. Prospective nonrandomized comparative trial. Forty-eight consecutive normal volunteers who met all eligibility requirements for inclusion into this study. Baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) was recorded. Subjects began treatment with betaxolol (1 drop both eyes twice daily) and underwent follow-up IOP recordings at 3 and 6 weeks. Peripheral blood was obtained for genetic analysis. Response to betaxolol was calculated as the change in mean IOP from baseline (averaged between both eyes and averaged between both follow-up visits). The beta1-AR genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphisms at codons 49 (serine [Ser] or glycine [Gly]) and 389 (arginine [Arg] or Gly). There were 32 Ser49 homozygotes and 16 Gly49 carriers. There were no statistically significant differences between the Ser49 homozygotes and the Gly49 carriers with respect to baseline IOP or response to betaxolol therapy. There were 25 Arg389 homozygotes and 23 Gly389 carriers (22 heterozygotes and 1 Gly389 homozygote). As compared with Gly389 carriers, the Arg389 homozygotes had a higher baseline IOP (15.8 mmHg vs. 13.7 mmHg; P = 0.009) and a greater magnitude of response to betaxolol therapy (-3.4 mmHg vs. -1.5 mmHg; P = 0.0009). The Ser49 homozygote genotype was not independently associated with baseline IOP (P = 0.47) or with a response to betaxolol (P = 0.99). The Arg389 homozygote genotype was independently associated with a higher baseline IOP (P = 0.03) and a greater response to betaxolol (P = 0.03), even after adjusting for baseline IOP. In this small pilot series, a single nucleotide polymorphism at codon 389 in the beta1-AR seems to correlate with a response to betaxolol therapy in normal, nonglaucomatous volunteers. There was no

  17. Myocardial Recovery in Patients With Systolic Heart Failure and Autoantibodies Against β1-Adrenergic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Yuji; McNamara, Dennis M; Alexis, Jeffrey D; Cooper, Leslie T; Dec, G William; Pauly, Daniel F; Sheppard, Richard; Starling, Randall C; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-02-28

    Among various cardiac autoantibodies (AAbs), those recognizing the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) demonstrate agonist-like effects and induce myocardial damage that can be reversed by β-blockers and immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) immunoadsorption. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of β1AR-AAbs belonging to the IgG3 subclass in patients with recent-onset cardiomyopathy. Peripheral blood samples were drawn at enrollment in patients with recent-onset cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≤0.40; <6 months). The presence of IgG and IgG3-β1AR-AAb was determined, and echocardiograms were assessed, at baseline and 6 months. Patients were followed up for ≤48 months. Among the 353 patients who had blood samples adequate for the analysis, 62 (18%) were positive for IgG3-β1AR-AAbs (IgG3 group), 58 (16%) were positive for IgG but not IgG3 (non-IgG3 group), and the remaining were negative. There were no significant differences in baseline systolic blood pressure, heart rate, or LVEF among the groups at baseline. Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters were significantly larger in the non-IgG3 group compared with the other groups (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, p < 0.01; left ventricular end-systolic diameter, p = 0.03). At 6 months, LVEF was significantly higher in the IgG3 group (p = 0.007). Multiple regression analysis showed that IgG3-β1AR-AAb was an independent predictor of LVEF at 6 months and change in LVEF over 6 months, even after multivariable adjustment (LVEF at 6 months, β = 0.20, p = 0.01; change in LVEF, β = 0.20, p = 0.008). In patients with high New York Heart Association functional class (III or IV) at baseline, the IgG3 group had a lower incidence of the composite endpoint of all-cause death, cardiac transplantation, and hospitalization due to heart failure, whereas the non-IgG3 group had the highest incidence of the composite endpoint. IgG3-β1AR-AAbs were associated with more

  18. α1-Adrenergic receptor control of the cerebral vasculature in humans at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Saxena, Ashwini; Eubank, Wendy L; Hoxha, Besim; Raven, Peter B

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological blockade of α(1)-adrenoreceptors (by prazosin), at rest and during steady-state dynamic exercise, would impair cerebral autoregulation and result in cerebral vasodilatation in healthy humans. In 10 subjects, beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure and mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity were determined at rest and during low (Ex90) and moderate workload (Ex130) on an upright bicycle ergometer without and with prazosin. Plasma noradrenaline concentrations increased significantly from rest to Ex130 during control conditions (from 1.8 ± 0.2 to 3.2 ± 0.3 pmol (ml plasma)(-1)). In the control conditions, the transfer function gain between mean arterial pressure and mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity in the low-frequency range was decreased at Ex90 (P = 0.035) and Ex130 (P = 0.027) from rest. A significant increase in critical closing pressure (CCP) was also observed in the control conditions from rest to Ex90 to Ex130 (from 18 ± 3 to 24 ± 4 to 31 ± 4 mmHg). An average of 74 ± 2% blockade of blood pressure response was achieved with oral prazosin. Following blockade, plasma noradrenaline concentrations further increased at rest and during Ex130 from the control value (from 2.6 ± 0.3 to 4.4 ± 0.5 pmol (ml plasma)(-1)). Prazosin also resulted in an increase in low-frequency gain (P < 0.003) compared with the control conditions. Prazosin blockade abolished the increases in CCP during Ex130 and increased the cerebrovascular conductance index (P = 0.018). These data indicate that in the control conditions a strengthening of cerebral autoregulation occurred with moderate dynamic exercise that is associated with an increase in CCP as a result of the exercise-mediated augmentation of sympathetic activity. Given that α(1)-adrenergic receptor blockade attenuated the increase in dynamic cerebral autoregulation and CCP, we conclude that increases in sympathetic activity have a role in establishing cerebral vascular

  19. Contribution of both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ sensitization to the alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction of rat penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Nuria; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Garcia-Sacristán, Albino; Simonsen, Ulf; Prieto, Dolores

    2007-02-01

    Sympathetic adrenergic nerves maintain the flaccid state of the penis through the tonic release of norepinephrine that contracts trabecular and arterial smooth muscle. Simultaneous measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and tension and experiments with alpha-toxin-permeabilized arteries were performed in branches of the rat dorsal penile artery to investigate the intracellular Ca(2+) signaling pathways underlying alpha(1)-adrenergic vasoconstriction. Phenylephrine increased both [Ca(2+)](i) and tension, these increases being abolished by extracellular Ca(2+) removal and reduced by about 50% by the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (0.3 microM). Non-L-type Ca(2+) entry through store-operated channels was studied by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). CPA (30 microM) induced variable phasic contractions that were abolished by extracellular Ca(2+) removal and by the store-operated channels antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB, 50 microM) and largely inhibited by nifedipine (0.3 microM). CPA induced a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that was reduced in a Ca(2+)-free medium. Under conditions of L-type channels blockade, Ca(2+) readmission after store depletion with CPA evoked a sustained and marked elevation in [Ca(2+)](i) not coupled to contraction. 2-APB (50 microM) inhibited the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by CPA and the nifedipine-insensitive increases in both [Ca(2+)](i) and contraction elicited by phenylephrine. In alpha-toxin-permeabilized penile arteries, activation of G proteins with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) and of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor with phenylephrine both enhanced the myofilament sensitivity to Ca(2+). This Ca(2+) sensitization was reduced by selective inhibitors of PKC, tyrosine kinase (TK), and Rho kinase (RhoK) by 43%, 67%, and 82%, respectively. As a whole, the present data suggest the alpha(1)-adrenergic vasoconstriction in penile small arteries

  20. Post-transcriptional induction of beta 1-adrenergic receptor by retinoic acid, but not triiodothyronine, in C6 glioma cells expressing thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    López-Barahona, M; Iglesias, T; García-Higuera, I; Mayor, F; Zaballos, A; Bernal, J; Muñoz, A

    1996-12-01

    Thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine; T3) has been shown to control the expression of beta 1-adrenergic receptors (beta 1-AR) in cardiac myocytes, but not in C6 glioma cells. This cell specificity has been attributed to low expression of T3 receptors and high expression of the c-erbA alpha 2 splice variant that interferes with the action of T3. To check this hypothesis we have expressed the c-erbA/thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha 1 gene in C6 glioma cells and investigated their response to thyroid hormone. Cells expressing TR alpha 1, but not wild-type cells, were responsive to T3 as shown by increased expression of mitochrondrial hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase after T3 exposure. However, T3 had no effect on beta 1-AR gene expression in either set of cells. The beta 1-AR mRNA concentrations were, however, altered by retinoic acid (RA) treatment. Retinoic acid caused a rapid up-regulation of beta 1-AR mRNA levels that was blocked by cycloheximide. Retinoic acid did not increase the beta 1-AR gene transcription rate in run-on experiments. These results indicate an indirect post-transcriptional effect of RA. Control of beta 1-AR expression in C6 cells is also exerted at the translational level, because there was no correlation between mRNA and protein induction, as determined by radioligand binding studies. We conclude that lack of responsiveness of the beta 1-AR gene in C6 cells to T3 is not due to high expression of c-erbA alpha 2 but to undefined cell-specific factors.

  1. Co-translational formation and pharmacological characterization of beta1-adrenergic receptor/nanodisc complexes with different lipid environments.

    PubMed

    Rues, Ralf-Bernhardt; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2016-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are of key significance for biomedical research. Streamlined approaches for their efficient recombinant production are of pivotal interest in order to explore their intrinsic conformational dynamics and complex ligand binding behavior. We have systematically optimized the co-translational association and folding of G protein-coupled receptors with defined membranes of nanodiscs by cell-free expression approaches. Each optimization step was quantified and the ligand binding active fraction of the receptor samples could drastically be improved. The strategy was exemplified with a stabilized and a non-stabilized derivative of the turkey beta1-adrenergic receptor. Systematic lipid screens with preformed nanodiscs revealed that generation of ligand binding active conformations of the analyzed beta1-adrenergic receptors strongly depends on lipid charge, flexibility and chain length. The lipid composition of the nanodisc membranes modulates the affinities to a variety of ligands of both receptor derivatives. In addition, the thermostabilization procedure had a significant impact on specific ligand affinities of the receptor and abolished or reduced the binding of certain antagonists. Both receptors were highly stable after purification with optimized nanodisc membranes. The procedure avoids any detergent contact of the receptors and sample production takes less than two days. Moreover, even non-stabilized receptors can be analyzed and their prior purification is not necessary for the formation of nanodisc complexes. The established process appears therefore to be suitable as a new platform for the functional or even structural characterization of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors associated with defined lipid environments.

  2. Modification of certain pharmacological effects of ethanol by lipophilic alpha-1 adrenergic agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.K.; Dinovo, E.C.; Haddox, V.G.

    1987-09-28

    The influence of four centrally-acting alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, namely, 2(2-chloro-5-trifluoromethylphenylimino) imidazolidine (St 587), cirazoline, (-) 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-8-methoxy-5-methylthio-2-naphthalenamine ((-)SKF 89748A) and 2-(2-methylindazol-4-imino)imidazolidine (Sgd 101/75) on the pharmacological effects of ethanol was investigated. All four drugs reduced the duration of ethanol-induced hypnosis in C57B1/6 mice, this effect being proportional to their relative potencies to exert central alpha-1 agonism. In prazosin-pretreated mice, St 587 failed to reduce the hypnotic effect of ethanol, which provided strong evidence for the role of alpha-1 agonism for the hypnosis reducing effect of St 587. Hyperactivity induced in C57B1/6 mice by a subhypnotic dose of ethanol and St 587 was reported earlier. In the present study, St 587, cirazoline and (-)SKF 89748A produced similar response, but no correlation between this effect and ethanol hypnosis blockade could be established. 19 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Correlation between phosphatidylinositol labeling and contraction in rabbit aorta: effect of alpha-1 adrenergic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Uc, M.; Hong, E.; Garcia-Sainz, J.A.

    1982-07-01

    Activation of rabbit aortic strips with alpha adrenergic agonists increased the labeling (with (/sup 32/P)Pi) of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid and contracted the vascular preparations in dose-related fashion. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and methoxamine produced maximal effects, whereas clonidine behaved as partial agonist and B-HT 933 (2-amino-6-ethyl-4,5,7,8-tetrahydro-6H-oxazole-(5,4-d) azepin dihydrochloride) was almost without activity in the two experimental models used. Phenylephrine was a full agonist in producing contraction, but failed to elicit the maximal increase in PI labeling. The EC50 values to produce contraction of aortic strips were lower for all agonists than those required to increase the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into PI, but there was a good correlation between the two sets of data. The increased PI labeling and contraction of aortic strips induced by epinephrine were antagonized by prazosin and yohimbine in dose-related fashion, but the first alpha blocker was about three orders of magnitude more potent than the second in antagonizing the two effects. The present results indicate that both stimulation of PI labeling and contraction are mediated through activation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors in rabbit aorta.

  4. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  5. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na+ current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na+-dependent Ca2+ overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca2+ calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  6. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-12-10

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine.

  7. Expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptors in rat prefrontal cortex: cellular co-localization with 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Santana, Noemí; Mengod, Guadalupe; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in behavioural control and cognitive processes that are altered in schizophrenia. The brainstem monoaminergic systems control PFC function, yet the cells/networks involved are not fully known. Serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) increase PFC neuronal activity through the activation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (α(1)ARs) and 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)Rs), respectively. Neurochemical and behavioural interactions between these receptors have been reported. Further, classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs share nm in vitro affinity for α(1)ARs while having preferential affinity for D(2) and 5-HT(2A)Rs, respectively. Using double in situ hybridization we examined the cellular expression of α(1)ARs in pyramidal (vGluT1-positive) and GABAergic (GAD(65/67)-positive) neurons in rat PFC and their co-localization with 5-HT(2A)Rs. α(1)ARs are expressed by a high proportion of pyramidal (59-85%) and GABAergic (52-79%) neurons. The expression in pyramidal neurons exhibited a dorsoventral gradient, with a lower percentage of α(1)AR-positive neurons in infralimbic cortex compared to anterior cingulate and prelimbic cortex. The expression of α(1A), α(1B) and α(1D) adrenergic receptors was segregated in different layers and subdivisions. In all them there is a high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs (∼80%). These observations indicate that NE controls the activity of most PFC pyramidal neurons via α(1)ARs, either directly or indirectly, via GABAergic interneurons. Antipsychotic drugs can thus modulate the activity of PFC via α(1)AR blockade. The high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs indicates a convergence of excitatory serotonergic and noradrenergic inputs onto the same neuronal populations. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics may exert a more powerful control of PFC function through the simultaneous blockade of α(1)ARs and 5-HT(2A)Rs.

  8. Women at altitude: short-term exposure to hypoxia and/or alpha(1)-adrenergic blockade reduces insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braun, B; Rock, P B; Zamudio, S; Wolfel, G E; Mazzeo, R S; Muza, S R; Fulco, C S; Moore, L G; Butterfield, G E

    2001-08-01

    After short-term exposure to high altitude (HA), men appear to be less sensitive to insulin than at sea level (SL). We hypothesized that the same would be true in women, that reduced insulin sensitivity would be directly related to the rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations at altitude, and that the addition of alpha-adrenergic blockade would potentiate the reduction. To test the hypotheses, 12 women consumed a high-carbohydrate meal at SL and after 16 h at simulated 4,300-m elevation (HA). Subjects were studied twice at each elevation: once with prazosin (Prz), an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist, and once with placebo (Pla). Mathematical models were used to assess insulin resistance based on fasting [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and postprandial [composite model insulin sensitivity index (C-ISI)] glucose and insulin concentrations. Relative to SL-Pla (HOMA-IR: 1.86 +/- 0.35), insulin resistance was greater in HA-Pla (3.00 +/- 0.45; P < 0.05), SL-Prz (3.46 +/- 0.51; P < 0.01), and HA-Prz (2.82 +/- 0.43; P < 0.05). Insulin sensitivity was reduced in HA-Pla (C-ISI: 4.41 +/- 1.03; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (5.73 +/- 1.01; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (4.18 +/- 0.99; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (8.02 +/- 0.92). Plasma epinephrine was significantly elevated in HA-Pla (0.57 +/- 0.08 ng/ml; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (0.42 +/- 0.07; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (0.82 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (0.28 +/- 0.04), but correlations with HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta-cell function, and C-ISI were weak. In women, short-term exposure to simulated HA reduced insulin sensitivity compared with SL. The change does not appear to be directly mediated by a concurrent rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations.

  9. Mapping of a functional autoimmune epitope on the beta 1-adrenergic receptor in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Y; Marullo, S; Hoyer, S; Waagstein, F; Andersson, B; Vahlne, A; Guillet, J G; Strosberg, A D; Hjalmarson, A; Hoebeke, J

    1990-01-01

    The presence and properties of serum autoantibodies against beta-adrenergic receptors in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were studied using synthetic peptides derived from the predicted sequences of the human beta-adrenergic receptors. Peptides corresponding to the sequences of the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors were used as antigens in an enzyme immunoassay to screen sera from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 42), ischemic heart disease (n = 17), or healthy blood donors (n = 34). The sera of thirteen dilated cardiomyopathy patients, none of the ischemic heart disease patients, and four of the healthy controls monospecifically recognized the beta 1-peptide. Only affinity-purified antibodies of these patients had a inhibitory effect on radioligand binding to the beta 1 receptor of C6 rat glioma cells. They recognized the receptor protein by immunoblot and bound in situ to human myocardial tissue. We conclude that a subgroup of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy have in their sera autoantibodies specifically directed against the second extracellular loop of the beta 1-adrenergic receptor. These antibodies could serve as a marker of an autoimmune response with physiological and/or pathological implications. Images PMID:1700798

  10. The Polymorphisms of Ser49Gly and Gly389Arg in Beta-1-Adrenergic Receptor Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    KOKUT, Süleyman; ATAY, İnci Meltem; UZ, Efkan; AKPINAR, Abdullah; DEMİRDAŞ, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It was reported that the genetic susceptibility of major depressive disorder (MDD) is related with genetic polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the genotype and allele frequencies of Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms in MDD by comparing them with healthy subjects. Methods A total of 144 patients with MDD diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 105 healthy controls were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for genotyping. Results Of the 144 participants in the MDD group, 77 (53.5%) had homozygous wild type (AA), 57 (39.6%) had heterozygous type (AG), and 10 (6.9%) had mutant (GG) genotype for Ser49Gly, whereas 75 (52.1%) had homozygous wild type (GG), 59 (41.0%) had heterozygous (GC) type, and 10 (6.9%) had mutant homozygous (CC) genotype for Gly386Arg. There were no significant difference in the allele and genotype frequencies of the beta-1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) gene for Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms after comparing with healthy controls (p=0.626; p=0.863 and p=0.625; p=0.914). Conclusion The results of our study did not reveal a major effect of the polymorphism of Ser49Gly and Gly389Arg in the ADRB1 gene in MDD. Further studies with larger sample size are required to elucidate the role of other beta-1 adrenergic gene polymorphisms in MDD. PMID:28360691

  11. Muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic mechanisms contribute to the spinal mediation of stimulation-induced antinociception from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dias, Quintino M; Crespilho, Simone F; Silveira, João Walter S; Prado, Wiliam A

    2009-05-01

    The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) injection of antagonists of acetylcholine, noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, opioids and GABA on stimulation-produced antinociception (SPA) from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) of rats were studied using the tail-flick test. The electrical stimulation of the PPTg produced a strong and long-lasting increase in tail-flick latency. The intensity and duration of the effect were significantly reduced in rats pretreated with i.p. or i.t. atropine (a non-selective muscarinic cholinergic antagonist), or i.t. phenoxybenzamine or WB 4101 (non-selective and selective alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonists, respectively). Intraperitoneal phenoxybenzamine, i.p. or i.t. methysergide or naloxone (non-selective serotonin and opioid antagonists, respectively), or i.t. idazoxan (a selective alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist) only reduced the duration of the effect. The duration of SPA from the PPTg was increased by i.t. phaclofen (a GABA(B) antagonist). The effect from the nucleus was not altered following i.t. bicuculline (a GABA(A) antagonist), or i.p. or i.t. mecamylamine, propranolol or haloperidol (non-selective nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists, respectively). Thus, SPA from the PPTg involves the spinal activation of muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic but not nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms. Serotonergic, endogenous opioid and alpha(2)-adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the duration but not in the intensity of the effect.

  12. Effect of alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist prazosin on behavioral alterations induced by MK-801 in a spatial memory task in Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Stuchlík, A; Petrásek, T; Vales, K

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders are current topics in behavioral neuroscience. Application of non-competitive antagonists of NMDA receptors (such as MK-801) was proposed as a model of schizophrenia, as it leads to specific behavioral alterations, which are partly analogous to human psychotic symptoms. This study examined an animal model of schizophrenia induced by a systemic application of MK-801 (0.15 and 0.20 mg/kg) into rats tested in the active allothetic place avoidance (AAPA) task. Previous studies suggested that MK-801 may interact in vivo with other neurotransmitter systems, including noradrenergic system. Our experiments therefore evaluated the hypothesis that both locomotor stimulation and deficit in avoidance behavior in AAPA task induced by this drug would be reversible by application of alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (1 and 2 mg/kg). The results showed that both doses of prazosin partially reversed hyperlocomotion induced by higher doses of MK-801 and an avoidance deficit measured as number of entrances into the shock sector. Interestingly, no effect of prazosin on the MK-801-induced decrease of maximum time between two entrances (another measure of cognitive performance) was observed. These results support previous data showing that prazosin can compensate for the hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 and newly show that this partial reduction sustains even in the forced locomotor conditions, which are involved in the AAPA task. The study also shows that certain parameters of avoidance efficiency may be closely related to locomotor activity, whereas other measures of cognition may more selectively reflect cognitive changes.

  13. [Detection of Autoantibodies Against the 1-Adrenergic Receptor in the Sera of Patients via the Competitive cell-Based Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, A Y; Kostiukevich, M V; Efremov, E E; Vlasik, T N; Mironova, N A; Zykov, K A; Kashirina, N M; Kuznetsova, I B; Sharf, T V; Mamochkina, E N; Lipatova, L N; Peklo, M M; Rutkevich, P N; Yanushevskaya, E V; Rybalkin, I N; Stukalova, O V; Malkina, T A; Belyaeva, M M; Kuznetsova, T V; Tkachev, G A; Zinchenko, L V; Gupalo, E M; Agapova, O Y; Yureneva-Tkhorzhevskaya, T V; Rvacheva, A V; Sidorova, M V; Sadgyan, A S; Tereshchenko, S N; Golitsyn, S P

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the level of anti-1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease and with presence of cardiovascular pathology in comparison with a group of healthy volunteers. The study included 44 patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease ("idiopathic"), 34 patients with diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) of inflammatory origin, 35 patients with coronary heart disease and ventricular arrhythmias, 12patients with coronary heart disease with no ventricular arrhythmias, and 19 healthy volunteers (control group). The level of autoantibodies against the 1-adrenergic receptor was determined by the developed competitive cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the standard ELISA using peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the 1-adrenergic receptor. Elevated level of autoantibodies detected by a competitive cell-based ELISA was observed in 62% of patients with DCM compared to 21% of healthy volunteers (p=0.0006). In patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias, the level of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies was lower than in healthy subjects (p=0.003). Coronary heart disease patients with or without ventricular arrhythmias exhibited no differences from the control group. The number of significantly positive signals in peptide-based ELISA did not exceed 10% in any of the groups. No correlation between the data from competitive cell-based ELISA and peptide-based ELISA was found. This study demonstrated that competitive cell-based ELISA technique can be applied for detection of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies. The results in DCM patients generally correspond to the expected. Decreased level of autoantibodies in patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias indicates that this disease is related to changes in the immune system. Such relation is not observed in the case of coronary heart disease

  14. The role of α1-adrenergic receptors in regulating metabolism: increased glucose tolerance, leptin secretion and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Papay, Robert S; Perez, Dianne M

    2017-04-01

    The role of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) and their subtypes in metabolism is not well known. Most previous studies were performed before the advent of transgenic mouse models and utilized transformed cell lines and poorly selective antagonists. We have now studied the metabolic regulation of the α1A- and α1B-AR subtypes in vivo using knock-out (KO) and transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant (CAM) form of the receptor, assessing subtype-selective functions. CAM mice increased glucose tolerance while KO mice display impaired glucose tolerance. CAM mice increased while KO decreased glucose uptake into white fat tissue and skeletal muscle with the CAM α1A-AR showing selective glucose uptake into the heart. Using indirect calorimetry, both CAM mice demonstrated increased whole body fatty acid oxidation, while KO mice preferentially oxidized carbohydrate. CAM α1A-AR mice displayed significantly decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and glucose levels while α1A-AR KO displayed increased levels of triglycerides and glucose. Both CAM mice displayed increased plasma levels of leptin while KO mice decreased leptin levels. Most metabolic effects were more efficacious with the α1A-AR subtype. Our results suggest that stimulation of α1-ARs results in a favorable metabolic profile of increased glucose tolerance, cardiac glucose uptake, leptin secretion and increased whole body lipid metabolism that may contribute to its previously recognized cardioprotective and neuroprotective benefits.

  15. Downregulation of β1 -adrenergic receptors in rat C6 glioblastoma cells by hyperforin and hyperoside from St John's wort.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Daniel; Hage-Hülsmann, Anne; Prenner, Lars; Kolb, Christiane; Weiser, Dieter; Häberlein, Hanns

    2013-06-01

    While the use of St John's wort extracts as treatment for mild to moderate depression is well established the mode of action is still under investigation. Individual constituents of St John's wort extract were tested for possible effects on the β1 AR density and a subsequent change in downstream signalling in rat C6 glioblastoma cells. The effect of compounds from St John's wort extract on the downregulation of β1 -adrenergic receptor-GFP fusion proteins (β1 AR-green fluorescent protein (GFP)) of transfected rat C6 gliobastoma cells (C6-β1 AR-GFP) was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The influence on the lateral mobility of β1 AR-GFP in C6-β1 AR-GFP was investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The formation of second messenger was determined by c-AMP-assay. Confocal LSM revealed that pretreatment of cells with 1 μm of hyperforin and hyperoside for 6 days, respectively, led to an internalization of β1 AR-GFP under non-stimulating conditions. Observation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed two diffusion time constants for control cells, with τdiff1  = 0.78 ± 0.18 ms and τdiff2  = 122.53 ± 69.41 ms, similarly distributed. Pretreatment with 1 μm hyperforin or 1 μm hyperoside for 3 days did not alter the τdiff values but decreased the fraction of τdiff1 whereas the fraction of τdiff2 increased significantly. An elevated level of β1 AR-GFP with hindered lateral mobility was in line with β1 AR-GFP internalization induced by hyperforin and hyperoside, respectively. A reduced β1 -adrenergic responsiveness was assumed for C6 gliobastoma cells after pretreatment for 6 days with 1 μm of both hyperforin and hyperoside, which was confirmed by decreased cAMP formation of about 10% and 5% under non-stimulating conditions. Decrease in cAMP formation by 23% for hyperforin and 15% for hyperoside was more pronounced after stimulation with 10 μm dobutamine for 30 min. The

  16. Effect of {beta}{sub 1} adrenergic receptor blockade on myocardial blood flow and vasodilatory capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Boettcher, M.; Czernin, J.; Sun, K.

    1997-03-01

    The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade reduces cardiac work and may thereby lower myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest. The effect of {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on hyperemic MBF is unknown. To evaluate the effect of selective {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on MBF at rest and during dipyridamole induced hyperemia, 10 healthy volunteers (8 men, 2 women, mean age 24 {+-} 5 yr) were studied using {sup 13}N-ammonia PET (two-compartment model) under control conditions and again during metoprolol (50 mg orally 12 hr and 1 hr before the study). The resting rate pressure product (6628 {+-} 504 versus 5225 {+-} 807) and heart rate (63 {+-} 6-54 {plus_minus} 5 bpm) declined during metoprolol (p < 0.05). Similarly, heart rate and rate pressure product declined from the baseline dipyridamole study to dipyridamole plus metoprolol (p < 0.05). Resting MBF declined in proportion to cardiac work by approximately 20% from 0.61 {+-} 0.09-0.51 {+-} 0.10 ml/g/min (p < 0.05). In contrast, hyperemic MBF increased when metoprolol was added to dipyridamole (1.86 {plus_minus} 0.27 {+-} 0.45 ml/g/min; p<0.05). The decrease in resting MBF together with the increase in hyperemic MBF resulted in a significant increase in the myocardial flow reserve during metoprolol (3.14 {+-} 0.80-4.61 {+-} 0.68; p<0.01). The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade increases coronary vasodilatory capacity and myocardial flow reserve. However, the mechanisms accounting for this finding remain uncertain. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Effect of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic stimulation on phosphoinositide metabolism and protein kinase C (PK-C) in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, T.; Lakatta, E.; Filburn, C.R.

    1986-03-01

    Alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic stimulation is known to enhance membrane phospholipid metabolism resulting in increases in inositol phosphates (IP's) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Cardiomyocytes prelabeled with /sup 3/H-myo-inositol were treated with norepinephrine (NE) for 1-15 min, acid extracted, and IP's separated by ion exchange chromatography. Addition of NE (10/sup -5/M) in the presence of propranolol (10/sup -5/ M) and LiCl (9 mM) enhanced the accumulation of IP's, linearly with time up to 15 min, and reached 7.3, and 1.5-fold at 15 min for IP/sub 1/, IP/sub 2/, and IP/sub 3/, respectively. KCl at 30 mM had no effect on accumulation of IP's, but augmented the effect of NE. PK-C activity was measured in both cytosol (S) and particulate (P) fractions of treated cells. NE alone had a negligible effect on membrane PK-C, while 30 mM KCl caused a small increase. However, pretreatment with KCl followed by NE produced a significant increase above that seen with KCl alone. Dioctanoylglycerol also stimulated membrane association of PK-C in these cells. These data suggest that ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic stimulation of membrane association of myocardial PK-C is mediated by DAG but may be dependent on membrane potential and/or the extent of Ca/sup 2 +/ loading.

  18. Activating autoantibodies to the beta-1 adrenergic and m2 muscarinic receptors facilitate atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Yu, Xichun; Patterson, Eugene; Huang, Shijun; Hamlett, Sean R; Chalmers, Laura; Pappy, Reji; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Morshed, Syed A; Davies, Terry F; Lazzara, Ralph; Kem, David C

    2009-09-29

    We studied activating autoantibodies to beta-1 adrenergic receptors (AAbeta1AR) and activating autoantibodies to M2 muscarinic receptors (AAM2R) in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Graves' hyperthyroidism. Atrial fibrillation frequently complicates hyperthyroidism. Both AAbeta1AR and AAM2R have been described in some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and AF. We hypothesized that their copresence would facilitate AF in autoimmune Graves' hyperthyroidism. Immunoglobulin G purified from 38 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism with AF (n=17) or sinus rhythm (n=21) and 10 healthy control subjects was tested for its effects on isolated canine Purkinje fiber contractility with and without atropine and nadolol. Immunoglobulin G electrophysiologic effects were studied using intracellular recordings from isolated canine pulmonary veins. Potential cross-reactivity of AAbeta1AR and AAM2R with stimulating thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies was evaluated before and after adsorption to Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human TSHRs using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The frequency of AAbeta1AR and/or AAM2R differed significantly between patients with AF and sinus rhythm (AAbeta1AR=94% vs. 38%, p<0.001; AAM2R=88% vs. 19%, p<0.001; and AAbeta1AR+AAM2R=82% vs. 10%, p<0.001). The copresence of AAbeta1AR and AAM2R was the strongest predictor of AF (odds ratio: 33.61, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 964.11, p=0.04). Immunoglobulin G from autoantibody-positive patients induced hyperpolarization, decreased action potential duration, enhanced early afterdepolarization formation, and facilitated triggered firing in pulmonary veins by local autonomic nerve stimulation. Immunoadsorption studies showed that AAbeta1AR and AAM2R were immunologically distinct from TSHR antibodies. When present in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism, AAbeta1AR and AAM2R facilitate development of AF.

  19. SYNAPTIC TRANSLATION OF STRIATAL-ENRICHED TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE (STEP) AFTER β1-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaer; Zhang, Yang; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The β-adrenergic system is implicated in long-term synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, a process that requires protein synthesis. To identify proteins that are translated in response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation and the pathways that regulate this process, we investigated the effects of isoproterenol on the translation of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in both cortico-striatal slices and primary neuronal cultures. Isoproterenol stimulation induced a rapid dose-dependent increase in STEP expression. Anisomycin blocked the increase in STEP expression while actinomycin D had no effect, suggesting a translation-dependent mechanism. Isoproterenol-induced STEP translation required activation of β1 receptors. Application of the MEK inhibitor SL327 blocked both isoproterenol-induced activation of pERK and subsequent STEP translation. Inhibitors of PI3K (LY294002) or mTOR (rapamycin) also completely blocked STEP translation. These results suggest that co-activation of both the ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways are required for STEP translation. As the substrates of STEP include ERK itself, these results suggest that STEP is translated upon β-adrenergic activation as part of a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:17623046

  20. Targeted disruption of the mouse beta1-adrenergic receptor gene: developmental and cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, D K; Desai, K H; Jasper, J R; Stevens, M E; Regula, D P; Barsh, G S; Bernstein, D; Kobilka, B K

    1996-01-01

    At least three distinct beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) subtypes exist in mammals. These receptors modulate a wide variety of processes, from development and behavior, to cardiac function, metabolism, and smooth muscle tone. To understand the roles that individual beta-AR subtypes play in these processes, we have used the technique of gene targeting to create homozygous beta 1-AR null mutants (beta 1-AR -/-) in mice. The majority of beta 1-AR -/- mice die prenatally, and the penetrance of lethality shows strain dependence. Beta l-AR -/- mice that do survive to adulthood appear normal, but lack the chronotropic and inotropic responses seen in wild-type mice when beta-AR agonists such as isoproterenol are administered. Moreover, this lack of responsiveness is accompanied by markedly reduced stimulation of adenylate cyclase in cardiac membranes from beta 1-AR -/- mice. These findings occur despite persistent cardiac beta 2-AR expression, demonstrating the importance of beta 1-ARs for proper mouse development and cardiac function, while highlighting functional differences between beta-AR subtypes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8693001

  1. Functional supersensitivity of alpha 1-adrenergic system in spinal ventral horn is due to absence of an uptake system and not to postsynaptic change.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, T; Ono, H; Fukuda, H

    1991-01-25

    The excitatory effects of adrenoceptor agonists on ventral horn cells were compared using an extracellular recording technique in spinal cord slices isolated from non-treated and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats (intracisternally 14 days previously). In spinal cord slices isolated from 6-OHDA-treated rats, the concentration-response curves for the alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated facilitatory effects produced by noradrenaline and phenylephrine but not those produced by methoxamine and isoproterenol were shifted to the left. 6-OHDA pretreatment decreased the level and uptake of noradrenaline and increased the number of [3H]prazosin binding sites in the spinal cord. These results suggest that in 6-OHDA-induced denervation, functional supersensitivity of the alpha 1-adrenergic system in the spinal ventral horn is due to absence of an uptake system, and not to postsynaptic change.

  2. Activating autoantibodies to the beta1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors facilitate atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Yu, Xichun; Patterson, Eugene; Huang, Shijun; Hamlett, Sean R.; Chalmers, Laura; Pappy, Reji; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.; Lazzara, Ralph; Kem, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We studied activating autoantibodies to β1-adrenergic (AAβ1AR) and M2 muscarinic receptors (AAM2R) in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Background AF frequently complicates hyperthyroidism. AAβ1AR and AAM2R have been described in some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and AF. We hypothesized their co-presence would facilitate AF in autoimmune Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Methods IgG purified from 38 patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism with AF (n=17) or sinus rhythm (n=21) and 10 healthy controls was tested for its effects on isolated canine Purkinje fiber contractility with and without atropine and nadolol. IgG electrophysiologic effects were studied using intracellular recordings from isolated canine pulmonary veins. Potential cross-reactivity of AAβ1AR and AAM2R with stimulating thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies was evaluated before and after adsorption to CHO cells expressing human TSHRs using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results The frequency of AAβ1AR and/or AAM2R differed significantly between patients with AF and sinus rhythm (AAβ1AR = 94% vs. 38%, p<0.001; AAM2R = 88% vs. 19%, p<0.001; and AAβ1AR+AAM2R = 82% vs. 10%, p<0.001). The co-presence of AAβ1AR and AAM2R was the strongest predictor of AF (odds ratio 33.61, 95% CI 1.17 - 964.11, p=0.04). IgG from autoantibody-positive patients induced hyperpolarization, decreased action potential duration, enhanced early afterdepolarization formation and facilitated triggered firing in pulmonary veins by local autonomic nerve stimulation. Imunoadsorption studies demonstrated that AAβ1AR and AAM2R were immunologically distinct from TSHR antibodies. Conclusions AAβ1AR and AAM2R when present in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism facilitate development of AF. PMID:19778674

  3. Molecular mimicry between the immunodominant ribosomal protein P0 of Trypanosoma cruzi and a functional epitope on the human beta 1- adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Sera from chagasic patients possess antibodies recognizing the carboxy- terminal part of the ribosomal P0 protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor. Comparison of both peptides showed that they contain a pentapeptide with very high homology (AESEE in P0 and AESDE in the human beta 1- adrenergic receptor). Using a competitive immunoenzyme assay, recognition of the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop (H26R) was inhibited by both P0-14i (AAAESEEEDDDDDF) and P0-beta (AESEE). Concomitantly, recognition of P0-beta was inhibited with the H26R peptide. Recognition of P0 in Western blots was inhibited by P0- 14i, P0-beta, and H26R, but not by a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor or by an unrelated peptide. Autoantibodies affinity purified with the immobilized H26R peptide were shown to exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats. This effect was blocked by both the specific beta 1 blocker bisoprolol and the peptide P0-beta. These results unambiguously prove that T. cruzi is able to induce a functional autoimmune response against the cardiovascular human beta 1-adrenergic receptor through a molecular mimicry mechanism. PMID:7790824

  4. Molecular mimicry between the immunodominant ribosomal protein P0 of Trypanosoma cruzi and a functional epitope on the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, I; Levin, M J; Wallukat, G; Elies, R; Lebesgue, D; Chiale, P; Elizari, M; Rosenbaum, M; Hoebeke, J

    1995-07-01

    Sera from chagasic patients possess antibodies recognizing the carboxy-terminal part of the ribosomal P0 protein of Trypanosoma cruzi and the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor. Comparison of both peptides showed that they contain a pentapeptide with very high homology (AESEE in P0 and AESDE in the human beta 1-adrenergic receptor). Using a competitive immunoenzyme assay, recognition of the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop (H26R) was inhibited by both P0-14i (AAAESEEEDDDDDF) and P0-beta (AESEE). Concomitantly, recognition of P0-beta was inhibited with the H26R peptide. Recognition of P0 in Western blots was inhibited by P0-14i, P0-beta, and H26R, but not by a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor or by an unrelated peptide. Autoantibodies affinity purified with the immobilized H26R peptide were shown to exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats. This effect was blocked by both the specific beta 1 blocker bisoprolol and the peptide P0-beta. These results unambiguously prove that T. cruzi is able to induce a functional autoimmune response against the cardiovascular human beta 1-adrenergic receptor through a molecular mimicry mechanism.

  5. Betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Rudoy, C A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2007-06-30

    Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on beta-adrenergic receptor (beta(1) and beta(2)) expression in the amygdala. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, but not beta(2)-adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 h following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 h following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on beta(1)-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline. Furthermore

  6. DNA immunizations with M2 muscarinic and beta1 adrenergic receptor coding plasmids impair cardiac function in mice.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Luis E D; Hernández, Ciria C Q; Mattos, Elisabete C; Brandão, Izaira Tincani; Olivieri, Bianca; Campelo, Roberto P; Araújo-Jorge, Tânia; Silva, Célio Lopes; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2005-05-01

    Autoimmune mediated myocardial damage is likely to be a pathogenic mechanism for acquired dilated cardiomyopathies. Evidence confirms that autoantibodies that bind to M(2) muscarinic (M(2)AChR) and beta(1) adrenergic receptors (beta(1)AR) are present in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagasic patients' sera. To elucidate the role of these antibodies in cardiac functional impairment, we used a murine model immunized with plasmids encoding the M(2)AChR or beta(1)AR via gene-gun bombardment. Anti-M(2)AChR and beta(1)AR antibodies were detected over the course of 37 weeks. These antibodies were directed to the second extracellular loop (el2) of both receptors and the third intracellular loop (il3) of the M(2)AChR. Peak antibody titers from weeks 2 to 5 against M(2)AChR-el2 and beta(1)AR-el2 as well as elevated titers against M(2)AChR-il3 were detected. Anti-M(2)AChR-il3 and anti-beta(1)AR-el2 antibodies were predominant in IgG1 subclass immunoglobulins, suggesting a T-helper-2 biased lymphocyte response. Heart morphology and function was assessed by echocardiography over the course of 42 weeks. Data showed progressive decrease in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and LV mass that was mostly evident for beta(1)AR-immunized mice albeit a small change in LV dimensions. Fractional shortening was altered and values of 41%, 37% and 48% were observed at week 42 for the M(2)AChR, beta(1)AR and control groups respectively. In support of autonomic deregulation, a twofold increase in M(2)AChR and a similar decrease in beta(1)AR density were observed in radioligand saturation assays for both experimental groups. Histological analysis revealed myofibril disarray and fibrosis, pointing towards remodeling as a consequence of the long-term presence of anti-receptor antibodies.

  7. Effect of Alpha-1-Adrenergic Agonist, Midodrine for the Management of Long-Standing Neurogenic Shock in Patient with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taikwan

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 71-year-old male patient who had suffered from long-lasting neurogenic shock for 13 weeks after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by a bicycle accident. The neurogenic shock was resolved dramatically 2 weeks after the administration of alpha-1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine hydrochloride. In usual cases, neurogenic shock tends to improve between 2 and 6 weeks after SCI; however, in a few cases, the shock lasts for several months. In our case, spinal shock lasted for 13 weeks and exhibited very sensitive decline of blood pressure for even a slight decrease of dopamine despite recovered bulbospongiosus reflex. Three days after midodrine hydrochloride was added, hypotension improved dramatically. We discuss our rare case with pertinent literatures. PMID:27169082

  8. Ser49Gly of beta1-adrenergic receptor is associated with effective beta-blocker dose in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Yvonne; Levin, Malin C; Eggertsen, Robert; Nyström, Ernst; Mobini, Reza; Schaufelberger, Maria; Andersson, Bert

    2005-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms at codons 49 and 389 of the beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) on the response to beta-blockers and outcome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We genotyped both codons of the beta1-AR in 375 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 492 control subjects. Neither of the polymorphisms was associated with susceptibility for dilated cardiomyopathy. In a retrospective analysis of patients receiving beta-blockers, there was a significant association between long-term survival rate and codon 49 (P = .014) but not codon 389 (P = .08). Despite a similar mean heart rate (69 beats/min), patients with the Ser49 genotype tended to have higher doses of beta-blockade compared with Gly49 carriers (P = .065). In patients receiving a low dose of beta-blockade (< or = 50% of targeted full dose), the 5-year mortality rate was lower among Gly49 carriers than Ser49 patients (risk ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.80; P = .020). In patients receiving high doses of beta-blockers, there was no significant difference in outcome between genotypes (P = .20), which was attributable to a better outcome for Ser49 patients treated with a high dose of beta-blockade as compared with a low dose. Gly49 carriers had a similar survival rate with different doses of beta-blockers. With low-dose beta-blockers, both codon 49 (RR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.89; P = .029) and codon 389 (RR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.04-5.63, P = .039) were related to 5-year mortality rate. In patients with heart failure, the influence of codon 49 on the outcome and effect of beta-blockers appeared to be more pronounced than that of codon 389. The more common Ser49Ser genotype responded less beneficially to beta-blockade and would motivate genotyping to promote higher doses for the best outcome effect.

