Science.gov

Sample records for alpha decay widths

  1. Alpha decay widths of excited states of 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, P. J.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz; Wheldon, C.; Catford, W. N.; Patterson, N. P.; Thomas, J. S.

    2010-03-01

    The 12C(13C, 9Be)16O reaction has been used to populate excited states in 16O. The 9Be nuclei were detected in a magnetic spectrometer and the 12C decay product of the recoiling excited 16O nucleus was detected in an array of silicon strip detectors. The large angular coverage of the strip detector array allowed the α-decay widths of the 14.66 MeV, 5-, and 16.275 MeV, 6+, states to be determined with good accuracy. The present results, together with earlier measurements, allow precise values for the branching ratios to be calculated: Ex(16O) = 14.66 MeV, Jπ = 5-, Γα0/Γ = 0.951 ± 0.049 and Γα1/Γ < 0.05; Ex(16O) = 16.275 MeV, Jπ = 6+, Γα0/Γ = 0.982 ± 0.048 and Γα1/Γ < 0.02.

  2. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  3. Channel-Coupling Contribution to the Widths of Decay Nuclear States and to Their Wave Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2004-12-01

    By using the formalism of the quantum theory of fission, the amplitudes of partial decay widths and the asymptotic behavior of the wave function for a decaying nucleus are found with allowance for open-decay-channel coupling not only for fission, but also for the binary decays of nuclei through protonic, alpha-particle, cluster, and other channels.

  4. Alpha decay in electron surrounding

    SciTech Connect

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of atomic electron shells on the constant of alpha decay of heavy and mediummass nuclei was considered in detail. A method for simultaneously taking into account the change in the potential-barrier shape and the effect of reflection of a diverging Coulomb wave in the classically allowed region was developed. The ratios of decay probabilities per unit time for a bare nucleus and the respective neutral atom were found for some alpha-decaying isotopes.

  5. Lorentz violation and {alpha} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Relating the effective Lorentz violation coefficients for composite particles to the coefficients for their constituent fields is a challenging problem. We calculate the Lorentz violation coefficients relevant to the dynamics of an {alpha} particle in terms of proton and neutron coefficients. The {alpha}-particle coefficients would lead to anisotropies in the {alpha} decays of nuclei, and because the decay process involves quantum tunneling, the effects of any Lorentz violations could be exponentially enhanced.

  6. Bremsstrahlung in {alpha} Decay Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Jentschura, U. D.; Koeck, F.; Lauer, M.; Schwalm, D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of {approx}500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the {alpha} particle and the emitted photon.

  7. Bremsstrahlung in alpha decay reexamined.

    PubMed

    Boie, H; Scheit, H; Jentschura, U D; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Milstein, A I; Terekhov, I S; Schwalm, D

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the alpha decay of (210)Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of approximately 500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the alpha particle and the emitted photon.

  8. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green’s function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  9. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green's function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  10. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, Troy

    2008-08-01

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 ± 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 ± 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  11. {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} Radiative-Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Victorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kubarovsky, V.P.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Leontiev, V.M.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Petrenko, S.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Kolganov, V.Z.

    2005-03-01

    The radiative decay {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} was recorded in the exclusive reaction p + N {yields} {lambda}(1520)K{sup +} + N at the SPHINX facility. The branching ratio for this decay and the corresponding partial width were found to be, respectively, Br[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = (1.02 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} and {gamma}[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = 159 {+-} 35 keV (the quoted errors are purely statistical, the systematic errors being within 15%)

  12. New Measurement of the π0 radiative decay width.

    PubMed

    Larin, I; McNulty, D; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Asratyan, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, G; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korchin, A; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Matveev, V; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vasiliev, A; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M; Zhou, S

    2011-04-22

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for π0 photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, 12C and 208Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9-5.5 GeV to extract the π0→γγ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The π0→γγ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is Γ(π0→γγ)=7.82±0.14(stat)±0.17(syst)  eV. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current Particle Data Group average of this fundamental quantity, and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions. PMID:21599360

  13. A New Measurement of the Pi0 Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M

    2011-04-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall~B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8\\% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  14. Neutron decay widths of excited states of Be11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, P. J.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; McEwan, P.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz.; Schulz, Ch.; Wheldon, C.

    2009-01-01

    The two-neutron transfer reaction Be9(O16, O14)Be11[Be10 +n] has been used to measure the branching ratios for the neutron decay of excited states of Be11. The O14 ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the Be10 fragments of the decaying Be11* recoil were measured in coincidence with the O14 ejectile using a double-sided silicon strip detector array at backward angles. This enabled a kinematic reconstruction of the reaction to be performed. Theoretical decay branch ratios were calculated using barrier penetrability factors and were compared to the measured ratios to provide information on the relative reduced widths of the states. The decay widths have been used to link states in Be11 with a common structure and structurally to states in the daughter nucleus Be10. The 3/2-8.82-MeV state was identified as a candidate for a molecular band head.

  15. Alpha Decay in the Complex-Energy Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Betan, R. Id

    2012-01-01

    Background: Alpha emission from a nucleus is a fundamental decay process in which the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels out through the potential barrier. Purpose: We describe alpha decay of 212Po and 104Te by means of the configuration interaction approach. Method: To compute the preformation factor and penetrability, we use the complex-energy shell model with a separable T = 1 interaction. The single-particle space is expanded in a Woods-Saxon basis that consists of bound and unbound resonant states. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the norm kernel appearing in the definition of the formation amplitude that guarantees the normalization of the channel function. Results: Without explicitly considering the alpha-cluster component in the wave function of the parent nucleus, we reproduce the experimental alpha-decay width of 212Po and predict an upper limit of T1/2 = 5.5 10 7 sec for the half-life of 104Te. Conclusions: The complex-energy shell model in a large valence configuration space is capable of providing a microscopic description of the alpha decay of heavy nuclei having two valence protons and two valence neutrons outside the doubly magic core. The inclusion of proton-neutron interaction between the valence nucleons is likely to shorten the predicted half-live of 104Te.

  16. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Stefan Meinel

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light-quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeV < m{sub {pi}} < 352 MeV, two lattice spacings, a = 0.085, 0.112 fm, and a volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3}. Our results for the axial couplings are g{sub 1} = 0.449(51), g{sub 2} = 0.84(20), and g{sub 3} = 0.71(13), where g{sub 1} governs the interaction between heavy-light mesons and pions and g{sub 2,3} are similar couplings between heavy-light baryons and pions. Using our lattice result for g{sub 3}, and constraining 1/m{sub Q} corrections in the strong decay widths with experimental data for {Sigma}{sub c}{sup (*)} decays, we obtain {Gamma}[{Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} {yields} {Lambda}{sub b} {pi}{sup {+-}}] = 4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *+}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *-} initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup prime(*)} baryons.

  17. Exotic {alpha} decays around the N=126 magic shell

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2009-07-15

    We investigate the {alpha}-decay half-lives of the exotic N=125,126,127 isotones by the generalized density-dependent cluster model (GDDCM) in combination with the microscopic two-level model. The decay widths are calculated using the overlap integral of the quasibound state wave function, the scattering state wave function, and the difference of potentials, instead of using the simple semiclassical WKB method along with the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The {alpha}-preformation factors are evaluated by the Z-dependent formula based on the two-level model, where the closed-shell effect is included. The calculated half-lives of {alpha} transitions to both ground states and excited states are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Alpha-Decay Half-Lives of Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Budaca, A. I.; Silisteanu, I.; Silisteanu, A. O.; Anghel, C. I.

    2010-11-24

    Half-lives given by self-consistent models for the {alpha}-clustering and resonance scattering are calculated and compared with data and empirical estimates. The major influence of the pairing, deformed shell closures and screening corrections is evidenced in the systematics of half-lives and provides a convenient basis for the interpretation of observed trends of the data and for prediction of new results. The very small widths of {alpha}-resonances observed experimentally in fusion-evaporation reactions, are interpreted as resonance levels of radioactive products, and such a correlation contributes directly to the study of the nuclear structure on the basis of decay data.

  19. Exotic vector charmonium and its leptonic decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Chiu, Wei-Feng; Gong, Ming; Gui, Long-Cheng; Liu, Zhao-Feng

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel type of interpolating field operator, which manifests the hybrid-like configuration that the charm quark-antiquark pair recoils against gluonic degrees of freedom. A heavy vector charmonium-like state with a mass of 4.33(2),GeV is disentangled from the conventional charmonium states in the quenched approximation. This state has affinity for the hybrid-like operators but couples less to the relevant quark bilinear operator. We also try to extract its leptonic decay constant and give a tentative upper limit that it is less than one tenth of that of J/ψ, which corresponds to a leptonic decay width about dozens of eV. The connection of this state with X(4260) is also discussed. The numerical calculations were carried out on Tianhe-1A at the National Supercomputer Center (NSCC) in Tianjin and the GPU cluster at Hunan Normal University. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11575196, 11575197, 11335001, 11405053), Y.C. and Z.L. also acknowledge the support of NSFC (11261130311) (CRC 110 by DFG and NSFC)

  20. {alpha}-Decay half-lives, {alpha}-capture, and {alpha}-nucleus potential

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu. Khudenko, A.A.

    2009-11-15

    {alpha}-Decay half-lives and {alpha}-capture cross sections are evaluated in the framework of a unified model for {alpha}-decay and {alpha}-capture. In this model {alpha}-decay and {alpha}-capture are considered as penetration of the {alpha}-particle through the potential barrier formed by the nuclear, Coulomb, and centrifugal interactions between the {alpha}-particle and nucleus. The spins and parities of the parent and daughter nuclei as well as the quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations of the daughter nuclei are taken into account for evaluation of the {alpha}-decay half-lives. The {alpha}-decay half-lives for 344 nuclei and the {alpha}-capture cross sections of {sup 40}Ca, {sup 44}Ca, {sup 59}Co, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 209}Bi agree well with the experimental data. The evaluated {alpha}-decay half-lives within the range of 10{sup -9}{<=}T{sub 1/2}{<=}10{sup 38} s for 1246 {alpha}-emitters are tabulated.

  1. {beta}-delayed {alpha} decay of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, L.; Ruprecht, G.; Ruiz, C.

    2009-10-15

    The {beta}-delayed {alpha} decay of {sup 16}N has been used to restrict the E1 fraction of the ground state {gamma} transition in the astrophysically important {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction in several experiments. A review of the published measurements is given, and GEANT4 simulations and R-matrix calculations are presented to further clarify the observed {alpha} spectra. A clear response function, in the form of a low-energy tail from the scattering of {alpha} particles in the catcher foil, is observed in these simulations for any foil thickness. Contrary to claims in the literature, the simulations show that the TRIUMF measurement and those performed at Yale and Mainz originate from the same underlying spectrum. The simulations suggest that the discrepancies between the Yale and TRIUMF final results can be attributed to incorrect deconvolution methods applied in the former case. The simulations show in general that the form (width) of the spectrum is very sensitive to the catcher foil thickness. It is concluded that the TRIUMF measurement most likely represents the currently closest approximation to the true {beta}-delayed {alpha}-decay spectrum of {sup 16}N.

  2. Spectrometer for rare alpha-decay events

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A.N.; Kushniruk, V.F.; Nefed'ev, O.K.; Rykhlyuk, A.V.; Subbotin, V.G.; Tomin, V.I.; Kharitonov, Yu.P.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.

    1987-07-01

    A low-background alpha spectrometer with 4..pi.. registration geometry is described. Use of time measurements reduces the background level in the region of 6-7 MeV to 0.02-0.03 counts/day. For two detectors 20 mm in diameter located at a distance of 1 mm from one another in registration of decay of /sup 223/Ra applied to the surface of one of the detectors, the decay efficiency is 0.82 +/- 0.04. The resolution for the 3.18-MeV line is 60 keV.

  3. Alpha decay of {sup 181}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Henderson, D.J.; Hermann, R.

    1995-08-01

    The {alpha}-decay energy of {sup 181}Pb was measured as 7211(10) keV and 7044(15). In the first study the isotope was produced in {sup 90}Zr bombardments of {sup 94}Mo and, after traversing a velocity filter, implanted in a position-sensitive Si detector; no half life for {sup 181}Pb was reported. In the second study the isotope was produced in {sup 40}Ca bombardments of {sup 144}Sm and transported to a position in front of a Si(Au) surface barrier detector with a fast He-gas-jet capillary system; an estimate of 50 ms was determined for the {sup 181}Pb half life. Recently we investigated {sup 181}Pb {alpha} decay at ATLAS as part of a survey experiment in which a l-pnA beam of 400-MeV {sup 92}Mo was used to irradiate targets of {sup 89}Y, {sup 90,92,94}Zr, and {sup 92}Mo to examine yields for one- and two-nucleon evaporation products from symmetric cold-fusion reactions. Recoiling nuclei of interest were passed through the Fragment Mass Analyzer and implanted in a double-sided silicon strip detector for {alpha}-particle assay. With the {sup 90}Zr target we observed a group at 7065(20) keV which was correlated with A = 181 recoils and had a half life of 45(20) ms. Our new results for {sup 181}Pb therefore agreed with those of the second study. There was no indication in the {sup 90}Zr + {sup 92}Mo data of the 7211(10)-keV {alpha} particles seen by Keller et al. The interested reader is referred to the 1993 atomic mass evaluation wherein the input {alpha}-decay energies and resultant masses of the light Pb isotopes (including {sup 181}Pb) are discussed.

  4. Electron Screening Effects on {alpha}-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Musumarra, A.; Bonasera, A.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Kimura, S.; Lattuada, M.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Nociforo, C.; Behr, K.-H.; Bosch, F.; Boutin, D.; Bruenle, A.

    2009-08-26

    An open problem in Nuclear Astrophysics concerns the understanding of electron-screening effects on nuclear reaction rates at stellar energies. In this framework, we have proposed to investigate the influence of the electron cloud on {alpha}-decay by measuring Q-values and {alpha}-decay half-lives of fully stripped, H-like and He-like ions. These kinds of measurements have been feasible just recently for highly-charged radioactive nuclides by fragmentation of {sup 238}U at relativistic energies at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI. In this way it is possible to produce, efficiently separate and store highly-charged {alpha}-emitters. Candidates for the proposed investigation were carefully selected and will be studied by using the Schottky Mass Spectroscopy technique. In order to establish a solid reference data set, lifetimes and Q{sub {alpha}}-value measurements of the corresponding neutrals have been performed directly at the FRS, by implanting the separated ions into an active Silicon stopper.

  5. Alpha-decay of light protactinium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Faestermann, T.; Gillitzer, A.; Hartel, K.; Henning, W.; Kienle, P.

    1987-12-10

    Light protactinium isotopes have been produced with /sup 204/Pb (/sup 19/F,xn) reactions. ..cap alpha..-activities with E/sub ..cap alpha../ = 9.90(5) MeV, T/sub 1/2/ = 53(10) ns and E/sub ..cap alpha../ = 9.65(5) MeV, T/sub 1/2/ = 0.78(16) ..mu..s could be attributed to the previously unobserved nuclei /sup 219/Pa and /sup 220/Pa with the help of excitation functions. The peak cross sections for the 4n and 3n evaporation channels are on the order of 10 ..mu..b. The decay energies as well as the halflives fit well into the systematics of these nuclei close to the magic neutron number N = 126. /sup 219/Pa is the shortest lived nuclide known with directly measured halflife.

  6. {alpha} decay of {sup 194}At

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Streicher, B.; Saro, S.; Venhart, M.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Sulignano, B.; Bianco, L.; Page, R. D.; Sapple, P.; Thomson, J.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.

    2009-06-15

    Detailed {alpha}-decay studies of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 194}At have been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 56}Fe+{sup 141}Pr{yields}{sup 194}At+3n at the velocity filter SHIP. Two {alpha}-decaying isomeric states with half-lives of T{sub 1/2}({sup 194}At{sup m1})=310(8) ms and T{sub 1/2}({sup 194}At{sup m2})=253(10) ms were identified in this nucleus. Their complex decays to the states in the daughter nucleus {sup 190}Bi are discussed in the article. We propose that similar to the case of the neighboring {sup 191,192,193,195}At isotopes, the oblate-deformed configurations based on the proton 1/2{sup +}[440] and/or 7/2{sup -}[514] Nilsson orbitals become important in {sup 194}At. A new isomeric state with the half-life of 175(8) ns was observed in {sup 190}Bi.

  7. Calculations of {alpha}-decay half-lives for heavy and superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yibin; Ni Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2011-04-15

    Systematic calculations on the {alpha}-decay half-lives of heavy and superheavy nuclei are performed within a deformed version of the cluster model, using the modified two-potential approach. The deformed Woods-Saxon potential is employed to calculate the {alpha}-decay width through a deformed barrier. For comparison the calculated {alpha}-decay half-lives in the empirical relations are also presented. The present study is initially restricted to even-even nuclei in the heavy mass region with N>126. Then the study is extended to the recently observed heaviest nuclei, including synthesized superheavy elements and isotopes. The {alpha}-decay half-lives obtained are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Id Betan, R.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

  9. The gravity dependence of the H-alpha width in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical gravity-scaling law for the H-alpha absorption width in late-type stars is developed. The derivation is based upon (1) the hydrostatic thickening of stellar chromospheres with decreasing surface gravity, and (2) a dependence of the H-alpha width upon opacity and Doppler width in a region subject to a chromospheric temperature rise. The scaling relation is approximately consistent with the mean gravity dependence deduced from the empirical correlation between H-alpha and Ca II K Wilson-Bappu widths. The calculations suggest that gravity variations in chromospheric-mass column density may, in addition to Doppler velocity enhancements, control the width-luminosity broadening of the H-alpha profile in late-type stars.

  10. Bilocal expansion of the Borel amplitude and the hadronic tau decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Lee, Taekoon

    2001-07-01

    The singular part of the Borel transform of a QCD amplitude near the infrared renormalon can be expanded in terms of higher order Wilson coefficients of the operators associated with the renormalon. In this paper we observe that this expansion gives nontrivial constraints on the Borel amplitude that can be used to improve the accuracy of the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude. In particular, we consider the Borel transform of the Adler function and its expansion around the first infrared renormalon due to the gluon condensate. Using the next-to-leading order (NLO) Wilson coefficient of the gluon condensate operator, we obtain an exact constraint on the Borel amplitude at the first IR renormalon. We then extrapolate, using judiciously chosen conformal transformations and Pade{prime} approximants, the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude in such a way that this constraint is satisfied. This procedure allows us to predict the O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 4}) coefficient of the Adler function, which gives a result consistent with the estimate by Kataev and Starshenko using a completely different method. We then apply this improved Borel amplitude to the tau decay width and obtain the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}{sup 2})=0.1193{+-}0.0007{sub exp.}{+-}0.0010{sub EW+CKM}{+-}0.0009{sub meth.}{+-}0.0003{sub evol.}. We then compare this result with those of other resummation methods.

  11. Possible Stimulation of Nuclear alpha Decay by Superfluid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. L.

    2009-08-28

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of {sup 4}He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha decay in a situation when an alpha emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  12. Possible stimulation of nuclear alpha decay by superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Barabanov, A L

    2009-08-28

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of (4)He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha decay in a situation when an alpha emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  13. {alpha} decay of even-even superheavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Khudenko, A. A.

    2010-03-15

    The {alpha}-decay half-lives of even-even superheavy elements within the range of proton number 104<=Z<=126, which can be formed by possible cold and hot fusion reactions, are calculated in the framework of various approaches for {alpha}-decay half-life evaluation and by using the Q values of {alpha} transitions obtained within different approximations for atomic masses. The dependencies of {alpha}-decay half-lives of superheavy elements on model approaches for both the Q values and half-life calculations are discussed in detail.

  14. HALF-LIVES OF LONG-LIVED ALPHA DECAY, BETA DECAY, ELECTRON CAPTURE DECAY, BETA BETA-DECAY, PROTON DECAY AND SPONTANEOUS FISSION DECAY NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, H.E.

    2003-08-08

    In his review of radionuclides for dating purposes, Roth noted that there were a large number of nuclides, normally considered ''stable'' but which are radioactive with a very long half-life. Roth suggested that I review the data on the half-life values of these long-lived nuclides for the 2001 Atomic Weights Commission meeting in Brisbane. I provided a report, BNL-NCS-68377, to fulfill Roth's request. Peiser has now made a similar suggestion that I review these data for our next Commission meeting in Ottawa for their possible inclusion in our Tables. These half-life values for long-lived nuclides include those due to various decay modes, {alpha}-decay, {beta}-decay, electron capture decay, {beta}{beta}-decay, proton decay and spontaneous fission decay. This data review (post Brisbane) provides an update to the recommendation of the 2001 review.

  15. New approach for alpha-decay calculations of deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2010-06-15

    We present a new theoretical approach to evaluate alpha-decay properties of deformed nuclei, namely the multichannel cluster model (MCCM). The deformed alpha-nucleus potential is taken into full account, and the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions is employed for quasibound states. Systematic calculations are carried out for well-deformed even-even nuclei with Z>=98 and isospin dependence of nuclear potentials is included in the calculations. Fine structure observed in alpha decay is well described by the four-channel microscopic calculation, which is performed for the first time in alpha-decay studies. The good agreement between experiment and theory is achieved for both total alpha-decay half-lives and branching ratios to the ground-state rotational band of daughter nuclei. Predictions on the branching ratios to high-spin daughter states are presented for superheavy nuclei, which may be important to interpret future observations.

  16. Microscopic calculation of {alpha}-decay half-lives with a deformed potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2009-11-15

    A new version of the generalized density-dependent cluster model is presented to describe an {alpha} particle tunneling through a deformed potential barrier. The microscopic deformed potential is numerically constructed in the double-folding model by the multipole expansion method. The decay width is computed using the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. We perform a systematic calculation on {alpha}-decay half-lives of even-even nuclei ranging from Z=52 to Z=104, including 65 well-deformed ones. The calculated {alpha}-decay half-lives are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values. There also exists good agreement with the available experimental branching ratios for well-deformed systems.

  17. Partial Decay Widths of Negative Parity Baryons in the 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, Emiliano; Scoccola, Norberto; Jayalath, Chandala; Goity, Jose

    2013-04-01

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are given.

  18. Partial decay widths of negative parity baryons in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, N. N.; Jayalath, C. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2013-03-25

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are given.

  19. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  20. Relativistic decay widths of autoionization processes: The relativistic FanoADC-Stieltjes method

    SciTech Connect

    Fasshauer, Elke; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Pernpointner, Markus

    2015-04-14

    Electronic decay processes of ionized systems are, for example, the Auger decay or the Interatomic/ Intermolecular Coulombic Decay. In both processes, an energetically low lying vacancy is filled by an electron of an energetically higher lying orbital and a secondary electron is instantaneously emitted to the continuum. Whether or not such a process occurs depends both on the energetic accessibility and the corresponding lifetime compared to the lifetime of competing decay mechanisms. We present a realization of the non-relativistically established FanoADC-Stieltjes method for the description of autoionization decay widths including relativistic effects. This procedure, being based on the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction (ADC), was adapted to the relativistic framework and implemented into the relativistic quantum chemistry program package Dirac. It is, in contrast to other existing relativistic atomic codes, not limited to the description of autoionization lifetimes in spherically symmetric systems, but is instead also applicable to molecules and clusters. We employ this method to the Auger processes following the Kr3d{sup −1}, Xe4d{sup −1}, and Rn5d{sup −1} ionization. Based on the results, we show a pronounced influence of mainly scalar-relativistic effects on the decay widths of autoionization processes.

  1. Single universal curve for cluster radioactivities and {alpha} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.

    2011-01-15

    One single line of universal (UNIV) curve for {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivities is obtained by plotting the sum of the decimal logarithm of the half-life and cluster preformation probability versus the decimal logarithm of the penetrability of external barrier. This fission-like theory is compared to the universal decay law (UDL) derived using {alpha}-like R-matrix theory. The experimental data on heavy cluster decay in three groups of even-even, even-odd, and odd-even parent nuclei are reproduced with comparable accuracy by both types of universal curves, UNIV and UDL.

  2. Discovery of 109Xe and 105Te: superallowed alpha decay near doubly magic 100Sn.

    PubMed

    Liddick, S N; Grzywacz, R; Mazzocchi, C; Page, R D; Rykaczewski, K P; Batchelder, J C; Bingham, C R; Darby, I G; Drafta, G; Goodin, C; Gross, C J; Hamilton, J H; Hecht, A A; Hwang, J K; Ilyushkin, S; Joss, D T; Korgul, A; Królas, W; Lagergren, K; Li, K; Tantawy, M N; Thomson, J; Winger, J A

    2006-08-25

    Two new alpha emitters 109Xe and 105Te were identified through the observation of the 109Xe --> 105Te --> 101Sn alpha-decay chain. The 109Xe nuclei were produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction 54Fe(58Ni,3n)109Xe and studied using the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Two transitions at Ealpha = 4062 +/- 7 keV and Ealpha = 3918 +/- 9 keV were interpreted as the l = 2 and l = 0 transitions from the 7/2+ ground state in 109Xe (T1/2 = 13 +/- 2 ms) to the 5/2+ ground state and a 7/2+ excited state, located at 150 +/- 13 keV in 105Te. The observation of the subsequent decay of 105Te marks the discovery of the lightest known alpha-decaying nucleus. The measured transition energy Ealpha = 4703 +/- 5 keV and half-life T1/2 = 620 +/- 70 ns were used to determine the reduced alpha-decay width delta2. The ratio delta105Te(2)/delta213Po(2) of approximately 3 indicates a superallowed character of the alpha emission from 105Te.

  3. Microscopic description of the anisotropy in alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Delion, D.S. ); Insolia, A. ); Liotta, R.J. )

    1994-06-01

    A microscopic description of alpha decay of odd mass nuclei is given for axially deformed nuclei. Realistic mean field+pairing residual interaction in a very large single particle basis is used. Systematics for At and Rn isotopes, as well as for [sup 221]Fr, are given. A pronounced anisotropic emission of alpha particles at low temperatures is predicted as a function of deformation for the At and Rn isotopes. This shows that alpha decay is an excellent tool to probe intrinsic deformations in nuclei.

  4. Systematics of. cap alpha. decay of even--even isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Poplavskii-breve, I.V.

    1987-02-01

    On the basis of an analysis of experimental data we have investigated for the first time the ..cap alpha.. decay of even--even isotones. We have established that the ..cap alpha..-decay energy of isotones depends on the number of protons approximately according to a linear law. We have shown that the Geiger--Nuttall law is valid both for isotopes and isobars, and also for isotones. The deviations from the Geiger--Nuttall law are due to the shell structure of the nucleus. The regularities observed in the ..cap alpha.. decay of isotones have been used to estimate the magnitudes of the ..cap alpha..-decay energies, the kinetic energies of the emitted ..cap alpha.. particles, and the partial half-lives for ..cap alpha.. decay of the known and unknown neutron--deficient nuclei /sup 202//sup ,//sup 204/Ra, /sup 210/Th, /sup 228//sup ,//sup 230/Pu, /sup 234//sup ,//sup 236/Cm, /sup 242//sup ,//sup 244/Fm, /sup 250//sup ,//sup 258/No, and /sup 254//sup ,//sup 256/Ku.

  5. Quasiclassical description of bremsstrahlung accompanying {alpha} decay including quadrupole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.; Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.

    2008-01-15

    We present a quasiclassical theory of {alpha} decay accompanied by bremsstrahlung with a special emphasis on the case of {sup 210}Po, with the aim of finding a unified description that incorporates both the radiation during the tunneling through the Coulomb wall and the finite energy E{sub {gamma}} of the radiated photon up to E{sub {gamma}}{approx}Q{sub {alpha}}/{radical}({eta}), where Q{sub {alpha}} is the {alpha}-decay Q-value and {eta} is the Sommerfeld parameter. The corrections with respect to previous quasiclassical investigations are found to be substantial, and excellent agreement with a full quantum mechanical treatment is achieved. Furthermore, we find that a dipole-quadrupole interference significantly changes the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation. We obtain good agreement between our theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  6. Alpha- and EC-decay measurements of 257Rf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heßberger, F. P.; Antalic, S.; Mistry, A. K.; Ackermann, D.; Andel, B.; Block, M.; Kalaninova, Z.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lommel, B.; Piot, J.; Vostinar, M.

    2016-07-01

    Alpha- and Electron capture (EC) decay properties of 257 Rf were investigated by measuring α - γ coincidences and correlations between conversion electrons (CE) emitted during the process of EC decay of 257Rf and α decays of the daughter isotope 257Lr. So far, previously unobserved α (8296 keV)- γ (557 keV) coincidences were measured and interpreted as decays of 257mRf ( 11/2-[725] into the 7/2-[743] level in 253No. A search of delayed coincidences between α particles and signals at E ≤ 1000 keV, which are interpreted as being due to CE emission, revealed a clear correlation between CE and α particles from the decay of 257Lr, which is regarded as a direct proof of the EC decay of 257gRf and 257mRf.

  7. Measurement of Lifetime and Decay-Width Difference in B_{s};{0}-->J/psivarphi Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-03-28

    We measure the mean lifetime tau=2/(Gamma_{L}+Gamma_{H}) and the decay-width difference DeltaGamma=Gamma_{L}-Gamma_{H} of the light and heavy mass eigenstates of the B_{s}{0} meson, B_{sL}{0} and B_{sH}{0}, in B_{s}{0}-->J/psivarphi decays using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp[over ] collider. Assuming CP conservation, a good approximation for the B_{s}{0} system in the standard model, we obtain DeltaGamma=0.076_{-0.063}{+0.059}(stat)+/-0.006(syst) ps{-1} and tau=1.52+/-0.04(stat)+/-0.02(syst) ps, the most precise measurements to date. Our constraints on the weak phase and DeltaGamma are consistent with CP conservation.

  8. Stability against {alpha} decay of some recently observed superheavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chowdhury, Partha; Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2011-02-15

    The probability of {alpha}-particle emission for some recently observed superheavy nuclei (SHN) are investigated. The {alpha}-decay half-lives of SHN are calculated in a quantum tunneling model with density-dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective nuclear interaction using theoretical and measured Q{sub {alpha}} values. We determine the density distribution of {alpha} and daughter nuclei from the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory using FSUGold force, NL3, and TM1 parameter sets. The double-folded nuclear potential is numerically calculated in a more microscopic manner using these density distributions. The estimated values of {alpha}-decay half-lives are in good agreement with the recent data. We compare our results with recently detected {alpha}-decay chains from a new element with atomic number Z=117 reported by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna. Finally, we determine the half-lives of superheavy elements with Z=108-120 and neutron number N=152-190 to explore the long-standing predictions of the existence of an 'island of stability' due to possible spherical proton (Z{approx}114) and neutron (N{approx}184) shell closures.

  9. Measuring the two-photon decay width of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at a photon-photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, T.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, I.

    1997-08-01

    The feasibility of a measurement of the partial decay width of the intermediate-mass Higgs boson into two photons at a photon-photon collider is studied by a simulation. The QCD radiative correction for quark pair background processes is taken into account for the realistic background estimation. It is found that the two-photon decay width can be measured with the statistical error of 7.6{percent} with about one year of experiment. The impact of the measurement of the two-photon decay width to look for the new physics beyond is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Direct measurement of the total decay width of the top quark.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-11-15

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5  GeV/c2, we find 1.10<Γtop<4.05  GeV at 68% confidence level, which is in agreement with the standard model expectation of 1.3 GeV and is the most precise direct measurement of the top quark width to date.

  11. Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5GeV/c2, we find 1.10<Γtop<4.05GeV at 68% confidence level, which is in agreement with the standard model expectation of 1.3 GeV and is the most precise direct measurement of the top quark width to date.

  12. Discovery of {sup 109}Xe and {sup 105}Te: Superallowed {alpha} Decay near Doubly Magic {sup 100}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Liddick, S. N.; Batchelder, J. C.; Grzywacz, R.; Bingham, C. R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Drafta, G.; Tantawy, M. N.; Page, R. D.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Gross, C. J.; Goodin, C.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Li, K.; Hecht, A. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Korgul, A.

    2006-08-25

    Two new {alpha} emitters {sup 109}Xe and {sup 105}Te were identified through the observation of the {sup 109}Xe{yields}{sup 105}Te{yields}{sup 101}Sn {alpha}-decay chain. The {sup 109}Xe nuclei were produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 54}Fe({sup 58}Ni,3n){sup 109}Xe and studied using the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Two transitions at E{sub {alpha}}=4062{+-}7 keV and E{sub {alpha}}=3918{+-}9 keV were interpreted as the l=2 and l=0 transitions from the 7/2{sup +} ground state in {sup 109}Xe (T{sub 1/2}=13{+-}2 ms) to the 5/2{sup +} ground state and a 7/2{sup +} excited state, located at 150{+-}13 keV in {sup 105}Te. The observation of the subsequent decay of {sup 105}Te marks the discovery of the lightest known {alpha}-decaying nucleus. The measured transition energy E{sub {alpha}}=4703{+-}5 keV and half-life T{sub 1/2}=620{+-}70 ns were used to determine the reduced {alpha}-decay width {delta}{sup 2}. The ratio {delta}{sub {sup 105}Te}{sup 2}/{delta}{sub {sup 213}Po}{sup 2} of {approx}3 indicates a superallowed character of the {alpha} emission from {sup 105}Te.

  13. Impact of metal ion's charge on the interatomic Coulombic decay widths in microsolvated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, V.; Brunken, C.; Gokhberg, K.

    2016-09-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is an efficient electronic decay mechanism of electronically excited atoms and molecules embedded in an environment. For the series of isoelectronic Na+, Mg2+, and Al3+ ions in aqueous solution, ultrashort ICD lifetimes of 3.1 fs, 1.5 fs, and 0.9 fs, respectively, were observed experimentally. The magnitude of the ICD lifetimes and their variation within the series were qualitatively explained by shortening metal-oxygen equilibrium distances and the increasing polarization of the water molecules as the metal's charge grows. We carried out an extensive ab initio investigation of the variation of the ICD widths with the metal-oxygen distances and the number of water neighbors in Na+-(H2O)m (m = 1-4) and Mg2+-(H2O)n (n = 1-6) clusters including and excluding polarization effects in the decaying state. We demonstrated that the effect of the induced polarization of the water ligand and the equilibrium cation-oxygen distance are equally important in determining the ordering and ratios of the ICD lifetimes in the series. Moreover, we showed that the induced polarization of the water molecules leads to a slower than linear growth of ICD width with the number of equivalent water neighbors; the non-linearity is stronger for Mg2+. The ab initio ICD widths in microsolvated Na+-(H2O)4 and Mg2+-(H2O)6 clusters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  14. Impact of metal ion's charge on the interatomic Coulombic decay widths in microsolvated clusters.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, V; Brunken, C; Gokhberg, K

    2016-09-14

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is an efficient electronic decay mechanism of electronically excited atoms and molecules embedded in an environment. For the series of isoelectronic Na(+), Mg(2+), and Al(3+) ions in aqueous solution, ultrashort ICD lifetimes of 3.1 fs, 1.5 fs, and 0.9 fs, respectively, were observed experimentally. The magnitude of the ICD lifetimes and their variation within the series were qualitatively explained by shortening metal-oxygen equilibrium distances and the increasing polarization of the water molecules as the metal's charge grows. We carried out an extensive ab initio investigation of the variation of the ICD widths with the metal-oxygen distances and the number of water neighbors in Na(+)-(H2O)m (m = 1-4) and Mg(2+)-(H2O)n (n = 1-6) clusters including and excluding polarization effects in the decaying state. We demonstrated that the effect of the induced polarization of the water ligand and the equilibrium cation-oxygen distance are equally important in determining the ordering and ratios of the ICD lifetimes in the series. Moreover, we showed that the induced polarization of the water molecules leads to a slower than linear growth of ICD width with the number of equivalent water neighbors; the non-linearity is stronger for Mg(2+). The ab initio ICD widths in microsolvated Na(+)-(H2O)4 and Mg(2+)-(H2O)6 clusters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values. PMID:27634259

  15. Mass spectra and leptonic decay widths of heavy quarkonia by using psi function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Salem, L. I.

    2004-10-01

    In this study, a non-relativistic two-body wave equation is used to describe the properties of heavy quark-antiquark systems with a potential proportional to the psgr-function. The wave equation is transformed into a true eigenvalue equation and solved numerically. Both the resonance masses and the leptonic decay widths of c\\bar c and b\\skew{-5}\\barb mesons are calculated. The obtained results showed that the quark-antiquark interaction in these systems could be described adequately by using this simple potential form which contains one adjustable parameter besides the quark masses.

  16. Resummation Analysis of the τ-DECAY Width Using the Four-Loop β-FUNCTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.; Pivovarov, A. A.

    We extract the strong coupling constant α s(m2_r) from the semileptonic τ-decay width taking into account resummation effects from the running of the strong coupling constant. In the /line{MS} scheme. The result reads αs=0.375±0.007 to third-order and αs=0.378±0.007 to fourth-order in the β-function, respectively, where we use the recently computed four-loop coefficient β3. These values for the coupling constant have to be compared with the value αs=0.354±0.005 derived from a third-order analysis of τ-decays. We determine the exact value of the convergence radius of the perturbation series by analyzing the singularity structure of the complex coupling constant plane.

  17. Determination of the sign of the decay width difference in the B(s)(0) system.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; de Bruyn, K; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-06-15

    The interference between the K+ K- S-wave and P-wave amplitudes in B(s)(0) → J/ψK+ K- decays with the K+ K- pairs in the region around the ϕ(1020) resonance is used to determine the variation of the difference of the strong phase between these amplitudes as a function of K+ K- invariant mass. Combined with the results from our CP asymmetry measurement in B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ decays, we conclude that the B(s)(0) mass eigenstate that is almost CP = +1 is lighter and decays faster than the mass eigenstate that is almost CP = -1. This determines the sign of the decay width difference ΔΓ(s) ≡ Γ(L) - Γ(H) to be positive. Our result also resolves the ambiguity in the past measurements of the CP violating phase ϕ(s) to be close to zero rather than π. These conclusions are in agreement with the standard model expectations. PMID:23004259

  18. Determination of the sign of the decay width difference in the B(s)(0) system.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; de Bruyn, K; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-06-15

    The interference between the K+ K- S-wave and P-wave amplitudes in B(s)(0) → J/ψK+ K- decays with the K+ K- pairs in the region around the ϕ(1020) resonance is used to determine the variation of the difference of the strong phase between these amplitudes as a function of K+ K- invariant mass. Combined with the results from our CP asymmetry measurement in B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ decays, we conclude that the B(s)(0) mass eigenstate that is almost CP = +1 is lighter and decays faster than the mass eigenstate that is almost CP = -1. This determines the sign of the decay width difference ΔΓ(s) ≡ Γ(L) - Γ(H) to be positive. Our result also resolves the ambiguity in the past measurements of the CP violating phase ϕ(s) to be close to zero rather than π. These conclusions are in agreement with the standard model expectations.