  9. Combining the α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist, Prazosin, with the β-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist, Propranolol, Reduces Alcohol Drinking More Effectively Than Either Drug Alone

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Dennis D; Beckwith, Lauren E; Kincaid, Carrie L; Froehlich, Janice C

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that activation of the noradrenergic system may contribute to alcohol drinking in animals and humans. Our previous studies demonstrated that blocking α1-adrenergic receptors with the antagonist, prazosin, decreased alcohol drinking in rats under various conditions. Since noradrenergic activation is also regulated by β-adrenergic receptors, we now examine the effects of the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol, alone or in combination with prazosin, on alcohol drinking in rats selectively bred for high voluntary alcohol intake and alcohol preference (P line). Methods Two studies were conducted with male P rats. In study one, rats were allowed to become alcohol-dependent during 14 weeks of ad libitum access to food, water and 20% alcohol and the effect of propranolol (5–15 mg/kg, IP) and prazosin (1–2 mg/kg, IP) on alcohol intake during withdrawal were assessed. In study two, the effect of propranolol (5 mg/kg, IP) and prazosin (2 mg/kg, IP) on alcohol intake following prolonged imposed abstinence was assessed. Results Alcohol drinking following propranolol treatment was variable, but the combination of propranolol + prazosin consistently suppressed alcohol drinking during both alcohol withdrawal and following prolonged imposed abstinence, and the combination of these two drugs was more effective than was treatment with either drug alone. Conclusions Treatment with prazosin + propranolol, or a combination of other centrally active α1- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists, may assist in preventing alcohol relapse in some individuals. PMID:24891220

  10. Dopamine acting at D1-like, D2-like and α1-adrenergic receptors differentially modulates theta and gamma oscillatory activity in primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Mazhar; Johnson, Nicholas W; Sehirli, Umit S; Woodhall, Gavin L; Stanford, Ian M

    2017-01-01

    The loss of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's is accompanied by the emergence of exaggerated theta and beta frequency neuronal oscillatory activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) and basal ganglia. DA replacement therapy or deep brain stimulation reduces the power of these oscillations and this is coincident with an improvement in motor performance implying a causal relationship. Here we provide in vitro evidence for the differential modulation of theta and gamma activity in M1 by DA acting at receptors exhibiting conventional and non-conventional DA pharmacology. Recording local field potentials in deep layer V of rat M1, co-application of carbachol (CCh, 5 μM) and kainic acid (KA, 150 nM) elicited simultaneous oscillations at a frequency of 6.49 ± 0.18 Hz (theta, n = 84) and 34.97 ± 0.39 Hz (gamma, n = 84). Bath application of DA resulted in a decrease in gamma power with no change in theta power. However, application of either the D1-like receptor agonist SKF38393 or the D2-like agonist quinpirole increased the power of both theta and gamma suggesting that the DA-mediated inhibition of oscillatory power is by action at other sites other than classical DA receptors. Application of amphetamine, which promotes endogenous amine neurotransmitter release, or the adrenergic α1-selective agonist phenylephrine mimicked the action of DA and reduced gamma power, a result unaffected by prior co-application of D1 and D2 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and sulpiride. Finally, application of the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin blocked the action of DA on gamma power suggestive of interaction between α1 and DA receptors. These results show that DA mediates complex actions acting at dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors, α1 adrenergic receptors and possibly DA/α1 heteromultimeric receptors to differentially modulate theta and gamma activity in M1.

  11. The α1 Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Reduces Heroin Self-Administration in Rats with Extended Access to Heroin Administration

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell, Thomas N.; Walker, Brendan M.; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration in dependent rats. Prazosin, an α1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). The data show that the α1-adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended drug access, while also stimulating their food intake by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. PMID:18703080

  12. Betaxolol, a selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rudoy, C.A.; Van Bockstaele, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on β-adrenergic receptor (β1 and β2) expression in the amygdala. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that β1–adrenergic receptor, but not β2–adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective β1–adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 hours following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 hours following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on β1-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Results Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline

  13. The role of nitric oxide synthase in reduced vasocontractile responsiveness induced by prolonged α1-adrenergic receptor stimulation in rat thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Gürdal, Hakan; Can, Alp; Uğur, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (6–12 h) of rat aorta to alpha1-adrenergic receptor (α1AR) agonist phenylephrine (Phe) leads to a decrease in α1AR-mediated vasoconstriction. This reduced responsiveness to α1AR stimulation was strongly dependent on the intactness of the endothelium. We examined the effect of Phe on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring the conversion of [3H]L-arginine to [3H]L-citrulline in rat aorta or in endothelial cells isolated from rat aorta. Phe stimulation increased NOS activity in control aortas. This response was antagonized by prazosin. However, Phe increased neither the activity of NOS nor intracellular Ca2+ in the isolated endothelial cells from the control aortas, whereas acetylcholine (Ach) was able to stimulate both responses in these cells. This result suggests that Phe stimulates α1AR on vascular smooth muscle cells and has an indirect influence on endothelial cells to increase NOS activity. In Phe-exposed aortic rings, basal NOS activity was found to have increased compared to vehicle-exposed control rings. Stimulation with Phe or Ach caused a small increase over basal NOS activity in these preparations. Prolonged exposure to Phe also caused an enhancement of Ach-mediated vasorelaxation in rat aorta. Immunoblot and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction experiments showed that prolonged exposure of rat aorta to Phe resulted in an increased expression of eNOS, but not iNOS. This increase was antagonized by nonselective antagonist prazosin. Immunohistochemical staining experiments also showed that expression of eNOS increased in endothelial cells after Phe exposure of the aortas. These results, all together, showed that prolonged exposure of rat aorta to α1AR agonist Phe enhanced the expression of eNOS and basal NOS activity, which probably causes a decreased vasocontractile response to Phe or to other agonists such as 5HT (5-hydroxytryptamine) in rat aorta. This phenomenon can be considered more as a functional

  14. Changes in myocardial beta1-adrenergic receptor and stimulatory G-protein gene expression after chronic treatment with doxorubicin in rat.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Keiichiro; Akatsuka, Keiko; Momozaki, Masami; Fujimori, Yuuki; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Temma, Kyosuke; Hara, Yukio

    2004-08-01

    The gene expression of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR) and stimulatory G-protein Gsalpha in ventricle after chronic treatment with doxorubicin (DOX) in rat was investigated. The rats were treated with DOX in a dose of 2.5 mg/kg once a week for 5 weeks, the cumulative dose being 12.5 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last injection, the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol was noticeably decreased in left atrial muscle preparations isolated from DOX-treated rats. Northern blot hybridization showed that the mRNA transcripts of beta(1)AR and Gsalpha, important signal transduction elements for regulating heart rate and contractility, were significantly decreased in the ventricle of DOX-treated rats. Thus, chronic treatment with DOX decreases the gene expression levels of myocardial beta(1)AR and Gsalpha.

  15. Decreased Autophagy in Rat Heart Induced by Anti-β1-Adrenergic Receptor Autoantibodies Contributes to the Decline in Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihu; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ke; Wang, Jin; Yan, Zi; Zhang, Suli; Du, Yunhui; Liu, Huirong

    2013-01-01

    It has been recognized that changes in mitochondrial structure plays a key role in development of cardiac dysfunction, and autophagy has been shown to exert maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis effects. Our previous study found that anti-β1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies (β1-AABs) could lead to cardiac dysfunction along with abnormalities in mitochondrial structure. The present study tested the hypothesis that β1-AABs may induce the decline in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by suppression of cardiac autophagy, which contributed to cardiac dysfunction. Male adult rats were randomized to receive a vehicle or peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the β1 adrenergic receptor (β1-AAB group, 0.4 μg/g every two weeks for 12 weeks) and treated with rapamycin (RAPA, an autophagy agonist) at 5 mg/kg/day for two days before detection. At the 4th week, 8th week and 12th week of active immunization, the rats were sacrificed and cardiac function and the levels of cardiac LC3 and Beclin-1 were detected. ΔΨm in cardiac myocytes was determined by myocardial radionuclide imaging technology and JC-1 staining. In the present study, β1-AABs caused cardiac dysfunction, reduced ΔΨm and decreased cardiac autophagy. Treatment with RAPA markedly attenuated β1-AABs-induced cardiac injury evidenced by recovered ΔΨm. Taken together, these results suggested that β1-AABs exerted significant decreased ΔΨm, which may contribute to cardiac dysfunction, most likely by decreasing cardiac autophagy in vivo. Moreover, myocardial radionuclide imaging technology may be needed to assess the risk in developing cardiac dysfunction for the people who have β1-AABs in their blood. PMID:24278413

  16. SAP97 Controls the Trafficking and Resensitization of the Beta-1-Adrenergic Receptor through Its PDZ2 and I3 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Mohammed M.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Kim, Sung-Jin; Xiang, Yang K.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have determined that the type-1 PDZ sequence at the extreme carboxy-terminus of the ß1-adrenergic receptor (ß1-AR) binds SAP97 and AKAP79 to organize a scaffold involved in trafficking of the ß1-AR. In this study we focused on characterizing the domains in SAP97 that were involved in recycling and resensitization of the ß1-AR in HEK-293 cells. Using a SAP97 knockdown and rescue strategy, we determined that PDZ-deletion mutants of SAP97 containing PDZ2 rescued the recycling and resensitization of the ß1-AR. Among the three PDZs of SAP97, PDZ2 displayed the highest affinity in binding to the ß1-AR. Expression of isolated PDZ2, but not the other PDZs, inhibited the recycling of the ß1-AR by destabilizing the macromolecular complex involved in trafficking and functional resensitization of the ß1-AR. In addition to its PDZs, SAP97 contains other protein interacting domains, such as the I3 sequence in the SRC homology-3 (SH3) domain, which binds to AKAP79. Deletion of I3 from SAP97 (ΔI3-SAP97) did not affect the binding of SAP97 to the ß1-AR. However, ΔI3-SAP97 could not rescue the recycling of the ß1-AR because it failed to incorporate AKAP79/PKA into the SAP97-ß1-AR complex. Therefore, bipartite binding of SAP97 to the ß1-AR and to AKAP79 is necessary for SAP97-mediated effects on recycling, externalization and functional resensitization of the ß1-AR. These data establish a prominent role for PDZ2 and I3 domains of SAP97 in organizing the ß1-adrenergic receptosome involved in connecting the ß1-AR to trafficking and signaling networks. PMID:23696820

  17. Effects of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, on cardiovascular functions in anaesthetised dogs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Ahuja, V M; Fahim, M

    2004-12-01

    Initially a dose-response curve of phenylephrine was constructed at dose strengths of 1-16 microg/kg in a cumulative manner. Phenylephrine caused a significant rise in the mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular contractility, stroke volume and a significant decline in the heart rate. Terazosin was administered in three selected doses of 10, 100 and 300 microg/kg. Following each dose of terazosin, dose-response curve of phenylephrine was constructed. Terazosin, per se, decreased the basal mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular contractility and stroke volume significantly in a dose dependent manner with an increase in the heart rate with no significant change in the cardiac output. The baroreflex sensitivity at all the three doses remained unchanged. In conclusion, the present findings support the view that terazosin reduces the blood pressure in a physiologically more favorable manner by maintaining the neural integrity of the cardiovascular system.

  18. Coexistence of alpha1 and beta adrenergic receptors in the liver of the frog Rana esculenta, the toad Bufo bufo, the lizard Podarcis sicula campestris, and the turtle Pseudemys picta elegans.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, E; Barbin, L; Capuzzo, A

    1997-09-01

    In mammals and birds the characteristics of alpha1 adrenergic receptors and their biological role in liver metabolism have been clearly described, although the predominance of receptor subtypes varies with species. In contrast, the actual presence of hepatic alpha1 adrenergic receptors in fish, amphibians, and reptiles has been questioned. Only recently has their existence been demonstrated in some fish species and also in the wood frog Rana sylvatica. The present study assessed the presence of alpha1 adrenergic binding sites on hepatic membranes of frogs, toads, lizards, and turtles using the specific alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist [3H]prazosin; for comparison, the binding of the specific beta adrenergic receptor antagonist [3H]CGP-12177A was evaluated in the same preparations. alpha1 Adrenergic receptors are indeed present in the liver of the ectotherms examined. Specific binding is saturable, reversible, and linear as a function of tissue concentration. The binding data indicated the presence of two classes of binding sites displaying high and low affinities with Kds in the nanomolar and micromolar ranges, respectively. The present study provides the first evidence for the presence of alpha1 adrenergic receptors in the liver of toad, lizard, and turtle while confirming their existence in another species of frog, Rana esculenta.

  19. Discovery of novel brain permeable and G protein-biased beta-1 adrenergic receptor partial agonists for the treatment of neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bitna; Jahangir, Alam; Evans, Andrew K; Briggs, Denise; Ravina, Kristine; Ernest, Jacqueline; Farimani, Amir B; Sun, Wenchao; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Green, Michael; Feinberg, Evan N; Pande, Vijay S; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    The beta-1 adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) is a promising therapeutic target intrinsically involved in the cognitive deficits and pathological features associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence indicates that ADRB1 plays an important role in regulating neuroinflammatory processes, and activation of ADRB1 may produce neuroprotective effects in neuroinflammatory diseases. Novel small molecule modulators of ADRB1, engineered to be highly brain permeable and functionally selective for the G protein with partial agonistic activity, could have tremendous value both as pharmacological tools and potential lead molecules for further preclinical development. The present study describes our ongoing efforts toward the discovery of functionally selective partial agonists of ADRB1 that have potential therapeutic value for AD and neuroinflammatory disorders, which has led to the identification of the molecule STD-101-D1. As a functionally selective agonist of ADRB1, STD-101-D1 produces partial agonistic activity on G protein signaling with an EC50 value in the low nanomolar range, but engages very little beta-arrestin recruitment compared to the unbiased agonist isoproterenol. STD-101-D1 also inhibits the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in vitro and in vivo, and shows high brain penetration. Other than the therapeutic role, this newly identified, functionally selective, partial agonist of ADRB1 is an invaluable research tool to study mechanisms of G protein-coupled receptor signal transduction.

  20. cap alpha. -2 adrenergic receptor: a radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Unnerstall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    ..cap alpha..-2 adrenergic agents have been shown to influence blood pressure, heart rate and other physiological and behavioral functions through interactions with adrenergic pathways within the central nervous system. Pharmacologically relevant ..cap alpha..-1 adrenergic receptors were biochemically characterized and radiohistochemically analyzed in intact tissue sections of the rat and human central nervous system. The anatomical distribution of the ..cap alpha..-2 receptors, labeled with the agonist (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine, verified the concept that ..cap alpha..-2 receptors are closely associated with adrenergic nerve terminals and that ..cap alpha..-2 agents can influence autonomic and endocrine function through an action in the central nervous system. Since ..cap alpha..-2 agonists can influence sympathetic outflow, ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites were closely analyzed in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracic spinal cord. The transport of putative presynaptic ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites in the rat sciatic nerve was analyzed by light microscopic radiohistochemical techniques. Finally, in intact tissue section of the rat central nervous system, the biochemical characteristics of (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine binding were analyzed. Data were also shown which indicates that the synthetic ..cap alpha..-2 antagonist (/sup 3/H)RX781094 also binds to ..cap alpha..-2 receptors with high-affinity. Further, the distribution of (/sup 3/H)RX781094 binding sites in the rat central nervous system was identical to the distribution seen when using (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine.

  1. Excitatory drive onto dopaminergic neurons in the rostral linear nucleus is enhanced by norepinephrine in an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Williams, Megan A; Li, Chia; Kash, Thomas L; Matthews, Robert T; Winder, Danny G

    2014-11-01

    Dopaminergic innervation of the extended amygdala regulates anxiety-like behavior and stress responsivity. A portion of this dopamine input arises from dopamine neurons located in the ventral lateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and rostral (RLi) and caudal linear nuclei of the raphe (CLi). These neurons receive substantial norepinephrine input, which may prime them for involvement in stress responses. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, we explored the physiology and responsiveness to norepinephrine of these neurons. We find that RLi dopamine neurons differ from VTA dopamine neurons with respect to membrane resistance, capacitance and the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih. Further, we found that norepinephrine increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) on RLi dopamine neurons. This effect was mediated through the α1 adrenergic receptor (AR), as the actions of norepinephrine were mimicked by the α1-AR agonist methoxamine and blocked by the α1-AR antagonist prazosin. This action of norepinephrine on sEPSCs was transient, as it did not persist in the presence of prazosin. Methoxamine also increased the frequency of miniature EPSCs, indicating that the α1-AR action on glutamatergic transmission likely has a presynaptic mechanism. There was also a modest decrease in sEPSC frequency with the application of the α2-AR agonist UK-14,304. These studies illustrate a potential mechanism through which norepinephrine could recruit the activity of this population of dopaminergic neurons.

  2. Discovery of the First Environment-Sensitive Near-Infrared (NIR) Fluorogenic Ligand for α1-Adrenergic Receptors Imaging in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao; Lin, Yuxing; Cheng, Yanna; Wu, Wenxiao; Cai, Rong; Chen, Shouzhen; Shi, Benkang; Han, Bo; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-03-10

    Fluorescent ligands are gaining popularity as tools to aid GPCR research. Nonetheless, in vivo application of such tools is hampered due to their short excitation wavelengths in the visible range and lack of fluorogenic switch. Here we report the discovery of fluorescent ligands (3a-f) for α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) by conjugating the environment-sensitive fluorophore cyane 5 (Cy5) with the quinazoline pharmacophore. Among them, the conjugated compound 3a, with acylated piperazine and the shortest carbon chain spacer, exhibited potent binding and remarkable changes in fluorescence (10-fold) upon binding to α1-AR. Furthermore, it could be employed to selectively and specifically label α1-ARs with no washing procedures in single cells, prostate tissue slices, intact tumor xenografts and organs in living mice. Especially, the slice imaging results gave direct and visual evidence that there is a close relationship between α1-ARs and pathological prostate. It is anticipated that our fluorescent tools will find broad applications in the study of α1-AR pharmacology and physiology to aid development of novel therapeutics.

  3. 3D Structure Prediction of Human β1-Adrenergic Receptor via Threading-Based Homology Modeling for Implications in Structure-Based Drug Designing

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein. PMID:25860348

  4. 3D structure prediction of human β1-adrenergic receptor via threading-based homology modeling for implications in structure-based drug designing.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein.

  5. Real-time optical recording of β1-adrenergic receptor activation reveals supersensitivity of the Arg389 variant to carvedilol

    PubMed Central

    Rochais, Francesca; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J.; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Antagonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) have become a main therapeutic regimen for the treatment of heart failure even though the mechanisms of their beneficial effects are still poorly understood. Here, we used fluorescent resonance energy transfer–based (FRET-based) approaches to directly monitor activation of the β1-AR and downstream signaling. While the commonly used β-AR antagonists metoprolol, bisoprolol, and carvedilol displayed varying degrees of inverse agonism on the Gly389 variant of the receptor (i.e., actively switching off the β1-AR), surprisingly, only carvedilol showed very specific and marked inverse agonist effects on the more frequent Arg389 variant. These specific effects of carvedilol on the Arg389 variant of the β1-AR were also seen for control of beating frequency in rat cardiac myocytes expressing the 2 receptor variants. This FRET sensor permitted direct observation of activation of the β1-AR in living cells in real time. It revealed that β1-AR variants dramatically differ in their responses to diverse beta blockers, with possible consequences for their clinical use. PMID:17200720

  6. Sorting of β1-Adrenergic Receptors Is Mediated by Pathways That Are Either Dependent on or Independent of Type I PDZ, Protein Kinase A (PKA), and SAP97*

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Mohammed M.; Chumpia, Maryanne M.; Hamilton, Thomas B.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2014-01-01

    The β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) is a target for treatment of major cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure and hypertension. Recycling of agonist-internalized β1-AR is dependent on type I PSD-95/DLG/ZO1 (PDZ) in the C-tail of the β1-AR and on protein kinase A (PKA) activity (Gardner, L. A., Naren, A. P., and Bahouth, S. W. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5085–5099). We explored the effects of point mutations in the PDZ and in the activity of PKA on recycling of the β1-AR and its binding to the PDZ-binding protein SAP97. These studies indicated that β1-AR recycling was inhibited by PKA inhibitors and by mutations in the PDZ that interfered with SAP97 binding. The trafficking effects of short sequences differing in PDZ and SAP97 binding were examined using chimeric mutant β1-AR. β1-AR chimera containing the type I PDZ of the β2-adrenergic receptor that does not bind to SAP97 failed to recycle except when serine 312 was mutated to aspartic acid. β1-AR chimera with type I PDZ sequences from the C-tails of aquaporin-2 or GluR1 recycled in a SAP97- and PKA-dependent manner. Non-PDZ β1-AR chimera derived from μ-opioid, dopamine 1, or GluR2 receptors promoted rapid recycling of chimeric β1-AR in a SAP97- and PKA-independent manner. Moreover, the nature of the residue at position −3 in the PDZ regulated whether the β1-AR was internalized alone or in complex with SAP97. These results indicate that divergent pathways were involved in trafficking the β1-AR and provide a roadmap for its trafficking via type I PDZs versus non-PDZs. PMID:24324269

  7. Modulation of neuroinflammation and pathology in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease using a biased and selective beta-1 adrenergic receptor partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Pooneh Memar; Evans, Andrew K; Yi, Bitna; Nguyen, Tiffany; Coutellier, Laurence; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2017-04-01

    Degeneration of noradrenergic neurons occurs at an early stage of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The noradrenergic system regulates arousal and learning and memory, and has been implicated in regulating neuroinflammation. Loss of noradrenergic tone may underlie AD progression at many levels. We have previously shown that acute administration of a partial agonist of the beta-1 adrenergic receptor (ADRB1), xamoterol, restores behavioral deficits in a mouse model of AD. The current studies examined the effects of chronic low dose xamoterol on neuroinflammation, pathology, and behavior in the pathologically aggressive 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of AD. In vitro experiments in cells expressing human beta adrenergic receptors demonstrate that xamoterol is highly selective for ADRB1 and functionally biased for the cAMP over the β-arrestin pathway. Data demonstrate ADRB1-mediated attenuation of TNF-α production with xamoterol in primary rat microglia culture following LPS challenge. Finally, two independent cohorts of 5XFAD and control mice were administered xamoterol from approximately 4.0-6.5 or 7.0-9.5 months, were tested in an array of behavioral tasks, and brains were examined for evidence of neuroinflammation, and amyloid beta and tau pathology. Xamoterol reduced mRNA expression of neuroinflammatory markers (Iba1, CD74, CD14 and TGFβ) and immunohistochemical evidence for microgliosis and astrogliosis. Xamoterol reduced amyloid beta and tau pathology as measured by regional immunohistochemistry. Behavioral deficits were not observed for 5XFAD mice. In conclusion, chronic administration of a selective, functionally biased, partial agonist of ADRB1 is effective in reducing neuroinflammation and amyloid beta and tau pathology in the 5XFAD model of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Roles of Dopamine and α1-Adrenergic Receptors in Cocaine Preferences in Female and Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adam N; Westenbroek, Christel; Jagannathan, Lakshmikripa; Becker, Jill B

    2015-11-01

    Cocaine dependence is characterized by compulsive drug taking and reduced involvement in social, occupational, or recreational activities. Unraveling the diverse mechanisms contributing to the loss-of-interest in these 'non-drug' pursuits is essential for understanding the neurobiology of addiction and could provide additional targets for treating addiction. The study objectives were to examine changes in cocaine-induced dopamine (DA) overflow in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) over the course of self-administration and determine the roles of α1- and β-adrenergic receptors (AR) in the loss-of-interest in food rewards following the development of an addicted phenotype in male and female rats. Subjects were given access to cocaine and palatable food pellets in a choice self-administration paradigm to identify 'addicted' cocaine-preferring (CP) individuals and resistant pellet-preferring (PP) individuals based on their patterns of self-administration over 7 weeks. Cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc was examined with microdialysis early and late during self-administration (weeks 2 and 7). Subjects were treated in counter-balanced order with propranolol (β-AR antagonist), terazosin (α1-AR antagonist), or vehicle for an additional 3 weeks of self-administration. CP rats displayed increased motivation for cocaine and attenuated motivation for pellets following the development of cocaine preferences. In females, the estrous cycle affected pellet, but not cocaine, self-administration. CP rats displayed attenuated cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc. Propranolol enhanced cocaine reinforcement and reduced pellet intake, whereas terazosin enhanced motivation for pellets and reversed preferences in a subset of CP rats. The implications of these results for the treatment of addiction are discussed.

  9. The Roles of Dopamine and α1-Adrenergic Receptors in Cocaine Preferences in Female and Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Adam N; Westenbroek, Christel; Jagannathan, Lakshmikripa; Becker, Jill B

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is characterized by compulsive drug taking and reduced involvement in social, occupational, or recreational activities. Unraveling the diverse mechanisms contributing to the loss-of-interest in these ‘non-drug' pursuits is essential for understanding the neurobiology of addiction and could provide additional targets for treating addiction. The study objectives were to examine changes in cocaine-induced dopamine (DA) overflow in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) over the course of self-administration and determine the roles of α1- and β-adrenergic receptors (AR) in the loss-of-interest in food rewards following the development of an addicted phenotype in male and female rats. Subjects were given access to cocaine and palatable food pellets in a choice self-administration paradigm to identify ‘addicted' cocaine-preferring (CP) individuals and resistant pellet-preferring (PP) individuals based on their patterns of self-administration over 7 weeks. Cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc was examined with microdialysis early and late during self-administration (weeks 2 and 7). Subjects were treated in counter-balanced order with propranolol (β-AR antagonist), terazosin (α1-AR antagonist), or vehicle for an additional 3 weeks of self-administration. CP rats displayed increased motivation for cocaine and attenuated motivation for pellets following the development of cocaine preferences. In females, the estrous cycle affected pellet, but not cocaine, self-administration. CP rats displayed attenuated cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc. Propranolol enhanced cocaine reinforcement and reduced pellet intake, whereas terazosin enhanced motivation for pellets and reversed preferences in a subset of CP rats. The implications of these results for the treatment of addiction are discussed. PMID:25900120

  10. Doxazosin, an α-1-adrenergic-receptor Antagonist, for Nightmares in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and/or Borderline Personality Disorder: a Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Stefan; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Repantis, Dimitris; Behnia, Behnoush; Bernard, Florian; Hansen, Marie-Luise; Otte, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Centrally active α-1-adrenergic-receptor antagonists such as prazosin are effective in the treatment of nightmares in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A pharmacological alternative is doxazosin, which has a longer half-life and fewer side effects. However, doxazosin is currently being used without solid empirical evidence. Furthermore, no study so far has assessed the effects of α-1-antagonists on nightmares in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). We retrospectively assessed the effectiveness of doxazosin on nightmares in PTSD and BPD. Method: A retrospective chart review of patients treated with doxazosin for trauma-associated nightmares in our clinic was performed. As in previous prazosin studies, the B2 score of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was used as the primary outcome measure. Furthermore, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-Addendum for PTSD (PSQI-A) and sleep logs were analyzed. Results: We identified 51 patients with PTSD and/or BPD (mean age 35.7 years, 92.3% women) who received doxazosin for nightmares. Of these, 46 patients continued doxazosin over a 4-week period and 31 patients over a 12-week period. Within the 12-week period, doxazosin treatment significantly reduced nightmares regardless of PTSD/BPD. 25 percent of patients treated for 12 weeks had full remission of nightmares. PSQI-A scores indicated that additional trauma-associated sleep symptoms improved over 12 weeks. Furthermore, recuperation of sleep improved with doxazosin within the first 4 weeks of treatment. Conclusion: Doxazosin might improve trauma associated nightmares and more general sleep parameters in patients with PTSD and BPD. Randomized controlled trials are warranted.

  11. Comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome: activation of β1-adrenergic receptor by xamoterol as a potential cognitive enhancer.

    PubMed

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L; Tun, Christine; Encarnacion, Angelo; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Belichenko, Pavel; Saw, Nay; Priestley, Matthew; Tsien, Richard W; Mobley, William C; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2011-08-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent form of mental retardation caused by genetic abnormalities in humans. This has been successfully modeled in mice to generate the Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS. This transgenic mouse model shares a number of physical and functional abnormalities with people with DS, including changes in the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Significant abnormalities in noradrenergic (NE-ergic) afferents from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus, as well as deficits in NE-ergic neurotransmission are detected in these animals. In the current study we characterized in detail the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice, in addition to using pharmacological tools for identification of target receptors mediating the learning and memory deficits observed in this model of DS. We undertook a comprehensive approach to mouse phenotyping using a battery of standard and novel tests encompassing: (i) locomotion (Activity Chamber, PhenoTyper, and CatWalk), (ii) learning and memory (spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, fear conditioning, and Intellicage), and (iii) social behavior. Ts65Dn mice showed increased locomotor activity in novel and home cage environments. There were significant and reproducible deficits in learning and memory tests including spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, Intellicage place avoidance and contextual fear conditioning. Although Ts65Dn mice showed no deficit in sociability in the 3-chamber test, a marked impairment in social memory was detected. Xamoterol, a β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-ADR) agonist, effectively restored the memory deficit in contextual fear conditioning, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition. These behavioral improvements were reversed by betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this mouse model of Down syndrome displays cognitive deficits which are mediated by an imbalance in the

  12. Comprehensive Behavioral Phenotyping of Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome: Activation of β1-Adrenergic Receptor by Xamoterol as a Potential Cognitive Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L.; Tun, Christine; Encarnacion, Angelo; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Belichenko, Pavel; Saw, Nay; Priestley, Matthew; Tsien, Richard W; Mobley, William C; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent form of mental retardation caused by genetic abnormalities in humans. This has been successfully modeled in mice to generate the Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS. This transgenic mouse model shares a number of physical and functional abnormalities with people with DS, including changes in the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Significant abnormalities in noradrenergic (NE-ergic) afferents from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus, as well as deficits in NE-ergic neurotransmission are detected in these animals. In the current study we characterized in detail the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice, in addition to using pharmacological tools for identification of target receptors mediating the learning and memory deficits observed in this model of DS. We undertook a comprehensive approach to mouse phenotyping using a battery of standard and novel tests encompassing: i) locomotion (Activity Chamber, PhenoTyper, and CatWalk), ii) learning and memory (spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, fear conditioning, and Intellicage), and iii) social behavior. Ts65Dn mice showed increased locomotor activity in novel and home cage environments. There were significant and reproducible deficits in learning and memory tests including spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, Intellicage place avoidance and contextual fear conditioning. Although Ts65Dn mice showed no deficit in sociability in the 3-chamber test, a marked impairment in social memory was detected. Xamoterol, a β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-ADR) agonist, effectively restored the memory deficit in contextual fear conditioning, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition. These behavioral improvements were reversed by betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this mouse model of Down Syndrome display cognitive deficits which is mediated by imbalance in noradrenergic

  13. In vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors mitigates stress-disturbed cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Bjelic, Maja M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of stress-associated reproductive dysfunction is complex and largely unknown. This study was designed to systematically analyze molecular effects of systemic in vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) on stress-induced disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling in testosterone-producing Leydig cells using the following parameters (i) level of circulating stress hormones, LH and testosterone; (ii) level of main molecular markers of Leydig cell functionality (testosterone, Insl3, cAMP); (iii) expression of cAMP signaling (cAMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers') and (iv) expression of NO-cGMP signaling (NO-cGMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers'). The results showed that oral administration of α1-ADR blocker before stress increased cGMP and diminished stress-reduced cAMP production in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-induced effects on cAMP/cGMP signaling pathways elements were changed. Sustained in vivo α1-ADR blockade completely abolished stress-increased transcription of most abundantly expressed phosphodiesterase that remove cAMP (Pde4b) and potentiated stress-increased expression of PRKA, the main stimulator of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In the same Leydig cells, stress-decreased NOS3 expression was abolished, while stress-increased GUCY1 (cGMP 'producer') and PRKG1 (cGMP 'effector') were potentiated. It is possible that all molecules mentioned could contribute, at least in part, in recovery of Leydig cell testosterone production. Presented data provide new role of α1-ADRs in stress-triggered disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling, and new molecular insights into the relationship between stress and mammalian reproduction. Regardless of whether the effects of α1-blocker + stress are direct or indirect, the results are important in terms of human reproductive health and the wide use of α1-ADR antagonists, alone or in combination, to treat post-traumatic stress disorders, hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and

  14. Amiloride interacts with renal. cap alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M.J.; Mullen, M.D.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques to assess whether amiloride and certain analogues of amiloride (ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil) can bind to adrenergic receptors in the kidney. They found that amiloride could compete for (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine (..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors), (/sup 3/H)prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors), and (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (..beta..-adrenergic receptors) binding in rat renal cortical membranes with inhibitor constants of 13.6 /plus minus/ 5.7, 24.4 /plus minus/ 7.4, and 8.36 /plus minus/ 13.5 ..mu..M, respectively. Ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil were from 2- to 25-fold more potent than amiloride in competing for radioligand binding sites in studies with these membranes. In addition, amiloride and the two analogues competed for (/sup 3/H)prazosin sites on intact Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and amiloride blocked epinephrine-stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production in these cells. They conclude that amiloride competes for binding to several classes of renal adrenergic receptors with a rank order of potency of ..cap alpha../sub 2/ > ..cap alpha../sub 1/ > ..beta... Binding to, and antagonism of, adrenergic receptors occurs at concentrations of amiloride that are lower than previously observed nonspecific interactions of this agent.

  15. alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Doze, Van A; Handel, Evelyn M; Jensen, Kelly A; Darsie, Belle; Luger, Elizabeth J; Haselton, James R; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2009-08-18

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) drugs are used for the treatment of chronic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety-related disorders. Chronic use of TCA drugs increases the expression of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs). Yet, it is unclear whether increased alpha(1)-AR expression contributes to the antidepressant effects of these drugs or if this effect is unrelated to their therapeutic benefit. In this study, mice expressing constitutively active mutant alpha(1A)-ARs (CAM alpha(1A)-AR) or CAM alpha(1B)-ARs were used to examine the effects of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-AR signaling on rodent behavioral models of depression, OCD, and anxiety. CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice, but not CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice, exhibited antidepressant-like behavior in the tail suspension test and forced swim test. This behavior was reversed by prazosin, a selective alpha(1)-AR inverse agonist, and mimicked by chronically treating wild type mice with cirazoline, an alpha(1A)-AR agonist. Marble burying behavior, commonly used to model OCD in rodents, was significantly decreased in CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice but not in CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice. In contrast, no significant differences in anxiety-related behavior were observed between wild type, CAM alpha(1A)-AR, and CAM alpha(1B)-AR animals in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box. This is the first study to demonstrate that alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-ARs differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse. These data suggest that alpha(1A)-ARs may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of depression.

  16. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene coding for the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kobilka, B.K.; Matsui, H.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Francke, U.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Regan, J.W.

    1987-10-30

    The gene for the human platelet ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor has been cloned with oligonucleotides corresponding to the partial amino acid sequence of the purified receptor. The identity of this gene has been confirmed by the binding of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic ligands to the cloned receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence is most similar to the recently cloned human ..beta../sub 2/- and ..beta../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors; however, similarities to the muscarinic cholinergic receptors are also evident. Two related genes have been identified by low stringency Southern blot analysis. These genes may represent additional ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtypes.

  17. Site-specific O-Glycosylation by Polypeptide N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GalNAc-transferase T2) Co-regulates β1-Adrenergic Receptor N-terminal Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Goth, Christoffer K; Tuhkanen, Hanna E; Khan, Hamayun; Lackman, Jarkko J; Wang, Shengjun; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Hansen, Lasse H; Overall, Christopher M; Clausen, Henrik; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Petäjä-Repo, Ulla E

    2017-03-17

    The β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and the predominant adrenergic receptor subtype in the heart, where it mediates cardiac contractility and the force of contraction. Although it is the most important target for β-adrenergic antagonists, such as β-blockers, relatively little is yet known about its regulation. We have shown previously that β1AR undergoes constitutive and regulated N-terminal cleavage participating in receptor down-regulation and, moreover, that the receptor is modified by O-glycosylation. Here we demonstrate that the polypeptide GalNAc-transferase 2 (GalNAc-T2) specifically O-glycosylates β1AR at five residues in the extracellular N terminus, including the Ser-49 residue at the location of the common S49G single-nucleotide polymorphism. Using in vitro O-glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage assays, a cell line deficient in O-glycosylation, GalNAc-T-edited cell line model systems, and a GalNAc-T2 knock-out rat model, we show that GalNAc-T2 co-regulates the metalloproteinase-mediated limited proteolysis of β1AR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that impaired O-glycosylation and enhanced proteolysis lead to attenuated receptor signaling, because the maximal response elicited by the βAR agonist isoproterenol and its potency in a cAMP accumulation assay were decreased in HEK293 cells lacking GalNAc-T2. Our findings reveal, for the first time, a GPCR as a target for co-regulatory functions of site-specific O-glycosylation mediated by a unique GalNAc-T isoform. The results provide a new level of β1AR regulation that may open up possibilities for new therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Changes in number of alpha-adrenergic receptor subtypes in hepatocytes from rats fed 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Kohei, K; Nomura, M; Koshiura, R

    1990-01-01

    Changes in numbers of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the plasma membranes of hepatocytes from female Donryu rats given feed containing 0.06% of the carcinogen 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3'-MeDAB), were examined. alpha 1-Adrenergic receptors, measured in terms of [3H]prazosin binding, decreased to half of the control 2 weeks after the start of this diet, then gradually decreased for the next 22 weeks. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptors, measured in terms of [3H]clonidine binding, transiently increased 3-fold over the control at 2 weeks. These changes in the early period of the 3'-MeDAB diet intake may be related to hepatocarcinogenesis.

  19. Evidence for direct regulation of myocardial Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 phosphorylation and activity by 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK): effects of the novel and specific RSK inhibitor fmk on responses to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Friederike; Snabaitis, Andrew K; Cohen, Michael S; Taunton, Jack; Avkiran, Metin

    2007-03-01

    Multiple stimuli of physiological and pathophysiological significance, including alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists, stimulate the cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) through activation of the mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) ERK-90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) signaling cascade. However, the individual contributions of ERK and RSK, which can each phosphorylate the NHE1 regulatory domain, to such stimulation are unknown. In the present study, we have used the novel RSK inhibitor fmk to determine the role of RSK as a direct regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity in response to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, in ventricular myocytes isolated from the adult rat heart. Initial experiments confirmed that pretreatment of myocytes with fmk before exposure to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine inhibited RSK C-terminal kinase activity and thereby RSK N-terminal kinase activation, without affecting MEK or ERK activation. Pretreatment of myocytes with fmk also inhibited phenylephrine-induced increases in NHE1 phosphorylation and the rate of NHE1-mediated H+ efflux under conditions of intracellular acidosis. These findings reveal, for the first time to our knowledge, that RSK is the principal regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation in adult myocardium.

  20. Alpha1b-adrenergic receptors control locomotor and rewarding effects of psychostimulants and opiates.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Candice; Darracq, Laurent; Trovero, Fabrice; Blanc, Gérard; Glowinski, Jacques; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2002-04-01

    Drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants and opiates, are generally considered as exerting their locomotor and rewarding effects through an increased dopaminergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens. Noradrenergic transmission may also be implicated because most psychostimulants increase norepinephrine (NE) release, and numerous studies have indicated interactions between noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons through alpha1-adrenergic receptors. However, analysis of the effects of psychostimulants after either destruction of noradrenergic neurons or pharmacological blockade of alpha1-adrenergic receptors led to conflicting results. Here we show that the locomotor hyperactivities induced by d-amphetamine (1-3 mg/kg), cocaine (5-20 mg/kg), or morphine (5-10 mg/kg) in mice lacking the alpha1b subtype of adrenergic receptors were dramatically decreased when compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, behavioral sensitizations induced by d-amphetamine (1-2 mg/kg), cocaine (5-15 mg/kg), or morphine (7.5 mg/kg) were also decreased in knock-out mice when compared with wild-type. Ruling out a neurological deficit in knock-out mice, both strains reacted similarly to novelty, to intraperitoneal saline, or to the administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg), an anti-muscarinic agent. Finally, rewarding properties could not be observed in knock-out mice in an oral preference test (cocaine and morphine) and conditioned place preference (morphine) paradigm. Because catecholamine tissue levels, autoradiography of D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors, and of dopamine reuptake sites and locomotor response to a D1 agonist showed that basal dopaminergic transmission was similar in knock-out and wild-type mice, our data indicate a critical role of alpha1b-adrenergic receptors and noradrenergic transmission in the vulnerability to addiction.

  1. A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc anchors a PKN-based signaling complex involved in α1-adrenergic receptor-induced p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Cariolato, Luca; Cavin, Sabrina; Diviani, Dario

    2011-03-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways are highly organized signaling systems that transduce extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses. In this context, it is currently poorly understood how kinases constituting these signaling cascades are assembled and activated in response to receptor stimulation to generate specific cellular responses. Here, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critically involved in the activation of the p38α MAPK downstream of α(1b)-adrenergic receptors (α(1b)-ARs). Our results indicate that AKAP-Lbc can assemble a novel transduction complex containing the RhoA effector PKNα, MLTK, MKK3, and p38α, which integrates signals from α(1b)-ARs to promote RhoA-dependent activation of p38α. In particular, silencing of AKAP-Lbc expression or disrupting the formation of the AKAP-Lbc·p38α signaling complex specifically reduces α(1)-AR-mediated p38α activation without affecting receptor-mediated activation of other MAPK pathways. These findings provide a novel mechanistic hypothesis explaining how assembly of macromolecular complexes can specify MAPK signaling downstream of α(1)-ARs.

  2. Effects of reboxetine and sertraline treatments alone and in combination on the binding properties of cortical NMDA and beta1-adrenergic receptors in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Harkin, A; Nally, R; Kelly, J P; Leonard, B E

    2000-01-01

    Changes to the binding properties of cortical N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and beta-adrenergic receptors have both been reported as potential indicators of antidepressant activity. In the present investigation we examined the effects of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, reboxetine, the serotonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, alone and in combination on the binding properties of cortical NMDA receptors and cortical beta1-adrenoceptors following 14 days of treatment in the olfactory bulbectomized rat model of depression. A decrease in the potency of glycine to displace the strychnine insensitive glycine antagonist [3H] 5,7 dichlorokynurenic acid (5,7 DCKA) was observed in cortical homogenates of OB rats when compared to sham-operated controls. Similarly, treatment with the combination of reboxetine and sertraline for 14 days produced a decrease in the potency of glycine when compared to vehicle treated controls. By contrast neither olfactory bulbectomy or drug treatment significantly altered basal or glycine enhanced binding of the non-competitive NMDA antagonist [3H] MK-801 in cortical homogenates. Reboxetine alone, and in combination with sertraline, down-regulated [3H]-CGP 12177 (a selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) binding in both OB and sham-operated animals. The lack of a bulbectomy effect in the [3H] CGP-12177 binding assay, and the fact that olfactory bulbectomy and antidepressant treatments produce a similar change to the potency of glycine at the NMDA receptor, suggests that these tests do not provide a neurochemical marker for either the behavioral hyperactivity deficit or antidepressant response in the model.

  3. {beta}1-Adrenergic receptor activation induces mouse cardiac myocyte death through both L-type calcium channel-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongyu; Gao, Hui; Kubo, Hajime; Berretta, Remus M; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac diseases persistently increase the contractility demands of cardiac myocytes, which require activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent increases in myocyte Ca(2+) transients. Persistent exposure to sympathetic and/or Ca(2+) stress is associated with myocyte death. This study examined the respective roles of persistent beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) agonist exposure and high Ca(2+) concentration in myocyte death. Ventricular myocytes (VMs) were isolated from transgenic (TG) mice with cardiac-specific and inducible expression of the beta(2a)-subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel (LTCC). VMs were cultured, and the rate of myocyte death was measured in the presence of isoproterenol (ISO), other modulators of Ca(2+) handling and the beta-adrenergic system, and inhibitors of caspases and reactive oxygen species generation. The rate of myocyte death was greater in TG vs. wild-type myocytes and accelerated by ISO in both groups, although ISO did not increase LTCC current (I(Ca-L)) in TG-VMs. Nifedipine, an LTCC antagonist, only partially prevented myocyte death. These results suggest both LTCC-dependent and -independent mechanisms in ISO induced myocyte death. ISO increased the contractility of wild type and TG-VMs by enhancing sarcoplasmic reticulum function and inhibiting sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and CaMKII partially protected myocyte from death induced by both Ca(2+) and ISO. Caspase and reactive oxygen species inhibitors did not, but beta(2)-AR activation did, reduce myocyte death induced by enhanced I(Ca-L) and ISO stimulation. Our results suggest that catecholamines induce myocyte necrosis primarily through beta(1)-AR-mediated increases in I(Ca-L), but other mechanisms are also involved in rodents.

  4. Role of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the growth hormone and prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in man.

    PubMed

    Tatár, P; Vigas, M

    1984-09-01

    The effects of intravenous infusion of the nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or of the selective alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine on growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and cortisol secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in 11 healthy young men. The GH response was blunted following each antagonist used, PRL secretion was higher after yohimbine and diminished after phentolamine when compared to controls. The plasma cortisol response was not influenced by either compound. In another series of experiments no effect of an oral administration of prazosin, a selective alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist, on the secretion of GH, PRL and cortisol was found in any of 7 subjects. Prazosin inhibited blood pressure increase during hypoglycemia and induced slight drowsiness and fatigue in the subjects. It is concluded that in man alpha-adrenergic stimulation of GH secretion during hypoglycemia is transmitted via alpha 2-receptors, PRL secretion is mediated via alpha 1-receptors, whereas inhibition of PRL release is mediated via alpha 2-receptors. In this experiment no effect of alpha 1- or alpha 2-blockade on cortisol response to hypoglycemia was seen.

  5. Deletion of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha induces an alteration of cardiac functions.

    PubMed

    Loichot, Cécile; Jesel, Laurence; Tesse, Angela; Tabernero, Antonia; Schoonjans, Kristina; Roul, Gérard; Carpusca, Irina; Auwerx, Johan; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2006-07-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) plays a major role in the control of cardiac energy metabolism. The role of PPARalpha on cardiac functions was evaluated by using PPARalpha knockout (PPARalpha -/-) mice. Hemodynamic parameters by sphygmomanometric measurements show that deletion of PPARalpha did not affect systolic blood pressure and heart rate. Echocardiographic measurements demonstrated reduced systolic performance as shown by the decrease of left ventricular fractional shortening in PPARalpha -/- mice. Telemetric electrocardiography revealed neither atrio- nor intraventricular conduction defects in PPARalpha -/- mice. Also, heart rate, P-wave duration and amplitude, and QT interval were not affected. However, the amplitude of T wave from PPARalpha -/- mice was lower compared with wild-type (PPARalpha +/+) mice. When the myocardial function was measured by ex vivo Langendorff's heart preparation, basal and beta-adrenergic agonist-induced developed forces were significantly reduced in PPARalpha-null mice. In addition, Western blot analysis shows that the protein expression of beta1-adrenergic receptor is reduced in hearts from PPARalpha -/- mice. Histological analysis showed that hearts from PPARalpha -/- but not PPARalpha +/+ mice displayed myocardial fibrosis. These results suggest that PPARalpha-null mice have an alteration of cardiac contractile performance under basal and under stimulation of beta1-adrenergic receptors. These effects are associated with myocardial fibrosis. The data shed light on the role of PPARalpha in maintaining cardiac functions.

  6. The alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptor mediates hyperactivity of coloboma mice, a model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Kristy J; Hess, Ellen J

    2006-09-01

    Drugs that modify noradrenergic transmission such as atomoxetine and clonidine are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the therapeutic targets of these compounds are unknown. Norepinephrine is also implicated in the hyperactivity exhibited by coloboma mice. To identify the receptor subtypes that regulate the hyperactivity, coloboma mice were systematically challenged with adrenergic drugs. The beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol and the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin each had little effect on the hyperactivity. Conversely, the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine reduced the activity of coloboma mice but not control mice. Subtype-selective blockade of alpha(2C)-, but not alpha(2A)- or alpha(2B)-adrenergic receptors, ameliorated hyperactivity of coloboma mice without affecting activity of control mice, suggesting that alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptors mediate the hyperactivity. Localized in the basal ganglia, alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptors are in a prime position to impact locomotor activity and are, therefore, potential targets of pharmacotherapy for ADHD.

  7. Norepinephrine release from spinal synaptosomes: auto-alpha2 -adrenergic receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhao, Z; Pan, H L; Eisenach, J C; Paqueron, X

    2000-07-01

    Clonidine produces analgesia after spinal injection by activating alpha2-adrenergic receptors. Recently, clonidine has been demonstrated to increase spinal release of norepinephrine (NE) in vivo, in contrast to that anticipated by classic presynaptic autoinhibition. The purpose of the current study was to determine if clonidine could inhibit release of NE in a preparation of spinal cord tissue lacking synaptic circuits. Crude synaptosomes were prepared from male Sprague-Dawley rat spinal cord, loaded with [3H]NE, and stimulated by potassium chloride to release [3H]NE. Samples were incubated with clonidine in the absence or presence of various inhibitors. To study the effect of alpha2a-adrenergic receptor subtypes, some animals were pretreated with an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) composed of a sense or antisense sequence to a portion of this receptor. Potassium chloride produced a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]NE release, and this release was inhibited by clonidine with a concentration producing 50% maximal inhibition (IC50) of 1.3 microm. The effect of clonidine was inhibited by the alpha2-adrenergic antagonists, yohimbine and idazoxan, but not by alpha1-adrenergic, muscarinic, or opioid antagonists. Intrathecal pretreatment with antisense ODN to alpha2A-adrenergic receptors reduced alpha2A-adrenergic receptor protein expression compared with sense ODN control and also reduced clonidine-induced inhibition of [3H]NE release. These data demonstrate the existence of classic autoinhibitory alpha2-adrenergic receptors in the spinal cord, probably of the alpha2Asubtype. They further suggest that clonidine-induced stimulation of spinal NE release must occur from indirect actions, presumably due to activation of a spinal circuit.

  8. An Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Megan D.; Chan, Trevor; Swigart, Philip M.; Myagmar, Bat-erdene; Dash, Rajesh; Simpson, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive effects in the heart and cardiac myocytes, and a myocyte survival pathway involving the alpha-1A receptor subtype and ERK activation exists in vitro. However, data in vivo are limited. Here we tested A61603 (N-[5-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-2-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl]methanesulfonamide), a selective imidazoline agonist for the alpha-1A. A61603 was the most potent alpha-1-agonist in activating ERK in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. A61603 activated ERK in adult mouse ventricular myocytes and protected the cells from death caused by the anthracycline doxorubicin. A low dose of A61603 (10 ng/kg/d) activated ERK in the mouse heart in vivo, but did not change blood pressure. In male mice, concurrent subcutaneous A61603 infusion at 10 ng/kg/d for 7 days after a single intraperitoneal dose of doxorubicin (25 mg/kg) increased survival, improved cardiac function, heart rate, and cardiac output by echocardiography, and reduced cardiac cell necrosis and apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. All protective effects were lost in alpha-1A-knockout mice. In female mice, doxorubicin at doses higher than in males (35–40 mg/kg) caused less cardiac toxicity than in males. We conclude that the alpha-1A-selective agonist A61603, via the alpha-1A adrenergic receptor, prevents doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in male mice, supporting the theory that alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonists have potential as novel heart failure therapies. PMID:28081170

  9. Pharmacologically relevant receptor binding characteristics and 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity of free Fatty acids contained in saw palmetto extract.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masayuki; Ito, Yoshihiko; Oyunzul, Luvsandorj; Oki-Fujino, Tomomi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-04-01

    Saw palmetto extract (SPE), used widely for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been shown to bind alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) calcium channel antagonist receptors. Major constituents of SPE are lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid and linoleic acid. The aim of this study was to investigate binding affinities of these fatty acids for pharmacologically relevant (alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-DHP) receptors. The fatty acids inhibited specific [(3)H]prazosin binding in rat brain in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 23.8 to 136 microg/ml, and specific (+)-[(3)H]PN 200-110 binding with IC(50) values of 24.5 to 79.5 microg/ml. Also, lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid and linoleic acid inhibited specific [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine ([(3)H]NMS) binding in rat brain with IC(50) values of 56.4 to 169 microg/ml. Palmitic acid had no effect on specific [(3)H]NMS binding. The affinity of oleic acid, myristic acid and linoleic acid for each receptor was greater than the affinity of SPE. Scatchard analysis revealed that oleic acid and lauric acid caused a significant decrease in the maximal number of binding sites (B(max)) for [(3)H]prazosin, [(3)H]NMS and (+)-[(3)H]PN 200-110. The results suggest that lauric acid and oleic acid bind noncompetitively to alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-DHP calcium channel antagonist receptors. We developed a novel and convenient method of determining 5alpha-reductase activity using LC/MS. With this method, SPE was shown to inhibit 5alpha-reductase activity in rat liver with an IC(50) of 101 microg/ml. Similarly, all the fatty acids except palmitic acid inhibited 5alpha-reductase activity, with IC(50) values of 42.1 to 67.6 microg/ml. In conclusion, lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid, and linoleic acid, major constituents of SPE, exerted binding activities of alpha(1)-adrenergic, muscarinic and 1,4-DHP receptors and inhibited 5

  10. Alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists as analgesics.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R E

    2001-08-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists are analgesic agents, and the alpha2-adrenergic agonist clonidine has been used in clinical studies for regional analgesia after intrathecal administration. We review here recent developments concerning the structure activity relationships of a new class of potent alpha2-adrenergic agonists and their use as analgesic agents. The effect of structure upon cardiovascular side-effects is also monitored, such as the prolongation of the QT portion of the cardiac action potential.

  11. Role of prejunctional alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the regulation of myocardial performance during exercise in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Heyndrickx, G R; Vilaine, J P; Moerman, E J; Leusen, I

    1984-06-01

    We examined, in conscious dogs, the potential role of prejunctional alpha 2-adrenergic receptors for the regulation of heart rate and contractility response to exercise through modulation of the neurotransmitter release. Changes in heart rate and left ventricular pressure with time during comparable exercise levels, together with changes in norepinephrine concentration in the coronary sinus, were compared before and after the intravenous administration of: prazosin (0.5 mg/kg), a preferential postjunctional alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blocking agent; phentolamine (1 mg/kg), a nonselective alpha-adrenergic blocking agent; and yohimbine (0.3 mg/kg), a preferential prejunctional alpha 2-adrenergic receptor blocking agent. During exercise after phentolamine or yohimbine, changes in heart rate and left ventricular dP/dt were markedly potentiated compared to the control exercise, as well as to exercise after prazosin, whereas the norepinephrine concentration in the coronary sinus was substantially elevated. After intracoronary administration of phentolamine (0.1 mg/kg) or yohimbine (0.03 mg/kg), heart rate and contractility response to exercise were also potentiated, compared to the control exercise. These observations indicate that, in the intact conscious animal, prejunctional alpha 2-adrenoreceptors are stimulated during exercise, thereby modulating the norepinephrine release through a negative feedback inhibitory mechanism. Blocking these receptors by phentolamine or yohimbine results in an uncontrolled norepinephrine release during exercise associated with an augmented beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated end organ response, i.e., a potentiation in heart rate and contractility response.

  12. Different pathways of ( sup 3 H)inositol phosphate formation mediated by. alpha. 1a- and. alpha. 1b-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.M.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1990-10-15

    The types of inositol phosphates (InsPs) formed in response to activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor subtypes were determined in collagenase-dispersed renal cells and hepatocytes by high pressure liquid chromatography separation. In hepatocytes, which contain only the alpha 1b subtype, norepinephrine stimulated rapid (10-s) formation of (3H)Ins(1,4,5)P3 and (3H)Ins(1,3,4)P3 and slower (5-min) formation of Ins(1,4)P2 and Ins(1)P. Selective inactivation of alpha 1b receptors by chloroethylclonidine almost completely blocked the effects of norepinephrine in hepatocytes. In renal cells, which contain both alpha 1a and alpha 1b receptors in a 60:40 ratio, norepinephrine did not significantly increase the size of any peaks until 5 min after agonist activation. At this time, only a peak eluting with Ins(1)P and one eluting shortly after Ins(1,4)P2 were significantly elevated. Incubation with norepinephrine for 2 h caused small but significant increases in peaks co-eluting with Ins(1)P and Ins(1,4,5)P3 in renal cells; however, only the increase in Ins(1)P was inhibited by chloroethylclonidine pretreatment. Extraction under neutral conditions suggested that cyclic InsPs may be the primary compounds formed in response to norepinephrine in renal cells. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ caused a 60% reduction in the InsP response to norepinephrine in renal cells but had no effect in hepatocytes. These results suggest that activation of alpha 1a and alpha 1b receptor subtypes results in formation of different InsPs and that the response to alpha 1a activation may require influx of extracellular Ca2+.

  13. Clebopride enhances contractility of the guinea pig stomach by blocking peripheral D2 dopamine receptor and alpha-2 adrenoceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, K.; Taniyama, K.; Kuno, T.; Sano, I.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohmura, I.; Tanaka, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The mechanism of action of clebopride on the motility of guinea pig stomach was examined by the receptor binding assay for bovine brain membrane and by measuring gastric contractility and the release of acetylcholine from the stomach. The receptor binding assay revealed that clebopride bound to the D2 dopamine receptor with a high affinity and to the alpha-2 adrenoceptor and 5-HT2 serotonin receptor with relatively lower affinity, and not to D1 dopamine, alpha-1 adrenergic, muscarinic acetylcholine, H1 histamine, or opioid receptor. In strips of the stomach, clebopride at 10{sup {minus} 8} M to 10{sup {minus} 5} M enhanced the electrical transmural stimulation-evoked contraction and the release of acetylcholine. This enhancement was attributed to the blockade of the D2 dopamine receptor and alpha-2 adrenoceptor because: (1) Maximum responses obtained with specific D2 dopamine receptor antagonist, domperidone, and with specific alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine, were smaller than that with clebopride, and the sum of the effects of these two specific receptor antagonists is approximately equal to the effect of clebopride. (2) The facilitatory effect of clebopride was partially eliminated by pretreatment of the sample with domperidone or yohimbine, and the facilitatory effect of clebopride was not observed in preparations treated with the combination of domperidone and yohimbine. Clebopride also antagonized the inhibitory effects of dopamine and clonidine on the electrical transmural stimulation-evoked responses. These results indicate that clebopride acts on post ganglionic cholinergic neurons at D2 and alpha-2 receptors in this preparation to enhance enteric nervous system stimulated motility.

  14. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  15. cap alpha. /sub 2/-Adrenergic receptor-mediated sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Toews, M.L.; Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-03-01

    Preincubation of HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists resulted in a 10- to 20-fold increase in forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production as compared to cells preincubated without agonist. Similar results were obtained using either a (/sup 3/H)adenine prelabeling assay or a cyclic AMP radioimmunoassay to measure cyclic AMP levels. This phenomenon, which is termed sensitization, is ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-mediated and rapid in onset and reversal. Yohimbine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-selective antagonist, blocked norepinephrine-induced sensitization, whereas prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic) and sotalol (..beta..-adrenergic) did not. The time for half-maximal sensitization was 5 min and the half-time for reversal was 10 min. Only a 2-fold sensitization of cyclic AMP production stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide was observed, indicating that sensitization is relatively selective for forskolin. Sensitization reflects an increased production of cyclic AMP and not a decreased degradation of cyclic AMP, since incubation with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and forskolin did not mimic sensitization. Increasing the levels of cyclic AMP during the preincubation had no effect on sensitization, indicating that sensitization is not caused by decreased cyclic AMP levels during the preincubation. This rapid and dramatic sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is a previously unreported effect that can be added to the growing list of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic responses that are not mediated by a decrease in cyclic AMP.

  16. G alpha 15 and G alpha 16 couple a wide variety of receptors to phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Offermanns, S; Simon, M I

    1995-06-23

    The murine G-protein alpha-subunit G alpha 15 and its human counterpart G alpha 16 are expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, and they have been shown to regulate beta-isoforms of inositide-specific phospholipase C. We studied the ability of a variety of receptors to interact with G alpha 15 and G alpha 16 by cotransfecting receptors and G-protein alpha-subunits in COS-7 cells. Activation of beta 2 adrenergic and muscarinic M2 receptors in cells expressing the receptors alone or together with G alpha q, G alpha 11, or G alpha 14 led to a very small stimulation of endogenous phospholipase C. However, when the receptors were coexpressed with G alpha 15 and G alpha 16, addition of appropriate ligands caused a severalfold increase in inositol phosphate production which was time- and dose-dependent. A similar activation of phospholipase C was observed when several other receptors which were previously shown to couple to members of the Gi and Gs family were coexpressed with G alpha 15/16. In addition, stimulation of inositol phosphate formation via receptors naturally coupled to phospholipase C was enhanced by cotransfection of G alpha 15 and G alpha 16. These data demonstrate that G alpha 15 and G alpha 16 are unique in that they can be activated by a wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors. The ability of G alpha 15 and G alpha 16 to bypass the selectivity of receptor G-protein interaction can be a useful tool to understand the mechanism of receptor-induced G-protein activation. In addition, the promiscuous behavior of G alpha 15 and G alpha 16 toward receptors may be helpful in finding ligands corresponding to orphan receptors whose signaling properties are unknown.

  17. Indenopyrazole oxime ethers: synthesis and β1-adrenergic blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Tommaso; Caruso, Anna; Rochais, Christophe; Caputo, Angela Maria; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Dallemagne, Patrick; Filice, Elisabetta; Genest, David; Pasqua, Teresa; Puoci, Francesco; Saturnino, Carmela; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; El-Kashef, Hussein

    2015-03-06

    This paper reports the synthesis and cardiac activity of new β-blockers derived from (Z/E)-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-4(1H)-one oximes (5a,b). The latter compounds were allowed to react with epichlorohydrin, followed by reacting the oxiranyl derivatives formed (6a,b) with some aliphatic amines to give the target compounds (Z/E)-1-phenyl-1H-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-4-one O-((2-hydroxy-3-(substituted amino)propyl)oxime (7a-c) and (Z/E)-1-methyl-1H-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-4-one O-((2-hydroxy-3-(substituted amino)propyl)oxime (8a-c). These final products 7a-c and 8a-c were evaluated for their ability to modulate the cardiac performance of a prototype mammalian heart. The results showed that, out of these molecules tested, 7b elicits a more potent depressant effect on contractility and relaxation, and competitively antagonizes β1-adrenergic receptors.

  18. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D).

  19. Targeting folate receptor alpha for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Debra H.; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Pellizzari, Giulia; Opzoomer, James; Bloomfield, Jacinta; Fittall, Matthew; Grigoriadis, Anita; Figini, Mariangela; Canevari, Silvana; Spicer, James F.; Tutt, Andrew N.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2016-01-01

    Promising targeted treatments and immunotherapy strategies in oncology and advancements in our understanding of molecular pathways that underpin cancer development have reignited interest in the tumor-associated antigen Folate Receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein. Its overexpression in tumors such as ovarian, breast and lung cancers, low and restricted distribution in normal tissues, alongside emerging insights into tumor-promoting functions and association of expression with patient prognosis, together render FRα an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize the role of FRα in cancer development, we consider FRα as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool, and we discuss different targeted treatment approaches with a specific focus on monoclonal antibodies. Renewed attention to FRα may point to novel individualized treatment approaches to improve the clinical management of patient groups that do not adequately benefit from current conventional therapies. PMID:27248175

  20. Cocaine increases dopaminergic neuron and motor activity via midbrain α1 adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Richard Brandon; Wanat, Matthew J; Gomez, Jorge A; Brown, Zeliene J; Phillips, Paul E M; Paladini, Carlos A

    2015-03-13

    Cocaine reinforcement is mediated by increased extracellular dopamine levels in the forebrain. This neurochemical effect was thought to require inhibition of dopamine reuptake, but cocaine is still reinforcing even in the absence of the dopamine transporter. Here, we demonstrate that the rapid elevation in dopamine levels and motor activity elicited by cocaine involves α1 receptor activation within the ventral midbrain. Activation of α1 receptors increases dopaminergic neuron burst firing by decreasing the calcium-activated potassium channel current (SK), as well as elevates dopaminergic neuron pacemaker firing through modulation of both SK and the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih). Furthermore, we found that cocaine increases both the pacemaker and burst-firing frequency of rat ventral-midbrain dopaminergic neurons through an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent mechanism within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. These results demonstrate the mechanism underlying the critical role of α1 adrenergic receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurotransmission and behavior by cocaine.

  1. The muscle-specific laminin receptor alpha7 beta1 integrin negatively regulates alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, D; Echtermayer, F; Schöber, S; Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1999-02-01

    alpha7 beta1 is the major integrin complex expressed in differentiated muscle cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. In this work we have expressed the alpha7 integrin subunit in CHO cells to investigate the functional properties of this receptor. After transfection with alpha7 CHO cells acquired the ability to adhere and spread on laminin 1 consistent with the laminin receptor activity of the alpha7 beta1. alpha7 transfectants, however, showed a 70% reduction in the ability to adhere to fibronectin and were unable to assemble a fibronectin matrix. The degree of reduction was inversely related to the level of alpha7 expression. To define the mechanisms underlying this adhesive defect we analyzed surface expression and functional properties of the alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor. Although cell surface expression of alpha5 beta1 was reduced by a factor of 20-25% in alpha7 transfectants compared to control untransfected cells, this slight reduction was not sufficient to explain the dramatic reduction in cell adhesion (70%) and matrix assembly (close to 100%). Binding studies showed that the affinity of 125I-fibronectin for its surface receptor was decreased by 50% in alpha7 transfectants, indicating that the alpha5 beta1 integrin is partially inactivated in these cells. Inactivation can be reversed by Mn2+, a cation known to increase integrin affinity for their ligands. In fact, incubation of cells with Mn2+ restored fibronectin binding affinity, adhesion to fibronectin, and assembly of fibronectin matrix in alpha7 transfectants. These data indicate that alpha7 expression leads to the functional down regulation of alpha5beta1 integrin by decreasing ligand binding affinity and surface expression. In conclusion, the data reported establish the existence of a negative cooperativity between alpha7 and alpha5 integrins that may be important in determining functional regulation of integrins during myogenic differentiation.

  2. Knockout of the alpha 1A/C-adrenergic receptor subtype: the alpha 1A/C is expressed in resistance arteries and is required to maintain arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Rokosh, D Gregg; Simpson, Paul C

    2002-07-09

    alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) play a major role in blood pressure regulation. The three alpha 1-AR subtypes (A/C, B, and D) stimulate contraction of isolated arteries, but it is uncertain how different subtypes contribute to blood pressure regulation in the intact animal. We studied the role of the alpha 1A/C subtype by using gene knockout. alpha 1A/C knockout (KO) mice were viable and overtly normal. The LacZ reporter gene replaced alpha 1A/C coding sequence in the KO, and beta-galactosidase staining was present in resistance arteries and arterioles, but not in the thoracic aorta or its main branches. By tail cuff manometer and arterial catheter in conscious mice, alpha 1A/C KO mice were hypotensive at rest, with an 8-12% reduction of blood pressure dependent on alpha 1A/C gene copy number. A61603, an alpha 1A/C-selective agonist, caused a pressor response that was lost in the KO and reduced but significant in heterozygous mice with a single copy of the alpha 1A/C. A subtype-nonselective agonist [phenylephrine (PE)] caused a pressor response in KO mice, but the final arterial pressure was only 85% of wild type. The baroreflex was reset in the KO, and heart rate variability was decreased. After baroreflex blockade with atropine, PE increased blood pressure but did not change heart rate. Cardiac and vascular responses to the beta-AR agonist isoproterenol were unchanged, and the arterial lumen area was not altered. We conclude that the alpha 1A/C-AR subtype is a vasopressor expressed in resistance arteries and is required for normal arterial blood pressure regulation. alpha 1A/C-selective antagonists might be desirable antihypertensive agents.

  3. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  4. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    SciTech Connect

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  6. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine, a novel radiolabeled agonist for studying central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.M.; Siegel, B.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Unlabeled p-iodoclonidine was efficacious in attenuating forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. Maximal attenuation was 76 +/- 3%, with an EC50 of 347 +/- 60 nM. Comparable values of epinephrine were 72 +/- 3% and 122 +/- 22 nM. Responses to both agonists were abolished by 10 microM phentolamine. Therefore, p-iodoclonidine is an agonist in a cell culture model system of the neuronal alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. p-(125I)Iodoclonidine binding to membranes were measured using various regions of the rat brain. The agonist labeled a single population of sites present on cerebral cortical membranes, which was saturable (Bmax = 230 fmol/mg of protein) and possessed high affinity for the ligand (Kd = 0.6 nM). Binding was largely specific (93% at 0.6 nM). A variety of alpha 2-adrenergic agonists and antagonists were shown to compete for the binding of the radioligand. The binding of p-(125I)iodoclonidine was much less sensitive to agents that interact with alpha 1-adrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Approximately 65% of the binding was sensitive to guanine nucleotides. Association kinetics using 0.4 nM radioligand were biphasic (37% associate rapidly, with kobs = 0.96 min-1, with the remainder binding more slowly, with kobs = 0.031 min-1) and reached a plateau by 90 min at 25 degrees. Dissociation kinetics were also biphasic, with 30% of the binding dissociating rapidly (k1 = 0.32 min-1) and the remainder dissociating 50-fold more slowly (k2 = 0.006 min-1). Agonist binding is, therefore, uniquely complex and probably reflects the conformational changes that accompany receptor activation.

  7. α1-adrenergic receptor signaling in osteoblasts regulates clock genes and bone morphogenetic protein 4 expression through up-regulation of the transcriptional factor nuclear factor IL-3 (Nfil3)/E4 promoter-binding protein 4 (E4BP4).

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Togari, Akifumi

    2014-06-13

    Several studies have demonstrated that the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) plays an important role in regulating cell growth and function in osteoblasts. However, the physiological role of α1-AR signaling in bone metabolism is largely unknown. In this study, the stimulation of phenylephrine (PHE), a nonspecific α1-AR agonist, increased the transcriptional factor Nfil3/E4BP4 and led to the rhythmic expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. We also showed that Bmp4 mRNA expression peaked in bone near zeitgeber time 8 in a 24-h rhythm. Furthermore, the expression of Nfil3 and Bmp4 displayed a circadian pattern with opposing phases, which suggested that Nfil3 repressed the expression of the Bmp4 gene during a circadian cycle. On a molecular level, both loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments demonstrated that Nfil3/E4BP4 negatively regulated Bmp4 expression in osteoblasts. Furthermore, the systemic administration of PHE increased the expression of Nfil3 mRNA in bone, whereas it decreased that of Bmp4 mRNA. The expression of Bmp4 mRNA was decreased significantly by exposure to PHE, and this was concomitant with the increase in Nfil3 binding to the D-box-containing Bmp4 promoter region in MC3T3-E1 cells, which indicates that the expression of Nfil3 by α1-AR signaling can bind directly to the Bmp4 promoter and inhibit Bmp4 expression in osteoblasts. Our results suggest that α1-AR signaling regulates clock genes and Bmp4 expression in osteoblasts. Moreover, α1-AR signaling negatively regulated Bmp4 expression by up-regulating the transcriptional factor Nfil3/E4BP4 in osteoblasts.

  8. Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In-Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Padilla-Banks E, Clark G, Newbold RR. Assessing estrogenic activity of phytochemicals using transcriptional activation and immature mouse...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0347 TITLE: Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In Mice 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0347 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  9. Phosphorylation and function of alpha4beta2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Isabel; Moroni, Mirko

    2006-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha4 and beta2 subunits expressed in heterologous expression systems assemble into high- and low-affinity receptors (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001; Nelson et al., 2003), which reflects the assembly of two distinct subunit stoichiometries of alpha4beta2 receptor (Nelson et al., 2003). The high-affinity receptor ([alpha4]2[beta2]3) is about 100-fold more sensitive to ACh than the low-affinity receptor ([alpha4]3[beta2]2) (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001; Nelson et al., 2003). Recent evidence implicated 14-3-3 proteins as modulators of the relative abundance of nAChR subunits in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where ligand-gated ion channels assemble. The 14-3-3 proteins influence ER-to-plasma membrane trafficking of multimeric cell-surface proteins (O'Kelly et al., 2002). 14-3-3 proteins bind components of these multimeric proteins, and this interaction overrides dibasic COP1 retention signal to permit forward transport of the protein (O'Kelly et al., 2002). In the case of alpha4beta2 nAChRs, 14-3-3 binds the alpha4 subunit, and this association is dependent on phosphorylation of a serine residue within a protein kinase A(PKA) consensus sequence in the large cytoplasmic domain of the alpha4 subunit, which is also a binding motif recognized by 14-3-3 (Jeancloss et al., 2001; O'Kelly et al., 2002). The interplay among PKA, alpha4 subunits, and 14-3-3 proteins increases cell-surface expression of alpha4beta2 nAChRs by increasing steady-state levels of the alpha4 subunit available for assembly with beta2 subunits (Jeancloss et al., 2001). Because it is not known how 14-3-3-dependent changes in the steady-state levels of the alpha4 subunit might affect the functional type of alpha4beta2 receptors, we have investigated the effects of mutations of the 14-3-3 binding motif in the alpha4 subunit on alpha4beta2 nAChR function.

  10. Role of TNF-alpha and its receptors in pericoronitis.

    PubMed

    Beklen, A; Laine, M; Ventä, I; Hyrkäs, T; Konttinen, Y T

    2005-12-01

    The classic stimulus for cellular cytokine production is bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin). It was therefore hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) may be responsible for pericoronitis. TNF-alpha and its receptors were detected by immunohistochemical staining in third molar pericoronitis in ten patients and ten healthy control samples. The percentage of TNF-alpha positive cells was high in pericoronitis (p = 0.0317). TNF receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 were found in macrophage- and fibroblast-like cells, vascular endothelial cells in post-capillary venules, and basal epithelial cells in pericoronitis, but were only weakly expressed in controls. Increased expression of interleukin-1beta and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 was found as a biological indicator of TNF-alpha ligand-receptor interaction. Explanted tissues acquired destructive potential upon TNF-alpha stimulation, whereas TNF-alpha blockers controlled it in inflamed tissues. These findings suggest that, in pericoronitis, inflammatory and resident cells produce and respond to potent pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, with pathogenic and potential therapeutic relevance.

  11. Episodic stimulation of alpha1-adrenoreceptors induces protein kinase C-dependent persistent changes in motoneuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Neverova, Natalia V; Saywell, Shane A; Nashold, Lisa J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Feldman, Jack L

    2007-04-18

    In vitro long-term facilitation (ivLTF) is a novel form of activity-independent postsynaptic enhancement of AMPA receptor function in hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons that can be induced by intermittent activation of 5-HT2 receptors. In vivo respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF) is characterized by a persistent 5-HT2 receptor-dependent increase in respiratory motor output or ventilation after episodic exposures to hypoxia in adult rats. Here, we demonstrate that ivLTF can also be induced by episodic but not continuous stimulation of alpha1-adrenergic receptors that requires protein kinase C (PKC), but not PKA (protein kinase A), activation. Additionally, we show that in vivo respiratory LTF is also alpha1-adrenergic receptor dependent. We suggest that, in vivo, concurrent episodic activation of 5-HT2 and alpha1-adrenergic receptors is necessary to produce long-lasting changes in the excitability of respiratory motoneurons, possibly involving PKC activation via the G alpha(q)-PLC (phospholipase C) signaling pathway common to both receptor subtypes. Such plasticity of XII motor output may increase upper airway muscle (innervated by XII nerve) tone and improve the likelihood that airway patency will be maintained. Elucidating the mechanism underlying LTF can be of clinical importance to the patients suffering from sleep-disordered breathing.

  12. Folate receptor {alpha} regulates cell proliferation in mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Congjun; Evans, Chheng-Orn; Stevens, Victoria L.; Owens, Timothy R.; Oyesiku, Nelson M.

    2009-11-01

    We have previously found that the mRNA and protein levels of the folate receptor alpha (FR{alpha}) are uniquely over-expressed in clinically human nonfunctional (NF) pituitary adenomas, but the mechanistic role of FR{alpha} has not fully been determined. We investigated the effect of FR{alpha} over-expression in the mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cell line as a model for NF pituitary adenomas. We found that the expression and function of FR{alpha} were strongly up-regulated, by Western blotting and folic acid binding assay. Furthermore, we found a higher cell growth rate, an enhanced percentage of cells in S-phase by BrdU assay, and a higher PCNA staining. These observations indicate that over-expression of FR{alpha} promotes cell proliferation. These effects were abrogated in the same {alpha}T3-1 cells when transfected with a mutant FR{alpha} cDNA that confers a dominant-negative phenotype by inhibiting folic acid binding. Finally, by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that mRNA expression of NOTCH3 was up-regulated in FR{alpha} over-expressing cells. In summary, our data suggests that FR{alpha} regulates pituitary tumor cell proliferation and mechanistically may involve the NOTCH pathway. Potentially, this finding could be exploited to develop new, innovative molecular targeted treatment for human NF pituitary adenomas.

  13. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  14. Phenylacetamides as selective alpha-1A adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Patane, M A; DiPardo, R M; Newton, R C; Price, R P; Broten, T P; Chang, R S; Ransom, R W; Di Salvo, J; Nagarathnam, D; Forray, C; Gluchowski, C; Bock, M G

    2000-08-07

    A novel class of potent and selective alpha-1a receptor antagonists has been identified. The structures of these antagonists were derived from truncating the 4-aryl dihydropyridine subunit present in known alpha-1a antagonists. The design principles which led to the discovery of substituted phenylacetamides, the synthesis and SAR of key analogues, and the results of select in vitro and in vivo studies are described.

  15. The integrin alpha 6 beta 4 is a laminin receptor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the putative laminin receptor function of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was assessed. For this purpose, we used a human cell line, referred to as clone A, that was derived from a highly invasive, colon adenocarcinoma. This cell line, which expresses the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin, adheres to the E8 and not to the P1 fragment of laminin. The adhesion of clone A cells to laminin is extremely rapid with half- maximal adhesion observed at 5 min after plating. Adhesion to laminin is blocked by GoH3, and alpha 6 specific antibody (60% inhibition), as well as by A9, a beta 4 specific antibody (30% inhibition). Most importantly, we demonstrate that alpha 6 beta 4 binds specifically to laminin-Sepharose columns in the presence of either Mg2+ or Mn2+ and it is eluted from these columns with EDTA but not with NaCl. The alpha 6 beta 4 integrin does not bind to collagen-Sepharose, but the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin does bind. Clone A cells do not express alpha 6 beta 1 as evidenced by the following observations: (a) no beta 1 integrin is detected in beta 1 immunoblots of GoH3 immunoprecipitates; and (b) no alpha 6 beta 1 integrin is seen in GoH3 immunoprecipitates of clone A extracts that had been immunodepleted of all beta 4 containing integrin using the A9 antibody. These data establish that laminin is a ligand for the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin and that this integrin can function as a laminin receptor independently of alpha 6 beta 1. PMID:1533398

  16. Endocytosis of GPI-linked membrane folate receptor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Rijnboutt, S; Jansen, G; Posthuma, G; Hynes, J B; Schornagel, J H; Strous, G J

    1996-01-01

    GPI-linked membrane folate receptors (MFRs) have been implicated in the receptor-mediated uptake of reduced folate cofactors and folate-based chemotherapeutic drugs. We have studied the biosynthetic transport to and internalization of MFR isoform alpha in KB-cells. MFR-alpha was synthesized as a 32-kD protein and converted in a maturely glycosylated 36-38-kD protein 1 h after synthesis. 32-kD MFR-alpha was completely soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. In contrast, only 33% of the 36-38-kD species could be solubilized at these conditions whereas complete solubilization was obtained in Triton X-100 at 37 degrees C or in the presence of saponin at 0 degree C. Similar solubilization characteristics were found when MFR-alpha at the plasma membrane was labeled with a crosslinkable 125I-labeled photoaffinity-analog of folic acid as a ligand. Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains containing MFR-alpha could be separated from soluble MFR-alpha on sucrose flotation gradients. Only Triton X-100 soluble MFR-alpha was internalized from the plasma membrane. The reduced-folate-carrier, an integral membrane protein capable of translocating (anti-)folates across membranes, was completely excluded from the Triton X-100-resistant membrane domains. Internalized MFR-alpha recycled slowly to the cell surface during which it remained soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found MFR-alpha along the entire endocytic pathway: in clathrin-coated buds and vesicles, and in small and large endosomal vacuoles. In conclusion, our data indicate that a large fraction, if not all, of internalizing MFR-alpha bypasses caveolae.

  17. Endocytosis of GPI-linked membrane folate receptor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    GPI-linked membrane folate receptors (MFRs) have been implicated in the receptor-mediated uptake of reduced folate cofactors and folate-based chemotherapeutic drugs. We have studied the biosynthetic transport to and internalization of MFR isoform alpha in KB-cells. MFR-alpha was synthesized as a 32-kD protein and converted in a maturely glycosylated 36-38-kD protein 1 h after synthesis. 32-kD MFR-alpha was completely soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. In contrast, only 33% of the 36- 38-kD species could be solubilized at these conditions whereas complete solubilization was obtained in Triton X-100 at 37 degrees C or in the presence of saponin at 0 degree C. Similar solubilization characteristics were found when MFR-alpha at the plasma membrane was labeled with a crosslinkable 125I-labeled photoaffinity-analog of folic acid as a ligand. Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains containing MFR-alpha could be separated from soluble MFR-alpha on sucrose flotation gradients. Only Triton X-100 soluble MFR-alpha was internalized from the plasma membrane. The reduced-folate-carrier, an integral membrane protein capable of translocating (anti-)folates across membranes, was completely excluded from the Triton X-100- resistant membrane domains. Internalized MFR-alpha recycled slowly to the cell surface during which it remained soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found MFR-alpha along the entire endocytic pathway: in clathrin-coated buds and vesicles, and in small and large endosomal vacuoles. In conclusion, our data indicate that a large fraction, if not all, of internalizing MFR-alpha bypasses caveolae. PMID:8567728

  18. Human GABAA receptor alpha 1 and alpha 3 subunits genes and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Parsian, A; Cloninger, C R

    1997-05-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. GABA effects are largely mediated by binding to the postsynaptic GABAA receptor, causing the opening of an integral chloride-ion channel. The GABAA antagonists picrotoxin and bicuculline reduce some ethanol-induced behaviors, such as motor impairment, sedation, and hypnosis. The role of this receptor in alcoholism is further supported by effective alleviation of alcohol withdrawal symptoms by GABAA agonists. To determine the role of the GABAA receptor (GABR) genes in the development of alcoholism, we have used alpha 1 and alpha 3 simple sequence repeat polymorphisms in a sample of unrelated alcoholics, alcoholic probands with both parents, and psychiatrically normal controls. For the GABR alpha 1 gene, the differences between allele frequencies, when all alleles were compared together, were not significant between total alcoholics, subtypes of alcoholics, and normal controls. However, for GABR alpha 3, the differences between total alcoholics and normal controls were significant when all alleles were compared together. The differences between subtypes of alcoholics and normal controls were not significant. The results of haplotype relative risk analysis for both genes, GABR alpha 1 and GABR alpha 3, were also negative. It is possible that the sample size in the haplotype relative risk is too small to have power to detect the differences in transmitted versus nontransmitted alleles. There is a need for a replication study in a large family sample that will allow haplotype relative risk or affected sib-pair analysis.

  19. Role of descending noradrenergic system and spinal alpha2-adrenergic receptors in the effects of gabapentin on thermal and mechanical nociception after partial nerve injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Mitsuo; Takasu, Keiko; Kasuya, Noriyo; Shimizu, Shinobu; Honda, Motoko; Ono, Hideki

    2005-03-01

    1. To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic actions of gabapentin, a chronic pain model was prepared by partially ligating the sciatic nerve in mice. The mice then received systemic or local injections of gabapentin combined with either central noradrenaline (NA) depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade. 2. Intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered gabapentin produced antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects that were manifested by elevation of the withdrawal threshold to a thermal (plantar test) or mechanical (von Frey test) stimulus, respectively. 3. Similar effects were obtained in both the plantar and von Frey tests when gabapentin was injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.), suggesting that it acts at both supraspinal and spinal loci. This novel supraspinal analgesic action of gabapentin was only obtained in ligated neuropathic mice, and gabapentin (i.p. and i.c.v.) did not affect acute thermal and mechanical nociception. 4. In mice in which central NA levels were depleted by 6-OHDA, the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of i.p. and i.c.v. gabapentin were strongly suppressed. 5. The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of systemic gabapentin were reduced by both systemic and i.t. administration of yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist. By contrast, prazosin (i.p. or i.t.), an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, did not alter the effects of gabapentin. 6. It was concluded that the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of gabapentin are mediated substantially by the descending noradrenergic system, resulting in the activation of spinal alpha2-adrenergic receptors.

  20. The beta-1 adrenergic antagonist, betaxolol, improves working memory performance in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Brian P; Colgan, Lesley; Nou, Eric; Ovadia, Shira; Wilson, Steven R; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have indicated that beta adrenergic receptor stimulation has no effect on the cognitive functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Blockade of beta-1 and beta-2 receptors in the PFC with the mixed beta-1/beta-2 antagonist, propanolol, had no effect on spatial working memory performance. However, more selective blockade of beta-1 or beta-2 receptors might show efficacy if the two receptors have opposite effects on PFC function. The current study examined the effects of the selective beta-1 antagonist, betaxolol, on working memory in rats and monkeys. In rats, betaxolol (.0011-1.11 microg/.5 microL) was infused into the PFC 5 min before delayed alternation testing. Monkeys were systemically injected with betaxolol (.0000011-.11 mg/kg) 2 hours before delayed response testing. Betaxolol produced a dose-related improvement in working memory performance following either direct PFC infusion in rats, or systemic administration in monkeys. However, some aged monkeys developed serious pancreatic problems over the course of this study. These findings suggest that endogenous activation of the beta-1 adrenergic receptor impairs PFC cognitive function. These results may have therapeutic relevance to post-traumatic stress disorder or other disorders with excessive noradrenergic activity and PFC dysfunction. Pancreatic side effects in aged subjects taking betaxolol warrants further investigation.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a drug/fatty acid-activated trans cription factor involved in the starvation response, and is thus relevant to the ketogenic diet (KD). This article summarizes research indicating the role of PPARalpha in central and peripheral nervous system function with particular reference to downstream targets relevant to anticonvulsant action.