  19. Alpha-decay properties of /sup 205-208/Fr: Identification of /sup 206/Fr/sup m/

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, B.G.; Toth, K.S.; Carter, H.K.; Mlekodaj, R.L.; Spejewski, E.H.

    1981-05-01

    Alpha-particle and ..gamma..-ray spectral measurements were made for /sup 205-208/Fr. A new a emitter (T/sub 1/2/ = 0.7 +- 0.1 sec and E/sub a/ = 6.930 +- 0.005 MeV) was observed and identified with the decay of a previously unknown isomer in /sup 206/Fr. From the a particle and g ray intensities, a decay branching ratios were deduced for /sup 205-208/Fr utilizing available information concerning the nuclides' (electron capture+positron) decay properties. Reduced widths were calculated and compared with those of neighboring nuclei.

  20. Decay widths of ground-state and excited {Xi}{sub b} baryons in a nonrelativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Limphirat, Ayut; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Suebka, Prasart; Yan, Yupeng

    2010-11-15

    Decay processes of ground and excited bottom baryons are studied in the {sup 3}P{sub 0} nonrelativistic quark model with all model parameters fixed in the sector of light quarks. Using as an input the recent mass of {Xi}{sub b} and the theoretical masses of {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}, narrow decay widths are predicted for the ground-state bottom baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}. The work predicts large decay widths, about 100 MeV for the {rho}-type orbital excitation states of {Xi}{sub b}.

  1. Measurement of Lifetime and Decay-Width Difference in B0s -> J/psi phi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2007-12-01

    The authors measure the mean lifetime, {tau} = 2/({Lambda}{sub L} + {Lambda}{sub H}), and the decay-width difference, {Delta}{Lambda} = {Lambda}{sub L} - {Lambda}{sub H}, of the light and heavy mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson, B{sub sL}{sup 0} and B{sub sH}{sup 0}, in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays using 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Assuming CP conservation, a good approximation for the B{sub s}{sup 0} system in the standard model, they obtain {Delta}{Lambda} = 0.076{sub -0.063}{sup +0.059}(stat.) {+-} 0.006(syst.) ps{sup -1} and {tau} = 1.52 {+-} 0.04(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps, the most precise measurements to date. The constraints on the weak phase and {Delta}{Lambda} are consistent with CP conservation.

  2. Cryogenic Detectors for Rare Alpha Decay Search: A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, N.; Dubovik, A.; Nagorny, S.; Nisi, S.; Orio, F.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Schäffner, K.; Tupitsyna, I.; Yakubovskaya, A.

    2016-08-01

    The detection of ^{148}Sm alpha decay with a precise measured half-life of ( {6.4_{-1.3}^{+1.2} }) × 10^{15}y and a Q-value of 1987.3 ± 0.5 keV was achieved by a new experimental approach, where a conventional ZnWO4 scintillating crystal doped with enriched ^{148}Sm isotope is operated as a cryogenic scintillating bolometer (phonon and light channel) at mK-temperatures.

  3. Alpha decay self-damage in cubic and monoclinic zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Land, C.C.; Peterson, D.E.; Rohr, D.L.; Roof, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of primarily-monoclinic /sup 238/Pu-doped zirconolite were stored at ambient temperature to allow accumulation of alpha decay self-damage to a dose of 1 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ (equivalent to a SYNROC age of approx. 10/sup 3/y). Bulk swelling reached 2.3 vol% with no tendency toward saturation, a damage response similar to that observed for cubic Pu-doped zirconolite. X-ray volumetric swelling at 4 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ was 1 vol%, considerably less than that for the cubic material. Changes in cell dimensions differed significantly from those reported by others for a monoclinic natural mineral. Extensive microcracking was observed, and is attributed at least partially to swelling differences between the matrix and minor phases.

  4. Pair decay width of the Hoyle state and its role for stellar carbon production.

    PubMed

    Chernykh, M; Feldmeier, H; Neff, T; von Neumann-Cosel, P; Richter, A

    2010-07-01

    The pair decay width of the first excited 0+ state in 12C (the Hoyle state) is deduced from a novel analysis of the world data on inelastic electron scattering covering a wide momentum transfer range, thereby resolving previous discrepancies. The extracted value Γπ=(62.3±2.0) μeV is independently confirmed by new data at low momentum transfers measured at the S-DALINAC and reduces the uncertainty of the literature values by more than a factor of 3. A precise knowledge of Γπ is mandatory for quantitative studies of some key issues in the modeling of supernovae and of asymptotic giant branch stars, the most likely site of the slow-neutron nucleosynthesis process. PMID:20867703

  5. The analysis of predictability of recent alpha decay formulae and the alpha partial half-lives of some exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta-Schubert, N.; Reyes, M. A.; Tamez, V. A.

    2009-04-20

    Alpha decay is one of the two main decay modes of the heaviest nuclei, (SHE), and constitutes one of the dominant decay modes of highly neutron deficient medium mass nuclei ('exotics'). Thus identifying and characterizing the alpha decay chains form a crucial part of the identification of SHE. We report the extension of the previously developed method for the detailed and systematic investigation of the reliability of the three main extant analytical formulae of alpha decay half-lives: the generalized liquid drop model based formula of Royer et al. (FR), the Sobiczewski modified semi-empirical Viola-Seaborg formula (VSS) and the recent phenomenological formula of Sobiczewski and Parkhomenko (SP)

  6. Unified formula of half-lives for {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Dong Tiekuang; Xu Chang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2008-10-15

    In view of the fact that {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity are physically analogical processes, we propose a general formula of half-lives and decay energies for {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity. This new formula is directly deduced from the WKB barrier penetration probability with some approximations. It is not only simple in form and easy to see the physical meanings but also shows excellent agreement with the experimental values. Moreover, the difference between two sets of parameters to separately describe {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity is small. Therefore, we use only one set of adjustable parameters to simultaneously describe the {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity data for even-even nuclei. The results are also satisfactory. This indicates that this formula successfully combines the phenomenological laws of {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity. We expect it to be a significant step toward a unified phenomenological law of {alpha} decay and cluster radioactivity.

  7. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of well deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-06-15

    We formulate a theoretical model for the {alpha} decay of well-deformed even-even nuclei based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation. The {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures observed in {alpha} decay are well described by the five-channel microscopic calculations. Since the branching ratios to high-spin states are hard to understand in the traditional {alpha}-decay theories, this success could be important to interpret future observations of heavier nuclei. It is also found that the {alpha} transition to high-spin states is a powerful tool to probe the energy spectrum and deformation of daughter nuclei.

  8. The presence of two skeletal muscle alpha-actinins correlates with troponin-tropomyosin expression and Z-line width

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Two species of alpha-actinin from rabbit fast skeletal muscles were identified with a monospecific antisera. Designated alpha-actinin1f and alpha-actinin2f, their distribution in muscles does not correlate with histochemically defined fast fiber type. Rather, the presence of each correlates with Z-line width and with the expression of different thin filament Ca2+-regulatory complexes. alpha-Actinin1f is expressed with troponin T 1f-alpha beta tropomyosin, and alpha-actinin2f with troponin T 2f-alpha 2 tropomyosin. CNBr peptide maps show that the fast alpha- actinin species differ in primary structure. In contrast, the slow alpha-actinin is indistinguishable from alpha-actinin1f. Further evidence for the similarity of alpha-actinin1f and slow alpha-actinin comes from electron microscopic studies which show that fibers that express these species exhibit thick Z-lines. So, unlike other contractile proteins, the multiple forms of alpha-actinin do not reflect the distinction between fast- and slow-twitch muscles. PMID:4030889

  9. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  10. alpha-decay half-lives and Q{sub a}lpha values of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jianmin; Zuo Wei; Gu Jianzhong; Wang Yanzhao; Peng Bangbao

    2010-06-15

    The alpha-decay half-lives of recently synthesized superheavy nuclei (SHN) are investigated by employing a unified fission model (UFM) where a new method to calculate the assault frequency of alpha emission is used. The excellent agreement with the experimental data indicates the UFM is a useful tool to investigate these alpha decays. It is found that the alpha-decay half-lives become more and more insensitive to the Q{sub a}lpha values as the atomic number increases on the whole, which is favorable for us to predict the half-lives of SHN. In addition, a formula is proposed to compute the Q{sub a}lpha values for the nuclei with Z>=92 and N>=140 with a good accuracy, according to which the long-lived SHN should be neutron rich. Several weeks ago, two isotopes of a new element with atomic number Z=117 were synthesized and their alpha-decay chains have been observed. The Q{sub a}lpha formula is found to work well for these nuclei, confirming its predictive power. The experimental half-lives are well reproduced by employing the UFM with the experimental Q{sub a}lpha values. This fact that the experimental half-lives are compatible with experimental Q{sub a}lpha values supports the synthesis of a new element 117 and the experimental measurements to a certain extent.

  11. Self-consistent calculations of alpha-decay energies

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Saperstein, E. E.

    2013-06-15

    On the basis of the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems, the energies of alphadecay chains were calculated for several new superheavy nuclei discovered recently in experiments of the Dubna-Livermore Collaboration headed by Yu.Ts. Oganessian. The approach in question is implemented on the basis of the generalized method of the density functional proposed by Fayans and his coauthors. The version used here relies on the functional DF3-a proposed recently for describing a wide array of nuclear data, including data on superheavy nuclei. A detailed comparison of the results obtained on this basis with the predictions of different approaches, including the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method, the micro-macro method in the version developed by Sobiczewski and his coauthors, and the phenomenological method of Liran and his coauthors, is performed. The resulting alpha-decay energies are used to calculate respective lifetimes with the aid of the phenomenological Parkhomenko-Sobiczewski formula.

  12. {alpha} decays to ground and excited states of heavy deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Khudenko, A. A.

    2009-09-15

    The experimental data for {alpha}-decay half-lives to ground and excited states of deformed nuclei with 222{<=}A{<=}252 and 88{<=}Z{<=}102 are analyzed in the framework of the unified model for {alpha} decay and {alpha} capture. The branching ratios to excited states depend on the energy and the angular momentum of the {alpha} particle. The evaluated branching ratios for 0{sub g.s.}{sup +}{yields}0{sub g.s.}{sup +},2{sup +},4{sup +} {alpha} transitions in even-even nuclei agree with the experimental data. The experimental and calculated branching ratios for {alpha} transitions into more highly excited states are similar.

  13. Measurement of the radiative decay width Γ [ Λ (1520) → Λγ ] with the SPHINX spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, Yu. M.; Artamonov, A. V.; Batarin, V. A.; Vavilov, D. V.; Victorov, V. A.; Eroshin, O. V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, Yu. P.; Kolganov, V. Z.; Kozhevnikov, A. P.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kubarovsky, V. P.; Kurshetsov, V. F.; Landsberg, L. G.; Leontiev, V. M.; Lomkatsi, G. S.; Molchanov, V. V.; Mukhin, V. A.; Nilov, A. F.; Patalakha, D. I.; Petrenko, S. V.; Smolyankin, V. T.; Sphinx Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The radiative decay Λ (1520) → Λγ was measured directly in the study of the exclusive diffractive-like reaction p + N → Λ (1520)K+ + N, Λ (1520) → Λγ with the SPHINX spectrometer. The values of the branching and partial width of this radiative decay were obtained: BR [ Λ (1520) → Λγ ] = (1.02 ± 0.21 (stat) ± 0.15 (syst)) ×10-2 and Γ [ Λ (1520) → Λγ ] = 159 ± 33 (stat) ± 26 (syst) keV.

  14. Measurement of the radiative decay width Γ[Λ(1520)→Λγ] with the SPHINX spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sphinx Collaboration; Antipov, Yu. M.; Artamonov, A. V.; Batarin, V. A.; Vavilov, D. V.; Victorov, V. A.; Eroshin, O. V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, Yu. P.; Kolganov, V. Z.; Kozhevnikov, A. P.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kubarovsky, V. P.; Kurshetsov, V. F.; Landsberg, L. G.; Leontiev, V. M.; Lomkatsi, G. S.; Molchanov, V. V.; Mukhin, V. A.; Nilov, A. F.; Patalakha, D. I.; Petrenko, S. V.; Smolyankin, V. T.

    2004-12-01

    The radiative decay Λ(1520)→Λγ was measured directly in the study of the exclusive diffractive-like reaction p+N→Λ(1520)K++N, Λ(1520)→Λγ with the SPHINX spectrometer. The values of the branching and partial width of this radiative decay were obtained: BR[Λ(1520)→Λγ]=(1.02±0.21(stat)±0.15(syst))×10-2 and Γ[Λ(1520)→Λγ]=159±33(stat)±26(syst) keV.

  15. Study of the D+s-->π- π+π+ Decay and Measurement of f0 Masses and Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-01-01

    From a sample of 848+/-44 D+s-->π- π+π+ decays, we find γ\\(D+s-->π- π+π+\\)/γ\\(D+s-->φπ+\\) = 0.245+/-0.028+0.019-0.012. Using a Dalitz plot analysis of this three body decay, we find significant contributions from the channels ρ0\\(770\\)π+, ρ0\\(1450\\)π+, f0\\(980\\)π+, f2\\(1270\\)π+, and f0\\(1370\\)π+. We also present the values obtained for masses and widths of the resonances f0\\(980\\) and f0\\(1370\\).

  16. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-09-15

    The fine structure observed in the {alpha} decay of deformed platinum isotopes is investigated using the recently developed five-channel formalism, based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. The internal effect of daughter states is taken into account in dealing with the interaction matrix and the {alpha}-cluster formation. The available experimental data concerning {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures are reproduced. Some predictions are made especially for the {alpha} decay of neutron-rich isotopes, which could guide future experiments.

  17. Fine structure of alpha decay to rotational states of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Z.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.; Zhang, H. F.

    2010-06-15

    To gain a better insight into alpha-decay fine structure, we calculate the relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} rotational states in the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and improved Royer's formula. The calculated relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} states are in good agreement with the experimental data. For the relative intensities of alpha decay to 4{sup +} states, a good agreement with experimental data is achieved for Th and U isotopes. The formula we obtain is useful for the analysis of experimental data of alpha-decay fine structure. In addition, some predicted relative intensities which are still not measured are provided for future experiments.

  18. Theoretical analysis of direct CP violation and differential decay width in in phase space around the resonances and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Song, Ren; Su, Yu-Mo; Lü, Gang; Zheng, Bo

    2015-09-01

    We perform a theoretical study on direct CP violation in in phase space around the intermediate states and . The possible interference between the amplitudes corresponding to the two resonances is taken into account, and the relative strong phase of the two amplitudes is treated as a free parameter. Our analysis shows that by a properly chosen strong phase, both the CP violation strength and the differential decay width accommodate the experimental results.

  19. Prediction of {alpha}-decay half-lives and Q{sub {alpha}} values of superheavy nuclei by a global potential for {alpha} + nucleus systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Basudeb

    2011-09-15

    An approach we have proposed recently for calculation of Q{sub {alpha}} energy and decay half-life T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}} on the {alpha} decay of radioactive heavy ions is applied to the evaluation of these two important parameters for the nuclei in the superheavy region Z = 112-118 for which experimental data are not available. It is shown that the {alpha} + nucleus potential represented by an exactly solvable potential used in the calculation could be expressed in terms of proton (Z) and neutron (N) numbers of the {alpha} emitter so that varieties of {alpha}-emitting nuclei differing in their Z and N values could be addressed for their decay properties without the help of any adjustable parameter and the results of Q{sub {alpha}} and T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}} for a nucleus are estimated without any prior knowledge of any one of these quantities. This procedure to obtain the values of Q{sub {alpha}} and T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}} works well to reproduce the known experimental results for superheavy nuclei and hence, the procedure is expected to provide proper information about these parameters in experiments on {alpha} decay of new nuclei in the superheavy region.

  20. Systematics of {alpha}-decay half-lives around shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Botros, M. M.; Adel, A.

    2010-02-15

    We present a systematic calculation of {alpha}-decay half-lives of even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei in the framework of the preformed {alpha} model. The microscopic {alpha}-daughter nuclear interaction potential is calculated by double-folding the density distributions of both {alpha} and daughter nuclei with a realistic effective Michigan three-Yukawa nucleon-nucleon interaction, and the microscopic Coulomb potential is calculated by folding the charge density distributions of the two interacting nuclei. The half-lives are found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the implementation of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition inherent in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. The {alpha}-decay half-lives obtained agree reasonably well with the available experimental data. Moreover, the study has been extended to the newly observed superheavy nuclei. The interplay of closed-shell effects in {alpha}-decay calculations is investigated. The {alpha}-decay calculations give the closed-shell effects of known spherical magicities, Z=82 and N=126, and further predict enhanced stabilities at N=152,162, and 184 for Z=100,108, and 114, owing to the stability of parent nuclei against {alpha} decays. It is worth noting that the aim of this work is not only to reproduce the experimental data better, but also to extend our understanding of {alpha}-decay half-lives around shell closures.

  1. {alpha} decay of {sup 216}Fr and {sup 212}At

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.F.; Paris, P.; Sheline, R.K.; Alexa, P.; Gizon, A.

    1996-11-01

    The alpha and coincident gamma decays of {sup 216}Fr and {sup 212}At in secular equilibrium with 0.8 s {sup 224}Pa and 26.1 ms {sup 220}Ac have been studied with emphasis on the level scheme of {sup 212}At. The level structure has been interpreted in terms of the shell model configurations {pi}({ital h}{sub 9/2}){sub 9/2}{sup 3}{nu}({ital g}{sub 9/2}), {pi}({ital h}{sub 9/2}){sub 0+}{sup 2}({ital f}{sub 7/2}){nu}({ital g}{sub 9/2}), and {pi}({ital h}{sub 9/2}){sub 9/2}{sup 3}{nu}({ital i}{sub 11/2}). These configurations are then compared with the calculated configurations in {sup 212}At and with the corresponding experimental configurations in {sup 210}Bi and {sup 212}Bi. In all three cases plots of the experimental energies vs the spin show the expected inverted parabola shape, but as we move farther away from the {sup 208}Pb closed shells, the inverted parabolas become more compressed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. {alpha}-decay energy formula for superheavy nuclei based on the liquid-drop model

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Tiekuang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2010-09-15

    A formula of {alpha}-decay energy for superheavy nuclei based on the method of macroscopic model plus shell corrections is proposed. The macroscopic part of this formula is derived from the Bethe-Weizsaecker binding energy formula, and the shell corrections at N=152 and N=162 are expressed by the Mexican hat wavelet functions. The parameters of this formula are obtained through fitting to 170 {alpha}-decay energies for nuclei ranging from Z=90 to Z=118 with N{>=}140. Numerical results show that 170 existing {alpha}-decay energies can be reproduced very well; the average and standard deviations between theoretical results and experimental data are 0.177 and 0.226 MeV, respectively. The {alpha}-decay energies of newly synthesized nuclei {sup 293,294}117 and their {alpha}-decay products are also reproduced very well. In addition, the {alpha}-decay energies for nuclei with Z=110-120 are predicted and compared with the results calculated by the macroscopic-microscopic model. Great differences are found for nuclei with Z{>=}116 and N{>=}176 due to the shell effects near the hypothetical doubly magic nucleus {sup 298}114{sub 184} in the macroscopic-microscopic model. Therefore, by comparing experimental {alpha}-decay energies measured in the future with the ones predicted by these two methods, one can obtain useful information about the next proton and neutron magic numbers.

  3. {alpha} decay chains in {sup 271-294}115 superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Santhosh, K. P.; Priyanka, B.; Joseph, Jayesh George; Sahadevan, Sabina

    2011-08-15

    {alpha} decay of {sup 271-294}115 superheavy nuclei is studied using the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The predicted {alpha} half-lives of {sup 287}115 and {sup 288}115 nuclei and their decay products are in good agreement with experimental values. Comparison of {alpha} and spontaneous fission half-lives predicts four-{alpha} chains and three-{alpha} chains, respectively, from {sup 287}115 and {sup 288}115 nuclei and are in agreement with experimental observation. Our study predicts two-{alpha} chains from {sup 273,274,289}115, three-{alpha} chains from {sup 275}115, and four-{alpha} chains consistently from {sup 284,285,286}115 nuclei. These observations will be useful for further experimental investigation in this region.

  4. Limits on the Higgs boson lifetime and width from its decay to four charged leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.

    2015-10-01

    Constraints on the lifetime and width of the Higgs boson are obtained from H →Z Z →4 ℓ events using data recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 with an integrated luminosity of 5.1 and 19.7 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The measurement of the Higgs boson lifetime is derived from its flight distance in the CMS detector with an upper bound of τH<1.9 ×10-13 s at the 95% confidence level (C.L.), corresponding to a lower bound on the width of ΓH>3.5 ×10-9 MeV . The measurement of the width is obtained from an off-shell production technique, generalized to include anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson to two electroweak bosons. From this measurement, a joint constraint is set on the Higgs boson width and a parameter fΛ Q that expresses an anomalous coupling contribution as an on-shell cross-section fraction. The limit on the Higgs boson width is ΓH<46 MeV with fΛ Q unconstrained and ΓH<26 MeV for fΛ Q=0 at the 95% C.L. The constraint fΛ Q<3.8 ×10-3 at the 95% C.L. is obtained for the expected standard model Higgs boson width.

  5. ON THE (NON-)ENHANCEMENT OF THE Ly{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTH BY A MULTIPHASE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Duval, Florent; Oestlin, Goeran

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that radiative transfer effects may explain the unusually high equivalent widths (EWs) of the Ly{alpha} line, observed occasionally from starburst galaxies, especially at high redshifts. If the dust is locked up inside high-density clouds dispersed in an empty intercloud medium, the Ly{alpha} photons could scatter off of the surfaces of the clouds, effectively having their journey confined to the dustless medium. The continuum radiation, on the other hand, does not scatter, and would thus be subject to absorption inside the clouds. This scenario is routinely invoked when Ly{alpha} EWs higher than what is expected theoretically are observed, although the ideal conditions under which the results are derived usually are not considered. Here we systematically examine the relevant physical parameters in this idealized framework, testing whether any astrophysically realistic scenarios may lead to such an effect. It is found that although clumpiness indeed facilitates the escape of Ly{alpha}, it is highly unlikely that any real interstellar media should result in a preferential escape of Ly{alpha} over continuum radiation. Other possible causes are discussed, and it is concluded that the observed high EWs are more likely to be caused by cooling radiation from cold accretion and/or anisotropic escape of the Ly{alpha} radiation.

  6. B physics: measurement of partial widths and search for direct cp violation in d0 meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-04

    We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K{sup -}K{sup +} and {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays of D{sup 0} mesons produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV. We use a sample of 2 x 10{sup 5} D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} (and charge conjugate) decays with the D{sup 0} decaying to K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}K{sup +}, and {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, corresponding to 123 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant direct CP violation is observed. We measure {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0992 {+-} 0.0011 {+-} 0.0012, {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.03594 {+-} 0.00054 {+-} 0.00040, A{sub CP} (K{sup -}K{sup +}) = (2.0 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.6)%, and A{sub CP} ({pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (1.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.6) %, where, in all cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  7. Measurement of the leptonic decay width of J/ψ using initial state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    Using a data set of 2.93 fb-1 taken at a center-of-mass energy of √{ s} = 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we measure the process e+e- → J / ψγ →μ+μ- γ and determine the product of the branching fraction and the electronic width Bμμ ṡΓee = (333.4 ±2.5stat ±4.4sys) eV. Using the earlier-published BESIII result for Bμμ = (5.973 ±0.007stat ±0.037sys)%, we derive the J / ψ electronic width Γee = (5.58 ±0.05stat ±0.08sys) keV.

  8. Identification of an {alpha}-decaying (9{sup -}) isomer in {sup 216}Fr

    SciTech Connect

    Kurcewicz, J.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kurcewicz, W.; Kurpeta, J.; Lewandowski, S.; Majorkiewicz, P.; Plochocki, A.; Wojtasiewicz, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Kasztelan, M.; Kisielinski, M.; Penttilae, H.; Roussiere, B.; Steczkiewicz, O.

    2007-11-15

    The {alpha} decay of the trans-lead isotopes {sup 212}At, {sup 216}Fr, and {sup 220}Ac was investigated by using mass-separated sources and analog as well as digital signal processing. By measuring {alpha}-{alpha} time correlations evidence was obtained for the occurrence of an {alpha}-decaying (9{sup -}) isomer in {sup 216}Fr. The {alpha}-decay energy and half-life amount to 9000(5) keV and 850(30) ns, respectively. The excitation energy of the isomer is compared with shell-model predictions for the high-spin members of the {pi}(h{sub 9/2}){nu}(g{sub 9/2}) multiplet, and the relevance of the new data concerning the search for reflection asymmetry is presented.

  9. New evaluation of the alpha and gamma emission intensities in the decay of (244)Cm.

    PubMed

    Badikov, Sergey A; Chechev, Valery P

    2016-03-01

    A method for self-consistent evaluation of the absolute emission probabilities for particles and photons accompanying radionuclide decays was applied to the evaluation of the (244)Cm alpha decay data. The absolute emission probabilities evaluated by the method meet the accurate balance relationships. The self-consistency of the results was reached through an iterative scheme of calculations, using the DDEP recommended probabilities for alpha transitions to the five (240)Pu highly excited levels as an initial approximation.

  10. Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A.; Mavrodiev, S. Cht.

    2010-05-04

    Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schredinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

  11. Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Proton and Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A.; Mavrodiev, S. Cht.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schroedinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

  12. Measurements of Charmless B Decays Related to alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; /INFN, Milan

    2009-12-09

    We report recent measurements of the CKM angle {alpha} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. In addition to improved constraints on {alpha} from the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup 0}, we also present preliminary results of neutral and charged B meson decays to K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi} and its impact on the estimate for the CKM angle {alpha} based on time-dependent analysis of CP-violating asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}} {pi}{sup {-+}}. Moreover we report the first observation of the decay B {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}a{sub 1}(1260){sup {-+}}; this mode can be used, in principle, to provide an independent measurement of {alpha}.

  13. Alpha Backgrounds for HPGe Detectors in Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. A.; Burritt, T. H.; Elliott, S. R.; Gehman, V. M.; Guiseppe, V.E.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Majorana Experiment will use arrays of enriched HPGe detectors to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Such a decay, if found, would show lepton-number violation and confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Searches for such rare events are hindered by obscuring backgrounds which must be understood and mitigated as much as possible. A potentially important background contribution to this and other double-beta decay experiments could come from decays of alpha-emitting isotopes in the 232Th and 238U decay chains on or near the surfaces of the detectors. An alpha particle emitted external to an HPGe crystal can lose energy before entering the active region of the detector, either in some external-bulk material or within the dead region of the crystal. The measured energy of the event will only correspond to a partial amount of the total kinetic energy of the alpha and might obscure the signal from neutrinoless double-beta decay. A test stand was built and measurements were performed to quantitatively assess this background. We present results from these measurements and compare them to simulations using Geant4. These results are then used to measure the alpha backgrounds in an underground detector in situ. We also make estimates of surface contamination tolerances for double-beta decay experiments using solid-state detectors.

  14. Recent {alpha} decay half-lives and analytic expression predictions including superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, G.

    2008-03-15

    New recent experimental {alpha} decay half-lives have been compared with the results obtained from previously proposed formulas depending only on the mass and charge numbers of the {alpha} emitter and the Q{sub {alpha}} value. For the heaviest nuclei they are also compared with calculations using the Density-Dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective interaction and the Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski (VSS) formulas. The correct agreement allows us to make predictions for the {alpha} decay half-lives of other still unknown superheavy nuclei from these analytic formulas using the extrapolated Q{sub {alpha}} of G. Audi, A. H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault [Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003)].

  15. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of the 230U decay series.

    PubMed

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Suliman, G; Stroh, H; Apostolidis, C; Abbas, K; Morgenstern, A

    2012-09-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed on the (230)U decay series. A (230)U source was prepared on a stainless steel disc by electrodeposition in an ammonium nitrate solution. Spectrometry of the alpha-particle energy spectrum was performed with ion-implanted planar silicon detectors in vacuum. A set of alpha emission probabilities is presented for (230)U and (226)Th. The measured peak intensities were corrected mathematically for coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons emitted in the same decay. A good agreement with literature data was observed. The uncertainty budget and the correlation matrix are presented. The validity of the alpha-particle energies was tested and could be confirmed for most peaks within a few keV, but discrepancies were found for the 2nd peak of (226)Th and the main peak of (218)Rn.

  16. Measurement of the CP-violating phase Φs and the Bs0 meson decay width difference with Bs0 → J/ψΦ decays in ATLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-08-24

    Here, a measurement of the Bs0 decay parameters in the Bs0 → J/ψΦ channel using an integrated luminosity of 14.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector from 8 TeV pp collisions at the LHC is presented. The measured parameters include the CP -violating phase Φs, the decay width Γs and the width difference between the mass eigenstates ΔΓs.

  17. A QCD sum rule calculation of the X± (5568) → Bs0 π± decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J. M.; Khemchandani, K. P.; Martínez Torres, A.; Nielsen, M.; Zanetti, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    To understand the nature of the X (5568), recently observed in the mass spectrum of the Bs0 π± system by the D0 Collaboration, we have investigated, in a previous work, a scalar tetraquark (diquak-antidiquark) structure for it, within the two-point QCD sum rules method. We found that it is possible to obtain a stable value of the mass compatible with the D0 result, although a rigorous QCD sum rule constrained analysis led to a higher value of mass. As a continuation of our investigation, we calculate the width of the tetraquark state with same quark content as X (5568), to the channel Bs0 π±, using the three-point QCD sum rule. We obtain a value of (20.4 ± 8.7) MeV for the mass ∼ 5568 MeV, which is compatible with the experimental value of 21.9 ± 6.4 (sta)-2.5+5.0 (syst) MeV /c2. We find that the decay width to Bs0 π± does not alter much for a higher mass state.

  18. Improvement in the speed of alpha-decay track measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hidetaka; Nakazawa, Kazuma; Yoshida, Jyunya; Mishina, Akihiro; Kinbara, Shinji; Endo, Yoko; Itoh, Hiroki; Soe, Mintkyaw; Tantint, Kint; E07 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    For analysis of double- Λ hypernucleus in nuclear emulsion, it is necessary to know shrinkage factor and density of emulsion plate by measuring the track ranges of alpha particles. The kinetic energies of nuclear fragment from double- Λ hypernucleus are measured by their ranges in the emulsion, which is dedicated photographic emulsion for nuclear physics. Then we have to reconstruct their original ranges since the emulsion plate shrinks about half in thickness after development. Besides, we have to calibrate range-energy relation because the density depends on the emulsion content of moisture. Therefore we use alpha-rays with monochromatic energy as calibration sources which were emitted from natural Radioisotope such as Thorium series and Uranium series in the emulsion. Technique which performs alpha-tracks measurement by image processing is being studied. In the E07 experiment at J-PARC, quick analysis is required for about alpha tracks on about 100 double- Λ hypernuclear events within a few years. At present, we are developing automated range measurement technique instead of traditional manual measurement. Alpha tracks are seen as black, bold lines in micrographs. Image processing program detects such lines and the positions, angles, ranges of them in micrographs.

  19. {alpha} decay of the new isotope {sup 206}Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, K.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Cocks, J.F.; Enqvist, T.; Hurskanen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Trzaska, W.H.; Uusitalo, J.; Allatt, R.G.; Greenlees, P.T.; Page, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The new neutron-deficient nuclide {sup 206}Ac was produced by bombarding a {sup 175}Lu target with 5.5 MeV/nucleon {sup 36}Ar ions. The evaporation residues were separated in flight by a gas-filled separator and subsequently identified by the {alpha}-{alpha} position and time correlation method. {sup 206}Ac was found to have two {alpha} particle emitting isomeric levels with half-lives of (22{sub {minus}5}{sup +9}) ms and (33{sub {minus}9}{sup +22}) ms, and with {alpha} particle energies of (7790{plus_minus}30) keV and (7750{plus_minus}20) keV, respectively. The former isomer is tentatively assigned to a J{sup {pi}}=3{sup +} level and the latter to a J{sup {pi}}=10{sup {minus}} level, both of which are also seen in the daughter and granddaughter nuclides {sup 202}Fr and {sup 198}At. Improved values of (27{sub {minus}6}{sup +11}) ms and (7693{plus_minus}25) keV for the half-life and {alpha} particle energy of {sup 207}Ac are also reported. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. {alpha}-decay hindrance factors: A probe of mean-field wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Karlgren, D.; Liotta, R.J.; Wyss, R.; Huyse, M.; Vel, K. van de; Duppen, P. van

    2006-06-15

    A simple model to calculate {alpha}-decay hindrance factors (HF) with special emphasis on the shape coexistence in the Pb-Po region is presented. Using deformation values obtained from potential energy surface (PES) calculations as the only input, hindrance factors for the {alpha} decay of Rn and Po isotopes are calculated. The fair agreement between experimental and theoretical hindrance factors suggest that the wave function obtained from the energy minima of the PES calculations contains an important part of the correlations that play a role for the {alpha} decay. The model is applicable to shape coexistence in the Po and Pb region when minima are well defined. The calculated HF that emerge from these calculations render a different interpretation than the commonly assumed n-particle n-hole picture of the intruder states in the Pb region.

  1. Alpha-decay-induced fracturing in zircon - The transition from the crystalline to the metamict state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Murakami, Takashi; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1987-01-01

    Zonation due to alpha-decay damage in a natural single crystal of zircon from Sri Lanka is discussed. The zones vary in thickness on a scale from one to hundreds of microns. The uranium and thorium concentrations vary from zone to zone such that the alpha decay dose is between 0.2 x 10 to the 16th and 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha-events per milligram. The transition from the crystalline to the aperiodic metamict state occurs over this dose range. At doses greater than 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha events/mg there is no evidence for long-range order. This type of damage will accumulate in actinide-bearing, ceramic nuclear waste forms. The systematic pattern of fractures would occur in crystalline phases that are zoned with respect to actinide radionuclides.

  2. Alpha-decay-induced fracturing in zircon - The transition from the crystalline to the metamict state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Murakami, Takashi; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1987-06-01

    Zonation due to alpha-decay damage in a natural single crystal of zircon from Sri Lanka is discussed. The zones vary in thickness on a scale from one to hundreds of microns. The uranium and thorium concentrations vary from zone to zone such that the alpha decay dose is between 0.2 x 10 to the 16th and 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha-events per milligram. The transition from the crystalline to the aperiodic metamict state occurs over this dose range. At doses greater than 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha events/mg there is no evidence for long-range order. This type of damage will accumulate in actinide-bearing, ceramic nuclear waste forms. The systematic pattern of fractures would occur in crystalline phases that are zoned with respect to actinide radionuclides.

  3. Correlation between {alpha}-Decay Energies of Superheavy Nuclei Involving the Effects of Symmetry Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jianmin; Zuo Wei; Scheid, Werner

    2011-07-01

    A formula for the relationship between the {alpha}-decay energies (Q values) of superheavy nuclei (SHN) is presented, which is composed of the effects of Coulomb energy and symmetry energy. It can be employed not only to validate the experimental observations and measurements to a large extent, but also to predict the Q values of heaviest SHN with a high accuracy generally which will be very useful for future experiments. Furthermore, the shell closures in superheavy region and the effect of the symmetry energy on the stability of SHN against {alpha} decay are discussed with the help of this formula.

  4. Experimental detection of alpha-particles from the radioactive decay of natural bismuth.

    PubMed

    de Marcillac, Pierre; Coron, Noël; Dambier, Gérard; Leblanc, Jacques; Moalic, Jean-Pierre

    2003-04-24

    The only naturally occurring isotope of bismuth, 209Bi, is commonly regarded as the heaviest stable isotope. But like most other heavy nuclei abundant in nature and characterized by an exceptionally long lifetime, it is metastable with respect to alpha-decay. However, the decay usually evades observation because the nuclear structure of 209Bi gives rise to an extremely low decay probability and, moreover, generates low-energy alpha-particles difficult to detect. Indeed, dedicated experiments attempting to record the alpha-decay of 209Bi in nuclear emulsions failed. However, scintillating bolometers operated at temperatures below 100 mK offer improved detection efficiency and sensitivity, whereas a broad palette of targets could be available. Here we report the successful use of this method for the unambiguous detection of 209Bi alpha-decay in bismuth germanate detectors cooled to 20 mK. We measure an energy release of 3,137 +/- 1 (statistical) +/- 2 (systematic) keV and a half-life of (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(19) yr, which are in agreement with expected values.

  5. Abrupt changes in alpha-decay systematics as a manifestation of collective nuclear modes

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, C.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R. A.; Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.

    2010-06-15

    An abrupt change in alpha-decay systematics around the N=126 neutron shell closure is discussed. It is explained as a sudden hindrance of the clustering of the nucleons that eventually form the alpha particle. This is because the clustering induced by the pairing mode acting upon the four nucleons is inhibited if the configuration space does not allow a proper manifestation of the pairing collectivity.

  6. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. IV - Intensities of Lyman-alpha and Mg II in epsilon Pegasi and epsilon Eridani, and line width-luminosity correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Linsky, J. L.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrometer on the Copernicus satellite has been used to confirm the existence of a line width-luminosity relation for the Ly-alpha and Mg II 2800-A chromospheric emission lines in K-type stars by observation of a K2 dwarf (epsilon Eri) and a K2 supergiant (epsilon Peg). Combined with previously reported observations of lines in three K giants (alpha Boo, alpha Tau, and beta Gem), the data are consistent with an identical dependence of line width on absolute visual magnitude for the Ca II K, Ly-alpha, and Mg II 2795-A lines. Surface fluxes of Ly-alpha, Mg II 2800-A, and O V 1218-A (upper limit) for epsilon Eri, and of Mg II 2800-A for epsilon Peg are also compared with values reported previously for the three giant stars.

  7. Assembly of an alpha-gamma coincidence measuring device for checking alpha decay schemes.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; Caro Marroyo, B

    2012-09-01

    Two new chambers for measuring alpha-particle emissions have been made: a low-geometry chamber with a powerful magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, and an alpha-gamma coincidence chamber. Both devices incorporate a high-resolution Si detector, and the second chamber, a low-energy Ge detector as well. A dual parameter multichannel analyzer was used to register coincidences in the second device. Alpha-particle and gamma-ray detectors work simultaneously in both individual and dual modes, providing single and coincidence spectra. Some preliminary alpha-gamma coincidence spectra have been obtained.

  8. Alpha decay of 109I and its implications for the proton decay of 105Sb and the astrophysical rapid proton-capture process.

    PubMed

    Mazzocchi, C; Grzywacz, R; Liddick, S N; Rykaczewski, K P; Schatz, H; Batchelder, J C; Bingham, C R; Gross, C J; Hamilton, J H; Hwang, J K; Ilyushkin, S; Korgul, A; Królas, W; Li, K; Page, R D; Simpson, D; Winger, J A

    2007-05-25

    An alpha-decay branch of (1.4+/-0.4) x 10(-4) has been discovered in the decay of 109I, which predominantly decays via proton emission. The measured Q(alpha) value of 3918+/-21 keV allows the indirect determination of the Q value for proton emission from 105Sb of 356+/-22 keV, which is approximately of 130 keV more bound than previously reported. This result is relevant for the astrophysical rapid proton-capture process, which would terminate in the 105Sn(p,gamma)106Sb(p,gamma)107Te(alpha decay)103Sn cycle at the densities expected in explosive hydrogen burning scenarios, unless unusually strong pairing effects result in a 103Sn(p,gamma)104Sb(p,gamma)105Te(alpha decay)101Sn) cycle.

  9. {alpha}-decay studies of the exotic N=125, 126, and 127 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2007-08-15

    The {alpha}-decay half-lives of the exotic N=125, 126, and 127 isotones (Po, Rn, Ra, Th, and U) are systematically studied by the density-dependent cluster model (DDCM). The influence of the neutron shell closure N=126 on the {alpha}-cluster formation and penetration probabilities is analyzed and discussed in detail. By combining the DDCM and a two-level microscopic model together, the experimental half-lives of {alpha} transitions to both the ground state and the excited state in the daughter nuclei are reproduced very well.

  10. Measurement of alpha / phi_2 from B to pi pi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.J.

    2007-01-17

    The current results on B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays and SU(2) constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} or {phi}{sub 2} from the B-factories are summarized. Based on these measurements, predictions of the isospin analysis constraints at the end of the lifetime of both B-factories are given.

  11. {alpha} decay studies of very neutron-deficient francium and radium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Leino, M.; Enqvist, T.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Keenan, A.; Kettunen, H.; Koivisto, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Scholey, C.; Eskola, K.

    2005-02-01

    Very neutron-deficient francium and radium isotopes have been produced in fusion evaporation reactions using {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu ions on {sup 141}Pr targets and {sup 36}Ar ions on {sup 170}Yb targets. The gas-filled recoil separator RITU was employed to collect the fusion products and to separate them from the scattered beam. The activities were implanted into a position-sensitive silicon detector after passing through a gas-counter system. The isotopes were identified using spatial and time correlations between the implants and decays. Two new {alpha} decaying radium isotopes, {sup 201}Ra and {sup 202}Ra, were identified. The {alpha} decay energy and half-life of {sup 203}Ra were measured with improved precision. The {alpha} decay properties measured for the francium isotopes {sup 201}Fr,{sup 202}Fr,{sup 203}Fr, and {sup 204}Fr were confirmed, in many cases with improved precision. For the first time, a ({pi}s{sub 1/2}{sup -1})1/2{sup +} proton intruder state was identified in francium isotopes, namely in {sup 201}Fr and tentatively in {sup 203}Fr. The measured decay properties for the neutron-deficient odd-mass Fr isotopes suggest an onset of substantial deformation at N=112.

  12. Plutonium-238 alpha-decay damage study of the ceramic waste form.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S M; Barber, T L; Cummings, D G; DiSanto, T; Esh, D W; Giglio, J J; Goff, K M; Johnson, S G; Kennedy, J R; Jue, J-F; Noy, M; O'Holleran, T P; Sinkler, W

    2006-03-27

    An accelerated alpha-decay damage study of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form has recently been completed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical and chemical durability of the waste form after significant exposure to alpha decay. This accelerated alpha-decay study was performed by doping the ceramic waste form with {sup 238}Pu which has a much greater specific activity than {sup 239}Pu that is normally present in the waste form. The alpha-decay dose at the end of the four year study was approximately 1 x 10{sup 18} alpha-decays/gram of material. An equivalent time period for a similar dose of {sup 239}Pu would require approximately 1100 years. After four years of exposure to {sup 238}Pu alpha decay, the investigation observed little change to the physical or chemical durability of the ceramic waste form (CWF). Specifically, the {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF maintained it's physical integrity, namely that the density remained constant and no cracking or phase de-bonding was observed. The materials chemical durability and phase stability also did not change significantly over the duration of the study. The only significant measured change was an increase of the unit-cell lattice parameters of the plutonium oxide and sodalite phases of the material and an increase in the release of salt components and plutonium of the waste form during leaching tests, but, as mentioned, these did not lead to any overall loss of waste form durability. The principal findings from this study are: (1) {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF is similar in microstructure and phase composition to referenced waste form. (2) Pu was observed primarily as oxide comprised of aggregates of nano crystals with aggregates ranging in size from submicron to twenty microns in diameter. (3) Pu phases were primarily found in the intergranular glassy regions. (4) PuO phase shows expected unit cell volume expansion due to alpha decay damage of approximately 0.7%, and the sodalite phase unit cell volume

  13. Alpha Decay Potential Barriers and Half-Lives and Analytical Formula Predictions for Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Guy; Zhang, Hongfei

    The α decay potential barriers are determined in the cluster-like shape path within a generalized liquid drop model including the proximity effects between the α particle and the daughter nucleus and adjusted to reproduce the experimental Qα. The α emission half-lives are determined within the WKB penetration probability. Calculations using previously proposed formulae depending only on the mass and charge of the alpha emitter and Qα are also compared with new experimental alpha-decay half-lives. The agreement allows to provide predictions for the α decay half-lives of other still unknown superheavy nuclei using the Qα determined from the 2003 atomic mass evaluation of Audi, Wapstra and Thibault.

  14. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days.

  15. Angular correlation measurements for 4-{alpha} decaying states in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    Previous measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 8}Be){sup 16}O{sup *}(4 {alpha}) reaction identified discrete levels in {sup 16}O which decay by breakup into 4 {alpha} particles through a number of different decay sequences, including {sup 16}O{sup *} {yields} {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C (O{sub 2}{sup +}). These states are observed in a range of excitation energies where resonances are observed in inelastic {alpha} + {sup 12}C scattering leading to the {sup 8}Be + {sup 8}Be and {alpha} + {sup 12}C final states. These resonances were associated with 4 {alpha}-particle chain configurations in {sup 16}O. Should the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction possess this same extended structure, it would serve as an important piece of evidence supporting the idea that even more deformed structures are formed in the {sup 24}Mg compound system. In order to more firmly make this association, it is important to determine the spins of the states populated in the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction.

  16. Direct bound on the total decay width of the top quark in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-01-30

    We present the first direct experimental bound on the total decay width of the top quark, Gamma(t), using 955 pb(-1) of the Tevatron's pp collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We identify 253 top-antitop pair candidate events. The distribution of reconstructed top quark mass from these events is fitted to templates representing different values of the top quark width. Using a confidence interval based on likelihood-ratio ordering, we extract an upper limit at 95% C.L. of Gamma(t)<13.1 GeV for an assumed top quark mass of 175 GeV/c(2).

  17. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jun-jie

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, ΓW, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb-1 data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, MT, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < MT < 200 GeV. The result if ΓW = 2.011 ± 0.093(stat) ± 0.107(syst) GeV.

  18. Measurement of the product of the leptonic width of the J/ψ meson and the branching ratio for its decay to hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kharlamova, T. A.; Collaboration: KEDR Collaboration

    2015-05-15

    A preliminary result of the KEDR/VEPP-4M experiment devoted to measuring the cross section for electron-positron annihilation to hadrons (e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons) in the energy region of J/ψ-resonance production is presented. The value found for the product of the J/ψ-meson width with respect to decay to electrons and the branching ratio for J/ψ-meson decay to hadrons is Γ{sub ee}B{sub h} = 4.67±0.04(stat.)± 0.22(syst.) keV.

  19. {alpha}-decay spectroscopy of the new isotope {sup 192}At

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Antalic, S.; Streicher, B.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Muenzenberg, G.; Franchoo, S.; Hessberger, F.P.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Sulignano, B.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Lesher, S.R.; Duppen, P. van; Nishio, K.; Page, R.D.

    2006-02-15

    Decay properties of the new neutron-deficient nuclide {sup 192}At have been studied in the complete fusion reaction {sup 144}Sm({sup 51}V,3n){sup 192}At at the velocity filter SHIP. Two isomeric states with half-lives of 88(6) ms and 11.5(6) ms, respectively, and with complex {alpha}-decay schemes were identified in {sup 192}At. The decay pattern of one of the isomers suggests that it is based on the oblate-deformed {pi}2f{sub 7/2}x{nu}1i{sub 13/2} configuration, which confirms the expected onset of deformation in the At isotopes by approaching the neutron midshell at N=104.

  20. Theoretical and experimental {alpha} decay half-lives of the heaviest odd-Z elements and general predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. F.; Royer, G.

    2007-10-15

    Theoretical {alpha} decay half-lives of the heaviest odd-Z nuclei are calculated using the experimental Q{sub {alpha}} value. The barriers in the quasimolecular shape path are determined within a Generalized Liquid Drop Model (GLDM) and the WKB approximation is used. The results are compared with calculations using the Density-Dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective interaction and the Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski (VSS) formulas. The calculations provide consistent estimates for the half-lives of the {alpha} decay chains of these superheavy elements. The experimental data stand between the GLDM calculations and VSS ones in the most time. Predictions are provided for the {alpha} decay half-lives of other superheavy nuclei within the GLDM and VSS approaches using the recent extrapolated Q{sub {alpha}} of Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault [Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003)], which may be used for future experimental assignment and identification.

  1. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. PMID:27161512

  2. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  3. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕ s and the B s 0 meson decay width difference with B s 0 → J/ ψϕ decays in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Mori, D.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morton, A.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-01

    A measurement of the B s 0 decay parameters in the B s 0 → J/ ψϕ channel using an integrated luminosity of 14.3 fb-1 collected by the ATLAS detector from 8 TeV pp collisions at the LHC is presented. The measured parameters include the CP -violating phase ϕ s , the decay width Γ s and the width difference between the mass eigenstates ΔΓ s . The values measured for the physical parameters are statistically combined with those from 4.9 fb-1 of 7 TeV data, leading to the following: {φ}_s=-0.090± 0.078(stat.)± 0.041(syst.)rad Δ {Γ}_s=0.085± 0.011(stat.)± 0.007(syst.){ps}^{-1} {Γ}_s=0.675± 0.003(stat.)± 0.003(syst.){ps}^{-1}.

  4. Anisotropic alpha decay from oriented odd-mass isotopes of some light actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, T. )

    1994-11-01

    Half-lives and anisotropies in the [alpha] decay of [sup 205,207,209]Rn, [sup 219]Rn, [sup 221]Fr, [sup 227,229]Pa, and [sup 229]U have been calculated using the reaction-theoretical formalism proposed by Jackson and Rhoades-Brown and adapted for axially symmetric deformed nuclei by Berggren and Olanders. The possibility of octupole deformation has been taken into account. In addition, a variant of triaxial octupole deformation has been considered tentatively in the case of [sup 227]Pa and [sup 229]Pa.

  5. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-01

    A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  6. alpha-decay half-lives of superheavy elements with the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) nucleon effective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dida; Ma Zhongyu; Chen Baoqiu; Shen Shuifa

    2010-04-15

    The nucleon effective interaction is calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach, which has been illustrated to reproduce well the ground-state properties and the experimental data of proton and alpha particle scattering off nuclei. The nuclear potential of the alpha-nucleus is obtained by doubly folding the nucleon effective interaction with respect to the density distributions of both the alpha particle and daughter nucleus. We apply this new nuclear potential of the alpha-nucleus to investigate the alpha-decay half-lives of superheavy elements in the preformed cluster model along with the experimental decay energies Q{sub exp}. Good agreement with the experimental data is achieved. We also systematically calculate the alpha-decay half-lives for 19 isotope chains (Z=102-120) in this framework using the theoretical alpha-decay energies Q{sub th} extracted from the Moeller-Nix-Kratz mass table. The predicted results are compared with those obtained by using the same Q{sub th} but the nuclear potentials evaluated with M3Y effective interaction and also with the results calculated in the empirical formulas of the Viola-Seaberg-Sobiczewski formula.

  7. Measurement of partial widths and search for direct CP violation in D0 meson decays to K-K+ and pi-pi+.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'agnello, S; Dell'orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; Ncnulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-04-01

    We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K-K+ and pi(-)pi(+) decays of D0 mesons produced in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. We use a sample of 2x10(5) D(*+)-->D0pi(+) (and charge conjugate) decays with the D0 decaying to K-pi(+), K-K+, and pi(-)pi(+), corresponding to 123 pb(-1) of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant direct CP violation is observed. We measure Gamma(D0-->K-K+)/Gamma(D0-->K-pi(+))=0.0992+/-0.0011+/-0.0012, Gamma(D0-->pi(-)pi(+))/Gamma(D0-->K-pi(+))=0.035 94+/-0.000 54+/-0.000 40, A(CP)(K-K+)=(2.0+/-1.2+/-0.6)%, and A(CP)(pi(-)pi(+))=(1.0+/-1.3+/-0.6)%, where, in all cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  8. Experimental aspects of the adiabatic approach in estimating the effect of electron screening on alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-12-15

    Special features of the effect of the electron shell on alpha decay that have important experimental implications are studied within the adiabatic approach. The magnitude of the effect is about several tenths of a percent or smaller, depending on the transition energy and on the atomic number. A dominant role of inner shells is shown: more than 80% of the effect is saturated by 1s electrons. This circumstance plays a crucial role for experiments, making it possible to measure this small effect by a difference method in the same storage rings via a comparison of, for example, decay probabilities in bare nuclei and heliumlike ions. The reasons behind the relative success and the applicability limits of the frozen-shell model, which has been used to calculate the effect in question for more than half a century, are analyzed. An interesting experiment aimed at studying charged alpha-particle states is proposed. This experiment will furnish unique information for testing our ideas of the interplay of nonadiabatic and adiabatic processes.

  9. Effects of alpha beam on the parametric decay of a parallel propagating circularly polarized Alfven wave: Hybrid simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Tao, Xin; Hao, Yufei; Wang, Shui

    2013-09-15

    Alfven waves with a finite amplitude are found to be unstable to a parametric decay in low beta plasmas. In this paper, the parametric decay of a circularly polarized Alfven wave in a proton-electron-alpha plasma system is investigated with one-dimensional (1-D) hybrid simulations. In cases without alpha particles, with the increase of the wave number of the pump Alfven wave, the growth rate of the decay instability increases and the saturation amplitude of the density fluctuations slightly decrease. However, when alpha particles with a sufficiently large bulk velocity along the ambient magnetic field are included, at a definite range of the wave numbers of the pump wave, both the growth rate and the saturation amplitude of the parametric decay become much smaller and the parametric decay is heavily suppressed. At these wave numbers, the resonant condition between the alpha particles and the daughter Alfven waves is satisfied, therefore, their resonant interactions might play an important role in the suppression of the parametric decay instability.

  10. Swelling induced by alpha decay in monazite and zirconolite ceramics: A XRD and TEM comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschanels, X.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A. M.; Magnin, V.; Mesbah, A.; Tribet, M.; Moloney, M. P.; Serruys, Y.; Peuget, S.

    2014-05-01

    Zirconolite and monazite matrices are potential ceramics for the containment of actinides (Np, Cm, Am, Pu) which are produced over the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides decay mainly through the emission of alpha particles, which in turn causes most ceramics to undergo structural and textural changes (amorphization and/or swelling). In order to study the effects of alpha decays on the above mentioned ceramics two parallel approaches were set up. The first involved the use of an external irradiation source, Au, which allowed the deposited recoil energy to be simulated. The second was based on short-lived actinide doping with 238Pu, (i.e. an internal source), via the incorporation of plutonium oxide into both the monazite and zirconolite structures during synthesis. In both types of irradiation experiments, the zirconolite samples became amorphous at room temperature with damage close to 0.3 dpa; corresponding to a critical dose of 4 × 1018 α g-1 (i.e. ∼1.3 × 1021 keV cm-3). Both zirconolite samples also showed the same degree of macroscopic swelling at saturation (∼6%), with ballistic processes being the predominant damaging effect. In the case of the monazite however, the macroscopic swelling and amorphization were dependent on the nature of the irradiation. Externally, (Au), irradiated samples became amorphous while also demonstrating a saturation swelling of up to 8%. In contrast to this, the swelling of the 238Pu doped samples was much smaller at ∼1%. Also, unlike the externally (Au) irradiated monazite these 238Pu doped samples remained crystalline up to 7.5 × 1018 α g-1 (0.8 dpa). XRD, TEM and swelling measurements were used to fully characterize and interpret this behavior. The low swelling and the conservation of the crystalline state of 238Pu doped monazite samples indicates that alpha annealing took place within this material.

  11. Constraints on the CKM Angle alpha in the B to rho rho Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.

    2004-11-03

    Using a data sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at SLAC, we measure the time-dependent-asymmetry parameters of the longitudinally polarized component in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} decay as C{sub L} = -0.23 {+-} 0.24(stat) {+-} 0.14(syst) and S{sub L} = -0.19 {+-} 0.33(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst). The B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0} decay mode is also searched for in a data sample of about 227 million B{bar B} pairs. No significant signal is observed, and an upper limit of 1.1 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.) on the branching fraction is set. The penguin contribution to the CKM angle {alpha} uncertainty is measured to be 11{sup o}. All results are preliminary.

  12. Measurements of the half-life of 246Cm and the alpha-decay emission probabilities of 246Cm and 250Cf.

    PubMed

    Kondev, F G; Ahmad, I; Greene, J P; Kellett, M A; Nichols, A L

    2007-03-01

    The alpha-decay half-life of Cm246 has been measured to be T(1/2)=4706 (40)yr by means of the alpha-counting of ingrowth activity following the decay of a mass separated source of the Cf250 parent nuclide. The alpha-decay emission probabilities of Cm246 and Cf250 have also been determined with high precision and have been compared with results from previous measurements. A new alpha-decay branch of Cm246 to the 4(+) level of the ground-state band of the Pu242 daughter nucleus has been identified and characterized.

  13. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  14. A systematic calculation of alpha decay half-lives using a new approach for barrier penetration probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; El-Depsy, A.; Mohamedien, O. A.

    2016-08-01

    A systematic calculation of alpha decay half-lives of 347 nuclei is considered in the framework of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation using two formulas. A recently proposed barrier penetration formula, with some modified parameters, is used first. Second, a new analytic barrier penetration formula is derived by taking into account the centrifugal potential. A good agreement with experimental data is achieved especially for spherical nuclei. The new formula reproduces experimental alpha decay half-lives with a satisfying accuracy especially for penetration energies much lower than the Coulomb barrier.

  15. Alpha decay of [sup 216]At and the level structure of [sup 212]Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.F.; Paris, P. ); Sheline, R.K. )

    1994-04-01

    The level structure of [sup 212]Bi has been studied by observing the alpha decay of [sup 216]At which is in secular equilibrium with [sup 220]Fr and [sup 224]Ac. Eight states are observed and tentatively assigned to the configuration [pi][ital h][sub 9/2][nu]([ital g][sub 9/2])[sup 3] and three to the configuration [pi][ital h][sub 9/2][nu]([ital g][sub 9/2])[sup 2][ital i][sub 11/2]. These two lowest configurations in [sup 212]Bi are compared with the corresponding configurations in [sup 210]Bi and the calculations of Warburton.

  16. Structural dynamics of the alpha-neurotoxin-acetylcholine-binding protein complex: hydrodynamic and fluorescence anisotropy decay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, Ryan E; Johnson, David A; Shi, Jianxin; Hansen, Scott B; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-20

    The three-fingered alpha-neurotoxins have played a pivotal role in elucidating the structure and function of the muscle-type and neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To advance our understanding of the alpha-neurotoxin-nAChR interaction, we examined the flexibility of alpha-neurotoxin bound to the acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP), which shares structural similarity and sequence identities with the extracellular domain of nAChRs. Because the crystal structure of five alpha-cobratoxin molecules bound to AChBP shows the toxins projecting radially like propeller "blades" from the perimeter of the donut-shaped AChBP, the toxin molecules should increase the frictional resistance and thereby alter the hydrodynamic properties of the complex. alpha-Bungarotoxin binding had little effect on the frictional coefficients of AChBP measured by analytical ultracentrifugation, suggesting that the bound toxins are flexible. To support this conclusion, we measured the anisotropy decay of four site-specifically labeled alpha-cobratoxins (conjugated at positions Lys(23), Lys(35), Lys(49), and Lys(69)) bound to AChBP and free in solution and compared their anisotropy decay properties with fluorescently labeled cysteine mutants of AChBP. The results indicated that the core of the toxin molecule is relatively flexible when bound to AChBP. When hydrodynamic and anisotropy decay analyses are taken together, they establish that only one face of the second loop of the alpha-neurotoxin is immobilized significantly by its binding. The results indicate that bound alpha-neurotoxin is not rigidly oriented on the surface of AChBP but rather exhibits segmental motion by virtue of flexibility in its fingerlike structure.

  17. Human alpha2-globin nonsense-mediated mRNA decay induced by a novel alpha-thalassaemia frameshift mutation at codon 22.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco J C; do Céu Silva, Maria; Picanço, Isabel; Seixas, Maria T; Ferrão, Anabela; Faustino, Paula; Romão, Luísa

    2006-04-01

    We describe a novel alpha-thalassaemia determinant in a 3-year-old girl presenting a mild microcytic and hypochromic anaemia, and normal haemoglobin A2 level. Molecular studies revealed heterozygosity for a novel microdeletion (-C) at codon 22 of the alpha2-globin gene. As the frameshift mutation generates a premature translation termination codon at position 48/49, we investigated the effect of the nonsense codon on the alpha2-globin gene expression. Although it does not affect RNA splicing, the premature nonsense codon induces accelerated mRNA degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first time the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay has been reported to occur in human alpha-globin mRNA.

  18. Phenyl-alpha-tert-butyl nitrone reverses mitochondrial decay in acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Popov, Vsevolod L; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s) of mitochondrial functional decline in acute Chagas' disease. Our data show a substantial decline in respiratory complex activities (39 to 58%) and ATP (38%) content in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected murine hearts compared with normal controls. These metabolic alterations were associated with an approximately fivefold increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production rate, substantial oxidative insult of mitochondrial membranes and respiratory complex subunits, and >60% inhibition of mtDNA-encoded transcripts for respiratory complex subunits in infected myocardium. The antioxidant phenyl-alpha-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) arrested the oxidative damage-mediated loss in mitochondrial membrane integrity, preserved redox potential-coupled mitochondrial gene expression, and improved respiratory complex activities (47 to 95% increase) and cardiac ATP level (>or=40% increase) in infected myocardium. Importantly, PBN resulted twofold decline in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production rate in infected myocardium. Taken together, our data demonstrate the pathological significance of oxidative stress in metabolic decay and energy homeostasis in acute chagasic myocarditis and further suggest that oxidative injuries affecting mitochondrial integrity-dependent expression and activity of the respiratory complexes initiate a feedback cycle of electron transport chain inefficiency, increased reactive oxygen species production, and energy homeostasis in acute chagasic hearts. PBN and other mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may be useful in altering mitochondrial decay and oxidative pathology in Chagas' disease.

  19. The relation between cross section, decay width and imaginary potential of heavy quarkonium in a quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Miguel Angel

    2013-08-01

    Computations with weakly-coupled plasmas and some lattice results suggest that the heavy quarkonium potential has an imaginary part that is important in order to study dissociation. This imaginary part is due to the scattering with partons in the medium in a process called quasi-free dissociation. At temperatures much below dissociation another process that is known to be important is the gluo-dissociation. The aim of this work is to clarify in a perturbative framework the relation of the different expressions for the quarkonium cross sections that can be found in the literature with the quarkonium thermal width. Finally, with the use of effective field theories we evaluate the quasi-free and gluo-dissociation cross sections in a wide range of temperatures ranging from the binding energy to the dissociation temperature. The work presented here is based on [N. Brambilla, M. A. Escobedo, J. Ghiglieri and A. Vairo, preprint number TUM-EFT 27/11, in preparation].

  20. Randall-Sundrum corrections to the width difference and CP-violating phase in B{sub s}{sup 0}-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Goertz, Florian; Pfoh, Torsten

    2011-11-01

    We study the impact of the Randall-Sundrum setup on the width difference {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} and the CP-violating phase {phi}{sub s} in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-B{sub s}{sup 0} system. Our calculations are performed in the general framework of an effective theory, based on operator product expansion. The results can thus be used for many new-physics models. We find that the correction to the magnitude of the decay amplitude {Gamma}{sub 12}{sup s} is below 4% for a realistic choice of input parameters. The main modification in the {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}/{beta}{sub s}-plane is caused by a new CP-violating phase in the mixing amplitude, which allows for a better agreement with the experimental results of the CDF and D0 Collaborations from B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} decays. The best-fit value of the CP asymmetry S{sub {psi}{phi}} can be reproduced, while simultaneously the theoretical prediction for the semileptonic CP asymmetry A{sub SL}{sup s} can enter the 1{sigma} range.

  1. Three-body decay of many-body resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, A.S.; Fedorov, D.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Garrido, E.

    2005-10-14

    We use the hyperspherical coordinates to describe decay of many-body resonances. Direct and sequential decay are described by different paths in the distances between the particles. We generalize the WKB expression for the {alpha}-decay width to decay of three charged particles. Decay mechanisms and resonance structures are computed in coordinate space. The energy distributions of the particles after decay are discussed. Moderate s-wave scattering lengths prefer decay via corresponding virtual state possibly leaving unique fingerprints of this reminiscence of the Efimov effect in the decay of excited states. Numerical illustrations are resonances in 6He, 12C, 17Ne.

  2. A systematic study of proton, alpha and cluster decays in Rhenium isotopes using the effective liquid drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Deepthy Maria; Ashok, Nithu; Joseph, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Employing the effective liquid drop model (ELDM), half-lives of proton and alpha decays and probable cluster decays are computed and analyzed for different proton-rich and neutron-rich isotopes of Rhenium. The investigation fortifies the phenomenon of cluster radioactivity (CR) in rare earth nuclei and also affirms the pivotal role played by neutron magicity in cluster decays. ELDM data is compared with that of universal decay law (UDL) model and found to be more efficient than the latter one. Apparently, cluster emissions slacken as the neutron number of daughter nucleus goes up and the linear nature of Geiger-Nuttall (G-N) plots stays unaltered even if the surface potential is incorporated.

  3. Improved Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle alpha using B0(B) --> rho+rho- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kazuhito, S; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-07-22

    We present results from an analysis of B(0)B(0)--> rho(+)rho(-) using 232 x 10(6) Gamma (4S) --> BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. We measure the longitudinal polarization fraction f(L) = 0.978 +/- 0.014(stat) + 0.021 / -0.029(syst) and the CP-violating parameters S(L)= -0.33 +/- 0.24(stat) + 0.08 / -0.14(syst) and C(L)= -0.03 +/- 0.18(stat) +/- 0.09(syst). Using an isospin analysis of B --> rhorho decays, we determine the unitarity triangle parameter alpha. The solution compatible with the standard model is alpha = (100 +/- 13) degrees.

  4. Measurement of the CKM Angle Alpha at the BABAR Detector Using B Meson Decays to Rho Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, Attila; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-16

    This thesis contains the results of an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. From a fitted signal yield of 617 {+-} 52 events, the longitudinal polarizations fraction, f{sub L}, of the decay is measured to be 0.978 {+-} 0.014(stat){sub -0.029}{sup +0.021}(syst). The nearly fully longitudinal dominance of the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} decay allows for a measurement of the time dependent CP parameters S{sub L} and C{sub L}, where the first parameter is sensitive to mixing induced CP violation and the second one to direct CP violation. From the same signal yield, these values are found to be S{sub L} = -0.33 {+-} 0.24(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.08}(syst) and C{sub L} = - 0.03 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). The CKM angle {alpha} is then determined, using these results and the branching fractions and polarizations of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0}. This measurement is done with an isospin analysis, in which a triangle is constructed from the isospin amplitudes of these three decay modes. A {chi}{sup 2} expression that includes the measured quantities expressed as the lengths of the sides of the isospin triangles is constructed and minimized to determine a confidence level on {alpha}. Selecting the solution compatible with the Standard Model, one obtains {alpha} = 100{sup o} {+-} 13{sup o}.

  5. Temperature dependence of decay time and intensity of alpha pulses in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Martinez, P.; Alekna, V.P.

    1962-01-01

    The intensity and decay time of Po210 ?? particle scintillations produced in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide have been measured with a fast electronic system as a function of temperature down to 77??K. Three modes of decay due to alpha excitation have been observed for CsI(Tl), and two for CsI. Other than the 7- and 0.55-??sec modes (at room temperature) reported in the literature for CsI(Tl), an additional temperature-independent mode of about 1.3 ??sec has been detected between 77 and 150??K. In CsI a fast temperature-dependent mode of decay (???100 nsec) was observed between 100-200??K in addition to the known principal mode. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  6. Mitochondrial decay in the brains of old rats: ameliorating effect of alpha-lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiangang; Gao, Feng; Tong, Liqi; Cotman, Carl W; Ames, Bruce N; Liu, Jiankang

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the mitochondrial decay and oxidative damage resulting from aging, the activities/kinetics of the mitochondrial complexes were examined in the brains of young and old rats as well as in old rats fed R-alpha-lipoic acid plus acetyl-L-carnitine (LA/ALC). The brain mitochondria of old rats, compared with young rats, had significantly decreased endogenous antioxidants and superoxide dismutase activity; more oxidative damage to lipids and proteins; and decreased activities of complex I, IV and V. Complex I showed a decrease in binding affinity (increase in K(m)) for substrates. Feeding LA/ALC to old rats partially restored age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction to the levels of the young rats. These results indicate that oxidative mitochondrial decay plays an important role in brain aging and that a combination of nutrients targeting mitochondria, such as LA/ALC, could ameliorate mitochondrial decay through preventing mitochondrial oxidative damage.

  7. A constitutive decay element promotes tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA degradation via an AU-rich element-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Stoecklin, Georg; Lu, Min; Rattenbacher, Bernd; Moroni, Christoph

    2003-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) expression is regulated by transcriptional as well as posttranscriptional mechanisms, the latter including the control of mRNA decay through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Using two mutant cell lines deficient for ARE-mediated mRNA decay, we provide evidence for a second element, the constitutive decay element (CDE), which is also located in the 3' UTR of TNF-alpha. In stably transfected RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the CDE continues to target a reporter transcript for rapid decay, whereas ARE-mediated decay is blocked. Similarly, the activation of p38 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits ARE-mediated but not CDE-mediated mRNA decay. The CDE was mapped to an 80-nucleotide (nt) segment downstream of the ARE, and point mutation analysis identified within the CDE a conserved sequence of 15 nt that is required for decay activity. We propose that the CDE represses TNF-alpha expression by maintaining the mRNA short-lived, thereby preventing excessive induction of TNF-alpha after LPS stimulation. Thus, CDE-mediated mRNA decay is likely to be an important mechanism limiting LPS-induced pathologic processes.

  8. Novel Manifestation of {alpha}-Clustering Structures: New '{alpha}+{sup 208}Pb' States in {sup 212}Po Revealed by Their Enhanced E1 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Astier, A.; Porquet, M.-G.; Petkov, P.; Delion, D. S.; Schuck, P.

    2010-01-29

    Excited states in {sup 212}Po were populated by {alpha} transfer using the {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O,{sup 14}C) reaction, and their deexcitation {gamma} rays were studied with the Euroball array. Several levels were found to decay by a unique E1 transition (E{sub {gamma}}<1 MeV) populating the yrast state with the same spin value. Their lifetimes were measured by the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The values, found in the range 0.1-1.4 ps, lead to very enhanced transitions, B(E1)=2x10{sup -2}-1x10{sup -3} W.u. These results are discussed in terms of an {alpha}-cluster structure which gives rise to states with non-natural-parity values, provided that the composite system cannot rotate collectively, as expected in the '{alpha}+{sup 208}Pb' case. Such states due to the oscillatory motion of the {alpha}-core distance are observed for the first time.

  9. Decay properties of charm and beauty open flavour mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Rai, Ajay; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2007-10-03

    The masses of S and P states, pseudoscalar and vector decay constants, leptonic, semileptonic decay widths of charm (D) and beauty (B) open flavour mesons have been computed in the framework of Coulomb and power potential of the form V(r) = -({alpha}{sub c}/r)+Ar{sup v}. The results are compared with other theoretical as well as experimental results.

  10. Exponential Decay of Correlations for Nonuniformly Hyperbolic Flows with a ${{C(1+alpha}}) $ C 1 + α Stable Foliation, Including the Classical Lorenz Attractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Vitor; Melbourne, Ian

    2016-11-01

    We prove exponential decay of correlations for a class of $C^{1+\\alpha}$ uniformly hyperbolic skew product flows, subject to a uniform nonintegrability condition. In particular, this establishes exponential decay of correlations for an open set of geometric Lorenz attractors. As a special case, we show that the classical Lorenz attractor is robustly exponentially mixing.

  11. Precise Determination of the Intensity of 226Ra Alpha Decay to the 186 keV Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. LaMont; R.J. Gehrke; S.E. Glover; R.H. Filby

    2001-04-01

    There is a significant discrepancy in the reported values for the emission probability of the 186 keV gamma-ray resulting from the alpha decay of 226 Ra to 186 keV excited state of 222 Rn. Published values fall in the range of 3.28 to 3.59 gamma-rays per 100 alpha-decays. An interesting observation is that the lower value, 3.28, is based on measuring the 186 keV gamma-ray intensity relative to the 226 Ra alpha-branch to the 186 keV level. The higher values, which are close to 3.59, are based on measuring the gamma-ray intensity from mass standards of 226 Ra that are traceable to the mass standards prepared by HÓNIGSCHMID in the early 1930''s. This discrepancy was resolved in this work by carefully measuring the 226 Ra alpha-branch intensities, then applying the theoretical E2 multipolarity internal conversion coefficient of 0.692±0.007 to calculate the 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability. The measured value for the alpha branch to the 186 keV excited state was (6.16±0.03)%, which gives a 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability of (3.64±0.04)%. This value is in excellent agreement with the most recently reported 186 keV gamma-ray emission probabilities determined using 226 Ra mass standards.

  12. {alpha} decay of nuclei in the range 67{<=}Z{<=}91 from the ground state and isomeric state

    SciTech Connect

    Santhosh, K. P.; Joseph, Jayesh George; Sahadevan, Sabina

    2010-12-15

    The Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) is used to study the favored and unfavored {alpha} decay of nuclei in the range 67{<=}Z{<=}91 from both the ground state (g.s.) and isomeric state (i.s.). The computed half-lives are in good agreement with experimental data. The standard deviation of half-life is found to be 0.44. Geiger-Nuttall (GN) plots for various parent isotopes are studied. It is found that all four types of transitions (g.s.{yields}g.s., g.s.{yields}i.s., i.s.{yields}g.s., i.s.{yields}i.s.) lie on a straight line. The isomeric state {alpha} decay shows a behavior similar to that of the ground state and the nuclear structure of the isomeric states imitates that of the ground states. Some predictions are done for {alpha} transition from both ground and isomeric states, which will be useful for future experiments.

  13. Expected accuracy in a measurement of the CKM angle alpha using a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 ---> rho pi decays in the BTeV project

    SciTech Connect

    Shestermanov, K.E.; Vasiliev, A.N; Butler, J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Kasper, P.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Kutschke, R.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Minaev, N.G.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the angle {alpha} in the CKM triangle is very important for a complete test of Standard Model. A theoretically clean method to extract {alpha} is provided by B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} decays. Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the BTeV reconstruction efficiency and to estimate the signal to background ratio for these decays were performed. Finally the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis, using the isospin amplitude formalism for tre and penguin contributions, was carried out. It was shown that in one year of data taking BTeV could achieve an accuracy on {alpha} better than 5{sup o}.

  14. The effect of alpha-tocopherol on the oxidation and free radical decay in irradiated UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Rowell, Shannon L; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2006-11-01

    We developed a radiation cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) stabilized with alpha-tocopherol (Vitamin E) as a bearing material in total joint replacements. The stabilizing effect of alpha-tocopherol on free radical reactions in UHMWPE is not well understood. We investigated the effect of alpha-tocopherol on the oxidation and transformation of residual free radicals during real-time aging of alpha-tocopherol-doped, irradiated UHMWPE (alphaTPE) and irradiated UHMWPE (control). Samples were aged at 22 degrees C (room temperature) in air, at 40 degrees C in air and at 40 degrees C in water for 7 months. During the first month, alphaTPE showed some oxidation at the surface, which stayed constant thereafter. Control exhibited substantial oxidation in the subsurface region, which increased with time. The alkyl/allyl free radicals transformed to oxygen centered ones in both materials; this transformation occurred faster in alpha-TPE. In summary, the real-time oxidation behavior of alpha-TPE was consistent with that observed using accelerated aging methods. This new UHMWPE is oxidation resistant and is expected to maintain its properties in the long term.