  2. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia.

  3. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif.

  4. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  5. Engineered secreted T-cell receptor alpha beta heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Grégoire, C; Rebaï, N; Schweisguth, F; Necker, A; Mazza, G; Auphan, N; Millward, A; Schmitt-Verhulst, A M; Malissen, B

    1991-01-01

    We have produced a soluble form of a mouse alpha beta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) by shuffling its variable (V) and constant (C) domains to the C region of an immunoglobulin kappa light chain. These chimeric molecules composed of V alpha C alpha C kappa and V beta C beta C kappa chains were efficiently secreted (up to 1 micrograms/ml) by transfected myeloma cells as noncovalent heterodimers of about 95-kDa molecular mass. In the absence of direct binding measurement, we have refined the epitopic analysis of the soluble V alpha C alpha C kappa-V beta C beta C kappa dimers and shown that they react with an anti-clonotypic antibody and two antibodies directed to the C domain of the TCR alpha and beta chains. Conversely, we have raised three distinct monoclonal antibodies against the soluble TCR heterodimers and shown that they recognize surface-expressed TCRs. Two of these antibodies were found to react specifically with the products of the V alpha 2 (V delta 8) and V beta 2 gene segments, respectively. When considered together, these data suggest that these soluble TCR molecules are folded in a conformation indistinguishable from that which they assume at the cell surface. Images PMID:1716770

  6. 3-Methylcholanthrene and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists directly activate estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Maen; Ariazi, Eric; Kim, Kyounghyun; Khan, Shaheen; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert; Liu, Shengxi; Hill, Denise; Finnell, Richard; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Jordan, V Craig; Safe, Stephen

    2006-02-15

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) is an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, and it has been reported that 3MC induces estrogenic activity through AhR-estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) interactions. In this study, we used 3MC and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB) as prototypical AhR ligands, and both compounds activated estrogen-responsive reporter genes/gene products (cathepsin D) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The estrogenic responses induced by these AhR ligands were inhibited by the antiestrogen ICI 182780 and by the transfection of a small inhibitory RNA for ER alpha but were not affected by the small inhibitory RNA for AhR. These results suggest that 3MC and PCB directly activate ER alpha, and this was confirmed in a competitive ER alpha binding assay and in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment in which PCB and 3MC induced CFP-ER alpha/YFP-ER alpha interactions. In a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, PCB and 3MC enhanced ER alpha (but not AhR) association with the estrogen-responsive region of the pS2 gene promoter. Moreover, in AhR knockout mice, 3MC increased uterine weights and induced expression of cyclin D1 mRNA levels. These results show that PCB and 3MC directly activate ER alpha-dependent transactivation and extend the number of ligands that activate both AhR and ER alpha.

  7. Activation of human alpha1 and alpha2 homomeric glycine receptors by taurine and GABA.

    PubMed

    De Saint Jan, D; David-Watine, B; Korn, H; Bregestovski, P

    2001-09-15

    1. Two ligand binding alpha subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the human (H) glycine receptor (GlyR) are involved at inhibitory synapses in the adult and neonatal spinal cord, respectively. The ability of homomeric alphaH1 and alphaH2 GlyRs to be activated by glycine, taurine and GABA was studied in Xenopus oocytes or in the human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cell line. 2. In outside-out patches from HEK cells, glycine, taurine and GABA activated both GlyRs with the same main unitary conductance, i.e. 85 +/- 3 pS (n = 6) for alphaH1, and 95 +/- 5 pS (n = 4) for alphaH2. 3. The sensitivity of both alphaH1 and alphaH2 GlyRs to glycine was highly variable. In Xenopus oocytes the EC50 for glycine (EC50gly) was between 25 and 280 microM for alphaH1 (n = 44) and between 46 and 541 microM for alphaH2 (n = 52). For both receptors, the highest EC50gly values were found on cells with low maximal glycine responses. 4. The actions of taurine and GABA were dependent on the EC50gly: (i) their EC50 values were linearly correlated to EC50gly, with EC50tau approximately 10 EC50gly and EC50GABA approximately 500-800 EC50gly; (ii) they could act either as full or weak agonists depending on the EC50gly. 5. The Hill coefficient (n(H)) of glycine remained stable regardless of the EC50gly whereas n(H) for taurine decreased with increasing EC50tau. 6. The degree of desensitization, evaluated by fast application of saturating concentrations of agonist on outside-out patches from Xenopus oocytes, was similar for glycine and taurine on both GlyRs and did not exceed 50 %. 7. Our data concerning the variations of EC50gly and the subsequent behaviour of taurine and GABA could be qualitatively described by the simple del Castillo-Katz scheme, assuming that the agonist gating constant varies whereas the binding constants are stable. However, the stability of the Hill coefficient for glycine was not explained by this model, suggesting that other mechanisms are involved in the modulation of EC50.

  8. Solution structure of alpha-conotoxin PIA, a novel antagonist of alpha6 subunit containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Si-Hyung; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Olivera, Baldomero M; McIntosh, J Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon

    2005-12-30

    alpha-Conotoxin PIA is a novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist isolated from Conus purpurascens that targets nAChR subtypes containing alpha6 and alpha3 subunits. alpha-conotoxin PIA displays 75-fold higher affinity for rat alpha6/alpha3beta2beta3 nAChRs than for rat alpha3beta2 nAChRs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of alpha-conotoxin PIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The alpha-conotoxin PIA has an "omega-shaped" overall topology as other alpha4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Yet, unlike other neuronally targeted alpha4/7-conotoxins, its N-terminal tail Arg1-Asp2-Pro3 protrudes out of its main molecular body because Asp2-Pro3-Cys4-Cys5 forms a stable type I beta-turn. In addition, a kink introduced by Pro15 in the second loop of this toxin provides a distinct steric and electrostatic environment from those in alpha-conotoxins MII and GIC. By comparing the structure of alpha-conotoxin PIA with other functionally related alpha-conotoxins we suggest structural features in alpha-conotoxin PIA that may be associated with its unique receptor recognition profile.

  9. Solution structure of {alpha}-conotoxin PIA, a novel antagonist of {alpha}6 subunit containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Si-Hyung; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Olivera, Baldomero M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon . E-mail: khhan600@kribb.re.kr

    2005-12-30

    {alpha}-Conotoxin PIA is a novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist isolated from Conus purpurascens that targets nAChR subtypes containing {alpha}6 and {alpha}3 subunits. {alpha}-conotoxin PIA displays 75-fold higher affinity for rat {alpha}6/{alpha}3{beta}2{beta}3 nAChRs than for rat {alpha}3{beta}2 nAChRs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of {alpha}-conotoxin PIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The {alpha}-conotoxin PIA has an '{omega}-shaped' overall topology as other {alpha}4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Yet, unlike other neuronally targeted {alpha}4/7-conotoxins, its N-terminal tail Arg{sup 1}-Asp{sup 2}-Pro{sup 3} protrudes out of its main molecular body because Asp{sup 2}-Pro{sup 3}-Cys{sup 4}-Cys{sup 5} forms a stable type I {beta}-turn. In addition, a kink introduced by Pro{sup 15} in the second loop of this toxin provides a distinct steric and electrostatic environment from those in {alpha}-conotoxins MII and GIC. By comparing the structure of {alpha}-conotoxin PIA with other functionally related {alpha}-conotoxins we suggest structural features in {alpha}-conotoxin PIA that may be associated with its unique receptor recognition profile.

  10. Solution conformation of a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA that discriminates {alpha}3 vs. {alpha}6 nAChR subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Olivera, Baldomero M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon . E-mail: khhan600@kribb.re.kr

    2006-06-23

    {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA from Conus omaria is the only {alpha}-conotoxin that shows a {approx}20-fold higher affinity to the {alpha}3{beta}2 over the {alpha}6{beta}2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We have determined a three-dimensional structure of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA has an '{omega}-shaped' overall topology with His{sup 5}-Asn{sup 12} forming an {alpha}-helix. Structural features of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA responsible for its selectivity are suggested by comparing its surface characteristics with other functionally related {alpha}4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Reduced size of the hydrophilic area in {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA seems to be associated with the reduced affinity towards the {alpha}6{beta}2 nAChR subtype.

  11. Integrin alpha v beta 3 differentially regulates adhesive and phagocytic functions of the fibronectin receptor alpha 5 beta 1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The plasma protein fibronectin is an important opsonin in wound repair and host defense. To better understand the process of fibronectin- mediated phagocytosis, we have transfected K562 cells, which endogenously express alpha 5 beta 1, with alpha v beta 3. In these transfectants, antibodies to alpha v beta 3 block phagocytosis of fibronectin-opsonized beads completely, even though half the ingestion occurs through endogenous alpha 5 beta 1 receptors. alpha 5 beta 1- mediated adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces is unaffected by alpha v beta 3 ligation. Neither alpha v beta 5 nor alpha M beta 2 ligation affects alpha 5 beta 1 phagocytic function in transfectants expressing these receptors. Pharmacologic data suggest that alpha v beta 3 ligation suppresses the phagocytic competence of high affinity alpha 5 beta 1 receptors through a signal transduction pathway, perhaps involving protein kinase C. In addition to its significance for phagocytosis, alpha v beta 3 regulation of alpha 5 beta 1 function may be significant for its roles in cell migration, metastasis, and angiogenesis. PMID:7525603

  12. Block of the alpha9 nicotinic receptor by ototoxic aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Rothlin, C V; Katz, E; Verbitsky, M; Vetter, D E; Heinemann, S F; Elgoyhen, A B

    2000-10-01

    In the present study, we report that the alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes is reversibly blocked by aminoglycoside antibiotics. The aminoglycosides tested blocked the alpha9 nAChR in a concentration-dependent manner with the following rank order of potency: neomycin>gentamicin>streptomycin>amikacin>kanamycin. The antagonistic effect of gentamicin was not overcome by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine (ACh), indicative of a non-competitive type of block. Blockage of ACh-evoked currents by gentamicin was found to be voltage-dependent, being more potent at hyperpolarized than at depolarized holding potentials. Furthermore, gentamicin blockage was dependent upon the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration, shown by the fact that increments in extracellular Ca(2+) significantly reduced the potency of this aminoglycoside to block the alpha9 nAChR. Possible mechanisms of blockage by the aminoglycosides are discussed. The present results suggest that the initial reversible actions of aminoglycosides at the organ of Corti, such as the elimination of the olivocochlear efferent function, are due in part to the interaction with the native alpha9-containing cholinergic receptor of the outer hair cells.

  13. Alpha 2A adrenergic receptor gene and suicide.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Adolfo; Mamdani, Firoza; Lalovic, Aleksandra; Anguelova, Milena; Lesage, Alain; Seguin, Monique; Chawky, Nadia; Desautels, Alex; Turecki, Gustavo

    2004-02-15

    Suicide is a complex trait resulting from the interaction of several predisposing factors, among which genes seem to play an important role. Alterations in the noradrenergic system have been observed in postmortem brain studies of suicide victims when compared to controls. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that genetic variants of the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor gene are implicated in suicide and/or have a modulatory effect on personality traits that are believed to mediate suicidal behavior. We studied a sample of suicides (N=110) and control subjects (N=130) for genetic variation at four loci, including three in the promoter region (g-1800t, c-1291 g and the g-261a) of the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor gene, and a potentially functional locus, N251K, which leads to an amino acid change (asparagine to lysine). No significant differences were observed at the promoter loci in terms of allelic or genotypic distribution between suicides and controls. However, analysis of the functional polymorphism N251K revealed that the 251 K allele was only present among suicides, though only three suicide cases had this allele, two of which were homozygous. These results are preliminary. If confirmed, they suggest that variation at the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor gene may play a role in a small proportion of suicide cases.

  14. Phospholipase D1 is involved in α1-adrenergic contraction of murine vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jörg W; Loga, Florian; Stegner, David; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hofmann, Franz

    2014-03-01

    α1-Adrenergic stimulation increases blood vessel tone in mammals. This process involves a number of intracellular signaling pathways that include signaling via phospholipase C, diacylglycerol (DAG), and protein kinase C. So far, it is not certain whether signaling via phospholipase D (PLD) and PLD-derived DAG is involved in this process. We asked whether PLD participates in the α1-adrenergic-mediated signaling in vascular smooth muscle. α1-Adrenergic-induced contraction was assessed by myography of isolated aortic rings and by pressure recordings using the hindlimb perfusion model in mice. The effects of the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol (IC50 0.15 vol%) and the inactive congener 2-butanol were comparatively studied. Inhibition of PLD by 1-butanol reduced specifically the α1-adrenergic-induced contraction and the α1-adrenergic-induced pressure increase by 10 and 40% of the maximum, respectively. 1-Butanol did not influence the aortic contractions induced by high extracellular potassium, by the thromboxane analog U46619, or by a phorbol ester. The effects of 1-butanol were absent in mice that lack PLD1 (Pld1(-/-) mice) or that selectively lack the CaV1.2 channel in smooth muscle (sm-CaV1.2(-/-) mice) but still present in the heterozygous control mice. α1-Adrenergic contraction of vascular smooth muscle involves activation of PLD1, which controls a portion of the α1-adrenergic-induced CaV1.2 channel activity.

  15. Mapping of the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Safran, A; Gershoni, J M; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic peptides and their respective antibodies have been used in order to map the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. By using antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 169-181 of the alpha subunit, we demonstrate that this sequence is included within the 18-kDa toxin binding fragment previously reported. Furthermore, the 18-kDa fragment was also found to bind a monoclonal antibody (5.5) directed against the cholinergic binding site. Sequential proteolysis of the acetylcholine receptor with trypsin, prior to Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion, resulted in a 15-kDa toxin binding fragment that is included within the 18-kDa fragment but is shorter than it only at its carboxyl terminus. This 15-kDa fragment therefore initiates beyond Asp-152 and terminates in the region of Arg-313/Lys-314. In addition, experiments are reported that indicate that in the intact acetylcholine receptor, Cys-128 and/or Cys-142 are not crosslinked by disulfide bridges with any of the cysteines (at positions 192, 193, and 222) that reside in the 15-kDa toxin binding fragment. Finally, the synthetic dodecapeptide Lys-His-Trp-Val-Tyr-Tyr-Thr-Cys-Cys-Pro-Asp-Thr, which is present in the 15-kDa fragment (corresponding to residues 185-196 of the alpha subunit) was shown to bind alpha-bungarotoxin directly. This binding was completely inhibited by competition with d-tubocurarine. Images PMID:3458258

  16. Mapping of the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Safran, A; Gershoni, J M; Fuchs, S

    1986-05-01

    Synthetic peptides and their respective antibodies have been used in order to map the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. By using antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 169-181 of the alpha subunit, we demonstrate that this sequence is included within the 18-kDa toxin binding fragment previously reported. Furthermore, the 18-kDa fragment was also found to bind a monoclonal antibody (5.5) directed against the cholinergic binding site. Sequential proteolysis of the acetylcholine receptor with trypsin, prior to Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion, resulted in a 15-kDa toxin binding fragment that is included within the 18-kDa fragment but is shorter than it only at its carboxyl terminus. This 15-kDa fragment therefore initiates beyond Asp-152 and terminates in the region of Arg-313/Lys-314. In addition, experiments are reported that indicate that in the intact acetylcholine receptor, Cys-128 and/or Cys-142 are not crosslinked by disulfide bridges with any of the cysteines (at positions 192, 193, and 222) that reside in the 15-kDa toxin binding fragment. Finally, the synthetic dodecapeptide Lys-His-Trp-Val-Tyr-Tyr-Thr-Cys-Cys-Pro-Asp-Thr, which is present in the 15-kDa fragment (corresponding to residues 185-196 of the alpha subunit) was shown to bind alpha-bungarotoxin directly. This binding was completely inhibited by competition with d-tubocurarine.

  17. alpha-latrotoxin action probed with recombinant toxin: receptors recruit alpha-latrotoxin but do not transduce an exocytotic signal.

    PubMed Central

    Ichtchenko, K; Khvotchev, M; Kiyatkin, N; Simpson, L; Sugita, S; Südhof, T C

    1998-01-01

    alpha-Latrotoxin stimulates neurotransmitter release probably by binding to two receptors, CIRL/latrophilin 1 (CL1) and neurexin Ialpha. We have now produced recombinant alpha-latrotoxin (LtxWT) that is as active as native alpha-latrotoxin in triggering synaptic release of glutamate, GABA and norepinephrine. We have also generated three alpha-latrotoxin mutants with substitutions in conserved cysteine residues, and a fourth mutant with a four-residue insertion. All four alpha-latrotoxin mutants were found to be unable to trigger release. Interestingly, the insertion mutant LtxN4C exhibited receptor-binding affinities identical to wild-type LtxWT, bound to CL1 and neurexin Ialpha as well as LtxWT, and similarly stimulated synaptic hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositolphosphates. Therefore, receptor binding by alpha-latrotoxin and stimulation of phospholipase C are insufficient to trigger exocytosis. This conclusion was confirmed in experiments with La3+ and Cd2+. La3+ blocked release triggered by LtxWT, whereas Cd2+ enhanced it. Both cations, however, had no effect on the stimulation by LtxWT of phosphatidylinositolphosphate hydrolysis. Our data show that receptor binding by alpha-latrotoxin and activation of phospholipase C do not by themselves trigger exocytosis. Thus receptors recruit alpha-latrotoxin to its point of action without activating exocytosis. Exocytosis probably requires an additional receptor-independent activity of alpha-latrotoxin that is selectively inhibited by the LtxN4C mutation and by La3+. PMID:9799228

  18. Chronic stress enhances progression of periodontitis via α1-adrenergic signaling: a potential target for periodontal disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan

    2014-10-17

    This study assessed the roles of chronic stress (CS) in the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and explored the underlying mechanisms of periodontitis. Using an animal model of periodontitis and CS, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the protein levels of the α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) were assessed. Furthermore, human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic the process of inflammation. The proliferation of the HPDLFs and the expression of α1-AR and β2-AR were assessed. The inflammatory-related cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were detected after pretreatment with the α1/β2-AR blockers phentolamine/propranolol, both in vitro and in vivo. Results show that periodontitis under CS conditions enhanced the expression of TH, α1-AR and β2-AR. Phentolamine significantly reduced the inflammatory cytokine levels. Furthermore, we observed a marked decrease in HPDLF proliferation and the increased expression of α1-ARfollowing LPS pretreatment. Pretreatment with phentolamine dramatically ameliorated LPS-inhibited cell proliferation. In addition, the blocking of α1-ARsignaling also hindered the upregulation of the inflammatory-related cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. These results suggest that CS can significantly enhance the pathological progression of periodontitis by an α1-adrenergic signaling-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in those patients suffering from concurrent CS.

  19. The alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonist A61603 reduces cardiac polyunsaturated fatty acid and endocannabinoid metabolites associated with inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Ilaiwy, Amro; Montgomery, Megan D.; Simpson, Paul C.; Jensen, Brian C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) with three highly homologous subtypes (α1A, α1B, and α1D). Of these three subtypes, only the α1A and α1B are expressed in the heart. Multiple pre-clinical models of heart injury demonstrate cardioprotective roles for the α1A. Non-selective α1-AR activation promotes glycolysis in the heart, but the functional α1-AR subtype and broader metabolic effects have not been studied. Objectives Given the high metabolic demands of the heart and previous evidence indicating benefit from α1A activation, we chose to investigate the effects of α1A activation on the cardiac metabolome in vivo. Methods Mice were treated for one week with a low, subpressor dose of A61603, a highly selective and potent α1A agonist. Cardiac tissue and serum were analyzed using a non-targeted metabolomics approach. Results We identified previously unrecognized metabolic responses to α1A activation, most notably broad reduction in the abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and endocannabinoids (ECs). Conclusion Given the well characterized roles of PUFAs and ECs in inflammatory pathways, these findings suggest a possible role for cardiac α1A-ARs in the regulation of inflammation and may offer novel insight into the mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective benefit of selective pharmacologic α1A activation. PMID:28533737

  20. Nootropic alpha7 nicotinic receptor allosteric modulator derived from GABAA receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Ng, Herman J; Whittemore, Edward R; Tran, Minhtam B; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Broide, Ron S; Johnstone, Timothy B; Zheng, Lijun; Stevens, Karen E; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-05-08

    Activation of brain alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChRs) has broad therapeutic potential in CNS diseases related to cognitive dysfunction, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In contrast to direct agonist activation, positive allosteric modulation of alpha7 nAChRs would deliver the clinically validated benefits of allosterism to these indications. We have generated a selective alpha7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator (PAM) from a library of GABAA receptor PAMs. Compound 6 (N-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-[[(4-chloro-phenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide) evokes robust positive modulation of agonist-induced currents at alpha7 nAChRs, while preserving the rapid native characteristics of desensitization, and has little to no efficacy at other ligand-gated ion channels. In rodent models, it corrects sensory-gating deficits and improves working memory, effects consistent with cognitive enhancement. Compound 6 represents a chemotype for allosteric activation of alpha7 nAChRs, with therapeutic potential in CNS diseases with cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular synapses: phylogenetic differences detected by snake alpha-neurotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Burden, S J; Hartzell, H C; Yoshikami, D

    1975-01-01

    Phylogenetic differences in acetylcholine receptors from skeletal neuromuscular synapses of various species of snakes and lizards have been investigated, using the snake venom alpha-neurotoxins alpha-atratoxin (cobrotoxin) and alpha-bungarotoxin. The acetylcholine receptors of the phylogenetically primitive lizards, like those from all other vertebrates previously tested, are blocked by these alpha-neurotoxins. In contrast, receptors from snakes and advanced lizards are insensitive to one or both of the toxins. It is suggested that toxin-resistant acetylcholine receptors appeared early in the evolution of Squamata and preceded the appearance of alpha-neurotoxins. Images PMID:1081230

  2. Direct evidence for a β1-adrenergic receptor–directed autoimmune attack as a cause of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valérie; Hein, Lutz; Triebel, Sven; Angermann, Christiane E.; Ertl, Georg; Lohse, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    Today, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) represents the main cause of severe heart failure and disability in younger adults and thus is a challenge for public health. About 30% of DCM cases are genetic in origin; however, the large majority of cases are sporadic, and a viral or immune pathogenesis is suspected. Following the established postulates for pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, here we provide direct evidence that an autoimmune attack directed against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor may play a causal role in DCM. First, we immunized inbred rats against the second extracellular β1-receptor loop (β1-ECII; 100% sequence identity between human and rat) every month. All these rats developed first, receptor-stimulating anti–β1-ECII Ab’s and then, after 9 months, progressive severe left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction. Second, we transferred sera from anti–β1-ECII–positive and Ab-negative animals every month to healthy rats of the same strain. Strikingly, all anti–β1-ECII–transferred rats also developed a similar cardiomyopathic phenotype within a similar time frame, underlining the pathogenic potential of these receptor Ab’s. As a consequence, β1-adrenergic receptor–targeted autoimmune DCM should now be categorized with other known receptor Ab-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as Graves disease or myasthenia gravis. Although carried out in an experimental animal model, our findings should further encourage the development of therapeutic strategies that combat harmful anti–β1-ECII in receptor Ab–positive DCM patients. PMID:15146239

  3. Studies on the receptors to 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one and 5alpha-androst-16-en-3alpha-ol in sow nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Gennings, J N; Gower, D B; Bannister, L H

    1977-02-28

    The presence of receptors to the "boar taint" pheromones 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one and 5alpha-androst-16-en-3alpha-ol has been demonstrated in sow olfactory mucosa. Binding studies indicated that a sufficiently low concentration of olfactory tissue homogenate exhibited saturation of binding of 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one, and this was of high affinity compared with control tissues of non-olfactory and heated olfactory tissues. Analysis of receptor binding of 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one gave a value for the affinity constant (Ka) of approx. 8.3-10(8) M-1 and the value for the molar concentration of binding sites (n[M]) was approx. 3.3 pmol/mg protein. Almost identical values of Ka and n [M] were obtained when receptor binding of 5alpha-[5alpha-3H]androst-16-en-3alpha-ol was investigated (Ka 8.4-10(8) M-1; n [M] 3.7 pmol/mg protein). This suggests that the same receptor binds both 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one and 5alpha-androst-16-en-3alpha-ol with equally high affinity. In a preliminary investigation to establish the specificity of the receptor, the binding of 17beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-3-one was assayed; this steroid is odourless but has a similar structure except in ring D to 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one. Binding was of the low affinity, non-specific type only, indicating that the sow olfactory receptors are not sensitive to this androgen.

  4. Estrogen-related receptor alpha and cancer: axis of evil.

    PubMed

    Ranhotra, Harmit S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is perhaps the fastest growing non-communicable disease in the human population worldwide. Although the molecular mechanism of cancer initiation and progression is known to some extent, however, the majority of pathways responsible for its onset, development and progression are largely unknown. Many members of the nuclear receptors (NRs) superfamily of transcriptional factors have key roles in cancer. Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is one of the members of the NR superfamily and studies have linked it with a wide variety of cancers. In endocrine-related cancers such as breast cancer, ERRα regulates a number of target genes directing cell proliferation and growth independent of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Knockdown of ERRα in a number of cancer tissues and cell lines significantly reduced tumor growth and malignancy indicating dependence on ERRα activity. The pro-angiogenesis factor vascular endothelial growth factor expression has been shown to be regulated by ERRα and has implications in several types of cancer. The effect of ERRα on cancers seems to be multipronged via regulation of cell cycle regulators, osteopontin, hypoxia inducible factor-1 as well as several energy metabolism genes that are part of glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipogenesis, etc., providing a metabolic twist to cancer. In this article, the action of ERRα on various types of cancers including new developments in this field shall be reviewed.

  5. KRÜPPEL-LIKE FACTOR 9 AND REGULATION OF ENDOMETRIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA SIGNALING

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endometrial cancer risk is linked to aberrant estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha) signaling caused by increased ER alpha activation due to hyper-estrogenic environments or mutations in growth-regulatory factors. We had shown that ER alpha signaling is attenuated by the Sp1-related transcription facto...

  6. T-cell receptor V alpha and C alpha alleles associated with multiple and myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Oksenberg, J R; Sherritt, M; Begovich, A B; Erlich, H A; Bernard, C C; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Steinman, L

    1989-01-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding that alpha chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, we amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR alpha cDNA probe. These PCR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, we have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V alpha and C alpha markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals. Images PMID:2915992

  7. T-cell receptor V alpha and C alpha alleles associated with multiple and myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Oksenberg, J R; Sherritt, M; Begovich, A B; Erlich, H A; Bernard, C C; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Steinman, L

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding that alpha chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, we amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR alpha cDNA probe. These PCR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, we have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V alpha and C alpha markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  8. Definition of the molecular basis for estrogen receptor-related receptor-alpha-cofactor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Stéphanie; Dwyer, Mary A; McDonnell, Donald P

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor-alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor that does not appear to require a classical small molecule ligand to facilitate its interaction with coactivators and/or hormone response elements within target genes. Instead, the apo-receptor is capable of interacting in a constitutive manner with coactivators that stimulate transcription by acting as protein ligands. We have screened combinatorial phage libraries for peptides that selectively interact with ERRalpha to probe the architecture of the ERRalpha-coactivator pocket. In this manner, we have uncovered a fundamental difference in the mechanism by which this receptor interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, as compared with members of the steroid receptor coactivator subfamily of coactivators. Our findings suggest that it may be possible to develop ERRalpha ligands that exhibit different pharmacological activities as a consequence of their ability to differentially regulate coactivator recruitment. In addition, these findings have implications beyond ERRalpha because they suggest that subtle alterations in the structure of the activation function-2 pocket within any nuclear receptor may enable differential recruitment of coactivators, an observation of notable pharmaceutical importance.

  9. Effects of wortmannin on alpha-1/alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated contractile responses in rabbit vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Waen-Safranchik, V I; Deth, R C

    1994-06-01

    The inhibitory effect of wortmannin (WO), a fungus-derived protein kinase inhibitor, was assessed on contractile responses elicited by phenylephrine-induced alpha 1-(alpha 1 R) and UK 14304-induced alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2R) stimulation in the rabbit aorta and saphenous vein, respectively. In agonist dose-response studies, WO caused a noncompetitive inhibition of both alpha 1R and alpha 2R responses, but was more potent against alpha 2R. Maximally effective single-dose responses at both receptors were less sensitive to WO. The initial alpha 1R contractile response, associated with intracellular Ca2+ release and myosin light chain kinase activation, was relatively insensitive to WO, while the Ca2+ influx-dependent tonic contraction was more sensitive. Contractions induced by high K+ buffer were relatively insensitive to WO in both the aorta and saphenous vein. These results indicate that WO inhibits receptor-initiated Ca2+ influx-dependent contractile responses such as those caused by alpha 2R stimulation and the sustained phase of alpha 1R stimulation more readily than Ca2+ release-dependent responses.

  10. Progesterone receptors A and B and estrogen receptor alpha expression in normal breast tissue and fibroadenomas.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Gisele; Schneider, Lolita; Cericatto, Rodrigo; Capp, Edison; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2009-06-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common benign breast tumors, occurring mainly in young women. Their responses to the hormonal environment are similar to those of normal breast tissue, which suggests that steroid receptors may play a role in tumor development. We evaluated the gene and protein expression of progesterone receptors A and B (PRA and PRB) and the protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) in fibroadenoma samples, comparing with adjacent normal breast tissue, from 11 premenopausal women. Progesterone and estradiol levels were determined. No alterations in the PRs gene and protein expression and the ER-alpha protein expression were observed between the follicular and luteal phases, in normal breast versus fibroadenomas. Protein levels of PRA and PRB were higher in fibroadenomas compared to normal breast tissue (P = 0.038 and P = 0.031), while the PRs mRNA levels were similar in both tissues (P = 0.721 and P = 0.139). There were no differences in ER-alpha protein expression between normal breast tissue and fibroadenomas (P = 0.508). The PRA:PRB ratio was similar in the tissues, and also showed a strong correlation in both (r = 0.964, P = 0.0001). Our data suggest a role of PRs in the growth and development of fibroadenomas, although without alterations of the PRA:PRB ratio in these tumors. The absence of alterations in ER-alpha protein levels could be a characteristic behavior of fibroadenomas, unlike breast cancer.

  11. Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Modulate Uterine α1-Adrenergic Sensitivity in Ovine Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hynan, Linda S.; Liu, Xiao-tie; Roy, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The uteroplacental vasculature is refractory to α-adrenergic stimulation, and large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa) may contribute. We examined the effects of uterine artery (UA) BKCa inhibition with tetraethylammonium (TEA) on hemodynamic responses to phenylephrine (PE) at 101 to 117 days and 135 to 147 days of ovine gestation, obtaining dose responses for mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and uteroplacental blood flow (UPBF) and vascular resistance (UPVR) before and during UA TEA infusions. The UA α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) were assessed. The PE increased MAP and UPVR and decreased HR and UPBF dose dependently at both gestations (P < .001, analysis of variance). The %▵MAP was less at 135 to 147 days before and during TEA infusions (P ≤ .008); however, responses during TEA were greater (P ≤ .002). The PE increased %▵UPVR>>%▵MAP, thus %▵UPBF fell. The TEA enhanced PE-mediated increases in %▵UPVR at 135 to 147 days (P ≤ .03). The UA α1-AR expression was unchanged in pregnancy. Uterine vascular responses to PE exceed systemic vascular responses throughout pregnancy and are attenuated by BKCa activation, suggesting BKCa protect UPBF. PMID:24026311

  12. The human T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes.

    PubMed

    Scaviner, D; Lefranc, M P

    2000-01-01

    'Human T Cell Receptor Alpha Variable (TRAV) Genes', the eighth report of the 'IMGT Locus in Focus' section, comprises four tables: (1) 'Number of human germline TRAV genes at 14q11 and potential repertoire'; (2) 'Human germline TRAV genes at 14q11'; (3) 'Human TRAV allele table', and (4) 'Correspondence between the different human TRAV gene nomenclatures'. These tables are available at the IMGT Marie-Paule page of IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics database (http://imgt.cines.fr:8104) created by Marie-Paule Lefranc, Université Montpellier II, CNRS, France. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Alpha adrenergic modulation on effects of norepinephrine transporter inhibitor reboxetine in five-choice serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yia-Ping; Lin, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chia-Hsin; Kao, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Shang-Tang; Tung, Che-Se

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the effects of a norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine (RBX) on an attentional performance test. Adult SD rats trained with five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) were administered with RBX (0, 3.0 and 10 mg/kg) in the testing day. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist PRA and alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist RX821002 were used to clarify the RBX effect. Results revealed that rat received RBX at 10 mg/kg had an increase in the percentage of the correct response and decreases in the numbers of premature response. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist Prazosin (PRA) at 0.1 mg/kg reversed the RBX augmented correct responding rate. However, alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist RX821002 at 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg dose dependently reversed the RBX reduced impulsive responding. Our results suggested that RBX as a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor can be beneficial in both attentional accuracy and response control and alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic receptors might be involved differently. PMID:19678962

  14. Interleukin-13 Receptor Alpha 2-Targeted Glioblastoma Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal primary brain tumor, and despite several refinements in its multimodal management, generally has very poor prognosis. Targeted immunotherapy is an emerging field of research that shows great promise in the treatment of GBM. One of the most extensively studied targets is the interleukin-13 receptor alpha chain variant 2 (IL13Rα2). Its selective expression on GBM, discovered almost two decades ago, has been a target for therapy ever since. Immunotherapeutic strategies have been developed targeting IL13Rα2, including monoclonal antibodies as well as cell-based strategies such as IL13Rα2-pulsed dendritic cells and IL13Rα2-targeted chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells. Advanced therapeutic development has led to the completion of several clinical trials with promising outcomes. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances in the IL13Rα2-targeted immunotherapy and evaluate the most promising strategy for targeted GBM immunotherapy. PMID:25247196

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  17. [Arterial hypertension. Density of alpha 1 and alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in blood platelets, beta adrenergic receptors in the lymphocytes and serum catecholamine levels].

    PubMed

    Halawa, B

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the sympathetic nervous system on blood pressure is mediated predominantly by catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine acting on alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors. The study of human alpha-adrenergic and beta-adrenergic receptors in hypertension is hampered by the lack of easily accessible cardiovascular tissues. Therefore numerous investigators have used platelets as a model system to study alpha-adrenergic receptors and lymphocytes to study beta-adrenergic receptors in humans. During the last decade some studies with small patient numbers have been published, that generally did not detect significant differences in platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptor density between normotensive and hypertensive subjects, however, most investigators have described higher density of beta-receptors in lymphocytes from hypertensive patients than in cells from normotensive control subjects. This study was carried out to analyse density of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors in platelet membrane preparations and beta-adrenoreceptors in lymphocytes before and after physiological increase in plasma catecholamines. It was found that density of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoreceptors in platelet membranes of patients with stable blood hypertension was similar to that in the healthy individuals while beta-adrenergic receptors density in lymphocytes was higher. In normotensives posture induced rise in plasma catecholamines correlated with reduced alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoreceptors density as well as beta-adrenoreceptor density. Hypertensive subjects had similar rise in plasma catecholamines with upright posture, but no changes in receptor density was observed. These suggest that in hypertension alpha-adrenergic and beta-adrenergic regulation by agonist may be disturbed.

  18. Noncontiguous domains of the alpha-factor receptor of yeasts confer ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Sen, M; Marsh, L

    1994-01-14

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor receptor has a 3400-fold higher affinity for the S. cerevisiae alpha-factor peptide (c-alpha-f) than for the Saccharomyces kluyveri alpha-factor peptide (k-alpha-f) as determined by competition for [3H] c-alpha-f binding. The S. kluyveri alpha-factor receptor has an approximately 2-fold higher affinity for k-alpha-f than for c-alpha-f. The S. kluyveri receptor gene (k-STE2) is incompletely regulated by S. cerevisiae mating type and poorly expressed on the surface of an S. cerevisiae mating type a strain. A chimeric receptor (c/k1) with amino acid residues 1-45 derived from S. cerevisiae and amino acid residues 46-427 from S. kluyveri exhibits the binding specificity of the S. kluyveri receptor. However, chimeric receptors containing residues 1-168 (c/k2) or 1-250 (c/k3) from S. cerevisiae and the remainder from the S. kluyveri receptor exhibit specificities similar to one another, but intermediate between the parent S. cerevisiae and S. kluyveri receptors. The relative ability of c-alpha-f and k-alpha-f to induce growth arrest in strains expressing chimeric receptors parallels relative affinity. Thus, two noncontiguous domains that include putative extracellular loops 1 and 3 and associated transmembrane segments, but exclude the extracellular NH2 terminus and loop 2, appear to contribute to alpha-factor receptor ligand specificity. COOH-terminal regions of the S. kluyveri receptor appear to confer a desensitization defect when expressed in S. cerevisiae. The S. cerevisiae receptor truncated at residue 296 retains ligand specificity for growth arrest.

  19. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Trosclair, Christopher; Pollen, Maressa; Capraro, Gerald; Cotelingam, James; Shackelford, Rodney E.

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by a t(15;17) which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype. PMID:25076892

  20. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Trosclair, Christopher; Pollen, Maressa; Capraro, Gerald; Cotelingam, James; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by a t(15;17) which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype.

  1. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as potent alpha-adrenergic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seoung-Soo; Bavadekar, Supriya A; Lee, Sang-Il; Patil, Popat N; Lalchandani, S G; Feller, Dennis R; Miller, Duane D

    2005-11-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs are described. Replacement of the carbon next to the imidazoline ring of phentolamine with a nitrogen atom provides compounds (2, 3) that are about 1.6 times and 4.1 times more potent functionally than phentolamine on rat alpha1-adrenergic receptors, respectively. In receptor binding assays, the affinities of phentolamine and its bioisosteric analogs were determined on the human embryonic kidney (HEK) and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing the human alpha1- and alpha2-AR subtypes, respectively. Analogs 2 and 3, both, displayed higher binding affinities at the alpha2- versus the alpha1-ARs, affinities being the least at the alpha1B-AR. Binding affinities of the methoxy ether analog 2 were greater than those of the phenolic analog 3 at all six alpha-AR subtypes. One of the nitrogen atoms in the imidazoline ring of phentolamine was replaced with an oxygen atom to give compounds 4 and 5, resulting in a 2-substituted oxazoline ring. The low functional antagonist activity on rat aorta, and binding potencies of these two compounds on human alpha1A- and alpha2A-AR subtypes indicate that a basic functional group is important for optimum binding to the alpha1- and alpha2A-adrenergic receptors.

  2. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  3. Adrenergic receptor subtypes in the cerebral circulation of newborn piglets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptor subtype mediating cerebral vasoconstriction during sympathetic nerve stimulation in the newborn piglet. The effect of ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antagonists prazosin and yohimbine on the cerebrovascular response to unilateral electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 15 V) of the superior cervical sympathetic trunk was studied in 25 newborn piglets. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with tracer microspheres. Sympathetic stimulation decreased blood flow to the ipsilateral cerebrum hippocampus, choroid plexus, and masseter muscle. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with prazosin inhibited the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the cerebrum, hippocampus, and masseter muscle and abolished it in the choroid plexus. ..cap alpha../sub s/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with yohimbine had no effect. Following the higher dose of yohimbine, however, blood flow to all brain regions was increased by approximately two-fold, possibly due to enhanced cerebral metabolism. These data demonstrate that vascular ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors mediate vasoconstriction to neuroadrenergic stimulation in cerebral resistance vessels in the newborn piglet.

  4. Effects of prenatal malnutrition on GABAA receptor alpha1, alpha3 and beta2 mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Janine L; Alexander, Mark J; Galler, Janina R; Farb, David H; Russek, Shelley J

    2003-09-15

    Exposure of pregnant rats to protein malnutrition throughout pregnancy alters the developing hippocampus, leading to increased inhibition and selective changes in hippocampal-mediated behaviors. Given that GABA mediates most inhibitory neurotransmission, we asked whether selective changes in the levels of GABA receptor subunit mRNAs might result. Quantitative RNase protection profiling of 12 GABAA and GABAB receptor subunit mRNAs show that alpha1 and beta2 decrease in the adult (P90) hippocampal formation of prenatally malnourished rats, while the levels of alpha3 are increased. Moreover, the distribution of alpha1, alpha3 and beta2 mRNAs remains unchanged in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal subfields relative to dentate gyrus. The data suggest that prenatal malnutrition produces global changes of certain GABAA, but not GABAB, receptor mRNAs in the hippocampal formation.

  5. Nicotine inhibits Fc epsilon RI-induced cysteinyl leukotrienes and cytokine production without affecting mast cell degranulation through alpha 7/alpha 9/alpha 10-nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Boyd, R Thomas; Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Langley, Raymond J; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2010-07-01

    Smokers are less likely to develop some inflammatory and allergic diseases. In Brown-Norway rats, nicotine inhibits several parameters of allergic asthma, including the production of Th2 cytokines and the cysteinyl leukotriene LTC(4). Cysteinyl leukotrienes are primarily produced by mast cells, and these cells play a central role in allergic asthma. Mast cells express a high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI). Following its cross-linking, cells degranulate and release preformed inflammatory mediators (early phase) and synthesize and secrete cytokines/chemokines and leukotrienes (late phase). The mechanism by which nicotine modulates mast cell activation is unclear. Using alpha-bungarotoxin binding and quantitative PCR and PCR product sequencing, we showed that the rat mast/basophil cell line RBL-2H3 expresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) alpha7, alpha9, and alpha10; exposure to exceedingly low concentrations of nicotine (nanomolar), but not the biologically inactive metabolite cotinine, for > or = 8 h suppressed the late phase (leukotriene/cytokine production) but not degranulation (histamine and hexosaminidase release). These effects were unrelated to those of nicotine on intracellular free calcium concentration but were causally associated with the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) activity and the PI3K/ERK/NF-kappaB pathway, including phosphorylation of Akt and ERK and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. The suppressive effect of nicotine on the late-phase response was blocked by the alpha7/alpha9-nAChR antagonists methyllycaconitine and alpha-bungarotoxin, as well as by small interfering RNA knockdown of alpha7-, alpha9-, or alpha10-nAChRs, suggesting a functional interaction between alpha7-, alpha9-, and alpha10-nAChRs that might explain the response of RBL cells to nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. This "hybrid" receptor might serve as a target for novel antiallergic/antiasthmatic therapies.