  15. {alpha}-decay of the new isotope {sup 187}Po: Probing prolate structures beyond the neutron mid-shell at N = 104

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Antalic, S.

    2006-04-15

    The new neutron-deficient isotope {sup 187}Po has been identified in the complete fusion reaction {sup 46}Ti+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 187}Po+3n at the velocity filter SHIP. Striking features of the {sup 187}Po {alpha} decay are the strongly-hindered decay to the spherical ground state and unhindered decay to a surprisingly low-lying deformed excited state at 286 keV in the daughter nucleus {sup 183}Pb. Based on the potential energy surface calculations, the {sup 187}Po ground state and the 286 keV excited state in {sup 183}Pb were interpreted as being of prolate origin. The systematic deviation of the {alpha}-decay properties in the lightest odd-A Po isotopes relative to the smooth behavior in the even-A neighbors is discussed. Improved data for the decay of {sup 187}Bi{sup m,g} were also obtained.

  16. A small segment of the MAT alpha 1 transcript promotes mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a stimulatory role for rare codons.

    PubMed Central

    Caponigro, G; Muhlrad, D; Parker, R

    1993-01-01

    Differences in decay rates of eukaryotic transcripts can be determined by discrete sequence elements within mRNAs. Through the analysis of chimeric transcripts and internal deletions, we have identified a 65-nucleotide segment of the MAT alpha 1 mRNA coding region, termed the MAT alpha 1 instability element, that is sufficient to confer instability to a stable PGK1 reporter transcript and that accelerates turnover of the unstable MAT alpha 1 mRNA. This 65-nucleotide element is composed of two parts, one located within the 5' 33 nucleotides and the second located in the 3' 32 nucleotides. The first part, which can be functionally replaced by sequences containing rare codons, is unable to promote rapid decay by itself but can enhance the action of the 3' 32 nucleotides (positions 234 to 266 in the MAT alpha 1 mRNA) in accelerating turnover. A second portion of the MAT alpha 1 mRNA (nucleotides 265 to 290) is also sufficient to destabilize the PGK1 reporter transcript when positioned 3' of rare codons, suggesting that the 3' half of the MAT alpha 1 instability element is functionally reiterated within the MAT alpha 1 mRNA. The observation that rare codons are part of the 65-nucleotide MAT alpha 1 instability element suggests possible mechanisms through which translation and mRNA decay may be linked. Images PMID:8355674

  17. Alpha Decay Preformation Factors for Even-Even 280-316116 Superheavy Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaif, Norah A. M.; Radiman, Shahidan; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Ahmed, Saad M. Saleh

    2016-06-01

    The success of the cluster formation model (CFM) in deriving an energy-dependent formula for the preformation factors of heavy nuclei has motivated us to expand this approach to the superheavy isotopes (SHI). In this paper, the alpha-cluster formation (preformation factor) behavior inside the parent nuclei of SHI with atomic number Z = 116 and neutron numbers 164 ≤ N ≤ 200 is determined using the alpha preformation formula contained within the CFM. The cluster formation energy of the alpha particles and the total energy of the parent nuclei are calculated on the basis of the various binding energies. Our results clearly show that the CFM remains valid for superheavy nuclei (SHN). In addition, our calculations reveal that the alpha clustering mechanism and formation probability in 280-316116 even-even SHI are similar to those of even-even heavy nuclei in a general sense.

  18. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; de Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Jain, Sa.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Nam, S. K.; Butanov, K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Traczyk, P.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Yuldashev, B. S.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Benhabib, L.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. T.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a W+W- pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 fb-1 at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalised to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Search for Higgs boson off-shell production in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV and derivation of constraints on its total decay width

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; et al

    2016-09-09

    A search is presented for the Higgs boson off-shell production in gluon fusion and vector boson fusion processes with the Higgs boson decaying into a WW pair and the W bosons decaying leptonically. The data observed in this analysis are used to constrain the Higgs boson total decay width. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.4 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV, respectively. An observed (expected) upper limit on the off-shell Higgs boson event yield normalisedmore » to the standard model prediction of 2.4 (6.2) is obtained at the 95% CL for the gluon fusion process and of 19.3 (34.4) for the vector boson fusion process. Observed and expected limits on the total width of 26 and 66 MeV are found, respectively, at the 95% confidence level (CL). These limits are combined with the previous result in the ZZ channel leading to observed and expected 95% CL upper limits on the width of 13 and 26 MeV, respectively.« less

  20. Description of alpha decay and cluster radioactivity in the dinuclear system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklin, S. N.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    A unified description of cluster radioactivity and α-decay of cold nuclei in the dinuclear system model is proposed. Quantum dynamical fluctuations along the charge (mass) asymmetry coordinate determine the spectroscopic factor, and tunneling along the relative distance coordinate determines the penetrability of the barrier of the nucleus-nucleus interaction potential. A new method for calculating the spectroscopic factor is proposed. The hindrance factors for the orbital angular momentum transfer are studied. A potential reason for the half-life to deviate from the Geiger-Nuttall law in α-decays of neutron-deficient nuclei 194, 196Rn is found. The fine structure of α-decays of U and Th isotopes is predicted and characterized. The model is used to describe α-decays from the rotational band of even-even nuclei. The known half-lives in the regions of "lead" and "tin" radioactivities are reproduced well, and the most probable cluster yields are predicted. The cluster decay of excited nuclei is discussed. The relation of cluster radioactivity to spontaneous fission and highly deformed nuclear states is analyzed.

  1. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 240Pu.

    PubMed

    Sibbens, G; Pommé, S; Altzitzoglou, T; García-Toraño, E; Janssen, H; Dersch, R; Ott, O; Sánchez, A Martín; Montero, M P Rubio; Loidl, M; Coron, N; de Marcillac, P; Semkow, T M

    2010-01-01

    Sources of enriched (240)Pu were prepared by vacuum evaporation on quartz substrates. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of (240)Pu was performed with high statistical accuracy using silicon detectors and with low statistical accuracy using a bolometer. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of six transitions were derived from the spectra and compared with literature values. Additionally, some alpha-particle emission probabilities were derived from gamma-ray intensity measurements with a high-purity germanium detector. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of the three main transitions at 5168.1, 5123.6 and 5021.2 keV were derived from seven aggregate spectra analysed with five different fit functions and the results were compatible with evaluated data. Two additional weak peaks at 4863.5 and 4492.0 keV were fitted separately, using the exponential of a polynomial function to represent the underlying tailing of the larger peaks. The peak at 4655 keV could not be detected by alpha-particle spectrometry, while gamma-ray spectrometry confirms that its intensity is much lower than expected from literature.

  2. Regulated alpha-globin mRNA decay is a cytoplasmic event proceeding through 3'-to-5' exosome-dependent decapping.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy D; Wang, Zuoren; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2002-12-01

    The alpha-globin mRNA contains a C-rich stability element (CRE) in its 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) which is critical for the stability of this long-lived mRNA. A protein complex, termed the alpha-complex, forms on the CRE and has been shown to contribute to stabilization of the mRNA by at least two mechanisms, first by interacting with the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) to prevent deadenylation, and second by protecting the mRNA from attack by an erythroid endoribonuclease. In this report, we demonstrate that the alpha-globin 3' UTR can confer stability on a heterologous mRNA in cells, and this stability is dependent on the alpha-complex. Moreover, the stability was exclusively detected with cytoplasmic mRNA, suggesting that the regulation of alpha-globin mRNA stability is a cytoplasmic event. An additional mechanism by which the alpha-complex can confer stability on an RNA in vitro was also identified and shown to involve inhibition of 3' to 5' exonucleolytic degradation. Furthermore, using an in vitro mRNA decay system, we were able to follow the demise of the alpha-globin RNA and demonstrate that the decay was initiated by deadenylation followed by 3'-to-5' decay carried out by the exosome and ultimately hydrolysis of the residual cap structure.

  3. Comparison of alpha decay with fission for isotopes of superheavy nuclei Z = 124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the α-decay properties of superheavy nuclei (SHN) Z = 124 in the range 282 ≤ A ≤ 333 using the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The calculated α half-lives agree with the values computed using the Viola-Seaborg systematic, the universal curve of Poenaru et al. [Phys. Rev. C 83 (2011) 014601; 85 (2012) 034615] and the analytical formulas of Royer [J. Phys. G, Nucl. Part. Phys. 26 (2000) 1149]. To identify the mode of decay of these isotopes, the spontaneous-fission half-lives were also evaluated using the semiempirical relation given by Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. C 78 (2008) 044329]. The calculated half-lives help to predict the possible isotopes of this superheavy element Z = 124. As we could observe α chain consistently from the nuclei 288-312124, we have predicted that these nuclei could not be synthesized and detected experimentally via α decay as their decay half-lives are too small. The nuclei 313-318124 were found to have long half-lives and hence could be sufficient to detect them if synthesized in a laboratory.

  4. Isomers in three doubly odd Fr-At-Bi. alpha. -decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Huyse, M.; Decrock, P.; Dendooven, P.; Reusen, G.; Van Duppen, P.; Wauters, J. )

    1992-10-01

    The {sup 206}Fr{r arrow}{sup 202}At{r arrow}{sup 198}Bi, {sup 204}Fr{r arrow}{sup 200}At{r arrow}{sup 196}Bi, and {sup 202}Fr{r arrow}{sup 198}At{r arrow}{sup 194}Bi {ital a}-decay chains have been studied by standard spectroscopic techniques using an on-line isotope separator. All the studied doubly odd isotopes have at least two isomers, which decay by a combination of the following decay modes: {ital a} emission, {beta}{sup +}/EC (electron capture) decay, and internal transition (IT). The internal transition, a highly retarded {ital E}3, is the {ital j}-forbidden transition between the ({pi}{ital h}{sub 9/2}{direct product}{nu}{ital i}{sub 13/2}){sub 10}{sup {minus}} and the ({pi}{ital h}{sub 9/2}{direct product}{nu}{ital f}{sub 5/2}){sub 7}{sup +} states. The {ital B}({ital E}3) values of these IT's together with their energy behavior as a function of the neutron and proton number, compared to the energy difference between the 13/2{sup +}({nu}{ital i}{sub 13/2}) and 5/2{sup {minus}}({nu}{ital f}{sub 5/2}) states in the odd-mass Pb isotones, indicate that these proton-neutron-coupled states have a rather pure shell-model character.

  5. A Ly{alpha} EMITTER WITH AN EXTREMELY LARGE REST-FRAME EQUIVALENT WIDTH OF {approx}900 A AT z = 6.5: A CANDIDATE POPULATION III-DOMINATED GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Hayashi, Masao; Iye, Masanori; Nagao, Tohru; Ota, Kazuaki; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Egami, Eiichi; Jiang, Linhua; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew A.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Shioya, Yasuhiro

    2012-12-20

    We have identified a very interesting Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE), whose Ly{alpha} emission line has an extremely large observed equivalent width of EW{sub 0} = 436{sup +422}{sub -{sub 149}} A, which corresponds to an extraordinarily large intrinsic rest-frame equivalent width of EW{sup int}{sub 0} = 872{sup +844}{sub -{sub 298}} A after the average intergalactic absorption correction. The object was spectroscopically confirmed to be a real LAE by its apparent asymmetric Ly{alpha} line profile detected at z = 6.538. The continuum emission of the object was definitely detected in our deep z'-band image; thus, its EW{sub 0} was reliably determined. Follow-up deep near-infrared spectroscopy revealed emission lines of neither He II {lambda}1640 as an apparent signature of Population III (Pop III) nor C IV {lambda}1549 as proof of an active nucleus. No detection of the short-lived He II {lambda}1640 line is not necessarily inconsistent with the interpretation that the underlying stellar population of the object is dominated by Pop III. We found that the observed extremely large EW{sub 0} of the Ly{alpha} emission and the upper limit on the EW{sub 0} of the He II {lambda}1640 emission can be explained by population synthesis models favoring a very young age less than 2-4 Myr and massive metal-poor (Z < 10{sup -5}) or even metal-free stars. The observed large EW{sub 0} of Ly{alpha} is insufficiently explained by Population I/II synthesis models with Z {>=} 10{sup -3}. However, we cannot conclusively rule out the possibility that this object is composed of a normal stellar population with a clumpy dust distribution, which could enhance the Ly{alpha} EW{sub 0}, though its significance is still unclear.

  6. Fluorescence Quenching of Alpha-Fetoprotein by Gold Nanoparticles: Effect of Dielectric Shell on Non-Radiative Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Wang, A.-Qing; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching spectrometry was applied to study the interactions between gold colloidal nanoparticles and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Experimental results show that the gold nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed AFP effectively. Furthermore, the intensity of fluorescence emission peak decreases monotonously with the increasing gold nanoparticles content. A mechanism based on surface plasmon resonance-induced non-radiative decay was investigated to illuminate the effect of a dielectric shell on the fluorescence quenching ability of gold nanoparticles. The calculation results show that the increasing dielectric shell thickness may improve the monochromaticity of fluorescence quenching. However, high energy transfer efficiency can be obtained within a wide wavelength band by coating a thinner dielectric shell.

  7. Fluorescence Quenching of Alpha-Fetoprotein by Gold Nanoparticles: Effect of Dielectric Shell on Non-Radiative Decay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Wang, A-Qing; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2010-06-15

    Fluorescence quenching spectrometry was applied to study the interactions between gold colloidal nanoparticles and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Experimental results show that the gold nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed AFP effectively. Furthermore, the intensity of fluorescence emission peak decreases monotonously with the increasing gold nanoparticles content. A mechanism based on surface plasmon resonance-induced non-radiative decay was investigated to illuminate the effect of a dielectric shell on the fluorescence quenching ability of gold nanoparticles. The calculation results show that the increasing dielectric shell thickness may improve the monochromaticity of fluorescence quenching. However, high energy transfer efficiency can be obtained within a wide wavelength band by coating a thinner dielectric shell.

  8. Can a variable alpha induce limit cycle behavior and exponential luminosity decay in transient soft x ray sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirellesfilho, C.; Liang, Edison P.

    1994-01-01

    There has been, recently, a revival of the stability problem of accretion disks. Much of this renewed interest is due to recent observational data on transient soft X-ray novae, which are low-mass X-ray binaries. It is widely believed that nonsteady mass transfer from the secondary onto the compact primary, through an accretion disk, is the reason for the observed spectacular events in the form of often repetitive outbursts, with recurrence times ranging from 1 to 60 yr and duration time on the scale of months. Though not having reached yet a consensus about the nature of the mechanism that regulates the mass transfer, the disk thermal instability model seems to be favored by the fact that the rise in the hard X-ray luminosity is prior to the rise in the soft X-ray luminosity, while the mass transfer instability model seems to be hindered by the fact that the luminosity during quiescence is unable to trigger the thermal instability. However, it should be stressed that, remarkably, the X-ray light curves of these X-ray novae all show overall exponential decays, a feature quite difficult to reproduce in the framework of the viscous disk model, which yields powerlike luminosity decay. Taking into account this observational constraint, we have studied the temporal evolution of perturbations in the accretion rate, under the assumption that alpha is radial and parameter dependent. The chosen dependence is such that the model can reproduce limit cycle behavior (the system is locally unstable but globally stable). However, the kind of dependence we are looking for in alpha does not allow us to use the usual Shakura and Sunyaev procedure in the sense that we no longer can obtain a linearized continuity equation without explicit dependence on the accretion rate. This is so because now we cannot eliminate the accretion rate by using the angular momentum conservation equation.

  9. Color-singlet J/{psi} production at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 6}) in {Upsilon} decay

    SciTech Connect

    He Zhiguo; Wang Jianxiong

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the conflict between the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay, we consider the {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order color-singlet (CS) contributions of processes {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gggg. Both the branching ratio and the J/{psi} momentum spectrum are calculated, and the branching ratio (4.7x10{sup -4}) is larger than the leading-order contribution ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}, {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+ccg). Together with the QCD and QED leading-order contributions considered in our previous work, the CS prediction of the branching ratio for the direct J/{psi} production is Br({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}{sub direct}+X)=0.90{sub -0.31}{sup +0.49}x10{sup -4}, which is still about 3.8 times less than the CLEO measurement. We also obtain a preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc}=(B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) and find that the value 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} is much larger than the color-octet prediction, and suggest to measure this quality in future experimental analysis.

  10. Many-particle decays of {alpha}-chain structures in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.

    1993-12-31

    We have searched for evidence of exotic cluster configurations in {sup 24}Mg resembling a linear chain of {alpha} particles in various many-particle final states of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C system, including {sup 1}C(O{sub 2}{sup +})+{sup 12}C(O{sub 2}{sup +}) and {sup 8}Be+{sup 16}O*(4a). Such configurations are predicted to occur by a number of different theoretical models of the structure of {sup 24}Mg. An array of highly segmented Double-Sided Silicon Strip Detectors permits detailed, high resolution reconstruction of these many-charged-particle final states.

  11. Scalar correlator at [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4), Higgs boson decay into bottom quarks, and bounds on the light-quark masses.

    PubMed

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2006-01-13

    We compute, for the first time, the absorptive part of the massless correlator of two quark scalar currents in five loops. As physical applications, we consider the [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4) corrections to the decay rate of the standard model Higgs boson into quarks, as well as the constraints on the strange quark mass following from QCD sum rules.

  12. Predictions on the alpha decay half lives of superheavy nuclei with Z = 113 in the range 255 ≤ A ≤ 314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Augustine, A.; Nithya, C.; Priyanka, B.

    2016-07-01

    An intense study of the alpha decay properties of the isotopes on superheavy element with Z = 113 has been performed within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) within the wide range 255 ≤ A ≤ 314. The predicted alpha decay half lives of 278113 and 282113 and the alpha half lives of their decay products are in good agreement with the experimental data. 6α chains and 4α chains predicted respectively for 278113 and 282113 are in agreement with the experimental observation. Our study shows that the isotopes in the mass range 278 ≤ A ≤ 286 will survive fission and can be synthesized and detected in the laboratory via alpha decay. In our study, we have predicted 6α chains from 279113, 4α chains from 286113, 3α chains from 280,281,283113, 2α chains from 284113 and 1α chain from 285113. We hope that these predictions will be a guideline for future experimental investigations.

  13. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  14. Extended systematics of alpha decay half lives for exotic superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, A. I.; Budaca, R.; Silisteanu, I.

    2016-07-01

    The experimentally available data on the α decay half lives and Qα values for 96 superheavy nuclei are used to fix the parameters for a modified version of the Brown empirical formula through two fitting procedures which enables its comparison with similar fits using Viola-Seaborg and Royer formulas. The new expressions provide very good agreement with experimental data having fewer or the same number of parameters. All formulas with the obtained parameters are then extrapolated to generate half lives predictions for 125 unknown superheavy α emitters. The nuclei where the employed empirical formulas maximally or minimally diverge are pointed out and a selection of 36 nuclei with exceptional superposition of predictions was made for experimental reference.

  15. Chemical and physical consequences of. cap alpha. and. beta. /sup -/ decay in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.P.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Ensor, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Interesting chemical and structural phenomena can occur when radioactive materials are stored in the solid state. Extensive studies have been made of both the chemical and physical status of progeny species that result from the ..cap alpha.. or ..beta.. /sup -/ day of actinide ions in several different compounds. The samples have been both initially pure actinide compounds - halides, oxides, etc. and actinides incorporated into other non-radioactive host materials, for example lanthanide halides. In general, the oxidation state of the actinide progeny is controlled by the oxidation state of its parent (a result of heredity). The structure of the progeny compound seems to be controlled by its host (a result of environment). These conclusions are drawn from solid state absorption spectral studies, and where possible, from x-ray diffraction studies of multi-microgram sized samples. 13 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  16. {alpha}-decay and fusion phenomena in heavy ion collisions using nucleon-nucleon interactions derived from relativistic mean-field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, BirBikram; Sahu, B. B.; Patra, S. K.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleus-nucleus potentials are determined in the framework of the double-folding model for a new microscopic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction relativistic mean field-3-Yukawa (R3Y) derived from the popular relativistic mean-field theory Lagrangian, and the results are compared for the use of Michigan-3-Yukawa (M3Y) effective NN interactions. The double-folding potentials so obtained are further taken up in the context of the preformed cluster model (PCM) of Gupta and collaborators and the barrier penetration model to study respectively the ground-state (g.s.) {alpha}-decay and low-energy fusion reactions. In this paper, using PCM, we deduce empirically the {alpha} preformation probability P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)} from experimental data on a few g.s. {alpha} decays in the trans-lead region. For fusion reactions, two projectile-target systems {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb are selected for calculating the barrier energies as well positions, fusion cross sections ({sigma}{sub fus}), and fusion barrier distribution [D(E{sub c.m.})]. The barrier energies and positions change for the R3Y NN interactions in comparison with those of the M3Y NN interactions. We find that in the {alpha}-decay studies the values of P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)}(R3Y) are similar to those of P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)}(M3Y). Further, both NN interactions give similar {sigma}{sub fus} values using the Wong formula specifically when the R3Y NN interaction calculated {sigma}{sub fus} values are reduced by 1.5 times, and the results are in agreement with the experimental data for both the systems, especially for the higher energies. Results for D(E{sub c.m.}) are also quite similar for both choices of NN interaction.

  17. Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs and the decay width difference ΔΓs using the Bs0 → J / ψ ϕ (1020) decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Radi, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Jarvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhardwaj, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sudhakar, K.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Maron, G.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Michelotto, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Barducci, D.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Thomas, L.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-06-01

    The CP-violating weak phase ϕs of the Bs0 meson and the decay width difference ΔΓs of the Bs0 light and heavy mass eigenstates are measured with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data sample of Bs0 → J / ψ ϕ (1020) →μ+μ-K+K- decays. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 collected in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. A total of 49 200 reconstructed Bs0 decays are used to extract the values of ϕs and ΔΓs by performing a time-dependent and flavour-tagged angular analysis of the μ+μ-K+K- final state. The weak phase is measured to be ϕs = - 0.075 ± 0.097 (stat) ± 0.031 (syst) rad, and the decay width difference is ΔΓs = 0.095 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst) ps-1.

  18. Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs and the decay width difference ΔΓs using the Bs0 → J / ψ ϕ (1020) decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Radi, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Jarvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhardwaj, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sudhakar, K.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Maron, G.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Michelotto, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Barducci, D.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Thomas, L.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-06-01

    The CP-violating weak phase ϕs of the Bs0 meson and the decay width difference ΔΓs of the Bs0 light and heavy mass eigenstates are measured with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data sample of Bs0 → J / ψ ϕ (1020) →μ+μ-K+K- decays. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 collected in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. A total of 49 200 reconstructed Bs0 decays are used to extract the values of ϕs and ΔΓs by performing a time-dependent and flavour-tagged angular analysis of the μ+μ-K+K- final state. The weak phase is measured to be ϕs = - 0.075 ± 0.097 (stat) ± 0.031 (syst) rad, and the decay width difference is ΔΓs = 0.095 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst) ps-1.

  19. Energy levels of {sup 249}Bk populated in the {alpha} decay of {sub 99}{sup 253}Es and {beta}{sup -} decay of {sub 96}{sup 249}Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F.G.; Moore, E.F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chasman, R.R.; Greene, J.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Hoff, R.W.; Evans, J.E.; Lougheed, R.W.; Porter, C.E.; Felker, L.K.

    2005-05-01

    The level structure of {sup 249}Bk has been investigated by measuring the {gamma}-ray spectra of an extremely pure {sup 253}Es sample obtained by milking this nuclide from {sup 253}Cf source material produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Additional information on the {sup 249}Bk levels was obtained from the {beta}{sup -}-decay study of {sup 249}Cm, produced by neutron irradiation of {sup 248}Cm. Using the results of the present study together with the data from previous {sup 248}Cm({alpha},t) and {sup 248}Cm({sup 3}He,d) reactions, the following single-particle states have been identified in {sup 249}Bk: 7/2{sup +}[633], 0.0 keV; 3/2{sup -}[521], 8.78 keV; 1/2{sup +}[400], 377.55 keV; 5/2{sup +}[642], 389.17 keV; 1/2{sup -}[530], 569.20 keV; 1/2{sup -}[521], 643.0 keV; 5/2{sup -}[523], 672.9 keV; and 9/2{sup +}[624], 1075.1 keV. Four vibrational bands were identified at 767.9, 932.2, 1150.7, and 1223.0 keV with tentative assignments of {l_brace}7/2{sup +} [633] x1{sup -}{r_brace}9/2{sup -}, {l_brace}7/2{sup +} [633] x 0{sup -}{r_brace}7/2{sup -}, {l_brace}7/2{sup +} [633] x 1{sup -}{r_brace}5/2{sup -}, and {l_brace}7/2{sup +} [633] x 0{sup +}{r_brace}7/2{sup +}, respectively. A band at 899.9 keV was observed in {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence measurements and given a tentative spin assignment of 3/2. It is possibly associated with a 2{sup -} phonon coupled to the ground state, with configuration {l_brace}7/2{sup +} [633] x 2{sup -}{r_brace}3/2{sup -}. Three levels at 624.3, 703.5, and 769.1 keV were assigned spins of 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2, respectively. These could be the members of the 3/2{sup +} [651] band, expected in this energy region.

  20. Energy levels of {sup 251}Cf populated in the {alpha} decay of {sub 100}{sup 255}Fm and EC decay of {sub 99}{sup 251}Es

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J.P.; Moore, E.F.; Kondev, F.G.; Chasman, R.R.; Porter, C.E.; Felker, L.K.

    2005-11-01

    Gamma-ray singles spectra of extremely pure (chemically and isotopically) samples of {sup 255}Fm, with strengths of {approx}1 mCi, have been measured with a high-resolution 2-cm{sup 2}x10-mm germanium LEPS detector and with a 25% Ge spectrometer. Gamma rays with intensities as low as 1.0x10{sup -6}% per {sup 255}Fm {alpha} decay have been identified. The electron spectrum of a mass-separated {sup 251}Es source was measured with a cooled Si(Li) electron spectrometer. The spectrum provided the conversion coefficients of low-energy transitions in {sup 251}Cf and thereby their multipolarities. The present measurements confirm the previous assignments of single-particle states in {sup 251}Cf. These include 1/2{sup +}[620], 0.0 keV; 7/2{sup +}[613], 106.30 keV; 3/2{sup +}[622], 177.59 keV; 11/2{sup -}[725], 370.47 keV; 9/2{sup -}[734], 433.91 keV; 5/2{sup +}[622], 543.98 keV; 1/2{sup -}[750], 632.0 keV; 9/2{sup +}[615], 683 keV; and 9/2{sup +}[604], 974.0 keV. A vibrational band was identified in previous studies at 981.4 keV and given an assignment of {l_brace}7/2{sup +}[613]x2{sup -}{r_brace}3/2{sup -}. Three new vibrational bands are identified in the present work at 942.5, 1086.5, and 1250.0 keV with tentative assignments {l_brace}7/2{sup +}[613]x1{sup -}{r_brace}5/2{sup -},{l_brace}7/2{sup +}[613]x1{sup -}{r_brace}9/2{sup -}, and {l_brace}7/2{sup +}[613]x0{sup +}{r_brace}7/2{sup +}, respectively. A level was identified at 1185.5 keV with spin of 5/2 or 7/2 but it was not given any configuration assignment. Another level was identified at 1077.5 keV and given a spin of 9/2. Again, no configuration could be assigned to this level.

  1. First observation of {alpha} decay of {sup 190}Pt to the first excited level (E{sub exc}=137.2 keV) of {sup 186}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.; Danevich, F. A.; Nagorny, S. S.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Incicchitti, A.

    2011-03-15

    The {alpha} decays of naturally occurring platinum isotopes, which are accompanied by the emission of {gamma} quanta, have been searched for deep underground (3600 m water equivalent) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). A sample of Pt with a mass of 42.5 g and a natural isotopic composition has been measured with a low background HP Ge detector (468 cm{sup 3}) during 1815 h. The {alpha} decay of {sup 190}Pt to the first excited level of {sup 186}Os (J{sup {pi}}=2{sup +}, E{sub exc}=137.2 keV) has been observed for the first time, with the half-life determined as T{sub 1/2}=2.6{sub -0.3}{sup +0.4}(stat.){+-}0.6(syst.)x10{sup 14} yr. The T{sub 1/2} limits for the {alpha} decays of other Pt isotopes have been determined at the level of T{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}10{sup 16}-10{sup 20} yr. These limits have been set for the first time or they are better than those known from earlier experiments.

  2. Neutron one-quasiparticle states in {sup 251}Fm{sub 151} populated via the {alpha} decay of {sup 255}No

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Ishii, Y.; Toyoshima, A.; Ishii, T.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Haba, H.; Ichikawa, T.; Kojima, Y.; Sueki, K.

    2011-01-15

    Excited states in {sup 251}Fm populated via the {alpha} decay of {sup 255}No are studied in detail through {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence and {alpha} fine-structure measurements. Five excited states reported previously in {sup 251}Fm are firmly established through the {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence measurement, and rotational bands built on one-quasiparticle states are newly established through the {alpha} fine-structure measurement. Spin-parities and neutron configurations of the excited states in {sup 251}Fm as well as the ground state of {sup 255}No are definitely identified on the basis of deduced internal conversion coefficients, lifetimes of {gamma} transitions, rotational-band energies built on one-quasiparticle states, and hindrance factors of {alpha} transitions. It is found that the excitation energy of the 1/2{sup +}[620] state in N=151 isotones increases with the atomic number, especially at Z{>=}100, while that of the 1/2{sup +}[631] state decreases at Z=100. Ground-state deformations and energies of neutron one-quasiparticle states in the N=151 isotones are calculated using a macroscopic-microscopic model, and the energy systematics of the one-quasiparticle states in the isotones are discussed in terms of the evolution of nuclear deformation involving the hexadecapole ({beta}{sub 4}) and hexacontatetrapole ({beta}{sub 6}) deformations.

  3. Feasibility study on signal separation for spontaneous alpha decay in LaBr3: Ce scintillator by signal peak-to-charge discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, R; Ishikawa, M

    2015-08-01

    A novel analysis method named peak-to-charge ratio (V(p)/Q(total)) discrimination, aiming at background rejection especially for alpha decay self-activity in LaBr3: Ce scintillators has been developed. This method is based on a waveform analysis using the peak-to-charge ratio in the output waveform of a photomultiplier tube. The discrimination of alpha-induced events was achieved by using a threshold function based on the error propagation of the V(p)/Q(total) value. The accidental rejection ratio of gamma-induced events was evaluated to be 0.17%. Furthermore, a total absorption peak spectrum processed with the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method for (68)Ga 1.883 MeV gamma rays, where the energy was overlapped with background alpha events, reproduced exactly the same result as that of the background subtraction method. The difference in measured peak counts of both methods was 0.716%, and the statistical error in the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method and background subtraction was 4.81% and 8.70%, respectively. Thus a higher-accuracy measurement could be achieved using the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method. The present study demonstrates that the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method is a promising method for background rejection of the spontaneous alpha decay in LaBr3:Ce scintillators. PMID:26329234

  4. Feasibility study on signal separation for spontaneous alpha decay in LaBr3: Ce scintillator by signal peak-to-charge discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, R; Ishikawa, M

    2015-08-01

    A novel analysis method named peak-to-charge ratio (V(p)/Q(total)) discrimination, aiming at background rejection especially for alpha decay self-activity in LaBr3: Ce scintillators has been developed. This method is based on a waveform analysis using the peak-to-charge ratio in the output waveform of a photomultiplier tube. The discrimination of alpha-induced events was achieved by using a threshold function based on the error propagation of the V(p)/Q(total) value. The accidental rejection ratio of gamma-induced events was evaluated to be 0.17%. Furthermore, a total absorption peak spectrum processed with the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method for (68)Ga 1.883 MeV gamma rays, where the energy was overlapped with background alpha events, reproduced exactly the same result as that of the background subtraction method. The difference in measured peak counts of both methods was 0.716%, and the statistical error in the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method and background subtraction was 4.81% and 8.70%, respectively. Thus a higher-accuracy measurement could be achieved using the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method. The present study demonstrates that the V(p)/Q(total) discrimination method is a promising method for background rejection of the spontaneous alpha decay in LaBr3:Ce scintillators.

  5. Experimental Identification of Spin-Parities and Single-Particle Configurations in {sup 257}No and Its {alpha}-Decay Daughter {sup 253}Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Ichikawa, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Akiyama, K.; Sakama, M.; Ishii, T.; Osa, A.; Oura, Y.; Sueki, K.; Shibata, M.

    2005-09-02

    {alpha}-{gamma} and {alpha}-electron coincidence spectroscopy for a short-lived heavy actinide nucleus {sup 257}No (T{sub 1/2}=24.5 s) has been performed using a gas-jet transport system and an on-line isotope separator. Spin-parities of excited states in {sup 253}Fm fed by the {alpha} decay of {sup 257}No have been identified on the basis of the measured internal conversion coefficients. The {nu}3/2{sup +}[622] configuration has been assigned to the ground state of {sup 257}No as well as to the 124.1 keV level in {sup 253}Fm. It was found that the ground-state configuration of {sup 257}No is different from that of lighter N=155 isotones.

  6. Experimental identification of spin-parities and single-particle configurations in 257No and its alpha-decay daughter 253Fm.

    PubMed

    Asai, M; Tsukada, K; Sakama, M; Ichikawa, S; Ishii, T; Nagame, Y; Nishinaka, I; Akiyama, K; Osa, A; Oura, Y; Sueki, K; Shibata, M

    2005-09-01

    alpha-gamma and alpha-electron coincidence spectroscopy for a short-lived heavy actinide nucleus (257)No (T(1/2) = 24.5 s) has been performed using a gas-jet transport system and an on-line isotope separator. Spin-parities of excited states in (253)Fm fed by the alpha decay of (257)No have been identified on the basis of the measured internal conversion coefficients. The nu3/2(+)[622] configuration has been assigned to the ground state of (257)No as well as to the 124.1 keV level in (253)Fm. It was found that the ground-state configuration of (257)No is different from that of lighter N = 155 isotones.

  7. Competition between alpha-decay and spontaneous fission at isotopes of superheavy elements Rf, Db, and Sg

    SciTech Connect

    Anghel, Claudia Ioana; Silisteanu, Andrei Octavian

    2015-12-07

    The most important decay modes for heavy and superheavy nuclei are their α-decay and spontaneous fission. This work investigates the evolution and the competition of these decay modes in long isotopic sequences. The partial half-lives are given by minimal sets of parameters extracted from the fit of experimental data and theoretical results. A summary of the experimental and calculated α-decay and spontaneous fission half-lives of the isotopes of elements Rf, Db, and Sg is presented. Some half-life extrapolations for nuclides not yet known are also obtained.

  8. Fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 191g,m}Bi and {sup 193g,m}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kettunen, H.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Greenlees, P. T.; Helariutta, K.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Uusitalo, J.; Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van de Vel, K.; Van Duppen, P.; Eskola, K.

    1999-11-16

    Two new hindered {alpha} transitions are presented for {sup 191}Bi and {sup 193}Bi. The {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence method was used to search for these weak transitions. The new alpha particle energies for {sup 191}Bi are 6581(9) keV and 6343(5) keV and for {sup 193}Bi the energies are 6160(10) keV and 5860(15) keV.

  9. An experimental analysis of the contribution of 210Po and of 210Po produced by 210Pb decay to the gross alpha-particle activity of water samples.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Michael F; West, Lynn E

    2008-09-01

    The contribution of 210Po and of 210Po produced by 210Pb decay to the gross alpha-particle activity of water samples by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 900.0 is investigated as a function of residue mass and geometry and time between sample collection and analysis. It is shown that these factors can cause the contribution to gross alpha-particle activity of 210Po to be up to 2.0 and 1.1 times the initial 210Po activity for grab and quarterly composite samples, respectively, and can cause the contribution to gross alpha-particle activity of 210Po from 210Pb decay to be up to 1.1 times and 1.5 times the 210Pb activity for grab and quarterly composite samples, respectively. It is also shown qualitatively that at least for some residues, there is a loss of polonium due to volatilization when the sample is heated over a flame.

  10. Expected accuracy in a measurement of the CKM angle {alpha} using a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {rho}{pi} decays in the BTeV project

    SciTech Connect

    Shestermanov, K. E.; Vasiliev, A. N. Butler, J.; Derevshchikov, A. A.; Kasper, P.; Kiselev, V. V.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Kubota, Y.; Kutschke, R.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Minaev, N. G.; Mochalov, V. V.; Morozov, D. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Rovere, M.; Ryazantsev, A. V.; Semenov, P. A.; Stone, S.; Uzunian, A. V.; Yarba, J

    2007-06-15

    A precise measurement of the angle {alpha} in the CKM triangle is very important for a complete test of the Standard Model. A theoretically clean method to extract {alpha} is provided by B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {rho}{pi} decays. Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the BTeV reconstruction efficiency and to estimate the signal-to-background ratio for these decays were performed. Finally the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis, using the isospin amplitude formalism for tree and penguin contributions, was carried out. It was shown that, in one year of data taking, BTeV could achieve an accuracy on {alpha} better than 5{sup o}.

  11. Study of the decay B0(B- 0)-->rho+rho-, and constraints on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle alpha.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-12-01

    Using a data sample of 89 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC, we measure the B0(B (0))-->rho(+)rho(-) branching fraction as [30+/-4(stat)+/-5(syst)]x10(-6) and a longitudinal polarization fraction of f(L)=0.99+/-0.03(stat)+0.04-0.03(syst). We measure the time-dependent-asymmetry parameters of the longitudinally polarized component of this decay as C(L)=-0.17+/-0.27(stat)+/-0.14(syst) and S(L)=-0.42+/-0.42(stat)+/-0.14(syst). We exclude values of alpha between 19 degrees and 71 degrees (90% C.L.).

  12. Model-independent constraints on the weak phase {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}) and QCD penguin pollution in B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Zhizhong; Zhang He

    2005-03-01

    We present an algebraic isospin approach towards a more straightforward and model-independent determination of the weak phase {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}) and QCD penguin pollution in B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays. The world averages of current experimental data allow us to impose some useful constraints on the isospin parameters of B{yields}{pi}{pi} transitions. We find that the magnitude of {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}) extracted from the indirect CP violation in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode is in agreement with the standard-model expectation from other indirect measurements, but its fourfold discrete ambiguity has to be resolved in the near future.

  13. Messenger RNA transcripts of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha gene containing premature termination codons are subject to nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Harries, Lorna W; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1a) gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Approximately 30% of these mutations generate mRNA transcripts harboring premature termination codons (PTCs). Degradation of such transcripts by the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway has been reported for many genes. To determine whether PTC mutant transcripts of the HNF-1alpha gene elicit NMD, we have developed a novel quantitative RT-PCR assay. We performed quantification of ectopically expressed mutant transcripts relative to normal transcripts in lymphoblastoid cell lines using a coding single nucleotide polymorphism (cSNP) as a marker. The nonsense mutations R171X, I414G415ATCG-->CCA, and P291fsinsC showed reduced mutant mRNA expression to 40% (P = 0.009), <0.01% (P alpha PTC mutations may be subject to NMD. Mutations that result in significant reduction of protein levels due to NMD will not have dominant-negative activity in vivo. Haploinsufficiency is therefore likely to be the most important mutational mechanism of HNF-1alpha mutations causing MODY. PMID:14747304

  14. ENERGY-DEPENDENT GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE WIDTH DUE TO THE CURVATURE EFFECT AND INTRINSIC BAND SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Zhao, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Bao, Y. Y.

    2012-06-20

    Previous studies have found that the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulse is energy dependent and that it decreases as a power-law function with increasing photon energy. In this work we have investigated the relation between the energy dependence of the pulse and the so-called Band spectrum by using a sample including 51 well-separated fast rise and exponential decay long-duration GRB pulses observed by BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory). We first decompose these pulses into rise and decay phases and find that the rise widths and the decay widths also behave as a power-law function with photon energy. Then we investigate statistically the relations between the three power-law indices of the rise, decay, and total width of the pulse (denoted as {delta}{sub r}, {delta}{sub d}, and {delta}{sub w}, respectively) and the three Band spectral parameters, high-energy index ({alpha}), low-energy index ({beta}), and peak energy (E{sub p} ). It is found that (1) {alpha} is strongly correlated with {delta}{sub w} and {delta}{sub d} but seems uncorrelated with {delta}{sub r}; (2) {beta} is weakly correlated with the three power-law indices, and (3) E{sub p} does not show evident correlations with the three power-law indices. We further investigate the origin of {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha}. We show that the curvature effect and the intrinsic Band spectrum could naturally lead to the energy dependence of the GRB pulse width and also the {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha} correlations. Our results hold so long as the shell emitting gamma rays has a curved surface and the intrinsic spectrum is a Band spectrum or broken power law. The strong {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} correlation and inapparent correlations between {delta}{sub r} and the three Band spectral parameters also suggest that the rise and decay phases of the GRB pulses have different origins.

  15. Fine Structure in the Alpha Decay of {sup 191g,m}Bi and {sup 193g,m}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kettunen, H.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Andreyev, A.N.; Dorvaux, O.; Eskola, K.; Greenlees, P.T.; Helariutta, K.; Huyse, M.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Trzaska, W.H.; Uusitalo, J.; Van de Vel, K.; Van Duppen, P.

    1999-12-31

    Two new hindered a transitions are presented for {sup 191}Bi and {sup 193}Bi. The {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence method was used to search for these weak transitions. The new alpha particle energies for {sup 191}Bi are 658(9) keV and 6343(5) keV and for {sup 193}Bi the energies are 6160(10) keV and 5860(15) KeV.

  16. The Higgs-boson decay H\\;\\to \\;{gg} up to {\\alpha }_{s}^{5}-order under the minimal momentum space subtraction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Dai-Min; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Wu, Xing-Gang; Shen, Jian-Ming

    2016-07-01

    We study the Higgs-boson decay width {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}) up to {α }s5 order under the minimal momentum space subtraction (mMOM) scheme. A major uncertainty of a finite-order perturbative quantum chromodymaics (pQCD) prediction is the perceived ambiguity in setting the renormalization scale. In the present paper, to achieve a precise pQCD prediction without renormalization scale uncertainty, we adopt the principle of maximum conformality (PMC) to set the renormalization scale of the process. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, which is based on renormalization group invariance and utilizes the renormalization group equation to fix the renormalization scale of the process. The key point of the application of the PMC is how to correctly set the {β i } terms of the process to achieve the correct α s -running behavior at each perturbative order. It is found that the ambiguities in dealing with the {β i } terms of the decay width {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}) under the \\bar{{{MS}}} scheme can be avoided by using the physical mMOM scheme. For this purpose, for the first time we provide the PMC scale-setting formulas within the mMOM scheme up to a four-loop level. By using the PMC, it is found that a more reliable pQCD prediction on {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}) can indeed be achieved under the mMOM scheme. As a byproduct, the convergence of the resultant pQCD series has been greatly improved due to the elimination of renormalon terms. By taking the newly measured Higgs mass, M H = 125.09 ± 0.21 ± 0.11 GeV, our PMC prediction of the decay width is, {{Γ }}(H\\to {gg}){| }{{mMOM,}{{PMC}}}=339.3+/- {1.7}-2.4+3.7 keV, in which the first error is from the Higgs mass uncertainty and the second error is the residual renormalization scale dependence by varying the initial renormalization scale {μ }r\\in [{M}H/2,4{M}H].

  17. Differentiation and semiquantitative analysis of an isoaspartic acid in human alpha-Crystallin by postsource decay in a curved field reflectron.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yuzo; Fujii, Norihiko; Sadakane, Yutaka; Fujii, Noriko

    2010-08-01

    Alpha-Crystallin, which forms a huge multimeric complex that is essential for maintaining eye lens transparency, is one of the major proteins in the lens. The protein, which exists as isoforms alphaA and alphaB, functions as a molecular chaperone to restore the original conformations of distorted constituent proteins in the lens. This function is important to maintain the transparency of the lens, because there is no protein turnover in the lens. Abnormal aggregation of constituent proteins in the lens has been reported in cataract patients, and deamidation of Asn as well as racemization and isomerization of Asp have been found in the alpha-Crystallin of these patients. While the establishment of a quick and facile analytical method is eagerly anticipated to investigate the relevance of the isomerization to pathological states such as cataracts, differentiating the isomerization states is still not performed routinely. Here, we report the differentiation and semiquantitative analysis of an isoaspartic acid (betaAsp) in human alpha-Crystallin using postsource decay on a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer incorporating a curved field reflectron. Our reproducible results of analyzing synthetic and tryptic peptides containing betaAsp corroborated results obtained using a previously reported diagnostic ion, y(l-n+1) - 46, for the differentiation of betaAsp. The relative content of betaAsp in the peptide was successfully estimated from a unique ratio, y(l-n):y(l-n+1), corresponding to cleavages at the C- and N-termini, respectively, of the isomeric residues. The betaAsp content was consistent with measurements obtained independently by reversed phase HPLC analysis. Experiments in which neighboring amino acids adjacent to betaAsp/Asp were substituted revealed that the ratio between y(l-n) and y(l-n+1) reflected the isomerization status, while the diagnostic ion was observed only in the peptides that included an arginine residue at their C-terminus. Postsource decay experiments

  18. Spectrophotometry of prominences in the phase preceding decay. [line spectra and spectral emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakhubovskiy, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of spectrophotometric processing of prominence spectra in both the quiet and the decay phases. A catalog was compiled of equivalent widths, central intensities, Doppler half-widths, and half-widths of emission lines. The reduced Doppler half-widths of D3 and of the H, K Ca(+) lines obtained in a prominence active phase are much larger than those obtained during a quiet phase. Comparison of the equivalent widths and central intensities of H sub alpha, H sub beta hydrogen and D3 helium lines shows that the values increase in the active phase for the D3 lines and decrease for the H sub alpha, H sub beta lines.

  19. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  20. Di-electron and two-photon widths in charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Badalian, A. M.; Danilkin, I. V.

    2009-07-15

    The vector and pseudoscalar decay constants are calculated in the framework of the Field Correlator Method. Di-electron widths: {Gamma}{sub ee}(J/{psi}) = 5.41 keV, {Gamma}{sub ee}({psi}'(3686)) = 2.47 keV, {Gamma}{sub ee}({psi}''(3770)) = 0.248 keV, in good agreement with experiment, are obtained with the same coupling, {alpha}{sub s} = 0.165, in the QCD radiative corrections. We show that the larger {alpha}{sub s} = 0.191 {+-} 0.004 is needed to reach agreement with experiment for {Gamma}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}({chi}c) = 7.22 keV, {Gamma}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}({chi}c({sup 3}P0)) = 3.3 keV, {Gamma}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}{chi}c({sup 3}P{sub 2}) = 0.54 keV, and also for {Gamma}(J/{psi} {yields} 3g) = 59.5 keV, {Gamma}(J/{psi} {yields} {gamma}2g) = 5.7 keV. Meanwhile, even larger {alpha}{sub s} = 0.238 gives rise to good description of {Gamma}({psi}' {yields} 3g) = 52.7 keV, {Gamma}({psi}' {yields} {gamma} 2g) = 3.5 keV, and provides correct ratio of the branching fractions: {Beta} (J/{psi} {yields} light hadrons)/{Beta} ({psi}' {yields} light hadrons) = 0.24.

  1. MALDI in-source decay of high mass protein isoforms: application to alpha- and beta-tubulin variants.

    PubMed

    Calligaris, David; Villard, Claude; Terras, Lionel; Braguer, Diane; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Lafitte, Daniel

    2010-07-15

    Tubulin is one of the major targets in cancer chemotherapy and the target of more than twenty percent of the cancer chemotherapic agents. The modulation of isoform content has been hypothesized as being a cause of resistance to treatment. Isoform differences lie mostly in the C-terminus part of the protein. Extensive characterization of this polypeptide region is therefore of critical importance. MALDI-TOF fragmentation of tubulin C-terminal domains was tested using synthetic peptides. Then, isotypes from HeLa cells were successfully characterized for the first time by in-source decay (ISD) fragmentation of their C-terminus coupled to a pseudo MS(3) technique named T(3)-sequencing. The fragmentation occurred in-source, preferentially generating y(n)-series ions. This approach required guanidination for the characterization of the beta(III)-tubulin C-terminus peptide. This study is, to our knowledge, the first example of reflectron in-source decay (reISD) of the C-terminus of a 50 kDa protein. This potentially occurs via a CID-like mechanism occurring in the MALDI plume. There are now new avenues for top-down characterization of important clinical biomarkers such as beta(III)-tubulin isotypes, a potential marker of drug resistance and tumor progression. This paper raises the challenge of protein isotypes characterization for early cancer detection and treatment monitoring.

  2. Expression levels of Protocadherin-alpha transcripts are decreased by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay with frameshift mutations and by high DNA methylation in their promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Kawaguchi, Masahumi; Toyama, Tomoko; Taguchi, Yusuke; Yagi, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    The mouse protocadherin (Pcdh) clusters, Pcdh-alpha, -beta, and -gamma, are located on chromosome 18. Many polymorphic variations are found in the Pcdh-alpha genes in wild-derived and laboratory mouse strains. In comparing the expression levels of Pcdh-alpha isoforms among several strains, we observed lower expression levels of Pcdh-alpha9 in BLG2 and BFM/2, and of Pcdh-alpha8 in C57BL/6 (B6) than in the other strains. For Pcdh-alpha8, high DNA methylation (72.7%) in the promoter region was found only in B6, whereas 36.4-44.3% methylation was seen in the other strains. On the other hand, the Pcdh-alpha9 DNA-methylation levels were similar (23.6-36.3%) among the strains regardless of the difference in expression levels. Interestingly, however, the Pcdh-alpha9 variable exon in both BLG2 and BFM/2 included a premature termination codon (PTC) generated by a nucleotide deletion or insertion. Treatment with emetine, a potent inhibitor of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), increased the expression level of Pcdh-alpha9 from the BLG2-Pcdh-alpha locus. These data indicate that the transcription levels of mature Pcdh-alpha mRNAs are decreased by the DNA-methylation state of the Pcdh-alpha promoter regions and by the NMD pathway during RNA maturation. And we correct some previous data on Sugino, H., Toyama, T., Taguchi, Y., Esumi, S., Miyazaki, M., Yagi, T., (2004) Negative and positive effects of an IAP-LTR on nearby Pcdaalpha gene expression in the central nervous system and neuroblastoma cell lines, Gene 337 91-103.

  3. Production of alpha 1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout pigs expressing both human decay-accelerating factor and N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III.

    PubMed

    Takahagi, Yoichi; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Miyagawa, Shuji; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Shigehisa, Tamotsu; Shirakura, Ryota; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    Heterozygous alpha 1,3-galactosyltransferase (GT) gene knockout pigs were produced with transgenic pig fetal cells expressing both human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) and N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III). In this study, we assessed the gene targeting efficiency in the transgenic pig fetal cells derived from different fetal tissues such as brain, skin, heart, and liver, or fetal carcass. Targeted cell colonies were selected by hygromycin B. The GT-knockout colonies (KO colonies) were obtained equally from the cells derived from all tissues except liver. Staining with five antibodies against intermediate filaments, all examined KO cell lines stained positive for vimentin with the exception of a colony that stained positive for both vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein simultaneously. This is the first study to produce KO cells from the astrocytes. Some of these KO cell lines were used for nuclear transfer (NT) to obtain KO pig fetuses. Fourteen fetuses were obtained from two recipients of the embryo transfer and eight of them had normal ploidy. The cells from the KO pig fetuses were also used for NT to produce cloned KO pigs. Two healthy clone pigs were born. These pigs were determined to have a heterozygous knockout GT gene and the two transgenes. The cells collected from the KO pigs were shown to have similar expression levels of hDAF and GnT-III compared to their original transgenic pigs and less than a half levels of the alphaGal epitopes existed in wild-type pig cells.

  4. Remarks concerning the O(Z. cap alpha. /sup 2/) corrections to Fermi decays, conserved-vector-current predictions, and universality

    SciTech Connect

    Sirlin, A.

    1987-06-01

    Finite-nuclear-size contributions to the O(Z..cap alpha../sup 2/) corrections to Fermi decays are studied for realistic nuclear-charge distributions. In conjunction with the results of Koslowsky et al. and recent papers by the author and Zucchini and by Jaus and Rasche, these refinements lead to an average value scrFt = 3070.6 +- 1.6 s for the accurately measured superallowed Fermi transitions. Correspondingly, V/sub u//sub d/ = 0.9744 +- 0.0010 and V/sub u//sub d/ /sup 2/+V/sub us/ /sup 2/+V/sub ub/ /sup 2/ = 0.9979 +- 0.0021 in good agreement with the three-generation standard model at the level of its quantum corrections. The agreement with conserved-vector-current predictions is very good, with each of the eight transitions differing from the average by <1sigma. The consequences of using two other calculations of the nuclear mismatch correction delta/sub c/, Wilkinson's microscopic analysis and the recent results of Ormand and Brown, are briefly discussed. A useful upper bound on scrFt, independent of the delta/sub c/ calculation, is given.

  5. Theory of two-step two-proton decays of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Ivankov, Yu. V.

    2014-12-01

    A general theory of many-body diagonal and nondiagonal one-proton decays of spherical and deformed nuclei is developed on the basis of an approach not employing R-matrix theory in describing deep-subbarrier alpha and one-proton decays of nuclei but relying on integral formulas for the widths with respect to these decays. With the aid of this theory and by means of a diagram technique, a formalism is developed for describing two-step two-proton decays of a ( Z, A) parent nucleus, which proceed as two successive time-separated one-proton decays of the parent and intermediate [( Z - 1, A - 1)] nuclei, these decays being related by the Green's function for the intermediate nucleus, G( Z - 1, A - 1). It is shown that, upon taking into account, in this Green's function, intermediate-nucleus states that are on- and off-shell states for the decaying system, there arise, respectively, sequential and virtual two-proton decays of parent nuclei. Expressions for the widths with respect to sequential and virtual two-proton decays from the ground and excited states of spherical and deformed nuclei and for the angular and energy distributions of emitted protons are obtained.

  6. Theory of two-step two-proton decays of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G. Ivankov, Yu. V.

    2014-12-15

    A general theory of many-body diagonal and nondiagonal one-proton decays of spherical and deformed nuclei is developed on the basis of an approach not employing R-matrix theory in describing deep-subbarrier alpha and one-proton decays of nuclei but relying on integral formulas for the widths with respect to these decays. With the aid of this theory and by means of a diagram technique, a formalism is developed for describing two-step two-proton decays of a (Z, A) parent nucleus, which proceed as two successive time-separated one-proton decays of the parent and intermediate [(Z − 1, A − 1)] nuclei, these decays being related by the Green’s function for the intermediate nucleus, G(Z − 1, A − 1). It is shown that, upon taking into account, in this Green’s function, intermediate-nucleus states that are on- and off-shell states for the decaying system, there arise, respectively, sequential and virtual two-proton decays of parent nuclei. Expressions for the widths with respect to sequential and virtual two-proton decays from the ground and excited states of spherical and deformed nuclei and for the angular and energy distributions of emitted protons are obtained.

  7. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Lucía; Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width.

  8. Recognition of decay accelerating factor and alpha(v)beta(3) by inactivated hantaviruses: Toward the development of high-throughput screening flow cytometry assays.

    PubMed

    Buranda, Tione; Wu, Yang; Perez, Dominique; Jett, Stephen D; BonduHawkins, Virginie; Ye, Chunyan; Edwards, Bruce; Hall, Pamela; Larson, Richard S; Lopez, Gabriel P; Sklar, Larry A; Hjelle, Brian

    2010-07-15

    Hantaviruses cause two severe diseases in humans: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS). The lack of vaccines or specific drugs to prevent or treat HFRS and HCPS and the requirement for conducting experiments in a biosafety level 3 laboratory (BSL-3) limit the ability to probe the mechanism of infection and disease pathogenesis. In this study, we developed a generalizable spectroscopic assay to quantify saturable fluorophore sites solubilized in envelope membranes of Sin Nombre virus (SNV) particles. We then used flow cytometry and live cell confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging to show that ultraviolet (UV)-killed SNV particles bind to the cognate receptors of live virions, namely, decay accelerating factor (DAF/CD55) expressed on Tanoue B cells and alpha(v)beta(3) integrins expressed on Vero E6 cells. SNV binding to DAF is multivalent and of high affinity (K(d) approximately 26pM). Self-exchange competition binding assays between fluorescently labeled SNV and unlabeled SNV are used to evaluate an infectious unit-to-particle ratio of approximately 1:14,000. We configured the assay for measuring the binding of fluorescently labeled SNV to Tanoue B suspension cells using a high-throughput flow cytometer. In this way, we established a proof-of-principle high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for binding inhibition. This is a first step toward developing HTS format assays for small molecule inhibitors of viral-cell interactions as well as dissecting the mechanism of infection in a BSL-2 environment.

  9. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  10. Two-loop virtual top-quark effect on Higgs-boson decay to bottom quarks.

    PubMed

    Butenschön, Mathias; Fugel, Frank; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2007-02-16

    In most of the mass range encompassed by the limits from the direct search and the electroweak precision tests, the Higgs boson of the standard model preferably decays to bottom quarks. We present, in analytic form, the dominant two-loop electroweak correction, of O(GF2mt4), to the partial width of this decay. It amplifies the familiar enhancement due to the O(GFmt2) one-loop correction by about +16% and thus more than compensates the screening by about -8% through strong-interaction effects of order O(alphasGFmt2).

  11. Diatomic predissociation line widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Predissociation by rotation and curve crossing in diatomic molecules is discussed. The pattern of predissociation line widths is seen as providing a highly sensitive yardstick for the determination of unknown potential curves. In addition, the computation of such a pattern for given potential curves is considered a matter of routine, unless the predissociation happens to occur from an adiabatic potential curve. Analytic formulas are used to provide physical insight into the details of the predissociation pattern, to the extent that a direct inversion procedure is developed for determination of the repulsive potential curves for Type 1 predissociations.

  12. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  13. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and Determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) /- pi-/

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K{sub 1}(1270) or K{sub 1}(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, correspond to 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 3.1{sub 0.7}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup 0}{pi}{sup +} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = 2.9{sub -1.7}{sup +2.9} x 10{sup -5} (< 8.2 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level), where the errors are statistical and systematic combined. The B{sup 0} decay mode is observed with a significance of 7.5{sigma}, while a significance of 3.2{sigma} is obtained for the B{sup +} decay mode. Based on these results, we estimate the weak phase {alpha} = (79 {+-} 7 {+-} 11){sup o} from the time dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays.

  14. Rapid postexposure decay of. cap alpha. /sub 2u/-globulin and hyaline droplets in the kidneys of gasoline-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, B.D.; Olson, M.J.; Demyan, W.F.; Roy, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    Renal ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin content increased to 210% of control within 18 h of a single oral dose of gasoline (2.0 ml/kg) in male rats; maximal levels (320% of control) were attained following gasoline administration for 3 d. Increases in renal ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin caused by gasoline were accompanied by concurrent proliferation of hyaline droplets. However, within 3 d of terminating gasoline administration renal ..cap alpha../sub2u/-globulin content decreased to the same level as that in unexposed rats, although renal hyaline droplet number returned to pretreatment levels somewhat more slowly. The conjoint effect of postexposure recovery and estradiol (an inhibitor of hepatic ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin synthesis) administration was also determined in male rats. On postexposure of 3, 6, and 9, estradiol treatment (1 mg/kg, sc, 4 d, starting on d 9 of gasoline treatment) decreased renal ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin content to 75%, 59%, and 48%, respectively, of that in rats allowed to recover from gasoline with no hormone treatment. Hepatic ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin content in estradiol-treated rats was decreased by 74%, 97%, and 96% at the same intervals. Estradiol treatment during recovery from gasoline also appeared to increase the removal of accumulated hyaline droplets from the renal cortex. Thus, accumulation of ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin-containing hyaline droplets after subacute exposure of male rats to gasoline is rapidly reversible, dependent on continuous exposure to gasoline and maintenance of the normal rate of hepatic ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin synthesis. These results emphasize the dynamic state of renal cortical hyaline droplets and suggest strongly that gasoline hydrocarbons cause hyaline droplet accumulation by prolonging the half-time degradation of ..cap alpha../sub 2u/-globulin.

  15. Bounds on the width, mass difference and other properties of X(3872)π+π-J/ψ decays

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S. -K.; Olsen, S. L.; Trabelsi, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, I. -S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Joshi, N. J.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. -H.; Li, J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Lim, C. -L.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Zyukova, O.

    2011-09-07

    We present results from a study of X(3872)→ππJ/ψ decays produced via exclusive B→KX(3872) decays. We determine the mass to be MX(3872)=(3871.85±0.27(stat)±0.19(syst)) MeV, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the natural width of ΓX(3872)<1.2 MeV, the product branching fraction B(B+→K+X(3872))×B(X(3872)→π+π-J/ψ)=(8.63±0.82(stat)±0.52(syst))×10-6, and a ratio of branching fractions B(B0→K0X(3872))/B(B+→K+X(3872))=0.50±0.14(stat)±0.04(syst). The difference in mass between the X(3872)→π+π-J/ψ signals in B+ and B0 decays is ΔMX(3872)=(-0.71±0.96(stat)±0.19(syst)) MeV. A search for a charged partner of the X(3872) in the decays B0→K-X+ or B+→K0X+, X+→π+π0J/ψ resulted in upper limits on the product branching fractions for these processes that are well below expectations for the case that the X(3872) is the neutral member of an isospin triplet. In addition, we examine possible JPC quantum number assignments for the X(3872) based on comparisons of angular correlations between final state particles in X(3872)→π+π-J/ψ decays with simulated data for JPC values of 1++ and 2-+. We examine the influence of ρ-ω interference in the M(π+π-) spectrum. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample that contains 772×106 BB meson pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance in the Belle detector at the KEKB e+e- collider.

  16. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  17. Radial widths, optical depths, and eccentricities of the Uranian rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Matthews, K.; Goldreich, P.

    1982-02-01

    Observations of the stellar occultation by the Uranian rings of 15/16 August 1980 are used to estimate radial widths and normal optical depths for segments of rings 6, 5, 4, alpha, beta, eta, gamma, and delta. Synthetic occultation profiles are generated to match the observed light curves. A review of published data confirms the existence of width-radius relations for rings alpha and beta, and indicates that the optical depths of these two rings vary inversely with their radial widths. Masses are obtained for rings alpha and beta, on the assumption that differential precession is prevented by their self-gravity. A quantitative comparison of seven epsilon-ring occultation profiles obtained over a period of 3.4 yr reveals a consistent structure, which may reflect the presence of unresolved gaps and subrings.

  18. Form factors and decay rate of Bc * Dsl+l- decays in the QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynali, K.; Bashiry, V.; Zolfagharpour, F.

    2014-08-01

    Rare exclusive decays are analyzed in the framework of the three-point QCD sum rules approach. The two-gluon condensate corrections to the correlation function are included and the form factors of this transition are evaluated. Using the form factors, the decay width and integrated decay rate for these decays are also calculated.

  19. Width of nonlinear resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S.

    1984-03-01

    Two approximations are made, one essential and the other not so essential but convenient to keep the analytical treatment manageable: (1) Only one nonlinear resonance is considered at a time so that the treatment is best suited when the tune is close to one resonance only. To improve this approximation, one must go to the next order which involves a canonical transformation of dynamical variables. Analytical treatment of more than one resonance is not possible for general cases. (2) In the formalism using the action-angle variables, the Hamiltonian can have terms which are independent of the angle variables. These terms are called phase-independent terms or shear terms. The tune is then a function of the oscillation amplitudes. In the lowest-order treatment, the (4N)-pole components but not the (4N + 2)-pole components contribute to this dependence. In deriving the resonance width analytically, one ignores these terms in the Hamiltonian for the sake of simplicity. If these are retained, one needs at least three extra parameters and the analytical treatment becomes rather unwieldy.

  20. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  1. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  2. Excited levels of /sup 238/Np from spectroscopic measurements of the /sup 237/Np(n,. gamma. )/sup 238/Np reaction and /sup 242m/Am alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.; Ruhter, W.; Mann, L.

    1981-06-01

    The gamma rays and conversion electrons emitted following neutron capture in a /sup 237/Np target have been measured by use of the GAMS and BILL spectrometers at Grenoble. Gamma ray and alpha particle measurements of /sup 242m/Am alpha decay (Ge(Li)..gamma.. singles, ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, ..cap alpha.. singles) have been made at Livermore. The data from these measurements have been combined with earlier measurements (Ionescu 1979, Asaro 1964) to produce a more detailed level scheme for /sup 238/Np. Approximately 36 levels have been identified from all of the experimental evidence. The experimentally-observed bandhead energies can be compared with predicted values derived from a simple linear addition of excitation energies observed in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splitting of each configurational pair were obtained from theoretical calculations (Piepenbring 1978). We have assigned configurations to ten rotational bands whose bandhead energies range from 0 to 342 keV and which represent all but one of the configurations predicted to occur below 385 keV.

  3. Decay-accelerating factor induction by tumour necrosis factor-alpha, through a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and protein kinase C-dependent pathway, protects murine vascular endothelial cells against complement deposition.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saifur R; Lidington, Elaine A; Ohta, Rieko; Okada, Noriko; Robson, Michael G; Davies, Kevin A; Leitges, Michael; Harris, Claire L; Haskard, Dorian O; Mason, Justin C

    2003-10-01

    We have shown that human endothelial cells (EC) are protected against complement-mediated injury by the inducible expression of decay-accelerating factor (DAF). To understand further the importance of DAF regulation, we characterized EC DAF expression on murine EC in vitro and in vivo using a model of glomerulonephritis. Flow cytometry using the monoclonal antibody (mAb) Riko-3 [binds transmembrane- and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored DAF], mAb Riko-4 (binds GPI-anchored DAF) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), demonstrated that murine EC DAF is GPI-anchored. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased EC DAF expression, detectable at 6 hr and maximal at 24-48 hr poststimulation. DAF upregulation required increased steady-state DAF mRNA and protein synthesis. In contrast, no increased expression of the murine complement receptor-related protein-Y (Crry) was seen with TNF-alpha. DAF upregulation was mediated via a protein kinase C (PKC)alpha, phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3 kinase), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent pathway. The increased DAF was functionally relevant, resulting in a marked reduction in C3 deposition following complement activation. In a nephrotoxic nephritis model, DAF expression on glomerular capillaries was significantly increased 2 hr after the induction of disease. The demonstration of DAF upregulation above constitutive levels suggests that this may be important in the maintenance of vascular integrity during inflammation, when the risk of complement-mediated injury is increased. The mouse represents a suitable model for the study of novel therapeutic approaches by which vascular endothelium may be conditioned against complement-mediated injury.

  4. Stability of {sup 248–254}Cf isotopes against alpha and cluster radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Santhosh, K.P. Biju, R.K.

    2013-07-15

    Stability of {sup 248–254}Cf nuclei against alpha and cluster emissions is studied within our Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). It is found that these nuclei are stable against light clusters (except alpha particles) and unstable against heavy cluster (A{sub 2}≥40) emissions. For heavy cluster emissions the daughter nuclei lead to doubly magic {sup 208}Pb or the neighbouring one. The effects of quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations of parent nuclei, daughter nuclei and emitted cluster on half lives are also studied. The computed alpha decay half life values (including quadrupole deformation β{sub 2}) are in close agreement with experimental data. Inclusion of quadrupole deformation reduces the height and width of the barrier (increases the barrier penetrability) and hence half life decreases. -- Highlights: •{sup 248–254}Cf parents are stable against light clusters (except alpha particles) and are unstable against heavy clusters ({sup 46}Ar, {sup 48,50}Ca etc.). •For the case of heavy cluster emissions the daughter nuclei are doubly magic {sup 208}Pb or neighbouring one. •The alpha decay half lives are in agreement with experimental data. •The cluster decay half lives decrease with the inclusion of quadrupole deformation.

  5. Decay data evaluation project (DDEP): updated evaluations of the 233Th and 241Am decay characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K

    2010-01-01

    The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for (233)Th (beta(-)) decay to nuclear levels in (233)Pa and (241)Am (alpha) decay to nuclear levels in (237)Np. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2009.

  6. Nuclear-structure dependence of O (. alpha. ) corrections to Fermi decays and the value of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V sub ud

    SciTech Connect

    Jaus, W.; Rasche, G. )

    1990-01-01

    We calculate nuclear-structure corrections to the {ital ft} values of the eight accurately measured superallowed {beta}{sup +} decays. The statistical fit for the average {ital ft} value is very good. The resulting new value for the matrix element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) matrix is {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar}=0.9735(5). The error in {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar} has thus been reduced by 50%. Combining this value for {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar} with the presently accepted results from kaon-, hyperon-, and {ital B}-decay constraints, the unitarity of the KM matrix for three generations of quarks seems to be violated.

  7. The Width of a Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Gila

    2014-01-01

    This paper's aim is to discuss the concept of width of a proof put forward by Timothy Gowers. It explains what this concept means and attempts to show how it relates to other concepts discussed in the existing literature on proof and proving. It also explores how the concept of width of a proof might be used productively in the mathematics…

  8. Phase width reduction project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Xie, Z.Q.; McMahan, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the phase width reduction project, 1993--96, was to reduce the phase width of the 88-Inch Cyclotron beam on target from 5--10 ns to 1--2 ns for certain experiments, such as Gammasphere, which use time-of-flight identification. Since reducing the phase width also reduces beam intensity, tuning should be done to also optimize the transmission. The Multi-turn Collimator slits in the cyclotron center region were used to collimate the early turns radially, thus reducing the phase width from about 5 ns to 1--2 ns FWHM for a Gammasphere beam. The effect of the slits on phase width was verified with a Fast Faraday Cup and with particle and gamma-ray detectors in the external beamline.

  9. Behavior of Intruder Based States in Light Bi and Tl Isotopes: The Study of 187Bi Alpha Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Brown, L.T.; Conticchio, L.F.; Davids, C.N.; DeCoster, C.; Decroix, B.; Heyde, K.; Irvine, R.J.; Seweryniak, D.; Toth, K.S.; Walters, W.B.; Wauters, J.; Wood, J.L.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1998-11-13

    The excitation energies of the single-particle normal and intruder levels in both `83T1 and 187Bi were measured for the first time via the ct decay of 187Bi produced in the 97Mo(92Mo,pn) 187Bi reaction. The previously unobserved 187Bi ground state (kw) to 183T1 ground state (s1/2) a transition was identified establishing the 187Bi intruder state excitation energy to be 112(21) keV, 70 keV less than that of the same level in 189Bi.

  10. Effect of orientational order on the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in membrane suspensions. Experimental verification on unilamellar vesicles and lipid/alpha-lactalbumin complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Ameloot, M; Hendrickx, H; Herreman, W; Pottel, H; Van Cauwelaert, F; van der Meer, W

    1984-01-01

    Various models for the analysis of time-dependent fluorescence anisotropy measurements were evaluated. The discussion was based on the analysis of pulsed experiments with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene embedded in small unilamellar vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/alpha-lactalbumin complexes. It was shown that a recently proposed model (Van der Meer, W., H. Pottel, W. Herreman, M. Ameloot, H. Hendrickx, H. Schröder, 1984, Biophys. J., 46:515-523) described the data better than did the earlier suggested cone model (Kinosita K., Jr., S. Kawato, and A. Ikegami, 1977, Biophys. J., 20:289-305). This permitted the use of the new model for the estimation of the second- and fourth-rank order parameters on nonoriented systems. The results indicated that a fraction of the probes was oriented perpendicularly to the preferred direction of the lipids. An increase of the rotational correlation times of the fluorescent probe and a higher order of its environment were detected after the interaction of alpha-lactalbumin with the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles at acidic pH at 24.2 degrees C. PMID:6548649

  11. Evolution of the Iron K-Alpha Emission Line in the Black Hole Candidate GX339-4 During and Outburst Decay Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.; Zhang, S.-N.; Chen, W.; Cui, Wei

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of the iron K-alpha line emission feature was found from the black hole candidate GX339-4 when its X-ray flux (2 to 10 keV) decreased significantly. With RXTE observations, a broad line emission feature around 7 keV was detected in its quiescent and low flux state; while in the high flux state, an emission line feature around 6.4 keV was detected. A similar 6.4 keV line feature was also detected with previous ASCA observations in a high flux state. We consider that the evolution could be the evidence of the variations in the geometric structure and the physical properties of the accretion flow when the accretion rate changed. This is because that the 7 keV line feature can be produced by the radiative recombination cascade, collisional excitation, and fluorescence of Fe XXVI and Fe XXV, which can exist in a very high temperature plasma; while the 6.4 keV line feature can be produced by fluorescent K-alpha line emission of neutral iron atoms in the cold accretion disk. (copyright) 1999 American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Ab initio calculation of ICD widths in photoexcited HeNe

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, G.; Klaiman, S.; Chiang, Y.-C.; Gokhberg, K.; Trinter, F.; Jahnke, T.

    2014-06-14

    Excitation of HeNe by synchrotron light just below the frequency of the 1s → 3p transition of isolated He has been recently shown to be followed by resonant interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD). The vibrationally resolved widths of the ICD states were extracted with high precision from the photoion spectra. In this paper, we report the results of ab initio calculations of these widths. We show that interaction between electronic states at about the equilibrium distance of HeNe makes dark states of He accessible for the photoexcitation and subsequent electronic decay. Moreover, the values of the calculated widths are shown to be strongly sensitive to the presence of the non-adiabatic coupling between the electronic states participating in the decay. Therefore, only by considering the complete manifold of interacting decaying electronic states a good agreement between the measured and computed ICD widths can be achieved.

  13. Internalization and degradation of human alpha-A interferon bound to bovine MDBK cells: regulation of the decay and resynthesis of receptors.

    PubMed

    Branca, A A; D'Alessandro, S B; Baglioni, C

    1983-01-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled human interferon alpha-A (HuIFN-alpha A) to receptors of bovine MDBK cells was investigated. About 4-fold more 125I-interferon was bound at 37 degrees C than at 0 degrees C. To establish whether the cell-bound IFN was internalized, the cells were treated with diluted acetic acid, a procedure known to remove polypeptides bound to the cell surface. About 80% of the IFN bound at 0 degrees C was dissociated from the cells by this treatment, whereas only 45% of that bound after a 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C was dissociated. Release of cell-bound 125I-interferon by cells washed and incubated in fresh medium was next examined at the two temperatures. At 0 degrees C, up to 50% of cell-bound IFN was released into the medium over a 2 h period, whereas at 37 degrees C the cell-bound radioactivity was slowly released over several hours as acid-soluble degradation products. Interferon was therefore internalized and degraded by MDBK cells incubated at 37 degrees C, but not by cells incubated at 0 degrees C. The increased binding at 37 degrees C could possibly be explained by the internalization of IFN/receptor complexes and by the recycling of the receptors to the cell surface. This recycling was limited, however, since incubation of MDBK cells with unlabeled IFN led to a rapid decrease or down regulation of available receptors. Recovery of binding activity was prevented by the addition of inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis, suggesting that de novo synthesis of receptors was required. The half-life of the IFN receptor in the presence of cycloheximide was about 3 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Chemical Treatment of US Department of Energy High Level and Low Level Waste to Obtain a Pure Radiochemical Fraction for Determination of Californium Alpha-Decay Content

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.

    2002-12-02

    We have developed a chemical separation technique that allows the radiochemical determination of the californium a-decay content in Department of Energy (DOE) high level wastes from the Hanford and Savannah River sites. The chemical separation technique uses a series of column extraction chromatography steps that use Eichrom Industries' lanthanide and actinide plus 3 oxidation state selective Ln-resin(R) and the transuranic selective plus 4 oxidation state TRU-resin(R) to obtain intermediate product phases in dilute nitric acid. The technique has been demonstrated on three types of authentic DOE high and low level waste samples. We obtain discrimination from Pu a-activity by a factor of over 200 and from Cm-244 a-activity by a factor approaching 1700. Californium recoveries are measured by addition of a Cf-249 spike and are in the range of 50 percent to 90 percent in the synthetic samples and are in the range of 1.4 percent to 48 percent for the authentic DOE waste samples.