  6. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  7. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  8. GRK5 Gln41Leu polymorphism is not associated with sensitivity to β1-adrenergic blockade in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Daniel; Cunningham, Andrew J; Sofowora, Gbenga G; Kohli, Utkarsh; Li, Chun; Friedman, Eitan A; Muszkat, Mordechai; Menon, Usha B; Wood, Alastair JJ; Stein, C Michael

    2010-01-01

    Aims A common, functionally significant polymorphism in GRK5 (Gln41Leu) encodes a gain-of-function enzyme that enhances desensitization of the β1-adrenergic receptor. GRK5 Leu41 has been postulated to confer endogenous ‘genetic β-blockade’ and contribute to an attenuated response to β-blockers in black subjects. The effects of this GRK5 variant on sensitivity to a β-blocker have not been studied in humans. We hypothesized that the GRK5 Gln41Leu variant contributes to interindividual variability in response to β-blockade and to the ethnic difference in sensitivity between black and Caucasian individuals. Materials & methods We measured the heart rate at rest and during a graded incremental exercise in 154 healthy subjects (85 white and 69 black) before and after an oral administration of 25 mg atenolol. We determined the genotypes of GRK5 (Gln41Leu), β1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1 Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly) genotypes and plasma atenolol concentrations. The effects of genotype and covariates on sensitivity to atenolol, measured as the reduction in exercise-induced tachycardia, were determined using multiple regression analyses. Results The minor allele frequency of GRK5 Leu41 was 32.6% in blacks and 0% in whites. Black individuals were less sensitive to atenolol than white individuals (p ≤ 0.011) but this was not explained by the GRK5 genotype. The GRK5 genotype had no effect on resting heart rate before (p = 0.61) and after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, atenolol concentrations, BMI and ADRB1 genotypes (p = 0.81). The decrease in heart rate after atenolol administration did not differ significantly according to the GRK5 genotype at rest or after exercise, before (all p > 0.14) and after statistical adjustment for covariates (all p > 0.17). Conclusion The GRK5 Gln41Leu polymorphism does not affect sensitivity to the β1-adrenergic blocker, atenolol, during acute physiological adrenergic stimulation, nor does it contribute to the ethnic differences in

  9. Use of radioactive 7alpha, 17alpha-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone (mibolerone) in the assay of androgen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.; Liao, S.

    1984-01-01

    Tritiated 7alpha, 17alpha-dimethyl-19-nortestosterone (DMNT; mibolerone), a synthetic androgen stable to metabolic conversion in the rat ventral prostate, is an excellent radioactive ligand for the quantitation and characterization of androgen receptors in prostate, liver, and cultured cells. DMNT is more receptor-selective than 17alpha-methyl-17beta-hydroxy-estra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (R1881); DMNT interacts with glucocorticoid and progestin receptors much less strongly than R1881. Unlike 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, DMNT does not bind tightly to testosterone-estradiol binding globulin of human serum. The hydroxylapatite-filter assay employed clearly distinguished between DMNT binding to androgen receptors of rat ventral prostate and interaction of DMNT with androgen binding protein of epididymides. The prostate cytosol (/sup 3/H)DMNT-receptor complex sediments in two forms (4 and 8 S) in a low salt medium. In 0.4 M KCl, both the prostate cytosol and nuclear (/sup 3/H)DMNT-receptor complexes migrated as 3-4 S components. The formation of both the cytosol and nuclear DMNT-receptor complexes is inhibited by antiandrogens and 17beta-estradiol.

  10. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  11. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  12. Human myometrial adrenergic receptors during pregnancy: identification of the alpha-adrenergic receptor by (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, M.M.; Hayashida, D.; Roberts, J.M.

    1985-07-15

    The radioactive alpha-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binds to particulate preparations of term pregnant human myometrium in a manner compatible with binding to the alpha-adrenergic receptor (alpha-receptor). (/sup 3/H) Dihydroergocryptine binds with high affinity (KD = 2 nmol/L and low capacity (receptor concentration = 100 fmol/mg of protein). Adrenergic agonists compete for (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding sites stereo-selectively ((-)-norepinephrine is 100 times as potent as (+)-norepinephrine) and in a manner compatible with alpha-adrenergic potencies (epinephrine approximately equal to norepinephrine much greater than isoproterenol). Studies in which prazosin, an alpha 1-antagonist, and yohimbine, and alpha 2-antagonist, competed for (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding sites in human myometrium indicated that approximately 70% are alpha 2-receptors and that 30% are alpha 1-receptors. (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding to human myometrial membrane particulate provides an important tool with which to study the molecular mechanisms of uterine alpha-adrenergic response.

  13. The nonpsychotropic cannabinoid cannabidiol modulates and directly activates alpha-1 and alpha-1-Beta glycine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Demir, Reyhan; Leuwer, Martin; de la Roche, Jeanne; Krampfl, Klaus; Foadi, Nilufar; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2009-01-01

    Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. Cannabidiol is a nonpsychotropic plant constituent of Cannabis sativa. As we hypothesized that non-CB receptor mechanisms of cannabidiol might contribute to its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects, we investigated the interaction of cannabidiol with strychnine-sensitive alpha(1 )and alpha(1)beta glycine receptors by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cannabidiol showed a positive allosteric modulating effect in a low micromolar concentration range (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 12.3 +/- 3.8 micromol/l and alpha(1)beta = 18.1 +/- 6.2 micromol/l). Direct activation of glycine receptors was observed at higher concentrations above 100 micromol/l (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 132.4 +/- 12.3 micromol/l and alpha(1)beta = 144.3 +/- 22.7 micromol/l). These in vitro results suggest that strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors may be a target for cannabidiol mediating some of its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties.

  14. Homology model of human interferon-alpha 8 and its receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Seto, M. H.; Harkins, R. N.; Adler, M.; Whitlow, M.; Church, W. B.; Croze, E.

    1995-01-01

    Human interferon-alpha 8 (HuIFN alpha 8), a type I interferon (IFN), is a cytokine belonging to the hematopoietic super-family that includes human growth hormone (HGH). Recent data identified two human type I IFN receptor components. One component (p40) was purified from human urine by its ability to bind to immobilized type I IFN. A second receptor component (IFNAR), consisting of two cytokine receptor-like domains (D200 and D200'), was identified by expression cloning. Murine cells transfected with a gene encoding this protein were able to produce an antiviral response to human IFN alpha 8. Both of these receptor proteins have been identified as members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of which HGH receptor is a member. The cytokine receptor-like structural motifs present in p40 and IFNAR were modeled based on the HGH receptor X-ray structure. Models of the complexes of HuIFN alpha 8 with the receptor subunits were built by superpositioning the conserved C alpha backbone of the HuIFN alpha 8 and receptor subunit models with HGH and its receptor complex. The HuIFN alpha 8 model was constructed from the C alpha coordinates of murine interferon-beta crystal structure. Electrostatic potentials and hydrophobic interactions appear to favor the model of HuIFN alpha 8 interacting with p40 at site 1 and the D200' domain of IFNAR at site 2 because there are regions of complementary electrostatic potential and hydrophobic interactions at both of the proposed binding interfaces. Some of the predicted receptor binding residues within HuIFN alpha 8 correspond to functionally important residues determined previously for human IFN alpha 1, IFN alpha 2, and IFN alpha 4 subtypes by site-directed mutagenesis studies. The models predict regions of interaction between HuIFN alpha 8 and each of the receptor proteins, and provide insights into interactions between other type I IFNs (IFN-alpha subtypes and IFN-beta) and their respective receptor components. PMID:7613464

  15. Fast skeletal muscle troponin I is a co-activator of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yuping; Chen Bin; Chen Jian; Lou Guiyu; Chen Shiuan; Zhou Dujin

    2008-05-16

    ERR{alpha} (estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. To further our understanding of the detailed molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by ERR{alpha}, we searched for ERR{alpha}-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system by screening a human mammary gland cDNA expression library with the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERR{alpha} as the 'bait'. Fast skeletal muscle troponin I (TNNI2), along with several known nuclear receptor co-activators, were isolated. We demonstrated that TNNI2 localizes to the cell nucleus and interacts with ERR{alpha} in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. GST pull-down assays also revealed that TNNI2 interacts directly with ERR{alpha}. Through luciferase reporter gene assays, TNNI2 was found to enhance the transactivity of ERR{alpha}. Combining mutagenesis and yeast two-hybrid assays, we mapped the ERR{alpha}-interacting domain on TNNI2 to a region encompassing amino acids 1-128. These findings reveal a new function for TNNI2 as a co-activator of ERR{alpha}.

  16. β1-Adrenergic and M2 Muscarinic Autoantibodies and Thyroid Hormone Facilitate Induction of Atrial Fibrillation in Male Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Murphy, Taylor; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Bing; Veitla, Vineet; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Kem, David C; Yu, Xichun

    2016-01-01

    Activating autoantibodies to the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors are present in a very high percentage of patients with Graves' disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible animal model and thereby to examine the impact of these endocrine-like autoantibodies alone and with thyroid hormone on induction of thyroid-associated atrial tachyarrhythmias. Five New Zealand white rabbits were coimmunized with peptides from the second extracellular loops of the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors to produce both sympathomimetic and parasympathomimetic antibodies. A catheter-based electrophysiological study was performed on anesthetized rabbits before and after immunization and subsequent treatment with thyroid hormone. Antibody expression facilitated the induction of sustained sinus, junctional and atrial tachycardias, but not AF. Addition of excessive thyroid hormone resulted in induced sustained AF in all animals. AF induction was blocked acutely by the neutralization of these antibodies with immunogenic peptides despite continued hyperthyroidism. The measured atrial effective refractory period as one parameter of AF propensity shortened significantly after immunization and was acutely reversed by peptide neutralization. No further decrease in the effective refractory period was observed after the addition of thyroid hormone, suggesting other cardiac effects of thyroid hormone may contribute to its role in AF induction. This study demonstrates autonomic autoantibodies and thyroid hormone potentiate the vulnerability of the heart to AF, which can be reversed by decoy peptide therapy. These data help fulfill Witebsky's postulates for an increased autoimmune/endocrine basis for Graves' hyperthyroidism and AF.

  17. Nebivolol, a β1-adrenergic blocker, protects from peritoneal membrane damage induced during peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Abensur, Hugo; Albar-Vizcaino, Patricia; Parra, Emilio González; Sandoval, Pilar; Ramírez, Laura García; del Peso, Gloria; Acedo, Juan Manuel; Bajo, María A.; Selgas, Rafael; Tomero, José A. Sánchez; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a form of renal replacement treatment, which employs the peritoneal membrane (PM) to eliminate toxins that cannot be removed by the kidney. The procedure itself, however, contributes to the loss of the PM ultrafiltration capacity (UFC), leading consequently to the technique malfunction. β-blockers have been considered deleterious for PM due to their association with loss of UFC and induction of fibrosis. Herein we analyzed the effects of Nebivolol, a new generation of β1-blocker, on PM alterations induced by PD fluids (PDF). In vitro: We found that mesothelial cells (MCs) express β1-adrenergic receptor. MCs were treated with TGF-β to induce mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and co-treated with Nebivolol. Nebivolol reversed the TGF-β effects, decreasing extracellular matrix synthesis, and improved the fibrinolytic capacity, decreasing plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and increasing tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) supernatant levels. Moreover, Nebivolol partially inhibited MMT and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-6 levels in supernatants. In vivo: Twenty-one C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups. Control group carried a catheter without PDF infusion. Study group received intraperitoneally PDF and oral Nebivolol during 30 days. PDF group received PDF alone. Nebivolol maintained the UFC and reduced PM thickness, MMT and angiogenesis promoted by PDF. It also improved the fibrinolytic capacity in PD effluents decreasing PAI-1 and IL-8 and increased tPA levels. Conclusion: Nebivolol protects PM from PDF-induced damage, promoting anti-fibrotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-fibrinolytic effects. PMID:27102153

  18. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors alpha 4* and alpha 6* differentially modulate dopamine release in mouse striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erin L; Yoshikami, Doju; McIntosh, J Michael

    2008-06-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) plays a major role in the regulation of motor coordination and in the processing of salient information. We used voltammetry to monitor DA-release evoked by electrical stimulation in striatal slices, where interneurons continuously release acetylcholine. Use of the alpha6-selective antagonist alpha-conotoxin MII[E11A] and alpha4 knockout mice enabled identification of two populations of DA-ergic fibers. The first population had a low action potential threshold, and action potential-evoked DA-release from these fibers was modulated by alpha6. The second population had a higher action potential threshold, and only alpha4(non-alpha6) modulated action potential-evoked DA-release. Striatal DA-ergic neurons fire in both tonic and phasic patterns. When stimuli were applied in a train to mimic phasic firing, more DA-release was observed in alpha4 knockout versus wild-type mice. Furthermore, block of alpha4(non-alpha6), but not of alpha6, increased DA release evoked by a train. These results indicate that there are different classes of striatal DA-ergic fibers that express different subtypes of nicotinic receptors.

  19. Morphine inhibits an alpha9-acetylcholine nicotinic receptor-mediated response by a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Lioudyno, M I; Verbitsky, M; Holt, J C; Elgoyhen, A B; Guth, P S

    2000-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are known to be targets for modulation by a number of substances, including the opiates. It is known that acetylcholine (ACh) coexists with opioid peptides in cochlear efferent neurons, and such a colocalization has been proposed for the vestibular system. In the present study we test the hypothesis that morphine, an opioid receptor agonist with a broad spectrum of selectivity, modulates alpha9nACh receptor-mediated responses in frog vestibular hair cells. Morphine dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited ACh-induced currents as recorded by the perforated patch-clamp method. In the presence of morphine the ACh dose-response curve was shifted to the right in a parallel fashion, suggesting a competitive interaction. However, naloxone did not antagonize the inhibition produced by morphine. To test the hypothesis that morphine could interact with the alpha9nACh receptor without the involvement of opioid receptors, experiments were performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with the alpha9nACh receptor cRNA. The currents activated by ACh in Xenopus oocytes, a system that lacks opioid receptors, were also dose-dependently inhibited by morphine. We conclude that morphine inhibits the alpha9nACh receptor-mediated response in hair cells and Xenopus oocytes through a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors but may be a direct block of the alpha9nACh receptor.

  20. Positive allosteric modulatory effects of ajulemic acid at strychnine-sensitive glycine alpha1- and alpha1beta-receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Leuwer, Martin; Demir, Reyhan; Krampfl, Klaus; de la Roche, Jeanne; Foadi, Nilufar; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2009-04-01

    The synthetic cannabinoid ajulemic acid (CT-3) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist which was found to reduce pain scores in neuropathic pain patients in the absence of cannabis-like psychotropic adverse effects. The reduced psychotropic activity of ajulemic acid has been attributed to a greater contribution of peripheral CB receptors to its mechanism of action as well as to non-CB receptor mechanisms. Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. As we hypothesised that additional non-CB receptor mechanisms of ajulemic acid might contribute to its effect in neuropathic pain, we investigated the interaction of ajulemic acid with strychnine-sensitive alpha(1)- and alpha(1)beta-glycine receptors by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ajulemic acid showed a positive allosteric modulating effect in a concentration range which can be considered close to clinically relevant concentrations (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 9.7 +/- 2.6 microM and alpha(1)beta = 12.4 +/- 3.4 microM). Direct activation of glycine receptors was observed at higher concentrations above 100 microM (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 140.9 +/- 21.5 microM and alpha(1)beta = 154.3 +/- 32.1 microM). These in vitro results demonstrate that ajulemic acid modulates strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in clinically relevant concentrations.

  1. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Bagheri, Marzieh; Hani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Features of malignant melanoma (MM) vary in the different geographic regions of the world. This may be attributable to environmental, ethnic, and genetic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) in MM in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was planned as a descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional investigation. During this study, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of MM was studied for ER-α using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In this study, 38 patients (female/male; 20/18) with a definite diagnosis of malignant cutaneous melanoma and mean age of 52.4 ± 11.2 years were investigated. Using envision IHC staining, there were not any cases with ER-α expression. Conclusion: In confirmation to the most previous studies, expression of ER-α was negative in MM. It is recommended to investigate the expression of estrogen receptor beta and other markers in MM. PMID:28299306

  2. Allosteric modulation of alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by HEPES.

    PubMed

    Weltzin, Maegan M; Huang, Yanzhou; Schulte, Marvin K

    2014-06-05

    A number of new positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been reported that enhance responses of neuronal alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes to orthosteric ligands. PAMs represent promising new leads for the development of therapeutic agents for disorders involving alterations in nicotinic neurotransmission including Autism, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. During our recent studies of alpha4beta2 PAMs, we identified a novel effect of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES). The effects of HEPES were evaluated in a phosphate buffered recording solution using two-electrode voltage clamp techniques and alpha4beta2 and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine induced responses of high-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors were potentiated 190% by co-exposure to HEPES. Responses were inhibited at higher concentrations (bell-shaped concentration/response curve). Coincidentally, at concentrations of HEPES typically used in oocyte recording (5-10mM), the potentiating effects of HEPES are matched by its inhibitory effects, thus producing no net effect. Mutagenesis results suggest HEPES potentiates the high-sensitivity stoichiometry of the alpha4beta2 receptors through action at the beta2+/beta2- interface and is dependent on residue beta2D218. HEPES did not potentiate low-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors and did not produce any observable effect on acetylcholine induced responses on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  3. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Mouse Adrenal Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Gahring, Lorise C.; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7G). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7G expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7G cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7G expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7G, TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7G. Occasional α7G cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7G cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  4. Opposite effects of the acute promyelocytic leukemia PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins on retinoic acid signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Ruthardt, M; Testa, U; Nervi, C; Ferrucci, P F; Grignani, F; Puccetti, E; Grignani, F; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1997-01-01

    Fusion proteins involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and the PML or PLZF nuclear protein are the genetic markers of acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs). APLs with the PML-RAR alpha or the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein are phenotypically indistinguishable except that they differ in their sensitivity to retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation: PML-RAR alpha blasts are sensitive to RA and patients enter disease remission after RA treatment, while patients with PLZF-RAR alpha do not. We here report that (i) like PML-RAR alpha expression, PLZF-RAR alpha expression blocks terminal differentiation of hematopoietic precursor cell lines (U937 and HL-60) in response to different stimuli (vitamin D3, transforming growth factor beta1, and dimethyl sulfoxide); (ii) PML-RAR alpha, but not PLZF-RAR alpha, increases RA sensitivity of hematopoietic precursor cells and restores RA sensitivity of RA-resistant hematopoietic cells; (iii) PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar RA binding affinities; and (iv) PML-RAR alpha enhances the RA response of RA target genes (those for RAR beta, RAR gamma, and transglutaminase type II [TGase]) in vivo, while PLZF-RAR alpha expression has either no effect (RAR beta) or an inhibitory activity (RAR gamma and type II TGase). These data demonstrate that PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar (inhibitory) effects on RA-independent differentiation and opposite (stimulatory or inhibitory) effects on RA-dependent differentiation and that they behave in vivo as RA-dependent enhancers or inhibitors of RA-responsive genes, respectively. Their different activities on the RA signalling pathway might underlie the different responses of PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha APLs to RA treatment. The PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein contains an approximately 120-amino-acid N-terminal motif (called the POZ domain), which is also found in a variety of zinc finger proteins and a group of poxvirus proteins and which mediates protein

  5. Rat alpha6beta2delta GABAA receptors exhibit two distinct and separable agonist affinities.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Stephen H; Amin, Jahanshah

    2007-06-15

    The onset of motor learning in rats coincides with exclusive expression of GABAA receptors containing alpha6 and delta subunits in the granule neurons of the cerebellum. This development temporally correlates with the presence of a spontaneously active chloride current through alpha6-containing GABAA receptors, known as tonic inhibition. Here we report that the coexpression of alpha6, beta2, and delta subunits produced receptor-channels which possessed two distinct and separable states of agonist affinity, one exhibiting micromolar and the other nanomolar affinities for GABA. The high-affinity state was associated with a significant level of spontaneous channel activity. Increasing the level of expression or the ratio of beta2 to alpha6 and delta subunits increased the prevalence of the high-affinity state. Comparative studies of alpha6beta2delta, alpha1beta2delta, alpha6beta2gamma2, alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha4beta2delta receptors under equivalent levels of expression demonstrated that the significant level of spontaneous channel activity is uniquely attributable to alpha6beta2delta receptors. The pharmacology of spontaneous channel activity arising from alpha6beta2delta receptor expression corresponded to that of tonic inhibition. For example, GABAA receptor antagonists, including furosemide, blocked the spontaneous current. Further, the neuroactive steroid 5alpha-THDOC and classical glycine receptor agonists beta-alanine and taurine directly activated alpha6beta2delta receptors with high potency. Specific mutation within the GABA-dependent activation domain (betaY157F) impaired both low- and high-affinity components of GABA agonist activity in alpha6betaY157Fdelta receptors, but did not attenuate the spontaneous current. In comparison, a mutation located between the second and third transmembrane segments of the delta subunit (deltaR287M) significantly diminished the nanomolar component and the spontaneous activity. The possibility that the high affinity state

  6. Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    and Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kelvin W. Gee RECIPIENT: University of California Irvine...Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dual Modulators of GABA-A and Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors for Treating Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...receptor (GABAAR) mediated signaling. Therefore GABAARs may be a relevant therapeutic target for blocking or reversing the symptoms of ASD. Nicotinic

  7. Key roles of hydrophobic rings of TM2 in gating of the alpha9alpha10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Plazas, Paola V; De Rosa, María J; Gomez-Casati, María E; Verbitsky, Miguel; Weisstaub, Noelia; Katz, Eleonora; Bouzat, Cecilia; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2005-08-01

    We have performed a systematic mutagenesis of three hydrophobic rings (17', 13' and 9') within transmembrane region (TM) 2 of the alpha9alpha10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) to a hydrophilic (threonine) residue and compared the properties of mutant receptors reconstituted in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Phenotypic changes in alpha9alpha10 mutant receptors were evidenced by a decrease in the desensitization rate, an increase in both the EC(50) for ACh as well as the efficacy of partial agonists and the reduction of the allosteric modulation by extracellular Ca(2+). Mutated receptors exhibited spontaneous openings and, at the single-channel level, an increased apparent mean open time with no major changes in channel conductance, thus suggesting an increase in gating of the channel as the underlying mechanism. Overall, the degrees of the phenotypes of mutant receptors were more overt in the case of the centrally located V13'T mutant. Based on the atomic model of the pore of the electric organ of the Torpedo ray, we can propose that the interactions of side chains at positions 13' and 9' are key ones in creating an energetic barrier to ion permeation. In spite of the fact that the roles of the TM2 residues are mostly conserved in the distant alpha9alpha10 member of the nAChR family, their mechanistic contributions to channel gating show significant differences when compared to other nAChRs. These differences might be originated from slight differential intramolecular rearrangements during gating for the different receptors and might lead each nAChR to be in tune with their physiological roles.

  8. Involvement of central alpha1-adrenoceptors on renal responses to central moxonidine and alpha-methylnoradrenaline.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Carina A F; de Andrade, Glaucia M F; De Paula, Patricia M; De Luca, Laurival A; Menani, José V

    2009-04-01

    Moxonidine (alpha2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline receptor agonist) injected into the lateral ventricle induces diuresis, natriuresis and renal vasodilation. Moxonidine-induced diuresis and natriuresis depend on central imidazoline receptors, while central alpha1-adrenoceptors are involved in renal vasodilation. However, the involvement of central alpha1-adrenoceptors on diuresis and natriuresis to central moxonidine was not investigated yet. In the present study, the effects of moxonidine, alpha-methylnoradrenaline (alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist) or phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist) alone or combined with previous injections of prazosin (alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine or RX 821002 (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists) intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) on urinary sodium, potassium and volume were investigated. Male Holtzman rats (n = 5-18/group) with stainless steel cannula implanted into the lateral ventricle and submitted to gastric water load (10% of body weight) were used. Injections of moxonidine (20 nmol) or alpha-methylnoradrenaline (80 nmol) i.c.v. induced natriuresis (196 +/- 25 and 171 +/- 30, respectively, vs. vehicle: 101 +/- 9 microEq/2 h) and diuresis (9.0 +/- 0.4 and 12.3 +/- 1.6, respectively, vs. vehicle: 5.2 +/- 0.5 ml/2 h). Pre-treatment with prazosin (320 nmol) i.c.v. abolished the natriuresis (23 +/- 4 and 76 +/- 11 microEq/2 h, respectively) and diuresis (5 +/- 1 and 7.6 +/- 0.8 ml/2 h, respectively) produced by i.c.v. moxonidine or alpha-methylnoradrenaline. RX 821002 (320 nmol) i.c.v. abolished the natriuretic effect of alpha-methylnoradrenaline, however, yohimbine (320 nmol) did not change renal responses to moxonidine. Phenylephrine (80 nmol) i.c.v. induced natriuresis and kaliuresis that were blocked by prazosin. Therefore, the present data suggest that moxonidine and alpha-methylnoradrenaline acting on central imidazoline receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors, respectively, activate central alpha1-adrenergic mechanisms to

  9. Rabies virus binding to an acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit peptide.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1990-04-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled rabies virus to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated. Binding of rabies virus to the receptor peptide was dependent on pH, could be competed with by unlabeled homologous virus particles, and was saturable. Synthetic peptides of snake venom, curaremimetic neurotoxins and of the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein, were effective in competing with labeled virus binding to the receptor peptide at micromolar concentrations. Similarly, synthetic peptides of the binding domain on the acetylcholine receptor competed for binding. These findings suggest that both rabies virus and neurotoxins bind to residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Competition studies with shorter alpha-subunit peptides within this region indicate that the highest affinity virus binding determinants are located within residues 179-192. A rat nerve alpha 3-subunit peptide, that does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin, inhibited binding of virus to the alpha 1 peptide, suggesting that rabies binds to neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These studies indicate that synthetic peptides of the glycoprotein binding domain and of the receptor binding domain may represent useful antiviral agents by targeting the recognition event between the viral attachment protein and the host cell receptor, and inhibiting attachment of virus to the receptor.

  10. Alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in hyperplastic human prostate: identification and characterization using (/sup 3/H) rauwolscine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine ((/sup 3/H)Ra), a selective ligand for the alpha 2 adrenergic receptor, was used to identify and characterize alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in prostate glands of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)Ra to prostatic tissue homogenates was rapid and readily reversible by addition of excess unlabelled phentolamine. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments demonstrates a single, saturable class of high affinity binding sites (Bmax = 0.31 +/- 0.04 fmol./microgram. DNA, Kd = 0.9 +/- 0.11 nM.). The relative potency of alpha adrenergic drugs (clonidine, alpha-methylnorepinephrine and prazosin) in competing for (/sup 3/H)Ra binding sites was consistent with the order predicted for an alpha 2 subtype. The role of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in normal prostatic function and in men with bladder outlet obstruction secondary to BPH requires further investigation.

  11. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Asare, B.K.; Biswas, P.K.; Rajnarayanan, R.V.

    2016-09-09

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  12. Ligand specificities of recombinant retinoic acid receptors RAR alpha and RAR beta.

    PubMed Central

    Crettaz, M; Baron, A; Siegenthaler, G; Hunziker, W

    1990-01-01

    Binding of retinoic acid (RA) to specific RA receptors alpha and beta (RAR alpha and RAR beta) was studied. Receptors were obtained in two ways: (1) full-length receptors were produced by transient expression of the respective human cDNAs in COS 1 cells; and (2) the ligand-binding domains of RAR alpha and RAR beta were produced in Escherichia coli. RA binding to the wild-type and truncated forms of the receptor was identical for both RAR alpha and RAR beta, indicating that the ligand-binding domains have retained the binding characteristics of the intact receptors. Furthermore, RA bound with the same affinity to both RAR alpha and RAR beta. Only retinoid analogues with an acidic end-group were able to actively bind to both receptors. On measuring the binding of various retinoids, we have found that the properties of the ligand-binding sites of RAR alpha and RAR beta were rather similar. Two retinoid analogues were capable of binding preferentially to either RAR alpha or RAR beta, suggesting that it may be possible to synthesize specific ligands for RAR alpha and RAR beta. PMID:2176462

  13. Changes in cortical acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid outflow during morphine withdrawal involve alpha-1 and alpha-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Beani, L; Tanganelli, S; Antonelli, T; Simonato, M; Spalluto, P; Tomasini, C; Bianchi, C

    1989-08-01

    Naloxone (0.3-9 mumol kg-1), electrical stimulation of locus ceruleus or clonidine at low doses (7.5-112 nmol kg-1) increased the release of acetylcholine from the exposed parietal cortex of freely moving, morphine-tolerant guinea pigs. This increase was not additive and was prevented by prazosin (35.8 nmol kg-1), suggesting the involvement of alpha-1 receptors. At high doses (374 nmol kg-1 or more) clonidine inhibited acetylcholine release through alpha-2 receptors, as it did in naive animals at 7.5 nmol kg-1. Clonidine (374 nmol kg-1) and prazosin (35.8 nmol kg-1) reduced the objective signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Electrical stimulation of the locus ceruleus or naloxone treatment reduced the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from the exposed parietal cortex of morphine-tolerant guinea pigs. This reduction was not additive and was prevented by idazoxan (84 nmol kg-1), suggesting the involvement of alpha-2 receptors. Clonidine (7.5 nmol kg-1), too, reduced the release of GABA in morphine-tolerant animals. However, when tested jointly with naloxone, clonidine (7.5-112 nmol kg-1) induced alpha-1-mediated facilitation of GABA release (like that elicited in naive animals at 112-374 nmol kg-1) leaving the signs of withdrawal unchanged. This points to the stimulation of alpha-1 receptors highly responsive to this agonist (but not to locus ceruleus stimulation) during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. In conclusion, chronic morphine treatment modifies the alpha-1- and alpha-2-mediated control of GABA and acetylcholine neurons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yo; Vega, Vinsensius B; Thomsen, Jane S; Zhang, Tao; Kong, Say Li; Xie, Min; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Lipovich, Leonard; Barnett, Daniel H; Stossi, Fabio; Yeo, Ailing; George, Joshy; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Lee, Yew Kok; Charn, Tze Howe; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Miller, Lance D; Cheung, Edwin; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Ruan, Yijun; Bourque, Guillaume; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T

    2007-06-01

    Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript), suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs), 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha binding and gene

  15. The mongoose acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit: analysis of glycosylation and alpha-bungarotoxin binding.

    PubMed

    Asher, O; Jensen, B S; Lupu-Meiri, M; Oron, Y; Fuchs, S

    1998-04-17

    The mongoose AChR alpha-subunit has been cloned and shown to be highly homologous to other AChR alpha-subunits, with only six differences in amino acid residues at positions that are conserved in animal species that bind alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX). Four of these six substitutions cluster in the ligand binding site, and one of them, Asn-187, forms a consensus N-glycosylation site. The mongoose glycosylated alpha-subunit has a higher apparent molecular mass than that of the rat glycosylated alpha-subunit, probably resulting from the additional glycosylation at Asn-187 of the mongoose subunit. The in vitro translated mongoose alpha-subunit, in a glycosylated or non-glycosylated form, does not bind alpha-BTX, indicating that lack of alpha-BTX binding can be achieved also in the absence of glycosylation.

  16. Interaction of the. alpha. beta. dimers of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor required for receptor autophosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Tollesfsen, S.E.; Stoszek, R.M.; Thompson, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have recently found that association of the two {alpha}{beta} dimers of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) receptor is required for formation of a high-affinity binding site for IGF I. To determine the structural requirements for IGF I activated kinase activity, they have examined the effect of dissociation of the two {alpha}{beta} dimers of the IGF I receptor on {beta} subunit autophosphorylation. The {alpha}{beta} dimers formed after treatment with 2 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) at pH 8.75 for 5 min were separated from IGF I receptor remaining as tetramers after DTT treatment by fast protein liquid chromatography on a Superose 6 gel filtration column. Purification of the {alpha}{beta} dimers was confirmed by Western blot analysis using {sup 125}I-labeled {alpha}IR-3, a monoclonal antibody to the IGF I receptor. Autophosphorylation of the IGF I receptor ({alpha}{beta}){sub 2} tetramer, treated without DTT or remaining after DTT treatment, is stimulated 1.6-2.9-fold by IGF I. In contrast, autophosporylation of the {alpha}{beta} dimers incubated in the presence or absence of IGF I (100 ng/mL) does not occur. Both IGF I receptor dimers and tetramers exhibit similar kinase activities using the synthetic substrate Arg-Arg-Leu-Ile-Glu-Asp-Ala-Glu-Tyr-Ala-Ala-Arg-Gly, indicating that the failure to detect autophosphorylation of the IGF I receptor dimers does not result from inactivation of the kinase by DTT treatment. They conclude that autophosphorylation of the IGF I receptor depends upon the interaction of the two {alpha}{beta} dimers.

  17. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit. Biochemical abnormalities include low/low-normal T4 and high/high-normal T3 concentrations, a subnormal T4/T3 ratio, variably reduced reverse T3, raised muscle creatine kinase and mild anaemia. The disorder is mediated by heterozygous, loss-of-function, mutations involving either TRα1 alone or both TRα1 and α2, with no discernible phenotype attributable to defective α2. Whole exome sequencing and diagnostic biomarkers may enable greater ascertainment of RTHα, which is important as thyroxine therapy reverses some metabolic abnormalities and improves growth, constipation, dyspraxia and wellbeing. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of RTHα and its optimal management remain to be elucidated. PMID:26303090

  18. Folate receptor alpha is more than just a folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Vineet; Siddiqui, M Rizwan; Tomita, Tadanori; Mayanil, Chandra Shekhar

    2017-01-01

    Until recently folate receptor alpha (FRα) has only been considered as a folate transporter. However, a novel role of FRα as a transcription factor was reported by our lab. More recently our lab showed a novel pleiotropic role of FRα: (a) direct transcriptional activation of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 genes; and (b) repression of biogenesis of miRNAs that target these genes or their effector molecules. These observations beg a question: "Can a simple molecule such as folate be used to manipulate the production and/or differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs), which may hold promise for future therapies?" Conditions such as spinal cord injury, motor neuron diseases, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis may benefit from increasing stem cell pool and promoting specific pathways of differentiation. On the flip-side, these NSCs may also contribute to some CNS tumors therefore promoting differentiation could prove more beneficial. FRα may hold promises for both since it has the potential to remodel chromatin in a context dependent manner. In this commentary we discuss our previous data and new questions arising in the context of the new role for FRα.

  19. Perilipin, a critical regulator of fat storage and breakdown, is a target gene of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Mst. Hasina; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Fumiko; Osumi, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    Perilipin is a protein localized on lipid droplet surfaces in adipocytes and steroidogenic cells, playing a central role in regulated lipolysis. Expression of the perilipin gene is markedly induced during adipogenesis. We found that transcription from the perilipin gene promoter is activated by an orphan nuclear receptor, estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR){alpha}. A response element to this receptor was identified in the promoter region by a gene reporter assay, the electrophoretic-gel mobility-shift assay and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} enhanced, whereas small heterodimer partner (SHP) repressed, the transactivating function of ERR{alpha} on the promoter. Thus, the perilipin gene expression is regulated by a transcriptional network controlling energy metabolism, substantiating the functional importance of perilipin in the maintenance of body energy balance.

  20. The role of phosphorylation in activation of the alpha 6A beta 1 laminin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, F; Kuikman, I; Noteboom, E; Sonnenberg, A

    1993-09-05

    The phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induces phosphorylation of serine residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha 6A integrin subunit, as well as activation of the alpha 6A beta 1 laminin receptor. We examined whether phosphorylation correlates with the induction of high affinity binding of laminin by the alpha 6A beta 1 receptor. Two potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C, serine 1041 and serine 1048, are present in the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha 6A subunit. We introduced point mutations into the alpha 6A cDNA, replacing either one or both of the serine residues with alanine. Wild-type and mutant alpha 6A cDNAs were transfected into K562 cells. All alpha 6A subunit mutants were expressed at levels similar to those of wild-type alpha 6A and formed heterodimers with endogenous beta 1. Analysis of the phosphorylation state of wild-type and mutant alpha 6A subunits in resting K562 cells and after treatment with PMA showed that serine 1041, but not serine 1048, is the target residue of PMA-induced phosphorylation. Cells expressing alpha 6A mutant subunits or wild-type alpha 6A transfectants all bound laminin in the presence, but not in the absence of PMA; however, the extent of binding differed. Cells transfected with alpha 6A containing the serine to alanine mutation showed a 2-3-fold higher binding to laminin than cells transfected with alpha 6A containing serine 1041. The results indicate that phosphorylation of the alpha 6A cytoplasmic domain is not required for the induction of high affinity of the alpha 6A beta 1 receptor by PMA, and suggest that, in contrast, it may reduce the affinity of this integrin for ligand.

  1. N alpha-methylhistamine inhibits intestinal transit in mice by central histamine H1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Adachi, N; Saeki, K

    1993-06-24

    The effects of (R)alpha-methylhistamine and N alpha-methylhistamine on intestinal transit were examined in mice. The passage of a charcoal meal in the gastrointestinal tract was dose dependently inhibited by N alpha-methylhistamine (1-20 mg/kg i.p.), but not by a selective H3 receptor agonist (R)alpha-methyl-histamine (1-50 mg/kg i.p.). The inhibitory effect of N alpha-methylhistamine (20 mg/kg) was attenuated by pretreatment with H1 receptor antagonists (mepyramine 5 mg/kg i.p. or 5 micrograms i.c.v. and triprolidine 5 mg/kg i.p.), but not by cimetidine (10 mg/kg i.p.), zolantidine (5 mg/kg i.p.), a brain-penetrating H2 receptor antagonist, or thioperamide (5 mg/kg i.p.), a selective H3 receptor antagonist. The effect of N alpha-methylhistamine was also attenuated by combined treatment with phentolamine and propranolol (5 and 15 mg/kg s.c., respectively) and by pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine (20 mg/kg i.p., 2 days before). N alpha-Methylhistamine markedly decreased histamine turnover in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that intestinal transit is inhibited by N alpha-methylhistamine via stimulation of central H1 but not H3 receptors and that stimulation of the sympathetic system is involved in this effect.

  2. alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptors in proximal tubules of rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Fortin, T.L.; Kelvie, S.L. )

    1987-11-01

    Proximal tubules were isolated from the rat kidney by collagenase digestion of the cortical tissue followed by Percoll gradient centrifugation. Microscopic and hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity studies proved the purity of the preparation. ({sup 3}H)Prazosin, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, and ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol were used to identify and quantitate respectively the {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub 2}- and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Proximal tubular (F{sub 4}) particulate fraction was compared against other cortical nephron segment (F{sub 1},F{sub 2}) fractions and the total collagenase-digested cortex particulate suspension (F{sub t}). Proximal tubules were enriched in {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors compared with. The fractions enriched in glomeruli and distal tubular segments had relatively low concentrations of {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities in the different fractions corroborated well with the pattern suggested by the ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol binding studies. The results suggest that whole-cortex preparation radioligand binding studies may reflect proximal tubular {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor changes quite well. They may, however, miss or give erroneous impressions about {beta}-adrenergic receptor changes occurring in different cortical nephron segments.

  3. Present state of alpha- and beta-adrenergic drugs I. The adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ahlquist, R P

    1976-11-01

    The cardiovascular alpha adrenergic receptors evoke vasoconstriction, the cardiovascular beta receptors evoke vasodilation and cardiac stimulation. All blood vessels have both alpha and beta receptors. In some areas, for example skin and kidney, the alpha receptors predominate. In some vascular beds, for example the nutrient vessels in skeletal muscle, beta receptors predominate. In other beds, such as coronary, visceral, and connective tissue both receptors are active. The cardiovascular effects of adrenergic agonists depend on which receptor they act on. Phenylephrine is specific for alpha receptors. Isoproterenol is specific for beta receptors. Epinephrine and norepinephrine act on both. The real value of knowing the receptor specificity of each agonist is that side effects can more easily be predicted. For example, adrenergic cardiac stimulants are antiasthmatics. Therefore, adrenergic antiasthmatics can produce excessive cardiac stimulation. For the future, agonists that are not only receptor-specific but also tissue-specific will be developed. The first of these in the United States is terbutaline. The rest of the world has in addition a similar drug, salbutamol. No one knows if this drug will be approved for use by American physicians.

  4. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  5. Detection of a T cell receptor delta chain with an anti-TCR alpha chain serum.

    PubMed

    Leca, G; Bories, J C; Davi, F; Bensussan, A

    1990-04-01

    Two types of T cell antigen-specific receptors have been described. Most peripheral blood T lymphocytes express, at their surface, an antigen receptor consisting of alpha and beta subunits, while a small subset of thymocytes and a minority of mature T lymphocytes express a heterodimeric receptor termed gamma delta. Whereas the gene segments localization corresponding to the TCR gamma and beta chains are separate, genes encoding the joining and the constant regions of TCR delta chain are located between the TCR V alpha region and the J alpha-C alpha gene cluster. To determine whether V alpha gene segments are used by delta chains, immunoprecipitations from human TCR gamma delta expressing cell clones were performed with an anti-alpha serum. The results show that a rabbit antiserum raised against the purified REX TCR alpha subunit immunoprecipitates a TCR delta chain from the cell surface of only one human T cell clone termed SO1. However, since no SO1 RNA hybridization is observed with REX TCR V alpha probe and SO1 cloned cells do react with an anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibody, we conclude that TCR delta and alpha chains expressed a limited structural homology and that REX TCR V alpha gene do not seem to be frequently used in a functional delta chain.

  6. Expression of alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and scavenger receptor in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, J; Hiltunen, T; Särkioja, T; Moestrup, S K; Gliemann, J; Kodama, T; Nikkari, T; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage- and smooth muscle cell (SMC)-derived foam cells are typical constituents of human atherosclerotic lesions. At least three receptor systems have been characterized that could be involved in the development of foam cells: alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/LDL receptor-related protein (alpha 2 MR/LRP), scavenger receptor, and LDL receptor. We studied the expression of these receptors in human atherosclerotic lesions with in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. An abundant expression of alpha 2MR/LRP mRNA and protein was found in SMC and macrophages in both early and advanced lesions in human aortas. alpha 2MR/LRP was also present in SMC in normal aortas. Scavenger receptor mRNA and protein were expressed in lesion macrophages but no expression was found in lesion SMC. LDL receptor was absent from the lesion area but was expressed in some aortas in medial SMC located near the adventitial border. The results demonstrate that (a) alpha 2MR/LRP is, so far, the only lipoprotein receptor expressed in lesions SMC in vivo; (b) scavenger receptors are expressed only in lesion macrophages; and (c) both receptors may play important roles in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:8182133

  7. Regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in sciatic motor neurons following axotomy.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, A J; Devlin, B K; Neitzel, K L; McLaurin, D L; Anderson, K J; Lee, N

    1999-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons are one of the few classes of neurons capable of regenerating axons following axotomy. Injury-induced expression of neurotrophic factors and corresponding receptors may play an important role in this rare ability. A wide variety of indirect data suggests that ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha may critically contribute to the regeneration of injured spinal motor neurons. We used immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and retrograde tracing techniques to study the regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in axotomized sciatic motor neurons. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha immunoreactivity, detected with two independent antisera, is increased in a subpopulation of caudal sciatic motor neuron soma one, two and six weeks after sciatic nerve transection and reattachment, while no changes are detected at one day and 15 weeks post-lesion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA levels are augmented in the same classes of neurons following an identical lesion, suggesting that increased synthesis contributes, at least in part, to the additional ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein. Separating the proximal and distal nerve stumps with a plastic barrier does not noticeably affect the injury-induced change in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha regulation, thereby indicating that this injury response is not dependent on signals distal to the lesion traveling retrogradely through the nerve or signals generated by axonal growth through the distal nerve. The prolonged increases in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein and messenger RNA found in regenerating sciatic motor neurons contrast with the responses of non-regenerating central neurons, which are reported to display, at most, a short-lived increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA expression following injury. The present data are the first to demonstrate, in vivo, neuronal regulation of

  8. Nicotine enhances the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of alpha4 subunits of neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y N; Edwards, S C; Wecker, L

    1997-12-01

    Studies determined whether alpha4beta2 or alpha3beta2 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes are substrates for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and whether nicotine affects receptor phosphorylation. The cRNAs for the subunits were coinjected into oocytes, and cells were incubated for 24 h in the absence or presence of nicotine (50 nM for alpha4beta2 and 500 nM for alpha3beta2 receptors). Nicotine did not interfere with the isolation of the receptors. When receptors isolated from oocytes expressing alpha4beta2 receptors were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and the catalytic subunit of PKA, separated by electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography, a labeled phosphoprotein with the predicted molecular size of the alpha4 subunit was present. Phosphorylation of alpha4 subunits of alpha4beta2 receptors increased within the first 5 min of incubation with nicotine and persisted for 24 h. In contrast, receptors isolated from oocytes expressing alpha3beta2 receptors did not exhibit a labeled phosphoprotein corresponding to the size of the alpha3 subunit. Results suggest that the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of alpha4 and not alpha3 subunits may explain the differential inactivation by nicotine of these receptor subtypes expressed in oocytes.

  9. Differential agonist sensitivity of glycine receptor alpha2 subunit splice variants.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul S; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-09-01

    1. The glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha2A and alpha2B splice variants differ by a dual, adjacent amino acid substitution from alpha2A(V58,T59) to alpha2B(I58,A59) in the N-terminal extracellular domain. 2. Comparing the effects of the GlyR agonists, glycine, beta-alanine and taurine, on the GlyR alpha2 isoforms, revealed a significant increase in potency for all three agonists at the alpha2B variant. 3. The sensitivities of the splice variants to the competitive antagonist, strychnine, and to the biphasic modulator Zn(2+), were comparable. In contrast, the allosteric inhibitor picrotoxin was more potent on GlyR alpha2A compared to GlyR alpha2B receptors. 4. Coexpression of alpha2A or alpha2B subunits with the GlyR beta subunit revealed that the higher agonist potencies observed with the alpha2B homomer were retained for the alpha2Bbeta heteromer. 5. The identical sensitivity to strychnine combined with a reduction in the maximum current induced by the partial agonist taurine at the GlyR alpha2A homomer, suggested that the changed sensitivity to agonists is in accordance with a modulation of agonist efficacy rather than agonist affinity. 6. An effect on agonist efficacy was also supported by using a structural model of the GlyR, localising the region of splice variation to the proposed docking region between GlyR loop 2 and the TM2-3 loop, an area associated with channel activation. 7. The existence of a spasmodic mouse phenotype linked to a GlyR alpha1(A52S) mutation, the equivalent position to the source of the alpha2 splice variation, raises the possibility that the GlyR alpha2 splice variants may be responsible for distinct roles in neuronal function.

  10. Expression and function of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Jubinsky, P T; Laurie, A S; Nathan, D G; Yetz-Aldepe, J; Sieff, C A

    1994-12-15

    To determine the expression and function of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha chain (GMR alpha) during hematopoiesis and on leukemic cells, monoclonal antibodies were raised by immunizing mice with cells expressing high levels of human GMR alpha. A pool of five antibodies isolated from three different mice was used to characterize GMR alpha. This antibody pool (anti-GMR alpha) immunoprecipitated a protein with the expected molecular weight of GMR alpha from COS cells transiently transfected with the GMR alpha gene. In factor-dependent cells, GMR alpha existed as a phosphoprotein. However, its phosphorylation was not stimulated by the presence of GM-CSF. Anti-GMR alpha inhibited the GM-CSF-dependent growth of cell lines and normal bone marrow cells and inhibited the binding of iodinated GM-CSF to its receptor. Cell surface expression of GMR alpha was examined using anti-GMR alpha and flow cytometry. GMR alpha was readily detectable on both blood monocytes and neutrophils. In adherence-depleted normal bone marrow, two separate populations expressed GMR alpha. The most positive cells were predominantly macrophages, whereas the cells that expressed less GMR alpha were largely myelocytes and metamyelocytes. A small population of lin-CD34+ or CD34+CD38- cells also expressed GMR alpha, but they were not capable of significant growth in colony-forming assays. In contrast, the majority of lin-CD34+ and CD34+CD38- cells were GMR alpha-, yet they produced large numbers of myeloid and erythroid colonies in the same assay. Malignant cells from patients with leukemia were also tested for GMR alpha expression. All of the myeloid leukemias and only rare lymphoid leukemias surveyed tested positive for GMR alpha. These results show that anti-GMR alpha is useful for the functional characterization of the GMR alpha and for the detection of myeloid leukemia and that GMR alpha is expressed on certain lineages throughout hematopoietic

  11. The anticancer estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen impairs consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory through estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfels, Martina; Dornelles, Arethuza da Silva; Petry, Fernanda Dos Santos; Blank, Martina; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2017-09-02

    Over two-thirds of women with breast cancer have positive tumors for hormone receptors, and these patients undergo treatment with endocrine therapy, tamoxifen being the most widely used agent. Despite being very effective in breast cancer treatment, tamoxifen is associated with side effects that include cognitive impairments. However, the specific aspects and mechanisms underlying these impairments remain to be characterized. Here, we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and interaction with estrogen receptors on formation of memory for inhibitory avoidance conditioning in female rats. In the first experiment, Wistar female rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg) or saline by gavage immediately after training and were tested for memory consolidation 24 h after training. In the second experiment, rats received a single dose of 1 mg/kg tamoxifen or saline by gavage 3 h after training and were tested 24 h after training for memory consolidation. In the third experiment, rats received a subcutaneous injection with estrogen receptor α agonist or estrogen receptor beta agonist 30 min before the training. After training, rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen 1 mg/kg or saline and were tested 24 h after training. In the fourth experiment, rats were trained and tested 24 h later. Immediately after test, rats received a single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg) or saline by gavage and were given four additional daily test trials followed by a re-instatement. Tamoxifen at 1 mg/kg impaired memory consolidation when given immediately after training and the estrogen receptor alpha agonist improved the tamoxifen-related memory impairment. Moreover, tamoxifen impairs memory consolidation of the test. These findings indicate that estrogen receptors regulate the early phase of memory consolidation and the effects of tamoxifen on memory consolidation.

  12. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY.
    MC Cardon, PC Hartig,LE Gray, Jr. and VS Wilson.
    U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for ...

  13. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay
    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  14. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY.
    MC Cardon, PC Hartig,LE Gray, Jr. and VS Wilson.
    U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for ...

  15. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay
    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  16. Ligand interaction of human alpha 2-macroglobulin-alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor studied by partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Kunath, M

    1996-05-17

    Alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M) is a major proteinase inhibitor in human blood and tissue. Besides its antiproteolytic potential, alpha 2-M was found to modulate antigen- and mitogen-driven immune responses and cell growth by binding and transporting distinct cytokines, growth factors and hormones. The inhibitor is cleared from circulation by binding to a multifunctional cellular receptor present on different cell types. Alpha 2-M, as well as its receptor, are capable of binding a variety of ligands. In the present study we have applied aqueous two-phase systems to analyze the interaction of IL-1 beta and alpha 2-M receptor to different forms of alpha 2-M. The partition of IL-1 beta was changed by addition of transformed alpha 2-M to the two-phase systems rather than by the native inhibitor. The interaction between IL-1 beta and alpha 2-M was enhanced by divalent cations. In addition, the complex formation between 125I-labelled receptor and alpha 2-M could clearly be demonstrated by partitioning. In the presence of divalent cations, transformed alpha 2-M, in contrast to the native inhibitor, effectively changed the partition of the receptor. However, the observed alteration of the partition coefficient was found to be less compared with the values obtained by partitioning of the receptor in the presence of whole plasma containing the inhibitor in equivalent concentrations. The results indicate that other components of the plasma exist which competitively bind to the receptor but independent of Ca2+-ions.

  17. A comparison of locomotor responses to some psychotropic drugs and cerebral receptors in the Acomys cahirinus and the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Marona-Lewicka, D; Michaluk, J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, L; Vetulani, J

    1987-01-01

    Comparative studies of the laboratory mouse and Acomys cahirinus have shown differences in their motor activity patterns and motor responses to morphine, apomorphine and clonidine. The two species also differed in respect of the density of cerebral alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, but no significant differences between other types of receptors (alpha 1-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, opiate mu and delta, and spiroperidol binding sites) were found. It is suggested that the high excitability of the Acomys may be related to a deficit in the inhibitory noradrenergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  18. Transgenic Over Expression of Nicotinic Receptor Alpha 5, Alpha 3, and Beta 4 Subunit Genes Reduces Ethanol Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C.; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol’s as well as nicotine’s effects. PMID:22459873

  19. Functional expression and properties of a nicotinic alpha9/5-HT3A chimeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Plazas, Paola V; Elgoyhen, A Belén

    2003-10-27

    We describe the functional properties of a nicotinic alpha9/serotonin subtype 3A (5HT3A) chimeric receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The chimera preserved ligand-binding properties of alpha9 and channel properties of 5HT3A. Thus, it responded to acetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 70 microM but not to serotonin. It was blocked by methyllycaconitine, strychnine, atropine and nicotine, with the same rank order of potency as alpha9 receptors. The current-voltage relationship of currents through the alpha9/5HT3A chimera was similar to that of the 5HT3A receptors. These results are an evidence of functional coupling between the ligand-binding and the channel domains of the chimeric receptor.

  20. Relation of central alpha-adrenoceptor and other receptors to the control of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1983-02-01

    The location and nature of the receptors in the brain on which clonidine acts to decrease renin secretion have been investigated in dogs. Clonidine was injected into the vertebral and carotid arteries, and its effects were compared with those of norepinephrine and epinephrine when injected into the third ventricle. It was also injected intravenously (IV) after transection of the brain stem and following treatment with intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine. The results suggest that the renin-regulating receptors are located in the brain stem in a region different from the receptors mediating the depressor response, that they are alpha 2-adrenoceptors, and that they are postsynaptic in location. Central alpha 1-adrenoceptors appear to mediate increased renin secretion. Central serotonergic receptors also mediate increased renin secretion, but it is not known how the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors interact with the serotonergic systems.

  1. Differential regulation of alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) expression in schizophrenic smokers.

    PubMed

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the alpha7* receptor, as measured by [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene expression in schizophrenic hippocampus. We examined the effects of smoking on CHRNA7 expression in the same tissue and find that smoking differentially regulates expression of both mRNA and protein for this gene. CHRNA7 mRNA and protein levels are significantly lower in schizophrenic nonsmokers compared to control nonsmokers and are brought to control levels in schizophrenic smokers. Sufficient protein but low surface expression of the alpha7* receptor, seen in the autoradiographic studies, suggests aberrant assembly or trafficking of the receptor.

  2. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  3. Steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor. 1. 17 alpha-(Bromoacetoxy)alkyl/alkynylestradiols.

    PubMed

    el Garrouj, D; Aumelas, A; Borgna, J L

    1993-10-01

    To develop steroidal affinity labels for the estrogen receptor, we prepared five electrophilic estradiol derivatives bearing the 17 alpha-propyl, 17 alpha-(1'-butynyl), or 17 alpha-(1'octynyl) chain, with either a terminal epoxy function (for the 17 alpha-propyl substituent) or a terminal bromoacetoxy function (for all three 17 alpha-substituent types). These compounds displayed low affinity for the lamb uterine estrogen receptor; with apparent relative affinity constants ranging from 0.02% to 0.24% that of estradiol. They were also rapidly transformed in cytosol, probably to the corresponding vicinal diols (epoxy compounds) or primary alcohols (bromoacetoxy compounds). Nevertheless, bromoacetates induced irreversible inactivation of the hormone-binding site but only with ligand-free binding sites. The effect of bromoacetates was prevented by treatment of the cytosol with the thiol-specific reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate. Inactivation of the receptor at 0 degrees C was rapid (< 1 h) and strongly dependent on both compound concentration and pH, with significant effects obtained at either > 150 nM (at pH 9) or pH > 7.5 (at 5 microM). Regardless of the conditions used, the order of efficiency for bromoacetates was always: 17 alpha-propyl derivative < 17 alpha-butynyl derivative < 17 alpha-octynyl derivative, with maximal inactivation of approximately 30% and approximately 70% of the hormone-binding sites obtained for the less active and more active compounds, respectively. Characteristics of the receptor inactivation suggest that (i) prepared bromoacetates are highly reactive affinity labels for the estrogen receptor, (ii) they react with similar (or even a single) nucleophilic amino acid residues located within or near the hormone-binding site of the receptor; these residues are probably the -SH of cysteines, and (iii) position 17 alpha of steroidal ligands is suitable for introducing electrophilic substituents to develop efficient affinity labels for the

  4. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  5. Activation of alpha-latrotoxin receptors in neuromuscular synapses leads to a prolonged splash acetylcholine release.

    PubMed

    Lelyanova, V G; Thomson, D; Ribchester, R R; Tonevitsky, E A; Ushkaryov, Y A

    2009-06-01

    The mechanisms of acetylcholine release in presynaptic terminals of motoneurons induced by mutant alpha-latrotoxin (LT(N4C)) were analyzed. In contrast to wild-type alpha-latrotoxin that causes both continuous and splash secretion of acetylcholine and necessarity block neuromuscular transmission, LT(N4C) causes only splash release lasting over many hours. Thus, activation of alpha-latrotoxin receptors controls long-lasting enhanced secretion of acetylcholine.

  6. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Tupone, Domenico; Cano, Georgina; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) agonists have been use as anti-hypertensive agents, in the management of drug withdrawal, and as sedative analgesics. Since α2-AR agonists also influence the regulation of body temperature, we explored their potential as antipyretic agents. This study delineates the central neural substrate for the inhibition of rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR agonists. Nanoinjection of the α2-AR agonist, clonidine (1.2 nmol), into the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) inhibited BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and BAT thermogenesis. Subsequent nanoinjection of the α2-AR antagonist, idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa reversed the clonidine-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis. Systemic administration of the α2-AR agonists, dexmedetomidine (25ug/kg, iv) or clonidine (100ug/kg, iv) inhibited shivering EMGs, BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis effects that were reversed by nanoinjection of idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa. Dexmedetomidine (100µg/kg, ip) prevented and reversed lipopolysaccharide (10µg/kg ip)-evoked thermogenesis in free-behaving rats. Cholera toxin subunit b retrograde tracing from rRPa and pseudorabies virus transynaptic retrograde tracing from BAT combined with immunohistochemistry for catecholaminergic biosynthetic enzymes revealed the ventrolateral medulla as the source of catecholaminergic input to the rRPa and demonstrated that these catecholaminergic neurons are synaptically connected to BAT. Photostimulation of VLM neurons expressing of the PRSx8-ChR2-mCherry lentiviral vector inhibited BAT SNA via activation of α2-ARs in the rRPa. These results indicate a potent inhibition of BAT and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR activation in the rRPa, and suggest a therapeutic potential of α2-AR agonists for reducing potentially-lethal elevations in body temperature during excessive fever. PMID:23365239

  7. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphisms and the risk of malignancies.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Andrei; Narita, Diana; Seclaman, Edward; Popovici, Emilian; Anghel, Mariana; Tamas, Liviu

    2010-12-01

    Estrogens represent risk factors for endocrine-related cancers and play also an important role in the development and progression of other malignancies. In order to analyze the associations between estrogen receptor gene alpha polymorphisms and cancers susceptibility, we genotyped six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 163 Caucasian cancer patients--103 breast cancers and 60 other malignancies (colorectal, bladder, hepatocellular carcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia)--and 114 healthy controls using hybridization probes. We performed Armitage`s association trend-test to evaluate the risk. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was assessed for each pair of markers. The genotypes CC and CT of rs3798577 were significantly associated with the cancers risk (p-trend breast = 4 × 10(-5); p-trend cancers = 1 × 10(-5)); in discrepancy with breast cancer where the C-allele represented the risk allele, for bladder, hepatocellular carcinomas and leukemia, the T allele seems to confer susceptibility. The minor G allele of rs1801132 was protective in our cases (p = 1 × 10(-4)); for rs2228480, the heterozygous frequency was higher for cancer groups (p = 0.03); the SNP pairs rs2228480&rs3798577 and rs2234693&rs9340799 were in low LD; the haplotypes T-A of rs2234693&rs9340799 and G-C of rs2228480&rs3798577 showed a trend to be higher represented in breast cancers; T allele of rs2234693 was higher expressed in breast, colon cancers and leukemia; rs2077647 was associated with colon (p = 0.008, C-risk allele) and bladder (p = 0.01, T-risk allele) cancers. We concluded that ESR1 polymorphisms may have distinct impact in carcinogenesis and further genotyping will establish whether these findings remain significant in larger cohorts.

  8. Antibodies to the. cap alpha. -subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hens

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Yu, J.; Bai, D.H.; Hester, P.Y.; Kim, K.

    1985-11-01

    Simple methods for the generation, purification, and assay of antibodies to the ..cap alpha..-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hen have been described. Chicken antibodies against the ..cap alpha..-subunit inhibit insulin binding to the receptor and stimulate glucose oxidation as well as autophosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit. Thus the properties of chicken antibodies are very similar to those of antibodies found in human autoimmune diseases and different from rabbit antibodies obtained against the same antigen.

  9. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  10. Some properties of human neuronal alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Palma, Eleonora; Mileo, Anna M; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2002-03-19

    The functional properties and cellular localization of the human neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptor (alpha7 AcChoR) and its L248T mutated (mut) form were investigated by expressing them alone or as gene fusions with the enhanced version of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Xenopus oocytes injected with wild-type (wt), mutalpha7, or the chimeric subunit cDNAs expressed receptors that gated membrane currents when exposed to AcCho. As already known, AcCho currents generated by wtalpha7 receptors decay much faster than those elicited by the mutalpha7 receptors. Unexpectedly, the fusion of GFP to the wt and mutated alpha7 receptors led to opposite results: the AcCho-current decay of the wt receptors became slower, whereas that of the mutated receptors was accelerated. Furthermore, repetitive applications of AcCho led to a considerable "run-down" of the AcCho currents generated by mutalpha7-GFP receptors, whereas those of the wtalpha7-GFP receptors remained stable or increased in amplitude. The AcCho-current run-down of mutalpha7-GFP oocytes was accompanied by a marked decrease of alpha-bungarotoxin binding activity. Fluorescence, caused by the chimeric receptors expressed, was seen over the whole oocyte surface but was more intense and abundant in the animal hemisphere, whereas it was much weaker in the vegetal hemisphere. We conclude that fusion of GFP to wtalpha7 and mutalpha7 receptors provides powerful tools to study the distribution and function of alpha7 receptors. We also conclude that fused genes do not necessarily recapitulate all of the properties of the original receptors. This fact must be borne close in mind whenever reporter genes are attached to proteins.

  11. Diabetes or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist increases mitochondrial thioesterase I activity in heart

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) is a transcriptional regulator of the expression of mitochondrial thioesterase I (MTE-I) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), which are induced in the heart at the mRNA level in response to diabetes. Little is known about the regulation of pr...

  12. AFR1 acts in conjunction with the alpha-factor receptor to promote morphogenesis and adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, J B

    1993-01-01

    Mating pheromone receptors activate a G-protein signaling pathway that induces changes in transcription, cell division, and morphogenesis needed for the conjunction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The C terminus of the alpha-factor pheromone receptor functions in two complex processes, adaptation and morphogenesis. Adaptation to alpha-factor may occur through receptor desensitization, and alpha-factor-induced morphogenesis forms the conjugation bridge between mating cells. A plasmid overexpression strategy was used to isolate a new gene, AFR1, which acts together with the receptor C terminus to promote adaptation. The expression of AFR1 was highly induced by alpha-factor. Unexpectedly, cells lacking AFR1 showed a defect in alpha-factor-stimulated morphogenesis that was similar to the morphogenesis defect observed in cells producing C-terminally truncated alpha-factor receptors. In contrast, AFR1 overexpression resulted in longer projections of morphogenesis, which suggests that this gene may directly stimulate morphogenesis. These results indicate that AFR1 encodes a developmentally regulated function that coordinates both the regulation of receptor signaling and the induction of morphogenesis during conjugation. Images PMID:8413281

  13. Functional characterization of mongoose nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit: resistance to alpha-bungarotoxin and high sensitivity to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Asher, O; Lupu-Meiri, M; Jensen, B S; Paperna, T; Fuchs, S; Oron, Y

    1998-07-24

    The mongoose is resistant to snake neurotoxins. The mongoose muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) alpha-subunit contains a number of mutations in the ligand-binding domain and exhibits poor binding of alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX). We characterized the functional properties of a hybrid (alpha-mongoose/beta gamma delta-rat) AChR. Hybrid AChRs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, respond to acetylcholine with depolarizing current, the mean maximal amplitude of which was greater than that mediated by the rat AChR. The IC50 of alpha-BTX to the hybrid AChR was 200-fold greater than that of the rat, suggesting much lower affinity for the toxin. Hybrid AChRs exhibited an apparent higher rate of desensitization and higher affinity for ACh (EC50 1.3 vs. 23.3 microM for the rat AChR). Hence, changes in the ligand-binding domain of AChR not only affect the binding properties of the receptor, but also result in marked changes in the characteristics of the current.

  14. Differential regulation of constitutive androstane receptor expression by hepatocyte nuclear factor4alpha isoforms.

    PubMed

    Pascussi, Jean Marc; Robert, Agnes; Moreau, Amelie; Ramos, Jeanne; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Navarro, Francis; Blanc, Pierre; Assenat, Eric; Maurel, Patrick; Vilarem, Marie Jose

    2007-05-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) controls the metabolism and elimination of endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds by up-regulating a battery of genes. In this work, we analyzed the expression of human CAR (hCAR) in normal liver during development and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the effect of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha isoforms (HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha7) on the hCAR gene promoter. By performing functional analysis of hCAR 5'-deletions including mutants, chromatin immunoprecipitation in human hepatocytes, electromobility shift and cotransfection assays, we identified a functional and species-conserved HNF4alpha response element (DR1: ccAGGCCTtTGCCCTga) at nucleotide -144. Both HNF4alpha isoforms bind to this element with similar affinity. However, HNF4alpha1 strongly enhanced hCAR promoter activity whereas HNF4alpha7 was a poor activator and acted as a repressor of HNF4alpha1-mediated transactivation of the hCAR promoter. PGC1alpha stimulated both HNF4alpha1-mediated and HNF4alpha7-mediated hCAR transactivation to the same extent, whereas SRC1 exhibited a marked specificity for HNF4alpha1. Transduction of human hepatocytes by HNF4alpha7-expressing lentivirus confirmed this finding. In addition, we observed a positive correlation between CAR and HNF4alpha1 mRNA levels in human liver samples during development, and an inverse correlation between CAR and HNF4alpha7 mRNA levels in HCC. These observations suggest that HNF4alpha1 positively regulates hCAR expression in normal developing and adult livers, whereas HNF4alpha7 represses hCAR gene expression in HCC.

  15. Laminin isoforms and their integrin receptors in glioma cell migration and invasiveness: Evidence for a role of alpha5-laminin(s) and alpha3beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Yamane, Tetsu; Naganuma, Hirofumi; Rousselle, Patricia; Andurén, Ingegerd; Tryggvason, Karl; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Glioma cell infiltration of brain tissue often occurs along the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels. In the present study we have investigated the role of laminins, major structural components of BMs and strong promoters of cell migration. Immunohistochemical studies of glioma tumor tissue demonstrated expression of alpha2-, alpha3-, alpha4- and alpha5-, but not alpha1-, laminins by the tumor vasculature. In functional assays, alpha3 (Lm-332/laminin-5)- and alpha5 (Lm-511/laminin-10)-laminins strongly promoted migration of all glioma cell lines tested. alpha1-Laminin (Lm-111/laminin-1) displayed lower activity, whereas alpha2 (Lm-211/laminin-2)- and alpha4 (Lm-411/laminin-8)-laminins were practically inactive. Global integrin phenotyping identified alpha3beta1 as the most abundant integrin in all the glioma cell lines, and this laminin-binding integrin exclusively or largely mediate the cell migration. Moreover, pretreatment of U251 glioma cells with blocking antibodies to alpha3beta1 integrin followed by intracerebral injection into nude mice inhibited invasion of the tumor cells into the brain tissue. The cell lines secreted Lm-211, Lm-411 and Lm-511, at different ratios. The results indicate that glioma cells secrete alpha2-, alpha4- and alpha5-laminins and that alpha3- and alpha5-laminins, found in brain vasculature, selectively promote glioma cell migration. They identify alpha3beta1 as the predominant integrin and laminin receptor in glioma cells, and as a brain invasion-mediating integrin.

  16. Uveal melanocytes do not respond to or express receptors for alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hu, Dan-Ning; Zhao, Huiquan; McCormick, Steven A; Nordlund, James J; Boissy, Raymond E

    2006-10-01

    Whereas cutaneous pigmentation increases after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, ocular pigmentation does not. This study was designed to examine the evidence that alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), which is thought to be the mediator of UV response in the skin, has any role to play in uveal melanocytes. Human uveal melanocytes derived from the choroid and the iris were cultivated by using eyes harvested from adult cadaveric donors and were assessed by Northern blot analysis for growth and melanogenic response to alpha-MSH and expression of the receptor for alpha-MSH (MC1-R). In addition, expression of alpha-MSH was evaluated in ocular tissue by immunocytochemistry. Uveal melanocytes, unlike cutaneous melanocytes in vitro, exhibited no stimulation of proliferation in response to alpha-MSH at dosages ranging from 0.1 to 100 muM. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase, DOPA oxidase, and protein levels for tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2 were not influenced by alpha-MSH. Associated with the lack of alpha-MSH response in cultured uveal melanocytes was the absence of expression of the receptor for alpha-MSH (MC1-R), as assessed by Northern blot analysis. Also in contrast to the skin, pigmented ocular tissue lacked expression of the alpha-MSH ligand, as assessed by immunocytochemistry. In conclusion, ocular pigmentation does not appear to be regulated by melanocyte stimulating hormone.

  17. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Griffith, Malachi; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Hundal, Jasreet; Allen, Julie A; Arthur, Cora D; Runci, Daniele; Bugatti, Mattia; Miceli, Alexander P; Schmidt, Heather; Trani, Lee; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Miller, Christopher A; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Vermi, William; Wilson, Richard K; Schreiber, Robert D; Mardis, Elaine R

    2016-09-27

    Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation.

  18. A transmembrane residue influences the interaction of propofol with the strychnine-sensitive glycine alpha1 and alpha1beta receptor.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Leuwer, Martin; Stachura, Sina; Krampfl, Klaus; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2008-12-01

    Propofol, well known for its anesthetic effects, acts as a positive allosteric modulator of the alpha-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor but also enhances the function of the glycine receptor. The GABA modulatory effects of propofol are influenced by an amino acid residue located within the second transmembrane domain (TM2) of the GABA(A) receptor beta subunit. In glycine alpha(1) subunits, the homologous residue (serine 267) affects the glycine modulatory actions of alcohols and alkane anesthetics. In the present study we investigated the role of this residue on the interaction of propofol with the glycine alpha(1) and alpha(1)beta receptor. The influence of propofol on wild type and mutant (alpha(1)S267M, alpha(1)S267I, alpha(1)S267Mbeta, alpha(1)S267Ibeta) glycine receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells was investigated by using the whole-cell clamp technique. Mutation of the alpha(1) subunit TM2 serine residue to either isoleucine or methionine decreased the sensitivity of the receptor to glycine, and abolished the direct activation of the glycine receptor by propofol. Additionally, the methionine and particularly the isoleucine mutation decreased the glycine-enhancing actions of propofol. The nature of the TM2 residue (267) of the glycine alpha(1) subunit influences the glycine modulatory effect of propofol and direct activation of the receptor by this anesthetic. A comparison of the impact of such complementary mutations on the interaction of propofol with glycine and GABA(A) receptors should permit a better understanding of the molecular determinants of action of propofol on these structurally related receptors and may aid in the development of selective glycine receptor modulators.

  19. Design and synthesis of S-(-)-2-[[4-(napht-1-yl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl]-1,4-dioxoperhydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine (CSP-2503) using computational simulation. A 5-HT1A receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, María L; Morcillo, Ma José; Fernández, Esther; Benhamú, Bellinda; Tejada, Ignacio; Ayala, David; Viso, Alma; Olivella, Mireia; Pardo, Leonardo; Delgado, Mercedes; Manzanares, Jorge; Fuentes, José A

    2003-04-17

    Based on a computational model for 5-HT(1A)R-ligand interaction and QSAR studies, we have designed and synthesized a new series of arylpiperazines 2-8 which exhibit high 5-HT(1A)R affinity and selectivity over alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors. Among them, compound CSP-2503 (4) has been pharmacologically characterized as a 5-HT(1A)R agonist at somatodendritic and postsynaptic sites, endowed with anxiolytic properties.

  20. A novel glycine receptor alpha Z1 subunit variant in the zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Devignot, V; Prado de Carvalho, L; Bregestovski, P; Goblet, C

    2003-01-01

    Alpha subunits of the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) display genetic heterogeneity in mammals and zebrafish. This diversity is increased in mammals by the alternative splicing mechanism. We report here in zebrafish, the characterization of a new alphaZ1 subunit likely arising from alphaZ1 gene by an alternative splice process (alphaZ1L). This novel cDNA possesses 45 supplementary nucleotides at the putative exon2/exon3 boundary. The corresponding protein contains 15 additional amino acids in the NH2-terminal domain. Heterologous expression of homomeric GlyRalphaZ1L in human embryonic kidney-293 cells generates glycine-gated strychnine-sensitive chloride channels with no obvious discrepancy with pharmacological properties of GlyRalphaZ1. Moreover, zinc modulation of glycine-induced currents is identical in alphaZ1 and alphaZ1L glycine receptors. During ontogenesis, simultaneous alphaZ1 and alphaZ1L mRNA synthesis have been observed. Embryonic and adult alphaZ1 and alphaZ1L mRNA expressions are restricted to the CNS. Embryonic alphaZ1L mRNA anatomical pattern of expression is, however, highly restrained and strictly limited to the rostral part of the brain revealing a highly regionalized function of alphaZ1L in the CNS. This report contributes to the characterization of the diversity of glycine receptor isoforms in zebrafish and emphasizes the common mechanism used among vertebrates for creating GlyR variety and specificity.

  1. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  2. Selective α1-adrenergic blockade disturbs the regional distribution of cerebral blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Igor A; Mattos, João D; Campos, Monique O; Machado, Alessandro C; Rocha, Marcos P; Rocha, Natalia G; Vianna, Lauro C; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2016-06-01

    Handgrip-induced increases in blood flow through the contralateral artery that supplies the cortical representation of the arm have been hypothesized as a consequence of neurovascular coupling and a resultant metabolic attenuation of sympathetic cerebral vasoconstriction. In contrast, sympathetic restraint, in theory, inhibits changes in perfusion of the cerebral ipsilateral blood vessels. To confirm whether sympathetic nerve activity modulates cerebral blood flow distribution during static handgrip (SHG) exercise, beat-to-beat contra- and ipsilateral internal carotid artery blood flow (ICA; Doppler) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer) were simultaneously assessed in nine healthy men (27 ± 5 yr), both at rest and during a 2-min SHG bout (30% maximal voluntary contraction), under two experimental conditions: 1) control and 2) α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. End-tidal carbon dioxide (rebreathing system) was clamped throughout the study. SHG induced increases in MAP (+31.4 ± 10.7 mmHg, P < 0.05) and contralateral ICA blood flow (+80.9 ± 62.5 ml/min, P < 0.05), while no changes were observed in the ipsilateral vessel (-9.8 ± 39.3 ml/min, P > 0.05). The reduction in ipsilateral ICA vascular conductance (VC) was greater compared with contralateral ICA (contralateral: -0.8 ± 0.8 vs. ipsilateral: -2.6 ± 1.3 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P < 0.05). Prazosin was effective to induce α1-blockade since phenylephrine-induced increases in MAP were greatly reduced (P < 0.05). Under α1-adrenergic receptor blockade, SHG evoked smaller MAP responses (+19.4 ± 9.2, P < 0.05) but similar increases in ICAs blood flow (contralateral: +58.4 ± 21.5 vs. ipsilateral: +54.3 ± 46.2 ml/min, P > 0.05) and decreases in VC (contralateral: -0.4 ± 0.7 vs. ipsilateral: -0.4 ± 1.0 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P > 0.05). These findings indicate a role of sympathetic nerve activity in the regulation of cerebral blood flow distribution during SHG.

  3. β1-Adrenergic blockers exert antioxidant effects, reduce matrix metalloproteinase activity, and improve renovascular hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Elen; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Ceron, Carla S; Prado, Cibele M; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2014-08-01

    Hypertension induces left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by mechanisms involving oxidative stress and unbalanced cardiac matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. We hypothesized that β1-adrenergic receptor blockers with antioxidant properties (nebivolol) could reverse hypertension-induced LVH more effectively than conventional β1-blockers (metoprolol) when used at doses that exert similar antihypertensive effects. Two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) hypertension was induced in male Wistar rats. Six weeks after surgery, hypertensive and sham rats were treated with nebivolol (10 mg kg(-1)day(-1)) or metoprolol (20 mg kg(-1)day(-1)) for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was monitored weekly by tail-cuff plethysmography. LV structural changes and fibrosis were studied in hematoxylin/eosin- and picrosirius-stained sections, respectively. Cardiac MMP levels and activity were determined by in situ zymography, gel zymography, and immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidium and lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence assays were used to assess cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Nitrotyrosine levels were determined in LV samples by immunohistochemistry and green fluorescence and were evaluated using the ImageJ software. Cardiac protein kinase B/Akt (AKT) phosphorylation state was assessed by Western blot. Both β-blockers exerted similar antihypertensive effects and attenuated hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. Both drugs reduced myocyte hypertrophy and collagen deposition in 2K1C rats. These effects were associated with lower cardiac ROS and nitrotyrosine levels and attenuation of hypertension-induced increases in cardiac MMP-2 levels and in situ gelatinolytic activity after treatment with both β-blockers. Whereas hypertension increased AKT phosphorylation, no effects were found with β-blockers. In conclusion, we found evidence that two β1-blockers with different properties attenuate hypertension-induced LV hypertrophy and cardiac collagen deposition in association with

  4. Histamine receptors on adult rat cardiomyocytes: antagonism of alpha/sub 1/-receptor stimulation of cAMP degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Bowen, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Incubation of intact cardiomyocytes with the histamine antagonist (/sup 3/H)mepyramine results in rapid reversible binding to a single class of high affinity sites (K/sub D/ = 1.2nM; 50,000 sites/myocyte). In membranes from purified myocytes histamine competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding (K/sub D/ = 300nM) is not altered by GTP (10..mu..M). Competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding by H-receptor subtype-selective antagonists suggests the presence of a single class of H/sub 1/-receptors. Incubation of intact myocytes with histamine (luM, H/sub 1/ receptor activation) plus norepinephrine (NE 1uM, alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ receptor activation) for 3 min leads to significantly more cAMP accumulation (36.5 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes) than NE alone (30 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes). Histamine alone does not alter basal cAMP = 10.4 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes, or beta/sub 1/ stimulation (isoproternol, 1uM) = 39.6 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes. Cyclic AMP accumulation with NE plus prazosin 10nM, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + alpha/sub 1/ blockade) is indistinguishable from NE + histamine, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + H/sub 1/) stimulation. Histamine competition for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding suggests that histamine does not block alpha/sub 1/ receptors on the myocyte. These data suggest that H/sub 1/ receptor activation leads to antagonism of the alpha/sub 1/ receptor mediated activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase the authors have recently described.

  5. The role of palmitoylation in functional expression of nicotinic alpha7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Drisdel, Renaldo C; Manzana, Ehrine; Green, William N

    2004-11-17

    Neuronal alpha-bungarotoxin receptors (BgtRs) are nicotinic receptors that require as yet unidentified post-translational modifications to achieve functional expression. In this study, we examined the role of protein palmitoylation in BgtR expression. BgtR alpha7 subunits are highly palmitoylated in neurons from brain and other cells capable of BgtR expression, such as pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. In PC12 cells, alpha7 subunits are palmitoylated with a stoichiometry of approximately one palmitate per subunit, and inhibition of palmitoylation blocks BgtR expression. In cells incapable of BgtR expression, such as human embryonic kidney cells, alpha7 subunits are not significantly palmitoylated. However, in these same cells, chimeric subunits with the N-terminal half of alpha7 fused to the C-terminal half of serotonin-3A receptor (alpha7/5-HT3A) subunits form functional BgtRs that are palmitoylated to an extent similar to that of BgtRalpha7 subunits in PC12 cells. Palmitoylation of PC12 and alpha7/5-HT3A BgtRs occurred during assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In conclusion, our data indicate a function for protein palmitoylation in which palmitoylation of assembling alpha7 subunits in the ER has a role in the formation of functional BgtRs.

  6. Modulation of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus via protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Vandana, Sharma; Navneet, Sangha; Surinder, Kaur; Krishnasastry, M V

    2003-01-30

    In the presence of assembled alpha-hemolysin (alpha-HL) of Staphylococcus aureus, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) is rapidly dephosphorylated. Several obvious possibilities that otherwise would have contributed to the dephosphorylation were ruled out. Instead, an elevation in the activity of a protein tyrosine phosphatase appears to be responsible for the observed loss of phosphorylation signal of EGFr. For this dephosphorylation, the assembly of alpha-HL is necessary while lytic pore formation is not required. In summary, the EGFr is unable to retain its phosphorylation signal in the presence of alpha-HL and the process is irreversible.

  7. Sustained nicotine exposure differentially affects alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y N; Amin, J; Weiss, D S; Wecker, L

    1996-02-01

    To determine whether prolonged exposure to nicotine differentially affects alpha 3 beta 2 versus alpha 4 beta 2 nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, oocytes were coinjected with subunit cRNAs, and peak responses to agonist, evoked by 0.7 or 7 microM nicotine for alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors, respectively, were determined before and following incubation for up to 48 h with nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. Agonist responses of alpha 4 beta 2 receptors decreased in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values in the 10 nM range following incubation for 24 h and in the 1 nM range following incubation for 48 h. In contrast, responses of alpha 3 beta 2 receptors following incubation for 24-48 h with 1,000 nM nicotine decreased by only 50-60%, and total ablation of responses could not be achieved. Attenuation of responses occurred within the first 5 min of nicotine exposure and was a first-order process for both subtypes; half-lives for inactivation were 4.09 and 2.36 min for alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors, respectively. Recovery was also first-order for both subtypes; half-lives for recovery were 21 and 7.5 h for alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors, respectively. Thus, the responsiveness of both receptors decreased following sustained exposure to nicotine, but alpha 4 beta 2 receptors recovered much slower. Results may explain the differential effect of sustained nicotine exposure on nicotinic receptor-mediated neurotransmitter release.

  8. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-12-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors.

  9. Mast cells express novel functional IL-15 receptor alpha isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Orinska, Zane; Krause, Hans; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-05-15

    Mast cells previously have been reported to be regulated by IL-15 and to express a distinct IL-15R, termed IL-15RX. To further examine IL-15 binding and signaling in mast cells, we have studied the nature of the IL-15R and some of its biological activities in these cells. In this study, we report the existence of three novel isoforms of the IL-15R alpha chain in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells as a result of an alternative exon-splicing mechanism within the IL-15R alpha gene. These correspond to new mRNA transcripts lacking exon 4; exons 3 and 4; or exons 3, 4, and 5 (IL-15R alpha Delta 4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4,5). After transient transfection in COS-7 cells, all IL-15R alpha isoforms associate with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, the perinuclear space, and the cell membrane. Analysis of glycosylation pattern demonstrates the usage of a single N-glycosylation site, while no O-glycosylation is observed. Importantly, IL-15 binds with high affinity to, and promotes the survival of, murine BA/F3 cells stably transfected with the IL-15R alpha isoforms. Furthermore, we report that signaling mediated by IL-15 binding to the newly identified IL-15R alpha isoforms involves the phosphorylation of STAT3, STAT5, STAT6, Janus kinase 2, and Syk kinase. Taken together, our data indicate that murine mast cells express novel, fully functional IL-15R alpha isoforms, which can explain the selective regulatory effects of IL-15 on these cells.

  10. Pregnancy effects on distribution of progesterone receptors, oestrogen receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptors, Ki-67 antigen and apoptosis in the bovine interplacentomal uterine wall and foetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Boos, A; Kohtes, J; Janssen, V; Mülling, C; Stelljes, A; Zerbe, H; Hässig, M; Thole, H H

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, studies dealing with the uterus of the pregnant cow focus primarily on the placentome or on early and late pregnancy. Thus, there is a paucity of information about many aspects of the interplacentomal uterine wall including adherent foetal membranes. Corresponding tissue specimens were collected at the slaughterhouse and in animals undergoing premature caesarean section. Two specimens per month of pregnancy were assessed immunohistochemically for progesterone receptors, oestrogen receptor alpha and glucocorticoid receptors, Ki-67 protein and TUNEL procedure was performed. The latter two methods were employed in three animals each per months 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 7 and 8 and in six animals undergoing caesarean section at days 274 and 275 post insemination or during spontaneous labour. Results indicate that proliferation and apoptosis are of minor importance for tissue homeostasis since both can histochemically be detected only sporadically. Thus, at the sites investigated here, cellular hypertrophy plays an important role for tissue growth during pregnancy. Progesterone receptors, oestrogen receptor alpha and glucocorticoid receptors, however, exhibit cell type and pregnancy stage specific distribution patterns within the tissues assessed. Progesterone receptor immunoreactive scores remained fairly unchanged during pregnancy. Oestrogen receptor alpha scores, however, generally decreased and glucocorticoid receptors increased with ongoing gestation. Progesterone receptors and oestrogen receptor alpha were present in endometrial stroma and in myometrial smooth muscle cells during whole pregnancy. Oestrogen receptor alpha was detectable during whole pregnancy also in uterine glands. Progesterone receptors were, however, present at a very low level at the latter site only during months 1-3 and 6-9. Oestrogen receptor alpha and glucocorticoid receptors may also mediate uterine blood flow since they were present in the tunica media of uterine blood vessels

  11. The Golgi apparatus is a functionally distinct Ca2+ store regulated by PKA and Epac branches of the β1-adrenergic signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaokang.; Kirton, Hannah M.; MacDougall, David A.; Boyle, John P.; Deuchars, James; Frater, Brenda; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Hardy, Matthew E.; White, Edward; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Peers, Chris; Steele, Derek S.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ release from the Golgi apparatus regulates key functions of the organelle, including vesicle trafficking. However, the signaling pathways that control this form of Ca2+ release are poorly understood and evidence of discrete Golgi Ca2+ release events is lacking. Here, we identified the Golgi apparatus as the source of prolonged Ca2+ release events that originate from the nuclear ‘poles’ of primary cardiac cells. Once initiated, Golgi Ca2+ release was unaffected by global depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+, and disruption of the Golgi apparatus abolished Golgi Ca2+ release without affecting sarcoplasmic reticulum function, suggesting functional and anatomical independence of Golgi and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. Maximal activation of β1-adrenoceptors had only a small stimulating effect on Golgi Ca2+ release. However, inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 or 4, or downregulation of PDE 3 and 4 in heart failure markedly potentiated β1-adrenergic stimulation of Golgi Ca2+ release, consistent with compartmentalization of cAMP signaling within the Golgi apparatus microenvironment. β1-adrenergic stimulation of Golgi Ca2+ release involved activation of both Epac and PKA signaling pathways and CaMKII. Interventions that stimulated Golgi Ca2+ release induced trafficking of vascular growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) from the Golgi apparatus to the surface membrane. These data establish the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear focal point for Ca2+ and β1-adrenergic signaling, which functions independently from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the global Ca2+ transients that underlie the primary contractile function of the cell. PMID:26462734

  12. The nicotinic receptor in the rat pineal gland is an alpha3beta4 subtype.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Susan C; Vicini, Stefano; Xiao, Yingxian; Dávila-García, Martha I; Yasuda, Robert P; Wolfe, Barry B; Kellar, Kenneth J

    2004-10-01

    The rat pineal gland contains a high density of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We characterized the pharmacology of the binding sites and function of these receptors, measured the nAChR subunit mRNA, and used subunit-specific antibodies to establish the receptor subtype as defined by subunit composition. In ligand binding studies, [3H]epibatidine ([3H]EB) binds with an affinity of approximately 100 pM to nAChRs in the pineal gland, and the density of these sites is approximately 5 times that in rat cerebral cortex. The affinities of nicotinic drugs for binding sites in the pineal gland are similar to those at alpha3beta4 nAChRs heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In functional studies, the potencies and efficacies of nicotinic drugs to activate or block whole-cell currents in dissociated pinealocytes match closely their potencies and efficacies to activate or block 86Rb+ efflux in the cells expressing heterologous alpha3beta4 nAChRs. Measurements of mRNA indicated the presence of transcripts for alpha3, beta2, and beta4 nAChR subunits but not those for alpha2, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, or beta3 subunits. Immunoprecipitation with subunit-specific antibodies showed that virtually all [3H]EB-labeled nAChRs contained alpha3 and beta4 subunits associated in one complex. The beta2 subunit was not associated with this complex. Taken together, these results indicate that virtually all of the nAChRs in the rat pineal gland are the alpha3beta4 nAChR subtype and that the pineal gland can therefore serve as an excellent and convenient model in which to study the pharmacology and function of these receptors in a native tissue.