  15. Recent Results on the CKM Angle Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-10-18

    The method to measure the CKM angle {alpha} and the modes sensitive to it are discussed. It is shown that the B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays provide the most stringent constraint on {alpha}, which is found to be {alpha} = 96{sup o} {+-} 10{sup o}(stat) {+-} 4{sup o}(syst){+-} 13{sup o}(penguin).

  16. Decays of New Nuclides and Isomers Beyond the Proton Drip Line--The Influence of Neutron Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Cooper, R. J.; Grahn, T.; Judson, D. S.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Simpson, J.; Labiche, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Al-Khalili, J. S.; Cannon, A. J.; Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.

    2008-11-11

    The energy of the vh{sub 9/2} orbital in nuclei above N = 82 drops rapidly in energy relative to the vf{sub 7/2} orbital as the occupancy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital increases. These two neutron orbitals become nearly degenerate as the proton drip line is approached. In this work, we have discovered the new nuclides {sup 161}Os and {sup 157}W, and studied the decays of the proton emitter {sup 160}Re in detail. The {sup 161}Os and {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced in reactions of 290, 300 and 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni ions with an isotopically enriched {sup 106}Cd target, separated in-flight using the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. The {sup 161}Os{alpha} a decays populated the new nuclide {sup 157}W, which decayed by {beta}-particle emission. The {beta} decay fed the known {alpha}-decaying 1/2{sup +} and 11/2{sup -} states in {sup 157}Ta, which is consistent with a vf{sub 7/2} ground state in {sup 157}W. The measured {alpha}-decay energy and half-life for {sup 161}Os correspond to a reduced {alpha}-decay width that is compatible with s-wave {alpha}-particle emission, implying that its ground state is also a vf{sub 7/2} state. Over 7000 {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced and the {gamma} decays of a new isomeric state feeding the {pi}d{sub 3/2} level in {sup 160}Re were discovered, but no evidence for the proton or a decay of the expected {pi}h{sub 11/2} state could be found. The isomer decays offer a natural explanation for this non-observation and provides a striking example of the influence of the near degeneracy of the vh{sub 9/2} and vf{sub 7/2} orbitals on the properties of nuclei in this region.

  17. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  18. The width of the Roper resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegelia, Jambul; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yao, De-Liang

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the width of the Roper resonance at next-to-leading order in a systematic expansion of baryon chiral perturbation theory with pions, nucleons, and the delta and Roper resonances as dynamical degrees of freedom. Three unknown low-energy constants contribute up to the given order. One of them can be fixed by reproducing the empirical value for the width of the Roper decay into a pion and a nucleon. Assuming that the remaining two couplings of the Roper interaction take values equal to those of the nucleon, the result for the width of the Roper decaying into a nucleon and two pions is consistent with the experimental value.

  19. Multimode fiber with z-dependent alpha-value.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, D

    1979-07-01

    The width of the impulse response of multimode fibers with power law index profiles depends on the alpha-value of the power law exponent. For constant alpha, optimum pulse width is achievable only in a very narrow range of values centered around alpha = 2 - (12/5)Delta. We show in this paper that the optimum width of the impulse response is achievable for fibers with nonoptimum alpha-values provided alpha varies slowly along the fiber and deviates on average by equal amounts to either side of its (constant) optimum value.

  20. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or ...

  1. On the maximal diphoton width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvio, Alberto; Staub, Florian; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into γγ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  2. Advances in high-power harmonic generation: Q-switched lasers with electronically adjustable pulse width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyres, Loren A.; Morehead, James J.; Gregg, Jeffrey; Richard, Derek J.; Grossman, William

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate a variable pulse width, internally-frequency-converted, near-diffraction-limited Nd:YAG laser with output power up to 40 Watts at 532 nm and pulse widths electronically adjustable over a 40-300 ns range. The variable pulse width is achieved by clipping the pulse decaying edge with the Q-switch in a laser cavity optimized for post-pulse gain insensitivity. This approach makes possible frequency converted lasers with pulse width and output power substantially independent of repetition rate.

  3. Fine structure of cluster decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O.

    1994-03-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach, expressions are derived for the hindrance factors of cluster radioactive decays in which {ital y} {ital the} {ital shell} {ital model} {ital with} {ital effective} {ital residual} {ital interactions} [{ital e}.{ital g}.,{ital thelar} in the Michigan State University version for nearly spherical nuclei, or the enlarged superfluid model (ESM) recently proposed for deformed nuclei]. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the M3Y interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Cm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra, and {sup 34}Si decay of {sup 243}Cm. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained.

  4. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  5. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  6. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  7. Resonances in (11)C observed in the (4)He((7)Be, alpha)(7)Be and (4)He((7)Be, p)(10)B reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Malcolm, J.; Munoz-Britton, T.; Price, D.; Wheldon, C.; Achouri, N. L.; Demaret, P.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Pain, Steven D; Brown, S.; Catford, W.; Harlin, Christopher W; Thomas, J. S.; Wilson, G.; Chipps, K.; Milin, M.; Raabe, R.; Soic, N.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the {sup 4}He({sup 7}Be,{alpha}){sup 7}Be and {sup 4}He({sup 7}Be,p){sup 10}B reactions were performed using {sup 7}Be beam energies of 7.1 and 23 MeV and a helium-4 target, employing the thick target technique. Resonances were observed between E{sub x}({sup 11}C) = 8.6 to 13.8 MeV. An R-matrix analysis was performed to characterize the spins and partial widths. This analysis showed that the observed sequence of states was consistent with that found for {sup 7}Li + {alpha} resonant scattering populating resonances in {sup 11}B. A comparison of the proposed partial widths for decay with the Wigner limit indicates that several of the states are associated with cluster-like structures.

  8. Direct top-quark width measurement at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths (Γ(t)) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale (Δ(JES)) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where Δ(JES) is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γ(t) <7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of 0.3 GeV <Γ(t) <4.4  GeV for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), which are consistent with the standard model prediction.

  9. Decay properties of {sup 265}Sg(Z=106) and {sup 266}Sg(Z=106)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, A.; Dressler, R.; Eichler, B.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T. |; Schaedel, M.; Bruechle, W.; Gregorich, K.E.; Trautmann, N.; Taut, S.

    1998-04-01

    The presently known most neutron-rich isotopes of element 106 (seaborgium, Sg), {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg, were produced in the fusion reaction {sup 22}Ne+{sup 248}Cm at beam energies of 121 and 123 MeV. Using the On-Line Gas chemistry Apparatus OLGA, a continuous separation of Sg was achieved within a few seconds. Final products were assayed by {alpha}-particle and spontaneous fission (SF) spectrometry. {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg were identified by observing time correlated {alpha}-{alpha}-({alpha}) and {alpha}-SF decay chains. A total of 13 correlated decay chains of {sup 265}Sg (with an estimated number of 2.8 random correlations) and 3 decay chains of {sup 266}Sg (0.6 random correlations) were identified. Deduced decay properties were T{sub 1/2}=7.4{sub {minus}2.7}{sup +3.3} s (68{percent} c.i.) and E{sub {alpha}}=8.69 MeV (8{percent}), 8.76 MeV (23{percent}), 8.84 MeV (46{percent}), and 8.94 MeV (23{percent}) for {sup 265}Sg; and T{sub 1/2}=21{sub {minus}12}{sup +20} s (68{percent} c.i.) and E{sub {alpha}}=8.52 MeV (33{percent}) and 8.77 MeV (66{percent}) for {sup 266}Sg. The resolution of the detectors was between 50{endash}100 keV (full width at half maximum). Upper limits for SF of {le}35{percent} and {le}82{percent} were established for {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg, respectively. The upper limits for SF are given with a 16{percent} error probability. Using the lower error limits of the half-lives of {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg, the resulting lower limits for the partial SF half-lives are T{sub 1/2}{sup SF}({sup 265}Sg){ge}13 s and T{sub 1/2}{sup SF}({sup 266}Sg){ge}11 s. Correspondingly, the partial {alpha}-decay half-lives are between T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}}({sup 265}Sg)=4.7{endash}16.5 s (68{percent} c.i.) and T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}}({sup 266}Sg)=9{endash}228 s (68{percent} c.i.), using the upper and lower error limits of the half-lives of {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg. The lower limit on the partial SF half-life of {sup 266}Sg is in good agreement with

  10. Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Graf C. P.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; La Cruz I. Heredia-De; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-05-04

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Gamma}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Gamma}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top-quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Gamma}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb}| < 0.59 for a high-mass fourth-generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth-generation quark-mixing matrix.

  11. An Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2012-01-01

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Lambda}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Lambda}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the CKM matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb'}| < 0.59 for a high mass fourth generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth generation quark mixing matrix.

  12. 23 CFR 658.15 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.15 Width. (a) No State shall impose a width limitation of more or less than 102 inches, or its approximate metric equivalent, 2.6 meters (102.36 inches)...

  13. Determination of the width of the top quark.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-01-14

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Γ(t), from the partial decay width Γ(t → Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top-quark production and from the branching fraction B(t → Wb) measured in tt events using up to 2.3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron pp Collider. The result is Γ(t) = 1.99(-0.55)(+0.69)  GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of τ(t) = (3.3(-0.9)(+1.3)) × 10(-25)   s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V(tb')| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  14. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2004-09-15

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form {eta}{sup {gamma}{sub 1}} with {eta} being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for {gamma}{sub 1} to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is <decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/{pi}M. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C({eta}) the scale factor and {alpha} determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  15. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  16. Expansion-cooled Lyman-alpha clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Robert C.; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1991-02-01

    It is shown that recent observations by Pettini et al. (1990) which indicate that low-N H I Ly-alpha forest lines have small velocity widths and that the velocity widths are positively correlated with N (H I) can be understood as the result of adiabatic cooling of expanding clouds. It is argued that expansion cooling can efficiently lower temperatures and velocity widths of diffuse ionized clouds, and that this trend of diminishing temperature and velocity width in a wide range of plausible cloud models is consistent with double-quasar data. Expansion can provide a natural explanation for the steep z-evolution of the cloud numbers.

  17. Anisotropic. cap alpha. -emission of on-line separated isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.; Vandeplassche, D.; van Walle, E.; Severijns, N.; Van Haverbeke, J.; Vanneste, L.

    1987-12-10

    The technical realization of particle detection at very low temperatures (4K) has made it possible to study for the first time the anisotropic ..cap alpha..-decay of oriented nuclei which have been produced, separated and implanted on line. The measured ..cap alpha..-angular distributions reveal surprising new results on nuclear aspects as well as in solid state physics. The nuclear structure information from these data questions the older ..cap alpha..-decay theoretical interpretation and urges for a reaxamination of the earliest work on anisotropic ..cap alpha..-decay.

  18. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  19. Optically thick line widths in pyrotechnic flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douda, B. E.; Exton, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experimentally determined sodium line widths for pyrotechnic flares are compared with simple analytical, optically-thick-line-shape calculations. Three ambient pressure levels are considered (760, 150 and 30 torr) for three different flare compositions. The measured line widths range from 1.3 to 481 A. The analytic procedure emphasizes the Lorentz line shape as observed under optically-thick conditions. Calculated widths are in good agreement with the measured values over the entire range.

  20. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, J. L.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2007-02-12

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  1. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  2. Vacuum decay in a soluble model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraz de Camargo F, A.; Shellard, R.C.; Marques, G.C.

    1984-03-15

    We study a field-theoretical model where the decay rate of the false vacuum can be computed up to the first quantum corrections in both the high-temperature and zero-temperature limits. We find that the dependence of the decay rate on the height and width of the potential barrier does not follow the same simple area rule as in the quantum-mechanical case. Furthermore, its behavior is strongly model dependent.

  3. Single-Majoron emission in. mu. decay

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, A.; Pich, A.; Bernabeu, J.

    1985-11-01

    The ..mu -->..etheta and ..mu -->..erho/sub L/ decays, where theta is a Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with the B-L breakdown and rho/sub L/ is a very light neutral Higgs boson, are evaluated in the framework of the triplet model of Gelmini and Roncadelli. It is shown that the widths of these decay modes may be comparable to the ..mu -->..e..gamma.. one.

  4. Combining LEP and LHC to bound the Higgs width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The correlation of on- and off-shell Higgs boson production at the LHC in gg →h* → ZZ has been used to bound the Higgs width. We propose an alternative complementary constraint which is only possible through the combination of LEP and LHC measurements. Precision electroweak measurements at LEP allow for the determination of indirect constraints on Higgs couplings to vector bosons by considering one-loop processes involving virtual Higgs exchange. As the indirect constraint is model dependent we will consider two specific models which modify the Higgs couplings and width, and our results will apply specifically to these models. By combining these LEP constraints with current LHC 8 TeV Higgs measurements a stronger limit on the Higgs width can be achieved than with LHC data alone. Looking to the future, a more robust constraint can be achieved by correlating LEP measurements with WBF Higgs production followed by Higgs decays to WW and ZZ. We will discuss the model dependence of this method in comparison to other proposed methods.

  5. Amplitude and Width Correlations in COBALT-57 and VANADIUM-49.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Prabha K.

    Angular distributions of the inelastically scattered protons and of the deexcitation (gamma)-rays in the ('56)Fe(p,p'(gamma)) reaction were measured for d-wave resonances in the proton energy range 3.10 to 4.01 MeV. The experiment was performed with an overall energy resolution of 350 to 400 eV (FWHM) at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory KN Van de Graaff accelerator and associated high resolution system. Results were obtained for 141 resonances; 83 resonances were assigned J('(pi)) = 5/2('+), while 58 resonances were assigned J('(pi)) = 3/2('+). Mixing parameters for the inelastic decay amplitudes were uniquely determined for the 5/2('+) resonances. For the 3/2('+) resonances sufficient information is not available from this experiment to extract a unique solution for the mixing parameters. Magnitudes and relative signs of three inelastic decay amplitudes were determined for the 5/2('+) resonances in ('57)Co. The angular distributions for the deexcitation (gamma)-rays were measured in coincidence with the inelastically scattered protons for 30 3/2('+) resonances in ('49)V in the proton energy region 2.2 to 3.1 MeV. The singles measurements from a previous experiment were combined with these coincidence measurements to eliminate the ambiguity in the solutions for the mixing parameters. Amplitude and width measurements were determined for the three decay channels for 30 3/2('+) resonances. Statistical analyses were performed on the set of 83 5/2('+) resonances in ('57)Co and on the set of 30 3/2('+) resonances in ('49)V. In both cases, large amplitude and width correlations are observed. These results are interpreted as evidence for direct reactions between the inelastic channels.

  6. HALF-LIVES OF LONG-LIVED A-DECAY, B-DECAY, BB-DECAY AND SPONTANEOUS FISSION NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    In his review of radionuclides for dating purposes, Roth noted that there were a large number of nuclides, normally considered ''stable'' but which are radioactive with a very long half-life. Roth suggested that I review the data on the half-life values of these long-lived nuclides for a discussion session at the next meeting. These half-life values for long-lived nuclides include those due to various decay modes, {alpha}-decay, {beta}-decay, electron capture decay, {beta}{beta}-decay and spontaneous fission decay. This report is preliminary but will provide a quick overview of the extensive table of data on the recommendations from that review.

  7. Unexpected Strong Decay Mode of Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.

    Calculations of half-lives of superheavy nuclei (SH) show an unexpected result: for some of them heavy particle radioactivity (HPR) dominates over alpha decay—the main decay mode of the majority of recently discovered SHs. The result is important for theory and future experiments producing heavier SHs with a substantial amount of funding. The standard identification technique by alpha decay chains will be impossible for these cases. HPR had been predicted in 1980 four years before the first experiment. The daughter is mainly the doubly magic ^{208}Pb. We changed the concept of HPR to allow emitted particles with Z_e > 28from parents with Z > 110 (daughter around ^{208}Pb). We find a trend toward shorter half-lives and larger branching ratios relative to alpha decay for heavier SHs. A new table of measured masses AME11 and the theoretical LiMaZe01, KTUY05 and FRDM95 tables are used to determine Q-values.

  8. Observation of parity violation in the Omega- ---> Lambda K- decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.C.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Choong, W.-S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.; Gidal, G.; Gustafson, H.R.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C.M.; Jones, T.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; Longo, M.J.; Luebke, W.; Luk, K.-B.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /UC, Berkeley /Fermilab /Guanajuato U. /IIT, Chicago /Lausanne U. /LBL, Berkeley /Michigan U. /South Alabama U. /Virginia U.

    2005-05-01

    The {alpha} decay parameter in the process {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -} has been measured from a sample of 4.50 million unpolarized {Omega}{sup -} decays recorded by the HyperCP (E871) experiment at Fermilab and found to be [1.78 {+-} 0.19(stat) {+-} 0.16(syst)] x 10{sup -2}. This is the first unambiguous evidence for a nonzero {alpha} decay parameter, and hence parity violation, in the {Omega}{sup -} {Lambda}K{sup -} decay.

  9. Critical comparison of Kramers' fission width with the stationary width from the Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Pal, Santanu

    2009-06-15

    It is shown that Kramers' fission width, originally derived for a system with constant inertia, can be extended to systems with a deformation-dependent collective inertia, which is the case for nuclear fission. The predictions of Kramers' width for systems with variable inertia are found to be in very good agreement with the stationary fission widths obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin equations.

  10. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  11. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  12. Radiative vacancies decay of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, Miron; Baltenkov, Arkadiy

    2006-05-01

    It is demonstrated that the fulleren shell affects dramatically the radiative vacancy decay of an endohedral atom A@C60. It also adds new possibilities to radiative and non-radiative decay by opening a number of new interchannel decays similar to that in ordinary atoms where initial and final state vacancies almost always belong to different subshells. We demonstrate that the radiative width of a vacancy decay due to electron transition in the atom A in A@C60 acquire an additional factor that can be expressed via the polarizability of the C60 at transition energy. In general, it can not only enhance but also totally lock the radiative decay channel. For vacancies in subvalent shells of noble gas atoms N the non-radiative decay is forbidden. For N@C60 this decay is allowed since can proceed due to transition of fulleren shell electron to the vacancy in N. Corresponding width is expressed via the C60 total photoabsorption cross-section at the transition energy.

  13. Perch width preferences of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Struelens, E; Tuyttens, F A M; Ampe, B; Odberg, F; Sonck, B; Duchateau, L

    2009-07-01

    1. In order to investigate the effect of perch width on perching behaviour of laying hens, two experiments in which hens could choose between 7 different perch widths (1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, 9.0 and 10.5 cm) were conducted. In one experiment (EXP-2P) test cages contained two long perches gradually broadening and narrowing stepwise, in the other experiment (EXP-7P) 7 separate short perches differing in width were placed in the test cages. In each experiment 12 groups of 4 hens were filmed during day and night. The behaviour and location of the hens were recorded and whether the nest box affected hen distribution over the perches was investigated. 2. During daytime, in EXP-2P, there was an increase in perch use with increasing perch width. Hens spent less time on perches of 1.5 cm wide compared to perches of 9.0 and 10.5 cm wide. In EXP-7P, the 1.5-cm wide perch was also used the least (but only the difference with 4.5-cm wide perches was statistically significant) but perch use did not increase linearly with perch width. During the night, there were no significant perch width preferences in either experiment. 3. The percentage of active behaviours (preening, walking, drinking, pecking at hen) versus passive behaviours (standing, sitting, sleeping) did not differ significantly according to perch width. 4. In EXP-7P, there was a trend for perch use to decrease with greater distances to the nest box in the morning. 5. A perch width of 1.5 cm is not recommended for laying hens. For wider perch widths, results were equivocal: they tend to support rather than challenge the widespread use of 4.5-cm wide perches in commercial units.

  14. On the holographic width of flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giataganas, Dimitrios; Irges, Nikos

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the width of the flux tube between heavy static quark charges. Using the gauge/gravity duality, we find the properties of the minimal connected surface related to the width of the bound state. We show that in the confining phase, the logarithmic broadening predicted by the effective string description and observed in lattice simulations is a generic property of all confining backgrounds. We also study the transverse fluctuations of the string connecting two static quarks in curved backgrounds. Our formalism is applied to AdS space where we compute the expectation value of the square of transverse deviations of the string, a quantity related to the width.

  15. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  16. FDCSUSYDecay: An MSSM decay package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Wang, Jian-xiong

    2007-08-01

    FDCSUSYDecay is a FORTRAN program package generated by FDC (Feynman Diagram Calculation) system fully automatically. It is dedicated to calculate at tree-level all the possible 2-body decays of SUSY and Higgs particles in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). The format of its output files complies with SUSY Les Houches Accord and can be easily imported by other packages. Program summaryManuscript title:FDCSUSYDecay: An MSSM decay package Authors:Wei Qi, Jian-xiong Wang Program title:FDCSUSYDecay (Version 1.00) Catalogue identifier:ADYV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:22 008 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:622 751 Distribution format:tar.gz Programming language:FORTRAN 77 Operating system:Linux Keywords:SUSY decay, MSSM, FDC PACS:02.70.-c, 12.60.Jv Classification:11.1, 11.6 External routines:CERNLIB 2003 (or up) Nature of problem: This package can calculate all the possible SUSY particle and Higgs 2-body decay width and branch ratio at tree-level in the MSSM model. Solution method: By running FDC, the Feynman rules for the MSSM model are generated, all the decay widths are calculated analytically and corresponding FORTRAN codes are generated for this package. Running time: Less than 1 second for both high-scale and low-scale modes on a Pentium IV 2.4 GHz machine (512 MB memory).

  17. 7 CFR 29.6054 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6054 Width. The relative breadth of a tobacco leaf expressed in relation to its length. (See chart.) Elements of Quality...

  18. Some (not so) Recent Results From Continuum Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2010-11-24

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order multiparticle correlation experiments to be done. The first round of experiments done by our collaboration has lead to the highest quality data on the decay of {sup 6}Be(into an alpha particle and 2 protons), detailed how the continuum states of {sup 10}C decay (into 2 alphas and 2 protons) and lead to finding several previously unknown states in light nuclei and casting doubt on some states found by others.

  19. Finite banana width effect on magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.P.; Tsai, S.T.

    1995-08-01

    The finite banana width (FBW) effect on the coupling between magnetoacoustic waves and the near harmonic gyro-oscillations of the energetic ions/{alpha} particles in tokamaks are studied. The gyrokinetic equation with FBW effect is rederived for the energetic trapped ions. The dispersion relation and growth rate of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MACI) are obtained. It is found that the coherence interaction between the energetic ion trajectory and mode field has a significant effect when the Larmor radius of energetic ions is larger than the wavelength of MACI. Near the low field side the FBW effect destabilizes the mode, while away from it the FBW gives a stabilizing effect. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Covariant calculation of strange decays of baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sengl, B.; Melde, T.; Plessas, W.

    2007-09-01

    We present results for kaon decay widths of baryon resonances from a relativistic study with constituent quark models. The calculations are done in the point form of Poincare-invariant quantum mechanics with a spectator-model decay operator. We obtain covariant predictions of the Goldstone-boson-exchange and a variant of the one-gluon-exchange constituent quark models for all kaon decay widths of established baryon resonances. They are generally characterized by underestimating the available experimental data. In particular, the widths of kaon decays with decreasing strangeness in the baryon turn out to be extremely small. We also consider the nonrelativistic limit, leading to the familiar elementary emission model, and demonstrate the importance of relativistic effects. It is found that the nonrelativistic approach evidently misses sensible influences from Lorentz boosts and some essential spin-coupling terms.

  1. Experiments to Further the Understanding of the Triple-Alpha Process in Hot Astrophysical Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N. R.; Greife, U.; Rehm, K. E.; Greene, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lee, H. Y.; Pardo, R.; Teh, K.; Deibel, C. M.; Notani, M.; Marley, S. T.; Tang, X. D.

    2009-03-04

    In astrophysics, the first excited 0{sup +} state of {sup 12}C at 7.654 MeV (Hoyle state) is the most important in the triple-{alpha} process for carbon nucleosynthesis. In explosive scenarios like supernovae, where temperatures of several 10{sup 9} K are achieved, the interference of the Hoyle state with the second 0{sup +} state located at 10.3 MeV in {sup 12}C becomes significant. The recent NACRE compilation of astrophysical reaction rates assumes a 2{sup +} resonance at 9.1 MeV for which no experimental evidence exists. Thus, it is critical to explore in more detail the 7-10 MeV excitation energy region, especially the minimum between the two 0{sup +} resonances for carbon nucleosynthesis. The states in {sup 12}C were populated through the {beta}-decay of {sup 12}B and {sup 12}N produced at the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) in-flight facility. The decay of {sup 12}C into three alphas is detected in a Frisch grid twin ionization chamber, acting as a low-threshold calorimeter. This minimizes the effects of {beta}-summing and allowed us to investigate the minimum above the Hoyle state with much higher accuracy than previously possible. A detailed data analysis will include an R-matrix fit to determine an upper limit on the 2{sup +} resonance width.

  2. Determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-09-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t {yields} Wb) measured in t{bar t} events using up to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The result is {Lambda}{sub t} = 1.99{sub -0.55}{sup +0.69} GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.3{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3}) x 10{sup -25} s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b{prime} quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V{sub tb{prime}}| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  3. Combination of CDF and D0 Results on the W-Boson Width

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-12-01

    The results on the direct measurements of the W-boson width, based on the data collected by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 at Fermilab during Run-I from 1992 to 1996 and Run-II since 2001 are summarized. The combination of the published Run-I and preliminary Run-II results, taking correlated uncertainties properly into account, is presented. The resulting preliminary Tevatron average for the total decay width of the W boson is: {Lambda}{sub W} = 2078 {+-} 87 MeV, where the total error consists of a statistical part of 62 MeV and a systematic part of 60 MeV.

  4. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  5. Measurement of the angle alpha at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.; /Orsay, LAL

    2009-06-25

    The authors present recent measurements of the CKM angle {alpha} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They present constraints on {alpha} from B {yields} {pi}{pi}, B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B {yields} {rho}{pi} decays.

  6. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wiss, J.

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  7. The Stokes line width and uncertainty relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikishov, A. I.; Ritus, V. I.

    1994-01-01

    For a function given by contour integral the two types (conventions) of asymptotic representations are considered: the usual representation by asymptotic series in inverse powers of large parameters and the special division of contour integral in contributions of high and low saddle points. It is shown that the width of the recessive term formation zone (Stokes strip) in the second convention is determined by uncertainty relation and is much less than the zone width in the first convention. The reasons of such a difference is clarified. The results of the work are useful for understanding of formation region of the exponentially small process arising on the background of the strong one.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  9. Experimental study of the decays of 112Cs and 111Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Cartegni, L.; Mazzocchi, C.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Darby, Iain; Liddick, Sean; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batchelder, J. C.; Bianco, L.; Bingham, Carrol R; Freeman, E.; Goodin, C.; Gross, Carl J; Guglielmetti, A.; Joss, D. T.; Liu, S. H.; Mazzocco, M.; Padgett, Stephen; Page, R. D.; Rajabali, M. M.; Romoli, M.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Watkins, H. V.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment to search for alpha decay of 112Cs has been performed at the Holield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The alpha decay of 112Cs was not observed, thus setting the upper limit of the alpha branching ratio at 0.21%. The half-life of 112Cs was measured as 410 40 s. In the same measurement the decay properties of its daughter 111Xe and granddaughter 107Te were also reinvestigated. The newly measured alpha branching ratio for 111Xe is 9:6 1:1 %.

  10. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  11. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Width. 29.1085 Section 29.1085 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ) (2 ) Waste tolerance (2 ) (2 ) (2 ) 1 Expressed in inches. 2 Expressed in percentage. elements...

  12. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Route width. 121.115 Section 121.115 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  13. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density. (5) ATC procedures. (b) Any... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Route width. 121.95 Section 121.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Width. 29.1085 Section 29.1085 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep....

  15. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Route width. 121.115 Section 121.115 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR...

  16. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Route width. 121.95 Section 121.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Approval of Routes: Domestic and Flag Operations § 121.95 Route...

  17. Evolution of niche width and adaptive diversification.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Martin; Doebeli, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Theoretical models suggest that resource competition can lead to the adaptive splitting of consumer populations into diverging lineages, that is, to adaptive diversification. In general, diversification is likely if consumers use only a narrow range of resources and thus have a small niche width. Here we use analytical and numerical methods to study the consequences for diversification if the niche width itself evolves. We found that the evolutionary outcome depends on the inherent costs or benefits of widening the niche. If widening the niche did not have costs in terms of overall resource uptake, then the consumer evolved a niche that was wide enough for disruptive selection on the niche position to vanish; adaptive diversification was no longer observed. However, if widening the niche was costly, then the niche widths remained relatively narrow, allowing for adaptive diversification in niche position. Adaptive diversification and speciation resulting from competition for a broadly distributed resource is thus likely if the niche width is fixed and relatively narrow or free to evolve but subject to costs. These results refine the conditions for adaptive diversification due to competition and formulate them in a way that might be more amenable for experimental investigations. PMID:15696740

  18. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Flue-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 11, 12, 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1085 Width. The relative breadth of a tobacco leaf expressed in relation to its length... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep....

  19. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Flue-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 11, 12, 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1085 Width. The relative breadth of a tobacco leaf expressed in relation to its length... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep....

  20. Definition of the {delta} mass and width

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, D.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2007-08-01

    In the framework of effective field theory we show that, at two-loop order, the mass and width of the {delta} resonance defined via the (relativistic) Breit-Wigner parametrization both depend on the choice of field variables. In contrast, the complex-valued position of the pole of the propagator is independent of this choice.

  1. The sensitivity of the Higgs boson branching ratios to the W boson width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, William

    2016-07-01

    The Higgs boson branching ratio into vector bosons is sensitive to the decay widths of those vector bosons because they are produced with at least one boson significantly off-shell. Γ (H → VV) is approximately proportional to the product of the Higgs boson coupling and the vector boson width. ΓZ is well measured, but ΓW gives an uncertainty on Γ (H → WW) which is not negligible. The ratio of branching ratios, BR (H → WW) / BR (H → ZZ) measured by a combination of ATLAS and CMS at LHC is used herein to extract a width for the W boson of ΓW =1.8-0.3+0.4 GeV by assuming Standard Model couplings of the Higgs bosons. This dependence of the branching ratio on ΓW is not discussed in most Higgs boson coupling analyses.

  2. Two-step mechanisms of two-proton decays of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Ivankov, Yu. V.

    2014-08-01

    A formalism for describing two-step two-proton decays of nuclei is developed on the basis of the multiparticle theory of deep-subbarrier one-proton decays of nuclei that employs integral expression for the decay widths in question. This formalism relies on the idea that the interaction between the emitted protons has but a slight effect on the widths with respect to the two-proton decays being considered. It is shown that such a decay is naturally broken down into the sequential one-proton decays of an ( A, Z) parent nucleus and an ( A - 1, Z - 1) intermediate nucleus, these decays being related by the Green's function G( A - 1, Z - 1) that describes the intermediate nucleus with allowance for its real and virtual states, which give rise to, respectively, the sequential and the virtual two-step two-proton decay of the parent nucleus. It is also shown that the widths with respect to sequential two-step two-proton decays coincide with the analogous widths constructed within the R-matrix theory of nuclear reactions leading to the production of unstable particles and with their counterparts obtained with the aid of solving the set of kinetic equations for the chain of nuclei undergoing radioactive decays. It is found that the widths with respect to virtual two-step two-proton decays are close in structure to the widths constructed for the simultaneous two-proton decays of nuclei by using integrated formulas within a simplified model of the method of three-particle hyperspherical polynomials.

  3. Fine structure in the cluster decays of the translead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O. |; Cioaca, C.

    1995-06-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach several hindrance factors for the radioactive decays in which are emitted {sup 4}He, {sup 14}C, and {sup 20}O atomic nuclei are calculated. The interior wave functions are supposed to be given by the recently proposed enlarged superfluid model, an extension of the JINR-Dubna`s quasiparticle phonon nuclear model. The spectroscopic factors are expanded in terms of products of cluster overlaps and intrinsic overlap integrals. The cluster overlaps are equivalents of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage, while for the intrinsic overlap integrals we construct a model, which is an extension of the usual models for simple particle decay such as deuteron, triton, and {alpha} decay. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the {ital M}3{ital Y} interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Fm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 20}O decay of {sup 229}Th and {sup 255}Fm. A relatively good agreement with the experimental data is obtained especially in the case of the {alpha}-decay fine structure.

  4. Kaon decay interferometry as meson dynamics probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ambrosio, G.; Paver, N.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the time-dependent interferences between KL and KS in the decays in 3π and ππγ, to be studied at interferometry machines such as the φ factory and CERN LEAR. We emphasize the possibilities and the advantages of using interferences, in comparision with width measurements, to obtain information both on CP-conserving and CP-violating amplitudes. Comparision with present data and suggestions for future experiments are made.

  5. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  6. Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha with the B-factories.

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, Adrian; /Liverpool U.

    2005-12-21

    B-meson decays involving b {yields} u transitions are sensitive to the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}). The B-factories at SLAC and KEK have made significant progress toward the measurement of {alpha} in recent years. This paper summarizes the results of the B-factories' constraints on {alpha}.

  7. Decays of excited baryons in the large Nc expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity; Norberto Scoccola

    2006-05-06

    We present the analysis of the decay widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  8. Digital signal processing for radioactive decay studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Miernik, K.; Rykaczewski, K.; Tan, H.

    2011-11-30

    The use of digital acquisition system has been instrumental in the investigation of proton and alpha emitting nuclei. Recent developments extend the sensitivity and breadth of the application. The digital signal processing capabilities, used predominately by UT/ORNL for decay studies, include digitizers with decreased dead time, increased sampling rates, and new innovative firmware. Digital techniques and these improvements are furthermore applicable to a range of detector systems. Improvements in experimental sensitivity for alpha and beta-delayed neutron emitters measurements as well as the next generation of superheavy experiments are discussed.

  9. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, G; Zalutsky, M R

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as 211At and 212Bi which decay by the emission of alpha-particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of 212Bi and 211At alpha-particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the beta-particles emitted by radionuclides such as 131I and 90Y, alpha-particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with 212Bi- and 211At-labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[211At]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by [3H]thymidine incorporation and by limiting dilution clonogenic assays, for human neuroblastoma cells is of the order of 1000 times higher than that of meta-[131I] iodobenzylguanidine. For meta-[211At] astatobenzylguanidine, the Do value was equivalent to only 6-7 211At atoms bound per cell. These results suggest that meta-[211At] astatobenzylguanidine might be valuable for the targeted radiotherapy of micrometastatic neuroblastomas.

  10. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping. PMID:27505755

  11. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    DOEpatents

    Slicker, James M.

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  12. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping.

  13. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  14. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  15. SDECAY: a Fortran code for the decays of the supersymmetric particles in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlleitner, M.; Djouadi, A.; Mambrini, Y.

    2005-05-01

    We present the Fortran code SDECAY, which calculates the decay widths and branching ratios of all the supersymmetric particles in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, including higher order effects. Besides the usual two-body decays of sfermions and gauginos and the three-body decays of charginos, neutralinos and gluinos, we have also implemented the three-body decays of stops and sbottoms, and even the four-body decays of the stop; the important loop-induced decay modes are also included. The QCD corrections to the two-body decays involving strongly interacting particles and the dominant components of the electroweak corrections to all decay modes are implemented. Program summaryTitle of program: SDECAY Version 1.1a (March 2005) Catalogue identifier: ADVJ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVJ Program obtainable: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed: Any with a Fortran77 system Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Linux, Unix Typical running time: A few seconds on modern personal computers and workstations Programming language used: Fortran77 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 59 621 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 338 478 Distribution format: tar.gz Memory required to execute (with test data): 7.3 MB Distribution format: ASCII Nature of physical problem: Numerical calculation of the decay widths and branching ratios of supersymmetric particles in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The program calculates two-, three- and four-body decays and loop decays. It includes the SUSY-QCD corrections to two-body decays involving strongly interacting particles. The top-quark decays within the MSSM are evaluated as well. Method of solution: Two-dimensional numerical integration of the analytic formulae for the double differential decay widths of the three

  16. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  17. Lunar Surface Outgassing and Alpha Particle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, R. D.; Binder, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-218 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. Once released, the radon spreads out by "bouncing" across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a randomwalk process. The half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays (depositing approximately half of the polonium-218 recoil nuclides on the lunar surface) and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to several days after they occur. The long residence time of the lead-210 precursor to polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 60 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution.

  18. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  20. Alpha Coincidence Spectroscopy studied with GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-11-02

    Abstract The high-energy side of peaks in alpha spectra, e.g. 241Am, as measured with a silicon detector has structure caused mainly by alpha-conversion electron and to some extent alphagamma coincidences. We compare GEANT4 simulation results to 241Am alpha spectroscopy measurements with a passivated implanted planar silicon detector. A large discrepancy between the measurements and simulations suggest that the GEANT4 photon evaporation database for 237Np (daughter of 241Am decay) does not accurately describe the conversion electron spectrum and therefore was found to have large discrepancies with experimental measurements. We describe how to improve the agreement between GEANT4 and alpha spectroscopy for actinides of interest by including experimental measurements of conversion electron spectroscopy into the photon evaporation database.

  1. A Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement from Lepton + Jets Events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width using t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. In the mode where the top quark decays to a W boson and a bottom quark, we select events in which one W decays leptonically and the other hadronically (lepton + jets channel) . From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of W boson that decays hadronically are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths ({Lambda}{sub t}) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale ({Delta}{sub JES}) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where {Delta}{sub JES} is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of {Lambda}{sub t} < 7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of 0.3 GeV < {Lambda}{sub t} < 4.4 GeV for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}, which are consistant with the standard model prediction. This is the first direct measurement of {Lambda}{sub t} to set a lower limit with 68% CL.

  2. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the Ds1(2536)+ Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    The decay width and mass of the D{sub s1}(2536){sup +} meson are measured via the decay channel D{sub s1}{sup +} {yields} D*{sup +} K{sub S}{sup 0} using 385 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector in the vicinity of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. The result for the decay width is {Gamma}(D{sub s1}{sup +}) = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 (stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.)MeV. For the mass, a value of m(D{sub s1}{sup +}) = 2535.08 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.15 (syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} is obtained. The mass difference between the D{sub s1}{sup +} and the D*{sup +} is measured to be m(D{sub s1}{sup +})-m(D*{sup +}) = 524.83 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, representing a significant improvement compared to the current world average. The unnatural spin-parity assignment for the D{sub s1}{sup +} meson is confirmed.