  13. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  14. Potent and selective agonists of alpha-melanotropin (alphaMSH) action at human melanocortin receptor 5; linear analogs of alpha-melanotropin.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; MacNeil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Cabello, M Angeles; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2007-05-01

    Alpha-melanotropin, Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr-Ser-Met-Glu-His(6)-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val(13)-NH(2)(1), is a non-selective endogenous agonist for the melanocortin receptor 5; the receptor present in various peripheral tissues and in the brain, cortex and cerebellum. Most of the synthetic analogs of alphaMSH, including a broadly used and more potent the NDP-alphaMSH peptide, Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr-Ser-Nle(4)-Glu-His(6)-D-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val(13)-NH(2), are also not particularly selective for MC5R. To elucidate physiological functions of the melanocortin receptor 5 in rodents and humans, the receptor subtype selective research tools are needed. We report herein syntheses and pharmacological evaluation in vitro of several analogs of NDP-alphaMSH which are highly potent and specific agonists for the human MC5R. The new linear peptides, of structures and solubility properties similar to those of the endogenous ligand alphaMSH, are exemplified by compound 7, Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr-Ser-Met-Glu-Oic(6)-D-4,4'-Bip(7)-Pip(8)-Trp(9)-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val(13)-NH(2) (Oic: octahydroindole-2-COOH, 4,4'-Bip: 4,4'-biphenylalanine, Pip: pipecolic acid), shortly NODBP-alphaMSH, which has an IC(50)=0.74 nM (binding assay) and EC(50)=0.41 (cAMP production assay) at hMC5R nM and greater than 3500-fold selectivity with respect to the melanocortin receptors 1b, 3 and 4. A shorter peptide derived from NODBP-alphaMSH: Ac-Nle-Glu-Oic(6)-D-4,4'-Bip(7)-Pip(8)-Trp(9) -NH(2) (17) was measured to be an agonist only 10-fold less potent at hMC5R than the full length parent peptide. In the structure of this smaller analog, the Nle-Glu-Oic(6)-D-4,4'-Bip(7)-Pip(8) segment was found to be critical for high agonist potency, while the C-terminal Trp(9) residue was shown to be required for high hMC5R selectivity versus hMC1b,3,4R.

  15. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  16. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  17. Both estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta agonists enhance cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, C A; Lieblich, S E; Bingham, B I; Williamson, M A; Viau, V; Galea, L A M

    2006-09-15

    This study investigated the involvement of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estradiol-induced enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult female rat. Subtype selective estrogen receptor agonists, propyl-pyrazole triol (estrogen receptor alpha agonist) and diarylpropionitrile (estrogen receptor beta agonist) were examined for each receptor's contribution, individual and cooperative, for estradiol-enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation. Estradiol increases hippocampal cell proliferation within 4 h [Ormerod BK, Lee TT, Galea LA (2003) Estradiol initially enhances but subsequently suppresses (via adrenal steroids) granule cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. J Neurobiol 55:247-260]. Therefore, animals received s.c. injections of estradiol (10 microg), propyl-pyrazole triol and diarylpropionitrile alone (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/0.1 ml dimethylsulfoxide) or in combination (2.5 mg propyl-pyrazole triol+2.5 mg diarylpropionitrile/0.1 ml dimethylsulfoxide) and 4 h later received an i.p. injection of the cell synthesis marker, bromodeoxyuridine (200 mg/kg). Diarylpropionitrile enhanced cell proliferation at all three administered doses (1.25 mg, P<0.008; 2.5 mg, P<0.003; 5 mg, P<0.005), whereas propyl-pyrazole triol significantly increased cell proliferation (P<0.0002) only at the dose of 2.5 mg. Our results demonstrate both estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta are individually involved in estradiol-enhanced cell proliferation. Furthermore both estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta mRNA was found co-localized with Ki-67 expression in the hippocampus albeit at low levels, indicating a potential direct influence of each receptor subtype on progenitor cells and their progeny. Dual receptor activation resulted in reduced levels of cell proliferation, supporting previous studies suggesting that estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta may modulate each other's activity. Our results also suggest that a component

  18. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Cinnamon Bidwell, L; Dew, Rachel E; Kollins, Scott H

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacologic management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has expanded beyond stimulant medications to include alpha-2 adrenergic agonists. These agents exert their actions through presynaptic stimulation and likely involve facilitation of dopamine and noradrenaline neurotransmission, both of which are thought to play critical roles in the pathophysiology of ADHD. Furthermore, frontostriatal dysfunction giving rise to neuropsychological weaknesses has been well-established in patients with ADHD and may explain how alpha-2 agents exert their beneficial effects. In the following review, we consider relevant neurobiological underpinnings of ADHD with respect to why alpha-2 agents may be effective in treating this condition. We also review new formulations of alpha-2 agonists, emerging data on their use in ADHD, and implications for clinical practice. Integrating knowledge of pathophysiologic mechanisms and mechanisms of drug action may inform our medication choices and facilitate treatment of ADHD and related disorders.

  19. Alpha-2 Adrenergic Receptors and Attention—Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, L. Cinnamon; Dew, Rachel E.; Kollins, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has expanded beyond stimulant medications to include alpha 2 adrenergic agonists. These agents exert their actions through presynaptic stimulation and likely involve facilitation of both dopamine and noradrenaline neurotransmission, which are both thought to play critical roles in the pathophysiology of ADHD. Further, frontostratial dysfunction giving rise to neuropsychological weaknesses has been well-established in patients with ADHD and may explain how alpha 2 agents exert their beneficial effects. In the following review, we consider relevant neurobiological underpinnings of ADHD with respect to why alpha 2 agents may be effective in treating this condition. We also review new formulations of alpha 2 agonists, emerging data on their use in ADHD, and implications for clinical practice. Integrating knowledge of pathphysiological mechanisms and mechanisms of drug action may inform our medication choices and facilitate treatment of ADHD and related disorders. PMID:20652773

  20. Investigation of the alpha(1)-glycine receptor channel-opening kinetics in the submillisecond time domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grewer, C

    1999-01-01

    The activation and desensitization kinetics of the human alpha(1)-homooligomeric glycine receptor, which was transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells, were studied with a 100-microseconds time resolution to determine the rate and equilibrium constants of individual receptor reaction steps. Concentration jumps of the activating ligands glycine and beta-alanine were initiated by photolysis of caged, inactive precursors and were followed by neurotransmitter binding, receptor-channel opening, and receptor desensitization steps that were separated along the time axis. Analysis of the ligand concentration-dependence of these processes allows the determination of 1) the rate constants of glycine binding, k(+1) approximately 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), and dissociation, k(-1) = 1900 s(-1); 2) the rates of receptor-channel opening, k(op) = 2200 s(-1), and closing, k(cl) = 38 s(-1); 3) the receptor desensitization rate, alpha = 0.45 s(-1); 4) the number of occupied ligand binding sites necessary for receptor-channel activation and desensitization, n >/= 3; and 5) the maximum receptor-channel open probability, p(0) > 0.95. The kinetics of receptor-channel activation are insensitive to the transmembrane potential. A general model for glycine receptor activation explaining the experimental data consists of a sequential mechanism based on rapid ligand-binding steps preceding a rate-limiting receptor-channel opening reaction and slow receptor desensitization. PMID:10423421

  1. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmi, S.M.; Mishra, R.K.

    1989-02-15

    The existence of specific alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites has been shown in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SH5Y) cells using direct radioligand binding. (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, exhibited high affinity, saturable binding to both Y-79 and SH-SY5Y cell membranes. The binding of alpha 1 specific antagonist, (/sup 3/H)Prazocine, was not detectable in either cell type. Competition studies with antagonists yielded pharmacological characteristics typical of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors: rauwolscine greater than yohimbine greater than phentolamine greater than prazocine. Based on the affinity constants of prazocine and oxymetazoline, it appears that Y-79 cells contain alpha 2A receptor, whereas SH-SY5Y cells probably represent a mixture of alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptors. alpha 2-agonists clonidine and (-)epinephrine inhibition curves yielded high and low affinity states of the receptor in SH-SY5Y cells. Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions reduced the proportion of high affinity sites of alpha 2 receptors. These two neuronal cell lines of human origin would prove useful in elucidating the action and regulation of human alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and their interaction with other receptor systems.

  2. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  3. Nicotinic alpha5 subunit deletion locally reduces high-affinity agonist activation without altering nicotinic receptor numbers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert W B; Collins, Allan C; Lindstrom, Jon M; Whiteaker, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha5 mRNA is widely expressed in the CNS. An alpha5 gene polymorphism has been implicated in behavioral differences between mouse strains, and alpha5-null mutation induces profound changes in mouse acute responses to nicotine. In this study, we have examined the distribution and prevalence of alpha5* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mouse brain, and quantified the effects of alpha5-null mutation on pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function (measured using synaptosomal (86)Rb(+) efflux) and overall [(125)I]epibatidine binding site expression. alpha5* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression was found in nine of fifteen regions examined, although < 20% of the total nicotinic acetylcholine receptor population in any region contained alpha5. Deletion of the alpha5 subunit gene resulted in localized loss of function (thalamus, striatum), which was itself confined to the DHbetaE-sensitive receptor population. No changes in receptor expression were seen. Consequently, functional changes must occur as a result of altered function per unit of receptor. The selective depletion of high agonist activation affinity sites results in overall nicotinic function being reduced, and increases the overall agonist activation affinity. Together, these results describe the receptor-level changes underlying altered behavioral responses to nicotine in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha5 subunit-null mutants.

  4. Stoichiometry and pharmacology of two human alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor types.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Mirko; Bermudez, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    The alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant nAChR subtype in the brain, where it forms the high-affinity binding site for nicotine. The alpha4beta2 nAChR belongs to a gene family of ligand-gated ion channels that also includes muscle nAChRs, GABAA receptors, and glycine receptors and that assembles into pentameric structures. alpha4 and beta2 nAChR subunits expressed heterologously in Xenopus laevis oocytes assemble into a mixture of high- and low-affinity functional receptors, giving rise to biphasic ACh concentration-response curves (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001). High- and low-affinity alpha4beta2 nAChRs differ significantly in their functional and pharmacological properties (Zwart and Vijverberg, 1998; Buisson and Bertrand, 2001; Houlihan et al., 2001; Nelson et al., 2003) and result from the assembly of alpha4 and beta2 subunits into two distinct stoichiometric arrangements: (alpha4)2(beta2)3(high-affinity subtype) and (alpha4)3(beta2)2 (low-affinity subtype) (Nelson et al., 2003). In this study we have examined the functional and pharmacological properties of high- and low-affinity alpha4beta2 receptors using two-electrode voltage clamp procedures on Xenopus oocytes transfected with high (1:10) or low (10:1) ratios of alpha4/beta2 cDNAs, which yield high (1:10)- or low (10:1)- affinity receptors with monophasic ACh concentration- response curves. Furthermore, to determine the stoichiometry of high- and low-affinity receptors expressed heterologously by Xenopus oocytes, we have determined the stoichiometry of high- and low-affinity alpha4beta2 receptors by mutating a highly conserved hydrophobic residue in the middle (position 9') of the pore-lining domain, which increases agonist potency in a manner that allows predictions on subunit composition (Cooper et al., 1991; Revah et al., 1991; Labarca et al., 1995; Boorman et al., 2000).

  5. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Tooth Morphogenesis Reveals Functional Pleiotropy

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Scott W.; Gahring, Lorise C.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype, alpha7, was investigated in the developing teeth of mice that were modified through homologous recombination to express a bi-cistronic IRES-driven tau-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP); alpha7GFP) or IRES-Cre (alpha7Cre). The expression of alpha7GFP was detected first in cells of the condensing mesenchyme at embryonic (E) day E13.5 where it intensifies through E14.5. This expression ends abruptly at E15.5, but was again observed in ameloblasts of incisors at E16.5 or molar ameloblasts by E17.5–E18.5. This expression remains detectable until molar enamel deposition is completed or throughout life as in the constantly erupting mouse incisors. The expression of alpha7GFP also identifies all stages of innervation of the tooth organ. Ablation of the alpha7-cell lineage using a conditional alpha7Cre×ROSA26-LoxP(diphtheria toxin A) strategy substantially reduced the mesenchyme and this corresponded with excessive epithelium overgrowth consistent with an instructive role by these cells during ectoderm patterning. However, alpha7knock-out (KO) mice exhibited normal tooth size and shape indicating that under normal conditions alpha7 expression is dispensable to this process. The function of ameloblasts in alpha7KO mice is altered relative to controls. High resolution micro-computed tomography analysis of adult mandibular incisors revealed enamel volume of the alpha7KO was significantly reduced and the organization of enamel rods was altered relative to controls. These results demonstrate distinct and varied spatiotemporal expression of alpha7 during tooth development, and they suggest that dysfunction of this receptor would have diverse impacts upon the adult organ. PMID:22666322

  6. Parathyroid-specific interaction of the calcium-sensing receptor and G alpha q.

    PubMed

    Pi, Min; Chen, Ling; Huang, MinZhao; Luo, Qiang; Quarles, L Darryl

    2008-12-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor regulates various parathyroid gland functions, including hormone secretion, gene transcription, and chief cell hyperplasia through G alpha q- and G alpha i-dependent signaling pathways. To determine the specific function of G alpha q in these processes, we generated transgenic mice using the human parathyroid hormone promoter to drive overexpression of a dominant negative G alpha q loop minigene to selectively disrupt G alpha q function in the parathyroid gland. The G alpha q loop mRNA was highly expressed in the parathyroid gland but not in other tissues of these transgenic mice. Gross appearance, body weight, bone mineral density, and survival of the transgenic mice were indistinguishable from those of their wild-type littermates. Adult transgenic mice, however, exhibited an increase in parathyroid hormone mRNA and in its basal serum level as well as in gland size. The response of the parathyroid gland to hypocalcemia was found to be reduced in sensitivity in the transgenic mice when compared to their wild-type controls. Abnormalities of the parathyroid gland function in these transgenic mice were similar to those of heterozygous G alpha q(+/-) and calcium sensing receptor(+/-) mice. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of selectively targeting the parathyroid gland to investigate signaling mechanisms downstream of the calcium receptor.

  7. Sequence and functional expression of a single alpha subunit of an insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J; Buckingham, S D; Shingai, R; Lunt, G G; Goosey, M W; Darlison, M G; Sattelle, D B; Barnard, E A

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes a locust (Schistocerca gregaria) nervous system nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit (alpha L1). The calculated molecular weight of the unglycosylated polypeptide, which contains in the proposed extracellular domain two adjacent cysteine residues which are characteristic of alpha (ligand binding) subunits, is 60,641 daltons. Injection into Xenopus oocytes, of RNA synthesized from this clone in vitro, results in expression of functional nicotinic receptors in the oocyte membrane. In these, nicotine opens a cation channel; the receptors are blocked by both alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt) and kappa-bungarotoxin (kappa-Bgt). Reversible block of the expressed insect AChR by mecamylamine, d-tubocurarine, tetraethylammonium, bicuculline and strychnine has also been observed. These data are entirely consistent with previously reported electrophysiological studies on in vivo insect nicotinic receptors and also with biochemical studies on an alpha-Bgt affinity purified locust AChR. Thus, a functional receptor exhibiting the characteristic pharmacology of an in vivo insect nicotinic AChR can be expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection with a single subunit RNA. PMID:1702381

  8. Molecular determinants conferring alpha-toxin resistance in recombinant DNA-derived acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Keller, S H; Kreienkamp, H J; Kawanishi, C; Taylor, P

    1995-02-24

    Sequences of the alpha-subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from the snake and mongoose contain several differences in the region between amino acids 183 and 200. Receptors from both of these species reveal resistance to the snake alpha-toxins presumably arising as a protective evolutionary mechanism. Sequence differences include the added glycosylation signals at residue 187 in the mongoose and at residues 189 and 111 in snake. Although previous observations with peptides and fusion proteins either synthesized chemically or in a bacterial expression system indicate that certain amino acid residues may contribute to the resistance, our findings with the intact receptor in an eukaryotic expression system indicate the major role for glycosylation. In this study, we show that addition of glycosylation signals gives rise to virtually complete glycosylation at the added sites, although heterogeneity of oligosaccharide processing is evident. By analysis of combinations of mutants, we document that glycosylation exerts the predominant influence on alpha-toxin binding. Substitutions at other residues are largely without influence as single mutations but appear to decrease affinity further in multiple mutants, particularly where the receptor is glycosylated at the 187 and 189 positions. Glycosylation exerts a major influence on the dissociation as well as the association rates of the alpha-toxin-receptor complex, suggesting that the decrease for alpha-toxin affinity is not simply a consequence of restricted diffusional access, rather glycosylation affects the conformation and stability of the bound complex.

  9. Alpha2 receptor binding in the medulla oblongata in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, J; Panigrahy, A; Filiano, J J; Sleeper, L A; St John, W M; Kinney, H C

    2001-02-01

    The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of postnatal infant mortality in the United States. Its etiology remains unknown. We propose that SIDS, or a subset of SIDS, is due to a failure of autoresuscitation, a protective brainstem response to asphyxia or hypoxia, in a vulnerable infant during a critical developmental period. Gasping is an important component of autoresuscitation that is thought to be mediated by the "gasping center" in the lateral tegmentum of the medulla, a region homologous in its cytoarchitecture and chemical anatomy to the intermediate reticular zone (IRZ) in the human. Since we found that [3H]para-aminoclonidine ([3H]PAC) binding to alpha2-adrenergic receptors localizes to this region in human infants and, thereby provides a neurochemical marker for it, we tested the hypothesis that [3H]PAC binding to alpha2-adrenergic receptors is decreased in the IRZ in SIDS victims. Using quantitative tissue autoradiography with [3H]PAC as the radioligand and phentolamine as the displacer, we analyzed alpha2-receptor binding density in the IRZ, as well as in 7 additional sites for comparison, in 10 SIDS and 10 control medullae. There were no significant differences in alpha2 receptor binding in the IRZ, vagal nuclei, or other medullary sites examined between SIDS and control cases. These results suggest that the putative gasping defect in the IRZ in SIDS victims is not related to [3H]PAC binding to alpha2-adrenergic receptors.

  10. Genomic organization of the mouse T cell receptor V alpha family.

    PubMed Central

    Jouvin-Marche, E; Hue, I; Marche, P N; Liebe-Gris, C; Marolleau, J P; Malissen, B; Cazenave, P A; Malissen, M

    1990-01-01

    Based on the analysis of V alpha gene segment deletions in a panel of T lymphomas, we have constructed a map of the mouse T cell receptor alpha/delta region and assigned the relative position of 72 distinct V gene segments. Three major observations have emerged from such studies. First, members of a given V alpha subfamily are not organized in discrete units along the chromosome but largely interspersed with members of other V alpha subfamilies. Second, analysis of the deletion map suggests the existence of repetitive patterns (V alpha clusters) in the chromosomal distribution of the V alpha gene segments. Third, the present-day organization of the V alpha/delta region may be readily explained by a series of sequential duplications involving three ancestral V alpha clusters. Direct evidence for the existence of these unique structural features has been gained by cloning approximately 370 kb of DNA and positioning 26 distinct V alpha gene segments belonging to six different subfamilies. Finally, the relationships existing between the V alpha/delta gene segment organization and usage are discussed in terms of position-dependent models. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2357962

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha: a pharmacological target with a promising future.

    PubMed

    van Raalte, Daniel H; Li, Min; Pritchard, P Haydn; Wasan, Kishor M

    2004-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor that belongs to the family of nuclear receptors. PPAR-alpha regulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid beta-oxidation and is a major regulator of energy homeostasis. Fibrates are PPAR-alpha agonists and have been used to treat dyslipidemia for several decades because of their triglyceride (TG) lowering and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) elevating effects. More recent research has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic actions of PPAR-alpha agonists in the vessel wall as well. Thus, PPAR-alpha agonists decrease the progression of atherosclerosis by modulating metabolic risk factors and by their anti-inflammatory actions on the level of the vascular wall. This is confirmed by several clinical studies, in which fibrates have shown to reduce atherosclerotic plaque formation and the event rate of coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome (MS). MS is characterized by a group of metabolic risk factors that include obesity, raised blood pressure, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance or glucose intolerance, and a prothrombotic state, and its incidence in the Western world is rising to epidemic proportions. This review paper will focus on the functions of PPAR-alpha in fatty acid beta-oxidation, lipid metabolism, and vascular inflammation. Furthermore, PPAR-alpha genetics, the clinical use of PPAR-alpha activators and their future perspective will be discussed.

  12. Nicotine trapping causes the persistent desensitization of alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Flotildes, Karen; Li, Maureen; Cohen, Bruce N

    2003-02-01

    To determine whether prolonged nicotine exposure persistently inactivates rat alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, we measured the voltage-clamped alpha4beta2 response to acetylcholine (ACh) before and 24 h after, 1-h or 12-h incubations in 10 microm nicotine. A 12-h incubation in 10 microm nicotine depressed the alpha4beta2 ACh response for 24 h without affecting total or surface alpha4beta2 expression. To determine whether oocyte-mediated nicotine release caused this depression, we co-incubated an alpha4beta2-expressing oocyte with an un-injected one (pre-incubated in 10 microm nicotine for 12 h) for 24 h and measured the change in the alpha4beta2 ACh response. The response decreased by the same factor after the co-incubation as it did after a 12-h incubation in 10 microm nicotine and a 24-h incubation in nicotine-free media. Thus, oocyte-mediated nicotine release caused the persistent desensitization we observed after a 12-h incubation in 10 microm nicotine. Consistent with this result, measurements of [3H]nicotine release show that oocytes release enough nicotine into the wash media to desensitize alpha4beta2 receptors and that prolonged incubation in 300 microm ACh (which cannot readily cross the membrane or accumulate in acidic vesicles) did not persistently depress the alpha4beta2 response.

  13. Overexpression of the alpha1B-adrenergic receptor causes apoptotic neurodegeneration: multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zuscik, M J; Sands, S; Ross, S A; Waugh, D J; Gaivin, R J; Morilak, D; Perez, D M

    2000-12-01

    Progress toward elucidating the function of alpha1B-adrenergic receptors (alpha1BARs) in the central nervous system has been constrained by a lack of agonists and antagonists with adequate alpha1B-specificity. We have obviated this constraint by generating transgenic mice engineered to overexpress either wild-type or constitutively active alpha1BARs in tissues that normally express the receptor, including the brain. All transgenic lines showed granulovacular neurodegeneration, beginning in alpha1B-expressing domains of the brain and progressing with age to encompass all areas. The degeneration was apoptotic and did not occur in non-transgenic mice. Correspondingly, transgenic mice showed an age-progressive hindlimb disorder that was parkinsonian-like, as demonstrated by rescue of the dysfunction by 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and considerable dopaminergic-neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Transgenic mice also had a grand mal seizure disorder accompanied by a corresponding dysplasia and neurodegeneration of the cerebral cortex. Both behavioral phenotypes (locomotor impairment and seizure) could be partially rescued with the alpha1AR antagonist terazosin, indicating that alpha1AR signaling participated directly in the pathology. Our results indicate that overstimulation of alpha1BAR leads to apoptotic neurodegeneration with a corresponding multiple system atrophy indicative of Shy-Drager syndrome, a disease whose etiology is unknown.

  14. Isolation of rat genomic clones encoding subtypes of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. Identification of a unique receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Lanier, S M; Downing, S; Duzic, E; Homcy, C J

    1991-06-05

    alpha 2-Adrenergic receptors (alpha 2-AR) exist as subtypes that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and differ in 1) their ligand recognition properties, 2) their extent of receptor protein glycosylation, and possible 3) their mechanism of signal transduction. Genomic or cDNA clones encoding three receptor subtypes have been characterized; however, both functional and radioligand binding studies in rodents suggest the existence of a fourth receptor subtype. To isolate the rat genes encoding receptor subtypes we screened a rat genomic library with an oligonucleotide probe encompassing the third membrane span of the human C-4 alpha 2-AR. Two intronless rat genes were isolated that encode distinct receptor subtypes (RG10, RG20). RG10 and RG20 encode proteins of 458 and 450 amino acids, respectively, that are 56% homologous and possess the structural features expected of this class of membrane-bound receptors. RG10 identifies a mRNA species of approximately 2500 nucleotides that is found primarily in brain, whereas RG20 identifies a larger mRNA species (approximately 4000 nucleotides) that is found in several tissues including brain, kidney, and salivary gland. RG10 is 88% homologous to the human C-4 alpha 2-AR and exhibits similar binding properties ( [3H]rauwolscine KD = 0.7 +/- 0.3 nM) as determined following transient expression of the receptor in COS-1 cells. RG20 exhibits ligand binding properties distinct from the three receptor subtypes identified by molecular cloning. Saturation binding studies indicate an affinity constant of 15 +/- 1.2 nM for the alpha 2-AR antagonist [3H]rauwolscine, a value 6-20 times higher than that observed for the three cloned receptor subtypes. In competition binding studies the potency order of competing ligands for RG20 is phentolamine greater than idazoxan greater than yohimbine greater than rauwolscine greater than prazosin. Of the three previously cloned alpha 2-AR, RG20 is most closely related to the human C-10 alpha 2-AR

  15. Correlation between chemical structure, receptor binding, and biological activity of some novel, highly active, 16 alpha, 17 alpha-acetal-substituted glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, E; Thalén, A; Brattsand, R; Gustafsson, J A; Johansson, U; Roempke, K; Saartok, T

    1984-01-01

    The affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor in rat skeletal muscle of some glucocorticoids with a new type of 16 alpha, 17 alpha-acetal substituent has been estimated and correlated to the glucocorticoid activities in three in vivo systems in rats. Budesonide (an approximately 1:1 mixture of the C(22) epimers of 11 beta, 21-dihydroxy-16 alpha, 17 alpha-[(22R,S)-propylmethylenedioxy]-pregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione) and the isolated (22R)- and (22S)-epimers bound to the same binding site as the potent glucocorticoids dexamethasone (DEX) or triamcinolone 16 alpha, 17 alpha-acetonide (TA), but with even higher affinity than DEX or TA, despite the lack of a 9 alpha-fluoro atom in budesonide and its epimers. The (22R)-epimer was twice as active as the (22S)-epimer, 4 times more active than TA, and 14 times more active than DEX. The introduction of a 9 alpha-fluoro atom slightly decreased the binding affinity of the (22R)-epimer of budesonide, in contrast to the positive effect of 9 alpha-fluorination of, e.g., 16 alpha, 17 alpha-acetonides. The negative influence of 9 alpha-fluorination of the (22R)-epimer was partially reversed in the 6 alpha, 9 alpha-difluorinated (22R)-epimer. Nevertheless, the fluorinated compounds were more active than DEX and TA (8 and 11 times more active than DEX, and 2 and 3 times more active than TA, in case of the 9 alpha-fluoro- and 6 alpha, 9 alpha-difluoro-derivatives of the (22R)-epimer, respectively). Budesonide is metabolized mainly to 16 alpha-hydroxyprednisolone (11 beta, 16 alpha, 17 alpha, 21-tetrahydroxy-pregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione) and 6 beta-hydroxy-budesonide. Both metabolites were very weak competitors for the ligand-binding sites on the receptor (3% and 6% of the affinity of DEX, respectively). The affinity for the receptor in vitro was closely correlated to the topical glucocorticoid activity in vivo for the 12 steroids compared (r = 0.98; R = 0.98), which supports the contention that in vitro tests for receptor affinity are

  16. Cat carotid body chemoreceptor responses before and after nicotine receptor blockade with alpha-bungarotoxin.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, E; Lahiri, S

    1987-01-01

    The nature of nicotine receptors in the carotid body was studied in anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats. Chemoreceptor discharge in single or few-fiber preparations of the carotid sinus nerve was measured during isocapnic hypoxia, hyperoxic hypercapnia and in response to nicotine injections before and after administration of alpha-bungarotoxin (10 cats) and after alpha-bungarotoxin plus mecamylamine (7 cats) which binds to neuromuscular-type nicotine cholinergic receptors. alpha-Bungarotoxin caused a slight enhancement of the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia without affecting the chemoreceptor stimulation by nicotine. Mecamylamine (1-5 mg, i.v.), a ganglionic-type nicotinic receptor blocker, had no further effect on the response to hypoxia while it completely abolished the chemoreceptor stimulation by nicotine. Thus the nicotinic receptors in the cat carotid body which elicit excitation of chemosensory fibers appear to be of the ganglionic-type. Blockade of neuromuscular and ganglionic types of nicotinic receptors in the carotid body by alpha-bungarotoxin and mecamylamine does not attenuate the chemosensory responses to either hypoxia or hypercapnia. These nicotinic receptors therefore, do not appear to play an essential role in hypoxic or hypercapnic chemoreception in the cat carotid body.

  17. IGF-1-dependent subunit communication of the IGF-1 holoreceptor: Interactions between. alpha. beta. heterodimeric receptor halves

    SciTech Connect

    Wilden, P.A.; Treadway, J.L.; Morrison, B.D.; Pessin, J.E. )

    1989-12-12

    Examination of {sup 125}I-IGF-1 affinity cross-linking and {beta}-subunit autophosphorylation has indicated that IGF-1 induces a covalent association of isolated {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric IGF-1 receptors into an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric state, in a similar manner to that observed for the insulin receptor. The formation of the {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric IGF-1 receptor complex from the partially purified {alpha}{beta} heterodimers was time dependent with half-maximal formation in approximately 30 min at saturating IGF-1 concentrations. The IGF-1-dependent association of the partially purified {alpha}{beta} heterodimers into an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric state was specific for the IGF-1 receptors since IGF-1 was unable to stimulate the protein kinase activity of the purified {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric insulin receptor complex. Incubation of the {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric IGF-1 holoreceptor with the specific sulfhydryl agent iodoacetamide (IAN) did not alter {sup 125}I-IGF-1 binding or IGF-1 stimulation of protein kinase activity. However, IAN treatment of the {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric IGF-1 receptors inhibited the IGF-1 dependent covalent formation of the disulfide-linked {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric complex. These data indicate that IGF-1 induces the covalent association of isolated {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complexes into a disulfide-linked {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric state whereas Mn/MgATP induces a noncovalent association. Therefore, unlike the insulin receptor in which noncovalent association is sufficient for kinase activation, only the covalent assembly of the IGF-1 receptor {alpha}{beta} heterodimers into the {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetrameric holoreceptor complex is associated with ligand-stimulated protein kinase activation.

  18. Altered adrenergic response and specificity of the receptors in rat ascites hepatoma AH130.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1989-11-15

    Adenylate cyclase activation through adrenergic receptors in rat ascites hepatoma (AH) 130 cells in response to adrenergic drugs was studied, and receptor binding and displacement were compared with those of normal rat hepatocytes. Epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) activated AH130 adenylate cyclase about half as much as isoproterenol (IPN) but equaled IPN after treatment with the alpha-antagonist phentolamine or islet-activating protein (IAP). The three catecholamines in hepatocytes were similar regardless of phentolamine or IAP. These catecholamines activated adenylate cyclase in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells but IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in hepatocytes. We then used the alpha 1-selective ligand [3H]prazosin, the alpha 2-selective ligand [3H]clonidine, and the beta-ligand [125I]iodocyanopindolol [( 125I]ICYP), and found that AH130 cells had few prazosin-binding sites, about eight times as many clonidine-binding sites with high affinity, and many more ICYP-binding sites than in hepatocytes. The dissociation constant (Ki) of the beta 1-selective drug metoprolol by Hofstee plots for AH130 cells was lower than that for hepatocytes. The inhibition of specific ICYP binding by the beta 2-selective agonist salbutamol for AH130 cells gave only one Ki value which was much higher than both high and low Ki values of the drug for hepatocytes. These findings indicate that the alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors in hepatocytes are predominantly alpha 1-type and beta 2-type, but that those in AH130 cells are predominantly alpha 2-type and beta 1-type, and the low adrenergic response of AH130 cells is due to the dominant appearance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, linked with the inhibitory guanine-nucleotide binding regulatory protein, instead of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, and beta 1-adrenergic receptors with low affinity for the hormone.

  19. The serotonin 5-Hydroxytryptaphan1A receptor agonist, (+)8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin, stimulates sympathetic-dependent increases in venous tone during hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Tiniakov, Ruslan; Scrogin, Karie E

    2006-11-01

    Adjuvant treatment of hypovolemic shock with vasoconstrictors is controversial due to their propensity to raise arterial resistance and exacerbate ischemia. A more advantageous therapeutic approach would use agents that also promote venoconstriction to augment perfusion pressure through increased venous return. Recent studies indicate that 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT)(1A) receptor agonists increase blood pressure by stimulating sympathetic drive when administered after acute hypotensive hemorrhage. Given that venous tone is highly dependent upon sympathetic activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, we hypothesized that the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, (+)8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), would increase venous tone in rats subject to hypovolemic shock through sympathetic activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors. Systemic administration of 8-OH-DPAT produced a sustained rise in blood pressure (+44 +/- 3 mm Hg 35 min after injection, P < 0.01 versus saline) and mean circulatory filling pressure (+4.2 +/- 0.7 mm Hg, P < 0.01 versus saline) in conscious rats subjected to hypovolemic shock. An equipressor infusion of epinephrine failed to influence mean circulatory filling pressure (MCFP). Ganglionic blockade, alpha(1)-, or peripheral alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor blockade prevented the rise in MCFP observed with 8-OH-DPAT, but only alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor blockade diminished the pressor effect of the drug (P < 0.01). 8-OH-DPAT raises blood pressure in rats in hypovolemic shock through both direct vascular activation and sympathetic activation of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors. The sympathoexcitatory effect of 8-OH-DPAT contributes to elevated venous tone through concurrent activation of both alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors. The data suggest that 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists may provide an advantageous alternative to currently therapeutic interventions used to raise perfusion pressure in hypovolemic shock.

  20. Involvement of Cholinergic and Adrenergic Receptors in Pathogenesis and Inflammatory Response Induced by Alpha-Neurotoxin Bot III of Scorpion Venom.

    PubMed

    Nakib, Imene; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Bot III neurotoxin is the most lethal α neurotoxin purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion venom. This toxin binds to the voltage-gated sodium channel of excitable cells and blocks its inactivation, inducing an increased release of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine and catecholamines). This study aims to elucidate the involvement of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in pathogenesis and inflammatory response triggered by this toxin. Injection of Bot III to animals induces an increase of peroxidase activities, an imbalance of oxidative status, tissue damages in lung parenchyma, and myocardium correlated with metabolic disorders. The pretreatment with nicotine (nicotinic receptor agonist) or atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) protected the animals from almost all disorders caused by Bot III toxin, especially the immunological alterations. Bisoprolol administration (selective β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist) was also efficient in the protection of animals, mainly on tissue damage. Propranolol (non-selective adrenergic receptor antagonist) showed less effect. These results suggest that both cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are activated in the cardiopulmonary manifestations induced by Bot III. Indeed, the muscarinic receptor appears to be more involved than the nicotinic one, and the β1 adrenergic receptor seems to dominate the β2 receptor. These results showed also that the activation of nicotinic receptor leads to a significant protection of animals against Bot III toxin effect. These findings supply a supplementary data leading to better understanding of the mechanism triggered by scorpionic neurotoxins and suggest the use of drugs targeting these receptors, especially the nicotinic one in order to counteract the inflammatory response observed in scorpion envenomation.

  1. Barium permeability of neuronal nicotinic receptor alpha 7 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sands, S B; Costa, A C; Patrick, J W

    1993-01-01

    The rat alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was expressed and studied in Xenopus oocytes. The magnitude and reversal potential of instantaneous whole cell currents were examined in solutions containing varying concentrations of either calcium or barium, and in the presence or absence of the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA. In external barium, application of nicotine elicits an inwardly rectifying response; in calcium the response is larger and has a linear IV relation. Pretreatment of oocytes with BAPTA-AM could not prevent activation of calcium-dependent chloride channels in external Ringer containing calcium. Using an extended GHK equation, the permeability ratio PBa/PNa of the alpha 7 receptor was determined to be about 17. Our results suggest that alpha 7 nicotinic receptors are highly permeable to divalent cations. PMID:8312496

  2. Ligand-induced interaction between. alpha. - and. beta. -type platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors: Role of receptor heterodimers in kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakaraj, P.; Raj, S.; Bishayee, S. ); Khan, S.A. )

    1991-02-19

    Two types of PDGF receptors have been cloned and sequenced. Both receptors are transmembrane glycoproteins with a ligand-stimulatable tyrosine kinase site. The authors have shown earlier that ligand-induced activation of the {beta}-type PDGF receptor is due to the conversion of the monomeric form of the receptor to the dimeric form. In the present studies, they have established the ligand-binding specificity of two receptor types and extended it further to investigate the ligand-induced association state of the {alpha}-receptor and the role of {alpha}-receptor in the activation of {beta}-receptor. These studies were conducted with cells that express one or the other type of PDGF receptor as well as with cells that express both types of receptors. Moreover, ligand-binding characteristics of the receptor were confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the receptor-{sup 125}I-PDGF covalent complex with type-specific anti-PDGF receptor antibodies. These studies revealed that all three isoforms of PDGF bind to {alpha}-receptor, and such binding leads to dimerization as well as activation of the receptor. In contrast, {beta}-receptor can be activated only by PDGF BB and not by PDGF AB or PDGF AA. However, by using antipeptide antibodies that are specific for {alpha}- or {beta}-type PDGF receptor, they demonstrated that in the presence of {alpha}-receptor, {beta}-receptor kinase can be activated by PDGF AB. They present here direct evidence that strongly suggests that such PDGF AB induced activation of {beta}-receptor is due to the formation of a noncovalently linked {alpha}-{beta} receptor heterodimer.

  3. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  4. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  5. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  6. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  7. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  8. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-04-18

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPAR{alpha} activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPAR{alpha} inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPAR{alpha}. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPAR{alpha}.

  10. Inhibitory effects of tramadol on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adrenal chromaffin cells and in Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha 7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Munehiro; Minami, Kouichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shigematsu, Akio; Shibuya, Izumi

    2002-05-01

    1. Tramadol has been used clinically as an analgesic; however, the mechanism of its analgesic effects is still unknown. 2. We used bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to investigate effects of tramadol on catecholamine secretion, nicotine-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases and membrane current changes. We also investigated effects of tramadol on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 3. Tramadol concentration-dependently suppressed carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion to 60% and 27% of the control at the concentration of 10 and 100 microM, respectively, whereas it had little effect on veratridine- or high K(+)-induced catecholamine secretion. 4. Tramadol also suppressed nicotine-induced ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Tramadol inhibited nicotine-induced inward currents, and the inhibition was unaffected by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. 5. Tramadol inhibited nicotinic currents carried by alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 6. Tramadol inhibited both alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic currents in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 7. In conclusion, tramadol inhibits catecholamine secretion partly by inhibiting nicotinic AChR functions in a naloxone-insensitive manner and alpha7 receptors are one of those inhibited by tramadol.

  11. alpha-conotoxin AuIB selectively blocks alpha3 beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and nicotine-evoked norepinephrine release.

    PubMed

    Luo, S; Kulak, J M; Cartier, G E; Jacobsen, R B; Yoshikami, D; Olivera, B M; McIntosh, J M

    1998-11-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with putative alpha3 beta4-subunits have been implicated in the mediation of signaling in various systems, including ganglionic transmission peripherally and nicotine-evoked neurotransmitter release centrally. However, progress in the characterization of these receptors has been hampered by a lack of alpha3 beta4-selective ligands. In this report, we describe the purification and characterization of an alpha3 beta4 nAChR antagonist, alpha-conotoxin AuIB, from the venom of the "court cone," Conus aulicus. We also describe the total chemical synthesis of this and two related peptides that were also isolated from the venom. alpha-Conotoxin AuIB blocks alpha3 beta4 nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes with an IC50 of 0.75 microM, a kon of 1.4 x 10(6) min-1 M-1, a koff of 0.48 min-1, and a Kd of 0.5 microM. Furthermore, alpha-conotoxin AuIB blocks the alpha3 beta4 receptor with >100-fold higher potency than other receptor subunit combinations, including alpha2 beta2, alpha2 beta4, alpha3 beta2, alpha4 beta2, alpha4 beta4, and alpha1 beta1 gamma delta. Thus, AuIB is a novel, selective probe for alpha3 beta4 nAChRs. AuIB (1-5 microM) blocks 20-35% of the nicotine-stimulated norepinephrine release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes, whereas nicotine-evoked dopamine release from striatal synaptosomes is not affected. Conversely, the alpha3 beta2-specific alpha-conotoxin MII (100 nM) blocks 33% of striatal dopamine release but not hippocampal norepinephrine release. This suggests that in the respective systems, alpha3 beta4-containing nAChRs mediate norepinephrine release, whereas alpha3 beta2-containing receptors mediate dopamine release.

  12. Upregulation of surface alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors is initiated by receptor desensitization after chronic exposure to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fenster, C P; Whitworth, T L; Sheffield, E B; Quick, M W; Lester, R A

    1999-06-15

    It is hypothesized that desensitization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) induced by chronic exposure to nicotine initiates upregulation of nAChR number. To test this hypothesis directly, oocytes expressing alpha4beta2 receptors were chronically incubated (24-48 hr) in nicotine, and the resulting changes in specific [3H]nicotine binding to surface receptors on intact oocytes were compared with functional receptor desensitization. Four lines of evidence strongly support the hypothesis. (1) The half-maximal nicotine concentration necessary to produce desensitization (9.7 nM) was the same as that needed to induce upregulation (9.9 nM). (2) The concentration of [3H]nicotine for half-maximal binding to surface nAChRs on intact oocytes was also similar (11.1 nM), as predicted from cyclical desensitization models. (3) Functional desensitization of alpha3beta4 receptors required 10-fold higher nicotine concentrations, and this was mirrored by a 10-fold shift in concentrations necessary for upregulation. (4) Mutant alpha4beta2 receptors that do not recover fully from desensitization, but not wild-type channels, were upregulated after acute (1 hr) applications of nicotine. Interestingly, the nicotine concentration required for half-maximal binding of alpha4beta2 receptors in total cell membrane homogenates was 20-fold lower than that measured for surface nAChRs in intact oocytes. These data suggest that cell homogenate binding assays may not accurately reflect the in vivo desensitization affinity of surface nAChRs and may account for some of the previously reported differences in the efficacy of nicotine for inducing nAChR desensitization and upregulation.

  13. Role of. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptors in the carotid body response to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Y.R.; Ernsberger, P.; Cherniack, N.S.; Prabhakar, N.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Clonidine, which acts in part as an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor agonist, depresses ventilation. The authors examined the role of {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors in carotid chemoreceptor activity. The density of {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors was determined in membrane fractions of 18 cat carotid bodies using {sup 125}I-iodoclonidine with 0.1 mM epinephrine or 10 {mu}M SKF-86466 defining nonspecific binding. {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptor density averaged 0.6{plus minus}0.1 fmol/carotid body (mean {plus minus} SEM) and was comparable to other sympathetic target tissues. The authors then studied the effects of an agonist (guanabenz) and an antagonist (SKF-86466; 6-Cl-N-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1-H3-benzazepine) specific for {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors on baseline and hypoxia-stimulated carotid body discharge, in 10 anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats. Intracarotid infusion of guanabenz for 5 minutes caused a dose-dependent depression of the baseline activity and reduced the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia by 88.0{plus minus}5.8% of the vehicle-injected controls. Intravenous administration of SKF-86466 reversed the effects of guanabenz on the carotid body activity. in contrast, chemoreceptor depression caused by dopamine was unaffected by SKF-86466. SKF-86466 alone increased baseline discharge and potentiated the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia by 34.0 {plus minus} 9.6% of the controls. These results demonstrate that {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors are present in the cat carotid body and they exert an inhibitory influence on the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia.

  14. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. ); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. ); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  15. Interferon-alpha down-regulates the interleukin-6 receptor in a human multiple myeloma cell line, U266.

    PubMed Central

    Anthes, J C; Zhan, Z; Gilchrest, H; Egan, R W; Siegel, M I; Billah, M M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor in a multiple myeloma cell line, U266, have been examined. IFN-alpha inhibits [3H]thymidine incorporation in U266 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, IFN-alpha inhibits the ability of IL-6 to induce increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation. While IFN-alpha suppresses the ability of 125I-IL-6 to bind to the IL-6 receptor on U266 cells, this effect is not due to competition of IFN-alpha with IL-6 for the IL-6 receptor. Although IFN-alpha induces IL-6 synthesis in the U266 cell, inhibition of IL-6 binding occurs when IL-6 synthesis is minimal. Furthermore, after pretreatment of U266 cells with neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies, IFN-alpha still inhibits 125I-IL-6 binding. These data suggest that IFN-alpha inhibition of 125I-IL-6 binding does not involve IL-6 synthesis. IFN-alpha reduces 125I-IL-6 binding without affecting its affinity, suggesting that IFN-alpha inhibits IL-6 receptor expression. Although pretreatment with cycloheximide inhibits 125I-IL-6 binding, IFN-alpha does not cause a selective decrease in the levels of gp130 or IL-6 receptor mRNA at times when 125I-IL-6 binding is inhibited. These observations indicate that IFN-alpha lowers IL-6 receptor density on U266 cells by mechanisms other than competitive binding or lowering IL-6 receptor mRNA production. Receptor down-regulation may be a mechanism of IFN-alpha-induced inhibition of growth in U266 cells. Images Figure 9 PMID:7619053

  16. [Subtype-specific clinically important effects of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors].

    PubMed

    Shishkina, G T; Dygalo, N N

    2002-01-01

    A- B- and C-subtypes of alpha 2-adrenoreceptors present in all mammals are involved in responses to currently existing subtype-nonselective ligands of these receptors widely used in medicine. Each of the subtypes has its own specific distribution in tissue and cells, onthogenetic pattern, specific regulation of activity and expression, and, as result, specific physiological functions. The latter suggests opportunities of using the subtype-specific for correction of the functions depending on this receptor. The article reviews the role of individual subtypes of alpha 2-adrenoreceptors in regulation of neurochemical transmission of cardiovascular system, psychoemotional state and development of psychic disorders, and also male sexual behaviour.

  17. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Raulli, R.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-05

    The potency of various alpha adrenergic compounds on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis was determined using (/sup 3/H)-inositol labelled cerebral cortical slices. Norepinephrine-induced PI hydrolysis was inhibited by the alpha/sub 1/ selective antagonist prazosin (1 ..mu..M) but not the beta receptor antagonist propranolol (1 ..mu..M). Tramazoline, (-)-ephedrine, and (+/-)-phenylpropanolamine were all found to be partial agonists at 1 mM concentrations. Clonidine, naphazoline, trazodone, and the novel antidepressant mianserin at concentrations of 100 ..mu..M to 1 mM produced no significant increase in PI hydrolysis above control levels. The relationship between responses and receptor binding will be discussed.

  18. The alpha9/alpha10-containing nicotinic ACh receptor is directly modulated by opioid peptides, endomorphin-1, and dynorphin B, proposed efferent cotransmitters in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Lioudyno, M I; Verbitsky, M; Glowatzki, E; Holt, J C; Boulter, J; Zadina, J E; Elgoyhen, A B; Guth, P S

    2002-08-01

    Opioid peptides have been detected in the auditory and vestibular efferent neurons where they colocalize with the major neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. We investigated the function of opioids to modulate neurotransmission mediated by hair cell's alpha9/alpha10-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha9/alpha10nAChRs). The endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 (mu agonist) and dynorphin B (kappa agonist), but not a delta agonist [D-Pen2,D-Pen-5]enkephalin, inhibited the acetylcholine-evoked currents in frog saccular hair cells and rat inner hair cells. This inhibition was noncompetitive, voltage-independent, and was accompanied by an acceleration of the rate of current decay. Selective mu- and kappa-opioid receptor antagonists did not block the inhibition, although partial reduction by naloxone was observed. All opioid antagonists tested also reduced the acetylcholine response. Endomorphin-1 and dynorphin B inhibited the acetylcholine-evoked currents in alpha9/alpha10-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Because oocytes lack opioid receptors, it provides strong evidence for the direct interaction of opioid peptides with alpha9/alpha10nAChR. alpha9/alpha10nAChR is a target for modulation by endomorphin-1 and dynorphin B, efferent cotransmitters in the inner ear.

  19. Evidence that nicotinic alpha(7) receptors are not involved in the hyperlocomotor and rewarding effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grottick, A J; Trube, G; Corrigall, W A; Huwyler, J; Malherbe, P; Wyler, R; Higgins, G A

    2000-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic receptors are comprised of combinations of alpha(2-9) and beta(2-4) subunits arranged to form a pentameric receptor. Currently, the principal central nervous system (CNS) subtypes are believed to be alpha(4)beta(2) and a homomeric alpha(7) receptor, although other combinations almost certainly exist. The identity of the nicotinic receptor subtype(s) involved in the rewarding effects of nicotine are unknown. In the present study, using some recently described subtype selective nicotinic agonists and antagonists, we investigated the role of the alpha(7) nicotinic receptor in the mediation of nicotine-induced hyperactivity and self-administration in rats. The alpha(7) receptor agonists AR-R 17779 and DMAC failed to stimulate locomotor activity in both nicotine-nontolerant and -sensitized rats. In contrast, nicotine and the putative alpha(4)beta(2) subtype selective agonist SIB1765F increased activity in both experimental conditions. In nicotine-sensitized rats, the high affinity (including the alpha(4)beta(2) subtype) nicotinic antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE), but not the selective alpha(7) antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), antagonized a nicotine-induced hyperactivity. Similarly, DHbetaE, but not MLA, pretreatment reduced nicotine self-administration. Electrophysiology experiments using Xenopus oocytes expressing the human alpha(7) receptor confirmed AR-R 17779 and DMAC to be potent agonists at this site, and further studies demonstrated the ability of systemically administered AR-R 17779 to penetrate into the CNS. Taken together, these results indicate a negligible role of alpha(7) receptors in nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion and reward in the rat, and support the view for an involvement of a member from the high-affinity nicotinic receptor subclass, possibly alpha(4)beta(2). Issues such as drug potency, CNS penetration, and desensitization of the alpha(7) receptor are discussed.

  20. Alpha-conotoxin GIC from Conus geographus, a novel peptide antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J Michael; Dowell, Cheryl; Watkins, Maren; Garrett, James E; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2002-09-13

    Many venomous organisms produce toxins that disrupt neuromuscular communication to paralyze their prey. One common class of such toxins comprises nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists (nAChRs). Thus, most toxins that act on nAChRs are targeted to the neuromuscular subtype. The toxin characterized in this report, alpha-conotoxin GIC, is a most striking exception. The 16-amino acid peptide was identified from a genomic DNA clone from Conus geographus. The predicted mature toxin was synthesized, and synthetic toxin was used in all studies described. alpha-Conotoxin GIC shows no paralytic activity in fish or mice. Furthermore, even at concentrations up to 100 microm, the peptide has no detectable effect on the human muscle nicotinic receptor subtype heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, the toxin has high affinity (IC(50) approximately 1.1 nm) for the human alpha3beta2 subunit combination, making it the most neuronally selective nicotinic antagonist characterized thus far. Although alpha-conotoxin GIC shares some sequence similarity with alpha-conotoxin MII, which is also a potent alpha3beta2 nicotinic antagonist, it is much less hydrophobic, and the kinetics of channel block are substantially different. It is noteworthy that the nicotinic ligands in C. geographus venom fit an emerging pattern in venomous predators, with one nicotinic antagonist targeted to the muscle subtype (thereby causing paralysis) and a second nicotinic antagonist targeted to the alpha3beta2 nAChR subtype (possibly inhibiting the fight-or-flight response).

  1. Statins enhance peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha activity to regulate energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxian; Wong, Chi-Wai

    2010-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) serves as an inducible coactivator for a number of transcription factors to control energy metabolism. Insulin signaling through Akt kinase has been demonstrated to phosphorylate PGC-1alpha at serine 571 and downregulate its activity in the liver. Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that reduce cholesterol synthesis in the liver. In this study, we found that statins reduced the active form of Akt and enhanced PGC-1alpha activity. Specifically, statins failed to activate an S571A mutant of PGC-1alpha. The activation of PGC-1alpha by statins selectively enhanced the expression of energy metabolizing enzymes and regulators including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4. Importantly, a constitutively active form of Akt partially reduced the statin-enhanced gene expression. Our study thus provides a plausible mechanistic explanation for the hypolipidemic effect of statin through elevating the rate of beta-oxidation and mitochondrial Kreb's cycle capacity to enhance fatty acid utilization while reducing the rate of glycolysis.

  2. Purification and characterization of the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shreeve, S.M.; Kerlavage, A.R.; Fraser, C.M.; Mariani, A.P.; Venter, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor (..cap alpha../sub 2/-R) from human platelets has been purified to homogeneity using a four step process. An affinity column was prepared by coupling p-aminoclonidine to CH-Sepharose 4B via the p-NH/sub 2/ group. Digitonin solubilized ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R bound to the affinity matrix were eluted with 100 ..mu..M phentolamine and directly applied to a DEAE-Sepharose column. Bound receptors were eluted with a linear gradient of 0-500 mM NaCl, pooled and chromatographed on HPLC size exclusion columns. Three peaks of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding were eluted from HPLC columns (t = 33, 42, 47 min). Radioiodination of HPLC eluates and analysis by SDS-PAGE indicated that ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding was associated with a 75-85 kDa protein. These data suggest that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R may exist in monomeric and oligomeric forms in the purified state and support previous target size data which indicate that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R exists as a dimer in the native membrane. The pure radioiodinated ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R (77-85 kDa) is a glycoprotein with terminal sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine residues and has a pI of 4.1 on column isoelectric focusing. These data are consistent with those previously reported on the partially purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R. Electron micrographs confirm the oligomeric nature and size of the pure ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R.

  3. Effects of iodoproxyfan, a potent and selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, on alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Pertz, H; Bitschnau, H; Purand, K; Kathmann, M; Elz, S; Schunack, W

    1995-07-01

    We determined the affinity and/or potency of the novel H3 receptor antagonist iodoproxyfan at alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors. Iodoproxyfan and rauwolscine (a reference alpha 2 ligand) (i) monophasically displaced 3H-rauwolscine binding to rat brain cortex membranes (pKi 6.79 and 8.59); (ii) facilitated the electrically evoked tritium overflow from superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline (pEC50 6.46 and 7.91) and (iii) produced rightward shifts of the concentration-response curve (CRC) of (unlabelled) noradrenaline for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow (pA2 6.65 and 7.88). In the guinea-pig ileum, iodoproxyfan 6.3 mumol/l failed to evoke a contraction by itself but depressed the maximum of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pD'2 5.24). Tropisetron (a reference 5-HT3 antagonist) produced rightward shifts of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pA2 7.84). In conclusion, the affinity/potency of iodoproxyfan at H3 receptors (range 8.3-9.7 [1]) exceeds that at alpha 2 receptors by at least 1.5 log units and that at 5-HT3 receptors by at least 3 log units.

  4. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha nAChR and the cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR activation, focusing on the translational aspects in the development of these drugs. The functional properties and anatomical localization of the alpha(7) nAChR makes it well suited to modulate cognitive function. Accordingly, systemic administration of alpha(7) nAChR agonists improves learning, memory, and attentional function in variety of animal models, and pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists have recently been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. The alpha(7) nAChR desensitizes rapidly in vitro, and this has been a major concern in the development of alpha(7) nAChR agonists as putative drugs. Our review of the existing literature shows that development of tolerance to the behavioral effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists does not occur in animal models or humans. However, the long-term memory-enhancing effects seen in animal models are not mimicked in healthy humans and schizophrenic patients, where attentional improvement predominates. This discrepancy may result from inherent differences in testing methods or from species differences in the level of expression of alpha(7) nAChRs in limbic brain regions, and may hamper preclinical evaluation of alpha(7) nAChR activation. It is therefore important to consider the translational power of the animal models used before entering into a clinical evaluation of the pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR activation.

  5. Glycosylation sites selectively interfere with alpha-toxin binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Kreienkamp, H J; Sine, S M; Maeda, R K; Taylor, P

    1994-03-18

    Sequence analysis reveals unique features in the alpha-subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from the alpha-toxin-resistant cobra and mongoose. Included are N-linked glycosylation signals just amino-terminal to the Tyr190, Cys192-Cys193 region of the ligand binding domain, substitution of Trp187 and Phe189 by non-aromatic residues and alteration of the proline sequence Pro194-X-X-Pro197. Glycosylation signals were inserted into the toxin-sensitive mouse alpha-subunit by the mutations F189N and W187N/F189T. The F189N alpha-subunit, when transfected with beta, gamma and delta, showed a 140-fold loss of alpha-bungarotoxin affinity, whereas the W187N/F189T double mutation exhibited a divergence in alpha-toxin affinities at the two sites, one class showing a 600-fold and the other showing an 11-fold reduction. The W187N mutant and the double mutant F189N/S191A lacking the requisite glycosylation signals exhibited little alteration in affinity, as did the P194L and P197H mutations. The glycosylation sites had little or no influence on binding of toxins of intermediate (alpha-conotoxin, 1500 Da) or small mass (lophotoxin, 500 Da) and of the agonist, carbamylcholine. The two sites for the binding of alpha-conotoxin M1 have widely divergent dissociation constants of 2.1 and 14,800 nM. Expression of alpha/gamma- and alpha/delta-subunit pairs indicated that the high and low affinity sites are formed by the alpha/delta and alpha/gamma contacts, respectively.

  6. Mixed nicotinic-muscarinic properties of the alpha9 nicotinic cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Verbitsky, M; Rothlin, C V; Katz, E; Elgoyhen, A B

    2000-10-01

    The rat alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and tested for its sensitivity to a wide variety of cholinergic compounds. Acetylcholine (ACh), carbachol, choline and methylcarbachol elicited agonist-evoked currents, giving maximal or near maximal responses. Both the nicotinic agonist suberyldicholine as well as the muscarinic agonists McN-A-343 and methylfurtrethonium behaved as weak partial agonists of the receptor. Most classical cholinergic compounds tested, being either nicotinic (nicotine, epibatidine, cytisine, methyllycaconitine, mecamylamine, dihydro-beta-erythroidine), or muscarinic (muscarine, atropine, gallamine, pilocarpine, bethanechol) agonists and antagonists, blocked the recombinant alpha9 receptor. Block by nicotine, epibatidine, cytisine, methyllycaconitine and atropine was overcome at high ACh concentrations, suggesting a competitive type of block. The present results indicate that alpha9 displays mixed nicotinic-muscarinic features that resemble the ones described for the cholinergic receptor of cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). We suggest that alpha9 contains the structural determinants responsible for the pharmacological properties of the native receptor.

  7. High calcium permeability and calcium block of the alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Katz, E; Verbitsky, M; Rothlin, C V; Vetter, D E; Heinemann, S F; Elgoyhen, A B

    2000-03-01

    At the synapse between olivocochlear efferent fibers and outer hair cells (OHCs) of the cochlea, a non-classical ionotropic cholinergic receptor allows Ca(2+) entry into the hair cell, thus activating a Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) current which hyperpolarizes the cell's membrane. In the mammalian ear, this leads to a reduction in basilar membrane motion, altering auditory nerve fiber activity and reducing the dynamic range of hearing. The alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit mediates synaptic transmission between cholinergic olivocochlear fibers and OHCs. Given that Ca(2+) is a key player at this inhibitory synapse, we evaluated the permeability to Ca(2+) of the recombinant alpha9 receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and the modulation of its activity by extracellular Ca(2+). Our results show that the alpha9 receptor is highly permeable to Ca(2+) and that this cation potently blocks monovalent currents through this channel (IC(50)=100 microM, at -70 mV) in a voltage-dependent manner. At a Ca(2+) concentration similar to that found in the perilymph bathing the base of the OHCs, approximately 90% of the Na(+) current through the alpha9 receptor is blocked, suggesting that one of the main functions of this channel could be to provide a pathway for Ca(2+) influx.

  8. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  9. SH2 domains of the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulate binding to growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, C J; Ellis, C; Reedijk, M; Anderson, D; Mbamalu, G; Reith, A D; Panayotou, G; End, P; Bernstein, A; Kazlauskas, A

    1992-01-01

    The binding of cytoplasmic signaling proteins such as phospholipase C-gamma 1 and Ras GTPase-activating protein to autophosphorylated growth factor receptors is directed by their noncatalytic Src homology region 2 (SH2) domains. The p85 alpha regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, which associates with several receptor protein-tyrosine kinases, also contains two SH2 domains. Both p85 alpha SH2 domains, when expressed individually as fusion proteins in bacteria, bound stably to the activated beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Complex formation required PDGF stimulation and was dependent on receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The bacterial p85 alpha SH2 domains recognized activated beta PDGF receptor which had been immobilized on a filter, indicating that SH2 domains contact autophosphorylated receptors directly. Several receptor tyrosine kinases within the PDGF receptor subfamily, including the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor and the Steel factor receptor (Kit), also associate with PI 3-kinase in vivo. Bacterially expressed SH2 domains derived from the p85 alpha subunit of PI 3-kinase bound in vitro to the activated colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor and to Kit. We infer that the SH2 domains of p85 alpha bind to high-affinity sites on these receptors, whose creation is dependent on receptor autophosphorylation. The SH2 domains of p85 are therefore primarily responsible for the binding of PI 3-kinase to activated growth factor receptors. Images PMID:1372092

  10. The role of tumour necrosis factor alpha and soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptors in the symptomatology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Levent; Batmaz, Sedat; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Soygur, Arif Haldun

    2016-07-01

    Background Immunological mechanisms may be responsible for the development and maintenance of schizophrenia symptoms. Aim The aim of this study is to measure tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor I (sTNF-αRI), and soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor II (sTNF-αRII) levels in patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals, and to determine their relationship with the symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Serum TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were measured. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered for patients with schizophrenia (n = 35), and the results were compared with healthy controls (n = 30). Hierarchical regression analyses were undertaken to predict the levels of TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII. Results No significant difference was observed in TNF-α levels, but sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were lower in patients with schizophrenia. Serum sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were found to be negatively correlated with the negative subscale score of the PANSS, and sTNF-αRI levels were also negatively correlated with the total score of the PANSS. Smoking, gender, body mass index were not correlated with TNF-α and sTNF-α receptor levels. Conclusions These results suggest that there may be a change in anti-inflammatory response in patients with schizophrenia due to sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels. The study also supports low levels of TNF activity in schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms.

  11. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  12. The role of the orphan nuclear receptor Rev-Erb alpha in adipocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, S; Fontaine, C; Fruchart, J C; Staels, B

    2005-01-01

    Lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis in higher organisms is governed by an integrated system that has a capacity to rapidly respond to metabolic changes. Numerous signals reciprocally convey information about body fat status from the periphery to central nervous system in the attempt to maintain body weight nearly stable throughout life. The role of adipocyte in energy homeostasis extends its function as a simple energy storage cell. Indeed, adipose tissue not only secretes fatty acids, but is also an active endocrine and paracrine organ due to the production of secreted proteins and lipid indicators collectively called adipokines. These observations have spurred interest in the identification of the transcriptional and other regulatory pathways of adipocyte differentiation. The nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) (NR1C3) and members of the CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family are central mediators controlling adipocyte differentiation and function. Rev-erb alpha (NR1D1) is an orphan nuclear receptor encoded on the opposite strand of the thyroid receptor alpha gene. Rev-erb alpha acts as a negative regulator of transcription binding to the same response element than another orphan nuclear receptor, ROR alpha. Rev-erb alpha is highly expressed in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, heart, liver and brain. Rev-erb alpha expression increases during adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and is induced by PPAR gamma activation in both 3T3-L1 cells in vitro and in rat adipose tissue in vivo via a direct repeat (DR2) in the Rev-erb alpha promoter. Ectopic expression of Rev-erb alpha potentiates the adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Recent results in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) indicate that Rev-erb alpha also controls inflammation by regulating NF-kappa B responsive genes, such as IL-6 and COX-2. Future studies on a potential role of Rev-erb alpha on glucose homeostasis and/or inflammation control are

  13. Contribution of valine 7' of TMD2 to gating of neuronal alpha3 receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Navedo, Manuel F; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2006-12-01

    The second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels forms the channel pore. The functional role of the amino acid residues contributing to the channel pore in neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptors is not well understood. We characterized the contribution of TMD2 position V7' to channel gating in neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute position alpha3 (V7') with four different amino acids (A, F, S, or Y) and coexpressed each mutant subunit with wild-type (WT) beta2 or beta4 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments show that substitution for an alanine, serine, or phenylalanine decreased by 2.3-6.2-fold the ACh-EC(50) for alpha3beta2 and alpha3beta4 receptor subtypes. Interestingly, mutation V7'Y did not produce a significant change in ACh-EC(50) when coexpressed with the beta2 subunit but showed a significant approximately two-fold increase with beta4. Similar responses were obtained with nicotine as the agonist. The antagonist sensitivity of the mutant channels was assessed by using dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE) and methyllycaconitine (MLA). The apparent potency of DHbetaE as an antagonist increased by approximately 3.7- and 11-fold for the alpha3beta2 V7'S and V7'F mutants, respectively, whereas no evident changes in antagonist potency were observed for the V7'A and V7'Y mutants. The V7'S and V7'F mutations increase MLA antagonist potency for the alpha3beta4 receptor by approximately 6.2- and approximately 9.3-fold, respectively. The V7'A mutation selectively increases the MLA antagonist potency for the alpha3beta4 receptor by approximately 18.7-fold. These results indicate that position V7' contributes to channel gating kinetics and pharmacology of the neuronal nicotinic alpha3 receptors.

  14. Structural Basis for Hormone Recognition by the Human CRFR2[alpha] G Protein-coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Xu, H. Eric; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2012-05-09

    The mammalian corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)/urocortin (Ucn) peptide hormones include four structurally similar peptides, CRF, Ucn1, Ucn2, and Ucn3, that regulate stress responses, metabolism, and cardiovascular function by activating either of two related class B G protein-coupled receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2. CRF and Ucn1 activate both receptors, whereas Ucn2 and Ucn3 are CRFR2-selective. The molecular basis for selectivity is unclear. Here, we show that the purified N-terminal extracellular domains (ECDs) of human CRFR1 and the CRFR2{alpha} isoform are sufficient to discriminate the peptides, and we present three crystal structures of the CRFR2{alpha} ECD bound to each of the Ucn peptides. The CRFR2{alpha} ECD forms the same fold observed for the CRFR1 and mouse CRFR2{beta} ECDs but contains a unique N-terminal {alpha}-helix formed by its pseudo signal peptide. The CRFR2{alpha} ECD peptide-binding site architecture is similar to that of CRFR1, and binding of the {alpha}-helical Ucn peptides closely resembles CRF binding to CRFR1. Comparing the electrostatic surface potentials of the ECDs suggests a charge compatibility mechanism for ligand discrimination involving a single amino acid difference in the receptors (CRFR1 Glu104/CRFR2{alpha} Pro-100) at a site proximate to peptide residue 35 (Arg in CRF/Ucn1, Ala in Ucn2/3). CRFR1 Glu-104 acts as a selectivity filter preventing Ucn2/3 binding because the nonpolar Ala-35 is incompatible with the negatively charged Glu-104. The structures explain the mechanisms of ligand recognition and discrimination and provide a molecular template for the rational design of therapeutic agents selectively targeting these receptors.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  17. Alpha-2 adrenergic and serotonin-1B receptors in the OK cell, an opossum kidney cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Alpha-2 adrenergic and serotonin-1B (5HT{sub 1B}) receptors, both negatively-coupled to adenylyl cyclase, were characterized in the OK cell line, a renal proximal tubule epithelial cell line derived from the kidney of a North American opossum. In membrane saturation radioligand binding experiments, ({sup 3}H)yohimbine and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine labeled an equivalent number of binding sites. Detailed pharmacological analysis of OK cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in competition binding assays indicate this receptor is neither an alpha-2A nor an alpha-2B adrenergic receptor subtype, although the alpha-2B receptor subtype-selective drugs prazosin, ARC-239 and chlorpromazine have affinities for OK cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors similar to those at the alpha-2B receptor subtype. Determinations of agonist potency for inhibition of PTH-stimulated cyclic AMP production and radioligand binding analysis using ({sup 125}I)({minus})-cyanopindolol indicate that a 5HT{sub 1B} receptor is expressed in the OK cell line. A biochemical effector system coupled to this receptor subtype has not been previously described. Several compounds appear to be potent agonists at the 5TH{sub 1B} receptor including the beta adrenergic antagonists cyanopindolol, pindolol, propranolol and alprenolol.

  18. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lee, Keesook

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actions, regulate cell growth and differentiation of a variety of normal tissues and hormone-responsive tumors through interaction with cellular factors. In this study, we show that thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2) is expressed in mammary gland and acts as ER{alpha} co-repressor. TTF-2 inhibited ER{alpha} transactivation in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, TTF-2 directly bound to and formed a complex with ER{alpha}, colocalizing with ER{alpha} in the nucleus. In MCF-7/TTF-2 stable cell lines, TTF-2 repressed the expression of endogenous ER{alpha} target genes such as pS2 and cyclin D1 by interrupting ER{alpha} binding to target promoters and also significantly decreased cell proliferation. Taken together, these data suggest that TTF-2 may modulate the function of ER{alpha} as a corepressor and play a role in ER-dependent proliferation of mammary cells.

  19. Ginsenoside Rf, a component of ginseng, regulates lipoprotein metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunghee; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yoon, Michung . E-mail: yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    We investigated whether ginseng regulates lipoprotein metabolism by altering peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})-mediated pathways, using a PPAR{alpha}-null mouse model. Administration of ginseng extract, ginsenosides, and ginsenoside Rf (Rf) to wild-type mice not only significantly increased basal levels of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and C-III mRNA compared with wild-type controls, but also substantially reversed the reductions in mRNA levels of apo A-I and C-III expected following treatment with the potent PPAR{alpha} ligand Wy14,643. In contrast, no effect was detected in the PPAR{alpha}-null mice. Testing of eight main ginsenosides on PPAR{alpha} reporter gene expression indicated that Rf was responsible for the effects of ginseng on lipoprotein metabolism. Furthermore, the inhibition of PPAR{alpha}-dependent transactivation by Rf seems to occur at the level of DNA binding. These results demonstrate that ginseng component Rf regulates apo A-I and C-III mRNA and the actions of Rf on lipoprotein metabolism are mediated via interactions with PPAR{alpha}.

  20. 3D model of lamprey estrogen receptor with estradiol and 15alpha-hydroxy-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Chang, David J; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie

    2009-06-25

    Lamprey, basal vertebrate, is an important model system for understanding early events in vertebrate evolution. Lamprey contains orthologs of the estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor and corticoid receptor. A perplexing property of lamprey is that 15alpha-hydroxy-steroids are active steroids. For example, 15alpha-hydroxy-estradiol [15alpha-OH-E2] is the estrogen, instead of estradiol [E2]. To investigate how 15alpha-OH-E2 binds lamprey ER, we constructed a 3D model of the lamprey ER with E2 and 15alpha-OH-E2. We used the 3D structure of human ERalpha as a template to construct a 3D model of lamprey ER. E2 and 15alpha-OH-E2 were inserted into the 3D model of lamprey ER and 15alpha-OH-E2 was inserted into human ERalpha. Then the each steroid-protein complex was refined using Discover 3 from Insight II software. To determine if lamprey ER had some regions that were unique among vertebrate ERs, we used the ligand-binding domain of lamprey ER as a query for a BLAST search of GenBank. Our 3D model of lamprey ER with 15alpha-OH-E2 shows that Sdelta on Met-409 can form a hydrogen bond with the 15alpha-hydroxyl on 15alpha-OH-E2. In human ERalpha, the corresponding residue Ile-424 has a van der Waals contact with 15alpha-OH-E2. BLAST analysis of GenBank indicates that among vertebrate ERs, only lamprey ER contains a methionine at this position. Thus, the contact between Sdelta on Met-409 and 15alpha-OH-E2 is unique. Interestingly, BLAST finds that five New World monkeys and a sturgeon contain a valine instead of isoleucine. In addition to shedding light on the structure of the ER in a basal vertebrate, our 3D model of lamprey ER should prove useful in virtual screening of chemical libraries to identify compounds for controlling reproduction in sea lamprey, an environmental pest in Lake Michigan.

  1. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  2. The binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in animal species resistant to alpha-bungarotoxin.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Ovadia, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1995-07-18

    The ligand binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is located in the alpha-subunit, within a small fragment containing the tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193. We have been analyzing the binding site domain of AChRs from several animal species exhibiting various degrees of resistance to alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX). Our earlier work on the snake and mongoose AChR, both of which do not bind alpha-BTX, suggested that amino acid substitutions at positions 187, 189, and 194 of the AChR alpha-subunit are important in determining the resistance of these AChRs to alpha-BTX. In the present study, we have examined the correlation between alpha-BTX binding and the structure of the binding site domain of AChR from the hedgehog, shrew, cat, and human. Fragments of the AChR alpha-subunit corresponding to residues 122-205 from these species were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The hedgehog fragment does not bind alpha-BTX, in common with the snake and mongoose AChR, and the human fragment is a partial binder. The shrew and cat fragments bind alpha-BTX to a similar extent as the mouse fragment. The hedgehog and human AChRs have nonaromatic amino acid residues at positions 187 and 189 of the alpha-subunit, as is seen with the "toxin resistant" snake and mongoose, and in contrast with the "toxin binders", which have aromatic residues at these two positions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Angiotensin II receptor blocker inhibits tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced cell damage in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Toru; Takao, Toshihiro; Horino, Taro; Matsumoto, Reiko; Inoue, Kousuke; Morita, Tatsuhito; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AII) type 1 (AT1) and angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor blockers on tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced cell damage in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC). The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG) release into the medium after TNF-alpha treatment in RPTEC were determined using modified commercial procedures. In addition, the levels of caspase 3/7 activity in RPTEC were measured after TNF-alpha treatment with AlphaTau1 or AT2 receptor blockers. Finally we investigated the change of p22phox protein levels after TNF-alpha with AlphaTau1 or AT2 receptor blockers in RPTEC. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (10(-8) mol/L) significantly increased LDH and NAG release into the medium from RPTEC. AlphaTau1 receptor blockers, olmesartan and valsartan (10(-9)-10(-6) mol/L) showed a significant reduction on TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release in RPTEC. AT2 receptor blocker, PD123319 (10(-7)-10(-5) mol/L) also decreased TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release in RPTEC. Blockade of both AlphaTau1 and AT2 receptor indicated additional reduction on TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release. TNF-alpha (10(-8) mol/L) treatment showed small but significant increases of caspase 3/7 activity in RPTEC, and AT1 and AT2 receptor blockers (10(-8) mol/L) comparably decreased TNF-alpha-induced caspase 3/7 activity. Significant increases of p22phox protein levels were observed in TNF-alpha-treated group in RPTEC. However, only AlphaTau1 (10(-8) mol/L) but not AT2 (10(-5) mol/L) receptor blocker significantly decreased TNF-alpha-induced p22phox protein levels. The present study demonstrates that TNF-alpha induces renal tubular cell damage in RPTEC and AT1/AT2 receptor blockers showed cytoprotective effects probably via at least partly different mechanism.

  4. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  5. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  6. The human alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor: identification of a 420-kD cell surface glycoprotein specific for the activated conformation of alpha 2-macroglobulin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography was used to purify a cell surface alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) receptor. Detergent extracts of human placenta were applied to an affinity matrix consisting of alpha 2M, previously reacted with methylamine, coupled to Sepharose. Elution with EDTA specifically released polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 420 and 39 kD. In some preparations, small amounts of a 90-kD polypeptide were observed. The 420- and 39-kD polypeptides appear specific for the forms of alpha 2M activated by reaction with proteinases or methylamine and do not bind to an affinity matrix consisting of native alpha 2M coupled to Sepharose. Separation of these two polypeptides was accomplished by anion exchange chromatography, and binding activity was exclusively associated with the 420-kD polypeptide. The purified 420-kD protein binds to the conformationally altered forms of alpha 2M that are known to specifically interact with alpha 2M receptors and does not bind to native alpha 2M. Binding of the 420-kD polypeptide to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin indicates that this polypeptide is a glycoprotein. The cell surface localization of the 420-kD glycoprotein was confirmed by affinity chromatography of extracts from surface radioiodinated fibroblasts. These properties suggest that the 420-kD polypeptide is a cell surface receptor for the activated forms of alpha 2M. PMID:1691187

  7. BDNF up-regulates alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels on subpopulations of hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Massey, Kerri A; Zago, Wagner M; Berg, Darwin K

    2006-12-01

    In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a number of synaptic components. Among these are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha7 subunits (alpha7-nAChRs), which are interesting because of their relative abundance in the hippocampus and their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that BDNF elevates surface and intracellular pools of alpha7-nAChRs on cultured hippocampal neurons and that glutamatergic activity is both necessary and sufficient for the effect. Blocking transmission through NMDA receptors with APV blocked the BDNF effect; increasing spontaneous excitatory activity with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline replicated the BDNF effect. BDNF antibodies blocked the BDNF-mediated increase but not the bicuculline one, consistent with enhanced glutamatergic activity acting downstream from BDNF. Increased alpha7-nAChR clusters were most prominent on interneuron subtypes known to directly innervate excitatory neurons. The results suggest that BDNF, acting through glutamatergic transmission, can modulate hippocampal output in part by controlling alpha7-nAChR levels.

  8. O Mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan is essential for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus receptor function.

    PubMed

    Imperiali, Mauro; Thoma, Claudio; Pavoni, Ernesto; Brancaccio, Andrea; Callewaert, Nico; Oxenius, Annette

    2005-11-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) was identified as a common receptor for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and several other arenaviruses including the human pathogenic Lassa fever virus. Initial work postulated that interactions between arenavirus glycoproteins and alpha-DG are based on protein-protein interactions. We found, however, that susceptibility toward LCMV infection differed in various cell lines despite them expressing comparable levels of DG, suggesting that posttranslational modifications of alpha-DG would be involved in viral receptor function. Here, we demonstrate that glycosylation of alpha-DG, and in particular, O mannosylation, which is a rare type of O-linked glycosylation in mammals, is essential for LCMV receptor function. Cells that are defective in components of the O-mannosylation pathway showed strikingly reduced LCMV infectibility. As defective O mannosylation is associated with severe clinical symptoms in mammals such as congenital muscular dystrophies, it is likely that LCMV and potentially other arenaviruses may have selected this conserved and crucial posttranslational modification as the primary target structure for cell entry and infection.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) {beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Tomoshige; Manoli, Irini; Kelkar, Sujata; Wang, Yonghong; Su, Yan A.; Chrousos, George P.

    2009-04-17

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GR{beta} and GR{alpha} isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9{beta} and {alpha}, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GR{beta} on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GR{beta} or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GR{beta} had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GR{beta}-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GR{alpha}, while GR{beta} and GR{alpha} mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GR{beta} and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GR{beta} and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GR{beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GR{alpha}-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  10. Demonstration of. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rat pancreatic islets using radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Cherksey, B.; Mendelsohn, S.; Zadunaisky, J.; Altszuler, N.

    1982-11-01

    The type of the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors on rat pancreatic islet cells was characterized directly using specific radioligands and displacement agonists and antagonists. Scatchard plots for binding of (/sup 3/H)clonidine (..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist) revealed a dissociation constant, K/sub d/ of 0.542 +/- 0.1 nM and density of binding sites (B/sub max/) of 50.4 +/- 3.6 fmole/mg protein. Similar values were obtained with (/sup 3/H)dihydroergocryptine (antagonist). The various agonists displaced (/sup 3/H)clonidine with the following order of potency: clonidine > epinephrine approx. = norepinephrine > isoproterenol. Yohimbine, the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antagonist, was very effective in displacing (/sup 3/H)clonidine, whereas the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antagonist, prazosin, was much less effective. The data indicate that the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors on rat pancreatic islets are of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ subtype.

  11. Neuropeptide Y inhibits spontaneous alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) release via a Y(5) receptor and suppresses thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced alpha-MSH secretion via a Y(1) receptor in frog melanotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Galas, Ludovic; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Beaujean, Delphine; Fredriksson, Robert; Larhammar, Dan; Lihrmann, Isabelle; Jegou, Sylvie; Fournier, Alain; Chartrel, Nicolas; Vaudry, Hubert

    2002-05-01

    In amphibians, the secretion of alpha-MSH by melanotrope cells is stimulated by TRH and inhibited by NPY. We have previously shown that NPY abrogates the stimulatory effect of TRH on alpha-MSH secretion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the receptor subtypes mediating the action of NPY and to investigate the intracellular mechanisms involved in the inhibitory effect of NPY on basal and TRH-induced alpha-MSH secretion. Y(1) and Y(5) receptor mRNAs were detected by RT-PCR and visualized by in situ hybridization histochemistry in the intermediate lobe of the pituitary. Various NPY analogs inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the spontaneous secretion of alpha-MSH from perifused frog neurointermediate lobes with the following order of potency porcine peptide YY (pPYY) > frog NPY (fNPY) > porcine NPY (pNPY)-2-36) > pNPY-(13-36) > [D-Trp(32)]pNPY > [Leu(31),Pro(34)]pNPY. The stimulatory effect of TRH (10(-8)6 M) on alpha-MSH release was inhibited by fNPY, pPYY, and [Leu(31),Pro(34)]pNPY, but not by pNPY-(13-36) and [D-Trp(32)]pNPY. These data indicate that the inhibitory effect of fNPY on spontaneous alpha-MSH release is preferentially mediated through Y(5) receptors, whereas the suppression of TRH-induced alpha-MSH secretion by fNPY probably involves Y(1) receptors. Pretreatment of neurointermediate lobes with pertussis toxin (PTX; 1 microg/ml; 12 h) did not abolish the inhibitory effect of fNPY on cAMP formation and spontaneous alpha-MSH release, but restored the stimulatory effect of TRH on alpha-MSH secretion, indicating that the adenylyl cyclase pathway is not involved in the action of fNPY on TRH-evoked alpha-MSH secretion. In the majority of melanotrope cells, TRH induces a sustained and biphasic increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Preincubation of cultured cells with fNPY (10(-7) M) or omega-conotoxin GVIA (10(-7) M) suppressed the plateau phase of the Ca(2+) response induced by TRH. However, although fNPY abrogated TRH-evoked alpha

  12. Antipsychotic clozapine inhibits the function of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sachin K; Zhang, Li; Morales, Marisela; Oz, Murat

    2007-02-01

    The effects of the antipsychotic clozapine on the function of the cloned alpha(7) subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated by using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Clozapine reversibly inhibited nicotine (10 microM)-induced currents in a concentration-dependent manner (300 nM to 90 microM), with an IC(50) value of 3.2+/-0.4 microM. The effect of clozapine was not dependent on the membrane potential. Clozapine did not affect the activity of endogenous Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels since the inhibition by clozapine was unaltered by the intracellularly injected Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+)-free bathing solution containing 2mM Ba(2+). Clozapine decreased the maximal nicotine-induced responses without significantly affecting its potency, indicating that it acts as a noncompetitive antagonist on alpha(7)-nACh receptors. In hippocampal slices, the whole-cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons indicated that the increases in the frequency and amplitudes of the GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents induced by bath application of 2 mM choline, a specific agonist for alpha(7)-nACh receptors, were abolished after 10 min application of 5 microM clozapine. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that clozapine inhibits the function of alpha(7)-nACh receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and in hippocampal neurons.

  13. Estrogen receptors alpha and beta in male and female gerbil prostates.

    PubMed

    Rochel-Maia, Sabrina S; Santos, Fernanda C A; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Góes, Rejane Maira; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus, Gerbilinae: Muridae) is useful for prostate studies, because both males and females spontaneously develop prostatic disorders with age. Estrogens regulate prostate homeostasis via two estrogen receptors, ER alpha (ESR1) and ER beta (ESR2), but the cellular distribution and regulation of these receptors in the gerbil prostate has not been described. Both receptors were localized by immunohistochemistry in the ventral prostate of intact male and female gerbils, in males 7 and 21 days after castration, and in females treated with testosterone for 7 and 21 days. In male and female adult gerbils, ER alpha was detected mainly in prostatic stromal cells, whereas ER beta was present mostly in secretory and basal cells. More ER alpha-positive stromal cells were found in females than in males, as was a reduction toward the male value in females treated with testosterone. Castration did not alter ER alpha expression. Testosterone was necessary for maintenance of ER beta in the male prostate epithelium: ER beta expression declined markedly in prostates of males older than 1 yr, and castration of 4-mo-old males caused a reduction in ER beta to levels seen in 1-yr-old males. Because ER beta is an antiproliferative receptor, its loss with age may predispose the aging gerbil to proliferative diseases of the prostate.

  14. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  15. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  16. Identification of