  3. DO QUASAR BROAD-LINE VELOCITY WIDTHS ADD ANY INFORMATION TO VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Croom, Scott M.

    2011-08-01

    We examine how much information measured broad-line widths add to virial black hole (BH) mass estimates for flux-limited samples of quasars. We do this by comparing the BH mass estimates to those derived by randomly reassigning the quasar broad-line widths to different objects and re-calculating the BH mass. For 9000 BH masses derived from the H{beta} line we find that the distributions of original and randomized BH masses in the M{sub BH}-redshift plane and the M{sub BH}-luminosity plane are formally identical. A two-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test does not find a difference at >90% confidence. For the Mg II line (32,000 quasars) we do find very significant differences between the randomized and original BH masses, but the amplitude of the difference is still small. The difference for the C IV line (14,000 quasars) is 2{sigma}-3{sigma} and again the amplitude of the difference is small. Subdividing the data into redshift and luminosity bins we find that the median absolute difference in BH mass between the original and randomized data is 0.025, 0.01, and 0.04 dex for H{beta}, Mg II, and C IV, respectively. The maximum absolute difference is always {<=}0.1 dex. We investigate whether our results are sensitive to corrections to Mg II virial masses, such as those suggested by Onken and Kollmeier. These corrections do not influence our results, other than to reduce the significance of the difference between original and randomized BH masses to only 1{sigma}-2{sigma} for Mg II. Moreover, we demonstrate that the correlation between mass residuals and Eddington ratio discussed by Onken and Kollmeier is more directly attributable to the slope of the relation between H{beta} and Mg II line width. The implication is that the measured quasar broad-line velocity widths provide little extra information, after allowing for the mean velocity width. In this case virial estimates are equivalent to M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sup {alpha}}, with L/L{sub Edd

  4. Direct measurement of the W boson width.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-12-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W --> enu candidate events. Data from approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded at square root of s = 1.96 TeV by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are analyzed. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 +/- 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model. PMID:20366142

  5. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  6. Evidence for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Caponio, F.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Sidorov, F.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-05-01

    Evidence is presented for the decay using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected with the LHCb detector. A signal yield of 32 ± 8 decays is found with a significance of 4.5 standard deviations. The ratio of the branching fraction of the decay to that of the decay is measured to be where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Cluster decay in osmium isotopes using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Nithu; Joseph, Deepthy Maria; Joseph, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Cluster radioactivity is a rare cold nuclear process which is intermediate between alpha decay and spontaneous fission. The present work is a theoretical investigation of the feasibility of alpha decay and cluster radioactivity from proton rich Osmium (Os) isotopes with mass number ranging from 162-190. Osmium forms a part of the transition region between highly deformed and spherical nuclei. Calculations have been done using unified fission model and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory. We have chosen only those decays with half-lives falling in measurable range. Geiger-Nuttall plot has been successfully reproduced. The isotope which is most favorable to each decay mode has a magic daughter nucleus.

  8. The effect of seal width on regenerator effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of axial conduction on regenerator effectiveness has been studied in the past under the assumption of zero seal width. The effect of axial conduction coupled with finite seal width is presented in this paper. A method for calculating effectiveness assuming axial conduction and finite seal width is presented. Results of sample calculations are presented to give the designer a feel for the dependence of seal width effects on system-parameter values. It is shown that for typical regenerator designs, reductions in effectiveness due to axial conduction coupled with finite seal width can be twice as great as those due to axial conduction under the assumption of zero seal width. Also, it is shown that the required regenerator size to achieve a given effectiveness can increase dramatically when finite seal width is considered in design procedures. It is concluded that consideration of axial conduction should include finite seal width.

  9. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H→WW

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the potential of the process gg → H→ WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H→ ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H → WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H → ZZ.

  10. Giant dipole resonance width in nuclei near Sn at low temperature and high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Gupta, D.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-02-15

    High energy {gamma} rays in coincidence with low energy yrast {gamma} rays have been measured from {sup 113}Sb, at excitation energies of 109 and 122 MeV, formed by bombarding {sup 20}Ne on {sup 93}Nb at projectile energies of 145 and 160 MeV, respectively, to study the role of angular momentum (J) and temperature (T) over giant dipole resonance (GDR) width ({gamma}). The maximum populated angular momenta for fusion were 67({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 73({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), respectively, for the above-mentioned beam energies. The high energy photons were detected using a Large Area Modular BaF{sub 2} Detector Array (LAMBDA) along with a 24-element multiplicity filter. After pre-equilibrium corrections, the excitation energy E* was averaged over the decay steps of the compound nucleus (CN). The average values of temperature, angular momentum, CN mass, etc., have been calculated using the statistical model code CASCADE. Using those average values, results show the systematic increase of GDR width with T, which is consistent with Kusnezov parametrization and the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The rise of GDR width with temperature also supports the assumptions of adiabatic coupling in the TSFM. But the GDR widths and corresponding reduced plots with J are not consistent with those of the theoretical model at high spins.

  11. Relativistic calculation of the width of the {theta}{sup +}(1540) pentaquark

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hu; Shakin, C.M.; Li Xiangdong

    2005-06-01

    We calculate the width of the {theta}{sup +}(1540) pentaquark in a relativistic model in which the pentaquark is considered to be composed of a scalar diquark and a spin 1/2 triquark. We consider both positive and negative parity for the pentaquark. There is a single parameter in our model which we vary and which describes the size of the pentaquark. If the pentaquark size is somewhat smaller than that of the nucleon, we find quite small widths for the pentaquark of about 1 MeV or less. Our model of confinement plays an important role in our analysis and makes it possible to use Feynman diagrams to describe the decay of the pentaquark.

  12. 2p-2p decay of {sup 8}C and isospin-allowed 2p decay of the isobaric-analog state in {sup 8}B

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Manfredi, J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Kilburn, M.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J.; Youngs, M.; Marley, S. T.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Ghosh, T. K.

    2010-10-15

    {sup 8}C is found to decay to four protons and an {alpha} particle in two 2p emission steps. The correlations between the protons in the first step ({sup 8}C to {sup 6}Be) exhibit a significant enhancement in the region of the decay phase space where the two protons have small relative energy, a region sometimes called the diproton region. The decay of the isobaric analog of {sup 8}C in {sup 8}B is also found to decay by 2p emission. This is the first case of isospin-allowed 2p decay between isobaric analog states.

  13. Double production of vector quarkonia in exclusive Higgs boson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kartvelishvili, V. G.; Luchinsky, A. V. Novoselov, A. A.

    2010-06-15

    Partial widths with respect to the exclusive decays of Standard Model Higgs bosons to pairs of vector quarkonia, H {sup {yields}}J/{psi}J/{psi}, H {sup {yields}}YY, H {sup {yields}}J/{psi}{phi}, and H {sup {yields}}J/{psi}Y, were calculated with allowance for relativistic corrections associated with the internal motion of quarks in qarkonia.

  14. Observation of the eta/sub c/(2980) produced in the radiative decay of the psi'(3684)

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T.M.; Trilling, G.H.; Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Blondel, A.P.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Levi, M.E.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Vella, E.N.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1980-10-06

    In a study of psi'(3684) radiative decays with the Mark II detector at SPEAR, the decay sequence psi'..--> gamma..eta/sub c/(2980) is observed, with the eta/sub c/(2980) decaying into several completely reconstructed hadronic modes. A mass M=2980 +- 8 MeV/c/sup 2/ and a width GAMMA<40 MeV/c/sup 2/ (90% confidence level) are obtained, and estimates of some of the decay branching ratios are presented.

  15. Real time pulse width monitor for Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) electro-optic shutters

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described or controlling and measuring the pulse width of electrical gate pulses used for optical shuttering of image intensifier. The intensifiers are coupled to high frame rate Charge-Coupled-Devices (CCD) or Focus-Projection Scan (FPS) vidicon TV cameras for readout and telemetry of time resolved image sequences. The shutter duration or gate width of individual shutters is measured in real time and encoded in the video frame corresponding to a given shutter interval. The shutter information is updated once catch video frame by strobing new data with each TV camera vertical sync pulse. This circuitry is used in conjunction with commercial video insertion/annotation equipment to provide die shutter width information in alpha numeric text form along with the time resolved video image on a frame-by-frame basis. The measurement technique and circuitry involving a combination of high speed digital counters and analog integrators for measurements in the Ins to 1024 ns range are described. The accuracy obtained is compared with measurements obtained using batch speed DSOs. The measured data are provided in 10-bit Binary (Bi) and four decades of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) and also displayed on four digit seven segment displays. The control circuitry including digital and analog input means for gate width selection are described. The implementation of both measurement and control circuitry into an Intensified Shuttered CCD (ISCCD) radiometric system for recording fast shuttered images at RS-170 to 4 KHz frame rates is presented.

  16. Mesonic Decay of Charm Hypernuclei Λc+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Fontoura, Carlos E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-03-01

    Λc+ hypernuclei are expected to have binding energies and other properties similar to those of strange hypernuclei in view of the similarity between the quark structures of the strange and charmed hyperons, namely Λ(uds) and Λc+(udc). One striking difference however occurs in their mesonic decays, as there is almost no Pauli blocking in the nucleonic decay of a charm hypernucleus because the final-state nucleons leave the nucleus at high energies. The nuclear medium nevertheless affects the mesonic decays of charm hypernucleus because the nuclear mean fields modify the masses of the charm hyperon. In the present communication we present results of a first investigation of the effects of finite baryon density on different weak mesonic decay channels of the Λc+ baryon. We found a non-negligible reduction of the decay widths as compared to their vacuum values.

  17. Strong Lyman-alpha emission in three distant radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinrad, H.; Filippenko, A. V.; Wyckoff, S.; Wagner, R. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Very strong, narrow Lyman alpha emission (equivalent width approximately 1000 angstroms) has been discovered in the redshifted ultraviolet spectra of three radio galaxies having z between 1.62 and 1.82. The three are 3C 256, 3C 239, and 3C 241. It is noted that Lyman alpha will probably be a very useful redshift and classification determinant in future spectroscopic surveys of active galaxies at still greater distances.

  18. Measurement of the $W$ Boson Mass and Width at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boline, Daniel; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2011-10-01

    I present a precise measurement of W boson mass measurement in electron decay channel using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A binned likelihood fit method is used to extract the mass information from the transverse mass, the electron transverse momentum and missing transverse energy distributions. I also present a precise direct measurement ofWboson width using the events with large transverse mass. The W mass result can be used to put stringent indirect limits on the Standard Model Higgs boson mass.

  19. Measurement of the in-medium Φ-meson width in proton–nucleus collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Polyanskiy, A.; Hartmann, M.; Kiselev, Yu. T.; Paryev, E. Ya.; Büscher, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; et al

    2010-10-28

    We measured the production of Φ mesons in the collisions of 2.83 GeV protons with C, Cu, Ag, and Au at forward angles via the Φ → K+K- decay using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. The Φ meson production cross section follows a target mass dependence of A0.56±0.02 in the momentum region of 0.6-1.6 GeV/c. Moreover, the comparison of the data with model calculations suggests that the in-medium Φ width is about an order of magnitude larger than its free value.

  20. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  1. Hadronic D decays involving even-parity light mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chiang, C.-W.

    2010-04-01

    We study the hadronic D meson decays into a pseudoscalar meson P and an even-parity meson M, where M represents a scalar meson S, an axial-vector meson A, or a tensor meson T. These decays are first analyzed in the flavor-diagram approach. Fits to the SP modes with S being a nonstrange scalar meson show that neither the simple qq picture nor the q{sup 2}q{sup 2} scheme is favored by data. Current measurements on the AP decays are insufficient for a meaningful analysis. Some TP data are inconsistent with the others. In certain cases, the W-annihilation diagrams indicated by the data are unexpectedly large. As a comparison, we also compute their decay rates in the factorization approach using form factors extracted from the covariant light-front model. We find that factorization works well for Cabibbo-allowed D{sup +{yields}}SP, AP decays free of the weak annihilation contributions (W-exchange or W-annihilation). For the other SP and AP modes, it is necessary to include weak annihilation contributions to account for the data. However, factorization fails for D{yields}TP decays for some unknown reason; the predicted rates are in general too small by at least 2 orders of magnitude compared to experiment. We also examine the finite-width effects of resonances. Some decay modes which are kinematically forbidden become physically allowed due to the finite width of the resonance. We show that the branching fraction of D{sup +{yields}{sigma}{pi}+} extracted from three-body decays is enhanced by a factor of 2, whereas B(D{sup 0{yields}}f{sub 2}(1270)K{sup 0}) is reduced by a factor of 4 by finite-width effects.

  2. Measuring hydraulic fracture width behind casing using radioactive proppant

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, J.S.; Fisher, K.; Holcomb, D.

    1996-09-01

    Knowing the width of hydraulic fracture behind casing can be useful in evaluating both reservoir performance and fracture design methods. This paper presents a method to obtain the widths of hydraulic fractures behind casing using radioactive, isotope-traced proppants. A tool-specific relationship between the gamma ray flux detected in a wellbore and the fracture width was developed using Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray transport around a wellbore. This method provides fracture width estimates with a vertical resolution of about one foot. The method has been successfully used in the field and compares favorably with other methods for evaluating fracture widths.

  3. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  4. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  5. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  6. Weak Decays of Excited B Mesons.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, B; Martin Camalich, J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the decays of the excited (bq[over ¯]) mesons as probes of the short-distance structure of the weak ΔB=1 transitions. These states are unstable under the electromagnetic or strong interactions, although their widths are typically suppressed by phase space. Compared to the pseudoscalar B meson, the purely leptonic decays of the vector B^{*} are not chirally suppressed and are sensitive to different combinations of the underlying weak effective operators. An interesting example is B_{s}^{*}→ℓ^{+}ℓ^{-}, which has a rate that can be accurately predicted in the standard model. The branching fraction is B∼10^{-11}, irrespective of the lepton flavor and where the main uncertainty stems from the unmeasured and theoretically not well known B_{s}^{*} width. We discuss the prospects for producing this decay mode at the LHC and explore the possibility of measuring the B_{s}^{*}→ℓℓ amplitude, instead, through scattering experiments at the B_{s}^{*} resonance peak. PMID:27104698

  7. Weak Decays of Excited B Mesons.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, B; Martin Camalich, J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the decays of the excited (bq[over ¯]) mesons as probes of the short-distance structure of the weak ΔB=1 transitions. These states are unstable under the electromagnetic or strong interactions, although their widths are typically suppressed by phase space. Compared to the pseudoscalar B meson, the purely leptonic decays of the vector B^{*} are not chirally suppressed and are sensitive to different combinations of the underlying weak effective operators. An interesting example is B_{s}^{*}→ℓ^{+}ℓ^{-}, which has a rate that can be accurately predicted in the standard model. The branching fraction is B∼10^{-11}, irrespective of the lepton flavor and where the main uncertainty stems from the unmeasured and theoretically not well known B_{s}^{*} width. We discuss the prospects for producing this decay mode at the LHC and explore the possibility of measuring the B_{s}^{*}→ℓℓ amplitude, instead, through scattering experiments at the B_{s}^{*} resonance peak.

  8. Experiment study of the decays of (112)Cs and (111)Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Cartegni, L.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Darby, Iain; Liddick, Sean; Bingham, C. R.; Freeman, E.; Padgett, S.; Rajabali, M. M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Guglielmetti, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Gross, Carl J; Batchelder, J. C.; Bianco, L.; Joss, D. T.; Page, R. D.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Watkins, H. V.; Goodin, C.; Liu, S. H.; Mazzocco, M.; Romoli, M.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment to search for the {alpha} decay of {sup 112}Cs has been performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The {alpha} decay of {sup 112}Cs was not observed, thus setting the upper limit of the {alpha} branching ratio at 0.26%. The half-life of {sup 112}Cs was measured as 506 {+-} 55 {micro}s. In the same measurement the decay properties of its proton decay daughter {sup 111}Xe were also reinvestigated. The newly measured {alpha} branching ratio for {sup 111}Xe is 10.4 {+-} 1.9%. The experimental proton separation energies S{sub p} for odd-Z nuclei above {sup 100}Sn were compared to shell model calculations. The calculated proton separation energies for {sup 103}Sb and {sup 102}Sb point to half-lives of the order of 10 ps and 1 ns, respectively.

  9. Equivalent width evaluation methods for Doppler, Lorentz, and Voigt profiles.

    PubMed

    Habib, Abdel Aziz M; Rammah, Yasser S

    2014-01-01

    An accurate technique has been developed to calculate the equivalent width of absorption lines. The calculations have been carried out for the pure Doppler and pure Lorentz limiting forms of the equivalent width. A novel expression for the equivalent width for Lorentz profile is given from direct integration of the line profile. The more general case of a Voigt profile leads to an analytical formula that permits a rapid estimate of the equivalent width for a wide range of maximum optical depths. The reliability of the approach is verified using a numerical application calculating the equivalent width for nickel resonance lines at 232.0 and 352.3 nm from atomic absorption (AA) measurements. The dependence of equivalent width on the number density of absorbing atoms is also provided. The results obtained for the equivalent width for the Voigt profile were compared with the data in the available literature obtained by different approaches. PMID:24480275

  10. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOEpatents

    Steadman, P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure is disclosed. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. 4 figs.

  11. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOEpatents

    Steadman, Peter; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure.

  12. Direct measurement of the W Boson width in ppover collisions at square roots = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Giovanni, G P Di; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-02-22

    A direct measurement of the total decay width of the W boson Gamma(W) is presented using 350 pb(-1) of data from pp[over ] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The width is determined by normalizing predicted signal and background distributions to 230 185 W candidates decaying to enu and micronu in the transverse-mass region 50

  13. Search for the Decay B^0 -> a^\\pm_1 \\rho^\\mp

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-10

    The authors present a search for the rare B-meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}} with {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}. We use (110 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEp-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They obtain an upper limit of 30 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.) for the branching fraction product {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}}) {Beta}({alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}), where they assume that the {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} decays exclusively to {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  14. Rare Decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  15. Radiographic reference limits for cardiac width of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Velayati, Mozhgan; Mirshahi, Ali; Razmyar, Jamshid; Azizzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Primary and secondary cardiovascular diseases are not uncommon in birds. Although radiologic standards for heart width have been developed for mammals, they are still not available for many avian species. The purpose of this study was to establish normal reference values for cardiac size in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus), one of the most popular pet bird species all over the world. After clinical and radiographic (lateral and ventrodorsal views) evaluations, 27 adult, clinically healthy budgerigars (10 females and 17 males) were included in this study. High-quality ventrodorsal and lateral radiographic projections were obtained. The cardiac and thoracic width, distance between third and fourth ribs, synsacrum width, coracoid width, and the distance between clavicle bones were measured on ventrodorsal radiographs. The ratio between cardiac width and other mentioned indices was calculated. Correlation of each anatomical index with the cardiac width was evaluated by linear regression model. Sex and weight were included in all models. Mean + SD of cardiac width was 10.8 +/- 0.6 mm, with lower and upper limits of 9.5 and 12.0 mm. The results showed a significant correlation between the cardiac width and the thoracic width (R2 = 0.28; P = 0.005). There were no significant associations between weight, sex, and the heart width. The values and ratios obtained in this study can be used as a reference of normal cardiac size of budgerigar in radiology for detection of cardiomegaly in this bird. PMID:25831574

  16. Radon Diffusion Measurement in Polyethylene based on Alpha Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Wolfgang

    2011-04-27

    We present a method to measure the diffusion of Radon in solid materials based on the alpha decay of the radon daughter products. In contrast to usual diffusion measurements which detect the radon that penetrates a thin barrier, we let the radon diffuse into the material and then measure the alpha decays of the radon daughter products in the material. We applied this method to regular and ultra high molecular weight poly ethylene and find diffusion lengths of order of mm as expected. However, the preliminary analysis shows significant differences between two different approaches we have chosen. These differences may be explained by the different experimental conditions.

  17. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  18. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  19. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  20. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  1. The Oklo Constraints on Alpha-Decay Half-Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, Eugene; Molgaard, Joshua

    2003-11-01

    Beginning with Shlyakhter in 1976, Oklo natural reactor data have been used by many authors to put limits on the time variation of "constants" such as the fine structure constant and the strong coupling constant. The Sm-149 resonance absorption data constrain the depth of the nuclear potential well to a small margin of error, determined by various unknowns, such as the reactor temperature. Although this change in well depth is slight, nevertheless at certain critical values the number of nodes in the wavefunction can change precipitously, with a corresponding change in other quantities. We show that even these small variations could allow the U-238 half-life to vary by more than one order of magnitude.

  2. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  3. An investigation of bridge width measurement and processing capabilities (1985)

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, K.P.

    1989-05-15

    An investigation of Mound`s ability to measure and process bridges was conducted in 1985. Prior to improvements in the measuring system and technique, bridge width was found to have a sigma of 0.00019 in. After improvements were made, a sigma of 0.000047 was realized. Bridge length was found to be more erratic than width, although most of the inaccuracy was caused by measurement uncertainty. Length and width were found to have little or no correlation.

  4. Recent Advances in Global Measurement and Application of River Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelsky, T.; Allen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Among variables relevant to river form and discharge that can be observed from space, river width is perhaps the simplest to measure. Width can be extracted directly from optical or radar imagery, and application of remotely sensed widths to problems in hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, and ecology dates back more than two decades. Despite this long heritage, until very recently remotely sensed width measurements have largely been made on an ad-hoc basis for individual studies over relatively small regions. Global studies that required river widths have largely relied on estimates from downstream hydraulic geometry relationships with basin area, which inevitably simplify width variability and may, in practice, underestimate the fraction of wide rivers and the total river surface area in many basins. Over the last two years, multiple new regional- and global-scale, satellite-derived river width datasets have been developed that have substantially improved our global understanding of river form. These datasets include the Global Width Database for Large Rivers (GWD-LR), which provides width measurements for rivers wider than ~180 m, and all rivers wider than ~300 m, based on the SRTM water mask and the Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL), which provides measurements for rivers as narrow as 30 m and all rivers wider than ~100 m. Several regional-scale datasets have also been developed. These datasets will facilitate improvements to regional and global scale hydrodynamic models, will provide more robust information on global river surface area for gas flux studies, and constitute novel information on global patterns of fluvial geomorphology. These datasets represent the beginning, not the end, of global river width measurements, however, as in the future multitemporal width measurements can be combined with recently developed algorithms to estimate river discharge for many rivers, globally.

  5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure the ...

  7. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nugala, Babitha; Kumar, BB Santosh; Sahitya, S; Krishna, P Mohana

    2012-01-01

    An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry. PMID:22368328

  8. Rare Decays of the ɛ Meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papandreou, Zisis

    2006-02-01

    A study of several rare η decays near threshold was carried out at the C-6 (π-) beamline of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory with the Crystal Ball detector, an electromagnetic calorimeter with nearly 4π geometric acceptance that is comprised of 672 optically isolated NaI(Tl) crystals with a thickness of 15.7 radiation lengths. Results from the search for the CP forbidden decay η → 4π0 and the investigation of the quadratic slope parameter in η → 3π0 decay will be profiled, among others. The focus of the talk will be on the η → π0γγ rare decay: its relative branching ratio was extracted to be B1 = (8.3 ± 2.8 ± 1.2) × 10-4, based on the analysis of 3 × 107 detected η mesons. This leads to a partial width for the eta meson of Γ(η → π0γγ) = (0.32 ± 0.15) eV/c2, a value much lower than past measurements and in line with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations.

  9. Measuring B{sub s} width difference at the {Upsilon}(5s) using quantum entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, David; Soni, Amarjit

    2010-08-01

    About 90% of B{sub s}B{sub s} pairs produced at the {Upsilon}(5s) resonance are initially B{sub s}{sup *}B{sub s}{sup *} pairs which decay radiatively to B{sub s}B{sub s}. This implies that the B{sub s}B{sub s} pair will then be in an eigenstate of charge conjugation (i.e. C=-1) and therefore in an entangled state. This allows for a determination of {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}/{Gamma}{sub s} and the CP phase using a number of possible correlations between the decays of the two B{sub s} mesons. In particular, we consider the time integrated correlation, the time ordering asymmetry, and the time ordering-charge asymmetry, which in addition to time ordering distinguishes B{sub s} from B{sub s}, for various combinations of final states. With the statistics of about O(10{sup 7}-10{sup 8}) {Upsilon}(5s) events available at B factories, we find that the time ordering asymmetry between suitably defined hadronic and flavor specific (tagging) decays offers a promising method for determining the width difference. The corresponding time ordering-charge asymmetry can also bound the mixing phase. Similar observables involving exclusive decays are also considered. At the super B factories with O(50) times greater luminosity time ordering and time ordering-charge asymmetries between inclusive and exclusive modes may also provide additional bounds on the phases in those decays.

  10. Approximate formulation of redistribution in the Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, H-alpha system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Hubeny, I.

    1989-01-01

    Simple approximate formulas are given for the coupled redistribution of Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, and H-alpha, by using well-defined approximations to an essentially exact formulation. These formulas incorporate all the essential physics including Raman scattering, lower state radiative decay, and correlated terms representing emission during a collision which must be retained in order that the emission coefficients are properly behaved in the line wings. Approximate expressions for the appropriate line broadening parameters are collected. Finally, practical expressions for the source functions are given. These are formulated through newly introduced nonimpact redistribution functions, which are shown to be reasonably approximated by existing (ordinary and generalized) redistribution functions.

  11. Tuning fork decay.

    PubMed

    Miller, G W

    1979-03-01

    Tuning fork tests are used routinely by many otologists. A different group of otologists find the tests inconsistent and unreliable. This controversy has probably developed because the audiometer has replaced the tuning fork in hearing measurement. As a result, the art of use of the tuning fork is poorly learned. This study examines decay, one of the physical parameters of tuning forks. Measurements of acoustic (sound wave) and vibration (stem movement) decay were made. Alteration in decay due to pressure changes on the fork stem were studied. Acoustic signals were generated in an anechoic chamber. Vibration measurements were obtained using an artificial mastoid. Analysis of the signals was accomplished by a system of amplifiers, filters, tape recorders, and a graphic recorder. Tuning fork sound decay is a property of the instrument which occurs every time the fork is struck. The decay is a constant in decibels per second. The acoustic mode and the vibration mode decay at similar rates for the same fork. The strike frequency (a higher frequency than the fundamental produced when the fork is struck) also has a constant decay rate in decibels per second, and it is reported here for the first time. Force of 800 gm. and less applied to the bottom of the stem in vibration measurement caused minimal decay constant changes. When the physical parameters of the tuning fork (including this information on damping) are fully studied, tuning fork testing should become more of a science and less of an art.

  12. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  13. B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays: Branching ratios and CP asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidalov, A. B. Vysotsky, M. I.

    2007-04-15

    Theoretically motivated smallness of the penguin amplitude in B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays allows one to calculate the value of the unitarity-triangle angle {alpha}(o{sub 2}) with good accuracy. The relatively large branching ratio of the decay into {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is explained by the large value of FSI phase difference between decay amplitudes with I = 0 and I = 2.

  14. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.

  15. SU-C-201-05: Imaging 212Pb-TCMC-Trastuzumab for Alpha Radioimmunotherapy for Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Meredith, R; Azure, M; Yoder, D; Torgue, J; Banaga, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To support the phase I trial for toxicity, biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of intra-peritoneal (IP) 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in patients with HER-2 expressing malignancy. A whole body gamma camera imaging method was developed for estimating amount of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab left in the peritoneal cavity. Methods: {sup 212}Pb decays to {sup 212}Bi via beta emission. {sup 212}Bi emits an alpha particle at an average of 6.1 MeV. The 238.6 keV gamma ray with a 43.6% yield can be exploited for imaging. Initial phantom was made of saline bags with 212Pb. Images were collected for 238.6 keV with a medium energy general purpose collimator. There are other high energy gamma emissions (e.g. 511keV, 8%; 583 keV, 31%) that penetrate the septae of the collimator and contribute scatter into 238.6 keV. An upper scatter window was used for scatter correction for these high energy gammas. Results: A small source containing 212Pb can be easily visualized. Scatter correction on images of a small 212Pb source resulted in a ∼50% reduction in the full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), while change in full width at half maximum (FWHM) was <10%. For photopeak images, substantial scatter around phantom source extended to > 5 cm outside; scatter correction improved image contrast by removing this scatter around the sources. Patient imaging, in the 1st cohort (n=3) showed little redistribution of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab out of the peritoneal cavity. Compared to the early post-treatment images, the 18-hour post-injection images illustrated the shift to more uniform anterior/posterior abdominal distribution and the loss of intensity due to radioactive decay. Conclusion: Use of medium energy collimator, 15% width of 238.6 keV photopeak, and a 7.5% upper scatter window is adequate for quantification of 212Pb radioactivity inside peritoneal cavity for alpha radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer. Research Support: AREVA Med, NIH 1UL1RR025777-01.

  16. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  17. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgari, P.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Signer, A.

    2013-05-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of Γ X /m X , with Γ X and m X the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the qoverline{q} partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naïve counting Γ t /m t 1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  18. Top-quark processes at NLO in production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith

    2012-04-01

    We describe the implementation of top production and decay processes in the parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. By treating the top quark as being on-shell, we can factorize the amplitudes for top-pair production, s-channel single-top production, and t-channel single-top production into the product of an amplitude for production and an amplitude for decay. In this way we can retain all spin correlations. Both the production and the decay amplitudes are calculated consistently at next-to-leading order in alpha_s. The full dependence on the b-quark mass is also kept. Phenomenological results are presented for various kinematic distributions at the LHC and for the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron.

  19. Polarization effects in radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Korchin, A. Yu.; Merenkov, N. P.

    2015-02-15

    The polarization effects in the one-meson radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton, τ → π{sup −}γν{sub τ}, are investigated. The inner bremsstrahlung and structural amplitudes are taken into account. The asymmetry of the differential decay width caused by the τ-lepton polarization and the Stokes parameters of the emitted photon itself are calculated depending on the polarization of the decaying τ lepton. These physical quantities are estimated numerically for an arbitrary direction of the τ lepton polarization 3-vector in the rest frame. The vector and axial-vector form factors describing the structure-dependent part of the decay amplitude are determined using the chiral effective theory with resonances (RχT)

  20. Study of the decay asymmetry parameter and CP violation parameter in the Lambda(c)+ ---> Lambda pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-09-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a new measurement of the weak decay-asymmetry parameter a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +} decay. Comparing particle with antiparticle decays, we obtain the first measurement of the CP violation parameter {Alpha} {triple_bond} a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} + a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}/a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} - a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}. We obtain a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.13 and {Alpha} = -0.07 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.12 where errors are statistical and systematic.

  1. Widths of Sobolev weight classes on a domain with cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Order estimates for the Kolmogorov, Gelfand and linear widths of the unit ball in weighted Sobolev space on a domain with cusp in a weighted Lebesgue space are obtained. Certain limit conditions on the parameters are considered for which the estimates for widths may differ from those in the case of weight one and a domain with Lipschitz boundary. Bibliography: 52 titles.

  2. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  3. Studies of Nuclear Structure and Decay Properties of Actinide Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Moore, E. F.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Kellett, M. A.; Nichols, A. L.

    2009-01-28

    The identification of single-particle states in heavy actinide nuclei by means of studying their decay schemes plays a seminal role in understanding the structure of the heaviest elements and testing the predictive power of modern theoretical models. The heaviest odd-mass nuclides available in sufficient quantity for detailed decay spectroscopic studies are 20-h {sup 255} Fm(for neutrons) and 20-d {sup 253}Es(for protons). Decay spectra of these isotopes, together with those for the odd-odd 276-d {sup 254}Es nuclide, were measured using a variety of {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy techniques. Well-defined decay data are also essential pre-requisites for the detection and accurate characterization of fissile radionuclides. The parameters of greatest relevance include actinide half-lives, branching fractions, and {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray energies and emission probabilities. Their quantification to good accuracy provides the means of monitoring their presence, behavior and transport in nuclear facilities as well as any clandestine movement and usage. As a consequence of recommendations made at recent IAEA research coordination meetings on 'Updated Decay Data Library for Actinides,' measurements were undertaken to determine specific decay data of the more inadequately defined radionuclides.

  4. Nuclear Structure Investigations Of Heavy Nuclei And The Decay Of SHE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuusiniemi, P.

    2005-04-05

    Within the framework of our studies of proton rich nuclei around the N 126 and N = 152 neutron shells we have performed a series of {alpha}-{gamma}-coincidence studies. The nuclei of interest were separated in-flight by the velocity filter SHIP and implanted into a position sensitive 16-strip PIPS-detector where their arrival and subsequent {alpha}-decays were registered. Associated {gamma}-rays were detected by a Ge-Clover-detector. In the present work recent results concerning 216Th and {alpha}-decay chains of 251No and 257Db are given together with brief discussion.

  5. Optimal decay rate for the local energy of a unbounded network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assel, R.; Jellouli, M.; Khenissi, M.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the wave equation on a unbounded network with Dirichlet and Kirchhoff conditions. We study the local energy decay of the solution. We prove that the energy is exponentially decaying and we give an exact formula for exponential decay rate. The limit energy is also given in terms of the initial conditions. The results are obtained using two approaches. A direct one uses type τ operators in the case of equal edge lengths. The other one is based on a spectral investigation of an associated linear operator leading to the correspondence between the resonances width and the local energy decay rate.

  6. Full-time nonexponential decay in double-barrier quantum structures

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Calderon, Gaston; Villavicencio, Jorge

    2006-06-15

    We examine an analytical expression for the survival probability for the time evolution of quantum decay to discuss a regime where quantum decay is nonexponential at all times. We find that the interference between the exponential and nonexponential terms of the survival amplitude modifies the usual exponential decay regime in systems where the ratio of the resonance energy to the decay width is less than 0.3. We suggest that such a regime could be observed in semiconductor double-barrier resonant quantum structures with appropriate parameters.

  7. Optical detection of radon decay in air

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m3 with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber. PMID:26867800

  8. Optical detection of radon decay in air.

    PubMed

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-02-12

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m(3) with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber.

  9. Looking for meson molecules in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Marina; Navarra, Fernando S.; Bediaga, Ignacio

    2013-05-06

    We use the QCD sum rule approach to study a {eta} Prime - {pi} molecular current. We consider an isovector-scalar I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 1{sup -}0{sup ++} molecular current. We work at leading order in {alpha}{sub s} and consider the contributions of condensates up to dimension six. We obtain a mass around 1.1 GeV, consistent with a loosely bound state. We discuss the possibility of observing this molecular state in a B threebody hadronic decay.

  10. Axions from wall decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  11. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  12. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  13. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  14. Charmless B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gradl, Wolfgang; /Edinburgh U.

    2007-03-06

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are a good testing ground for the standard model. The dominant amplitudes contributing to this class of B decays are CKM suppressed tree diagrams and b {yields} s or b {yields} d loop diagrams (''penguins''). These decays can be used to study interfering standard model (SM) amplitudes and CP violation. They are sensitive to the presence of new particles in the loops, and they provide valuable information to constrain theoretical models of B decays. The B factories BABAR at SLAC and Belle at KEK produce B mesons in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B}. So far they have collected integrated luminosities of about 406 fb{sup -1} and 600 fb{sup -1}, respectively. The results presented here are based on subsets of about 200-500 fb{sup -1} and are preliminary unless a journal reference is given.

  15. Step width alters iliotibial band strain during running.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey A; Campbell, Samuel; Derrick, Timothy R

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the effect of step width during running on factors related to iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 15 healthy recreational runners during overground running under various step width conditions (preferred and at least +/- 5% of their leg length). Strain and strain rate were estimated from a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. Greater ITB strain and strain rate were found in the narrower step width condition (p < 0.001, p = 0.040). ITB strain was significantly (p < 0.001) greater in the narrow condition than the preferred and wide conditions and it was greater in the preferred condition than the wide condition. ITB strain rate was significantly greater in the narrow condition than the wide condition (p = 0.020). Polynomial contrasts revealed a linear increase in both ITB strain and strain rate with decreasing step width. We conclude that relatively small decreases in step width can substantially increase ITB strain as well as strain rates. Increasing step width during running, especially in persons whose running style is characterized by a narrow step width, may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of running-related ITB syndrome.

  16. Concurrent subspace width optimization method for RBF neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wen; Chen, Xiaoqian; Zhao, Yong; van Tooren, Michel

    2012-02-01

    Radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs) are widely used in nonlinear function approximation. One of the challenges in RBFNN modeling is determining how to effectively optimize width parameters to improve approximation accuracy. To solve this problem, a width optimization method, concurrent subspace width optimization (CSWO), is proposed based on a decomposition and coordination strategy. This method decomposes the large-scale width optimization problem into several subspace optimization (SSO) problems, each of which has a single optimization variable and smaller training and validation data sets so as to greatly simplify optimization complexity. These SSOs can be solved concurrently, thus computational time can be effectively reduced. With top-level system coordination, the optimization of SSOs can converge to a consistent optimum, which is equivalent to the optimum of the original width optimization problem. The proposed method is tested with four mathematical examples and one practical engineering approximation problem. The results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of CSWO in optimizing width parameters over the traditional width optimization methods.

  17. The case for three-body decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Huang, Wei-Chih; Low, Ian; Shaughnessy, Gabe E-mail: whuang@sissa.it E-mail: shaughnessy@wisc.edu

    2013-01-01

    Fermi-LAT has confirmed the excess in cosmic positron fraction observed by PAMELA, which could be explained by dark matter annihilating or decaying in the center of the galaxy. Most existing models postulate that the dark matter annihilates or decays into final states with two or four leptons, which would produce diffuse gamma ray emissions that are in tension with data measured by Fermi-LAT. We point out that the tension could be alleviated if the dark matter decays into three-body final states with a pair of leptons and a missing particle. Using the goldstino decay in a certain class of supersymmetric theories as a prime example, we demonstrate that simultaneous fits to the total e{sup +}+e{sup −} and the fractional e{sup +}/e{sup −} fluxes from Fermi-LAT and PAMELA could be achieved for a 2 TeV parent particle and a 1 TeV missing particle, without being constrained by gamma-ray measurements. By studying different effective operators giving rise to the dark matter decay, we show that this feature is generic for three-body decaying dark matter containing a missing particle. Constraints on the hadronic decay widths from the cosmic anti-proton spectra are also discussed.

  18. Open Flavor Strong Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.; Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the results of a QM calculation of the open-flavor strong decays of **** light nucleon resonances. These are the results of a recent calculation, where we used a modified ^3P_0 model for the amplitudes and the U(7) algebraic model and the hypercentral quark model to predict the baryon spectrum. The decay amplitudes are compared with the existing experimental data.

  19. Decay-Assisted Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. M.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Groote, R. P.; De Schepper, S.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Procter, T. J.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Strashnov, I.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the hyperfine-structure and radioactive-decay studies of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-206 performed with the Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at the ISOLDE facility, CERN. The high resolution innate to collinear laser spectroscopy is combined with the high efficiency of ion detection to provide a highly sensitive technique to probe the hyperfine structure of exotic isotopes. The technique of decay-assisted laser spectroscopy is presented, whereby the isomeric ion beam is deflected to a decay-spectroscopy station for alpha-decay tagging of the hyperfine components. Here, we present the first hyperfine-structure measurements of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-206, in addition to the identification of the low-lying states of Fr202,204 performed at the CRIS experiment.

  20. Biologic width and crown lengthening: case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Lim

    2010-01-01

    The biologic width includes both the connective tissue attachment and the junctional epithelium and has a mean dimension of approximately 2 mm. Invading the biologic width with a restoration can result in localized crestal bone loss, gingival recession, localized gingival hyperplasia, or a combination of these three. When restoring teeth that have subgingival caries or fractures below the gingival attachment, a clinical crown-lengthening procedure is needed to establish the biologic width. This article presents three case reports that utilized crown-lengthening procedures.

  1. Influence of pulse width and detuning on coherent phonon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Shikano, Yutaka; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the coherent phonon generation mechanism by irradiation of an ultrashort pulse with a simple two-level model. Our derived formulation shows that both impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) and impulsive absorption (IA) simultaneously occur, and phonon wave packets are generated in the electronic ground and excited states by ISRS and IA, respectively. We identify the dominant process from the amplitude of the phonon oscillation. For short pulse widths, ISRS is very small and becomes larger as the pulse width increases. We also show that the initial phase is dependent on the pulse width and the detuning.

  2. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  3. Radiative decays of the Sigma0(1385) and Lambda(1520) hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Taylor; Gordon Mutchler; CLAS Collaboration

    2005-03-01

    The electromagnetic decays of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and {Lambda}(1520) hyperons were studied in photon-induced reactions {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} in the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. We report the first observation of the radiative decay of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and a measurement of the {Lambda}(1520) radiative decay width. For the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we measured a partial width of 479 {+-} 120(stat){sub -100}{sup +81}(sys) keV, larger than all of the existing model predictions. For the {Lambda}(1520) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we obtained a partial width of 167 {+-} 43(stat){sub -12}{sup +26}(sys) keV.

  4. The b --> s g g Decay in the General two Higgs Doublet Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ýltan, E. O.

    2002-05-01

    We study the decay width of the inclusive process b -> s g g in the two Higgs doublet model with three-level flavor changing neutral currents (model III). We analyse the dependencies of the differential decay width to the s- quark energy Es and model III parameters, charged Higgs mass mH+/- and Yukawa coupling bar{x}N,bbD. We observe that there exist a considerable enhancement in the decay width for the relevant process. This enhancement can be reduced by choosing C7eff as negative or increasing the lower bound of mH+/- to the large values. This is an interesting result which gives an idea on the mass mH+/- and sign of C7eff.

  5. Techniques for the treatment of IR divergences in decay processes at NLO and application to the top-quark decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Lorenzo; Dittmaier, Stefan; Huss, Alexander; Oggero, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    We present the extension of two general algorithms for the treatment of infrared singularities arising in electroweak corrections to decay processes at next-to-leading order: the dipole subtraction formalism and the one-cutoff slicing method. The former is extended to the case of decay kinematics which has not been considered in the literature so far. The latter is generalised to production and decay processes with more than two charged particles, where new "surface" terms arise. Arbitrary patterns of massive and massless external particles are considered, including the treatment of infrared singularities in dimensional or mass regularisation. As an application of the two techniques we present the calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD and electroweak corrections to the top-quark decay width including all off-shell and decay effects of intermediate {W} bosons. The result, e.g., represents a building block of a future calculation of NLO electroweak effects to off-shell top-quark pair ({W^+} {W^-} {b} {bar{b}} ) production. Moreover, this calculation can serve as the first step towards an event generator for top-quark decays at next-to-leading order accuracy, which can be used to attach top-quark decays to complicated many-particle top-quark processes, such as for {t} {bar{t}} +{H} or {t} {bar{t}} +{jets}.

  6. Alpha-Particle Angular Distributions of At and Rn Isotopes and Their Relation to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    NICOLE Collaboration and ISOLDE Collaboration

    1996-12-01

    We report on an extensive on-line nuclear orientation study of the angular distribution of {alpha} particles emitted in the favored decay of neutron deficient At and Rn nuclei near the {ital N}=126 shell closure. Surprisingly large anisotropies were observed, showing pronounced changes from one isotope to another. Comparing these data with several theoretical models shows that anisotropic {alpha} emission in favored decays from near-spherical nuclei can well be explained within the shell model, implying that it is mainly determined by the structure of the decaying nucleus. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  8. H. cap alpha. in RS CVn binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, B.W.; Talcott, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The 1976--78 results of a spectroscopic program to monitor H..cap alpha.. in several RS CVn-type binaries are reported. For six objects well observed over orbital phase, four (HR 4665, HR 5110, sigma Gem, Z Her) show H..cap alpha.. as an absorption feature having a constant ( +- 15%) equivalent width (EW). AR Lac exhibits an absorption profile also, but the EW varies by a factor of three due to partial filling by emission. This variation is sporadic and not phase dependent. The H..cap alpha.. feature in HK Lac shows the most extreme variation: normally seen as an absorption feature with variable EW, it has been observed as a pure emission feature on three spectrograms, showing a blueshift with respect to the photosphere of approx.50--100 km sec/sup -1/. On a single occasion HK Lac showed double H..cap alpha.. emission with a separation of the peaks of approx.300 km sec/sup -1/. These high velocity features are interpreted in terms of prominence-like structure in the atmosphere of the active star.

  9. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  10. Rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry for line-width control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ha-Young; Bang, Kyoung-Yoon; Lee, Jaeho; Bak, Heungin; Sohn, Young-Soo; An, Ilsin

    2002-07-01

    Rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry (RCSE) was applied to the characterization of line-width in deep UV photoresist films. Variation of line-width in few nm was distinguishable by comparing the features in conventional ellipsometry parameters or the degree of polarization spectra obtainable form RCSE. The variations in the former spectra were caused by the density change in patterned PR films. Meanwhile, the variations in latter spectra wee caused by the surface profile of the film. Once the spectral positions of the features were related to the result of CD- SEM, both spectra could be used to estimate the line-width of patterned PR without in-depth analysis. Further, when uniaxial anisotropy was assumed for the film, the line-width could be roughly deduced in the process of extracting the optical properties of film via an effective medium approximation.

  11. Simple parametrization of fragment reduced widths in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-04-01

    A systematic analysis of the observed reduced widths obtained in relativistic heavy ion fragmentation reactions is used to develop a phenomenological parametrization of these data. The parametrization is simple, accurate, and completely general in applicability.

  12. 223. FREQUENTLY REPRODUCED VIEW OF GWMP SHOWING VARIABLE WIDTH MEDIANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    223. FREQUENTLY REPRODUCED VIEW OF GWMP SHOWING VARIABLE WIDTH MEDIANS WITH INDEPENDENT ALIGNMENTS FROM KEY BRIDGE LOOKING NORTHWEST, 1953. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  13. Patterns of river width and surface area newly revealed by the satellite-derived North American River Width (NARWidth) dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.

    2014-12-01

    The total surface area of rivers and streams is a key quantity for estimating gaseous emissions from fluvial networks to the atmosphere. Presently, the most sophisticated evaluations of continental-scale river surface area rely on: 1) calculating river width from digital elevation models (DEMs) by scaling width to upstream drainage area via downstream hydraulic geometry (DHG) relationships; 2) extrapolating river width and length from large to small river basins using Horton ratios; and 3) extrapolating empirical relationships between climate and percentage water cover to from low- to high-latitude basins where hydrologically conditioned topographic data does not exist. Here we use the recently developed North American River Width (NARWidth) dataset to estimate the total surface area of North American rivers and streams. NARWidth is the first fine-resolution, continental-scale river centerline and width database. The database is derived from Landsat satellite imagery and contains measurements of >2.4×105 km of rivers wider than 30 m at mean annual discharge. We find that datasets that estimate river width by applying DHG relationships to DEMs underestimate the abundance of wide rivers and do not capture the widest rivers observed by NARWidth. We attribute these differences to: 1) the tendency of stream gauges to be located at stable, single channel sites, leading to a potential bias of measured river width relative to the representative river width throughout a river's entire length; and 2) physiographic conditions that are not captured by DHG and can cause substantial deviation from strict width-discharge relationships. We then calculate the total surface area of North American rivers by extrapolating the strong observed relationship between total river surface area and width at different widths (r2>0.996 for 100-2000 m widths) to narrow rivers and streams. We find that the total surface area of North American rivers is ~1.38×105 km2 for all rivers wider than 1

  14. Beta-decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, I. N.

    2006-10-01

    Major astrophysical applications involve a huge number of exotic nuclei. Their beta-decay properties play a crucial role in stellar explosive events. An important effort has been developed in last decades to measure the masses and β-decay properties of very neutron-rich nuclei at radioactive nuclear beam facilities. However, most of them cannot be synthesized in terrestrial laboratories and only theoretical predictions can fill the gap. We will concentrate mainly on the β-decay rates needed for stellar r-process modeling and for performing the RNB experiments. An overview of the microscopic approaches to the β-decay strength function is given. The continuum QRPA approach based on the self-consistent ground state description in the framework of the density functional theory is outlined. For the first time, a systematic study of the total β-decay half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities takes into account the Gamow Teller and first-forbidden transitions. Due to the shell configuration effects, the first-forbidden decays have a strong impact on the β-decay characteristics of the r-process relevant nuclei at Z≈28, N>50; Z⩾50, N>82 and Z=60 70, N≈126. Suppression of the delayed neutron emission probability is found in nuclei with the neutron excess bigger than one major shell. The effect originates from the high-energy first-forbidden transitions to the states outside the (Q-B)-window in the daughter nuclei. The performance of existing global models for the nuclides near the r-process paths is critically analyzed and confronted with the recent RIB experiments in the regions of 78Ni, 132Sn and “east” of 208Pb.

  15. Quantifying River Widths of North America from Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Miller, Z.

    2013-12-01

    River width is a fundamental predictor variable in many hydrologic, geomorphic, and biogeochemical models, yet current large-scale models rely on theoretical hydraulic geometry relationships that do not fully capture natural variability in river form. Here we present the first high-resolution dataset of long-term mean width of North American rivers wider than 30 m. The dataset contains 7.93 million georeferenced width measurements derived from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery that were acquired when rivers were most likely to be at mean discharge. We built the dataset by developing an automated procedure that selects and downloads raw imagery, creates cloud-free normalized difference water index images, histogram balances and mosaics them together, and produces a water mask using a dynamic water-land threshold technique. We then visually inspected and corrected the mask for errors and used RivWidth software to calculate river width at each river centerline pixel. We validated our dataset using >1000 United States Geological Survey and Water Survey of Canada in situ gauge station measurements. Error analysis shows a robust relationship between the remotely sensed widths and in situ gauge measurements with an r 2 = 0.86 (Spearman's = 0.81) and a mean absolute error of 27.5 m. We find that North American river widths lie on logarithmic frequency curve with some notable exceptions at widths <100 m. This dataset can be used to improve our understanding of the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles, as well as large-scale landscape evolution models. Our results also allow for the characterization of the extent of rivers likely to be observable by the planned Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission.

  16. Comprehensive intermaxillary tooth width proportion of Bangkok residents.

    PubMed

    Manopatanakul, Somchai; Watanawirun, Narumon

    2011-01-01

    Proper occlusion depends on the correct width ratio between upper and lower teeth, known as Bolton's ratio. In fact, this ratio can be calculated for each pair of teeth from the central incisor to the first permanent molar. This set of ratios, known as comprehensive cumulative percentage ratios (CPRs), can be used not only to determine which tooth or teeth have a tooth width discrepancy, but can also enable the partial graphical analysis of tooth width discrepancy when there is agenesis of certain permanent teeth. Although CPRs have been calculated for Caucasians, tooth width is known to vary depending on racial origin. Therefore, a test of differences between racial groups should be carried out. If these ratios of the Caucasians and Bangkokians are significantly different, the ratio of the Bangkokians is recommended. The objective of this study was to measure tooth size disproportion for Thai patients and to calculate a corresponding set of CPRs. Thirty-seven pairs of dental models were made from a group of Bangkok residents with normal occlusion. Mesiodistal tooth width was measured for each model. The intra- and inter-examiner measurement errors were ascertained as insignificant (p > 0.05). CPRs were then calculated and compared to those derived from other studies. Ten of thirteen CPRs were significantly different from corresponding values derived from Caucasians. We conclude that tooth width ratios vary between different racial groups, and therefore that these should be calculated specifically for each patient racial group.

  17. Peak width issues with generalised 2D correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, Gemma M.; Adams, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional spectral correlation analysis is shown to be sensitive to fluctuations in spectral peak width as a function of perturbation variable. This is particularly significant where peak width fluctuations are of similar order of magnitude as the peak width values themselves and where changes in peak width are not random but are, for example, proportional to intensity. In such cases these trends appear in the asynchronous matrix as false peaks that serve to interfere with interpretation of the data. Complex, narrow band spectra such as provided by 1H NMR spectroscopy are demonstrated to be prone to such interference. 2D correlation analysis was applied to a series of NMR spectra corresponding to a commercial wine fermentation, in which the samples collected over a period of several days exhibit dramatic changes in concentration of minor and major components. The interference due to changing peak width effects is eliminated by synthesizing the recorded spectra using a constant peak width value prior to performing 2D correlation analysis.

  18. Universal decay law in charged-particle emission and exotic cluster radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Qi, C; Xu, F R; Liotta, R J; Wyss, R

    2009-08-14

    A linear universal decay formula is presented starting from the microscopic mechanism of the charged-particle emission. It relates the half-lives of monopole radioactive decays with the Q values of the outgoing particles as well as the masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. This relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger-Nuttall law in alpha radioactivity and explains well all known cluster decays. Predictions on the most likely emissions of various clusters are presented.

  19. Negative parity baryon decays in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jayalath, C.; Goity, J. L.; Gonzalez de Urreta, E.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2011-10-01

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are obtained.

  20. Top-quark decay at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2013-01-25

    We present the complete calculation of the top-quark decay width at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD, including next-to-leading electroweak corrections as well as finite bottom quark mass and W boson width effects. In particular, we also show the first results of the fully differential decay rates for the top-quark semileptonic decay t → W(+)(l(+)ν)b at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. Our method is based on the understanding of the invariant mass distribution of the final-state jet in the singular limit from effective field theory. Our result can be used to study arbitrary infrared-safe observables of top-quark decay with the highest perturbative accuracy.

  1. Finite-temperature modification of heavy particle decay and dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, Martin; Dighera, Francesco; Hryczuk, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    We apply the operator product expansion (OPE) technique to the decay and annihilation of heavy particles in a thermal medium with temperature below the heavy particle mass, m χ. This allows us to explain two interesting observations made before: a) that the leading thermal correction to the decay width of a charged particle is the same multiplicative factor of the zero-temperature width for a two-body decay and muon decay, and b) that the leading thermal correction to fermionic dark matter annihilation arises only at order T 4/ m χ 4 . The OPE further considerably simplifies the computation and factorizes it into model-independent matrix elements in the thermal background, and short-distance coefficients to be computed in zero-temperature field theory.

  2. Investigations on the charmless decay modes of Zc(3900 ) and Zc(4025 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi; Li, Gang; Shao, Fenglan; Wang, Ruiqin

    2016-07-01

    To date, the nature of Zc(3900 )/Zc(4025 ) is not clear. In this work, we propose to study the internal structure of Zc(3900 )/Zc(4025 ) by exploring the charmless decays. Compared to charmed decays, charmless decay channels may play a unique role since they request the annihilation of the heavy constituents. We calculate the decay width for Zc(3900 )/Zc(4025 )→V P , where P and V denote the pseudoscalar and light vector meson, respectively. Here, the Zc(3900 ) and Zc(4025 ) are the molecular states of D*D ¯ and D*D¯*. The decay process occurs through intermediate D D*/D*D* meson loops. Based on an effective Lagrangian, we obtain sizable predictions for the branching ratios, which are accessible in experiments. The experimental measurements in the future will not only shed light on the decay mechanism but will also lead to a deeper understanding of the mysterious structure of the Zc(3900 )/Zc(4025 ).

  3. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, Jr., G. Harold

    1993-01-01

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  4. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  5. Development of decay energy spectroscopy using low temperature detectors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y S; Kim, G B; Kim, K J; Kim, M S; Lee, H J; Lee, J S; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, S J; Ri, H C; Yoon, W S; Yuryev, Y N; Kim, Y H

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a high-resolution detection technique for measuring the energy and activity of alpha decay events using low-temperature detectors. A small amount of source material containing alpha-emitting radionuclides was enclosed in a 4π metal absorber. The energy of the alpha particles as well as that of the recoiled nuclides, low-energy electrons, and low-energy x-rays and γ-rays was converted into thermal energy of the gold absorber. A metallic magnetic calorimeter serving as a fast and sensitive thermometer was thermally attached to the metal absorber. In the present report, experimental demonstrations of Q spectroscopy were made with a new meander-type magnetic calorimeter. The thermal connection between the temperature sensor and the absorber was established with annealed gold wires. Each alpha decay event in the absorber resulted in a temperature increase of the absorber and the temperature sensor. Using the spectrum measured for a drop of (226)Ra solution in a 4π gold absorber, all of the alpha emitters in the sample were identified with a demonstration of good detector linearity. The resolution of the (226)Ra spectrum showed a 3.3 keV FWHM at its Q value together with an expected gamma escape peak at the energy shifted by its γ-ray energy.

  6. Determination of Alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeissani, Mokhtar Abdallah

    The determination of the strong coupling constant alpha_ s, using Energy-Energy Correlation Asymmetry and jet mass difference with Mark II data at SLC (91 GeV) is presented. In Energy-Energy Correlation Asymmetry (EECA), we used the same systematic procedure used to determine alpha_ s with MARK II data at PEP (29 GeV). The chi^2 fit suggests that alpha_ s = 0.119 +/- 0.007(stat.) +/- 0.007(syst.). In addition, we used the EECA method to determine the QCD scale parameter Lambda_{LLA}. The chi^2 fit suggests that Lambda _{LLA} = 420 +/- 90(stat.) MeV. In the jet mass difference method, the determination of alpha_ s is based on QCD calculations up to 2nd order. We showed that in this method we are able to reproduce the value of alpha _ s from a Monte Carlo sample to a very high accuracy. The result with this method is alpha _ s = 0.134 +/- 0.085(stat.) +/- 0.004(syst.). The two values of alpha_ s presented in this work are in agreement within the error bars and in a good agreement with recent results of alpha_ s published from other e^+e^- experiments.

  7. Measurement of ion cascade energies through resolution degradation of alpha particle microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Stiehl, Gregory M.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Plionis, Alexander A.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2010-02-15

    Atomic cascades caused by ions impinging on bulk materials have remained of interest to the scientific community since their discovery by Goldstein in 1902. While considerable effort has been spent describing and, more recently, simulating these cascades, tools that can study individual events are lacking and several aspects of cascade behavior remain poorly known. These aspects include the material energies that determine cascade magnitude and the variation between cascades produced by monoenergetic ions. We have recently developed an alpha particle detector with a thermodynamic resolution near 100 eV full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and an achieved resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM for 5.3 MeV particles. The detector relies on the absorption of particles by a bulk material and a thermal change in a superconducting thermometer. The achieved resolution of this detector provides the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive technique and a factor of 8 improvement over semiconductor detectors. The exquisite resolution can be directly applied to improved measurements of fundamental nuclear decays and nuclear forensics. In addition, we propose that the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and achieved resolution is due to fluctuations in lattice damage caused by ion-induced cascades in the absorber. Hence, this new detector is capable of measuring the kinetic energy converted to lattice damage in individual atomic cascades. This capability allows new measurements of cascade dynamics; for example, we find that the ubiquitous modeling program, SRIM, significantly underestimates the lattice damage caused in bulk tin by 5.3 MeV alpha particles.

  8. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  9. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Kinetics of Radioactive Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, S.

    At present there are over 3,000 known nuclides (see the Appendix in Vol. 2 on the “Table of the Nuclides”), 265 of which are stable, while the rest, i.e., more than 90% of them, are radioactive. The chemical applications of the specific isotopes of chemical elements are mostly connected with the latter group, including quite a number of metastable nuclear isomers, making the kinetics of radioactive decay an important chapter of nuclear chemistry. After giving a phenomenological and then a statistical interpretation of the exponential law, the various combinations of individual decay processes as well as the cases of equilibrium and nonequilibrium will be discussed. Half-life systematics of the different decay modes detailed in Chaps. 2 and 4 of this volume are also summarized.

  11. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  12. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  13. Semileptonic decay properties of Λb baryon in potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, S.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-08-01

    Considering the hyperradial Schrödinger equation in the presence of a potential combination containing harmonic and Deng-Fan-type terms and choosing the harmonic term as parent, we obtain baryonic hyperradial wave function and masses of Lambda baryons. Then, we apply the differential decay width with the Isgur-Wise function to find rates for the semileptonic baryon decay Λb → Λc ℓ bar{ν}. Comparison with other published models is also included.

  14. Transverse Stress Decay in a Specially Orthotropic Strip Under Localizing Normal Edge Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    2000-01-01

    Solutions are presented for the stresses in a specially orthotropic infinite strip which is subjected to localized uniform normal loading on one edge while the other edge is either restrained against normal displacement only, or completely fixed. The solutions are used to investigate the diffusion of load into the strip and in particular the decay of normal stress across the width of the strip. For orthotropic strips representative of a broad range of balanced and symmetric angle-ply composite laminates, minimum strip widths are found that ensure at least 90% decay of the normal stress across the strip. In addition, in a few cases where, on the fixed edge the peak shear stress exceeds the normal stress in magnitude, minimum strip widths that ensure 90% decay of both stresses are found. To help in putting these results into perspective, and to illustrate the influence of material properties on load 9 orthotropic materials, closed-form solutions for the stresses in similarly loaded orthotropic half-planes are obtained. These solutions are used to generate illustrative stress contour plots for several representative laminates. Among the laminates, those composed of intermediate-angle plies, i.e., from about 30 degrees to 60 degrees, exhibit marked changes in normal stress contour shape with stress level. The stress contours are also used to find 90% decay distances in the half-planes. In all cases, the minimum strip widths for 90% decay of the normal stress exceed the 90% decay distances in the corresponding half-planes, in amounts ranging from only a few percent to about 50% of the half-plane decay distances. The 90% decay distances depend on both material properties and the boundary conditions on the supported edge.

  15. Weak decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Moby Dick spectrometer (at BNL) in coincidence with a range spectrometer and a TOF neutron detector will be used to study the weak decay modes of /sup 12/C. The Moby Dick spectrometer will be used to reconstruct and tag events in which specific hypernuclear states are formed in the reaction K/sup -/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C. Subsequent emission of decay products (pions, protons and neutrons) in coincidence with the fast forward pion will be detected in a time and range spectrometer, and a neutron detector.

  16. Search for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for decays is performed using 3 .0 fb1- of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The f 0(980) meson is reconstructed through its decay to the π + π - final state in the mass window 900 MeV /c 2 < m( π + π -) < 1080 MeV /c 2. No significant signal is observed. The first upper limits on the branching fraction of are set at 90 % (95 %) confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Dependence of various SOL widths on plasma current and density in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J; Maingi, R; Boedo, J; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-02-12

    The dependence of various SOL widths on the line-averaged density ({ovr n}{sub e}) and plasma current (l{sub p}) for the quiescent H-mode plasmas with Type-V ELMs in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) was investigated. It is found that the heat flux SOL width ({lambda}{sub q}), measured by the IR camera, is virtually insensitive to {ovr n}{sub e} and has a strong negative dependence on l{sub p}. This insensitivity of {lambda}{sub q} to {ovr n}{sub e} is consistent with the scaling law from JET H-mode plasmas that shows a very weak dependence on the upstream density. The electron temperature, ion saturation current density, electron density, and electron pressure decay lengths ({lambda}{sub Te}, {lambda}{sub jsat}, {lambda}{sub ne}, and {lambda}{sub pe}, respectively) measured by the probe showed that {lambda}{sub Te} and {lambda}{sub jsat} have strong negative dependence on l{sub p}, whereas {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} revealed only a little or no dependence. The dependence of {lambda}{sub Te} on l{sub p} is consistent with the scaling law in the literature while {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} dependence shows a different trend.

  18. Combination of CDF and D0 results on the W boson mass and width

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Tevatron Electroweak Working

    2008-08-01

    The results on the direct measurements of the W-boson mass and width, based on the data collected by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D{sup -} at Fermilab are summarized and combined. The CDF Run-0 (1988-1889) and Run-I (1992-1995) results have been re-averaged using the BLUE method and combined with Run-I D{sup -} results and the latest published results from CDF taken from the first period of Run-II (2001-2004). The results are corrected to have consistency between the parton distribution functions and electroweak parameters. The resulting Tevatron averages for the mass and total decay width of the W boson are: M{sub W} = 80432 {+-} 39 MeV and {Lambda}{sub W} = 2056 {+-} 62 MeV. The inclusion of a preliminary Run-II measurement of {Lambda}{sub W} from D{sup -}0 gives {Lambda}{sub W} = 2050 {+-} 58 MeV.

  19. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay widthW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  20. Gold Coated Lanthanide Phosphate Nanoparticles for Targeted Alpha Generator Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Mark F; Woodward, Jonathan; Boll, Rose Ann; Wall, Jonathan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Kennel, Steve J; Mirzadeh, Saed; Robertson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapies maximize cytotoxicty to cancer cells. In vivo generators such as 225Ac, which emits four particles in its decay chain, can significantly amplify the radiation dose delivered to the target site. However, renal dose from unbound 213Bi escaping during the decay process limits the dose of 225Ac that can be administered. Traditional chelating moieties are unable to sequester the radioactive daughters because of the high recoil energy from alpha particle emission. To counter this, we demonstrate that an engineered multilayered nanoparticle-antibody conjugate can both deliver radiation and contain the decay daughters of the in vivo -generator 225Ac while targeting biologically relevant receptors. These multi-shell nanoparticles combine the radiation resistance of crystalline lanthanide phosphate to encapsulate and contain 225Ac and its radioactive decay daughters, the magnetic properties of gadolinium phosphate for easy separation, and established surface chemistry of gold for attachment of nanoparticles to targeting antibodies.

  1. Reheating dynamics affects non-perturbative decay of spectator fields

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: rose.lerner@helsinki.fi

    2013-11-01

    The behaviour of oscillating scalar spectator fields after inflation depends on the thermal background produced by inflaton decay. Resonant decay of the spectator is often blocked by large induced thermal masses. We account for the finite decay width of the inflaton and the protracted build-up of the thermal bath to determine the early evolution of a homogeneous spectator field σ coupled to the Higgs Boson Φ through the term g{sup 2}σ{sup 2}Φ{sup 2}, the only renormalisable coupling of a new scalar to the Standard Model. We find that for very large higgs-spectator coupling g∼>10{sup −3}, the resonance is not always blocked as was previously suggested. As a consequence, the oscillating spectator can decay quickly. For other parameter values, we find that although qualitative features of the thermal blocking still hold, the dynamics are altered compared to the instant decay case. These findings are important for curvaton models, where the oscillating field must be relatively long lived in order to produce the curvature perturbation. They are also relevant for other spectator fields, which must decay sufficiently early to avoid spoiling the predictions of baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis.

  2. On a possible large width 750 GeV diphoton resonance at ATLAS and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloni, Daniel; Blum, Kfir; Dery, Avital; Efrati, Aielet; Nir, Yosef

    2016-08-01

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC have reported an excess of diphoton events with invariant mass around 750 GeV, with local significance of about 3.6 σ and 2.6 σ, respectively. We entertain the possibility that this excess is due to new physics, in which case the data suggest a new particle with 13 TeV LHC production cross section times diphoton branching ratio of about 5 fb. Interestingly, ATLAS reports a mild preference for a sizeable width for the signal of about 45 GeV; this result appears consistent with CMS, and is further supported by improving the compatibility of the 8 TeV and 13 TeV analyses. We focus on the possibility that the new state is a scalar. First, we show that, in addition to the new state that is needed directly to produce the diphoton bump, yet more new particles beyond the Standard Model are needed to induce diphoton decay rate of the right size. Second, we note that if the excess is attributed to the Breit-Wigner peak of a single new state, then the signal strength and width — taken together — suggest a total LHC production cross section of order 105 fb. Restricting to perturbative models without ad-hoc introduction of many new states or exotic charges, we reach the following conclusions: (i) Gluon-fusion cannot explain the required large production cross section. (ii) Tree level production from initial state quarks cannot explain the required branching ratio to two photons. (iii) Tree level production is constrained by flavor data as well as LHC Run-I and Tevatron dijet analyses. Insisting on a large width we are led to suggest that more than one scalar states, nearly degenerate in mass, could conspire to produce an observed wide bump.

  3. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  4. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  5. Effects of roadside transect width on waterfowl and wetland estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Jane E.; Sklebar, H. Thomas; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Buhl, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    Strip transects located along roads are commonly used to estimate waterfowl populations and characterize associated wetland habitat. We used data collected in May and early June, 1995, on forty-five 40-km2 plots in North Dakota to evaluate bias of 800-m and 400-m wide roadside transects for sampling wetlands relative to a larger (40-km2) scale and to compare duck abundance at the two widths. Densities of all basins combined and of seasonal basins considered alone were biased high for both transect widths, but mean bias did not differ from zero for temporary or semipermanent basins. Biases did not occur when excavated seasonal and temporary basins (i.e., road ditches) were excluded from the sample. Mean basin density was higher for the inner (400-m) transect width than for the outer transect width (area remaining of the 800-m transect, outside of center 400-m width) for all basins combined and for seasonal and temporary basins. We detected an area-related bias in the occurrence of basins in transects: smaller basins (0.08–1.6 ha) were over-represented in transect samples by 2.9–6.5%, and larger basins (≥11 ha) were under-represented in 800-m transects by 7.3% and in 400-m transects by 16.3%. We compared the distribution of ducks relative to water conditions in the inner and outer transect widths to evaluate whether they were affected by proximity to the road. Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos L.), northern pintails (A. acuta L.), and gadwall (A. strepera L.) responded to water conditions equally in the inner and outer transect widths, but northern shovelers (A. clypeata L.) and blue-winged teal (A. discors L.) responded more strongly to wetlands on the inner than the outer transect width, indicating that estimates of these species would be higher from a 400-m wide transect than from an 800-m wide transect. Differences in an adjustment index, used to account for the portion of basin obscured from view, were highly variable between inner and outer transect widths but

  6. Mechanism of pion production in {alpha}p scattering at 1 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Prokofiev, A. N. Smirnov, I. B.; Strokovsky, E. A.

    2012-09-15

    An analysis of the experimental data on one-pion and two-pion production in the p({alpha}, {alpha} Prime )X reaction studied in a semi-exclusive experiment at an energy of E{sub {alpha}} = 4.2 GeV has been performed. The obtained results demonstrate that the inelastic {alpha}-particle scattering on the proton at the energy of the experiment proceeds either through excitation and decay of the {Delta} resonance in the projectile {alpha} particle, or through excitation in the target proton of the Roper resonance, which decays into a nucleon and a pion, or a nucleon and a {sigma} meson-a system of two pions in the isospin I = 0, S-wave state.

  7. {alpha}-cluster structure above doubly closed shells in a generalized density-dependent cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-01-15

    An extension of the generalized density-dependent cluster model (GDDCM) is presented to study {alpha}-cluster structure above doubly closed shells. In all cases, the microscopic {alpha}-core potential is numerically constructed in the double-folding model with CDM3Y6 nucleon-nucleon interactions plus proton-proton Coulomb interactions. The properties of intraband E2 transitions and {alpha} decays are calculated by the exact solution of the Schroedinger equation with appropriate boundary conditions. It is found that the enhanced B(E2) transition strengths are well reproduced without any effective charge and the calculations of {alpha}-decay properties show good agreement with the available experimental data. This indicates that the GDDCM has universal applicability and equal validity regardless of whether the {alpha}-cluster states are in light or heavy nuclei.

  8. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalka, A. M.

    1986-04-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the dc input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  9. Effective Widths of Compression-Loaded Plates With a Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A study of the effects of cutouts and laminate construction on the prebuckling and initial postbuckling stiffnesses, and the effective widths of compression-loaded, laminated-composite and aluminum square plates is presented. The effective-width concept is extended to plates with cutouts, and experimental and nonlinear finite-element analysis results are presented. Behavioral trends are compared for seven plate families and for cutout-diameter-to-plate-width ratios up to 0.66. A general compact design curve that can be used to present and compare the effective widths for a wide range of laminate constructions is also presented. A discussion of how the results can be used and extended to include certain types of damage, cracks, and other structural discontinuities or details is given. Several behavioral trends are described that initially appear to be nonintuitive. The results demonstrate a complex interaction between cutout size and plate orthotropy that affects the axial stiffness and effective width of a plate subjected to compression loads.

  10. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, Alex M.

    1986-01-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  11. Alpha Coincidence Detection for the Assay of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha

    2013-11-15

    Abstract – Interferences in both decay counting and mass counting techniques limit their application for some environmental monitoring applications. For example, 238U interferes with 238Pu in mass spectrometry measurements, while in conventional alpha spectroscopy measurements it is nearly impossible to separate 238Pu from 241Am and 239Pu from 240Pu. These interferences are typically resolved by using chemical separation and/or different measurement techniques for different isotopes. We are investigating radiation detector concepts to simultaneously assay these four isotopes with minimal sample preparation by exploiting radiation signatures measured in coincidence with the typical alpha decays of these isotopes. Particles in coincidence with the alpha decay include conversion electrons, gamma rays, x-rays, and Auger electrons. Each decay has a unique energy distribution enabling the separation of the isotopes. We are exploring two basic detector concepts to achieve these goals: a silicon-based design and a gas-detector design. The silicon system provides the potential for higher energy resolution at the cost of lower efficiency compared to a gas detector. In this paper, we will describe our evaluation of the different detector concepts, which will include detection efficiency, ability to resolve the isotopes, sample preparation and equipment requirements.

  12. Channel coupling in heavy quarkonia: Energy levels, mixing, widths, and new states

    SciTech Connect

    Danilkin, I. V.; Simonov, Yu. A.

    2010-04-01

    The mechanism of channel coupling via decay products is used to study energy shifts, level mixing as well as the possibility of new near-threshold resonances in cc, bb systems. The Weinberg eigenvalue method is formulated in the multichannel problems, which allows one to describe coupled-channel resonances and wave functions in a unitary way, and to predict new states due to channel coupling. Realistic wave functions for all single-channel states and decay matrix elements computed earlier are exploited, and no new fitting parameters are involved. Examples of level shifts, widths, and mixings are presented; the dynamical origin of X(3872) and the destiny of the single-channel 2{sup 3}P{sub 1}(cc) state are clarified. As a result a sharp and narrow peak in the state with quantum numbers J{sup PC}=1{sup ++} is found at 3.872 GeV, while the single-channel resonance originally around 3.940 GeV becomes increasingly broad and disappears with growing coupling to open channels.

  13. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer.

  14. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22202153

  15. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  16. BABAR B Decay Results

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, David B

    2002-03-14

    Data from the first run of the BABAR detector at the PEP II accelerator are presented. Measurements of many rare B decay modes are now possible using the large data sets currently being collected by BABAR. An overview of analysis techniques and results on data collected in 2000 are described.

  17. Cosmology with decaying particles

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1984-09-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which an unstable massive relic particle species (denoted by X) has an initial mass density relative to baryons ..beta../sup -1/ identically equal rho/sub X//rho/sub B/ >> 1, and then decays recently (redshift z less than or equal to 1000) into particles which are still relativistic today (denoted by R). We write down and solve the coupled equations for the cosmic scale factor a(t), the energy density in the various components (rho/sub X/, rho/sub R/, rho/sub B/), and the growth of linear density perturbations (delta rho/rho). The solutions form a one parameter (..beta..) family of solutions; physically ..beta../sup -1/ approx. = (..cap omega../sub R//..cap omega../sub NR/) x (1 + z/sub D/) = (ratio today of energy density of relativistic to nonrelativistic particles) x (1 + redshift of (decay)). We discuss the observational implications of such a cosmological model and compare our results to earlier results computed in the simultaneous decay approximation. In an appendix we briefly consider the case where one of the decay products of the X is massive and becomes nonrelativistic by the present epoch. 21 references.

  18. Semileptonic B Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-01-03

    Semileptonic decays of B mesons play a critical role in the determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix elements V{sub cb} and V{sub ub}. These two quantities are fundamental parameters of the Standard Model and have to be determined experimentally. Over the past decade, the vast samples of B mesons recorded at the B factories at LEP at Cornell University, KEK at Tsukuba, and SLAC at Stanford University have allowed for detailed studies of semileptonic B decays. These decays proceed via first-order weak interactions; thus, they are expected to be free of non-Standard Model contributions and therefore are well suited for the extraction of the quark-mixing parameters. Differential decay rates are combined with theoretical calculations of hadronization effects, leading to a substantially improved knowledge of |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}|. The results are used to constrain the parameters of the CKM matrix and to test the Standard Model predictions for CP-violating effects.

  19. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  20. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePlus

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries