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Sample records for alpha inverse agonist

  1. Kaempferol is an estrogen-related receptor alpha and gamma inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Fang, Fang; Huang, Zhiyan; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-02-18

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonoid that is thought to function as a selective estrogen receptor modulator. In this study, we established that kaempferol also functions as an inverse agonist for estrogen-related receptors alpha and gamma (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). We demonstrated that kaempferol binds to ERRalpha and ERRgamma and blocks their interaction with coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Kaempferol also suppressed the expressions of ERR-target genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 (PDK2 and PDK4). This evidence suggests that kaempferol may exert some of its biological effect through both estrogen receptors and estrogen-related receptors. PMID:19171140

  2. Identification of Selective ERRγ Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Im, Chun Young; Yoo, Eun Kyung; Ma, Min Jung; Kim, Sang-Bum; Hong, Eunmi; Chin, Jungwook; Hwang, Hayoung; Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Lee, In-Kyu; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin

    2016-01-12

    GSK5182 (4) is currently one of the lead compounds for the development of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) inverse agonists. Here, we report the design, synthesis, pharmacological and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity (ADMET) properties of a series of compounds related to 4. Starting from 4, a series of analogs were structurally modified and their ERRγ inverse agonist activity was measured. A key pharmacophore feature of this novel class of ligands is the introduction of a heterocyclic group for A-ring substitution in the core scaffold. Among the tested compounds, several of them are potent ERRγ inverse agonists as determined by binding and functional assays. The most promising compound, 15g, had excellent binding selectivity over related subtypes (IC50 = 0.44, >10, >10, and 10 μM at the ERRγ, ERRα, ERRβ, and ERα subtypes, respectively). Compound 15g also resulted in 95% transcriptional repression at a concentration of 10 μM, while still maintaining an acceptable in vitro ADMET profile. This novel class of ERRγ inverse agonists shows promise in the development of drugs targeting ERRγ-related diseases.

  3. Recent advances in the discovery of alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The alpha(1) adrenoceptors are three of nine well-characterized receptors that are activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Agonists acting at the alpha(1) adrenoceptors produce numerous physiological effects, and are used therapeutically for several indications. Many known alpha(1) adrenoceptor agonists are alpha(1A) selective, but the discovery of highly selective alpha(1B) and alpha(1D) adrenoceptor agonists has proven to be an extremely difficult goal to achieve. This review will focus on recent advances in the discovery, development and clinical utility of subtype-specific alpha(1) agonists as well as contributions to our understanding of agonist-receptor interactions.

  4. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  5. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline.

  6. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  7. Design, evaluation, and comparison of ghrelin receptor agonists and inverse agonists as suitable radiotracers for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Constance; Bergmann, Ralf; Pietzsch, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-04-18

    Ghrelin agonist and inverse agonist radiotracers, suitable for positron emission tomography (PET), were developed to study the behavior of ghrelin receptor ligands in vivo and for further design of druggable peptides. The target peptides were synthesized on solid support and conjugated to the bifunctional chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid-4,7-acetic acid (NODAGA), which is known to form a stable complex with Ga(3+). Complexation with (68)Ga could be achieved under mild conditions and led to radiotracers with high radiochemical purity and specific activity. The biological activity of the radiotracers was evaluated in vitro by an inositol phosphate turnover assay. Pharmacokinetic profile and metabolic stability of the (68)Ga-NODAGA-radiotracers were investigated by small animal PET in rodent. Ghrelin derived agonists presented very high kidney accumulation, negligible tissue distribution, fast blood clearance, and poor stability in blood. Contrarily, the inverse agonist radiotracer exhibited very high stability in blood, large diffusion in tissues, reasonable kidney and liver metabolism, and slow blood clearance. This pharmacokinetic profile makes the ghrelin inverse agonist motif KwFwLL-CONH(2) suitable for further development of radiotracers and a promising lead to design peptide-based therapeutics against obesity. PMID:22372770

  8. Computational Prediction and Biochemical Analyses of New Inverse Agonists for the CB1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Scott, Caitlin E; Ahn, Kwang H; Graf, Steven T; Goddard, William A; Kendall, Debra A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-25

    Human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) G-protein coupled receptor is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. The previously predicted and experimentally validated ensemble of ligand-free conformations of CB1 [Scott, C. E. et al. Protein Sci. 2013 , 22 , 101 - 113 ; Ahn, K. H. et al. Proteins 2013 , 81 , 1304 - 1317] are used here to predict the binding sites for known CB1-selective inverse agonists including rimonabant and its seven known derivatives. This binding pocket, which differs significantly from previously published models, is used to identify 16 novel compounds expected to be CB1 inverse agonists by exploiting potential new interactions. We show experimentally that two of these compounds exhibit inverse agonist properties including inhibition of basal and agonist-induced G-protein coupling activity, as well as an enhanced level of CB1 cell surface localization. This demonstrates the utility of using the predicted binding sites for an ensemble of CB1 receptor structures for designing new CB1 inverse agonists.

  9. Pyridopyrimidine based cannabinoid-1 receptor inverse agonists: Synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Debenham, John S; Madsen-Duggan, Christina B; Wang, Junying; Tong, Xinchun; Lao, Julie; Fong, Tung M; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Xiao, Jing Chen; Huang, Cathy C R-R; Shen, Chun-Pyn; Sloan Stribling, D; Shearman, Lauren P; Strack, Alison M; Euan Macintyre, D; Hale, Jeffrey J; Walsh, Thomas F

    2009-05-01

    The synthesis, SAR and binding affinities are described for cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) specific inverse agonists based on pyridopyrimidine and heterotricyclic scaffolds. Food intake and pharmacokinetic evaluation of several of these compounds indicate that they are effective orally active modulators of CB1R.

  10. Cell type and gene-specific activity of the retinoid inverse agonist AGN 193109: divergent effects from agonist at retinoic acid receptor gamma in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Nagpal, S; Klein, E S; Arefieg, T; Krasinski, G; DiSepio, D; Agarwal, C; Johnson, A; Eckert, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are important regulators of epithelial differentiation. AGN 193109 is a high-affinity antagonist and inverse agonist for the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paradoxically, both AGN 193109 and retinoid agonists inhibit the expression of the differentiation marker MRP-8 in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). TTNPB, an RAR agonist, and AGN 193109 mutually antagonize MRP-8 inhibition at both mRNA and protein levels. We find that this antagonism, which is greatest at an AGN 193109:TTNPB ratio of about 10:1, is absent when either compound is in significant excess. The potent RARalpha-specific agonist, AGN 193836, has no effect on MRP-8 regulation. These data indicate that inverse agonists and agonists suppress MRP-8 in NHKs through RARgamma using distinct and mutually inhibitory mechanisms. The activity of AGN 193109 on MRP-8 is cell type specific. In differentiating ECE16-1 cervical cells, TTNPB inhibits while AGN 193109 induces MRP-8 mRNA levels. The effect of AGN 193109 on genes inhibited by retinoid agonists in NHKs is also selective; expression of the differentiation markers transglutaminase 1 and keratin 6 is not down-regulated by AGN 193109 whereas stromelysin-1 expression is suppressed. These results show a complex gene and cell context-specific interplay between agonist and inverse agonist for the regulation of gene expression.

  11. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor coupling events initiated by methoxy-substituted tolazoline partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, P.; Keung, A.; Deth, R.

    1986-03-01

    A series of mono- and dimethyoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives, known to be partial agonists at the alpha/sub 1/ receptor, were compared with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/ selective full agonist phenylephrine (PE) on isolated strips of rabbit aorta Agonist activity was evaluated in contraction, /sup 45/Ca influx, /sup 45/Ca efflux, and /sup 32/P-Phospholipid labelling studies. Maximum contractile responses for the 2-, 3-, and 3, 5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives (10/sup -5/M) were 53.8, 67.6 and 99.7% of the PE (10/sup -5/M) response respectively. These same partial agonists caused a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx to the extent of 64, 86, and 95% of the PE response respectively. In /sup 45/Ca efflux studies, (a measure of the intracellular Ca/sup +2/ release) the tolazolines caused: 30%, 63%, and 78% of the PE stimulated level. /sup 32/P-Phosphatidic acid (PA) labelling was measured as an index of PI turnover after ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptor stimulation. Compared to PE, the 2-, 3-, and 3,5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives caused 22, 46, and 72% PA labelling. The above values are all in reasonable accord with the rank order or agonist activity shown in maximum contractile responses. The results of this investigation suggest that partial agonists stimulate ..cap alpha.. receptor coupling events at a level which is quantitatively comparable to their potencies in causing contraction of arterial smooth muscle.

  12. Meclizine is an agonist ligand for mouse constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and an inverse agonist for human CAR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Ping; Schrader, William T; Moore, David D

    2004-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a key regulator of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The ligand-binding domains of murine (m) and human (h) CAR are divergent relative to other nuclear hormone receptors, resulting in species-specific differences in xenobiotic responses. Here we identify the widely used antiemetic meclizine (Antivert; Bonine) as both an agonist ligand for mCAR and an inverse agonist for hCAR. Meclizine increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Like the mCAR agonist 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, meclizine stimulates binding of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the murine receptor in vitro. Meclizine administration to mice increases expression of CAR target genes in a CAR-dependent manner. In contrast, meclizine suppresses hCAR transactivation and inhibits the phenobarbital-induced expression of the CAR target genes, cytochrome p450 monooxygenase (CYP)2B10, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2, in primary hepatocytes derived from mice expressing hCAR, but not mCAR. The inhibitory effect of meclizine also suppresses acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in humanized CAR mice. These results demonstrate that a single compound can induce opposite xenobiotic responses via orthologous receptors in rodents and humans. PMID:15272053

  13. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3′,5′-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury. PMID:26196013

  14. PPAR{alpha} agonists up-regulate organic cation transporters in rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luci, Sebastian; Geissler, Stefanie; Koenig, Bettina; Koch, Alexander; Stangl, Gabriele I.; Hirche, Frank; Eder, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.eder@landw.uni-halle.de

    2006-11-24

    It has been shown that clofibrate treatment increases the carnitine concentration in the liver of rats. However, the molecular mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we observed for the first time that treatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} agonist clofibrate increases hepatic mRNA concentrations of organic cation transporters (OCTNs)-1 and -2 which act as transporters of carnitine into the cell. In rat hepatoma (Fao) cells, treatment with WY-14,643 also increased the mRNA concentration of OCTN-2. mRNA concentrations of enzymes involved in carnitine biosynthesis were not altered by treatment with the PPAR{alpha} agonists in livers of rats and in Fao cells. We conclude that PPAR{alpha} agonists increase carnitine concentrations in livers of rats and cells by an increased uptake of carnitine into the cell but not by an increased carnitine biosynthesis.

  15. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  16. Treating enhanced GABAergic inhibition in Down syndrome: use of GABA α5-selective inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cué, Carmen; Delatour, Benoît; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2014-10-01

    Excess inhibition in the brain of individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21 could be responsible for cognitive deficits observed throughout their lives. A change in the excitatory/inhibitory balance in adulthood would alter synaptic plasticity, potentially triggering learning and memory deficits. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature central nervous system and binds to GABAA receptors, opens a chloride channel, and reduces neuronal excitability. In this review we discuss methods to alleviate neuronal inhibition in a mouse model of Down syndrome, the Ts65Dn mouse, using either an antagonist (pentylenetetrazol) or two different inverse agonists selective for the α5-subunit containing receptor. Both inverse agonists, which reduce inhibitory GABAergic transmission, could rescue learning and memory deficits in Ts65Dn mice. We also discuss safety issues since modulation of the excitatory-inhibitory balance to improve cognition without inducing seizures remains particularly difficult when using GABA antagonists.

  17. Human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptors. I. Functional exploration and pharmacological definition with selected alpha-2 agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Galitzky, J.; Mauriege, P.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1989-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate more fully the pharmacological characteristics of the human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Biological assays were performed on intact isolated fat cells while radioligand binding studies were carried out with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine in membranes. These pharmacological studies brought: (1) a critical definition of the limits of the experimental conditions required for the exploration of alpha-2 adrenergic responsiveness on human fat cells and membranes; (2) an improvement in the pharmacological definition of the human fat cell postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Among alpha-2 agonists, UK-14,304 was the most potent and the relative order of potency was: UK-14,304 greater than p-aminoclonidine greater than clonidine = B-HT 920 greater than rilmenidine. For alpha-2 antagonists, the potency order was: yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than SK F-86,466 much greater than benextramine; (3) a description of the impact of benextramine (irreversible alpha-1/alpha-2 antagonist) on human fat cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and on human fat cell function; the drug inactivates the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors with a minor impact on beta adrenergic receptors and without noticeable alterations of fat cell function as assessed by preservation of beta adrenergic and Al-adenosine receptor-mediated lipolytic responses; and (4) a definition of the relationship existing between alpha-2 adrenergic receptor occupancy, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and antilipolysis with full and partial agonists. The existence of a receptor reserve must be taken into account when evaluating alpha-2 adrenergic receptor distribution and regulation of human fat cells.

  18. Evaluation and synthesis of polar aryl- and heteroaryl spiroazetidine-piperidine acetamides as ghrelin inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Orr, Suvi T M; Beveridge, Ramsay; Bhattacharya, Samit K; Cameron, Kimberly O; Coffey, Steven; Fernando, Dilinie; Hepworth, David; Jackson, Margaret V; Khot, Vishal; Kosa, Rachel; Lapham, Kimberly; Loria, Paula M; McClure, Kim F; Patel, Jigna; Rose, Colin; Saenz, James; Stock, Ingrid A; Storer, Gregory; von Volkenburg, Maria; Vrieze, Derek; Wang, Guoqiang; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Yingxin

    2015-02-12

    Several polar heteroaromatic acetic acids and their piperidine amides were synthesized and evaluated as ghrelin or type 1a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) inverse agonists. Efforts to improve pharmacokinetic and safety profile was achieved by modulating physicochemical properties and, more specifically, emphasizing increased polarity of our chemical series. ortho-Carboxamide containing compounds provided optimal physicochemical, pharmacologic, and safety profile. pH-dependent chemical stability was also assessed with our series.

  19. Identification of SR3335 (ML176): a Synthetic RORα Selective Inverse Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Solt, Laura A.; Kumar, K. Ganesh; Nuhant, Philippe; Duckett, Derek R.; Cameron, Michael D.; Butler, Andrew A.; Roush, William R.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors (NRs) are still characterized as orphan receptors since ligands have not yet been identified for these proteins. The retinoic acid receptor-related receptors (RORs) have no well-defined physiological ligands. Here, we describe the identification of a selective RORα synthetic ligand, SR3335 (ML-176). SR3335 directly binds to RORα, but not other RORs, and functions as a selective partial inverse agonist of RORα in cell-based assays. Furthermore, SR3335 suppresses the expression of endogenous RORα target genes in HepG2 involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis including glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that SR3335 displays reasonable exposure following an i.p. injection into mice. We assess the ability of SR3335 to suppress gluconeogenesis in vivo using a diet induced obesity (DIO) mouse model where the mice where treated with 15 mg/kg b.i.d., i.p. for 6-days followed by a pyruvate tolerance test. SR3335 treated mice displayed lower plasma glucose levels following the pyruvate challenge consistent with suppression of gluconeogenesis. Thus, we have identified the first selective synthetic RORα inverse agonist and this compound can be utilized as a chemical tool to probe the function of this receptor both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, our data suggests that RORα inverse agonists may hold utility for suppression of elevated hepatic glucose production in type 2 diabetics. PMID:21090593

  20. The identification of GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394; the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas; Elster, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Søren Møller; Poda, Suresh Babu; Loechel, Frosty; Volbracht, Christiane; Klewe, Ib Vestergaard; David, Laurent; Watson, Stephen P

    2014-11-15

    The identification of the novel and selective GPR3 inverse agonist AF64394, the first small molecule inhibitor of GPR3 receptor function, is described. Structure activity relationships and syntheses based around AF64394 are reported.

  1. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, R; de la Motte, C; DiCorleto, P E

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants have been proposed to be anti-atherosclerotic agents; however, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects are poorly understood. We have examined the effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-tcp) on one cellular event in atherosclerotic plaque development, monocyte adhesion to stimulated endothelial cells (ECs). Human umbilical vein ECs were pretreated with alpha-tcp before stimulation with known agonists of monocyte adhesion: IL-1 (10 ng/ml), LPS (10 ng/ml), thrombin (30 U/ml), or PMA (10 nM). Agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion, but not basal adhesion, was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by alpha-tcp. The IC50 of alpha-tcp on an IL-1-induced response was 45 microM. The inhibition correlated with a decrease in steady state levels of E-selectin mRNA and cell surface expression of E-selectin which is consistent with the ability of a monoclonal antibody to E-selectin to inhibit monocytic cell adhesion in this system. Probucol (50 microM) and N-acetylcysteine (20 mM) also inhibited agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion; whereas, several other antioxidants had no significant effect. Protein kinase C (PKC) does not appear to play a role in the alpha-tcp effect since no suppression of phosphorylation of PKC substrates was observed. Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B is reported to be necessary but not sufficient for E-selectin expression in EC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays failed to show an alpha-tcp-induced decrease in activation of this transcription factor after cytokine stimulation. It has been hypothesized that alpha-tcp acts as an anti-atherosclerotic molecule by inhibiting generation of oxidized LDL--a putative triggering molecule in the atherosclerotic process. Our results point to a novel alternative mechanism of action of alpha-tcp. Images PMID:7518838

  2. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Renaud, Marie Pierre; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre; Spire, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes induced by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.

  3. Development of novel silicon-containing inverse agonists of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Nakamura, Masaharu; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Yotaro; Nakagomi, Madoka; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2014-03-15

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptors (RORs) regulate a variety of physiological processes, including hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm and immune function. The RAR agonist: all-trans retinoic acid was reported to be an RORβ inverse agonist, but no information is available regarding ROR activity of its synthetic analogue Am580. Therefore, we screened Am580 and some related tetramethyltetrahydronaphthalene derivatives and carried out structural development studies, including substitution of carbon atoms with silicon, with the aim of creating a potent ROR transcriptional inhibitor. The phenyl amide disila compound 22 showed the most potent ROR-inhibitory activity among the compounds examined. Its activity towards RORα, RORβ and RORγ was increased compared to that of Am580. The IC₅₀ values for RORα, RORβ and RORγ are 1.3, >10 and 4.5 μM, respectively.

  4. Infusions of alpha-2 noradrenergic agonists and antagonists into the amygdala: effects on kindling.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, M R; Corcoran, M E

    1993-12-31

    We reported previously that activation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors with infusions of clonidine into the amygdala/pyriform region is sufficient to retard kindling. To characterize further the involvement in kindling of alpha-2 receptors in the amygdala/pyriform, we exposed rats to unilateral intraamygdaloid infusions of a variety of noradrenergic drugs followed by either low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala, to induce rapid kindling, or conventional high-frequency stimulation. Infusions and electrical stimulation were administered once every 48 h. The prophylactic effects of clonidine were blocked by simultaneous infusion of idazoxan, an alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist, which suggests strongly that these effects were produced at an alpha-2 receptor. Intraamygdaloid infusions of xylazine, another alpha-2 agonist, also significantly retarded low-frequency kindling. Unexpectedly, intraamygdaloid infusions of the alpha-2 antagonists idazoxan, yohimbine, and SK&F 104856 failed to accelerate kindling. Infusion of the alpha-1 antagonist corynanthine also failed to affect kindling. We propose that the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the amygdala/pyriform region contribute to the prophylactic effects of systemically administered clonidine and that the facilitation of kindling observed after systemic administration of alpha-2 antagonists may be due to blockade of alpha-2 adrenoceptors outside of the amygdala/pyriform region.

  5. Nigramide J is a novel potent inverse agonist of the human constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Tanuma, Nobuaki; Yatsu, Tomofumi; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Inouye, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is very important for drug development and for understanding pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. We screened by mammalian one hybrid assay among natural compounds to discover novel ligands of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR). hCAR transcriptional activity was measured by luciferase assay and mRNA levels of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 in HepTR-hCAR cells and human primary hepatocytes were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Nigramide J (NJ) whose efficacy is comparable to those of hitherto known inverse agonists such as clotrimazole, PK11195, and ethinylestradiol. NJ is a naturally occurring cyclohexane-type amide alkaloid that was isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum. The suppressive effect of NJ on the CAR-dependent transcriptional activity was found to be species specific, in the descending order of hCAR, rat CAR, and mouse CAR. The unliganded hCAR-dependent transactivation of reporter and endogenous genes was suppressed by NJ at concentrations higher than 5 μmol/L. The ligand-binding cavity of hCAR was shared by NJ and CITCO, because they were competitive in the binding to hCAR. NJ interfered with the interaction of hCAR with coactivator SRC-1, but not with its interaction with the corepressor NCoR1. Furthermore, NJ is agonist of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR). NJ is a dual ligand of hCAR and hPXR, being an agonist of hPXR and an inverse agonist of hCAR. PMID:25505573

  6. Discovery of PF-5190457, a Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Ghrelin Receptor Inverse Agonist Clinical Candidate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potent, highly selective orally bioavailable ghrelin receptor inverse agonists from a spiro-azetidino-piperidine series is described. Examples from this series have promising in vivo pharmacokinetics and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in human whole and dispersed islets. A physicochemistry-based strategy to increase lipophilic efficiency for ghrelin receptor potency and retain low clearance and satisfactory permeability while reducing off-target pharmacology led to the discovery of 16h. Compound 16h has a superior balance of ghrelin receptor pharmacology and off-target selectivity. On the basis of its promising pharmacological and safety profile, 16h was advanced to human clinical trials. PMID:24900864

  7. Pharmacological Profiles of Alpha 2 Adrenergic Receptor Agonists Identified Using Genetically Altered Mice and Isobolographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Stone, Laura S.; Wilcox, George L.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous, descending noradrenergic fibers convey powerful analgesic control over spinal afferent circuitry mediating the rostrad transmission of pain signals. These fibers target alpha 2 adrenergic receptors (α2ARs) on both primary afferent terminals and secondary neurons, and their activation mediates substantial inhibitory control over this transmission, rivaling that of opioid receptors which share similar a similar pattern of distribution. The terminals of primary afferent nociceptive neurons and secondary spinal dorsal horn neurons express α2AAR and α2CAR subtypes, respectively. Spinal delivery of these agents serves to reduce their side effects, which are mediated largely at supraspinal sites, by concentrating the drugs at the spinal level. Targeting these spinal α2ARs with one of five selective therapeutic agonists, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, brimonidine, ST91 and moxonidine, produces significant antinociception that can work in concert with opioid agonists to yield synergistic antinociception. Application of several genetically altered mouse lines had facilitated identification of the primary receptor subtypes that likely mediate the antinociceptive effects of these agents. This review provides first an anatomical description of the localization of the three subtypes in the central nervous system, second a detailed account of the pharmacological history of each of these six primary agonists, and finally a comprehensive report of the specific interactions of other GPCR agonists with each of the six principal α2AR agonists featured. PMID:19393691

  8. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphins are micro-opioid receptor antagonists lacking inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Li, Tingyou; Bryant, Sharon D; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2007-10-01

    [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphin-1 and -2 ([N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2) are new selective micro-opioid receptor antagonists obtained by N-alkylation with an allyl group on the amino terminus of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) derivatives. To further characterize properties of these compounds, their intrinsic activities were assessed by functional guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) binding assays and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cell membranes obtained from vehicle, morphine, and ethanol-treated SK-N-SH cells and brain membranes isolated from naive and morphine-dependent mice; their mode of action was compared with naloxone or naltrexone, which both are standard nonspecific opioid-receptor antagonists. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2 were neutral antagonists under all of the experimental conditions examined, in contrast to naloxone and naltrexone, which behave as neutral antagonists only in membranes from vehicle-treated cells and mice but act as inverse agonists in membranes from morphine- and ethanol-treated cells as well as morphine-treated mice. Both endomorphin analogs inhibited the naloxone- and naltrexone-elicited withdrawal syndromes from acute morphine dependence in mice. This suggests their potential therapeutic application in the treatment of drug addiction and alcohol abuse without the adverse effects observed with inverse agonist alkaloid-derived compounds that produce severe withdrawal symptoms.

  9. A 7-phenyl substituted triazolopyridazine has inverse agonist activity at the benzodiazepine receptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Biziere, K.; Bourguignon, J. J.; Chambon, J. P.; Heaulme, M.; Perio, A.; Tebib, S.; Wermuth, C. G.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate further the structural requirements for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor ligands, we synthesized SR 95195, [7-phenyl-3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolo-(4,3-b) pyridazine], a positional isomer of the 6-phenyl-triazolo-pyridazines, which were the first non-BZD derivatives to exhibit high affinity for the BZD receptor and BZD-like activity in vivo. In vitro, SR 95195 displaced specifically bound [3H]-flunitrazepam from rat cerebellar and hippocampal membranes with respective IC50 values of 4 and 8 microM. In vivo, SR 95195 lacked BZD-like activity. At high doses SR 95195 induced clonic seizures in mice (threshold convulsant dose: 150 mg kg-1; CD50: 160 mg kg-1 i.p.) which were antagonized by Ro 15-1788. At non-convulsant doses (25 mg kg-1 i.p. and 100 mg kg-1 i.p.) SR 95195 significantly decreased punished responding in an operant conflict procedure in the rat, suggesting SR 95195 has intrinsic anxiogenic activity. SR 95195, in mice, reversed the anticonvulsant and myorelaxant actions of diazepam 3 mg kg-1, orally (respective ED50 values: 45 mg kg-1 i.p. and 44 mg kg-1 i.p.). In an operant-conflict test in rats, SR 95195 at non-anxiogenic doses, antagonized the disinhibitory action of diazepam 4 mg kg-1, i.p. (ED50: 8.6 mg kg-1, i.p.), but not that of pentobarbitone 15 mg kg-1, i.p. It is concluded that SR 95195 has the pharmacological profile of an inverse BZD agonist and that displacing the phenyl from the 6- to the 7-position in the triazolopyridazine series causes a shift from agonist to inverse agonist type activity at the BZD receptor site. PMID:3028557

  10. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 can act both as an agonist and an inverse agonist when estrogen receptor α AF-2 is modified

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E.; Farman, Helen H.; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H.; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Andersson, Annica; Stubelius, Alexandra; Carlsten, Hans; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The bone-sparing effect of estrogen is primarily mediated via estrogen receptor (ER) α, which stimulates target gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs), AF-1 in the N-terminal and AF-2 in the ligand-binding domain. It was recently demonstrated that the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) acts as an ER agonist in uterus of mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2. To evaluate the estrogen-like effects of ICI in different tissues, ovariectomized wild-type mice and mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2 (ERαAF-20) were treated with ICI, estradiol, or vehicle for 3 wk. Estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass as well as the uterine weight, whereas it reduced fat mass, thymus weight, and the growth plate height in wild-type but not in ERαAF-20 mice. Although ICI had no effect in wild-type mice, it exerted tissue-specific effects in ERαAF-20 mice. It acted as an ERα agonist on trabecular bone mass and uterine weight, whereas no effect was seen on cortical bone mass, fat mass, or thymus weight. Surprisingly, a pronounced inverse agonistic activity was seen on the growth plate height, resulting in enhanced longitudinal bone growth. In conclusion, ICI uses ERα AF-1 in a tissue-dependent manner in mice lacking ERαAF-2, resulting in no effect, agonistic activity, or inverse agonistic activity. We propose that ERα lacking AF-2 is constitutively active in the absence of ligand in the growth plate, enabling ICI to act as an inverse agonist. PMID:24395795

  11. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Han, Xiang Hua; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak-Ju; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  13. Discovery of oxa-sultams as RORc inverse agonists showing reduced lipophilicity, improved selectivity and favorable ADME properties.

    PubMed

    René, Olivier; Fauber, Benjamin P; Barnard, Adrian; Chapman, Kerry; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Gobbi, Alberto; Johnson, Adam R; La, Hank; Norman, Maxine; Salmon, Gary; Summerhill, Susan; Wong, Harvey

    2016-09-15

    Modification of the δ-sultam ring of RORc inverse agonist 2 led to the discovery of more polar oxa-sultam 65. The less lipophilic inverse agonist (65) displayed high potency in a biochemical assay, which translated into inhibition of IL-17 production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The successful reduction of lipophilicity of this new analog gave rise to additional improvements in ROR selectivity and aqueous kinetic solubility, as well as reduction in plasma protein binding, while maintaining high cellular permeability. PMID:27524313

  14. Pharmacological properties of AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Kiyoshi, T; Kohayakawa, H; Iwamura, Y; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    We investigated in this study the pharmacological properties of AC-3933 (5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one), a novel benzodiazepine receptor (BzR) partial inverse agonist. AC-3933 potently inhibited [3H]-flumazenil binding to rat whole brain membrane with a Ki value of 5.15 ± 0.39 nM and a GABA ratio of 0.84 ± 0.03. AC-3933 exhibited almost no affinity for the other receptors, transporters and ion channels used in this study. In addition, AC-3933, in the presence of GABA (1 μM), gradually but significantly increased [³⁵S] tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding to rat cortical membrane to 117.1% of the control (maximum increase ratio) at 3000 nM. However, this increase reached a plateau at 30 nM with hardly any change at a concentration range of 100-3000 nM (from 115.2% to 117.1%). AC-3933 (0.1-10 μM) significantly enhanced KCl-evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release from rat hippocampal slices in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, in vivo brain microdialysis showed that intragastric administration of AC-3933 at the dose of 10 mg/kg significantly increased extracellular ACh levels in the hippocampus of freely moving rats (area under the curve (AUC₀₋₂ h) of ACh level; 288.3% of baseline). These results indicate that AC-3933, a potent and selective BzR inverse agonist with low intrinsic activity, might be useful in the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with degeneration of the cholinergic system.

  15. The inverse type II β-turn on D-Trp-Phe, a pharmacophoric motif for MOR agonists.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Luca; Tolomelli, Alessandra; De Marco, Rossella; Spampinato, Santi; Bedini, Andrea; Artali, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Herein we propose the D-Trp-Phe sequence within an inverse type II β-turn as a new kind of pharmacophoric motif for μ-opioid receptor (MOR) cyclopeptide agonists. Initially, we observed that c[Tyr-D-Pro-D-Trp-Phe-Gly] (4), an analogue of endomorphin-1 (H-Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH₂) lacking the crucial protonatable amino group of Tyr 1, is a MOR agonist with 10⁻⁸ M affinity. Molecular docking analysis suggested that the relevant interactions with the receptor involve D-Trp-Phe. The bioactive conformation of this region was investigated by selected derivatives of 4 designed to adopt an inverse type II β-turn. These efforts led to c[Tyr-Gly-D-Trp-Phe-Gly] (14) and to the cyclotetrapeptide c[D-Asp-1-amide-β-Ala-D-Trp-Phe] (15), showing improved nanomolar affinity. Both 14 and 15 selectively bind MOR, as they have negligible affinity for the κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Both 14 and 15 behave as partial MOR agonists in functional assays. Conformational and docking analyses confirm the role of the inverse β-turn in binding. These results indicate that the D-Trp-Phe inverse β-turn structure can be used for designing non-endomorphin-like peptidomimetic opioid agonists in general, characterized by an atypical mechanism of interaction between ligand and receptor.

  16. Influence of circulating alpha adrenoceptor agonists on lung function in patients with exercise induced asthma and healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, K; Martinsson, A; Hjemdahl, P

    1986-01-01

    The influence of circulating noradrenaline (in this context primarily a non-selective alpha agonist) and the alpha 1 selective agonist phenylephrine on bronchial tone, blood pressure, and heart rate was studied in eight patients with exercise induced asthma and eight age and sex matched controls. All subjects refrained from taking treatment for at least one week before the trial. The agonists were infused intravenously in stepwise increasing doses of 0.04, 0.085, 0.17, and 0.34 micrograms/kg a minute for noradrenaline and 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 micrograms/kg a minute for phenylephrine. At the highest dose the plasma concentration of noradrenaline was about 30 nmol/l, resembling the concentrations found during intense exercise, and that of phenylephrine was about 400 nmol/l. Both agonists caused dose dependent and similar increases in blood pressure in the two groups. Despite clearcut cardiovascular effects (systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by about 40-50/25-30 mm Hg), neither agonist altered lung function, as assessed by measurements of specific airway compliance (sGaw), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or end expiratory flow rate, in either group. It is concluded that circulating alpha agonists, whether alpha 1 selective (phenylephrine) or non-selective (noradrenaline), fail to alter basal bronchial tone in patients with exercise induced asthma or in healthy subjects. PMID:3787535

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of novel [alpha]-heteroaryl-phenylpropanoic acid derivatives as PPAR[alpha/gamma] dual agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Bigge, Christopher F.; Davis, Jo Ann; Padalino, Teresa; Pulaski, James; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; McConnell, Patrick; Kane, Christopher D.; Royer, Lori J.; Stevens, Kimberly A.; Auerbach, Bruce; Collard, Wendy; McGregor, Christine; Song, Kun; Pfizer

    2010-09-27

    The synthesis of a new series of phenylpropanoic acid derivatives incorporating an heteroaryl group at the {alpha}-position and their evaluation for binding and activation of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} are presented in this report. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-{l_brace}4-[3-(5-methyl-2-phenyl-oxazol-4-yl)-propyl]-phenyl{r_brace}-2-1,2,3-triazol-2-yl-propionic acid (17j), was identified as a potent human PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual agonist (EC{sub 50} = 0.013 and 0.061 {micro}M, respectively) with demonstrated oral bioavailability in rat and dog. 17j was shown to decrease insulin levels, plasma glucose, and triglycerides in the ZDF female rat model. In the human apolipoprotein A-1/CETP transgenic mouse model 17j produced increases in hApoA1 and HDL-C and decreases in plasma triglycerides. The increased potency for binding and activation of both PPAR subtypes observed with 17j when compared to previous analogs in this series was explained based on results derived from crystallographic and modeling studies.

  18. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine is a partial agonist at the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, M.A.; Wade, S.M.; Neubig, R.R. )

    1990-08-01

    The binding properties of p-(125I)iodoclonidine (( 125I)PIC) to human platelet membranes and the functional characteristics of PIC are reported. (125I)PIC bound rapidly and reversibly to platelet membranes, with a first-order association rate constant (kon) at room temperature of 8.0 +/- 2.7 x 10(6) M-1 sec-1 and a dissociation rate constant (koff) of 2.0 +/- 0.8 x 10(-3) sec-1. Scatchard plots of specific (125I)PIC binding (0.1-5 nM) were linear, with a Kd of 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. (125I)PIC bound to the same number of high affinity sites as the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2-AR) full agonist (3H) bromoxidine (UK14,304), which represented approximately 40% of the sites bound by the antagonist (3H)yohimbine. Guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate greatly reduced the amount of (125I)PIC bound (greater than 80%), without changing the Kd of the residual binding. In competition experiments, the alpha 2-AR-selective ligands yohimbine, bromoxidine, oxymetazoline, clonidine, p-aminoclonidine, (-)-epinephrine, and idazoxan all had Ki values in the low nanomolar range, whereas prazosin, propranolol, and serotonin yielded Ki values in the micromolar range. Epinephrine competition for (125I)PIC binding was stereoselective. Competition for (3H)bromoxidine binding by PIC gave a Ki of 1.0 nM (nH = 1.0), whereas competition for (3H)yohimbine could be resolved into high and low affinity components, with Ki values of 3.7 and 84 nM, respectively. PIC had minimal agonist activity in inhibiting adenylate cyclase in platelet membranes, but it potentiated platelet aggregation induced by ADP with an EC50 of 1.5 microM. PIC also inhibited epinephrine-induced aggregation, with an IC50 of 5.1 microM. Thus, PIC behaves as a partial agonist in a human platelet aggregation assay. (125I)PIC binds to the alpha 2B-AR in NG-10815 cell membranes with a Kd of 0.5 +/- 0.1 nM.

  19. Inverse Agonist of Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Mediates Antidiabetic Effect Through Inhibition of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Gang, Gil-Tae; Ryu, Dongryeol; Koh, Minseob; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Sim, Taebo; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive metabolic disorder with diverse pathological manifestations and is often associated with abnormal regulation of hepatic glucose production. Many nuclear receptors known to control the hepatic gluconeogenic program are potential targets for the treatment of T2DM and its complications. Nevertheless, the therapeutic potential of the estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) in T2DM remains unknown. In this study, we show that the nuclear receptor ERRγ is a major contributor to hyperglycemia under diabetic conditions by controlling hepatic glucose production. Hepatic ERRγ expression induced by fasting and diabetic conditions resulted in elevated levels of gluconeogenic gene expression and blood glucose in wild-type mice. Conversely, ablation of hepatic ERRγ gene expression reduced the expression of gluconeogenic genes and normalized blood glucose levels in mouse models of T2DM: db/db and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. In addition, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study and long-term studies of the antidiabetic effects of GSK5182, the ERRγ-specific inverse agonist, in db/db and DIO mice demonstrated that GSK5182 normalizes hyperglycemia mainly through inhibition of hepatic glucose production. Our findings suggest that the ability of GSK5182 to control hepatic glucose production can be used as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:23775767

  20. The discovery of taranabant, a selective cannabinoid-1 receptor inverse agonist for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, William K

    2008-07-01

    The cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) has emerged as one of the most important targets for the treatment of obesity. Pioneering studies with rimonabant helped to validate animal models of food intake reduction and weight loss and made the connection to weight loss in the clinic. A novel, acyclic amide was identified from a high throughput screen (HTS) of the Merck sample collection and found to be a potent and selective CB1R inhibitor. Further optimization led to more potent compounds that were orally active in reducing food intake and weight loss in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. However, many of these analogues exhibited a high potential for bioactivation and the formation of reactive intermediates and covalent protein binding. Identification of the products of oxidative metabolism guided medicinal chemistry efforts to minimize the formation of these unwanted products. These efforts resulted in the identification of the CB1R inverse agonist, taranabant, which is currently in Phase-III clinical studies for the treatment of obesity. This mini-review will describe some of the medicinal chemistry strategies that were followed from the original high throughput screen hit to the discovery of taranabant. PMID:18574849

  1. Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists. beta. -CCM and RO 15-3505 both reverse the anxiolytic effects of ethanol in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Belzung, C.; Misslin, R.; Vogel, E.

    1988-01-01

    The antagonistic effects of the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist ..beta..-CCM and of the partial inverse agonist RO 15-3505 on the anxiolytic properties of ethanol in mice confronted with a light/dark choice procedure and with the staircase test were investigated. Both drugs reversed the effects of ethanol on some of the behavioral parameters, but ..beta..-CCM alone elicited anxiogenic intrinsic effects. RO-3505 induced seizures in mice treated with a subconvulsant dose of pentylenetetrazole, the most efficient doses being 3 and 6 mg/kg. These data indicate that ..beta..-CCM and RO 15-3505 can reverse some of the anxiolytic effects of ethanol, acting probably to oppose GABA function via the benzodiazepine receptor.

  2. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  3. Berberine is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Li, Changqing; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Although berberine has hypolipidemic effects with a high affinity to nuclear proteins, the underlying molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Here, we determine whether berberine is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), with a lipid-lowering effect. The cell-based reporter gene analysis showed that berberine selectively activates PPARalpha (EC50 =0.58 mM, Emax =102.4). The radioligand binding assay shows that berberine binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPARalpha (Ki=0.73 mM) with similar affinity to fenofibrate. The mRNA and protein levels of CPT-Ialpha gene from HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver are remarkably up-regulated by berberine, and this effect can be blocked by MK886, a non-competitive antagonist of PPARalpha. A comparison assay in which berberine and fenofibrate were used to treat hyperlipidaemic rats for three months shows that these drugs produce similar lipid-lowering effects, except that berberine increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol more effectively than fenofibrate. These findings provide the first evidence that berberine is a potent agonist of PPARalpha and seems to be superior to fenofibrate for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:27100490

  4. Structural Optimization of Ghrelin Receptor Inverse Agonists to Improve Lipophilicity and Avoid Mechanism-Based CYP3A4 Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Bitoku; Funami, Hideaki; Shibata, Makoto; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Koyama, Makoto; Kanki, Satomi; Muto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Structural optimization of 2-aminonicotinamide derivatives as ghrelin receptor inverse agonists is reported. So as to avoid mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of CYP3A4, 1,3-benzodioxol ring of the lead compound was modified. Improvement of the main activity and lipophilicity was achieved simultaneously, leading to compound 18a, which showed high lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) and low MBI activity. PMID:26423040

  5. The water diuretic effect of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, AGN 190851, is species-dependent.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D P; Edwards, R M; Depalma, P D; Fredrickson, T A; Hieble, J P; Gellai, M

    1991-12-01

    The effect of the novel alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, AGN 190851, was evaluated for its diuretic action in the rat, dog and cynomolgus monkey and its ability to inhibit vasopressin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat and dog cortical collecting tubules in vitro. The data indicate that in the rat, AGN 190851 resulted in a dose-dependent water diuresis, which was accompanied by an increase in blood pressure and osmolar clearance. In addition, AGN 190851 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of vasopressin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat cortical collecting tubules in vitro. In contrast, AGN 190851 was unable to cause either a water diuresis in conscious dogs or inhibit vasopressin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in canine tissue in vitro. In the lightly anesthetized cynomolgus monkey, AGN 190851 also failed to alter renal function significantly. Administration of the vasopressin receptor antagonist, SK&F 105494, to either dogs or cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated that antagonism of the vasopressin V2 receptor could result in a brisk water diuresis in both species. The data demonstrate that alpha-2 adrenoceptors can functionally antagonize vasopressin antidiuretic activity in the rat, but not in the dog or cynomolgus monkey.

  6. Synergistic acceleration of thyroid hormone degradation by phenobarbital and the PPAR{alpha} agonist WY14643 in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieneke, N.; Neuschaefer-Rube, F.; Bode, L.M.; Kuna, M.; Andres, J.; Carnevali, L.C.; Hirsch-Ernst, K.I.; Pueschel, G.P.

    2009-10-01

    Energy balance is maintained by controlling both energy intake and energy expenditure. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in regulating energy expenditure. Their levels are adjusted by a tight feedback-controlled regulation of thyroid hormone production/incretion and by their hepatic metabolism. Thyroid hormone degradation has previously been shown to be enhanced by treatment with phenobarbital or other antiepileptic drugs due to a CAR-dependent induction of phase II enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism. We have recently shown, that PPAR{alpha} agonists synergize with phenobarbital to induce another prototypical CAR target gene, CYP2B1. Therefore, it was tested whether a PPAR{alpha} agonist could enhance the phenobarbital-dependent acceleration of thyroid hormone elimination. In primary cultures of rat hepatocytes the apparent half-life of T3 was reduced after induction with a combination of phenobarbital and the PPAR{alpha} agonist WY14643 to a larger extent than after induction with either compound alone. The synergistic reduction of the half-life could be attributed to a synergistic induction of CAR and the CAR target genes that code for enzymes and transporters involved in the hepatic elimination of T3, such as OATP1A1, OATP1A3, UGT1A3 and UGT1A10. The PPAR{alpha}-dependent CAR induction and the subsequent induction of T3-eliminating enzymes might be of physiological significance for the fasting-induced reduction in energy expenditure by fatty acids as natural PPAR{alpha} ligands. The synergism of the PPAR{alpha} agonist WY14643 and phenobarbital in inducing thyroid hormone breakdown might serve as a paradigm for the synergistic disruption of endocrine control by other combinations of xenobiotics.

  7. Molecular modeling of human pentameric alpha(7) neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its interaction with its agonist and competitive antagonist.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Marimuthu; Rajasekaran, Mohan Babu; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam

    2009-04-01

    The nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) is the major class of neurotransmitter receptors that is involved in many neurodegenerative conditions such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The N-terminal region or Ligand Binding Domain (LBD) of nAChR is located at pre- and post-synaptic nervous system, which mediates synaptic transmission. nAChR acts as the drug target for agonist and competitive antagonist molecules that modulate signal transmission at the nerve terminals. Based on Acetylcholine Binding Protein (AChBP) from Lymnea stagnalis as the structural template, the homology modeling approach was carried out to build three dimensional model of the N-terminal region of human alpha(7)nAChR. This theoretical model is an assembly of five alpha(7) subunits with 5 fold axis symmetry, constituting a channel, with the binding pocket present at the interface region of the subunits. alpha-neurotoxin is a potent nAChR competitive antagonist that readily blocks the channel resulting in paralysis. The molecular interaction of alpha-Bungarotoxin, a long chain alpha-neurotoxin from (Bungarus multicinctus) and human alpha(7)nAChR was studied. Agonists such as acetylcholine, nicotine, which are used in a diverse array of biological activities, such as enhancements of cognitive performances, were also docked with the theoretical model of human alpha(7)nAChR. These docked complexes were analyzed further for identifying the crucial residues involved in interaction. These results provide the details of interaction of agonists and competitive antagonists with three dimensional model of the N-terminal region of human alpha(7)nAChR and thereby point to the design of novel lead compounds.

  8. Procognitive and neuroprotective activity of a novel alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist for treatment of neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, Renza; Scali, Carla; Comery, Thomas A; Grauer, Steven M; Aschmi, Suzan; Bothmann, Hendrick; Jow, Brian; Kowal, Dianne; Gianfriddo, Marco; Kelley, Cody; Zanelli, Ugo; Ghiron, Chiara; Haydar, Simon; Dunlop, John; Terstappen, Georg C

    2009-05-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising target for treatment of cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Here, we report the pharmacological properties of 5-morpholin-4-yl-pentanoic acid (4-pyridin-3-yl-phenyl)-amide [SEN12333 (WAY-317538)], a novel selective agonist of alpha7 nAChR. SEN12333 shows high affinity for the rat alpha7 receptor expressed in GH4C1 cells (K(i) = 260 nM) and acts as full agonist in functional Ca(2+) flux studies (EC(50) = 1.6 microM). In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, SEN12333 activated peak currents and maximal total charges similar to acetylcholine (EC(50) = 12 microM). The compound did not show agonist activity at other nicotinic receptors tested and acted as a weak antagonist at alpha3-containing receptors. SEN12333 treatment (3 mg/kg i.p.) improved episodic memory in a novel object recognition task in rats in conditions of spontaneous forgetting as well as cognitive disruptions induced via glutamatergic [5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (dizocilpine maleate); MK-801] or cholinergic (scopolamine) mechanisms. This improvement was blocked by the alpha7-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine, indicating that it is mediated by alpha7 activation. SEN12333 also prevented a scopolamine-induced deficit in a passive avoidance task. In models targeting other cognitive domains, including attention and perceptual processing, SEN12333 normalized the apomorphine-induced deficit of prepulse inhibition. Neuroprotection of SEN12333 was demonstrated in quisqualate-lesioned animals in which treatment with SEN12333 (3 mg/kg/day i.p.) resulted in a significant protection of choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in the lesioned hemisphere. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that the novel alpha7 nAChR agonist SEN12333 has procognitive and neuroprotective properties, further demonstrating utility of alpha7 agonists for treatment of neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders.

  9. Plasma catecholamine modulation of alpha 2 adrenoreceptor agonist affinity and sensitivity in normotensive and hypertensive human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, A S; Onrot, J; Lonce, S; Nadeau, J H; Robertson, D

    1986-01-01

    We measured alpha 2-adrenoreceptor density as well as affinity for and sensitivity to agonist on intact platelets of normotensive and hypertensive subjects before and after physiological increases in plasma catecholamines. In normotensives, posture-induced rises in plasma catecholamines correlated with reduced alpha 2-adrenoreceptor agonist affinity and fewer high affinity state receptors. Platelet aggregation and inhibition of adenylate cyclase by L-epinephrine also was reduced. Hypertensive subjects had similar rises in plasma catecholamines with upright posture, but showed no change in receptor affinity or sensitivity. No change in platelet alpha 2-adrenoreceptor number occurred in these studies. In vitro incubation with L-epinephrine revealed that platelets from hypertensives had slower desensitization than those from normotensives. Binding studies at different temperatures and with varying sodium concentrations found no thermodynamic or sodium-dependent differences between normotensive and hypertensive groups. These studies demonstrate that platelets from hypertensive subjects exhibit a defect in the ability of physiological concentrations of agonist to desensitize the alpha 2-adrenoreceptor. PMID:3009543

  10. The inhibitory effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists on gastrointestinal transit during croton oil-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Pol, O.; Valle, L.; Ferrer, I.; Puig, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The peripheral effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists were investigated in a model of intestinal inflammation induced by intragastric administration of croton oil (CO). Our hypothesis was that inflammation would 'sensitize' adrenoceptors in peripheral and/or central terminals of myenteric and submucous plexus neurones, and enhance systemic effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. 2. Male swiss CD-1 mice, received intragastrically CO (0.05 ml), castor oil (CA, 0.1 ml) or saline (SS) 3 h before the study: gastrointestinal transit (GIT) was evaluated 20 min afterwards with a charcoal meal. The presence of inflammation was assessed by electron microscopy. 3. The intragastric administration of CA or CO caused an increase in GIT and weight loss, but only CO induced an inflammatory response. Both clonidine (imidazoline1/alpha(2)-agonist) and UK-14304 (alpha(2)-agonist) produced dose-related inhibitions of GIT in all groups. During inflammatory diarrhoea (CO), potencies of systemic (s.c.) clonidine and UK-14304 were significantly increased 3.5 and 2.1 times, respectively, while potencies remained unaltered in the presence of diarrhoea without inflammation (CA). The effects were reversed by administration (s.c.) of receptor-specific adrenoceptor antagonists, but not by naloxone. 4. Clonidine was 8.3 (SS) and 2.8 (CO) times more potent when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), than when administered s.c. Inflammation of the gut did not alter the potency of i.c.v. clonidine, demonstrating that enhanced effects of s.c. clonidine are mediated by peripheral receptors. During inflammation, i.c.v. efaroxan did not antagonize low doses of s.c. clonidine (ED20 and ED50S), but partially reversed ED80S, further supporting the peripheral effects of the agonists in CO treated animals. 5. The results demonstrate that inflammation of the gut enhances the potency of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists by a peripheral mechanism. The results also suggest that the inflammatory

  11. AC-3933, a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, improves memory performance in MK-801-induced amnesia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Iwamura, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, is a drug candidate for cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously reported that AC-3933 enhances acetylcholine release in the rat hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment and age-related cognitive decline in both rats and mice. In this study, we further evaluated the procognitive effect of AC-3933 on memory impairment induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, in mice. Unlike the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142, oral administration of AC-3933 significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced memory impairment in the Y-maze test and in the object location test. Interestingly, the procognitive effects of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment were not affected by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil, although this was not the case for the beneficial effects of AC-3933 on scopolamine-induced memory deficit. Moreover, the onset of AC-3933 ameliorating effect on scopolamine- or MK-801-induced memory impairment was different in the Y-maze test. Taken together, these results indicate that AC-3933 improves memory deficits caused by both cholinergic and glutamatergic hypofunction and suggest that the ameliorating effect of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment is mediated by a mechanism other than inverse activation of the benzodiazepine receptor.

  12. Agonist-promoted desensitization and phosphorylation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors coupled to stimulation of phosphatidylinositol metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Cotecchia, S.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    In the DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 hamster vas deferens smooth muscle cell line the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor (..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR) agonist norepinephrine (NE) promotes rapid attenuation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) metabolism which is paralleled by rapid phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR. Cells were labeled by incubation with /sup 32/P/sub i/. Coincubation with NE (100 ..mu..M) significantly increases the rate of /sup 32/P-labeling of both PI and phosphatidic acid. Pretreatment of cells with 100 ..mu..M NE (in the presence of 1 ..mu..M propranolol to prevent ..beta..-AR interactions) results in a drastic attenuation of the NE response on PI metabolism. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR from labeled cells can be solubilized and purified by affinity chromatography on Affigel-A55414 and wheat germ agglutinin agarose chromatography. SDS-PAGE of purified ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR shows a NE-promoted increase in phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 80K ligand binding peptide. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation increases from approx. 1 mol phosphate/mol ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR in the basal condition to approx. 2.5 after NE treatment. Both desensitization and phosphorylation are rapid being maximal within 10-20 min of agonist exposure. These results together with previous findings that phorbol esters promote rapid ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR uncoupling and phosphorylation suggest that receptor phosphorylation is an important mechanism of regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-AR receptor responsiveness.

  13. Synergistic effects of cannabinoid inverse agonist AM251 and opioid antagonist nalmefene on food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Richard Z; Huang, Ruey-Ruey C; Shen, Chun-Pyn; MacNeil, Douglas J; Fong, Tung M

    2004-03-01

    Oral administration of the opioid antagonist nalmefene alone (up to 20 mg/kg) failed to show a significant effect on acute food intake in mice. However, combined oral dosing of nalmefene and subthreshold doses of AM251, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist, led to a significant reduction in food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. Furthermore, the anorectic effect of a high dose of AM251 was further enhanced when co-administered with nalmefene. The results support a synergistic interaction between opioid and cannabinoid systems in regulating feeding behavior.

  14. Structural heterogeneity of the alpha subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in relation to agonist affinity alkylation and antagonist binding.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, M; Gullick, W; Spiess, J; Wan, K; Criado, M; Lindstrom, J

    1986-07-29

    The structural basis for the heterogeneity of the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor with respect to antagonist binding and reactivity toward affinity alkylating reagents was investigated. There is one agonist binding site on each of the two alpha subunits in a receptor monomer. One of these sites is easily affinity labeled with bromoacetylcholine, while more extreme conditions are required to label the other. Evidence is presented that the site which is easily labeled with bromoacetylcholine is the site with higher affinity for the antagonist d-tubocurarine. Digestion of purified alpha subunits with staphylococcal V8 protease gave two limit fragments with apparent molecular weights of 17K and 19K. Both of these fragments began at residue 46 of the alpha sequence, and both reacted with monoclonal antibodies specific for the sequence alpha 152-159 but not with antibodies specific for alpha 235-242. Their tryptic peptide maps and reactivity with a number of monoclonal antibodies were virtually identical. Only the 17-kilodalton (17-kDa) fragments stained heavily for sugars with Schiff's reagent. However, both fragments bound 125I-labeled concanavalin A. Complete removal of carbohydrate detectable with concanavalin A from V8 protease digests of alpha subunits resulted in two fragments of lower apparent molecular weights, indicating that these fragments differed not only in carbohydrate content but also in their C-termini or by another covalent modification. Covalent labeling of one of the two agonist sites of the intact receptor with bromo[3H]acetylcholine followed by digestion with V8 protease resulted in labeling of only the 19-kDa fragment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. alpha-Adrenoceptors in the ventricular myocardium: clonidine, naphazoline and methoxamine as partial alpha-agonists exerting a competitive dualism in action to phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Schümann, H J; Endoh, M

    1976-04-01

    Tha alpha-sympathomimetic agonists, clonidine, naphazoline, methoxamine, oxymetazoline and phenylephrine were used to further characterize the alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic effect in the isolated papillary muscle of the rabbit heart. The maximal inotropic effects of these amines were compared with the effect of isoprenaline and it was examined whether or not these amines compete for alpha-adrenoceptors. On the papillary muscle stimulated at 0.5 Hz, phenylephrine showed a high affinity (pD2 value=6.13) and produced the most pronounced intrinsic activity of the alpha-sympathomimetic amines. Therefore, the intrinsic activity of phenylephrine, in the presence of prindolol (3 X 10(-8) M), was used for comparison with those of the other alpha-agonists. Clonidine caused a positive inotropic effect: the intrinsic activity amounted to 0.32 of that of phenylephrine; the affinity was the highest among the amines tested (pD2 value=6.46); its effect was inhibited by 10(-6) M phentolamine. The affinity and the intrinsic activity of naphazoline were slightly lower than those of clonidine. Methoxamine showed a relatively high intrinsic activity (0.56) but the lowest affinity (4.68). Oxymetazoline did not cause any positive inotropic effect. Clonidine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline antagonized the positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine, mediated via the alpha-adrenocaptors in the presence of 3 X 10(-8) M prindolol, in a competitive manner. This observation suggests that these alpha-sympathomimetic amines compete with phenylephrine for the same receptor site. Thus the present results provide additional evidence for alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic actions of sympathomimetic amines in the rabbit papillary muscle.

  16. alpha2-Adrenergic agonists antagonise the anxiolytic-like effect of antidepressants in the four-plate test in mice.

    PubMed

    Massé, Fabienne; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2005-10-14

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) has been reported to be efficient in anxiety disorders. Some animal models have demonstrated an anxiolytic-like effect following acute administration, however, it is not yet known how noradrenergic receptors are implicated in the therapeutic effects of antidepressants (ADs) in anxiety. The effects of two alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (clonidine, guanabenz) on anxiolytic-like effect of two SSRIs (paroxetine and citalopram) and two SNRIs (venlafaxine and milnacipran) were evaluated in the four-plate test (FPT) in mice. Paroxetine (4 mg/kg), citalopram (8 mg/kg), venlafaxine (8 mg/kg), and milnacipran (8 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) increased the number of punishments accepted by mice in the FPT. Clonidine (0.0039-0.5 mg/kg) and guanabenz (0.03-0.5mg/kg) had no effect on the number of punishments accepted by mice. Clonidine (0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg) and guanabenz (0.125 and 0.5 mg/kg) (i.p. -45 min) reversed the anti-punishment effect of paroxetine, citalopram, venlafaxine and milnacipran (i.p. -30 min). But if the antidepressants are administered 45 min before the test and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists 30 min before the test, alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists failed to alter the anti-punishment effect of antidepressants. The results of this present study indicate that alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists antagonise the anxiolytic-like effect of antidepressants in mice when they are administered 15 min before the administration of antidepressant suggesting a close inter-regulation between noradrenergic and serotoninergic system in the mechanism of SSRIs and SNRIs in anxiety-like behaviour.

  17. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.

  18. Inverse agonist of estrogen-related receptor γ controls Salmonella typhimurium infection by modulating host iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Kwang Soo; Park, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Deuk; Koh, Minseob; Shin, Minsang; Jung, Yoon Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Chul; Kim, Jae Il; Park, Hwan Tae; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Min, Jung-Joon; Jung, Sook-In; Choi, Seok-Yong; Choy, Hyon E; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2014-04-01

    In response to microbial infection, expression of the defensin-like peptide hepcidin (encoded by Hamp) is induced in hepatocytes to decrease iron release from macrophages. To elucidate the mechanism by which Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium (S. typhimurium), an intramacrophage bacterium, alters host iron metabolism for its own survival, we examined the role of nuclear receptor family members belonging to the NR3B subfamily in mouse hepatocytes. Here, we report that estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ, encoded by Esrrg) modulates the intramacrophage proliferation of S. typhimurium by altering host iron homeostasis, and we demonstrate an antimicrobial effect of an ERRγ inverse agonist. Hepatic ERRγ expression was induced by S. typhimurium-stimulated interleukin-6 signaling, resulting in an induction of hepcidin and eventual hypoferremia in mice. Conversely, ablation of ERRγ mRNA expression in liver attenuated the S. typhimurium-mediated induction of hepcidin and normalized the hypoferremia caused by S. typhimurium infection. An inverse agonist of ERRγ ameliorated S. typhimurium-mediated hypoferremia through reduction of ERRγ-mediated hepcidin mRNA expression and exerted a potent antimicrobial effect on the S. typhimurium infection, thereby improving host survival. Taken together, these findings suggest an alternative approach to control multidrug-resistant intracellular bacteria by modulating host iron homeostasis.

  19. Noradrenergic alpha-2 agonists have anxiolytic-like actions on stress-related behavior and mesoprefrontal dopamine biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Bret A; George, Tony P; Roth, Robert H

    2004-11-19

    Clonidine (CLON), an alpha-2 agonist, has anxiolytic-like actions on the response of mesoprefrontal dopamine (DA) neurons to aversive stimuli in addition to some fear-related behavioral responses. We hypothesized that the anxiolytic-like actions of clonidine could be mimicked by stimulation of alpha-2 receptors on the mesoprefrontal dopamine neurons. Here, we test this hypothesis using clonidine or guanfacine (GFC), another alpha-2 agonist, in a model of aversive conditioning that selectively activates the mesoprefrontal dopamine neurons. One day prior to testing with drugs, rats were conditioned to fear a soft tone by pairing it with a footshock. During testing, the animals were subjected to the tones alone after drugs were administered systemically, or by local infusion into the regions containing the cell bodies and terminals of the mesoprefrontal dopamine neurons, namely, the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the prelimbic (PL) cortex. Systemic administration of guanfacine blocked the increase in immobility in response to the conditioned tone and prevented the stress-associated increase in dopamine turnover in the prelimbic cortex. Systemic clonidine also prevented the stress-associated increase in dopamine turnover but caused sedation preventing behavioral measures. Guanfacine was then used in all local injection studies. The local application of guanfacine into either the prelimbic cortex or the ventral tegmental area did not prevent the conditioned fear-induced increase in dopamine turnover or the increase in immobility in response to the conditioned tones. We conclude that the anxiolytic-like actions of alpha-2 agonists are not due to binding to alpha-2 receptors on the stress-sensitive mesoprefrontal dopamine neurons. PMID:15494168

  20. Benzodiazepine recognition site inverse agonists Ro-15-4513 and FG 7142 both antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Marrosu, F.; Mereu, G.; Giorgi, O.; Corda, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, two inverse agonists for benzodiazepine recognition sites, to antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in freely moving rats. Ethanol induced sedation and ataxia associated with a progressive suppression of the fast cortical activities and an enhancement of low frequencies in both cortical and hippocampal tracings. In contrast, Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142 both caused a state of alertness associated with desynchronized cortical activity and theta hippocampal rhythm as well as spiking activity which was predominantly observed in the cortical tracings. When rats were treated with FG 7142 or Ro 15-4513 either before or after ethanol, a reciprocal antagonism of the behavioral and EEG effects of ethanol and of the partial inverse agonists was observed. These data support the view that the anti-ethanol effects of Ro 15-4513 may be related to its partial inverse agonist properties.

  1. The conjugated linoleic acid isomer trans-9,trans-11 is a dietary occurring agonist of liver X receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Josef; Liebisch, Gerhard; Patsch, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-30

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers are dietary fatty acids that modulate gene expression in many cell types. We have previously reported that specifically trans-9,trans-11 (t9,t11)-CLA induces expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism of human macrophages. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional activation, we asked whether t9,t11-CLA affects activity of liver X receptor (LXR) {alpha}, a major regulator of macrophage lipid metabolism. Here we show that t9,t11-CLA is a regulator of LXR{alpha}. We further demonstrate that the CLA isomer induces expression of direct LXR{alpha} target genes in human primary macrophages. Knockdown of LXR{alpha} with RNA interference in THP-1 cells inhibited t9,t11-CLA mediated activation of LXR{alpha} including its target genes. To evaluate the effective concentration range of t9,t11-CLA, human primary macrophages were treated with various doses of CLA and well known natural and synthetic LXR agonists and mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was analyzed. Incubation of human macrophages with 10 {mu}M t9,t11-CLA led to a significant modulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transcription and caused enhanced cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein AI. In summary, these data show that t9,t11-CLA is an agonist of LXR{alpha} in human macrophages and that its effects on macrophage lipid metabolism can be attributed to transcriptional regulations associated with this nuclear receptor.

  2. Scientific Rationale for the Use of Alpha-Adrenergic Agonists and Glucocorticoids in the Therapy of Pediatric Stridor

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Baloglu, Orkun; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Schwartz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The most common pharmacological therapies used in the treatment of stridor in children are glucocorticosteroids (GC) and alpha-adrenergic (αAR) agonists. Despite the long-standing reported efficacy of these medications, there is a paucity of data relating to their actual mechanisms of action in the upper airway. Summary. There is compelling scientific evidence supporting the use of αAR-agonists and GCs in pediatric stridor. αAR signaling and GCs regulate the vasomotor tone in the upper airway mucosa. The latter translates into better airflow dynamics, as delineated by human and nonhuman upper airway physiological models. In turn, clinical trials have demonstrated that GCs and the nonselective αAR agonist, epinephrine, improve respiratory distress scores and reduce the need for further medical care in children with stridor. Future research is needed to investigate the role of selective αAR agonists and the potential synergism of GCs and αAR-signaling in the treatment of upper airway obstruction and stridor. PMID:22220172

  3. The inverse agonist propranolol confers no corticosteroid-sparing activity in mild-to-moderate persistent asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William J; Short, Philip M; Williamson, Peter A; Manoharan, Arvind; Lipworth, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    The murine asthma model shows that switching off airway β2 receptors with an inverse agonist may confer anti-inflammatory effects as well as corticosteroid-sparing activity. We have assessed for any corticosteroid-sparing effects of propranolol, an inverse agonist, added to low-dose inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) compared with higher dose ICS. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial in mild-to-moderate persistent asthmatic patients was performed. After a run-in (2 weeks) on hydrofluoroalkane-beclometasone dipropionate (HFA-BDP) at 100 μg/day (HFA-BDP100), patients received randomized treatments (4 weeks) with propranolol at 80 mg/day plus HFA-BDP at 100 μg/day compared with placebo plus HFA-BDP at 400 μg/day (HFA-BDP400). Propranolol was up-titrated to 80 mg/day over the initial 2 weeks. Tiotropium was co-administered until 5 days before each histamine challenge (the primary outcome). Sixteen patients completed the study [mean age, 38 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), 86.4%; histamine provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20), 1.39 mg/ml; ICS dose, 406 μg/day]. Histamine PC20 was unchanged by adding propranolol to HFA-BDP100 compared with baseline (HFA-BDP100) {0.17 doubling dilution (dd) difference [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.58 to 0.92]}, but there was a significant improvement with HFA-BDP400 compared with both baseline [1.05 dd (95% CI: 0.43-1.66); P=0.02], and propranolol+HFA-BDP100 [0.88 dd (95% CI: 0.45-1.30); P=0.006]. Significant improvements were also observed with HFA-BDP400 for exhaled nitric oxide, blood eosinophils, serum eosinophilic cationic protein and asthma quality-of-life questionnaire symptoms compared with propranolol+HFA-BDP100. Salbutamol recovery post-challenge was partially blunted by propranolol (median prolongation 5 min; P=0.002). Domiciliary evening FEV1 also fell with propranolol+HFA-BDP100 [mean reduction from baseline 0.22 litres (95% CI: 0.10-0.34); P=0.012], whereas

  4. Discovery of imidazo[1,5-a]pyridines and -pyrimidines as potent and selective RORc inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Fauber, Benjamin P; Gobbi, Alberto; Robarge, Kirk; Zhou, Aihe; Barnard, Adrian; Cao, Jianhua; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Ganguli, Arunima; Hawkins, Julie; Johnson, Adam R; La, Hank; Norman, Maxine; Salmon, Gary; Summerhill, Susan; Ouyang, Wenjun; Tang, Wei; Wong, Harvey

    2015-08-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma (RORγ, RORc, or NR1F3) is a promising target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. RORc is a critical regulator in the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17. We discovered a series of potent and selective imidazo[1,5-a]pyridine and -pyrimidine RORc inverse agonists. The most potent compounds displayed >300-fold selectivity for RORc over the other ROR family members, PPARγ, and NRs in our cellular selectivity panel. The favorable potency, selectivity, and physiochemical properties of GNE-0946 (9) and GNE-6468 (28), in addition to their potent suppression of IL-17 production in human primary cells, support their use as chemical biology tools to further explore the role of RORc in human biology. PMID:26048793

  5. Agonist-dependent single channel current and gating in alpha4beta2delta and alpha1beta2gamma2S GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Angelo; Harrison, Neil L

    2008-02-01

    The family of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediates two types of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Phasic inhibition is mediated by synaptic GABA(A)Rs that are mainly comprised of alpha(1), beta(2), and gamma(2) subunits, whereas tonic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs comprised of alpha(4/6), beta(2), and delta subunits. We investigated the activation properties of recombinant alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs in response to GABA and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one (THIP) using electrophysiological recordings from outside-out membrane patches. Rapid agonist application experiments indicated that THIP produced faster opening rates at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 1600 s(-1)) than at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 460 s(-1)), whereas GABA activated alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs more rapidly (beta approximately 1800 s(-1)) than alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta < 440 s(-1)). Single channel recordings of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) and alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs showed that both channels open to a main conductance state of approximately 25 pS at -70 mV when activated by GABA and low concentrations of THIP, whereas saturating concentrations of THIP elicited approximately 36 pS openings at both channels. Saturating concentrations of GABA elicited brief (<10 ms) openings with low intraburst open probability (P(O) approximately 0.3) at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs and at least two "modes" of single channel bursting activity, lasting approximately 100 ms at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs. The most prevalent bursting mode had a P(O) of approximately 0.7 and was described by a reaction scheme with three open and three shut states, whereas the "high" P(O) mode ( approximately 0.9) was characterized by two shut and three open states. Single channel activity elicited by THIP in alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA

  6. The Use of the LanthaScreen TR-FRET CAR Coactivator Assay in the Characterization of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Inverse Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carazo, Alejandro; Pávek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a critical nuclear receptor in the gene regulation of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The LanthaScreenTM TR-FRET CAR coactivator assay provides a simple and reliable method to analyze the affinity of a ligand to the human CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) with no need to use cellular models. This in silico assay thus enables the study of direct CAR ligands and the ability to distinguish them from the indirect CAR activators that affect the receptor via the cell signaling-dependent phosphorylation of CAR in cells. For the current paper we characterized the pharmacodynamic interactions of three known CAR inverse agonists/antagonists—PK11195, clotrimazole and androstenol—with the prototype agonist CITCO (6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime) using the TR-FRET LanthaScreenTM assay. We have confirmed that all three compounds are inverse agonists of human CAR, with IC50 0.51, 0.005, and 0.35 μM, respectively. All the compounds also antagonize the CITCO-mediated activation of CAR, but only clotrimazole was capable to completely reverse the effect of CITCO in the tested concentrations. Thus this method allows identifying not only agonists, but also antagonists and inverse agonists for human CAR as well as to investigate the nature of the pharmacodynamic interactions of CAR ligands. PMID:25905697

  7. Co-crystal structure guided array synthesis of PPAR[gamma] inverse agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Ryan P.; Cobb, Jeffrey E.; Shearer, Barry G.; Lambert, Millard H.; Nolte, Robert T.; Willson, Timothy M.; Buckholz, Richard G.; Zhao, Sumin M.; Leesnitzer, Lisa M.; Iannone, Marie A.; Pearce, Kenneth H.; Billin, Andrew N.; Hoekstra, William J.

    2008-10-02

    PPAR{gamma}-activating thiazolidinediones and carboxylic acids such as farglitazar exert their anti-diabetic effects in part in PPAR{gamma} rich adipose. Both pro- and anti-adipogenic PPAR{gamma} ligands promote glucose and lipid lowering in animal models of diabetes. Herein, we disclose representatives of an array of 160 farglitazar analogues with atypical inverse agonism of PPAR{gamma} in mature adipocytes.

  8. Actions of the prototypical 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT at human alpha2-adrenoceptors: (+)8-OH-DPAT, but not (-)8-OH-DPAT is an alpha2B subtype preferential agonist.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Tourette, Amélie; Tardif, Stéphanie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Croville, Guillaume; Cussac, Didier

    2010-08-25

    8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] is the prototypical agonist at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors; however, activity at other targets contributes to the functional effects of the compound as well. We examined the properties of 8-OH-DPAT and its enantiomers at recombinant human (h)alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes, using a panel of radioligand binding and functional tests. In competition binding experiments using [3H]-RX821002, about 10-fold selectivity of (+)8-OH-DPAT for the halpha2B subtype (pKi about 7) over halpha2A- and halpha2C-adrenoceptors was observed. In contrast, the S(-) enantiomer of 8-OH-DPAT showed similar weak affinities for the three receptor subtypes (pKis<6). The binding affinity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the halpha2B- and the halpha2A-adrenoceptor was found sensitive to GTPgammaS, a receptor/G protein-uncoupling agent, indicating agonist properties of the drug. Furthermore, using [35S]GTPgammaS binding determination at CHO-halpha2B or CHO-halpha2A cell membranes and G protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) current recordings in Xenopus oocytes expressing halpha2B, partial agonist activity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the respective receptors was confirmed in these two different functional assays. Potency of (+)8-OH-DPAT for stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS incorporation was lower at the halpha2A- than at the halpha2B-adrenoceptor, consistent with binding affinities. Thus, (+)8-OH-DPAT and, as a consequence, racemic (+/-)8-OH-DPAT are partial agonists at halpha2-adrenoceptors with selectivity for the halpha2B subtype, a property that might contribute to the effects of the compound described in native systems.

  9. Virtual screening studies of Chinese medicine Coptidis Rhizoma as alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Li; Xu, Youdong; Zhang, Yan; Meng, Xianli; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. Extensive in vitro and in vivo experiments have proved that the decreased activity of the cholinergic neuron is responsible for the memory and cognition deterioration. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is proposed to a drug target of AD, and compounds which acting as α7-nAChR agonists are considered as candidates in AD treatment. Chinese medicine CoptidisRhizoma and its compounds are reported in various anti-AD effects. In this study, virtual screening, docking approaches and hydrogen bond analyses were applied to screen potential α7-nAChR agonists from CoptidisRhizome. The 3D structure of the protein was obtained from PDB database. 87 reported compounds were included in this research and their structures were accessed by NCBI Pubchem. Docking analysis of the compounds was performed using AutoDock 4.2 and AutoDock Vina. The images of the binding modes hydrogen bonds and the hydrophobic interaction were rendered with PyMOL1.5.0.4. and LigPlot+ respectively. Finally, N-tran-feruloyltyramine, isolariciresinol, flavanone, secoisolariciresinol, (+)-lariciresinol and dihydrochalcone, exhibited the lowest docking energy of protein-ligand complex. The results indicate these 6 compounds are potential α7 nAChR agonists, and expected to be effective in AD treatment.

  10. Structural insights into selective agonist actions of tamoxifen on human Estrogen Receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Biswas, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an anti-estrogenic ligand in breast tissues and being used as a first-line treatment in ER-positive breast cancers, is found to develop resistance followed by resumption of growth of the tumor in about 30% of cases. Whether tamoxifen starts assisting in proliferation in such cases or there exists any ligand-independent pathways to transcription is not fully understood; also, no ERα mutants have been detected so far which could lead to tamoxifen resistance. Performing in-silico conformational analysis of ERα ligand binding domain, in the absence and presence of selective agonist (Diethylstilbestrol; DES), antagonist (Faslodex; ICI), and SERM (4-hydroxy tamoxifen; 4-OHT) ligands, we elucidated ligand-responsive structural modulations of ERα-LBD dimer in their agonist and antagonist complexes and address the issue of “tamoxifen resistance”. We found DES and ICI to stabilize the dimer in their agonist and antagonist conformations, respectively. The ERα-LBD dimer without the presence of any bound ligand also leads to a stable structure in agonist conformation. However, the binding of 4-OHT to antagonist structure is found to lead to a flexible conformation allowing the protein visiting conformations populated by agonists as are evident from principal component analysis and radius of gyration plots. Further, the relaxed conformations of the 4-OHT bound protein is found to exhibit a diminished size of the co-repressor binding pocket at LBD, thus signaling a partial blockage of the co-repressor binding motif. Thus, the ability of 4-OHT bound ERα-LBD to assume flexible conformations visited by agonists and reduced co-repressor binding surface at LBD provide crucial structural insights into tamoxifen-resistance complementing our existing understanding. PMID:25060147

  11. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  12. The Novel, Nicotinic Alpha7 Receptor Partial Agonist, BMS-933043, Improves Cognition and Sensory Processing in Preclinical Models of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Linda J.; Easton, Amy E.; Li, Yu-Wen; Sivarao, Digavalli V.; Lidge, Regina; Jones, Kelli M.; Post-Munson, Debra; Daly, Christopher; Lodge, Nicholas J.; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Molski, Thaddeus; Pieschl, Richard; Chen, Ping; Hendricson, Adam; Westphal, Ryan; Cook, James; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Morgan, Daniel; Benitex, Yulia; King, Dalton; Macor, John E.; Zaczek, Robert; Olson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The development of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists is considered a promising approach for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. In the present studies we characterized the novel agent, (2R)-N-(6-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl)-4'H-spiro[4-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,5'-[1,3]oxazol]-2'-amine (BMS-933043), in vitro and in rodent models of schizophrenia-like deficits in cognition and sensory processing. BMS-933043 showed potent binding affinity to native rat (Ki = 3.3 nM) and recombinant human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (Ki = 8.1 nM) and agonist activity in a calcium fluorescence assay (EC50 = 23.4 nM) and whole cell voltage clamp electrophysiology (EC50 = 0.14 micromolar (rat) and 0.29 micromolar (human)). BMS-933043 exhibited a partial agonist profile relative to acetylcholine; the relative efficacy for net charge crossing the cell membrane was 67% and 78% at rat and human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors respectively. BMS-933043 showed no agonist or antagonist activity at other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes and was at least 300 fold weaker at binding to and antagonizing human 5-HT3A receptors (Ki = 2,451 nM; IC50 = 8,066 nM). BMS-933043 treatment i) improved 24 hour novel object recognition memory in mice (0.1–10 mg/kg, sc), ii) reversed MK-801-induced deficits in Y maze performance in mice (1–10 mg/kg, sc) and set shift performance in rats (1–10 mg/kg, po) and iii) reduced the number of trials required to complete the extradimensional shift discrimination in neonatal PCP treated rats performing the intra-dimensional/extradimensional set shifting task (0.1–3 mg/kg, po). BMS-933043 also improved auditory gating (0.56–3 mg/kg, sc) and mismatch negativity (0.03–3 mg/kg, sc) in rats treated with S(+)ketamine or neonatal phencyclidine respectively. Given this favorable preclinical profile BMS-933043 was selected for further development to support clinical evaluation in humans. PMID

  13. The Novel, Nicotinic Alpha7 Receptor Partial Agonist, BMS-933043, Improves Cognition and Sensory Processing in Preclinical Models of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Linda J; Easton, Amy E; Li, Yu-Wen; Sivarao, Digavalli V; Lidge, Regina; Jones, Kelli M; Post-Munson, Debra; Daly, Christopher; Lodge, Nicholas J; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Molski, Thaddeus; Pieschl, Richard; Chen, Ping; Hendricson, Adam; Westphal, Ryan; Cook, James; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Morgan, Daniel; Benitex, Yulia; King, Dalton; Macor, John E; Zaczek, Robert; Olson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The development of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists is considered a promising approach for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. In the present studies we characterized the novel agent, (2R)-N-(6-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl)-4'H-spiro[4-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,5'-[1,3]oxazol]-2'-amine (BMS-933043), in vitro and in rodent models of schizophrenia-like deficits in cognition and sensory processing. BMS-933043 showed potent binding affinity to native rat (Ki = 3.3 nM) and recombinant human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (Ki = 8.1 nM) and agonist activity in a calcium fluorescence assay (EC50 = 23.4 nM) and whole cell voltage clamp electrophysiology (EC50 = 0.14 micromolar (rat) and 0.29 micromolar (human)). BMS-933043 exhibited a partial agonist profile relative to acetylcholine; the relative efficacy for net charge crossing the cell membrane was 67% and 78% at rat and human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors respectively. BMS-933043 showed no agonist or antagonist activity at other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes and was at least 300 fold weaker at binding to and antagonizing human 5-HT3A receptors (Ki = 2,451 nM; IC50 = 8,066 nM). BMS-933043 treatment i) improved 24 hour novel object recognition memory in mice (0.1-10 mg/kg, sc), ii) reversed MK-801-induced deficits in Y maze performance in mice (1-10 mg/kg, sc) and set shift performance in rats (1-10 mg/kg, po) and iii) reduced the number of trials required to complete the extradimensional shift discrimination in neonatal PCP treated rats performing the intra-dimensional/extradimensional set shifting task (0.1-3 mg/kg, po). BMS-933043 also improved auditory gating (0.56-3 mg/kg, sc) and mismatch negativity (0.03-3 mg/kg, sc) in rats treated with S(+)ketamine or neonatal phencyclidine respectively. Given this favorable preclinical profile BMS-933043 was selected for further development to support clinical evaluation in humans. PMID:27467081

  14. The Novel, Nicotinic Alpha7 Receptor Partial Agonist, BMS-933043, Improves Cognition and Sensory Processing in Preclinical Models of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Linda J; Easton, Amy E; Li, Yu-Wen; Sivarao, Digavalli V; Lidge, Regina; Jones, Kelli M; Post-Munson, Debra; Daly, Christopher; Lodge, Nicholas J; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Molski, Thaddeus; Pieschl, Richard; Chen, Ping; Hendricson, Adam; Westphal, Ryan; Cook, James; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Morgan, Daniel; Benitex, Yulia; King, Dalton; Macor, John E; Zaczek, Robert; Olson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The development of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists is considered a promising approach for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. In the present studies we characterized the novel agent, (2R)-N-(6-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl)-4'H-spiro[4-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,5'-[1,3]oxazol]-2'-amine (BMS-933043), in vitro and in rodent models of schizophrenia-like deficits in cognition and sensory processing. BMS-933043 showed potent binding affinity to native rat (Ki = 3.3 nM) and recombinant human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (Ki = 8.1 nM) and agonist activity in a calcium fluorescence assay (EC50 = 23.4 nM) and whole cell voltage clamp electrophysiology (EC50 = 0.14 micromolar (rat) and 0.29 micromolar (human)). BMS-933043 exhibited a partial agonist profile relative to acetylcholine; the relative efficacy for net charge crossing the cell membrane was 67% and 78% at rat and human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors respectively. BMS-933043 showed no agonist or antagonist activity at other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes and was at least 300 fold weaker at binding to and antagonizing human 5-HT3A receptors (Ki = 2,451 nM; IC50 = 8,066 nM). BMS-933043 treatment i) improved 24 hour novel object recognition memory in mice (0.1-10 mg/kg, sc), ii) reversed MK-801-induced deficits in Y maze performance in mice (1-10 mg/kg, sc) and set shift performance in rats (1-10 mg/kg, po) and iii) reduced the number of trials required to complete the extradimensional shift discrimination in neonatal PCP treated rats performing the intra-dimensional/extradimensional set shifting task (0.1-3 mg/kg, po). BMS-933043 also improved auditory gating (0.56-3 mg/kg, sc) and mismatch negativity (0.03-3 mg/kg, sc) in rats treated with S(+)ketamine or neonatal phencyclidine respectively. Given this favorable preclinical profile BMS-933043 was selected for further development to support clinical evaluation in humans.

  15. Different affinity states of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors defined by agonists and antagonists in bovine aorta plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, G.; Deth, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Evidence for a nonlinear relationship between alpha-1 adrenergic receptor occupancy and tissue responses, together with the finding of different affinity states for agonist binding, has raised the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We have conducted studies to examine: 1) binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)prazosin, 2) competition of antagonists at these sites and 3) different affinity states of the receptor for agonists and modulation of these states by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p). A plasma membrane-enriched vesicular fraction (F2; 15%/33% sucrose interphase) was prepared from the muscular medial layer of bovine thoracic aorta. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding was characterized by a monophasic saturation isotherm (KD = 0.116 nM, Bmax = 112 fmol/mg of protein). Antagonist displacement studies yielded a relative potency order of prazosin greater than or equal to WB4104 much greater than phentolamine greater than corynanthine greater than yohimbine greater than or equal to idazoxan greater than rauwolscine. Competition curves for unlabeled prazosin, WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4 benzodioxane) and phentolamine were shallow and were best modeled to two binding sites with picomolar and nanomolar KD values. Gpp(NH)p was without effect on antagonist affinity. Agonist (epinephrine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine) competition with (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding was biphasic with pseudo-Hill slopes less than 1.0. Binding was best described by a two-site model in which the average contribution of high affinity sites was 23% of total binding. KD values for the high affinity site ranged from 2.9 to 18 nM, and 3.9 to 5.0 microM for the low affinity site.

  16. Role of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether regulatory protein, N/sub i/ was required for high affinity agonist binding to the a/sub 2/ adrenergic receptor in human platelet membranes. Human platelet membranes treated under alkaline conditions (pH 11.5) exhibited a selective and complete loss of high affinity agonist binding as measured by the parital agonist (/sup 3/H)-p-aminoclonidine and full agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 in direct binding studies. The binding parameters for (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 are as follows: for control platelet membranes, the K/sub d/ was 0.88 +/- 0.17 and nM and the B/sub max/ was 280 +/- 20 fmol/mg compared to 1.89 +/- 0.34 nM and 75 fmol/mg for pH 11.5 treated membranes. For (/sup 3/H)p-aminoclonidine, the data for pH 11.5 treated membranes is as follows: B/sub max/ = 100 +/- 20 fmol/mg, K/sub d/ = 3.4 +/- 0.1 nM, compared to control membranes: (best fit with a two site fit) K/sub d1/ = 0.7 nM, K/sub d2/ = 8 nM, B/sub max1/ = 76 fmol/mg, B/sub max2/ = 198 fmol/mg. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/ antagonists, (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, was used to assess the presence of the receptor.

  17. Shaping of adaptive immune responses to soluble proteins by TLR agonists: a role for IFN-alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Yc; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2004-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are believed to play a major role in the recognition of invading organisms, although their ability to shape immune responses is not completely understood. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on the generation of antibody responses and the induction of CD8+ T-cell cross-priming after immunization with soluble protein antigens. While all TLR agonists tested elicited the production of immunomodulatory cytokines, marked differences were observed in their ability to stimulate antigen-specific immune responses. Zymosan, poly(I:C) and CpG DNA, which signal through TLR2/6, 3 and 9, respectively, were found to strongly induce the production of IgG2a antibodies, whereas R-848 (TLR7) and LPS (TLR4) did so much more weakly. In contrast, LPS, poly(I:C) and CpG DNA, but not zymosan, induced functional CD8+ T-cell responses against OVA; peptidoglycan (TLR2/?) and R-848 were also ineffective in stimulating cross-priming. Experiments using IFN-alpha/beta R-deficient mice showed that the induction of cross-priming by LPS and poly(I:C) was abrogated in the absence of IFN-alpha/beta signalling, and induction by CpG DNA was greatly reduced. Overall, our results identify LPS as another TLR agonist that is able to generate functional cross-priming against a soluble protein antigen. In addition, our results demonstrate that the ability of TLR stimuli to initiate CD8+ T-cell responses against soluble protein antigens is largely dependent on the IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:15550117

  18. Treating ADHD in Prison: Focus on Alpha-2 Agonists (Clonidine and Guanfacine).

    PubMed

    Mattes, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is prevalent in prison populations, but optimal treatment recommendations in prison are uncertain. Stimulants are problematic because of the potential for abuse. This article is a review of medication options for ADHD, focusing on the α2 agonists clonidine and guanfacine, which, in their extended-release (ER) forms, are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of ADHD, although they are probably less efficacious, overall, than stimulants. Advantages of α2 agonists in prison include: they are not controlled substances and have no known abuse potential; they may be particularly helpful for ADHD with associated aggression and other features of conduct disorder; they may reduce anxiety and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder; and they are somewhat sedating. The pharmacology of these agents and the presumed mechanism of action are discussed, including the fact that guanfacine more specifically affects α2A receptors, which are postsynaptic in the frontal cortex. Other differences between clonidine and guanfacine and between the generic immediate-release (IR) forms and the ER forms are also discussed. The IR forms, while themselves not FDA approved for ADHD, may, with dosage adjustment, be reasonable alternatives (with considerable cost savings). Overall, given the FDA-accepted evidence of efficacy, the lack of abuse potential, and the favorable side effect profile, α agonists may be the treatment of choice for prison inmates with ADHD. PMID:27236168

  19. Inverse agonist of estrogen-related receptor α suppresses the growth of triple negative breast cancer cells through ROS generation and interaction with multiple cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guan-Min; Zhang, Kun-Shui; Liu, Qiao; Liang, Shu-Wei; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Hong-Bin; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need for targeted therapy approaches for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Increasing evidences suggested that the expression of estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) was correlate with unfavorable clinical outcomes of breast cancer patients. We here show that inhibition of ERRα by its inverse agonist XCT-790 can suppress the proliferation, decrease G2/M phases, and induce mitochondrial-related apoptosis of TNBC cells. XCT-790 elevates the proteins related to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress such as ATF4/6, XBT-1 and CHOP. It also increases the expression of growth inhibition related proteins such as p53 and p21. Further, XCT-790 can increase the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNBC cells mainly through inhibition of SOD1/2. While ROS scavenger NAC abolishes XCT-790 induced ER-stress and growth arrest. XCT-790 treatment can rapidly activate the signal molecules including ERK1/2, p38-MAPK, JNK, Akt, p65, and IκBα, while NAC attenuates effects of XCT-790 induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38-MAPK and Akt. Further, the inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK, Akt, and NF-κB attenuate XCT-790 induced ROS generation. These data suggest that AKT/ROS and ERK/ROS positive feedback loops, NF-κB/ROS, and ROS/p38-MAPK, are activated in XCT-790 treated TNBC cells. In vivo experiments show that XCT-790 significantly suppresses the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors, which is associated with up regulation of p53, p21, ER-stress related proteins while down regulation of bcl-2. The present discovery makes XCT-790 a promising candidate drug and lays the foundation for future development of ERRα-based therapies for TNBC patients. PMID:26871469

  20. Preclinical evaluation of the abuse potential of Pitolisant, a histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist compared with Modafinil

    PubMed Central

    Uguen, M; Perrin, D; Belliard, S; Ligneau, X; Beardsley, PM; Lecomte, JM; Schwartz, JC

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pitolisant, a histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist is currently under Phase III clinical trials for treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness namely in narcoleptic patients. Its drug abuse potential was investigated using in vivo models in rodents and monkeys and compared with those of Modafinil, a psychostimulant currently used in the same indications. Experimental Approach Effects of Pitolisant on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, on spontaneous and cocaine-induced locomotion, locomotor sensitization were monitored. It was also tested in three standard drug abuse tests i.e. conditioned place preference in rats, self-administration in monkeys and cocaine discrimination in mice as well as in a physical dependence model. Key Results Pitolisant did not elicit any significant changes in dopaminergic indices in rat nucleus accumbens whereas Modafinil increased dopamine release. In rodents, Pitolisant was without any effect on locomotion and reduced the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In addition, no locomotor sensitization and no conditioned hyperlocomotion were evidenced with this compound in rats whereas significant effects were elicited by Modafinil. Finally, Pitolisant was devoid of any significant effects in the three standard drug abuse tests (including self-administration in monkeys) and in the physical dependence model. Conclusions and Implications No potential drug abuse liability for Pitolisant was evidenced in various in vivo rodent and primate models, whereas the same does not seem so clear in the case of Modafinil. PMID:23472741

  1. Augmentation of Tonic GABAA Inhibition in Absence Epilepsy: Therapeutic Value of Inverse Agonists at Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Errington, Adam C.; Cope, David W.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that impaired GABAergic inhibition within neuronal networks can lead to hypersynchronous firing patterns that are the typical cellular hallmark of convulsive epileptic seizures. However, recent findings have highlighted that a pathological enhancement of GABAergic signalling within thalamocortical circuits is a necessary and sufficient condition for nonconvulsive typical absence seizure genesis. In particular, increased activation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (eGABAAR) and augmented “tonic” GABAA inhibition in thalamocortical neurons have been demonstrated across a range of genetic and pharmacological models of absence epilepsy. Moreover, evidence from monogenic mouse models (stargazer/lethargic) and the polygenic Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) indicate that the mechanism underlying eGABAAR gain of function is nonneuronal in nature and results from a deficiency in astrocytic GABA uptake through the GAT-1 transporter. These results challenge the existing theory that typical absence seizures are underpinned by a widespread loss of GABAergic function in thalamocortical circuits and illustrate a vital role for astrocytes in the pathology of typical absence epilepsy. Moreover, they explain why pharmacological agents that enhance GABA receptor function can initiate or exacerbate absence seizures and suggest a potential therapeutic role for inverse agonists at eGABAARs in absence epilepsy. PMID:21912539

  2. Administration of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist MRK-016 rescues acquisition and memory consolidation following peripheral administration of bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Eimerbrink, M J; White, J D; Pendry, R J; Hodges, S L; Sadler, L N; Wiles, J D; Weintraub, M K; Chumley, M J; Boehm, G W

    2015-07-15

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation-induced decrements in cognitive function can be mitigated via manipulation of excitatory or inhibitory transmission. We tested the ability of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, MRK-016 (MRK) to protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, using a contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm. In Experiment One, mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or MRK injections prior to CFC training, and were then tested 24h after training. In Experiment Two, animals received similar treatment injections immediately after training, and were tested 24h later. Additionally, hippocampal samples were collected 4h after LPS injections and immediately after testing, to evaluate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression. Results indicate that MRK can protect against LPS-induced learning/memory decrements in both paradigms. We also found, in both paradigms, that animals treated with LPS/Saline expressed significantly less BDNF mRNA when compared to Saline/Saline-treated animals 4h after LPS administration, but that MRK did not restore BDNF expression levels. Further, treatment administrations had no effect on IGF-1 mRNA expression at any collection time-point. In summary, MRK-016 can protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, in this hippocampus-dependent paradigm, though this protection occurs independently of recovery of BDNF expression. PMID:25823763

  3. The alpha-2A noradrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine improves visual object discrimination reversal performance in aged rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Steere, J C; Arnsten, A F

    1997-10-01

    Administration of either low or high doses of the alpha-2A adrenergic agonist guanfacine (GFC) to aged monkeys has been shown to improve performance of the delayed-response task, a task linked to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Monkeys treated with higher guanfacine doses also appeared less disinhibited, suggesting enhanced ventromedial-orbital PFC (vmPFC) function. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the effects of low versus high doses of GFC on reversal of a visual object discrimination task, a task particularly sensitive to vmPFC lesions. The results of this study showed that high (0.1 mg/kg) but not low (0.00001-0.001 mg/kg) doses of GFC significantly improved reversal performance in aged monkeys. These results may be relevant to GFC's calming effects in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:9383511

  4. Profiling of the Tox21 10K compound library for agonists and antagonists of the estrogen receptor alpha signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Martin, Matt T.; Reif, David M.; Judson, Richard S.; Houck, Keith A.; Casey, Warren; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Shockley, Keith R.; Ceger, Patricia; Fostel, Jennifer; Witt, Kristine L.; Tong, Weida; Rotroff, Daniel M.; Zhao, Tongan; Shinn, Paul; Simeonov, Anton; Dix, David J.; Austin, Christopher P.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Tice, Raymond R.; Xia, Menghang

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Tox21 program has screened a library of approximately 10,000 (10K) environmental chemicals and drugs in three independent runs for estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonist and antagonist activity using two types of ER reporter gene cell lines, one with an endogenous full length ERα (ER-luc; BG1 cell line) and the other with a transfected partial receptor consisting of the ligand binding domain (ER-bla; ERα β-lactamase cell line), in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format. The ability of the two assays to correctly identify ERα agonists and antagonists was evaluated using a set of 39 reference compounds with known ERα activity. Although both assays demonstrated adequate (i.e. >80%) predictivity, the ER-luc assay was more sensitive and the ER-bla assay more specific. The qHTS assay results were compared with results from previously published ERα binding assay data and showed >80% consistency. Actives identified from both the ER-bla and ER-luc assays were analyzed for structure-activity relationships (SARs) revealing known and potentially novel ERα active structure classes. The results demonstrate the feasibility of qHTS to identify environmental chemicals with the potential to interact with the ERα signaling pathway and the two different assay formats improve the confidence in correctly identifying these chemicals. PMID:25012808

  5. Alpha-2A Adrenoceptor Agonist Guanfacine Restores Diuretic Efficiency in Experimental Cirrhotic Ascites: Comparison with Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Sansoè, Giovanni; Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Mengozzi, Giulio; Parola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background In human cirrhosis, adrenergic hyperfunction causes proximal tubular fluid retention and contributes to diuretic-resistant ascites, and clonidine, a sympatholytic drug, improves natriuresis in difficult-to-treat ascites. Aim To compare clonidine (aspecific α2-adrenoceptor agonist) to SSP-002021R (prodrug of guanfacine, specific α2A-receptor agonist), both associated with diuretics, in experimental cirrhotic ascites. Methods and Results Six groups of 12 rats were studied: controls (G1); controls receiving furosemide and potassium canrenoate (G2); rats with ascitic cirrhosis due to 14-week CCl4 treatment (G3); cirrhotic rats treated (over the 11th-14th CCl4 weeks) with furosemide and canrenoate (G4), furosemide, canrenoate and clonidine (G5), or diuretics and SSP002021R (G6). Three rats of each group had their hormonal status and renal function assessed at the end of 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th weeks of respective treatments.Cirrhotic rats in G3 and G4 gained weight over the 12th-14th CCl4 weeks. In G4, brief increase in sodium excretion over the 11th-12th weeks preceded worsening of inulin clearance and natriuresis (diuretic resistance). In comparison with G4, the addition of clonidine (G5) or guanfacine (G6) to diuretics improved, respectively, sodium excretion over the 11th-12th CCl4 weeks, or GFR and electrolytes excretion over the 13th-14th CCl4 weeks. Natriuretic responses in G5 and G6 were accompanied by reduced catecholamine serum levels. Conclusions α2A-receptor agonists restore glomerular filtration rate and natriuresis, and delay diuretic-resistant ascites in experimental advanced cirrhosis. Clonidine ameliorates diuretic-dependent natriuresis just for a short time. PMID:27384184

  6. Alpha-2 Adrenergic Receptor Agonists: A Review of Current Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Giovannitti, Joseph A.; Thoms, Sean M.; Crawford, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The α-2 adrenergic receptor agonists have been used for decades to treat common medical conditions such as hypertension; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; various pain and panic disorders; symptoms of opioid, benzodiazepine, and alcohol withdrawal; and cigarette craving.1 However, in more recent years, these drugs have been used as adjuncts for sedation and to reduce anesthetic requirements. This review will provide an historical perspective of this drug class, an understanding of pharmacological mechanisms, and an insight into current applications in clinical anesthesiology. PMID:25849473

  7. Inhibitory effects of the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist zilpaterol on the LPS-induced production of TNF-alpha in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, K C M; Doornbos, R P; van der Greef, J; Witkamp, R F; Rodenburg, R J T

    2005-12-01

    In this study the anti-inflammatory properties of zilpaterol, a beta2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist specifically developed as a growth promoter in cattle were investigated. Although zilpaterol has a different structure compared with the beta2-AR agonists known to date, it was noted that it was able to bind to both the beta2-AR (Ki = 1.1 x 10(-6)) and the beta1-AR (Ki = 1.0 x 10(-5)). Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed U937 macrophages, the production of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were investigated. Zilpaterol inhibited TNF-alpha release and induced intracellular cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of TNF-alpha release and induction of cAMP production was mainly mediated via the beta2-AR, as indicated by addition of beta1- and beta2-specific antagonists. The effects of zilpaterol were investigated in LPS-treated male Wistar rats after pretreatment with zilpaterol. Zilpaterol dosed at 500 microg/kg body weight reduced the TNF-alpha plasma levels. In conclusion, zilpaterol is a beta2-adrenergic agonist and an inhibitor of TNF-alpha production induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro.

  8. Enhanced behavioral sensitivity to the competitive GABA agonist, gaboxadol, in transgenic mice over-expressing hippocampal extrasynaptic alpha6beta GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Saarelainen, Kati S; Ranna, Martin; Rabe, Holger; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Möykkynen, Tommi; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Linden, Anni-Maija; Lüddens, Hartmut; Korpi, Esa R

    2008-04-01

    The behavioral and functional significance of the extrasynaptic inhibitory GABA(A) receptors in the brain is still poorly known. We used a transgenic mouse line expressing the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit gene in the forebrain under the Thy-1.2 promoter (Thy1alpha6) mice ectopically expressing alpha6 subunits especially in the hippocampus to study how extrasynaptically enriched alphabeta(gamma2)-type receptors alter animal behavior and receptor responses. In these mice extrasynaptic alpha6beta receptors make up about 10% of the hippocampal GABA(A) receptors resulting in imbalance between synaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition. The synthetic GABA-site competitive agonist gaboxadol (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol; 3 mg/kg) induced remarkable anxiolytic-like response in the light : dark exploration and elevated plus-maze tests in Thy1alpha6 mice, while being almost inactive in wild-type mice. The transgenic mice also lost quicker and for longer time their righting reflex after 25 mg/kg gaboxadol than wild-type mice. In hippocampal sections of Thy1alpha6 mice, the alpha6beta receptors could be visualized autoradiographically by interactions between gaboxadol and GABA via [(35)S]TBPS binding to the GABA(A) receptor ionophore. Gaboxadol inhibition of the binding could be partially prevented by GABA. Electrophysiology of recombinant GABA(A) receptors revealed that GABA was a partial agonist at alpha6beta3 and alpha6beta3delta receptors, but a full agonist at alpha6beta3gamma2 receptors when compared with gaboxadol. The results suggest strong behavioral effects via selective pharmacological activation of enriched extrasynaptic alphabeta GABA(A) receptors, and the mouse model represents an example of the functional consequences of altered balance between extrasynaptic and synaptic inhibition.

  9. Novel Retinoic Acid Receptor Alpha Agonists for Treatment of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN. PMID:22125642

  10. Novel retinoic acid receptor alpha agonists for treatment of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Wu, Yingwei; Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN.

  11. Commentary: Are alpha-2 agonist really effective in children with tics with comorbid ADHD? A commentary on Whittington et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Bloch, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    In this issue, Whittington et al. (2016) present a systematic review that reports the efficacy of three primary treatments for children with Tourette syndrome (TS) - (a) α2-adrenergic receptor agonists; (b) antipsychotic medications; and (c) habit reversal training/comprehensive behavioral intervention. In this commentary, we highlight the large degree of heterogeneity observed in the meta-analysis of trials involving alpha-2 agonist medications and present possible explanations for the observed heterogeneity. Among these possible explanations is the possibility that presence of comorbid ADHD may moderate the efficacy of alpha-2 agonists in the treatment of tic disorder with the medications being more effective in patients with both conditions. The commentary reviews the evidence supporting this possible moderating effect of ADHD and discusses the implications for such a relationship.

  12. Commentary: Are alpha-2 agonist really effective in children with tics with comorbid ADHD? A commentary on Whittington et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Bloch, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    In this issue, Whittington et al. (2016) present a systematic review that reports the efficacy of three primary treatments for children with Tourette syndrome (TS) - (a) α2-adrenergic receptor agonists; (b) antipsychotic medications; and (c) habit reversal training/comprehensive behavioral intervention. In this commentary, we highlight the large degree of heterogeneity observed in the meta-analysis of trials involving alpha-2 agonist medications and present possible explanations for the observed heterogeneity. Among these possible explanations is the possibility that presence of comorbid ADHD may moderate the efficacy of alpha-2 agonists in the treatment of tic disorder with the medications being more effective in patients with both conditions. The commentary reviews the evidence supporting this possible moderating effect of ADHD and discusses the implications for such a relationship. PMID:27535650

  13. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  14. Motor, Visual and Emotional Deficits in Mice after Closed-Head Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Are Alleviated by the Novel CB2 Inverse Agonist SMM-189

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Anton; Heldt, Scott A.; Presley, Chaela S.; Guley, Natalie H.; Elberger, Andrea J.; Deng, Yunping; D’Surney, Lauren; Rogers, Joshua T.; Ferrell, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Del Mar, Nobel; Honig, Marcia G.; Gurley, Steven N.; Moore, Bob M.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a focal blast model of closed-head mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. As true for individuals that have experienced mild TBI, mice subjected to 50–60 psi blast show motor, visual and emotional deficits, diffuse axonal injury and microglial activation, but no overt neuron loss. Because microglial activation can worsen brain damage after a concussive event and because microglia can be modulated by their cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2), we evaluated the effectiveness of the novel CB2 receptor inverse agonist SMM-189 in altering microglial activation and mitigating deficits after mild TBI. In vitro analysis indicated that SMM-189 converted human microglia from the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to the pro-healing M2 phenotype. Studies in mice showed that daily administration of SMM-189 for two weeks beginning shortly after blast greatly reduced the motor, visual, and emotional deficits otherwise evident after 50–60 psi blasts, and prevented brain injury that may contribute to these deficits. Our results suggest that treatment with the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189 after a mild TBI event can reduce its adverse consequences by beneficially modulating microglial activation. These findings recommend further evaluation of CB2 inverse agonists as a novel therapeutic approach for treating mild TBI. PMID:25561230

  15. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression. PMID:27474687

  16. APD125, a Selective Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Inverse Agonist, Significantly Improves Sleep Maintenance in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Russell; Seiden, David J.; Hull, Steven G.; Erman, Milton; Schwartz, Howard; Anderson, Christen; Prosser, Warren; Shanahan, William; Sanchez, Matilde; Chuang, Emil; Roth, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Insomnia is a condition affecting 10% to 15% of the adult population and is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or nonrestorative sleep, accompanied by daytime impairment or distress. This study evaluates APD125, a selective inverse agonist of the 5-HT2A receptor, for treatment of chronic insomnia, with particular emphasis on sleep maintenance. In phase 1 studies, APD125 improved sleep maintenance and was well tolerated. Methodology: Adult subjects (n = 173) with DSM-IV defined primary insomnia were randomized into a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study to compare 2 doses of APD125 (10 mg and 40 mg) with placebo. Each treatment period was 7 days with a 7- to 9-day washout period between treatments. Polysomnographic recordings were performed at the initial 2 screening nights and at nights (N) 1/2 and N 6/7 of each treatment period. Results: APD125 was associated with significant improvements in key sleep maintenance parameters measured by PSG. Wake time after sleep onset decreased (SEM) by 52.5 (3.2) min (10 mg) and 53.5 (3.5) min (40 mg) from baseline to N 1/2 vs. 37.8 (3.4) min for placebo, (P < 0.0001 for both doses vs placebo), and by 51.7 (3.4) min (P = 0.01) and 48.0 (3.6) min (P = 0.2) at N 6/7 vs. 44.0 (3.8) min for placebo. Significant APD125 effects on wake time during sleep were also seen (P < 0.0001 N 1/2, P < 0.001 N 6/7). The number of arousals and number of awakenings decreased significantly with APD125 treatment compared to placebo. Slow wave sleep showed a statistically significant dose-dependent increase. There was no significant decrease in latency to persistent sleep. No serious adverse events were reported, and no meaningful differences in adverse event profiles were observed between either dose of APD125 and placebo. APD125 was not associated with next-day psychomotor impairment as measured by Digit Span, Digit Symbol Copy, and Digit Symbol Coding Tests

  17. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-10-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells.

  18. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  19. (4-(Bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229): a new cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mariam M; Olszewska, Teresa; Liu, Hui; Shore, Derek M; Hurst, Dow P; Reggio, Patricia H; Lu, Dai; Kendall, Debra A

    2015-02-01

    Some inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) have been demonstrated to be anorectic antiobesity drug candidates. However, the first generation of CB1 inverse agonists, represented by rimonabant (SR141716A), otenabant, and taranabant, are centrally active, with a high level of psychiatric side effects. Hence, the discovery of CB1 inverse agonists with a chemical scaffold distinct from these holds promise for developing peripherally active CB1 inverse agonists with fewer side effects. We generated a new CB1 inverse agonist, (4-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229), from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs. This compound binds to CB1 more selectively than cannabinoid receptor type 2, with a Ki value of 220 nM. Comparable CB1 binding was also observed by analogs 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-cinnamylpiperazine dihydrochloride (LDK1203) and 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-tosylpiperazine hydrochloride (LDK1222), which differed by the substitution on the piperazine ring where the piperazine of LDK1203 and LDK1222 are substituted by an alkyl group and a tosyl group, respectively. LDK1229 exhibits efficacy comparable with SR141716A in antagonizing the basal G protein coupling activity of CB1, as indicated by a reduction in guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. Consistent with inverse agonist behavior, increased cell surface localization of CB1 upon treatment with LDK1229 was also observed. Although docking and mutational analysis showed that LDK1229 forms similar interactions with the receptor as SR141716A does, the benzhydryl piperazine scaffold is structurally distinct from the first-generation CB1 inverse agonists. It offers new opportunities for developing novel CB1 inverse agonists through the optimization of molecular properties, such as the polar surface area and hydrophilicity, to reduce the central activity observed with SR141716A.

  20. (4-(Bis(4-Fluorophenyl)Methyl)Piperazin-1-yl)(Cyclohexyl)Methanone Hydrochloride (LDK1229): A New Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Inverse Agonist from the Class of Benzhydryl Piperazine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mariam M.; Olszewska, Teresa; Liu, Hui; Shore, Derek M.; Hurst, Dow P.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Lu, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Some inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) have been demonstrated to be anorectic antiobesity drug candidates. However, the first generation of CB1 inverse agonists, represented by rimonabant (SR141716A), otenabant, and taranabant, are centrally active, with a high level of psychiatric side effects. Hence, the discovery of CB1 inverse agonists with a chemical scaffold distinct from these holds promise for developing peripherally active CB1 inverse agonists with fewer side effects. We generated a new CB1 inverse agonist, (4-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229), from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs. This compound binds to CB1 more selectively than cannabinoid receptor type 2, with a Ki value of 220 nM. Comparable CB1 binding was also observed by analogs 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-cinnamylpiperazine dihydrochloride (LDK1203) and 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-tosylpiperazine hydrochloride (LDK1222), which differed by the substitution on the piperazine ring where the piperazine of LDK1203 and LDK1222 are substituted by an alkyl group and a tosyl group, respectively. LDK1229 exhibits efficacy comparable with SR141716A in antagonizing the basal G protein coupling activity of CB1, as indicated by a reduction in guanosine 5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. Consistent with inverse agonist behavior, increased cell surface localization of CB1 upon treatment with LDK1229 was also observed. Although docking and mutational analysis showed that LDK1229 forms similar interactions with the receptor as SR141716A does, the benzhydryl piperazine scaffold is structurally distinct from the first-generation CB1 inverse agonists. It offers new opportunities for developing novel CB1 inverse agonists through the optimization of molecular properties, such as the polar surface area and hydrophilicity, to reduce the central activity observed with SR141716A. PMID:25411367

  1. 3-(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-alkyl-N-arylbenzamides: potent, non-peptidic agonists of both the micro and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J; Garrido, Dulce M; Boswell, G Evan; Collins, Mark A; Harris, Philip A; McNutt, Robert W; O'Neill, Scott J; Wei, Ke; Chang, Kwen-Jen

    2003-02-13

    Opioid analgesics with both micro and delta opioid receptor activation represent a new approach to the treatment of severe pain with an improved safety profile. Compounds with this profile may exhibit strong analgesic properties due to micro agonism, with a reduced side effect profile resulting from delta agonism. Replacing the p-diethylamide of the known potent delta opioid receptor selective agonist BW373U86 with a m-diethylamide resulted in a compound with agonist activity at both the micro and delta opioid receptors. Modifying the amide to an N-methyl-N-phenylamide increased agonist potency at both receptors. A series of 3-(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-alkyl-N-arylbenzamides have been made to explore the structure-activity relationship (SAR) around the N-methyl-N-phenylamide. Several potent agonists of both the micro and delta opioid receptors have been identified, including (+)-3-((alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-methylbenzamide (23), which has EC50 values of 0.67 and 1.1 nM at the micro (guinea pig ileum assay) and delta (mouse vas deferens assay) opioid receptors, respectively.

  2. A Novel Aminotetralin-Type Serotonin (5-HT) 2C Receptor-Specific Agonist and 5-HT2A Competitive Antagonist/5-HT2B Inverse Agonist with Preclinical Efficacy for Psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Drake; Felsing, Daniel; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Rowland, Neil E.; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-01-01

    Development of 5-HT2C agonists for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychoses, substance abuse, and obesity, has been fraught with difficulties, because the vast majority of reported 5-HT2C selective agonists also activate 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2B receptors, potentially causing hallucinations and/or cardiac valvulopathy. Herein is described a novel, potent, and efficacious human 5-HT2C receptor agonist, (−)-trans-(2S,4R)-4-(3′[meta]-bromophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (−)-MBP), that is a competitive antagonist and inverse agonist at human 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. (−)-MBP has efficacy comparable to the prototypical second-generation antipsychotic drug clozapine in three C57Bl/6 mouse models of drug-induced psychoses: the head-twitch response elicited by [2,5]-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine; hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine maleate)]; and hyperlocomotion induced by amphetamine. (−)-MBP, however, does not alter locomotion when administered alone, distinguishing it from clozapine, which suppresses locomotion. Finally, consumption of highly palatable food by mice was not increased by (−)-MBP at a dose that produced at least 50% maximal efficacy in the psychoses models. Compared with (−)-MBP, the enantiomer (+)-MBP was much less active across in vitro affinity and functional assays using mouse and human receptors and also translated in vivo with comparably lower potency and efficacy. Results indicate a 5-HT2C receptor-specific agonist, such as (−)-MBP, may be pharmacotherapeutic for psychoses, without liability for obesity, hallucinations, heart disease, sedation, or motoric disorders. PMID:24563531

  3. Prolonged spinal analgesia in the rat with the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S; Loomis, C; Milne, B; Cervenko, F

    1987-08-01

    The acute intrathecal (i.t.) injection of 50, 100, 200, 250 and 300 nmol of oxymetazoline produced dose-dependent antinociception in rats assessed by tail flick and paw pressure tests. Significant antinociception was observed with all doses of oxymetazoline except 50 nmol in the paw pressure test. The ED50 values for i.t. oxymetazoline in the tail flick and paw pressure tests were 120 nmol (95% CI: 76-178 nmol) and 148 nmol (95% CI: 120-186 nmol), respectively. Oxymetazoline had a long duration of action; a single i.t. dose of 100 nmol significantly elevated tail flick latency and paw pressure threshold for 8 h. The alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine, given i.t. 1 h after oxymetazoline, attenuated the antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner. Phentolamine (50 micrograms i.t.) produced almost complete antagonism in the tail flick and paw pressure tests. These data indicate that oxymetazoline produces long lasting antinociception in the rat following i.t. injection, and that the effect is mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors in the spinal cord.

  4. Cyclic alpha-conotoxin peptidomimetic chimeras as potent GLP-1R agonists.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Schroeder, Christina I; Mitchell, Justin M; Durek, Thomas; Fairlie, David P; Edmonds, David J; Griffith, David A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Derksen, David R; Loria, Paula M; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A; Craik, David J

    2015-10-20

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from compromised pancreatic β-cell function, reduced insulin production, and lowered insulin sensitivity in target organs resulting in hyperglycemia. The GLP-1 hormone has two biologically active forms, GLP-1-(7-37) and GLP-1-(7-36)amide, which are equipotent at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). These peptides are central both to normal glucose metabolism and dysregulation in T2DM. Several structurally modified GLP-1 analogues are now approved drugs, and a number of other analogues are in clinical trials. None of these compounds is orally bioavailable and all require parenteral delivery. Recently, a number of smaller peptidomimetics containing 11-12 natural and unnatural amino acids have been identified that have similar insulin regulating profiles as GLP-1. The α-conotoxins are a class of disulfide rich peptide venoms isolated from cone snails, and are known for their highly constrained structures and resistance to enzymatic degradation. In this study, we examined whether 11-residue peptidomimetics incorporated into α-conotoxin scaffolds, forming monocyclic or bicyclic compounds constrained by disulfide bonds and/or backbone cyclization, could activate the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Several compounds showed potent (nanomolar) agonist activity at GLP-1R, as evaluated via cAMP signaling. In addition, HPLC retention times and in silico calculations suggested that mono- and bicyclic compounds had more favorable n-octanol/water partition coefficients according to the virtual partition coefficient model (vLogP), while maintaining a smaller radius of gyration compared to corresponding uncyclized peptidomimetics. Our findings suggest that cyclic peptidomimetics provide a potential avenue for future design of potent, compact ligands targeting GLP-1R and possessing improved physicochemical properties. PMID:26352676

  5. Soluble interleukin-15 receptor alpha (IL-15R alpha)-sushi as a selective and potent agonist of IL-15 action through IL-15R beta/gamma. Hyperagonist IL-15 x IL-15R alpha fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Erwan; Quéméner, Agnès; Vusio, Patricia; Lorenzen, Inken; Boublik, Yvan; Grötzinger, Joachim; Plet, Ariane; Jacques, Yannick

    2006-01-20

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the generation of multiple lymphocyte subsets (natural killer (NK), NK-T cells, and memory CD8 T cells), and transpresentation of IL-15 by monocytes and dendritic cells has been suggested to be the dominant activating process of these lymphocytes. We have previously shown that a natural soluble form of IL-15R alpha chain corresponding to the entire extracellular domain of IL-15R alpha behaves as a high affinity IL-15 antagonist. In sharp contrast with this finding, we demonstrate in this report that a recombinant, soluble sushi domain of IL-15R alpha, which bears most of the binding affinity for IL-15, behaves as a potent IL-15 agonist by enhancing its binding and biological effects (proliferation and protection from apoptosis) through the IL-15R beta/gamma heterodimer, whereas it does not affect IL-15 binding and function of the tripartite IL-15R alpha/beta/gamma membrane receptor. Our results suggest that, if naturally produced, such soluble sushi domains might be involved in the IL-15 transpresentation mechanism. Fusion proteins (RLI and ILR), in which IL-15 and IL-15R alpha-sushi are attached by a flexible linker, are even more potent than the combination of IL-15 plus sIL-15R alpha-sushi. After binding to IL-15R beta/gamma, RLI is internalized and induces a biological response very similar to the IL-15 high affinity response. Such hyper-IL-15 fusion proteins appear to constitute potent adjuvants for the expansion of lymphocyte subsets.

  6. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in man. Stimulation by acid and inhibition by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, L; Flemström, G

    1989-01-01

    A multi-channel small diameter tube was used to study the secretion of bicarbonate by 3 cm long segments of the proximal duodenum isolated between balloons. The tube had an outer diameter of 5.3 mm and two central and four smaller, peripheral channels. Measurements of infused phenol red, 14C-PEG and vitamin B12 and of trypsin activity were performed to rule out contamination of the perfusate by gastric and pancreatic secretions. Basal secretion of bicarbonate by the duodenal mucosa in healthy subjects varied between 135 and 220 mumol/cm of intestine per hour. Perfusion of the lumen with acid (100 mM HCl for five minutes) increased the secretion to greater than 400 mumol/cm/h and the alpha 2-adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine (150 micrograms iv) decreased the HCO3- secretion by 70 mumol/cm/h. Clonidine simultaneously reduced the mean arterial blood pressure and plasma noradrenaline concentration, but did not affect the plasma glucose or adrenaline concentration. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion is important in the protection of this mucosa against acid discharged from the stomach. Increased sympathetic activity may, by inhibiting the bicarbonate secretion, decrease the protection in proximal duodenum in man and facilitate ulceration. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2558985

  7. The alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine suppresses memory formation only at doses attenuating the perception of sensory input.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Hugo; Stienen, Peter J; Doornenbal, Arie; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2010-03-10

    It was investigated whether continuous rate infusion of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine can suppress memory formation by mechanisms other than reducing perception of sensory input in a fear-conditioning paradigm. Different groups of rats infused with either saline or dexmedetomidine (2.0, 4.0 or 10.0microg/kg bolus, followed by 2.0, 4.0 or 10.0microg/kg/h continuous rate infusion respectively), were subjected to a somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) fear-conditioning paradigm. This paradigm combined the pairing of an innoxious conditioned stimulus (CS) and a noxious unconditioned stimulus (US), of which the latter was used to generate the SEPs (training phase).The following day, the perception of the US during the training phase was assessed by presenting the CS only and subsequently scoring the resulting duration of freezing behaviour (testing phase). Freezing behaviour was reduced only in those groups which demonstrated reduced SEPs. Based on these findings, it is concluded that dexmedetomidine suppresses memory formation only at doses reducing central nervous system activity in response to sensory input.

  8. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailbala; Nehete, Pramod N.; Yang, Guojun; He, Hong; Nehete, Bharti; Hanley, Patrick W.; Barry, Michael A.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT) cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors. PMID:25553254

  9. Corticosteroid biosynthesis in vitro by testes of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides) after 17alpha-methyltestosterone-induced sex inversion.

    PubMed

    Lee, S T; Lam, T J; Tan, C H

    2000-11-01

    This study reports the unique compartmentalization of cortisol and 11-deoxycortisol biosynthesis in vitro from [(3)H]17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17P) in testicular tissues of groupers after sex inversion induced by 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT). Before MT implantation, the ovarian tissues produced only nonpolar metabolites. Following sex inversion some 6 months later, synthesis of these nonpolar metabolites was not detectable. Instead, cortisol and 11-deoxycortisol, with yields of about 3% and 14%, respectively, were synthesized together with two other polar metabolites. The corticosteroids and polar metabolites were distinctly nondetectable in ovarian tissues of the control fish throughout the experiment. While the significance of this testicular synthesis of corticosteroids is presently unclear, it could be related to the increased energy demands arising from the reorganization of gonadal tissues during sex inversion.

  10. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  11. Histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists on cognitive and motor processes: relevance to Alzheimer's disease, ADHD, schizophrenia, and drug abuse

    PubMed Central

    Vohora, Divya; Bhowmik, Malay

    2012-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonists/inverse agonists possess potential to treat diverse disease states of the central nervous system (CNS). Cognitive dysfunction and motor impairments are the hallmark of multifarious neurodegenerative and/or psychiatric disorders. This review presents the various neurobiological/neurochemical evidences available so far following H3R antagonists in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and drug abuse each of which is accompanied by deficits of some aspects of cognitive and/or motor functions. Whether the H3R inverse agonism modulates the neurochemical basis underlying the disease condition or affects only the cognitive/motor component of the disease process is discussed with the aim to provide a rationale for their use in diverse disease states that are interlinked and are accompanied by some common motor, cognitive and attentional deficits. PMID:23109919

  12. A peripheral neuroimmune link: glutamate agonists upregulate NMDA NR1 receptor mRNA and protein, vimentin, TNF-alpha, and RANTES in cultured human synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    McNearney, Terry A; Ma, Yinghong; Chen, Yueping; Taglialatela, Giulio; Yin, Huaizhi; Zhang, Wen-Ru; Westlund, Karin N

    2010-03-01

    Human primary and clonal synovial cells were incubated with glutamate receptor agonists to assess their modulating influence on glutamate receptors N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) NR1 and NR2 and inflammatory cytokines to determine potential for paracrine or autocrine (neurocrine) upregulation of glutamate receptors, as has been shown for bone and chondrocytes. Clonal SW982 synoviocytes constitutively express vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and NMDA NR1 and NR2. Coincubation (6 h) with glutamate agonists NMDA (5 microM), and the NMDA NR1 glycine site activator (+/-)1-aminocyclopentane-cis-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (5 muM), significantly increases cellular mRNA and protein levels of glutamate receptors, as well as increasing vimentin, SMA, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), assessed qualitatively and quantitatively with nucleotide amplification, image analysis of immunocytochemical staining, fluorescein-activated cell sorting, Western blotting, and immunoassays. Human primary synovial cells harvested from patients with arthritic conditions also constitutively expressed NMDA NR1 with increases after agonist treatment. Glutamate receptor agonist-induced increases were blocked by the noncompetitive glutamate antagonist MK-801 (8 microg/ml) and NR1 blocking antibody. Coincubation with glutamate agonists and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a protein kinase C activator, significantly enhanced mean levels of TNF-alpha and RANTES in SW982 cell supernatants compared with incubation with either agent alone. Increases were diminished with protein kinase inhibitor and NR1 blocking antibody. The functional activation of glutamate receptors on human synoviocytes establishes a neurogenic cell signaling link between neurotransmitter glutamate released from nerve terminals and target cells in the joint capsule. The influence of glutamate on subsequent release of cellular proinflammatory mediators in non

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists FG 7142 and RO 15-4513 both reverse some of the behavioral effects of ethanol in a holeboard test

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, R.G.

    1987-09-21

    The intrinsic effects of the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonists RO 15-4513 and FG 7142 on the behavior of mice in a holeboard were investigated. Both drugs caused dose-related decreases in exploratory head-dipping. The highest dose of FG 7142 (40 mg/kg) also reduced locomotor activity. RO 15-4513 (1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg) and FG 7142 (10 and 20 mg/kg) reversed the reductions in the number of head-dips caused by ethanol (2 g/kg). The higher doses of these two drugs also partially reversed the locomotor stimulant action of ethanol. Animals that received ethanol in combination with either inverse agonist spent less time head-dipping than vehicle-treated controls. These data indicate that FG 7142 and RO 15-4513 can reverse, at least in part, some of the behavioral effects of ethanol. Neither drug significantly altered blood alcohol concentrations suggesting that the antagonism does not result from pharmacokinetic changes. 26 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Frascerra, Silvia; Corrado, Alda; Pupilli, Cinzia; Bernini, Giampaolo; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2011-07-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN){gamma} and tumor necrosis factor (TNF){alpha}. IFN{gamma} stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNF{alpha} alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPAR{alpha} activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPAR{gamma} agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPAR{alpha} activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  15. Visualization of distinct patterns of subcellular redistribution of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 and gqalpha /G11alpha induced by agonist stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Drmota, T; Novotny, J; Gould, G W; Svoboda, P; Milligan, G

    1999-01-01

    The rat thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (TRHR-1) was modified by the addition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed stably in HEK293 cells. Extensive overlap of plasma membrane distribution of autofluorescent TRHR-1-GFP with that of the phosphoinositidase C-linked G-proteins Gqalpha/G11alpha, identified by indirect immunofluorescence, was monitored concurrently. Addition of thyrotropin-releasing hormone resulted in rapid separation of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha signals as the receptor was internalized. This situation persisted for more than an hour. At longer time periods a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha was also internalized, although much of the Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity remained associated with the plasma membrane. Parallel experiments, in which the cellular distribution of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity were monitored in sucrose-gradient fractions following cell disruption, also demonstrated a rapid, agonist-induced movement of TRHR-1-GFP away from the plasma membrane to low-density vesicular fractions. At later time points, a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity was also redistributed to overlapping, but non-identical, low-density-vesicle-containing fractions. Pretreatment of the cells with cytochalasin D or nocodazole prevented agonist-induced redistribution of G-protein but not TRHR-1-GFP, further indicating resolution of the mechanics of these two processes. The combination of a GFP-modified receptor and immunostaining of the G-proteins activated by that receptor allows, for the first time, concurrent analysis of the varying dynamics and bases of internalization and redistribution of two elements of the same signal-transduction cascade. PMID:10333499

  16. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists affect both binding and gating of recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Piast, Michał; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2007-05-28

    Benzodiazepines are known to act by enhancing the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonists. Positive modulation by benzodiazepines is typically ascribed to upregulation of agonist binding affinity but their effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor gating remain unclear. In this work, we have used the ultrafast application system to examine the impact of flurazepam and zolpidem on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors. As expected, both drugs strongly enhanced currents evoked by low [gamma-aminobutyric acid]. These compounds, however, also affected currents elicited by saturating agonist concentration. In particular, flurazepam and zolpidem reduced current amplitudes and slowed down the recovery process in paired-pulse experiments. Moreover, flurazepam accelerated the current rise time and zolpidem enhanced the rate and extent of desensitization. We propose that flurazepam and zolpidem modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors by strong enhancement of agonist binding with a superimposed limited effect on the receptor gating.

  17. PWZ-029, an inverse agonist selective for α₅ GABAA receptors, improves object recognition, but not water-maze memory in normal and scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Milić, Marija; Timić, Tamara; Joksimović, Srđan; Biawat, Poonam; Rallapalli, Sundari; Divljaković, Jovana; Radulović, Tamara; Cook, James M; Savić, Miroslav M

    2013-03-15

    Inverse agonism at the benzodiazepine site of α(5) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors is an attractive approach for the development of putative cognition-enhancing compounds, which are still far from clinical application. Several ligands with binding and/or functional selectivity for α(5) GABA(A) receptors have been synthesized and tested in a few animal models. PWZ-029 is an α(5) GABA(A) selective inverse agonist whose memory enhancing effects were demonstrated in the passive avoidance task in rats and in Pavlovian fear conditioning in mice. In the present study we investigated the effects of PWZ-029 administration in novel object recognition test and Morris water maze, in normal and scopolamine-treated rats. All the three doses of PWZ-029 (2, 5 and 10 mg/kg) improved object recognition after the 24-h delay period, as shown by significant differences between the exploration times of the novel and old object, and the respective discrimination indices. PWZ-029 (2 mg/kg) also successfully reversed the 0.3 mg/kg scopolamine-induced deficit in recognition memory after the 1-h delay. In the Morris water maze test, PWZ-029 (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) did not significantly influence swim patterns, either during five acquisition days or during the treatment-free probe trial. PWZ-029 (2, 5 and 10 mg/kg) also proved to be ineffective in the reversal of the 1mg/kg scopolamine-induced memory impairment in the water maze. The present mixed results encourage use of a variety of tests and experimental conditions in order to increase the predictability of preclinical testing of selective α(5) GABA(A) inverse agonists.

  18. Comparison of prostaglandin F2alpha, bimatoprost (prostamide), and butaprost (EP2 agonist) on Cyr61 and connective tissue growth factor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanbin; Li, Chen; Guzman, Victor M; Evinger, Albert J; Protzman, Charles E; Krauss, Achim H-P; Woodward, David F

    2003-07-18

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and Cyr61 (cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61) are members of the CCN gene family that encode multifunctional, extracellular matrix-associated signaling proteins. Because the mechanism of action of certain anti-glaucoma drugs involves extracellular matrix remodeling of ocular ciliary muscle, with a resultant increase in drainage of aqueous humor from the eye, we compared the effects of three pharmacologically distinct ocular hypotensive agents on Cyr61 and CTGF gene expression. Thus, prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) (FP receptor agonist), Butaprost (EP2 receptor agonist), and Bimatoprost (a prostamide) were compared. Using Affymetrix gene chip technology, we first identified that PGF2alpha dramatically up-regulated Cyr61 and CTGF mRNA expression in HEK 293/EBNA cells (hFP-HEK 293/EBNA). Northern blot further confirmed the Cyr61 and CTGF up-regulation is in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PGF2alpha-induced up-regulation of Cyr61 appeared to exclusively involve the Rho pathway, and up-regulation of CTGF was via multiple intracellular pathways. Because prostamide receptors are, to date, defined only at the pharmacological level, Bimatoprost effects on Cyr61 and CTGF were studied in the isolated feline iris sphincter preparation, a tissue highly responsive to prostamides. Both PGF2alpha and Bimatoprost up-regulated Cyr61 mRNA expression in the cat iris tissue. Only PGF2alpha up-regulated CTGF mRNA expression in the cat iris. Therefore, PGF2alpha and Bimatoprost appear to interact with different receptors populations in the cat iris, according to their markedly different effects on CTGF. Activation of prostaglandin EP2 receptors (Gs-coupled) also up-regulated Cyr61 but not CTGF mRNA expression in the isolated cat iris. Similar data were observed in human primary ciliary smooth muscle cells. Thus, despite quite different signal transduction pathways, FP receptor stimulation up-regulates CTGF and Cyr61. The prostamide analog

  19. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Produces Neuron Loss That Can Be Rescued by Modulating Microglial Activation Using a CB2 Receptor Inverse Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Deng, Yunping; Del Mar, Nobel; Guley, Natalie M.; Moore, Bob M.; Honig, Marcia G.; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that mild TBI created by focal left-side cranial blast in mice produces widespread axonal injury, microglial activation, and a variety of functional deficits. We have also shown that these functional deficits are reduced by targeting microglia through their cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptors using 2-week daily administration of the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189. CB2 inverse agonists stabilize the G-protein coupled CB2 receptor in an inactive conformation, leading to increased phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and thus bias activated microglia from a pro-inflammatory M1 to a pro-healing M2 state. In the present study, we showed that SMM-189 boosts nuclear pCREB levels in microglia in several brain regions by 3 days after TBI, by using pCREB/CD68 double immunofluorescent labeling. Next, to better understand the basis of motor deficits and increased fearfulness after TBI, we used unbiased stereological methods to characterize neuronal loss in cortex, striatum, and basolateral amygdala (BLA) and assessed how neuronal loss was affected by SMM-189 treatment. Our stereological neuron counts revealed a 20% reduction in cortical and 30% reduction in striatal neurons bilaterally at 2–3 months post blast, with SMM-189 yielding about 50% rescue. Loss of BLA neurons was restricted to the blast side, with 33% of Thy1+ fear-suppressing pyramidal neurons and 47% of fear-suppressing parvalbuminergic (PARV) interneurons lost, and Thy1-negative fear-promoting pyramidal neurons not significantly affected. SMM-189 yielded 50–60% rescue of Thy1+ and PARV neuron loss in BLA. Thus, fearfulness after mild TBI may result from the loss of fear-suppressing neuron types in BLA, and SMM-189 may reduce fearfulness by their rescue. Overall, our findings indicate that SMM-189 rescues damaged neurons and thereby alleviates functional deficits resulting from TBI, apparently by selectively modulating microglia

  20. Gating allosterism at a single class of etomidate sites on alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA A receptors accounts for both direct activation and agonist modulation.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Dirk; Zhong, Huijun; Forman, Stuart A

    2004-05-14

    At clinical concentrations, the potent intravenous general anesthetic etomidate enhances gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptor activity elicited with low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations, whereas much higher etomidate concentrations activate receptors in the absence of GABA. Therefore, GABA(A) receptors may possess two types of etomidate sites: high affinity GABA-modulating sites and low affinity channel-activating sites. However, GABA modulation and direct activation share stereoselectivity for the (R)(+)-etomidate isomer and display parallel dependence on GABA(A) beta subunit isoforms, suggesting that these two actions may be mediated by a single class of etomidate site(s) that exert one or more molecular effects. In this study, we assessed GABA modulation by etomidate using leftward shifts of electrophysiological GABA concentration responses in cells expressing human alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. Etomidate at up to 100 microm reduced GABA EC(50) values by over 100-fold but without apparent saturation, indicating the absence of high affinity etomidate sites. In experiments using a partial agonist, P4S, etomidate both reduced EC(50) and increased maximal efficacy, demonstrating that etomidate shifts the GABA(A) receptor gating equilibrium toward open states. Results were quantitatively analyzed using equilibrium receptor gating models, wherein a postulated class of equivalent etomidate sites both directly activates receptors and enhances agonist gating. A Monod-Wyman-Changeux co-agonist mechanism with two equivalent etomidate sites that allosterically enhance GABA(A) receptor gating independently of agonist binding most simply accounts for direct activation and agonist modulation. This model also correctly predicts the actions of etomidate on GABA(A) receptors containing a point mutation that increases constitutive gating activity.

  1. Pro-cognitive and antipsychotic efficacy of the alpha7 nicotinic partial agonist SSR180711 in pharmacological and neurodevelopmental latent inhibition models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Barak, Segev; Arad, Michal; De Levie, Amaya; Black, Mark D; Griebel, Guy; Weiner, Ina

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia symptoms can be segregated into positive, negative and cognitive, which exhibit differential sensitivity to drug treatments. Accumulating evidence points to efficacy of alpha7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) agonists for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia but their activity against positive symptoms is thought to be minimal. The present study examined potential pro-cognitive and antipsychotic activity of the novel selective alpha7 nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 using the latent inhibition (LI) model. LI is the reduced efficacy of a previously non-reinforced stimulus to gain behavioral control when paired with reinforcement, compared with a novel stimulus. Here, no-drug controls displayed LI if non-reinforced pre-exposure to a tone was followed by weak but not strong conditioning (2 vs 5 tone-shock pairings). MK801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) -treated rats as well as rats neonatally treated with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NoArg (10 mg/kg, s.c.) on postnatal days 4-5, persisted in displaying LI with strong conditioning, whereas amphetamine (1 mg/kg) -treated rats failed to show LI with weak conditioning. SSR180711 (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to alleviate abnormally persistent LI produced by acute MK801 and neonatal L-NoArg; these models are believed to model cognitive aspects of schizophrenia and activity here was consistent with previous findings with alpha7-nAChR agonists. In addition, unexpectedly, SSR180711 (1, 3 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated LI with strong conditioning in no-drug controls and reversed amphetamine-induced LI disruption, two effects considered predictive of activity against positive symptoms of schizophrenia. These findings suggest that SSR180711 may be beneficial not only for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia, as reported multiple times previously, but also positive symptoms.

  2. Pro-cognitive and antipsychotic efficacy of the alpha7 nicotinic partial agonist SSR180711 in pharmacological and neurodevelopmental latent inhibition models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Barak, Segev; Arad, Michal; De Levie, Amaya; Black, Mark D; Griebel, Guy; Weiner, Ina

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia symptoms can be segregated into positive, negative and cognitive, which exhibit differential sensitivity to drug treatments. Accumulating evidence points to efficacy of alpha7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) agonists for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia but their activity against positive symptoms is thought to be minimal. The present study examined potential pro-cognitive and antipsychotic activity of the novel selective alpha7 nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 using the latent inhibition (LI) model. LI is the reduced efficacy of a previously non-reinforced stimulus to gain behavioral control when paired with reinforcement, compared with a novel stimulus. Here, no-drug controls displayed LI if non-reinforced pre-exposure to a tone was followed by weak but not strong conditioning (2 vs 5 tone-shock pairings). MK801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) -treated rats as well as rats neonatally treated with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NoArg (10 mg/kg, s.c.) on postnatal days 4-5, persisted in displaying LI with strong conditioning, whereas amphetamine (1 mg/kg) -treated rats failed to show LI with weak conditioning. SSR180711 (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to alleviate abnormally persistent LI produced by acute MK801 and neonatal L-NoArg; these models are believed to model cognitive aspects of schizophrenia and activity here was consistent with previous findings with alpha7-nAChR agonists. In addition, unexpectedly, SSR180711 (1, 3 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated LI with strong conditioning in no-drug controls and reversed amphetamine-induced LI disruption, two effects considered predictive of activity against positive symptoms of schizophrenia. These findings suggest that SSR180711 may be beneficial not only for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia, as reported multiple times previously, but also positive symptoms. PMID:19158670

  3. Insights into the influence of 5-HT2c aminoacidic variants with the inhibitory action of serotonin inverse agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Roberta; Massaccesi, Luca; Piva, Francesco; Principato, Giovanni; Laudadio, Emilioano

    2014-03-01

    Specific modulation of serotonin 5-HT(2C) G protein-coupled receptors may be therapeutic for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders. The different efficacy of drugs targeting these receptors are due to the presence of genetic variants in population and this variability is still hard to predict. Therefore, in order to administer the more suitable drug, taking into account patient genotype, it is necessary to know the molecular effects of its gene nucleotide variations. In this work, starting from an accurate 3D model of 5-HT(2C), we focus on the prediction of the possible effect of some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) producing amino acidic changes in proximity of the 5-HT(2C) ligand binding site. Particularly we chose a set of 5-HT(2C) inverse agonists and antagonists which have high inhibitory activity. After prediction of the structures of the receptor-ligand complexes using molecular docking tools, we performed full atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit lipid bilayer monitoring the interactions between ligands and trans-membrane helices of the receptor, trying to infer relations with their biological activity. Serotonin, as the natural ligand was chosen as reference compound to advance a hypothesis able to explain the receptor inhibition mechanism. Indeed we observed a different behavior between the antagonists and inverse agonist with respect to serotonin or unbounded receptor, which could be responsible, even if not directly, of receptor's inactivation. Furthermore, we analyzed five aminoacidic variants of 5HT(2C) receptor observing alterations in the interactions between ligands and receptor which give rise to changes of free energy values for every complex considered.

  4. O-2050 facilitates noradrenaline release and increases the CB1 receptor inverse agonistic effect of rimonabant in the guinea pig hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jergas, Bernd; Schulte, Kirsten; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2014-07-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptors on the noradrenergic neurons in guinea pig hippocampal slices show an endogenous endocannabinoid tone. This conclusion is based on rimonabant, the facilitatory effect of which on noradrenaline release might be due to its inverse CB1 receptor agonism and/or the interruption of a tonic inhibition elicited by endocannabinoids. To examine the latter mechanism, a neutral antagonist would be suitable. Therefore, we studied whether O-2050 is a neutral CB1 receptor antagonist in the guinea pig hippocampus and whether it mimics the facilitatory effect of rimonabant. CB1 receptor affinity of O-2050 was quantified in cerebrocortical membranes, using (3)H-rimonabant binding. Its CB1 receptor potency and effect on (3)H-noradrenaline release were determined in superfused hippocampal slices. Its intrinsic activity at CB1 receptors was studied in hippocampal membranes, using (35)S-GTPγS binding. Endocannabinoid levels in hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring. O-2050 was about ten times less potent than rimonabant in its CB1 receptor affinity, potency and facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release. Although not affecting (35)S-GTPγS binding by itself, O-2050 shifted the concentration-response curve of a CB1 receptor agonist to the right but that of rimonabant to the left. Levels of anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol in guinea pig hippocampus closely resembled those in mouse hippocampus. In conclusion, our results with O-2050 confirm that the CB1 receptors on noradrenergic neurons of the guinea pig hippocampus show an endogenous tone. To differentiate between the two mechanisms leading to an endogenous tone, O-2050 is not superior to rimonabant since O-2050 may increase the inverse agonistic effect of endocannabinoids.

  5. The effects of alpha-2 agonist, medetomidine and its antagonist, atipamezole on reaction and movement times in a visual choice reaction time task in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rämä, P; Linnankoski, I; Carlson, S

    1997-01-01

    Alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists have been shown to improve the working memory task performance of aged monkeys. Suggestions offered to explain this finding include improved short-term memory processing, slight sedation, and decreased distractiveness. Although sedation is evident at high doses, it may also contribute to the working memory task performance at low doses. The aim of the present work was to find out whether the positive effects of an alpha-2 agonist, medetomidine, on working memory performance could be explained by its sedative effects. This was accomplished by measuring the reaction and movement times of monkeys performing a visual choice reaction time task under the influence of medetomidine or its antagonist atipamezole. In the task a trial began with the monkey holding a central pad. After a short period one of two lateral light emitting diodes was turned on for 300 ms and the monkeys were trained to release the central bar and touch either of the bars, situated below the diodes, depending on the location of the stimulus. The reaction and movement times were significantly longer than on saline control only at the highest dose of medetomidine (10.0 micrograms/kg). At the lowest dose of atipamezole (0.01 mg/kg), the reaction times were significantly shorter than on saline control. The results of this study demonstrate that low doses of medetomidine, which have earlier been shown to improve working memory performance, do not induce sedation as measured by reaction and movement times.

  6. Molecular mimicry in Lyme arthritis demonstrated at the single cell level: LFA-1 alpha L is a partial agonist for outer surface protein A-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Trollmo, C; Meyer, A L; Steere, A C; Hafler, D A; Huber, B T

    2001-04-15

    Antibiotic treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease that follows infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (BB:). A marked Ab and T cell response to BB: outer surface protein A (OspA) often develops during prolonged episodes of arthritis. Furthermore, cross-reaction between the bacterial OspA and human LFA-1alpha(L) at the T cell level and the inability to detect BB: in the joint implicate an autoimmune mechanism. To analyze the nature of response to OspA and LFA-1alpha(L), we used OspA-specific T cell hybrids from DR4 transgenic mice, as well as cloned human cells specific for OspA(165-184), the immunodominant epitope, from five DRB1*0401(+) patients, using OspA-MHC class II tetramers. Although OspA(165-184) stimulated nearly all OspA-specific human T cell clones tested to proliferate and secrete IFN-gamma and IL-13, LFA-1alpha(L326-345) stimulated approximately 10% of these clones to proliferate and a greater percentage to secrete IL-13. Assays with LFA- or OspA-DR4 monomers revealed that higher concentrations of LFA-DR4 were needed to stimulate dual-reactive T cell hybrids. Our analysis at the clonal level demonstrates that human LFA-1alpha(L326-345) behaves as a partial agonist, perhaps playing a role in perpetuating symptoms of arthritis.

  7. Prolonged administration in vivo of alpha and beta adrenergic agonists decreases insulin binding to rat myocardial membranes in vitro by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Desoye, G.; Ertl-Stockinger, U.; Porta, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Male Sprague Dawley rats were continuously treated in vivo for 6, 12 and 20 hours with a combination of an alpha- (beta-) adrenoreceptor agonist and a beta- (alpha-) adrenoreceptor antagonist in subcutaneously implanted depot tablets. Crude membranes prepared from myocardial cells exhibited a decreased maximum binding of ({sup 125}I)-insulin after 20 hours irrespective of the treatment applied. Scatchard and non-linear regression analysis of the displacement curves assuming two non-cooperative binding sites revealed a downregulation of the high affinity receptors for about 85% and a concomitant 2.5-fold increased receptor affinity under beta-adrenergic influence. In contrast, alpha-adrenergic treatment did not affect the receptor number but decreased the high affinity by 70%. The low affinity binding sites were virtually unaffected by the different treatments. The phospholipid and cholesterol contents of the membranes were not significantly altered. The phospholipid/cholesterol ratios after 12 and 20 hours of alpha-adrenergic treatment, however, were decreased.

  8. Imidazenil: a low efficacy agonist at alpha1- but high efficacy at alpha5-GABAA receptors fail to show anticonvulsant cross tolerance to diazepam or zolpidem.

    PubMed

    Auta, James; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio

    2008-08-01

    Whereas advances in the molecular biology of GABA(A) receptor complex using knock-out and knock-in mice have been valuable in unveiling the structure, composition, receptor assembly, and several functions of different GABA(A) receptor subtypes, the mechanism(s) underlying benzodiazepine (BZ) tolerance and withdrawal remain poorly understood. Studies using specific GABA(A) receptor subunit knock-in mice suggest that tolerance to sedative action of diazepam requires long-term activation of alpha1 and alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subunits. We investigated the role of long-term activation of these GABA(A) receptor subunits during anticonvulsant tolerance using high affinity and high intrinsic efficacy ligands for GABA(A) receptors expressing the alpha5 subunit (imidazenil) or alpha1 subunit (zolpidem), and a non-selective BZ recognition site ligand (diazepam). We report here that long-term activation of GABA(A) receptors by zolpidem and diazepam but not by imidazenil elicits anticonvulsant tolerance. Although anticonvulsant cross-tolerance occurs between diazepam and zolpidem, there is no cross-tolerance between imidazenil and diazepam or zolpidem. Furthermore, diazepam or zolpidem long-term treatment decreased the expression of mRNA encoding the alpha1 GABA(A) receptor subunit in prefrontal cortex by 43% and 20% respectively. In addition, diazepam but not zolpidem long-term treatment produced a 30% increase in the expression of the alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA in prefrontal cortex. In contrast, imidazenil which is devoid of anticonvulsant tolerance does not elicit significant changes in the expression of alpha1 or alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subunit. These findings suggest that long-term activation of GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha1 or other subunits but not the alpha5 receptor subunit is essential for the induction of anticonvulsant tolerance.

  9. Increased 21-hydroxylase and shutdown of C(17,20) lyase activities in testicular tissues of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides) during 17alpha-methyltestosterone-induced sex inversion.

    PubMed

    Lee, S T; Lam, T J; Tan, C H

    2002-05-01

    The metabolism in vitro of [(3)H]17-hydroxyprogesterone by gonadal tissues of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides) during 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT)-induced female-to-male sex inversion was examined. In the female phase, C(17,20) lyase, 5beta-reductase, 3alpha/beta-HSD, 20beta-HSD, and 17beta-HSD activities resulted in the biosynthesis of 5beta-pregnans and 5beta-androstanes (including 5beta-androstane-3alpha/beta, 17beta-diol, 3alpha/beta, 17alpha-dihydroxy-5beta-pregnen-20-one, and 5beta-androstane-3,17-dione). In the MT-induced male phase, however, the abrogation of C(17,20) lyase activity and the concomitant activation of 21alpha-hydroxylase/11beta-hydroxylase resulted in the preferential synthesis of polar 21alpha-hydroxlyated 5beta-pregnans (5beta-pregnan-3beta,17alpha,20beta,21alpha-tetrol and 3beta,20beta,21alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-pregnan-3-one) and corticosteroids (11-deoxycortisol and cortisol). Interestingly, synthesis of these 21alpha-hydroxylated 5beta-pregnans and corticosteroids was uniquely compartmentalized in only testicular tissues of the MT-induced males. This study shows that there is selective activation of specific steroidogenic enzymes in the different sexual phases leading to the synthesis of metabolites that may be involved in regulating sex inversion of the grouper.

  10. Identification of a new component of the agonist binding site of the nicotinic alpha 7 homooligomeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Corringer, P J; Galzi, J L; Eiselé, J L; Bertrand, S; Changeux, J P; Bertrand, D

    1995-05-19

    Tryptophan 54 of the alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic homooligomeric receptor is homologous to gamma-Trp-55 and delta-Trp-57 of non-alpha subunits of Torpedo receptor labeled by d-tubocurarine. This residue was mutated on the alpha 7-V201-5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)3 homooligomeric chimera, which displays alpha 7 nicotinic pharmacology, and for which both equilibrium binding studies and electrophysiological recordings could be carried out in parallel. Replacement of Trp-54 by a Phe, Ala, or His causes a progressive decrease both in binding affinity and in responses (EC50 or IC50) for acetylcholine, nicotine, and dihydro-beta-erythroidine, without significant modification in alpha-Bgtx binding. Except for Gln-56, comparatively small effects are observed when the other residues of the 52-58 region are mutated into alanine. These data support the participation of Trp-54 to ligand binding, and provide evidence for a new "complementary component" of the alpha 7 nicotinic binding site, distinct from its three-loop "principal component," and homologous to the "non-alpha component" present on gamma and delta subunits.

  11. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  12. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  13. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  15. Modulatory effects of S 38232, a non alpha-7 containing nicotine acetylcholine receptor agonist on network activity in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lagostena, Laura; Danober, Laurence; Challal, Sylvie; Lestage, Pierre; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Trocmé-Thibierge, Caryn; Cherubini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular field potentials (fEPSPs) and whole cell patch-clamp recordings were used to test the effect of S 38232, a newly developed potent non-alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) agonist, on synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices obtained from adult mice. S 38232 increased the amplitude of fEPSPs, evoked in stratum radiatum by Schaffer collateral stimulation. This effect was potentiated by picrotoxin, suggesting that S 38232 exerts at least in part its effect on GABAergic interneurons. The action of S 38232 was mediated by non-alpha7 containing nAChRs since it was prevented by DHbetaE (1muM) but not by alpha-BTX (100nM). A similar potentiating effect on fEPSPs was observed when nicotine (1muM) was applied to hippocampal slices obtained from alpha7 -/- mice in the presence of picrotoxin. The potentiating effect of S 38232 was probably presynaptic in origin since it was associated with a significant reduction in paired-pulse ratio. In addition, in patch clamp experiments, S 38232 enhanced the frequency (but not the amplitude) of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, sIPSCs) recorded from CA1 principal cells. Moreover, it enhanced the frequency of miniature IPSCs but not EPSCs, suggesting that it was acting on nAChRs located on presynaptic/pre-terminal regions of GABAergic interneurons. The effect of S 38232 on GABAergic signaling was concentration-dependent with an EC(50) of 43muM. In conclusions, we present evidence that the new nicotine ligand S 38232, by selectively activating non-alpha7 nAChRs located on principal cells and GABAergic interneurons, influences network activity and information processing in the hippocampus.

  16. (R)-3'-(3-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-yl)spiro[1-azabicyclo[2,2,2]octane-3,5'-oxazolidin]-2'-one, a novel and potent alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist displays cognitive enhancing properties.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Ryo; Fujio, Masakazu; Takanashi, Shin-ichi; Numata, Atsushi; Katayama, Jiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Shiigi, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Jun-ichi; Kuriyama, Makoto; Horikawa, Takashi; Murozono, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2006-07-13

    Recent studies have suggested that the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play important roles in learning and memory. Herein, we describe our research of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) in a series of (S)-spiro[1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3,5'-oxazolidin]-2'-ones bearing various bicyclic moieties to discover novel alpha7 receptor agonists. Through a number of SAR studies on the series, we have found out that inhibition of CYP 2D6 isozyme, which was a primary obstacle for the previously identified compound, was avoidable by the introduction of bicyclic moieties. Chemical optimization of the series led to the identification of a novel and potent alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist 23. This compound not only possessed high binding affinity (K(i) = 3 nmol/L) toward the alpha7 receptor but also showed agonistic activity even at a concentration of 0.1 micromol/L. In addition, compound 23 improved cognition in several rat models, which might suggest the potential of the alpha7 receptor partial agonist for the treatment of neurological disorders including cognitive dysfunction.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-04-18

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPAR{alpha} activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPAR{alpha} inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPAR{alpha}. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPAR{alpha}.

  18. Effect of Alpha-1-Adrenergic Agonist, Midodrine for the Management of Long-Standing Neurogenic Shock in Patient with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taikwan

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 71-year-old male patient who had suffered from long-lasting neurogenic shock for 13 weeks after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by a bicycle accident. The neurogenic shock was resolved dramatically 2 weeks after the administration of alpha-1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine hydrochloride. In usual cases, neurogenic shock tends to improve between 2 and 6 weeks after SCI; however, in a few cases, the shock lasts for several months. In our case, spinal shock lasted for 13 weeks and exhibited very sensitive decline of blood pressure for even a slight decrease of dopamine despite recovered bulbospongiosus reflex. Three days after midodrine hydrochloride was added, hypotension improved dramatically. We discuss our rare case with pertinent literatures. PMID:27169082

  19. Acute alertness-promoting effects of a novel histamine subtype-3 receptor inverse agonist in healthy sleep-deprived male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Iannone, R; Palcza, J; Renger, J J; Calder, N; Cerchio, K; Gottesdiener, K; Hargreaves, R; Dijk, D J; Boyle, J; Murphy, M G

    2010-12-01

    The alertness-promoting effect of MK-0249 (10 or 50 mg), a histamine subtype-3 receptor (HRH3) inverse agonist (IA), was evaluated in the stimulant reference sleep deprivation model (SRSDM) using a double-blind, double-dummy, placebo- and modafinil- (200 mg) controlled, four-period crossover design in 24 healthy young men. The two primary hypotheses were related to sleep latency (first appearance of one epoch of stage 2, 3, or 4 or REM sleep, as detected using polysomnography (PSG)) at 8:00 AM on day 2. Statistically significant increases in sleep latency were observed in association with the use of modafinil 200 mg (9.07 min; P < 0.0001), MK-0249 50 mg (5.17 min; P = 0.008), and MK-0249 10 mg (5.45 min; P = 0.005) at the maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT) at 8:00 AM. Sleep latency was higher when averaged over all MWT time points (P < 0.0001 for modafinil and for both doses of MK-0249). The alertness-promoting effect with the use of MK-0249 in the SRSDM suggests that HRH3 IAs may be effective in disorders involving excessive somnolence. PMID:20981000

  20. Double di oxygenation by mouse 8S-lipoxygenase: Specific formation of a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jisaka, Mitsuo . E-mail: jisaka@life.shimane-u.ac.jp; Iwanaga, Chitose; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo; Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki; Ikeda, Izumi; Nishimura, Kohji; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Fushiki, Tohru; Yokota, Kazushige

    2005-12-09

    Mouse 8S-lipoxygenase (8-LOX) metabolizes arachidonic acid (AA) specifically to 8S-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (8S-HPETE), which will be readily reduced under physiological circumstances to 8S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (8S-HETE), a natural agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}). Here, we investigated whether 8-LOX could further oxygenate AA and whether the products could activate PPARs. The purified recombinant 8-LOX converted AA exclusively to 8S-HPETE and then to (8S,15S)-dihydroperoxy-5Z,9E,11Z,13E-eicosatetraenoic acid (8S,15S-diHPETE). The k {sub cat}/K {sub m} values for 8S-HPETE and AA were 3.3 x 10{sup 3} and 2.7 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. 8-LOX also dioxygenated 8S-HETE and 15S-H(P)ETE specifically to the corresponding 8S,15S-disubstituted derivatives. By contrast, 15-LOX-2, a human homologue of 8-LOX, produced 8S,15S-diH(P)ETE from 8S-H(P)ETE but not from AA nor 15S-H(P)ETE. 8S,15S-diHETE activated PPAR{alpha} more strongly than 8S-HETE did. The present results suggest that 8S,15S-diH(P)ETE as well as 8S-H(P)ETE would contribute to the physiological function of 8-LOX and also that 8-LOX can function as a potential 15-LOX.

  1. The effects of ethanol in combination with the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist atipamezole on brain monoamine metabolites and motor performance of mice.

    PubMed

    Idänpään-Heikkilä, J J; Björn, M; Seppälä, T

    1995-01-13

    The time course of the effects of ethanol alone and in combination with the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine and the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist atipamezole was studied in NIH-Swiss mice. Core body temperature, rotarod performance, motility and changes in the noradrenaline, dopamine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) metabolite contents of different brain parts (limbic forebrain, striatum, lower brainstem, the rest of the forebrain + midbrain and hypothalamus) were measured. Atipamezole (3 mg/kg) attenuated the hypothermia induced by either ethanol (3 g/kg) alone or ethanol in combination with dexmedetomidine (0.3 mg/kg). Atipamezole shortened the duration of the ethanol-impaired and ethanol + dexmedetomidine-impaired rotarod performance. Further, atipamezole prevented the decreased motility due to the combined treatment with ethanol and dexmedetomidine. Ethanol increased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol (MHPG), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) values. Dexmedetomidine alone decreased MHPG and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations and increased DOPAC and HVA values. Dexmedetomidine combined with ethanol resulted in a further increase in DOPAC and HVA values. Pharmacokinetic parameters did not contribute to this antagonism of ethanol's effects by atipamezole, nor did the antagonism observed in rotarod performance or hypothermia seem to correlate with the changes seen in the brain noradrenaline and dopamine or 5-HT metabolism. In conclusion, these findings suggest that several ethanol effects are not mediated via direct activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors, even though some of ethanol's behavioral and physiological effects may be antagonized by coadministration of alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists.

  2. In vitro screening of 200 pesticides for agonistic activity via mouse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} and PPAR{gamma} and quantitative analysis of in vivo induction pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Shinji; Matsuda, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Hiroyuki . E-mail: kojima@iph.pref.hokkaido.jp

    2006-12-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors and key regulators of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation. However, there have been few studies reporting on a variety of environmental chemicals, which may interact with these receptors. In the present study, we characterized mouse PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonistic activities of 200 pesticides (29 organochlorines, 11 diphenyl ethers, 56 organophosphorus pesticides, 12 pyrethroids, 22 carbamates, 11 acid amides, 7 triazines, 8 ureas and 44 others) by in vitro reporter gene assays using CV-1 monkey kidney cells. Three of the 200 pesticides, diclofop-methyl, pyrethrins and imazalil, which have different chemical structures, showed PPAR{alpha}-mediated transcriptional activities in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, none of the 200 pesticides showed PPAR{gamma} agonistic activity at concentrations {<=} 10{sup -5} M. To investigate the in vivo effects of diclofop-methyl, pyrethrins and imazalil, we examined the gene expression of PPAR{alpha}-inducible cytochrome P450 4As (CYP4As) in the liver of female mice intraperitoneally injected with these compounds ({<=} 300 mg/kg). RT-PCR revealed significantly high induction levels of CYP4A10 and CYP4A14 mRNAs in diclofop-methyl- and pyrethrins-treated mice, whereas imazalil induced almost no gene expressions of CYP4As. In particular, diclofop-methyl induced as high levels of CYP4A mRNAs as WY-14643, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist. Thus, most of the 200 pesticides tested do not activate PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{gamma} in in vitro assays, but only diclofop-methyl and pyrethrins induce PPAR{alpha} agonistic activity in vivo as well as in vitro.

  3. Indanylacetic acid derivatives carrying 4-thiazolyl-phenoxy tail groups, a new class of potent PPAR alpha/gamma/delta pan agonists: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Joachim; Chen, Libing; Majumdar, Dyuti; Bullock, William H; Burns, Michael; Claus, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Fernando E; Daly, Michelle; Ehrgott, Frederick J; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Livingston, James N; Schoenleber, Robert W; Shapiro, Jeffrey; Yang, Ling; Tsutsumi, Manami; Ma, Xin

    2007-03-01

    Compounds that simultaneously activate the three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes alpha, gamma, and delta hold potential to address the adverse metabolic and cardiovascular conditions associated with diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. We recently identified the indanylacetic acid moiety as a well-tunable PPAR agonist head group. Here we report the synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of novel aryl tail group derivatives that led to a new class of potent PPAR pan agonists. While most of the tail group modifications imparted potent PPAR delta agonist activity, improvement of PPAR alpha and gamma activity required the introduction of new heterocyclic substituents that were not known in the PPAR literature. Systematic optimization led to the discovery of 4-thiazolyl-phenyl derivatives with potent PPAR alpha/gamma/delta pan agonistic activity. The lead candidate from this series was found to exhibit excellent ADME properties and superior therapeutic potential compared to known PPAR gamma activating agents by favorably modulating lipid levels in hApoA1 mice and hyperlipidemic hamsters, while normalizing glucose levels in diabetic rodent models. PMID:17274610

  4. Effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonists clofibrate and fish oil on hepatic fatty acid metabolism in weaned dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Litherland, N B; Bionaz, M; Wallace, R L; Loor, J J; Drackley, J K

    2010-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) agonists increase fatty acid oxidation in liver of nonruminants. If similar effects occur in dairy cattle, enhanced hepatic oxidative capacity could decrease circulating nonesterified fatty acids and hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation in periparturient cows. The objectives of this study were 1) to determine whether partitioning of fatty acid metabolism by liver slices from weaned Holstein calves treated with PPARalpha agonists in vivo is altered compared with partitioning by liver slices from control (untreated) calves, and 2) to measure in vitro metabolism of palmitate and oleate by bovine liver slices and relate these to mRNA abundance for key enzymes. Weaned male Holstein calves (7 wk old; n=15) were assigned to 1 of 3 groups for a 5-d treatment period: control (untreated), clofibrate (62.5 mg/kg of BW), or fish oil (250 mg/kg of BW). Calves treated with clofibrate consumed less dry matter. Body weight, liver weight, liver weight:body weight ratio, blood nonesterified fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and liver composition were not significantly different among treatments. Liver slices were incubated for 2, 4, and 8 h to determine in vitro conversion of [1-(14)C] palmitate and [1-(14)C] oleate to CO(2), acid-soluble products, esterified products, and total metabolism. In liver slices incubated for 8 h, conversion of palmitate to CO(2) was greater for calves treated with clofibrate compared with control calves or calves treated with fish oil. Conversion of palmitate to esterified products, total palmitate metabolism, and metabolism of oleate were not different among treatments. Conversion of palmitate to CO(2) was greater than that from oleate for all treatments, but rates of total metabolism did not differ. Clofibrate increased or tended to increase liver expression of several PPARalpha target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation (e.g., ACADVL, ACOX1, CPT1A), whereas fish oil did not significantly

  5. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  6. Farrowing induction with a combination of prostaglandin F(2alpha) and a peripherally acting alpha(2)--adrenergic agonist AGN 190851 and a combination of prostaglandin F(2alpha) and oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Yang, P C; Fang, W D; Huang, S Y; Chung, W B; Hsu, W H

    1996-11-01

    We studied the effect of prostaglandin (PG) F(2alpha)-AGN 190851 on farrowing induction and compared it with that of PGF(2alpha)-oxytocin. Eighty crossbred, multiparous sows were randomly assigned to the following 4 treatment groups of 20 sows each: 1) control, saline-saline; 2) PGF(2alpha) (10 mg/sow)-oxytocin (30 IU/sow); 3) PGF(2alpha) (10 mg/sow)-AGN 190851 (0.06 mg/kg); and 4) PGF(2alpha) (10 mg/sow)-AGN 190851 (0.1 mg/kg). Either PGF(2alpha) or saline was administered intramuscularly on Day 111 of gestation at 11:30 h; AGN 190851, oxytocin or saline was administered intramuscularly 20 h after the first injection. The PGF(2alpha)-AGN 190851 (0.1 mg/kg) treated sows had the shortest mean farrowing interval (2.1 +/- 1.6 h, mean +/- SD) compared with the remaining treatment groups (control: 67.1 +/- 26.2 h; PGF(2alpha)-oxytocin: 5.6 +/- 6.7 h; PGF(2alpha)-AGN 190851 [0.06 mg/kg]: 3.0 +/- 2.8 h). Duration of farrowing, litter size, litter weight and interval from weaning to first estrus in sows were not significantly changed by these treatments. The PGF(2alpha)-oxytocin group had a significantly higher stillbirth rate than the control group, whereas the PGF(2alpha)-AGN 190851 (0.1 mg/kg) group had the lowest number of pigs born dead and stillbirth rate among the 4 treatment groups. These results suggested that the PGF(2alpha)-AGN 190851 combination can be used as an alternative method to PGF(2alpha)-oxytocin for synchronizing farrowing.

  7. Liver X receptor agonist GW3965 dose-dependently regulates lps-mediated liver injury and modulates posttranscriptional TNF-alpha production and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in liver macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun Yong; Dahle, Maria K; Steffensen, Knut R; Reinholt, Finn P; Collins, Jon L; Thiemermann, Christoph; Aasen, Ansgar O; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Wang, Jacob E

    2009-11-01

    Modulation of the host inflammatory response to infection may be a key approach to improve the outcome of patients with sepsis and organ injury. We previously reported that pretreatment of rats with the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965 reduced the liver injury associated with endotoxemia and attenuated the production of TNF-alpha by rat Kupffer cells. Here, we examine the dose-dependent effect of GW3965 on liver injury and cytokine production in a rat model of endotoxemia and explore the mechanisms underlying TNF-alpha attenuation in Kupffer cells. Low doses of GW3965 (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) administered 30 min before infusion of LPS and peptidoglycan significantly attenuated the increase in plasma levels of the liver injury markers alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin (6 h) as well as the inflammatory mediators TNF-alpha (1 h) and prostaglandin E2 (6 h) associated with endotoxemia. In contrast, pretreatment with a higher dose of GW3965 (1.0 mg/kg) had no such effect. Studies in primary cultures of rat Kupffer cells demonstrated that LXR agonist treatment attenuated both the secreted and cell-associated levels of TNF-alpha, whereas TNF-alpha mRNA levels were not altered. Phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which plays a major role in production of TNF-alpha at the posttranscriptional level, was attenuated by GW3965 treatment in Kupffer cells. Experiments in murine LXR-deficient Kupffer cells demonstrated enhanced production of TNF-alpha in Kupffer cells from LXR-alpha(-/-) mice when challenged with LPS compared with LXR-beta(-/-) and wild-type Kupffer cells. Taken together, these results argue in favor of a novel mechanism for LXR-mediated attenuation of liver injury by interfering with posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-alpha in Kupffer cells. PMID:19295476

  8. Quantitative determination of MK-0767, a dual alpha/gamma peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist, in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Hengchang; Yan, Kerri; Xu, Xiaohui; Lo, Man-Wai

    2004-10-15

    5-[2,4-Dioxothiazolidin-5-yl)methyl]-2-methoxy-N-[[(4-trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]methyl]benzamide (I, MK-0767 or KRP-297, Fig. 1), is a dual alpha/gamma peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist. A LC-MS/MS method for the determination of I in human plasma has been successfully developed, validated and applied to clinical programs. The analyte and internal standard (II) are extracted from 0.05 mL plasma via solid phase extraction (SPE). HPLC is used for the separation of I and II from possible co-extracted endogenous and other compounds. Detection is by MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using a TurboIonSpray probe. The whole sample preparation is automated by using a Packard Multiprobe liquid handling system. The linear range is 4-2000 ng/mL in plasma. Recoveries were 71.1% and 69.4% for I and II, respectively. The method exhibited good linearity, reproducibility and sensitivity, selectivity and robustness when used for the analysis of clinical samples.

  9. The effects of dexmedetomidine, an alpha 2 agonist, on learning and memory, assessed using passive avoidance and water maze tasks in rats.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, J; Riekkinen, P; Ekonsalo, T; Lammintausta, R; Riekkinen, P J

    1992-02-01

    The effects of dexmedetomidine, a specific and potent alpha 2 agonist, on the performance of rats in passive avoidance and water maze tasks were studied. Pre-training administration of subanaesthetic dose (9.0 micrograms/kg) of dexmedetomidine impaired the retention of the passive avoidance task (assessed 24 hr after training) but it did not affect the training of this task. Smaller doses (0.3, 0.9 and 3.0 micrograms/kg) did not affect the training or retention of this aversively motivated task. On the other hand, pre-training administration of 0.3 and 0.9 microgram/kg dexmedetomidine impaired the acquisition of the water maze task, whereas larger doses (3.0 and 9.0 micrograms/kg) had no significant effect on spatial learning. Pre-training administration of dexmedetomidine (0.3-9.0 micrograms/kg) increased swimming speed in rats. Only a large dose (300 micrograms/kg) of dexmedetomidine, administered immediately after training, impaired the retention of the passive avoidance task and the acquisition of the water maze task. These data agree with previous findings that pharmacological manipulation of the noradrenergic system affects the retention of aversively-motivated (passive avoidance) tasks. The present results suggest that the dose-response curve of dexmedetomidine for impairment of learning/memory differs between the passive avoidance and water maze tasks.

  10. Tricyclic pyrazoles. Part 8. Synthesis, biological evaluation and modelling of tricyclic pyrazole carboxamides as potential CB2 receptor ligands with antagonist/inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Valeria; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Asproni, Battistina; Cichero, Elena; Fossa, Paola; Muñoz, Eduardo; Deligia, Francesco; Murineddu, Gabriele; García-Arencibia, Moisés; Pinna, Gerard A

    2016-04-13

    Previous studies have investigated the relevance and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of pyrazole derivatives in relation with cannabinoid receptors, and the series of tricyclic 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazoles emerged as potent CB2 receptor ligands. In the present study, novel 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole and 1H-benzo[g]indazole carboxamides containing a cyclopropyl or a cyclohexyl substituent were designed and synthesized to evaluate the influence of these structural modifications towards CB1 and CB2 receptor affinities. Among these derivatives, compound 15 (6-cyclopropyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide) showed the highest CB2 receptor affinity (Ki = 4 nM) and remarkable selectivity (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 2232), whereas a similar affinity, within the nM range, was seen for the fenchyl derivative (compound 10: Ki = 6 nM), for the bornyl analogue (compound 14: Ki = 38 nM) and, to a lesser extent, for the aminopiperidine derivative (compound 6: Ki = 69 nM). Compounds 10 and 14 were also highly selective for the CB2 receptor (KiCB1/KiCB2 > 1000), whereas compound 6 was relatively selective (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 27). The four compounds were also subjected to GTPγS binding analysis showing antagonist/inverse agonist properties (IC50 for compound 14 = 27 nM, for 15 = 51 nM, for 10 = 80 nM and for 6 = 294 nM), and this activity was confirmed for the three more active compounds in a CB2 receptor-specific in vitro bioassay consisting in the quantification of prostaglandin E2 release by LPS-stimulated BV2 cells, in the presence and absence of WIN55,212-2 and/or the investigated compounds. Modelling studies were also conducted with the four compounds, which conformed with the structural requirements stated for the binding of antagonist compounds to the human CB2 receptor.

  11. Reactive metabolite trapping studies on imidazo- and 2-methylimidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-based inverse agonists of the ghrelin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kalgutkar, Amit S; Ryder, Tim F; Walker, Gregory S; Orr, Suvi T M; Cabral, Shawn; Goosen, Theunis C; Lapham, Kimberly; Eng, Heather

    2013-07-01

    The current study examined the bioactivation potential of ghrelin receptor inverse agonists, 1-{2-[2-chloro-4-(2H-1,2,3-triazol-2-yl)benzyl]-2,7-diazaspiro[3.5]nonan-7-yl}-2-(imidazo[2,1-b]thiazol-6-yl)ethanone (1) and 1-{2-[2-chloro-4-(2H-1,2,3-triazol-2-yl)benzyl]-2,7-diazaspiro[3.5]nonan-7-yl}-2-(2-methylimidazo[2,1-b]thiazol-6-yl)ethanone (2), containing a fused imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole motif in the core structure. Both compounds underwent oxidative metabolism in NADPH- and glutathione-supplemented human liver microsomes to yield glutathione conjugates, which was consistent with their bioactivation to reactive species. Mass spectral fragmentation and NMR analysis indicated that the site of attachment of the glutathionyl moiety in the thiol conjugates was on the thiazole ring within the bicycle. Two glutathione conjugates were discerned with the imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole derivative 1. One adduct was derived from the Michael addition of glutathione to a putative S-oxide metabolite of 1, whereas, the second adduct was formed via the reaction of a second glutathione molecule with the initial glutathione-S-oxide adduct. In the case of the 2-methylimidazo[2,1-b]thiazole analog 2, glutathione conjugation occurred via an oxidative desulfation mechanism, possibly involving thiazole ring epoxidation as the rate-limiting step. Additional insights into the mechanism were obtained via ¹⁸O exchange and trapping studies with potassium cyanide. The mechanistic insights into the bioactivation pathways of 1 and 2 allowed the deployment of a rational chemical intervention strategy that involved replacement of the thiazole ring with a 1,2,4-thiadiazole group to yield 2-[2-chloro-4-(2H-1,2,3-triazol-2-yl)benzyl]-2,7-diazaspiro[3.5]nonan-7-yl)-2-(2-methylimidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-6-yl)ethanone (3). These structural changes not only abrogated the bioactivation liability but also retained the attractive pharmacological attributes of the prototype agents. PMID:23610086

  12. Tricyclic pyrazoles. Part 8. Synthesis, biological evaluation and modelling of tricyclic pyrazole carboxamides as potential CB2 receptor ligands with antagonist/inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Valeria; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Asproni, Battistina; Cichero, Elena; Fossa, Paola; Muñoz, Eduardo; Deligia, Francesco; Murineddu, Gabriele; García-Arencibia, Moisés; Pinna, Gerard A

    2016-04-13

    Previous studies have investigated the relevance and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of pyrazole derivatives in relation with cannabinoid receptors, and the series of tricyclic 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazoles emerged as potent CB2 receptor ligands. In the present study, novel 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole and 1H-benzo[g]indazole carboxamides containing a cyclopropyl or a cyclohexyl substituent were designed and synthesized to evaluate the influence of these structural modifications towards CB1 and CB2 receptor affinities. Among these derivatives, compound 15 (6-cyclopropyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide) showed the highest CB2 receptor affinity (Ki = 4 nM) and remarkable selectivity (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 2232), whereas a similar affinity, within the nM range, was seen for the fenchyl derivative (compound 10: Ki = 6 nM), for the bornyl analogue (compound 14: Ki = 38 nM) and, to a lesser extent, for the aminopiperidine derivative (compound 6: Ki = 69 nM). Compounds 10 and 14 were also highly selective for the CB2 receptor (KiCB1/KiCB2 > 1000), whereas compound 6 was relatively selective (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 27). The four compounds were also subjected to GTPγS binding analysis showing antagonist/inverse agonist properties (IC50 for compound 14 = 27 nM, for 15 = 51 nM, for 10 = 80 nM and for 6 = 294 nM), and this activity was confirmed for the three more active compounds in a CB2 receptor-specific in vitro bioassay consisting in the quantification of prostaglandin E2 release by LPS-stimulated BV2 cells, in the presence and absence of WIN55,212-2 and/or the investigated compounds. Modelling studies were also conducted with the four compounds, which conformed with the structural requirements stated for the binding of antagonist compounds to the human CB2 receptor. PMID:26890113

  13. Comparison of the enantiomers of (+/-)-doxanthrine, a high efficacy full dopamine D(1) receptor agonist, and a reversal of enantioselectivity at D(1) versus alpha(2C) adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Julie A; Cueva, Juan P; Chemel, Benjamin R; Hsu, K Joseph; Riese, David J; McCorvy, John D; Chester, Julia A; Nichols, David E; Watts, Val J

    2009-02-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition involving the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine D(1) receptor agonists are potential alternative treatments to current therapies that employ L-DOPA, a dopamine precursor. We evaluated the pharmacological profiles of the enantiomers of a novel dopamine D(1) receptor full agonist, doxanthrine (DOX) at D(1) and alpha(2C) adrenergic receptors. (+)-DOX displayed greater potency and intrinsic activity than (-)-DOX in porcine striatal tissue and in a heterologous D(1) receptor expression system. Studies in MCF7 cells, which express an endogenous human dopamine D(1)-like receptor, revealed that (-)-DOX was a weak partial agonist/antagonist that reduced the functional activity of (+)-DOX and dopamine. (-)-DOX had 10-fold greater potency than (+)-DOX at alpha(2C) adrenergic receptors, with an EC50 value of 4 nM. These findings demonstrate a reversed stereoselectivity for the enantiomers of DOX at D(1) and alpha(2C) receptors and have implications for the therapeutic utility of doxanthrine.

  14. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects.

  15. Blood flow in histamine- and allergen-induced weal and flare responses, effects of an H1 antagonist, alpha-adrenoceptor agonist and a topical glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, A; Olsson, P; Pipkorn, U

    1990-01-01

    Allergen has previously been shown to induce a continuous increase in local dermal blood flow after a prick test in allergic subjects, whereas histamine induced, initially, similar peak increases in blood flow of much shorter duration. Blood flow changes induced by histamine and allergen have now been evaluated (i) after pretreatment with a local corticosteroid cream, clobetasole-17-propionate; (ii) after oral administration of the H1-antihistamine loratadine; and (iii) after oral pretreatment with the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist pseudoephedrine. Blinded placebo-controlled designs were used in the substudies. Laser doppler flowmetry was used for non-invasive recording of changes in local blood flow intermittently for 24 h after the topical corticosteroid, 6 h for the substudies on loratadine and pseudoephedrine. The size of the immediate weal and flare reactions, as well as late phase reactions, were also determined. Pretreatment with clobetasole-17-propionate cream on the skin for 1 week prior to prick tests did not affect the blood flow response elicited by histamine or allergen, in either the initial part (up to 1 h) or the protracted 24 h determinations. The size of the weal and flare reactions decreased. Loratadine and pseudoephedrine did not reduce the initial allergen-induced increase in blood flow, while lower blood flow compared with placebo pretreatment was noted for the protracted (1-6 h) determinations. Blood flow changes after histamine were unaffected. The histamine-induced weal and flare was inhibited by loratadine more effectively than the corresponding allergen-induced reaction. The weal and flare reactions after histamine and allergen were not changed after pseudoephedrine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Design and synthesis of novel alpha(1)(a) adrenoceptor-selective antagonists. 2. Approaches to eliminate opioid agonist metabolites via modification of linker and 4-methoxycarbonyl-4-phenylpiperidine moiety.

    PubMed

    Murali Dhar, T G; Nagarathnam, D; Marzabadi, M R; Lagu, B; Wong, W C; Chiu, G; Tyagarajan, S; Miao, S W; Zhang, F; Sun, W; Tian, D; Shen, Q; Zhang, J; Wetzel, J M; Forray, C; Chang, R S; Broten, T P; Schorn, T W; Chen, T B; O'Malley, S; Ransom, R; Schneck, K; Bendesky, R; Harrell, C M; Vyas, K P

    1999-11-18

    We have previously described compound 1a as a high-affinity subtype selective alpha(1a) antagonist. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of compound 1a showed its major metabolite to be a mu-opioid agonist, 4-methoxycarbonyl-4-phenylpiperidine (3). Several dihydropyrimidinone analogues were synthesized with the goal of either minimizing the formation of 3 by modification of the linker or finding alternative piperidine moieties which when cleaved as a consequence of metabolism would not give rise to mu-opioid activity. Modification of the linker gave several compounds with good alpha(1a) binding affinity (K(i) = < 1 nM) and selectivity (>300-fold over alpha(1b) and alpha(1d)). In vitro analysis in the microsomal assay revealed these modifications did not significantly affect N-dealkylation and the formation of the piperidine 3. The second approach, however, yielded several piperidine replacements for 3, which did not show significant mu-opioid activity. Several of these compounds maintained good affinity at the alpha(1a) adrenoceptor and selectivity over alpha(1b) and alpha(1d). For example, the piperidine fragments of (+)-73 and (+)-83, viz. 4-cyano-4-phenylpiperidine and 4-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine, were essentially inactive at the mu-opioid receptor (IC(50) > 30 microM vs 3 microM for 3). Compounds (+)-73 and (+)-83 were subjected to detailed in vitro and in vivo characterization. Both these compounds, in addition to their excellent selectivity (>880-fold) over alpha(1b) and alpha(1d), also showed good selectivity over several other recombinant human G-protein coupled receptors. Compounds (+)-73 and (+)-83 showed good functional potency in isolated human prostate tissues, with K(b)s comparable to their in vitro alpha(1a) binding data. In addition, compound (+)-73 also exhibited good uroselectivity (DBP K(b)/IUP K(b) > 20-fold) in the in vivo experiments in dogs, similar to 1a.

  17. alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Doze, Van A; Handel, Evelyn M; Jensen, Kelly A; Darsie, Belle; Luger, Elizabeth J; Haselton, James R; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2009-08-18

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) drugs are used for the treatment of chronic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety-related disorders. Chronic use of TCA drugs increases the expression of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs). Yet, it is unclear whether increased alpha(1)-AR expression contributes to the antidepressant effects of these drugs or if this effect is unrelated to their therapeutic benefit. In this study, mice expressing constitutively active mutant alpha(1A)-ARs (CAM alpha(1A)-AR) or CAM alpha(1B)-ARs were used to examine the effects of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-AR signaling on rodent behavioral models of depression, OCD, and anxiety. CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice, but not CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice, exhibited antidepressant-like behavior in the tail suspension test and forced swim test. This behavior was reversed by prazosin, a selective alpha(1)-AR inverse agonist, and mimicked by chronically treating wild type mice with cirazoline, an alpha(1A)-AR agonist. Marble burying behavior, commonly used to model OCD in rodents, was significantly decreased in CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice but not in CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice. In contrast, no significant differences in anxiety-related behavior were observed between wild type, CAM alpha(1A)-AR, and CAM alpha(1B)-AR animals in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box. This is the first study to demonstrate that alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-ARs differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse. These data suggest that alpha(1A)-ARs may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of depression.

  18. Comparison of the effect of an H(3)-inverse agonist on energy intake and hypothalamic histamine release in normal mice and leptin resistant mice with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Hatano, Kouta; Murotani, Tomotaka; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2008-04-01

    Leptin is a key signal linking peripheral adiposity levels to the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. The injection of leptin decreases body weight and food intake in lean rodents; however, in a rodent model of high fat diet-induced obesity (DIO), the exogenous leptin cannot improve adiposity. This ineffectiveness is known as leptin resistance, and the factors downstream of leptin signaling have received attention as viable targets in the treatment of obesity. We previously reported that the histaminergic system is one of the targets of leptin. In the present study, the effect of an H(3)-receptor inverse agonist on hypothalamic histamine release and energy intake was investigated in normal and DIO mice. Leptin (1.3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased hypothalamic histamine release and reduced 12 h-energy intake in normal mice, but had no such effects in DIO mice. In contrast, clobenpropit (5 mg/kg, i.p.), an H(3)-inverse agonist, elicited a significant increase in histamine release in both types of mice. Clobenpropit did not reduce 12 h-energy intake; however, it decreased 3 h-energy intake in both types of mice. These results suggest that lack of the activation of the histaminergic system partly contributes to obesity in DIO mice and direct activation of the histaminergic system circumvents leptin resistance.

  19. The dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/delta agonist GFT505 exerts anti-diabetic effects in db/db mice without peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-associated adverse cardiac effects.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Rémy; Millatt, Lesley J; Cariou, Bertrand; Noel, Benoit; Rigou, Géraldine; Delataille, Philippe; Daix, Valérie; Hum, Dean W; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    We report here the efficacy and safety of GFT505, a novel liver-targeted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/delta (PPARα/δ) agonist, in the db/db mouse model of diabetes. Mice were treated with vehicle, GFT505, PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone or dual-PPARα/γ agonist aleglitazar for up to 8 weeks. All compounds comparably reduced fasting glycaemia and HbA1c and improved insulin sensitivity. The glucose-lowering effect of GFT505 was associated with decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis, correlating with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes. In contrast with the PPARγ-activating drugs, treatment with GFT505 did not affect heart weight and did not increase plasma adiponectin concentrations. This absence of cardiac effects of GFT505 was confirmed after 12 months of administration in cynomolgus monkeys, by the absence of echocardiographic and histological findings. Moreover, long-term GFT505 administration to monkeys induced no change in haematological parameters or in bone marrow differential cell counts. Compared to PPARγ-activating drugs, the dual-PPARα/δ agonist GFT505 therefore shows an improved benefit/risk ratio, treating multiple features of type 2 diabetes without inducing the cardiac side-effects associated with PPARγ activation.

  20. Apparent Inverse Relationship between Cannabinoid Agonist Efficacy and Tolerance/Cross-Tolerance Produced by Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hruba, Lenka; Ginsburg, Brett C.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (CBs) [naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl) methanone (JWH-018) and naphthalen-1-yl-(1-butylindol-3-yl) methanone (JWH-073)] are marketed, sold, and used as alternatives to cannabis. Synthetic CBs appear to have effects similar to those of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the drug primarily responsible for the behavioral effects of cannabis. However, synthetic CB products produce atypical effects (e.g., hypertension, seizures, and panic attacks). One potential explanation for atypical effects is CB1 receptor agonist efficacy, which is reportedly higher for JWH-018 and JWH-073 compared with Δ9-THC. The goal of this study was to test a prediction from receptor theory that tolerance/cross-tolerance (i.e., resulting from daily Δ9-THC treatment) is greater for a low-efficacy agonist compared with a high-efficacy agonist. Rhesus monkeys discriminated 0.1 mg/kg Δ9-THC i.v. from vehicle, and sensitivity to CB1 agonists was determined before and after 3 and 14 days of Δ9-THC treatment (1 mg/kg per day s.c.). (1R,3R,4R)-3-[2-Hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl) phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexan-1-ol (CP-55,940), a prototype high-efficacy CB1 receptor agonist, JWH-018, and JWH-073 substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of Δ9-THC. Three days of Δ9-THC treatment produced less tolerance/cross-tolerance than 14 days of Δ9-THC treatment. Three days of Δ9-THC did not result in cross-tolerance to CP-55,940, JWH-073, and JWH-018; in contrast, as reported previously, 3 days of Δ9-THC treatment decreased sensitivity to Δ9-THC 3-fold. Fourteen days of Δ9-THC decreased sensitivity to Δ9-THC, CP-55,940, JWH-018, and JWH-073 9.2-fold, 3.6-fold, 4.3-fold, and 5.6-fold, respectively. The greater loss of sensitivity to Δ9-THC relative to CP-55,940 and JWH-018 suggests that differences in CB1 receptor agonist efficacy are important in vivo and might underlie differences in the dependence liability and adverse effects of synthetic CBs versus

  1. Apparent inverse relationship between cannabinoid agonist efficacy and tolerance/cross-tolerance produced by Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hruba, Lenka; Ginsburg, Brett C; McMahon, Lance R

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (CBs) [naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl) methanone (JWH-018) and naphthalen-1-yl-(1-butylindol-3-yl) methanone (JWH-073)] are marketed, sold, and used as alternatives to cannabis. Synthetic CBs appear to have effects similar to those of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹-THC), the drug primarily responsible for the behavioral effects of cannabis. However, synthetic CB products produce atypical effects (e.g., hypertension, seizures, and panic attacks). One potential explanation for atypical effects is CB₁ receptor agonist efficacy, which is reportedly higher for JWH-018 and JWH-073 compared with Δ⁹-THC. The goal of this study was to test a prediction from receptor theory that tolerance/cross-tolerance (i.e., resulting from daily Δ⁹-THC treatment) is greater for a low-efficacy agonist compared with a high-efficacy agonist. Rhesus monkeys discriminated 0.1 mg/kg Δ⁹-THC i.v. from vehicle, and sensitivity to CB(1) agonists was determined before and after 3 and 14 days of Δ⁹-THC treatment (1 mg/kg per day s.c.). (1R,3R,4R)-3-[2-Hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl) phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexan-1-ol (CP-55,940), a prototype high-efficacy CB₁ receptor agonist, JWH-018, and JWH-073 substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of Δ⁹-THC. Three days of Δ⁹-THC treatment produced less tolerance/cross-tolerance than 14 days of Δ⁹-THC treatment. Three days of Δ⁹-THC did not result in cross-tolerance to CP-55,940, JWH-073, and JWH-018; in contrast, as reported previously, 3 days of Δ⁹-THC treatment decreased sensitivity to Δ⁹-THC 3-fold. Fourteen days of Δ⁹-THC decreased sensitivity to Δ⁹-THC, CP-55,940, JWH-018, and JWH-073 9.2-fold, 3.6-fold, 4.3-fold, and 5.6-fold, respectively. The greater loss of sensitivity to Δ⁹-THC relative to CP-55,940 and JWH-018 suggests that differences in CB₁ receptor agonist efficacy are important in vivo and might underlie differences in the dependence liability and

  2. Involvement of medial prefrontal cortex alpha-2 adrenoceptors on memory acquisition deficit induced by arachidonylcyclopropylamide, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, in rats; possible involvement of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Afsaneh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush

    2016-09-01

    Functional interactions between cannabinoid and alpha-2 adrenergic systems in cognitive control in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) seem possible. The present study evaluated the possible role of alpha-2 adrenoceptors of the prefrontal cortex on effect of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, in adult male Wistar rats. The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the mPFC, trained in a step-through task, and tested 24 h after training to measure step-through latency. Results indicate that pre-training microinjection of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 μg/rat) and clonidine (alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist; 1 and 2 μg/rat) reduce memory acquisition. Pre-training subthreshold dose of clonidine (0.5 µg/rat) restored memory-impairing effect of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 µg/rat). On the other hand, pre-training administration of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine in all doses used (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/rat) did not affect memory acquisition by itself, while a subthreshold dose of yohimbine (2 µg/rat) potentiated memory impairment induced by ACPA (0.005 µg/rat). Finally, a subthreshold dose of SKF96365 (a Ca(2+) channel blocker) blocked clonidine and yohimbine effect of memory responses induced by ACPA. In conclusion, these data indicate that mPFC alpha-2 adrenoceptors play an important role in ACPA-induced amnesia and Ca(2+) channels have a critical role this phenomenon. PMID:27317021

  3. A novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma agonist, BPR1H0101, inhibits topoisomerase II catalytic activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chitlimalla, Santhosh Kumar; Pan, Wen-Yu; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chuang, Shuang-En; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2008-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists are used clinically for treating diabetes mellitus and cancer. 2-Methyl-2[(1-{3-phenyl-7-propylbenzol[d]isoxazol-6-yl}oxy)propyl]-1H-4-indolyl) oxy]propanoic acid (BPR1H0101) is a novel synthetic indole-based compound, discovered through research to identify new PPARgamma agonists, and it acts as a dual agonist for PPARgamma and PPARalpha. Isobologram analysis demonstrated that BPR1H0101 is capable of antagonistic interaction with the topoisomerase (topo) II poison, VP16. A study of its mechanism showed that BPR1H0101 could inhibit the catalytic activity of topo II in vitro, but did not produce detectable topo II-mediated DNA strand breaks in human oral cancer KB cells. Furthermore, BPR1H0101 could inhibit VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated phosphorylation in KB cells. The results suggest that BPR1H0101 can interfere with the topo II reaction by inhibiting catalytic activity before the formation of the intermediate cleavable complex; consequently, it can impede VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and cell death. This is the first identified PPARalpha/gamma agonist that can serve as a topo II catalytic inhibitor, to interfere with VP16-induced cell death. The result might have relevance to the clinical use of the PPARalpha/gamma agonist in combination chemotherapy. PMID:18176111

  4. Interaction between orexin A and cannabinoid system in the lateral hypothalamus of rats and effects of subchronic intraperitoneal administration of cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist on food intake and the nutritive utilization of protein.

    PubMed

    Merroun, I; El Mlili, N; Martinez, R; Porres, J M; Llopis, J; Ahabrach, H; Aranda, P; Sanchez Gonzalez, C; Errami, M; Lopez-Jurado, M

    2015-04-01

    Crosstalk may occur between cannabinoids and other systems controlling appetite, since cannabinoid receptors are present in hypothalamic circuits involved in feeding regulation, and likely to interact with orexin. In this study, an immunohistochemical approach was used to examine the effect of the intracerebroventricular administration of cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist AM 251 on orexin neuropeptide in the hypothalamic system. AM-activated neurons were identified using c-Fos as a marker of neuronal activity. The results obtained show that AM 251 decreases orexin A immunoreactivity, and that it increases c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons within the hypothalamus when compared with the vehicle-injected control group. We also studied the effects of subchronic intraperitoneal administration of AM 251 on food intake, body weight, and protein utilization. The administration of AM 251 at 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg led to a significant reduction in food intake, along with a significant decrease in the digestive utilization of protein in the groups injected with 1 and 2 mg/kg. There was a dose-related slowdown in weight gain, especially at the doses of 2 and 5 mg/kg, during the initial days of the trial. The absence of this effect in the pair-fed group reveals that any impairment to digestibility was the result of administering AM 251. These data support our conclusion that hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides are involved in the reduction of appetite and mediated by the cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist. Furthermore, the subchronic administration of AM 251, in addition to its effect on food intake, has significant effects on the digestive utilization of protein.

  5. Interaction between orexin A and cannabinoid system in the lateral hypothalamus of rats and effects of subchronic intraperitoneal administration of cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist on food intake and the nutritive utilization of protein.

    PubMed

    Merroun, I; El Mlili, N; Martinez, R; Porres, J M; Llopis, J; Ahabrach, H; Aranda, P; Sanchez Gonzalez, C; Errami, M; Lopez-Jurado, M

    2015-04-01

    Crosstalk may occur between cannabinoids and other systems controlling appetite, since cannabinoid receptors are present in hypothalamic circuits involved in feeding regulation, and likely to interact with orexin. In this study, an immunohistochemical approach was used to examine the effect of the intracerebroventricular administration of cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist AM 251 on orexin neuropeptide in the hypothalamic system. AM-activated neurons were identified using c-Fos as a marker of neuronal activity. The results obtained show that AM 251 decreases orexin A immunoreactivity, and that it increases c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons within the hypothalamus when compared with the vehicle-injected control group. We also studied the effects of subchronic intraperitoneal administration of AM 251 on food intake, body weight, and protein utilization. The administration of AM 251 at 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg led to a significant reduction in food intake, along with a significant decrease in the digestive utilization of protein in the groups injected with 1 and 2 mg/kg. There was a dose-related slowdown in weight gain, especially at the doses of 2 and 5 mg/kg, during the initial days of the trial. The absence of this effect in the pair-fed group reveals that any impairment to digestibility was the result of administering AM 251. These data support our conclusion that hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides are involved in the reduction of appetite and mediated by the cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist. Furthermore, the subchronic administration of AM 251, in addition to its effect on food intake, has significant effects on the digestive utilization of protein. PMID:25903949

  6. Interaction of the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline with serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C and 5-HT1D receptors.

    PubMed

    Schoeffter, P; Hoyer, D

    1991-04-17

    Oxymetazoline was recognized with nanomolar affinity by 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D binding sites and mimicked the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine with about the same potency and intrinsic activity as the endogenous amine in the corresponding functional tests. At 5-HT1C receptors, oxymetazoline behaved as a mixed agonist-antagonist. Clonidine had minimal activity. Methiothepin antagonized the effects of oxymetazoline (7.4 less than pKB less than 8.8). Thus, oxymetazoline is a full and potent agonist at 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors and a partial agonist at 5-HT1C receptors.

  7. The Neutrophil Response Induced by an Agonist for Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (GPR43) Is Primed by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and by Receptor Uncoupling from the Cytoskeleton but Attenuated by Tissue Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Lena; Mårtensson, Jonas; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Holdfeldt, André; Uhrbom, Martin; Bylund, Johan; Højgaard Hansen, Anders; Pandey, Sunil K; Ulven, Trond; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-10-15

    Ligands with improved potency and selectivity for free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2R) have become available, and we here characterize the neutrophil responses induced by one such agonist (Cmp1) and one antagonist (CATPB). Cmp1 triggered an increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+), and the neutrophils were then desensitized to Cmp1 and to acetate, a naturally occurring FFA2R agonist. The antagonist CATPB selectively inhibited responses induced by Cmp1 or acetate. The activated FFA2R induced superoxide anion secretion at a low level in naive blood neutrophils. This response was largely increased by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in a process associated with a recruitment of easily mobilizable granules, but neutrophils recruited to an aseptic inflammation in vivo were nonresponding. Superoxide production induced by Cmp1 was increased in latrunculin A-treated neutrophils, but no reactivation of desensitized FFA2R was induced by this drug, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is not directly involved in terminating the response. The functional and regulatory differences between the receptors that recognize short-chain fatty acids and formylated peptides, respectively, imply different roles of these receptors in the orchestration of inflammation and confirm the usefulness of a selective FFA2R agonist and antagonist as tools for the exploration of the precise role of the FFA2R. PMID:27503855

  8. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor [alpha] Selective Agonist 2-((3-((2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-5-methyloxazol-4-yl)methoxy)benzyl)(methoxycarbonyl)amino)acetic Acid (BMS-687453)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Kennedy, Lawrence J.; Shi, Yan; Tao, Shiwei; Ye, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Stephanie Y.; Wang, Ying; Hernndez, Andrs S.; Wang, Wei; Devasthale, Pratik V.; Chen, Sean; Lai, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shung; Smirk, Rebecca A.; Bolton, Scott A.; Ryono, Denis E.; Zhang, Huiping; Lim, Ngiap-Kie; Chen, Bang-Chi; Locke, Kenneth T.; O’Malley, Kevin M.; Zhang, Litao; Srivastava, Rai Ajit; Miao, Bowman; Meyers, Daniel S.; Monshizadegan, Hossain; Search, Debra; Grimm, Denise; Zhang, Rongan; Harrity, Thomas; Kunselman, Lori K.; Cap, Michael; Kadiyala, Pathanjali; Hosagrahara, Vinayak; Zhang, Lisa; Xu, Carrie; Li, Yi-Xin; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Chang, Chiehying; An, Yongmi; Krystek, Stanley R.; Blanar, Michael A.; Zahler, Robert; Mukherjee, Ranjan; Cheng, Peter T.W.; Tino, Joseph A.

    2010-04-12

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and 410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystal structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ agonists protect oligodendrocyte progenitors against tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced damage: Effects on mitochondrial functions and differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Nuccio, C; Bernardo, A; Cruciani, C; De Simone, R; Visentin, S; Minghetti, L

    2015-09-01

    The activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is known to exert anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects and PPAR-γ agonists are considered potential therapeutic agents in brain diseases including those affecting myelin. In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammation is one of the causes of myelin and axonal damage. Oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation is highly dependent on mitochondria, which are major targets of inflammatory insult. Here we show that PPAR-γ agonists protect OL progenitors against the maturational arrest induced by the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α by affecting mitochondrial functions. We demonstrate that the inhibition of OL differentiation by TNF-α is associated with i) increased mitochondrial superoxide production; ii) decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (mMP); and iii) decreased ADP-induced Ca(2+) oscillations, which we previously showed to be dependent on efficient mitochondria. The TNF-α effects were comparable to those of the mitochondrial toxin rotenone, further suggesting that TNF-α damage is mediated by mitochondrial function impairment. PPAR-γ agonists protected OL progenitors against the inhibitory activities of both TNF-α and rotenone on mMP, mitochondrial ROS production, Ca(2+) oscillations and OL differentiation. Finally, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone increased the expression of PGC-1α (a mitochondrial biogenesis master regulator), UCP2 (a mitochondrial protein known to reduce ROS production), and cytochrome oxidase subunit COX1. These findings confirm the central role of mitochondria in OL differentiation and point to mitochondria as major targets of PPAR-γ agonist protection against TNF-α damage. PMID:26210873

  10. Isoproterenol Acts as a Biased Agonist of the Alpha-1A-Adrenoceptor that Selectively Activates the MAPK/ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Copik, Alicja. J.; Baldys, Aleksander; Nguyen, Khanh; Sahdeo, Sunil; Ho, Hoangdung; Kosaka, Alan; Dietrich, Paul J.; Fitch, Bill; Raymond, John R.; Ford, Anthony P. D. W.; Button, Donald; Milla, Marcos E.

    2015-01-01

    The α1A-AR is thought to couple predominantly to the Gαq/PLC pathway and lead to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, although certain agonists acting at this receptor have been reported to trigger activation of arachidonic acid formation and MAPK pathways. For several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) agonists can manifest a bias for activation of particular effector signaling output, i.e. not all agonists of a given GPCR generate responses through utilization of the same signaling cascade(s). Previous work with Gαq coupling-defective variants of α1A-AR, as well as a combination of Ca2+ channel blockers, uncovered cross-talk between α1A-AR and β2-AR that leads to potentiation of a Gαq-independent signaling cascade in response to α1A-AR activation. We hypothesized that molecules exist that act as biased agonists to selectively activate this pathway. In this report, isoproterenol (Iso), typically viewed as β-AR-selective agonist, was examined with respect to activation of α1A-AR. α1A-AR selective antagonists were used to specifically block Iso evoked signaling in different cellular backgrounds and confirm its action at α1A-AR. Iso induced signaling at α1A-AR was further interrogated by probing steps along the Gαq /PLC, Gαs and MAPK/ERK pathways. In HEK-293/EBNA cells transiently transduced with α1A-AR, and CHO_α1A-AR stable cells, Iso evoked low potency ERK activity as well as Ca2+ mobilization that could be blocked by α1A-AR selective antagonists. The kinetics of Iso induced Ca2+ transients differed from typical Gαq- mediated Ca2+ mobilization, lacking both the fast IP3R mediated response and the sustained phase of Ca2+ re-entry. Moreover, no inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation could be detected in either cell line after stimulation with Iso, but activation was accompanied by receptor internalization. Data are presented that indicate that Iso represents a novel type of α1A-AR partial agonist with signaling bias toward MAPK

  11. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2015-01-01

    α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs) are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT) receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive) hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant), different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  12. Alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke and bone fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhenying; Li, Li; Wang, Liang; Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates stroke injury by increasing neuroinflammation. We hypothesize that activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine (α-7 nAchR) agonist attenuates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and reduces brain injury in mice with bone fracture and stroke. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) was performed in C57BL/6J mice followed by tibia fracture 1 day later. Mice were treated with 0.8 mg/kg PHA568487 (PHA, α-7 nAchR-specific agonist), 6 mg/kg Methyllycaconitine (MLA, α-7 nAchR antagonist), or saline 1 and 2 days after pMCAO. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Neuronal injury, CD68+, M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia/macrophages, phosphorylated p65 component of NF-kb in microglia/macrophages, oxidative and anti-oxidant gene expression were quantified. Compared to saline-treated mice, PHA-treated mice performed better in behavioral tests, had fewer apoptotic neurons (NeuN+TUNEL+), fewer CD68+ and M1 macrophages, and more M2 macrophages. PHA increased anti-oxidant gene expression and decreased oxidative stress and phosphorylation of NF-κb p65. MLA had the opposite effects. Our data indicate that α-7 nAchR agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, which are associated with reduced brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke plus tibia fracture. PMID:25040630

  13. Dendritic cells and NK cells stimulate bystander T cell activation in response to TLR agonists through secretion of IFN-alpha beta and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Arun T; Sheasby, Christopher E; Tough, David F

    2005-01-15

    Recognition of conserved features of infectious agents by innate pathogen receptors plays an important role in initiating the adaptive immune response. We have investigated early changes occurring among T cells after injection of TLR agonists into mice. Widespread, transient phenotypic activation of both naive and memory T cells was observed rapidly after injection of molecules acting through TLR3, -4, -7, and -9, but not TLR2. T cell activation was shown to be mediated by a combination of IFN-alphabeta, secreted by dendritic cells (DCs), and IFN-gamma, secreted by NK cells; notably, IFN-gamma-secreting NK cells expressed CD11c and copurified with DCs. Production of IFN-gamma by NK cells could be stimulated by DCs from TLR agonist-injected mice, and although soluble factors secreted by LPS-stimulated DCs were sufficient to induce IFN-gamma, maximal IFN-gamma production required both direct contact of NK cells with DCs and DC-secreted cytokines. In vitro, IFN-alphabeta, IL-18, and IL-12 all contributed to DC stimulation of NK cell IFN-gamma, whereas IFN-alphabeta was shown to be important for induction of T cell bystander activation and NK cell IFN-gamma production in vivo. The results delineate a pathway involving innate immune mediators through which TLR agonists trigger bystander activation of T cells. PMID:15634897

  14. Discovery and characterization of 6-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)propoxy]phenyl}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (CEP-26401, irdabisant): a potent, selective histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Hudkins, Robert L; Raddatz, Rita; Tao, Ming; Mathiasen, Joanne R; Aimone, Lisa D; Becknell, Nadine C; Prouty, Catherine P; Knutsen, Lars J S; Yazdanian, Mehran; Moachon, Gilbert; Ator, Mark A; Mallamo, John P; Marino, Michael J; Bacon, Edward R; Williams, Michael

    2011-07-14

    Optimization of a novel series of pyridazin-3-one histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R) antagonists/inverse agonists identified 6-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)propoxy]phenyl}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (8a, CEP-26401; irdabisant) as a lead candidate for potential use in the treatment of attentional and cognitive disorders. 8a had high affinity for both human (K(i) = 2.0 nM) and rat (K(i) = 7.2 nM) H(3)Rs with greater than 1000-fold selectivity over the hH(1)R, hH(2)R, and hH(4)R histamine receptor subtypes and against an in vitro panel of 418 G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, transporters, and enzymes. 8a demonstrated ideal pharmaceutical properties for a CNS drug in regard to water solubility, permeability and lipophilicity and had low binding to human plasma proteins. It weakly inhibited recombinant cytochrome P450 isoforms and human ether-a-go-go-related gene. 8a metabolism was minimal in rat, mouse, dog, and human liver microsomes, and it had good interspecies pharmacokinetic properties. 8a dose-dependently inhibited H(3)R agonist-induced dipsogenia in the rat (ED(50) = 0.06 mg/kg po). On the basis of its pharmacological, pharmaceutical, and safety profiles, 8a was selected for preclinical development. The clinical portions of the single and multiple ascending dose studies assessing safety and pharmacokinetics have been completed allowing for the initiation of a phase IIa for proof of concept.

  15. Probes for narcotic receptor mediated phenomena. 41. Unusual inverse μ-agonists and potent μ-opioid antagonists by modification of the N-substituent in enantiomeric 5-(3- hydroxyphenyl)morphans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kejun; Lee, Yong Sok; Rothman, Richard B.; Dersch, Christina M.; Bittman, Ross W.; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2011-01-01

    Conformational restraint in the N-substituent of enantiomeric 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)morphans was conferred by the addition of a cyclopropane ring or a double-bond. All of the possible enantiomers and isomers of the N-substituted compounds were synthesized. Opioid receptor binding assays indicated that some of them had about twenty-fold higher μ-affinity than the compound with an N-phenylpropyl substituent (Ki = 2 to 450 nM for the examined compounds with various N-substituents). Most of the compounds acted unusually as inverse agonists in the [35S]GTP-γ-S functional binding assay using non-dependent cells that stably express the cloned human μ-opioid receptor. Two of the N-substituted compounds with a cyclopropane ring were very potent μ-opioid antagonists ((+)−29, Ke = 0.17 and (−)−30, Ke =0.3) in the [35S]GTP-γ-S functional binding assay. By comparing the geometry-optimized structures of the newly synthesized compounds, an attempt was made to rationalize their μ-opioid receptor affinity in terms of the spatial position of N-substituents. PMID:21247164

  16. Subtle side-chain modifications of the hop phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin result in distinct agonist/antagonist activity profiles for estrogen receptors alpha and beta.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Frederik; Heldring, Nina; Dhooge, Willem; Bengtsson, Martin; Comhaire, Frank; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Treuter, Eckardt; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2006-12-14

    In search of therapeutic agents for estrogen-related pathologies, phytoestrogens are being extensively explored. In contrast to naringenin, 8-prenylnaringenin is a potent hop-derived estrogenic compound, highlighting the importance of the prenyl group for hormonal activity. We investigated the effects of substituting the prenyl group at C(8) with alkyl chains of varying lengths and branching patterns on estrogen receptor (ER) subtype ERalpha- and ERbeta-binding affinities and transcriptional activities. In addition, features of the ligand-induced receptor conformations were explored using a set of specific ER-binding peptides. The new 8-alkylnaringenins were found to span an activity spectrum ranging from full agonism to partial agonism to antagonism. Most strikingly, 8-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)naringenin exhibited full agonist character on ERalpha, but pronounced antagonist character on ERbeta. Knowledge on how ER-subtype-selective activities can be designed provides valuable information for future drug or tool compound discovery.

  17. Alpha 2A adrenergic receptor agonist, guanfacine, attenuates cocaine-related impairments of inhibitory response control and working memory in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Alvin V.; Callahan, Patrick M.; Schade, Rosann; Kille, Nancy J.; Plagenhoef, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that centrally acting α2A adrenergic receptor agonists can attenuate impairments in executive function that result from dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex. Such positive effects resulted in the recent approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the α2A agonists clonidine and guanfacine for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but also suggest that they could have beneficial effects in substance abuse disorders and other neuropsychiatric conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate guanfacine for its ability to attenuate behavioral alterations associated with acute cocaine exposure in rats trained to perform a task of sustained attention, the five choice serial reaction time task (5C-SRTT) and monkeys trained to perform a task of working/short term memory, the delayed match to sample task (DMTS). In the rodent 5C-SRTT acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of cocaine (3.5–15.0 mg/kg) did not affect accuracy, but was associated with dose-dependent increases in premature responses and timeout responses. Guanfacine (0.1–1.0 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently decreased premature responses and timeout responses associated with cocaine and it attenuated similar deficits in inhibitory response control observed in a variable ITI version of the 5C-SRTT. In the DMTS task in monkeys, acute intramuscular (i.m.) administration of cocaine (4.0 mg/kg) was associated with impairments in accuracy at long delay intervals, an effect that was attenuated by guanfacine (0.4 mg/kg). These animal studies suggest that guanfacine may have therapeutic potential for treating impairments of executive function that are associated with the abuse of cocaine. PMID:25242808

  18. PPAR{alpha} agonist fenofibrate protects the kidney from hypertensive injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats via inhibition of oxidative stress and MAPK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xiaoyang; Shen, Ying H.; Li, Chuanbao; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Cheng; Bu, Peili; Zhang, Yun

    2010-04-09

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the development of hypertensive renal injury. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) has antioxidant effect. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate significantly reduced proteinuria, inflammatory cell recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins deposition in the kidney of SHRs without apparent effect on blood pressure. To investigate the mechanisms involved, we found that fenofibrate treatment markedly reduced oxidative stress accompanied by reduced activity of renal NAD(P)H oxidase, increased activity of Cu/Zn SOD, and decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK and JNK in the kidney of SHRs. Taken together, fenofibrate treatment can protect against hypertensive renal injury without affecting blood pressure by inhibiting inflammation and fibrosis via suppression of oxidative stress and MAPK activity.

  19. Functional evidence of inverse agonism in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, M. A.; Ivorra, M. D.; D'Ocon, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. In the present study, depletion of internal Ca2+ stores sensitive to noradrenaline (1 microM) in rat aorta, is the signal for the entry of extracellular Ca2+, not only to refill the stores but also, in our experimental conditions, to activate the contractile proteins. This induces an increase in the resting tone that constitutes, the first functional evidence of this Ca2+ entry. 2. The fact that methoxamine (100 microM) reproduces the same processes as noradrenaline but clonidine (1 microM) does not, indicates that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor activation is related to the increase in the resting tone observed after depletion of adrenoceptor-sensitive internal Ca2+-stores. 3. Benoxathian and WB 4101 (alpha(1A)- and alpha(1D)-adrenoceptor antagonists) selectively inhibit, in a concentration-dependent manner, this mechanical response observed in absence of the agonist, which suggests that these agents can act as inverse agonists and provide a functional model for studying this phenomenon. Since chloroethylclonidine (100 microM) has no effect on this response, the participation of alpha(1B)-adrenoceptors can be ruled out. 4. Contractile responses to noradrenaline (1 microM) in Ca2+-free medium were selectively blocked by chloroethylclonidine. This suggests that the response to noradrenaline in Ca2+-free medium mainly depends on the activation of the alpha(1B)-adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:8872369

  20. In vitro study on the effects of some selected agonists and antagonists of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors on the contractility of the aneurysmally-changed aortic smooth muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Gnus, J; Czerski, A; Ferenc, S; Zawadzki, W; Witkiewicz, W; Hauzer, W; Rusiecka, A; Bujok, J

    2012-02-01

    The study included 18 sections of the aneurysmally-changed abdominal aortas, obtained from patients of the Provincial Specialist Hospital in Wroclaw and 18 sections of normal abdominal aortas obtained from swine. The collected samples were placed horizontally in the incubation chamber. Changes in their transverse section area were registered. They were stretched to a tension of 5 mN. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was used as the incubatory environment. Incubation of the sections was performed at a temperature of 37°C, in the gaseous mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide used in the following proportion: 95% of O(2) and 5% of CO(2). Contractions of the aorta were registered with isotonic transducers (Letica Scientific Instruments). In the studies, we examined the influence of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (and their subtypes α(1A), α(1B), α(1D)) on the contractility of the aortic muscle in humans and swine by their stimulation or inhibition with some selected agonists or antagonists. This time, it was shown that the stimulation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors leads to contractions of the human and swine aortic muscle; the observed increase in the muscle tone may follow from the stimulation of all subtypes of alpha-1 receptor (α(1A), α(1B), α(1D)). All three subtypes of 1-adrenergic receptor are engaged in vasoconstriction, especially of α(1A) and α(1D) subtypes; the α(1B) subtype is less significant for aortic contractility. The contractile response of the aneurysmally-changed abdominal aorta in humans to agonists of α-adrenergic receptors was significantly less intense than that of the normal porcine aorta. It can be concluded that aneurysms influence the contractile response of the aorta.

  1. Development and validation of an UPLC-MS/MS assay for quantitative analysis of the ghrelin receptor inverse agonist PF-5190457 in human or rat plasma and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Mwlod; Leggio, Lorenzo; El-Kattan, Ayman; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2015-07-01

    PF-5190457 is a ghrelin receptor inverse agonist that is currently undergoing clinical development for the treatment of alcoholism. Our aim was to develop and validate a simple and sensitive assay for quantitative analysis of PF-5190457 in human or rat plasma and rat brain using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The analyte and stable isotope internal standard were extracted from 50 μL plasma or rat brain homogenate by protein precipitation using 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile. Chromatography was carried out on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (2.1 mm × 50 mm) column with 1.7 μm particle size and 130 Å pore size. The flow rate was 0.5 mL/min and total chromatographic run time was 2.2 min. The mobile phase consisted of a gradient mixture of water: acetonitrile 95:5% (v/v) containing 0.1% formic acid (solvent A) and 100% acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid (solvent B). Multiple reaction monitoring was carried out in positive electro-spray ionization mode using m/z 513.35 → 209.30 for PF-5190457 and m/z 518.47 → 214.43 for the internal standard. The recovery ranged from 102 to 118% with coefficient of variation (CV) less than 6% for all matrices. The calibration curves for all matrices were linear over the studied concentration range (R(2) ≥ 0.998, n = 3). The lower limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL in rat or human plasma and 0.75 ng/g in rat brain. Intra- and inter-run mean percent accuracies were between 85 and 115% and percent imprecision was ≤15%. The assays were successfully utilized to measure the concentration of PF-5190457 in pre-clinical and clinical pharmacology studies of the compound.

  2. Discovery of 1-{4-[3-fluoro-4-((3s,6r)-3-methyl-1,1-dioxo-6-phenyl-[1,2]thiazinan-2-ylmethyl)-phenyl]-piperazin-1-yl}-ethanone (GNE-3500): a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (RORc or RORγ) inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Fauber, Benjamin P; René, Olivier; Deng, Yuzhong; DeVoss, Jason; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Ganguli, Arunima; Gobbi, Alberto; Hawkins, Julie; Johnson, Adam R; La, Hank; Lesch, Justin; Lockey, Peter; Norman, Maxine; Ouyang, Wenjun; Summerhill, Susan; Wong, Harvey

    2015-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (RORc, RORγ, or NR1F3) is a nuclear receptor that plays a major role in the production of interleukin (IL)-17. Considerable efforts have been directed toward the discovery of selective RORc inverse agonists as potential treatments of inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Using the previously reported tertiary sulfonamide 1 as a starting point, we engineered structural modifications that significantly improved human and rat metabolic stabilities while maintaining a potent and highly selective RORc inverse agonist profile. The most advanced δ-sultam compound, GNE-3500 (27, 1-{4-[3-fluoro-4-((3S,6R)-3-methyl-1,1-dioxo-6-phenyl-[1,2]thiazinan-2-ylmethyl)-phenyl]-piperazin-1-yl}-ethanone), possessed favorable RORc cellular potency with 75-fold selectivity for RORc over other ROR family members and >200-fold selectivity over 25 additional nuclear receptors in a cell assay panel. The favorable potency, selectivity, in vitro ADME properties, in vivo PK, and dose-dependent inhibition of IL-17 in a PK/PD model support the evaluation of 27 in preclinical studies. PMID:26061388

  3. Homomers of alpha 8 and alpha 7 subunits of nicotinic receptors exhibit similar channel but contrasting binding site properties.

    PubMed

    Gerzanich, V; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J

    1994-02-01

    alpha 8 subunits of alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive chick neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes from cRNA are shown to form homomeric, acetylcholine-gated, rapidly desensitizing, inwardly rectifying, Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels similar to those of alpha 7 homomers. alpha 8 forms oligomers of several sizes, of which < 14% are expressed on the oocyte surface, which is less efficient than for alpha 7 homomers. alpha 8 homomers are more sensitive to agonists but less sensitive to antagonists than are alpha 7 homomers, and some agonists for alpha 8 homomers are partial agonists or antagonists for alpha 7 homomers. The pharmacological properties of homomers of alpha 8 and alpha 7 subunits generally reflect those of native alpha 8 and alpha 7 receptors.

  4. Antiobesity efficacy of a novel cannabinoid-1 receptor inverse agonist, N-[(1S,2S)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(3-cyanophenyl)-1-methylpropyl]-2-methyl-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]oxy]propanamide (MK-0364), in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fong, Tung M; Guan, Xiao-Ming; Marsh, Donald J; Shen, Chun-Pyn; Stribling, D Sloan; Rosko, Kim M; Lao, Julie; Yu, Hong; Feng, Yue; Xiao, Jing C; Van der Ploeg, Lex H T; Goulet, Mark T; Hagmann, Williams K; Lin, Linus S; Lanza, Thomas J; Jewell, James P; Liu, Ping; Shah, Shrenik K; Qi, Hongbo; Tong, Xinchun; Wang, Junying; Xu, Suoyu S; Francis, Barbara; Strack, Alison M; MacIntyre, D Euan; Shearman, Lauren P

    2007-06-01

    The cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) has been implicated in the control of energy balance. To explore the pharmacological utility of CB1R inhibition for the treatment of obesity, we evaluated the efficacy of N-[(1S,2S)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(3-cyanophenyl)-1-methylpropyl]-2-methyl-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]oxy]propanamide (MK-0364) and determined the relationship between efficacy and brain CB1R occupancy in rodents. MK-0364 was shown to be a highly potent CB1R inverse agonist that inhibited the binding and functional activity of various agonists with a binding K(i) of 0.13 nM for the human CB1R in vitro. MK-0364 dose-dependently inhibited food intake and weight gain, with an acute minimum effective dose of 1 mg/kg in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. CB1R mechanism-based effect was demonstrated for MK-0364 by its lack of efficacy in CB1R-deficient mice. Chronic treatment of DIO rats with MK-0364 dose-dependently led to significant weight loss with a minimum effective dose of 0.3 mg/kg (p.o.), or a plasma C(max) of 87 nM. Weight loss was accompanied by the loss of fat mass. Partial occupancy (30-40%) of brain CB1R by MK-0364 was sufficient to reduce body weight. The magnitude of weight loss was correlated with brain CB1R occupancy. The partial receptor occupancy requirement for efficacy was also consistent with the reduced food intake of the heterozygous mice carrying one disrupted allele of CB1R gene compared with the wild-type mice. These studies demonstrated that MK-0364 is a highly potent and selective CB1R inverse agonist and that it is orally active in rodent models of obesity. PMID:17327489

  5. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  6. 5-Amino-6-chloro-N-[(1-isobutylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-2-methylimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyridine-8-carboxamide (CJ-033,466), a novel and selective 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor partial agonist: pharmacological profile in vitro and gastroprokinetic effect in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Tadayoshi; Ochi, Yasuo; Suzuki, Keiko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sugie, Yutaka; Sakakibara, Minoru

    2008-04-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors and dopamine(2) (D(2)) receptor modulate gastrointestinal motility. Gastroprokinetic agents that act on several 5-HT receptor subtypes and/or D(2) receptors are used clinically. Although the 5-HT(4) receptor is known to mediate the gastroprokinetic effects of these agents, the absence of highly selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists has made it difficult to confirm the physiological consequences of selective 5-HT(4) receptor stimulation. In this study, we report the in vitro pharmacological profiles and the in vivo gastroprokinetic effects of 5-amino-6-chloro-N-[(1-isobutylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-2-methylimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyridine-8-carboxamide (CJ-033,466), a novel, potent, and selective 5-HT(4) partial agonist. Compared with preceding 5-HT(4) agonists such as cisapride, mosapride, and tegaserod, CJ-033,466 had a superior in vitro profile, with nanomolar agonistic activities for the 5-HT(4) receptor and 1000-fold greater selectivity for the 5-HT(4) receptor over other 5-HT and D(2) receptors. In vivo studies in conscious dogs showed that CJ-033,466 dose-dependently stimulated gastric antral motility in both the fasted and postprandial states at the same dose range and that it was 30 times more potent than cisapride. Furthermore, CJ-033,466 accelerated the gastric emptying rate in a gastroparesis dog model at the minimally effective dose established in the gastric motility study. In conclusion, CJ-033,466 is a potent and highly selective 5-HT(4) agonist that stimulates physiologically coordinated gastric motility, and it has no activity on other 5-HT receptor subtypes and D(2) receptors. Therefore, CJ-033,466 could be used to treat gastroparesis, providing better gastroprokinetics and reduced side effects mediated by the other receptors. PMID:18198343

  7. Inverse agonism and its therapeutic significance

    PubMed Central

    Khilnani, Gurudas; Khilnani, Ajeet Kumar

    2011-01-01

    A large number of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) show varying degrees of basal or constitutive activity. This constitutive activity is usually minimal in natural receptors but is markedly observed in wild type and mutated (naturally or induced) receptors. According to conventional two-state drug receptor interaction model, binding of a ligand may initiate activity (agonist with varying degrees of positive intrinsic activity) or prevent the effect of an agonist (antagonist with zero intrinsic activity). Inverse agonists bind with the constitutively active receptors, stabilize them, and thus reduce the activity (negative intrinsic activity). Receptors of many classes (α-and β-adrenergic, histaminergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, opiate, and angiotensin receptors) have shown basal activity in suitable in vitro models. Several drugs that have been conventionally classified as antagonists (β-blockers, antihistaminics) have shown inverse agonist effects on corresponding constitutively active receptors. Nearly all H1 and H2 antihistaminics (antagonists) have been shown to be inverse agonists. Among the β-blockers, carvedilol and bucindolol demonstrate low level of inverse agonism as compared to propranolol and nadolol. Several antipsychotic drugs (D2 receptors antagonist), antihypertensive (AT1 receptor antagonists), antiserotoninergic drugs and opioid antagonists have significant inverse agonistic activity that contributes partly or wholly to their therapeutic value. Inverse agonism may also help explain the underlying mechanism of beneficial effects of carvedilol in congestive failure, naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome in opioid dependence, clozapine in psychosis, and candesartan in cardiac hypertrophy. Understanding inverse agonisms has paved a way for newer drug development. It is now possible to develop agents, which have only desired therapeutic value and are devoid of unwanted adverse effect. Pimavanserin (ACP-103), a highly selective 5-HT2A inverse

  8. Peripherally mediated antinociception of the mu-opioid receptor agonist 2-[(4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6beta-yl)amino]acetic acid (HS-731) after subcutaneous and oral administration in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Spetea, Mariana; Guo, Yan; Schütz, Johannes; Windisch, Petra; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2006-04-01

    Opioids induce analgesia by activating opioid receptors not only within the central nervous system but also on peripheral sensory neurons. This study investigated peripherally mediated antinociception produced by the mu-opioid receptor agonist 2-[(4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6beta-yl)amino]acetic acid (HS-731) after s.c. and oral administration in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation. Antinociceptive effects after s.c. administration were assessed 3 h after intraplantar carrageenan injection and compared with those of centrally acting mu-opioid agonists 14-methoxymetopon and morphine. Opioid agonists caused dose-dependent increases in inflamed paw withdrawal latencies to mechanical and thermal stimulation. The time course of action was different, in that HS-731 (20 microg/kg s.c.) produced significant long-lasting effects up to 4 h after administration, whereas 14-methoxymetopon (20 microg/kg) and morphine (2 mg/kg) reached their peak of action at 10 to 30 min, and their effect declined rapidly thereafter. Subcutaneous administration of the peripherally selective opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide inhibited antinociception elicited by HS-731 (20 microg/kg s.c.), whereas it was ineffective against 14-methoxymetopon (20 microg/kg s.c.). Moreover, the antinociception produced by 100 microg/kg s.c. HS-731 was dose-dependently reversed by s.c. naloxone methiodide. This indicates that HS-731 preferentially activates peripheral opioid receptors, whereas 14-methoxymetopon mediates analgesia via central mechanisms. Orally administered HS-731 significantly reduced hyperalgesia in the inflamed paw induced by carrageenan, which was reversible by s.c. administered naloxone methiodide. These results show that systemic (s.c. and oral) treatment with the mu-opioid agonist HS-731 produces potent and long-lasting antinociception through peripheral mechanisms in rats with carrageenan-induced hindpaw inflammation.

  9. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; García-Muñoz, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardini, G.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of f(v‖, v⊥) agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated f(v‖, v⊥) are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of f(v‖, v⊥) at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion.

  10. Toxicological Evaluation of a Potential Immunosensitizer for Use as a Mucosal Adjuvant—Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Spore-Crystals: A Possible Inverse Agonist that Deserves Further Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Mezzomo, Bélin Poletto; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their applicability as biopesticides, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac spore-crystals are being researched in the immunology field for their potential as adjuvants in mucosal and parenteral immunizations. We aimed to investigate the hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of Bt spore-crystals genetically modified to express Cry1Ac individually, administered orally (p.o.) or with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 24 h before euthanasia, to simulate the routes of mucosal and parenteral immunizations in Swiss mice. Blood samples were used to perform hemogram, and bone marrow was used for the micronucleus test. Cry1Ac presented cytotoxic effects on erythroid lineage in both routes, being more severe in the i.p. route, which also showed genotoxic effects. The greater severity noted in this route, mainly at 6.75 mg/kg, as well as the intermediate effects at 13.5 mg/kg, and the very low hematotoxicity at 27 mg/kg, suggested a possible inverse agonism. The higher immunogenicity for the p.o. route, particularly at 27 mg/kg, suggested that at this dose, Cry 1Ac could potentially be used as a mucosal adjuvant (but not in parenteral immunizations, due to the genotoxic effects observed). This potential should be investigated further, including making an evaluation of the proposed inverse agonism and carrying out cytokine profiling. PMID:26690217

  11. Toxicological Evaluation of a Potential Immunosensitizer for Use as a Mucosal Adjuvant--Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Spore-Crystals: A Possible Inverse Agonist that Deserves Further Investigation.

    PubMed

    Mezzomo, Bélin Poletto; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2015-12-01

    In addition to their applicability as biopesticides, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac spore-crystals are being researched in the immunology field for their potential as adjuvants in mucosal and parenteral immunizations. We aimed to investigate the hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of Bt spore-crystals genetically modified to express Cry1Ac individually, administered orally (p.o.) or with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 24 h before euthanasia, to simulate the routes of mucosal and parenteral immunizations in Swiss mice. Blood samples were used to perform hemogram, and bone marrow was used for the micronucleus test. Cry1Ac presented cytotoxic effects on erythroid lineage in both routes, being more severe in the i.p. route, which also showed genotoxic effects. The greater severity noted in this route, mainly at 6.75 mg/kg, as well as the intermediate effects at 13.5 mg/kg, and the very low hematotoxicity at 27 mg/kg, suggested a possible inverse agonism. The higher immunogenicity for the p.o. route, particularly at 27 mg/kg, suggested that at this dose, Cry 1Ac could potentially be used as a mucosal adjuvant (but not in parenteral immunizations, due to the genotoxic effects observed). This potential should be investigated further, including making an evaluation of the proposed inverse agonism and carrying out cytokine profiling. PMID:26690217

  12. Estrogen prevents norepinephrine alpha-2a receptor reversal of stress-induced working memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    SHANSKY, REBECCA M.; BENDER, GENEVIEVE; ARNSTEN, A. F. T.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding effects of estrogen on the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) may help to elucidate the increased prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in women of ovarian cycling age. Estrogen replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) young rats amplifies the detrimental effects of stress on working memory (a PFC-mediated task), but the mechanisms by which this occurs have yet to be identified. In male rats, stimulation of norepinephrine alpha-2 adrenoceptors protects working memory from stress-induced impairments. However, this effect has not been studied in females, and has not been examined for sensitivity to estrogen. The current study asked whether OVX females with estrogen replacement (OVX + Est) and without replacement (OVX + Veh) responded differently to stimulation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors after administration of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142, a pharmacological stressor. The alpha-2 agonist, guanfacine, protected working memory from the impairing effects of FG7142 in OVX + Veh, but not in OVX + Est rats. Western Blot analysis for alpha-2 receptors was performed on PFC tissue from each group, but no changes in expression were found, indicating that the behavioral effects observed were likely not due to changes in receptor expression. These findings point to possible mechanisms by which estrogen may enhance the stress response, and hold implications for the gender discrepancy in the prevalence of stress-related mental illness. PMID:19005873

  13. The effect of urapidil, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, on the vascular tone of the porcine coronary and pulmonary arteries, the rat aorta and the human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Claire; Auger, Cyril; Diemunsch, Pierre; Schini-Kerth, Valérie

    2016-05-15

    Urapidil (Eupressyl(®)) an antihypertensive drug acting as an α1 antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, may be of special interest in the treatment of hypertension associated with preeclamptic toxaemia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction. However, the effect of urapidil on vascular tone has been poorly investigated. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using pulmonary and coronary arteries from 36 pigs, aortae from 22 rats and 9 human pulmonary artery samples suspended in organ chambers. Concentration-relaxation curves either to urapidil, 5-HT, or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were constructed after pre-contraction of rings. Pig pulmonary and coronary artery rings were contracted with U46619, a thromboxane mimetic, rat aortic rings with either endothelin-1 or phenylephrine, and human pulmonary artery rings with U46619 or phenylephrine. Urapidil markedly inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium with a more pronounced effect observed in rings without endothelium. Both 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT failed to induce relaxation in rat aortic rings with an intact endothelium. 5-HT, but not urapidil and 8-OH-DPAT, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary and pulmonary artery rings with an intact endothelium (P<0.05). 5-HT and phenylephrine but not urapidil caused concentration-dependent contractions in human pulmonary artery rings. The present findings, while confirming that urapidil is a potent inhibitor of α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction, do not support the role of 5-HT1A receptor activation in the control of the vascular tone of the different types of arteries tested in response to urapidil. In addition, they indicate that urapidil seems to preferentially target arteries with endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Synergistic alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation of rat proximal nephron Na+/H+ exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gesek, F.A.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Strandhoy, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Both alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors have been localized to the renal cortex, with the majority of binding sites on the proximal tubule. Because the major regulator of Na+ uptake into the proximal tubule is the Na+/H+ exchanger, and because alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors stimulate it in other tissues, we tested the hypothesis that both alpha adrenoceptor subtypes can increase Na+ uptake into the proximal nephron by stimulating the Na+/H+ antiporter. Enhancement of Na+ transport by agonists was studied in isolated rat proximal tubules by determining the uptake of 22Na that was suppressible by the Na+/H+ inhibitor, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA). The phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, (0.1 microM), directly stimulated the antiporter through protein kinase C and increased EIPA-suppressible 22Na uptake 250% above control. The alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, cirazoline and phenylephrine, in addition to the mixed agonist, norepinephrine, maximally stimulated uptake by 226 to 232% at 1 microM concentrations. alpha-2 agonists produced a range of maximal stimulations at 1 microM from 65% with guanabenz to 251% with B-HT 933. Increases in 22Na uptake by agonists were inhibited by selective adrenergic antagonists and by EIPA. The drugs did not change the EIPA-resistant component of 22Na uptake. Inasmuch as the adrenoceptor subtypes likely stimulated Na+/H+ exchange by differing intracellular pathways impinging upon common transport steps, we examined whether simultaneous stimulation of both pathways was additive. Submaximal concentrations (5 nM each) of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists in combination synergistically enhanced 22Na uptake to a level similar to 1 microM concentrations of adrenoceptor agonists alone or in combination.

  15. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  16. [beta]1-Adrenoceptor or [alpha]1-Adrenoceptor Activation Initiates Early Odor Preference Learning in Rat Pups: Support for the Mitral Cell/cAMP Model of Odor Preference Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Carolyn W.; Darby-King, Andrea; McCann, Jennifer; McLean, John H.

    2006-01-01

    We proposed that mitral cell [beta]1-adrenoceptor activation mediates rat pup odor preference learning. Here we evaluate [beta]1-, [beta]2-, [alpha]1-, and [alpha]2-adrenoceptor agonists in such learning. The [beta]1-adrenoceptor agonist, dobutamine, and the [alpha]1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, induced learning, and both exhibited an…

  17. Specificity of acceptor binding to Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F dextransucrase: binding and acceptor-product structure of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 by inversion of the hydroxyl and by replacement of the hydroxyl with hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Fu, D T; Slodki, M E; Robyt, J F

    1990-02-01

    The specificity of acceptor binding to the active site of dextransucrase was studied by using alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 positions by (a) inversion of the hydroxyl group and (b) replacement of the hydroxyl group with hydrogen. 2-Deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside was synthesized from 2-deoxyglucose; 3- and 4-deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranosides were synthesized from alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside; and alpha-methyl-D-allopyranoside was synthesized from D-glucose. The analogs were incubated with [14C]sucrose and dextransucrase, and the products were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Structures of the acceptor products were determined by methylation analyses and optical rotation. The relative effectiveness of the acceptor analogs in decreasing order were 2-deoxy, 2-inverted, 3-deoxy, 3-inverted, 4-inverted, and 4-deoxy. The enzyme transfers D-glucopyranose to the C-6 hydroxyl of analogs modified at C-2 and C-3, to the C-4 hydroxyl of 4-inverted, and to the C-3 hydroxyl of 4-deoxy analogs of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside. The data indicate that the hydroxyl group at C-2 is not as important for acceptor binding as the hydroxyl groups at C-3 and C-4. The hydroxyl group at C-4 is particularly important as it determines the binding orientation of the alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside ring.

  18. Identification of a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674), that produces marked changes in serum lipids and apolipoprotein A-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jai Pal; Kauffman, Raymond; Bensch, William; Wang, Guoming; McClelland, Pam; Bean, James; Montrose, Chahrzad; Mantlo, Nathan; Wagle, Asavari

    2005-09-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) is an important risk factor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Optimum therapy for raising HDL-c is still not available. Identification of novel HDL-raising agents would produce a major impact on CAD. In this study, we have identified a potent (IC50 approximately 24 nM) and selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674). In human apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) transgenic mice, LY518674 produced a dose-dependent increase in serum HDL-c, resulting in 208 +/- 15% elevation at optimum dose. A new synthesis of apoA-1 contributed to the increase in HDL-c. LY518674 increased apoA-1 mRNA levels in liver. Moreover, liver slices from animals treated with LY518674 secreted 3- to 6-fold more apoA-1 than control liver slices. In cultured hepatocytes, LY518674 produced 50% higher apoA-1 secretion, which was associated with increase in radiolabeled methionine incorporation in apoA-1. Thus, LY518674 is a potent and selective PPARalpha agonist that produced a much greater increase in serum HDL-c than the known fibrate drugs. The increase in HDL-c was associated with de novo synthesis of apoA-1. PMID:15933217

  19. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  20. Effects of LAAM and methadone utilization in an opiate agonist treatment program.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, J F; Khattak, S

    2000-01-01

    The development and approval of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) as a pharmacotherapeutic agent in opioid agonist therapy provided an alternative to methadone. Clinicians recognized the potential benefits that LAAM, a synthetic mu agonist with pharmacological properties which differ from those of methadone,could have in the treatment management of addicts in opioid agonist therapy. We report our experience utilizing LAAM from 1995 to 1999 at the Hines VA opioid agonist therapy clinic. The addition of LAAM to the clinic's treatment armamentarium has resulted in management options that have improved the areas of patient recruitment, patient retention, patient traffic, take-home medication, detoxification, and treatment outcomes.

  1. The PPAR alpha gene is associated with triglyceride, low-density cholesterol and inflammation marker response to fenofibrate intervention: the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR Alpha) agonist, fenofibrate favorably modulates dyslipidemia and inflammation markers, which are associated with cardiovascular risk. To determine whether variation in the PPAR Alpha receptor gene was associated with lipid and inflammatory ...

  2. Differential effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor inverse agonists Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 on electrophysiological responses to 5-HT1A receptor activation in rat dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris; Falsini, Chiara; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Cilia, Antonio; Destefani, Carla; Testa, Rodolfo

    2005-10-01

    The pharmacological properties of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, {2-[4-(2-bromo-5-methoxybenzyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}-(2-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)amide (Rec 27/0224), and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, (2-methoxy-phenyl)-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}amide (Rec 27/0074), were characterized using radioligand displacement and guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding assays, as well as electrophysiological experiments, in rat hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) slices. Both compounds showed a high affinity (Ki, approximately 1 nM) and selectivity (>70-fold) at human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors versus other 5-HT receptors. In [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays on HeLa cells stably expressing human 5-HT1A receptors, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 inhibited basal [35S]GTPgammaS binding by 44.8 +/- 1.7% (pEC50 = 8.58) and 25 +/- 2.5% (pEC50 = 8.86), respectively. In intracellularly recorded CA1 pyramidal cells, 5-HT1A (hetero)receptor-mediated hyperpolarization, elicited by 100 nM 5-carboxamidoytryptamine (5-CT), was partially antagonized by Rec 27/0224 (approximately 50%; IC50 = 18.0 nM) and Rec 27/0074 (74%; IC50 = 0.8 nM). In extracellularly recorded DRN serotonergic neurons, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 fully antagonized the inhibition of firing caused by the activation of 5-HT1A (auto)receptors by 30 nM 5-CT with an IC50 of 34.9 nM and 16.5 nM, respectively. The antagonism had a slow time course, reaching a steady state within 60 min. Both compounds also antagonized the citalopram-elicited, endogenous 5-HT-mediated inhibition of cell firing. In conclusion, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 exhibited inverse agonism in [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays and differential antagonistic properties on 5-HT1A receptor-mediated responses in the hippocampus but not in the DRN. Whether this differential effect is causally related to inverse agonist activity is unclear. The qualitatively different nature of the antagonism in the hippocampus versus

  3. Contamination with retinoic acid receptor agonists in two rivers in the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nakama, Koki; Sawada, Kazuko; Watanabe, Taro; Takagi, Mai; Sei, Kazunari; Yang, Min; Hirotsuji, Junji; Hu, Jianying; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the agonistic activity against human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha in the Lake Biwa-Yodo River and the Ina River in the Kinki region of Japan. To accomplish this, a yeast two-hybrid assay was used to elucidate the spatial and temporal variations and potential sources of RARalpha agonist contamination in the river basins. RARalpha agonistic activity was commonly detected in the surface water samples collected along two rivers at different periods, with maximum all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) equivalents of 47.6 ng-atRA/L and 23.5 ng-atRA/L being observed in Lake Biwa-Yodo River and Ina River, respectively. The results indicated that RARalpha agonists are always present and widespread in the rivers. Comparative investigation of RARalpha and estrogen receptor alpha agonistic activities at 20 stations along each river revealed that the spatial variation pattern of RARalpha agonist contamination was entirely different from that of the estrogenic compound contamination. This suggests that the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants, a primary source of estrogenic compounds, seemed not to be the cause of RARalpha agonist contamination in the rivers. Fractionation using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directed by the bioassay found two bioactive fractions from river water samples, suggesting the presence of at least two RARalpha agonists in the rivers. Although a trial conducted to identify RARalpha agonists in the major bioactive fraction was not completed as part of this study, comparison of retention times in HPLC analysis and quantification with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the major causative contaminants responsible for the RARalpha agonistic activity were not RAs (natural RAR ligands) and 4-oxo-RAs, while 4-oxo-RAs were identified as the major RAR agonists in sewage in Beijing, China. These findings suggest that there are unknown RARalpha agonists with high

  4. Decreased 8N sub 3 -(gamma- sup 32 P)GTP photolabeling of G sub s. alpha. in tumorigenic lung epithelial cell lines: Association with decreased hormone responsiveness and loss of contact-inhibited growth

    SciTech Connect

    Droms, K.A.; Malkinson, A.M. ); Haley, B.E. ); Smith, G.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The 45-kDa {alpha} subunit of the signal transducing G{sub s} protein complex, which stimulates receptor-coupled adenylate cyclase, incorporated less of the photoaffinity probe, 8N{sub 3}-({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP, in extracts from tumorigenic cell lines in comparison with nontumorigenic cell lines derived from mouse lung epithelium. Immunoblotting experiments using anti-G{sub s}{alpha} antibodies demonstrated that tumor cells do not have a decreased amount of G{sub s}{alpha} and photolabeling of tumor cell G{sub s}{alpha} increased when the rate of nucleotide exchange was promoted. Therefore, tumor cell G{sub s}{alpha} function may be altered. Consistent with this hypothesis is the observation that the tumor cells exhibited decreased responsiveness to the {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. G{sub s}{alpha} photolabeling in growing nontumorigenic cells was reduced to a level resembling that observed in tumor cells, but photolabeling increased when cells became contact-inhibited. This increase in 8N{sub 3}-({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP incorporation into G{sub s}{alpha} by normal cells at confluence was not seen in the tumorigenic cells. Since G{sub s}{alpha} photolabeling was inversely proportional to the percentage of ({sup 3}H) thymidine-labeled nuclei at confluence, the authors suggest that the altered G{sub s}{alpha} in tumor cells is involved in the loss of cell growth regulation.

  5. Characterization of the specificities of human blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase toward sulfated/sialylated/fucosylated acceptors: evidence for an inverse relationship between alpha 1,2-L-fucosylation of Gal and alpha 1,6-L-fucosylation of asparagine-linked GlcNAc.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Jain, R K; Larsen, R D; Wlasichuk, K; Matta, K L

    1996-07-01

    The assembly of complex structures bearing the H determinant was examined by characterizing the specificities of a cloned blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase (FT) toward a variety of sulfated, sialylated, or fucosylated Gal beta 1,3/4GlcNAc beta- or Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha-based acceptor structures. (a) As compared to the basic type 2, Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-(K(m) = 1.67 mM), the basic type 1 was 137% active (K(m) = 0.83 mM). (b) On C-6 sulfation of Gal, type 1 became 142.1% active and type 2 became 223.0% active (K(m) = 0.45 mM). (c) On C-6 sulfation of GlcNAc, type 2 showed 33.7% activity. (d) On C-3 or C-4 fucosylation of GlcNAc, both types 1 and 2 lost activity. (e) Type 1 showed 70.8% and 5.8% activity, respectively, on C-6 and C-4 O-methylation of GlcNAc. (f) Type 1 retained 18.8% activity on alpha 2,6-sialylation of GlcNAc. (g) Terminal type 1 or 2 of extended chain had lower activity. (h) With Gal in place of GlcNAc in type 1, the activity became 43.2%. (i) Compounds with terminal alpha 1,3-linked Gal were inactive. (j) Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- (the T-hapten) was approximately 0.4-fold as active as Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-. (k) C-6 sulfation of Gal on the T-hapten did not affect the acceptor activity. (l) C-6 sulfation of GalNAc decreased the activity to 70%, whereas on C-6 sulfation of both Gal and GalNAc the T-hapten lost the acceptor ability. (m) C-6 sialylation of GalNAc also led to inactivity. (n) beta 1,6 branching from GalNAc of the T-hapten by a GlcNAc residue or by units such as Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc-, Gal beta 1,4(Fuc alpha 1,3)GlcNAc-, or 3-sulfoGal beta 1,4GlcNAc- resulted in 111.9%, 282.8%, 48.3%, and 75.3% activities, respectively. (o) The enhancement of enzyme affinity by a sulfo group on C-6 of Gal was demonstrated by an increase (approximately 5-fold) in the K(m) for Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta 1,6(Gal beta 1,3)GalNAc alpha-O-Bn in presence of 6-sulfoGal beta 1,- 4GlcNAc beta-O-Me (3.0 mM). (p) Among the two sites in

  6. Characterization of the specificities of human blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase toward sulfated/sialylated/fucosylated acceptors: evidence for an inverse relationship between alpha 1,2-L-fucosylation of Gal and alpha 1,6-L-fucosylation of asparagine-linked GlcNAc.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Jain, R K; Larsen, R D; Wlasichuk, K; Matta, K L

    1996-07-01

    The assembly of complex structures bearing the H determinant was examined by characterizing the specificities of a cloned blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase (FT) toward a variety of sulfated, sialylated, or fucosylated Gal beta 1,3/4GlcNAc beta- or Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha-based acceptor structures. (a) As compared to the basic type 2, Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-(K(m) = 1.67 mM), the basic type 1 was 137% active (K(m) = 0.83 mM). (b) On C-6 sulfation of Gal, type 1 became 142.1% active and type 2 became 223.0% active (K(m) = 0.45 mM). (c) On C-6 sulfation of GlcNAc, type 2 showed 33.7% activity. (d) On C-3 or C-4 fucosylation of GlcNAc, both types 1 and 2 lost activity. (e) Type 1 showed 70.8% and 5.8% activity, respectively, on C-6 and C-4 O-methylation of GlcNAc. (f) Type 1 retained 18.8% activity on alpha 2,6-sialylation of GlcNAc. (g) Terminal type 1 or 2 of extended chain had lower activity. (h) With Gal in place of GlcNAc in type 1, the activity became 43.2%. (i) Compounds with terminal alpha 1,3-linked Gal were inactive. (j) Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- (the T-hapten) was approximately 0.4-fold as active as Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-. (k) C-6 sulfation of Gal on the T-hapten did not affect the acceptor activity. (l) C-6 sulfation of GalNAc decreased the activity to 70%, whereas on C-6 sulfation of both Gal and GalNAc the T-hapten lost the acceptor ability. (m) C-6 sialylation of GalNAc also led to inactivity. (n) beta 1,6 branching from GalNAc of the T-hapten by a GlcNAc residue or by units such as Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc-, Gal beta 1,4(Fuc alpha 1,3)GlcNAc-, or 3-sulfoGal beta 1,4GlcNAc- resulted in 111.9%, 282.8%, 48.3%, and 75.3% activities, respectively. (o) The enhancement of enzyme affinity by a sulfo group on C-6 of Gal was demonstrated by an increase (approximately 5-fold) in the K(m) for Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta 1,6(Gal beta 1,3)GalNAc alpha-O-Bn in presence of 6-sulfoGal beta 1,- 4GlcNAc beta-O-Me (3.0 mM). (p) Among the two sites in

  7. A natural history of "agonist".

    PubMed

    Russo, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a brief history of the biochemical term agonist by exploring the multiple meanings of the root agôn in ancient Greek literature and describing how agonist first appeared in the scientific literature of the 20th century in the context of neurophysiologists' debates about the existence and properties of cellular receptors. While the narrow scientific definition of agonist may appear colorless and dead when compared with the web of allusions spun by the ancient Greek agôn, the scientific power and creativity of agonist actually resides precisely in its exact, restricted meaning for biomedical researchers.

  8. Labeled ALPHA4BETA2 ligands and methods therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Pichika, Ramaiah; Potkin, Steven; Leslie, Frances; Chattopadhyay, Sankha

    2013-02-19

    Contemplated compositions and methods are employed to bind in vitro and in vivo to an .alpha.4.beta.2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a highly selective manner. Where such compounds are labeled, compositions and methods employing such compounds can be used for PET and SPECT analysis. Alternatively, and/or additionally contemplated compounds can be used as antagonists, partial agonists or agonists in the treatment of diseases or conditions associated with .alpha.4.beta..beta.2 dysfunction.

  9. The decrease of dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor densities in the putamen and nucleus caudatus goes parallel with maintained levels of CB₁ cannabinoid receptors in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary autoradiographic study with the selective dopamine D₂/D₃ antagonist [³H]raclopride and the novel CB₁ inverse agonist [¹²⁵I]SD7015.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin; Jia, Zhisheng; Harkany, Tibor; Palkovits, Miklós; Donohou, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Máthé, Domokos; Csiba, László; Gulyás, Balázs

    2012-04-10

    Cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB₁Rs) modulate synaptic neurotransmission by participating in retrograde signaling in the adult brain. Increasing evidence suggests that cannabinoids through CB₁Rs play an important role in the regulation of motor activities in the striatum. In the present study, we used human brain samples to examine the relationship between CB₁R and dopamine receptor density in case of Parkinson's disease (PD). Post mortem putamen, nucleus caudatus and medial frontal gyrus samples obtained from PD patients were used for CB₁R and dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor autoradiography. [¹²⁵I]SD7015, a novel selective CB₁R inverse agonist, developed by a number of the present co-authors, and [³H]raclopride, a dopamine D₂/D₃ antagonist, were used as radioligands. Our results demonstrate unchanged CB₁R density in the putamen and nucleus caudatus of deceased PD patients, treated with levodopa (L-DOPA). At the same time dopamine D₂/D₃ receptors displayed significantly decreased density levels in case of PD putamen (control: 47.97 ± 10.00 fmol/g, PD: 3.73 ± 0.07 fmol/g (mean ± SEM), p<0.05) and nucleus caudatus (control: 30.26 ± 2.48 fmol/g, PD: 12.84 ± 5.49 fmol/g, p<0.0005) samples. In contrast to the putamen and the nucleus caudatus, in the medial frontal gyrus neither receptor densities were affected. Our data suggest the presence of an unaltered CB₁R population even in late stages of levodopa treated PD. This further supports the presence of an intact CB₁R population which, in line with the conclusion of earlier publications, may be utilized as a pharmacological target in the treatment of PD. Furthermore we found discrepancy between a maintained CB₁R population and a decreased dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor population in PD striatum. The precise explanation of this conundrum requires further studies with simultaneous examination of the central cannabinoid and dopaminergic systems in PD using higher sample size.

  10. Elucidation of the biochemical basis for a clinical drug-drug interaction between atorvastatin and 5-(N-(4-((4-ethylbenzyl)thio)phenyl)sulfamoyl)-2-methyl benzoic acid (CP-778875), a subtype selective agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Kalgutkar, Amit S; Chen, Danny; Varma, Manthena V; Feng, Bo; Terra, Steven G; Scialis, Renato J; Rotter, Charles J; Frederick, Kosea S; West, Mark A; Goosen, Theunis C; Gosset, James R; Walsky, Robert L; Francone, Omar L

    2013-11-01

    1. 5-(N-(4-((4-ethylbenzyl)thio)phenyl)sulfamoyl)-2-methyl benzoic acid (CP-778875), an agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, has been evaluated in the clinic to treat dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Herein, we investigate the effect of CP-778875 on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin acid and its metabolites in humans. 2. The study incorporated a fixed-sequence design conducted in two groups. Group A was designed to estimate the effects of multiple doses of CP-778875 on the single dose pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin. Subjects in group A (n = 26) received atorvastatin (40 mg) on days 1 and 9 and CP-778875 (1.0 mg QD) on days 5-12. Group B was designed to examine the effects of multiple doses of atorvastatin on the single dose pharmacokinetics of CP-778875. Subjects in group B (n = 29) received CP-778875 (0.3 mg) on days 1 and 9 and atorvastatin (40 mg QD) on days 5-12. 3. Mean maximum serum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve of atorvastatin were increased by 45% and 20%, respectively, upon co-administration with CP-778875. Statistically significant increases in the systemic exposure of ortho- and para-hydroxyatorvastatin were also observed upon concomitant dosing with CP-778875. CP-778875 pharmacokinetics, however, were not impacted upon concomitant dosing with atorvastatin. 4.  Inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 by CP-778875 (IC50 = 2.14 ± 0.40 μM) could be the dominant cause of the pharmacokinetic interaction as CP-778875 did not exhibit significant inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4/3A5, multidrug resistant protein 1 or breast cancer resistant protein, which are also involved in the hepatobiliary disposition of atorvastatin.

  11. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  12. Discovery of Azetidinone Acids as Conformationally-Constrained Dual PPARalpha/gamma Agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Devasthale, P; Farrelly, D; Gu, L; Harrity, T; Cap, M; Chu, C; Kunselman, L; Morgan, N; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    A novel class of azetidinone acid-derived dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists has been synthesized for the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. The preferred stereochemistry in this series for binding and functional agonist activity against both PPARa and PPAR? receptors was shown to be 3S,4S. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds in this series are described. A high-yielding method for N-arylation of azetidinone esters is also described.

  13. Alpha3* and alpha 7 nAChR-mediated Ca2+ transient generation in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Andersen, Elisabeth; Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Lee, Chih-Hung; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2010-10-01

    Alpha3-containing (alpha 3*) and alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells and implicated in Ca(2+) signaling. In this study, we investigated the intracellular Ca(2+) transient generation evoked by selective activation of alpha 3* (agonist potency rank order: epibatidine>varenicline>nicotine approximately cytisine) and alpha 7 (rank order in the presence of alpha 7 positive allosteric modulator or PAM: A-795723>NS6784 approximately PNU-282987) using, respectively, varenicline and NS6784 (+alpha 7 PAM) by Ca(2+) imaging. Effects of inhibitors of nAChRs (MLA and mecamylamine), ER Ca(2+) ATPase pump (CPA and thapsigargin), Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (ryanodine and dantrolene), Ca(2+) channels (nitrendipine, diltiazem, and Cd(2+)), and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) were examined. alpha 7 PAMs, when tested in the presence of NS6784, were more active when added first, followed by the agonist, than in the reverse order. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) - but not CPA, thapsigargin, ryanodine, dantrolene, nitrendipine, diltiazem, or Cd(2+) - diminished the alpha 7 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients. In contrast, only diltiazem and nitrendipine and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) inhibited the alpha 3*-mediated Ca(2+) transients. The differential effect of diltiazem and nitrendipine versus Cd(2+) was due to direct inhibition of alpha 3* nAChRs as revealed by Ca(2+) imaging in HEK-293 cells expressing human alpha 3 beta 4 nAChRs and patch clamp in IMR-32 cells. In summary, this study provides evidence that alpha 3* and alpha 7 nAChR agonist-evoked global Ca(2+) transient generation in IMR-32 cells does not primarily involve voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, intracellular Ca(2+) stores, or Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. These mechanisms may, however, be still involved in other forms of nAChR-mediated Ca(2+) signaling.

  14. Behavioral models in mice. Implication of the alpha noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, M; Bourin, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The mechanism of action of drugs might change according to the test used. Several noradrenergic drugs were tested in order to understand their implication in the mobility tests. 2. It was found that clonidine, an Alpha 2 agonist, acted differently according to the test used. It provoked sedation in spontaneous activity test, and anti-immobility effects in the other tests. 3. Tail suspension test is able to show the double acting of clonidine. 4. Idazoxan might act either as an alpha 2 antagonist or as partial alpha 2 agonist. TST shown the unexpected partial alpha agonist effect of the molecule. 5. Forced swimming test is more specific for predicting antidepressant activity than tail suspension test which is close to a spontaneous activity model. PMID:1684874

  15. Behavioral models in mice. Implication of the alpha noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, M; Bourin, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The mechanism of action of drugs might change according to the test used. Several noradrenergic drugs were tested in order to understand their implication in the mobility tests. 2. It was found that clonidine, an Alpha 2 agonist, acted differently according to the test used. It provoked sedation in spontaneous activity test, and anti-immobility effects in the other tests. 3. Tail suspension test is able to show the double acting of clonidine. 4. Idazoxan might act either as an alpha 2 antagonist or as partial alpha 2 agonist. TST shown the unexpected partial alpha agonist effect of the molecule. 5. Forced swimming test is more specific for predicting antidepressant activity than tail suspension test which is close to a spontaneous activity model.

  16. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs.

  17. Role of SIRT1 in regulation of LPS- or two ethanol metabolites-induced TNF-alpha production in cultured macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Ajmo, Joanne M; Rogers, Christopher Q; Liang, Xiaomei; Le, Lisa; Murr, Michel M; Peng, Yanhua; You, Min

    2009-05-01

    Dysregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent class III protein deacetylase that is known to be involved in regulating production of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha. In the present study, we examined the role of SIRT1 signaling in TNF-alpha generation stimulated by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acetaldehyde (AcH), or acetate (two major metabolites of ethanol) in two cultured macrophage cell lines. In both rat Kupffer cell line 1 (RKC1) and murine RAW 264.7 macrophages, treatment with either LPS, AcH, or acetate caused significant decreases in SIRT1 transcription, translation, and activation, which essentially demonstrated an inverse relationship with TNF-alpha levels. LPS, AcH, and acetate each provoked the release of TNF-alpha from RKC1 cells, whereas coincubation with resveratrol (a potent SIRT1 agonist) inhibited this effect. Conversely, addition of sirtinol (a known SIRT1 inhibitor) or knocking down SIRT1 by the small silencing SIRT1 plasmid (SIRT1shRNA) augmented TNF-alpha release, suggesting that impairment of SIRT1 may contribute to TNF-alpha secretion. Further mechanistic studies revealed that inhibition of SIRT1 by LPS, AcH, or acetate was associated with a marked increase in the acetylation of the RelA/p65 subunit of nuclear transcription factor (NF-kappaB) and promotion of NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT1-NF-kappaB signaling is involved in regulating LPS- and metabolites-of-ethanol-mediated TNF-alpha production in rat Kupffer cells and in murine macrophages. Our study provides new insights into understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:19299582

  18. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  19. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  20. Direct Measurement of {sup 21}Na+{alpha} Stellar Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Binh, D. N.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Kume, N.; Kato, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Tho, N. T.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-08-12

    The measurement of the resonant alpha scattering and the {sup 21}Na({alpha}, p) reaction were performed for the first time in inverse kinematics with the thick target method using a {sup 21}Na radioisotope (RI) beam. This paper reports the current result of alpha scattering measurement and its astrophysics implication.

  1. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  2. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  3. Suppression of hepatic prostaglandin F2 alpha in rats by dietary alpha-tocopherol acetate is independent of total hepatic alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Duitsman, P K; Chen, H W; Cook, L R; Hendrich, S

    1992-09-01

    Groups of eight weanling female F344/N rats were fed semipurified diets that supplied 0, 50, 500, 5000, or 15,000 mg alpha-tocopherol acetate/kg diet, with and without 0.05% phenobarbital (PB) for 9 weeks. Both plasma and hepatic alpha-tocopherol levels, measured by HPLC, strongly correlated with alpha-tocopherol intake (r greater than 0.73, p less than 0.0001). Phenobarbital both depleted hepatic alpha-tocopherol and increased plasma alpha-tocopherol significantly. Although treatment with PB for 9 weeks significantly increased GST activity, PB did not affect hepatic prostaglandin (PG)F2 alpha status, as determined by radioimmunoassay. PGF2 alpha was significantly greater (by 52%) in rats fed no alpha-tocopherol than in rats fed 15,000 mg alpha-tocopherol acetate/kg diet. Hepatic PGF2 alpha status was correlated inversely but weakly with dietary alpha-tocopherol (r = -0.24, p less than 0.05). Hepatic PGF2 alpha status was not correlated with hepatic or plasma alpha-tocopherol status. This finding suggests either that there is a small depletion-resistant subcellular alpha-tocopherol pool which regulates PGF2 alpha production or that alpha-tocopherol alters PGF2 alpha production in vivo by an indirect mechanism.

  4. A study of presynaptic alpha2-autoreceptors in alpha2A/D-, alpha2B- and alpha2C-adrenoceptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Trendelenburg, A U; Klebroff, W; Hein, L; Starke, K

    2001-08-01

    The function of presynaptic alpha2-autoreceptors was studied in the hippocampus, occipito-parietal cortex, atria and vas deferens of NMRI mice, mice in which the alpha2A/D-, the alpha2B- or alpha2c-adrenoceptor gene had been disrupted (alpha2A/DKO, alpha2BKO and alpha2CKO, respectively), and the wildtype mice from which the knockout animals had been generated. Tissue pieces were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline and then superfused and stimulated electrically. The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine reduced the electrically evoked overflow of tritium in all tissues from all mouse strains (stimulation with single pulses or single high-frequency pulse trains, called POPs, i.e. pulse patterns leading to minimal autoinhibition). The effects of medetomidine did not differ in NMRI, wildtype, alpha2BKO and alpha2CKO mice but were greatly reduced in alpha2A/DKO brain preparations and to a lesser extent in alpha2A/DKO atria and vasa deferentia. Six drugs were tested as antagonists against medetomidine. Their pKd values indicated that the hippocampal and occipito-parietal alpha2-autoreceptors in NMRI and wildtype mice were alpha2D (the rodent variant of the alpha2A/D-adrenoceptor) whereas the atrial and vas deferens alpha2-autoreceptors in NMRI and wildtype mice could not be identified with a single alpha2 subtype. Deletion of the alpha2A/D gene changed the pKd values in all tissues so that they now reflected alpha2C properties, whereas deletion of the alpha2C gene changed the pKd values in atria and vasa deferentia so that they now had alpha2D properties (as they had in NMRI and wildtype brain preparations). Autoinhibition by released noradrenaline was created using trains of up to 64 pulses or up to 4 POPs, and the overflow-enhancing effect of the alpha2 antagonist rauwolscine was determined. Results did not differ, irrespective of whether preparations were obtained from NMRI, wildtype, alpha2BKO or alpha2CKO mice: the overflow of tritium elicited by p pulses or POPs

  5. cap alpha. -2 adrenergic receptor: a radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Unnerstall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    ..cap alpha..-2 adrenergic agents have been shown to influence blood pressure, heart rate and other physiological and behavioral functions through interactions with adrenergic pathways within the central nervous system. Pharmacologically relevant ..cap alpha..-1 adrenergic receptors were biochemically characterized and radiohistochemically analyzed in intact tissue sections of the rat and human central nervous system. The anatomical distribution of the ..cap alpha..-2 receptors, labeled with the agonist (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine, verified the concept that ..cap alpha..-2 receptors are closely associated with adrenergic nerve terminals and that ..cap alpha..-2 agents can influence autonomic and endocrine function through an action in the central nervous system. Since ..cap alpha..-2 agonists can influence sympathetic outflow, ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites were closely analyzed in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracic spinal cord. The transport of putative presynaptic ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites in the rat sciatic nerve was analyzed by light microscopic radiohistochemical techniques. Finally, in intact tissue section of the rat central nervous system, the biochemical characteristics of (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine binding were analyzed. Data were also shown which indicates that the synthetic ..cap alpha..-2 antagonist (/sup 3/H)RX781094 also binds to ..cap alpha..-2 receptors with high-affinity. Further, the distribution of (/sup 3/H)RX781094 binding sites in the rat central nervous system was identical to the distribution seen when using (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine.

  6. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  7. Increased flow precedes remote arteriolar dilations for some microapplied agonists.

    PubMed

    Frame, M D

    2000-04-01

    This study asks which occurs first in time for remote responses: a dilation or a remote change in flow. Arteriolar diameter (approximately 20 microm) and fluorescently labeled red blood cell (RBC) velocity were measured in the cremaster muscle of anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 70 mg/kg) hamsters (n = 51). Arterioles were locally stimulated for 60 s with micropipette-applied 10 microg/ml LM-609 (alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin agonist), 10(-3) M adenosine, or 10(-3) M 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, nitric oxide donor) as remote response agonists or with 10(-3) M papaverine, which dilates only locally. Observations were made at a remote site 1,200 microm upstream. With LM-609 or adenosine, the RBC velocity increased first (within 5 s), and the remote dilation followed 5-7 s later. N-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) blocked the LM-609 (100%) and adenosine (60%) remote dilations. SIN-1 induced a concurrent remote dilation and decrease in RBC velocity (approximately 10 s), suggesting the primary signal was to dilate. Papaverine had no remote effects. This study suggests that, although remote responses to some agonists are induced by primary signals to dilate, additionally, network changes in flow can stimulate extensive remote changes in diameter.

  8. Rhesus monkey alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: comparisons to human alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Papke, Roger L; McCormack, Thomas J; Jack, Brian A; Wang, Daguang; Bugaj-Gaweda, Bozena; Schiff, Hillary C; Buhr, Joshua D; Waber, Amanda J; Stokes, Clare

    2005-11-01

    An alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor sequence was cloned from Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). This clone differs from the mature human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in only four amino acids, two of which are in the extracellular domain. The monkey alpha7 nicotinic receptor was characterized in regard to its functional responses to acetylcholine, choline, cytisine, and the experimental alpha7-selective agonists 4OH-GTS-21, TC-1698, and AR-R17779. For all of these agonists, the EC(50) for activation of monkey receptors was uniformly higher than for human receptors. In contrast, the potencies of mecamylamine and MLA for inhibiting monkey and human alpha7 were comparable. Acetylcholine and 4OH-GTS-21 were used to probe the significance of the single point differences in the extracellular domain. Mutants with the two different amino acids in the extracellular domain of the monkey receptor changed to the corresponding sequence of the human receptor had responses to these agonists that were not significantly different in EC(50) from wild-type human alpha7 nicotinic receptors. Monkey alpha7 nicotinic receptors have a serine at residue 171, while the human receptors have an asparagine at this site. Monkey S171N mutants were more like human alpha7 nicotinic receptors, while mutations at the other site (K186R) had relatively little effect. These experiments point toward the basic utility of the monkey receptor as a model for the human alpha7 nicotinic receptor, albeit with the caveat that these receptors will vary in their agonist concentration dependency. They also point to the potential importance of a newly identified sequence element for modeling the specific amino acids involved with receptor activation. PMID:16266703

  9. Agonist self-inhibition at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor a nonspecific action

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Firestone, L.L.; Miller, K.W.

    1987-05-19

    Agonist concentration-response relationships at nicotinic postsynaptic receptors were established by measuring /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from acetylcholine receptor rich native Torpedo membrane vesicles under three different conditions: (1) integrated net ion efflux (in 10 s) from untreated vesicles, (2) integrated net efflux from vesicles in which most acetylcholine sites were irreversibly blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, and (3) initial rates of efflux (5-100 ms) from vesicles that were partially blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Exposure to acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, or (-)-nicotine over 10/sup 8/-fold concentration ranges results in bell-shaped ion flux response curves due to stimulation of acetylcholine receptor channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channel function at 60-2000 times higher concentrations. Concentrations of agonists that inhibit their own maximum /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux by 50% (K/sub B/ values) are 110, 211, 3.0, 39, and 8.9 mM, respectively, for the agonists listed above. For acetylcholine and carbamylcholine, K/sub B/ values determined from both 10-s and 15-ms efflux measurements are the same, indicating that the rate of agonist-induced desensitization increases to maximum at concentrations lower than those causing self-inhibition. For all partial and full agonists studied, Hill coefficients for self-inhibition are close to 1.0. Concentrations of agonists up to 8 times K/sub B/ did not change the order parameter reported by a spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated in Torpedo membranes. The authors conclude that agonist self-inhibition cannot be attributed to a general nonspecific membrane perturbation. Instead, these results are consistent with a saturable site of action either at the lipid-protein interface or on the acetylcholine receptor protein itself.

  10. Distinct activities of GABA agonists at synaptic- and extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin; Ebert, Bjarke; Wafford, Keith; Smart, Trevor G

    2010-04-15

    The activation characteristics of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are important for shaping the profile of phasic and tonic inhibition in the central nervous system, which will critically impact on the activity of neuronal networks. Here, we study in isolation the activity of three agonists, GABA, muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydoisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one (THIP), to further understand the activation profiles of alpha 1 beta 3 gamma 2, alpha 4 beta 3 gamma 2 and alpha 4 beta 3 delta receptors that typify synaptic- and extrasynaptic-type receptors expressed in the hippocampus and thalamus. The agonists display an order of potency that is invariant between the three receptors, which is reliant mostly on the agonist dissociation constant. At delta subunit-containing extrasynaptic-type GABA(A) receptors, both THIP and muscimol additionally exhibited, to different degrees, superagonist behaviour. By comparing whole-cell and single channel currents induced by the agonists, we provide a molecular explanation for their different activation profiles. For THIP at high concentrations, the unusual superagonist behaviour on alpha 4 beta 3 delta receptors is a consequence of its ability to increase the duration of longer channel openings and their frequency, resulting in longer burst durations. By contrast, for muscimol, moderate superagonist behaviour was caused by reduced desensitisation of the extrasynaptic-type receptors. The ability to specifically increase the efficacy of receptor activation, by selected exogenous agonists over that obtained with the natural transmitter, may prove to be of therapeutic benefit under circumstances when synaptic inhibition is compromised or dysfunctional.

  11. Effect of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on follicle recruitment and pregnancy rate in cattle.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E J; Drost, M; Diaz, T; Roomes, C; Thatcher, W W

    1996-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether a GnRH agonist eliminated a potentially persistent first-wave dominant follicle (PDF) and recruited a new dominant follicle with improved fertility upon ovulation. In Exp. 1, five nonlactating Holstein cows were treated on d 7 (d 0 = estrus) with a norgestomet implant and PGF2 alpha (25 mg); a GnRH agonist was injected on d 9. On d 16, the norgestomet implant was removed and PGF2 alpha was injected. The corpus luteum (CL) regressed (5/5 cows), and plasma progesterone (P4) decreased (P < .01) from d 7 (P4 = 10.4 +/- .3) to 9 (P4 = 1.0 +/- .3 ng/mL). The GnRH agonist induced ovulation of the first-wave dominant follicle. New dominant follicles emerged by d 12 +/- 1. In all cows, removal of norgestomet implants and injection of PGF2 alpha on d 16 caused regression (P < .01) of the CL induced by the GnRH agonist. The GnRH agonist-recruited dominant follicles were highly estrogenic on d 17 (estradiol = 19.6 +/- .8 pg/mL) and ovulated on d 19.8 +/- .2 (5/5). In Exp. 2, 147 heifers at a synchronized estrus were assigned disproportionally but randomly to two treatments (GnRHa, n = 94; PDF, n = 53). On d 7, a used controlled internal drug releasing (CIDR-B) device was inserted into the vagina and PGF2 alpha was injected. On d 9, heifers in GnRHa were injected with GnRH agonist. The CIDR-B devices were removed and PGF2 alpha was injected into all heifers on d 16. Within 4 d after removal of CIDR-B devices, 96.8 and 94.3% of heifers in GnRHa and PDF were detected in estrus and inseminated. Pregnancy rates were GnRHa = 60.6% > PDF = 43.4% (P < .05). In summary, fertility after ovulation of a persistent first-wave dominant follicle is reduced, whereas induction of a new dominant follicle following injection of a GnRH agonist results in greater fertility.

  12. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  13. Postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors mediate melanosome aggregation in melanophores of the white-spotted rabbitfish (Siganus canaliculatus).

    PubMed

    Amiri, M H

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the nature of neuro-melanophore junction in the white-spotted rabbit fish Siganus canaliculatus. In vitro experiments using split fin preparation indicated that melanophores of S. canaliculatus are highly responsive to potassium ions and adrenergic agonists. Potassium ions and the adrenergic agonists induced prompt melanosome aggregation that could be competitively blocked by yohimbine (alpha-2 specific adrenergic antagonist) and phentolamine (non-specific alpha adrenergic antagonist). The melanophore responses to repeated potassium stimulation (up to 20 stimuli) did not show any sign of fatigue. However, statistically significant enhancement was observed in responses to potassium that followed the first five stimulations. Adrenergic agonists acted in a time and concentration-dependent manner and their relative potency had the following rank order: clonidine (alpha-2 specific agonist) > norepinephrine (non-specific adrenergic agonist) > phenylephrine (alpha-1 specific agonist) > methoxamine (alpha-1-specific agonist). Yohimbine exerted a more potent inhibiting effect on norepinephrine induced melanosome aggregation compared to phentolamine. Prazosine (alpha-1 specific antagonist) had no effect on such aggregation. Chemically denervated melanophores displayed hypersensitivity to alpha-adrenergic agonists but were refractive to potassium ion stimulation. The refractivity of denervated melanophores to potassium indicates the effect of potassium ion is not direct on melanophores but it is rather through depolarization effect of potassium on the neuro-melanophore peripheral sympathetic fibers and hence release of norepinephrine. In denervated melanophores, similar to intact melanophores, only phentolamine and yohimbine but not prazosine, significantly inhibited melanosome aggregation effect of norepinephrine, indicating that norepinephrine effect is through postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptors. The present data demonstrate

  14. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  15. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Croft; Cowley, Patrick M; Singh, Abhishek; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M; Baker, Anthony J; Simpson, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  16. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  17. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    PubMed

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  18. Structural differences determine the relative selectivity of nicotinic compounds for native alpha 4 beta 2*-, alpha 6 beta 2*-, alpha 3 beta 4*- and alpha 7-nicotine acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Grady, Sharon R; Drenan, Ryan M; Breining, Scott R; Yohannes, Daniel; Wageman, Charles R; Fedorov, Nikolai B; McKinney, Sheri; Whiteaker, Paul; Bencherif, Merouane; Lester, Henry A; Marks, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    Mammalian brain expresses multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes that differ in subunit composition, sites of expression and pharmacological and functional properties. Among known subtypes of receptors, alpha 4 beta 2* and alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChR have the highest affinity for nicotine (where * indicates possibility of other subunits). The alpha 4 beta 2*-nAChRs are widely distributed, while alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChR are restricted to a few regions. Both subtypes modulate release of dopamine from the dopaminergic neurons of the mesoaccumbens pathway thought to be essential for reward and addiction. alpha 4 beta 2*-nAChR also modulate GABA release in these areas. Identification of selective compounds would facilitate study of nAChR subtypes. An improved understanding of the role of nAChR subtypes may help in developing more effective smoking cessation aids with fewer side effects than current therapeutics. We have screened a series of nicotinic compounds that vary in the distance between the pyridine and the cationic center, in steric bulk, and in flexibility of the molecule. These compounds were screened using membrane binding and synaptosomal function assays, or recordings from GH4C1 cells expressing h alpha 7, to determine affinity, potency and efficacy at four subtypes of nAChRs found in brain, alpha 4 beta 2*, alpha 6 beta 2*, alpha 7 and alpha 3 beta 4*. In addition, physiological assays in gain-of-function mutant mice were used to assess in vivo activity at alpha 4 beta 2* and alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChRs. This approach has identified several compounds with agonist or partial agonist activity that display improved selectivity for alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChR.

  19. Plasma elastase alpha 1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin in sepsis: evidence for neutrophils as mediators in fatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Abbink, J J; Wachtfogel, Y T; Colman, R W; Eerenberg, A J; Dors, D; Kamp, A J; Strack van Schijndel, R J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1992-02-01

    Increased vasopermeability and vasodilation, presumably the result of endothelial perturbation, are considered among the basic pathogenetic mechanisms in septic shock. Neutrophils have been implicated as a source for mediators in endothelial injury. We measured elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) complexes and lactoferrin as markers for release of neutrophil granule contents in plasma from patients with sepsis on admission to the Intensive Care Unit, and we delineated the relationship of neutrophil activation to other inflammatory parameters and to hemodynamic and biochemical parameters. Levels of elastase-alpha 1AT and lactoferrin significantly correlated with each other (r = 0.58; p less than 0.008), and were increased (greater than 3.33 and 5 nmol/L, respectively) in 96% and 71% of the patients, respectively. Lactoferrin, but not elastase-alpha 1AT, correlated with the number of white blood cells (r = 0.38; p = 0.008). Elastase-alpha 1 AT levels were significantly higher (p = 0.008), whereas white blood cell counts were lower (p = 0.015) in patients with shock when compared with patients without abnormal blood pressure. Both elastase-alpha 1AT and lactoferrin levels correlated with lactate levels (r = 0.33; p = 0.024 and r = 0.30; p = 0.04), suggesting a role for neutrophil activation in the pathogenesis of hypoxygenation. In addition, elastase-alpha 1AT correlated with the concentrations of interleukin 6 (IL-6) (r = 0.46; p = 0.001) and C3a (r = 0.38; p = 0.009), suggesting that cytokines and complement may contribute to the degranulation of neutrophils in sepsis. Elastase-alpha 1AT complexes were inversely related to C1-inhibitor (r = -0.33; p = 0.028) and to platelet numbers (r = -0.42; p = 0.003). Levels of elastase-alpha 1AT complexes in plasma appeared to be of prognostic significance; levels were higher in 27 patients who died than in 21 patients who survived (p = 0.01). The mortality in 27 patients with concentrations below 10 nM was 37%, whereas it

  20. alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors augment thermal hyperalgesia in mildly burnt skin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    The effect of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine on sensitivity to heat was investigated at three sites of mild burn injury in the cutaneous forearm of 19 healthy participants. Two of the sites were pre-treated with the alpha(1)-antagonist terazosin, to determine whether the effect of phenylephrine was mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Terazosin was administered before the burn injury at one site, and after the burn injury at the other site. In another 15 participants, the nociceptive effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was investigated with and without prior treatment with the alpha(2)-antagonist rauwolscine. Drugs were introduced into the skin by iontophoresis, and burns were induced by heating the skin to 48 degrees C for 2min. Heat pain thresholds to a temperature ramp (0.5 degrees C/s), and heat pain ratings to a thermal stimulus (45 degrees C, 7s), were determined before and after the administration of each drug. Thermal hyperalgesia provoked by phenylephrine was inhibited by terazosin administered after the burn injury, but not by terazosin administered before the burn injury. However, neither alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation nor blockade affected sensitivity to heat in the mildly burnt skin. These findings suggest that stimulation of cutaneous alpha(1)-adrenoceptors increased the excitability of heat-sensitized nociceptive afferents. As terazosin was more effective when administered in burnt skin, an inflammatory response induced by the burn injury may have facilitated access of adrenergic agents to alpha(1)-adrenoceptors.

  1. Effects of hippocampal injections of a novel ligand selective for the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 subunits of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor on Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Bailey, David J; Tetzlaff, Julie E; Cook, James M; He, Xiaohui; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2002-07-01

    Benzodiazepine pharmacology has led to greater insight into the neural mechanisms underlying learning and anxiety. The synthesis of new compounds capable of modulating responses produced by these receptors has been made possible by the development of an isoform model of the GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complex. In the current experiment, rats were pretreated with several concentrations of the novel ligand RY024 (an alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 -selective benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist) in the hippocampus and were trained in a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm. RY024 independently produced fear-related behavior prior to training and, at the highest concentration, decreased the strength of conditioning observed 24 h after training. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of hippocampal GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptors in learning and anxiety.

  2. The Benzenesulfoamide T0901317 [N-(2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl)-N-[4-[2,2,2-trifluoro-1-hydroxy-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]phenyl]-benzenesulfonamide] Is a Novel Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor-α/γ Inverse Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Solt, Laura A.; Conkright, Juliana J.; Wang, Yongjun; Istrate, Monica A.; Busby, Scott A.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs) regulate a variety of physiological processes including hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, and immune function. Here we present the first high-affinity synthetic ligand for both RORα and RORγ. In a screen against all 48 human nuclear receptors, the benzenesulfonamide liver X receptor (LXR) agonist N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-N-[4-[2,2,2-trifluoro-1-hydroxy-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]phenyl]-benzenesulfonamide (T0901317) inhibited transactivation activity of RORα and RORγ but not RORβ. T0901317 was found to directly bind to RORα and RORγ with high affinity (Ki = 132 and 51 nM, respectively), resulting in the modulation of the receptor's ability to interact with transcriptional cofactor proteins. T0901317 repressed RORα/γ-dependent transactivation of ROR-responsive reporter genes and in HepG2 cells reduced recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator-2 by RORα at an endogenous ROR target gene (G6Pase). Using small interference RNA, we demonstrate that repression of the gluconeogenic enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase in HepG2 cells by T0901317 is ROR-dependent and is not due to the compound's LXR activity. In summary, T0901317 represents a novel chemical probe to examine RORα/γ function and an excellent starting point for the development of ROR selective modulators. More importantly, our results demonstrate that small molecules can be used to target the RORs for therapeutic intervention in metabolic and immune disorders. PMID:19887649

  3. The Effect of PPARalpha, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and PPARpan Agonists on Body Weight, Body Mass, and Serum Lipid Profiles in Diet-Induced Obese AKR/J Mice.

    PubMed

    Harrington, W Wallace; S Britt, Christy; G Wilson, Joan; O Milliken, Naphtali; G Binz, Jane; C Lobe, David; R Oliver, William; C Lewis, Michael; M Ignar, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha, delta, and gamma subtypes increases expression of genes involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation and alters adiposity in animal models of obesity and type-2 diabetes. PPARpan agonists which activate all three receptor subtypes have antidiabetic activity in animal models without the weight gain associated with selective PPARgamma agonists. Herein we report the effects of selective PPAR agonists (GW9578, a PPARalpha agonist, GW0742, a PPARdelta agonist, GW7845, a PPARgamma agonist), combination of PPARalpha and delta agonists, and PPARpan (PPARalpha/gamma/delta) activators (GW4148 or GW9135) on body weight (BW), body composition, food consumption, fatty acid oxidation, and serum chemistry of diet-induced obese AKR/J mice. PPARalpha or PPARdelta agonist treatment induced a slight decrease in fat mass (FM) while a PPARgamma agonist increased BW and FM commensurate with increased food consumption. The reduction in BW and food intake after cotreatment with PPARalpha and delta agonists appeared to be synergistic. GW4148, a PPARpan agonist, induced a significant and sustained reduction in BW and FM similar to an efficacious dose of rimonabant, an antiobesity compound. GW9135, a PPARpan agonist with weak activity at PPARdelta, induced weight loss initially followed by rebound weight gain reaching vehicle control levels by the end of the experiment. We conclude that PPARalpha and PPARdelta activations are critical to effective weight loss induction. These results suggest that the PPARpan compounds may be expected to maintain the beneficial insulin sensitization effects of a PPARgamma agonist while either maintaining weight or producing weight loss.

  4. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  5. Nonshivering thermogenesis in marsupials: absence of thermogenic response to beta 3-adrenergic agonists.

    PubMed

    Nicol, S C; Pavlides, D; Andersen, N A

    1997-07-01

    The status of nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) in marsupials remains controversial. Although morphological studies have failed to find evidence for the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adults or juveniles of species from all extant families of marsupial, a number of studies have investigated the metabolic response of marsupials to noradrenaline (NA) and yielded conflicting results. In eutherian mammals, NA stimulates NST in BAT by acting on beta 3-receptors, and in the experiments reported here we investigated the response of adult and juvenile brush tail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), a Brazilian opossum (Monodelphis domestica), adult and juvenile red-necked (Bennett's) wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) and the laboratory rat to selective beta 3-agonists (ICI D7114 and BRL 35135) and to NA. Wallabies were tested with the beta 3-agonists only. Although NA and both beta 3-agonists caused an 85% increase in oxygen consumption in rats, there was no significant effect on any of the marsupials. These results clearly indicate no beta 3-stimulated NST in these marsupials. All reports of metabolic responses to NA are from macropods, and a recent study demonstrates that NA and other alpha-adrenergic agonists stimulate thermogenesis in a small macropod, the bettong (Bettongia gaimardi), by acting on alpha 1-receptors. Thermogenic responses to NA seems to be restricted to macropods, showing the danger of characterising the response of any one marsupial species as being representative of marsupials as a group. PMID:9172391

  6. [Adrenergic beta-agonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Carrola, Paulo; Devesa, Nuno; Silva, José Manuel; Ramos, Fernando; Alexandrino, Mário B; Moura, José J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases (father and daughter), observed in the Hospital Urgency with distal tremors, anxiety, palpitations, nausea, headaches and dizziness, two hours after ingestión of cow liver. They also had leucocytosis (with neutrophylia), hypokalemia and hyperglycaemia. After treatment with potassium i.v. and propranolol, the symptoms disappeared. The symptoms recurred at home because the patients didn't take the prescribed medication and persisted for five days, with spontaneous disappearance. The serum of both patients revealed the presence of clenbuterol (65 hg/ml - father and 58 hg/ml - daughter). The animal's liver had a concentration of 1,42 mg/kg. Clenbuterol is a ß-adrenergic agonist with low specificity, with some veterinary indications. However, this substance has been illegally used as a growth's promotor. We intend to alert doctors for this problem, particularly those that work in the Urgency.

  7. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  8. GABA(A) receptors containing (alpha)5 subunits in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal fields regulate ethanol-motivated behaviors: an extended ethanol reward circuitry.

    PubMed

    June, H L; Harvey, S C; Foster, K L; McKay, P F; Cummings, R; Garcia, M; Mason, D; Grey, C; McCane, S; Williams, L S; Johnson, T B; He, X; Rock, S; Cook, J M

    2001-03-15

    GABA receptors within the mesolimbic circuitry have been proposed to play a role in regulating alcohol-seeking behaviors in the alcohol-preferring (P) rat. However, the precise GABA(A) receptor subunit(s) mediating the reinforcing properties of EtOH remains unknown. We examined the capacity of intrahippocampal infusions of an alpha5 subunit-selective ( approximately 75-fold) benzodiazepine (BDZ) inverse agonist [i.e., RY 023 (RY) (tert-butyl 8-(trimethylsilyl) acetylene-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5a] [1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate)] to alter lever pressing maintained by concurrent presentation of EtOH (10% v/v) and a saccharin solution (0.05% w/v). Bilateral (1.5-20 microgram) and unilateral (0.01-40 microgram) RY dose-dependently reduced EtOH-maintained responding, with saccharin-maintained responding being reduced only with the highest doses (e.g., 20 and 40 microgram). The competitive BDZ antagonist ZK 93426 (ZK) (7 microgram) reversed the RY-induced suppression on EtOH-maintained responding, confirming that the effect was mediated via the BDZ site on the GABA(A) receptor complex. Intrahippocampal modulation of the EtOH-maintained responding was site-specific; no antagonism by RY after intra-accumbens [nucleus accumbens (NACC)] and intraventral tegmental [ventral tegmental area (VTA)] infusions was observed. Because the VTA and NACC contain very high densities of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits, respectively, we determined whether RY exhibited a "negative" or "neutral" pharmacological profile at recombinant alpha1beta3gamma2, alpha2beta3gamma2, and alpha5beta3gamma2 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. RY produced "classic" inverse agonism at all alpha receptor subtypes; thus, a neutral efficacy was not sufficient to explain the failure of RY to alter EtOH responding in the NACC or VTA. The results provide the first demonstration that the alpha5-containing GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus play an important role in regulating Et

  9. Use of clinically available PPAR agonists for heart failure; do the risks outweigh the potential benefits?

    PubMed

    Sarma, Satyam

    2012-06-01

    PPAR agonists represent a heterogeneous group of compounds that have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases for over thirty years. While the primary indications for PPAR agonist therapy focus on hyperlipidemia and diabetes, there is a growing body of pre-clinical data that suggests they may be beneficial in the treatment of heart failure; a disease marked by abnormal myocardial metabolism, fibrosis and insulin insensitivity. PPAR agonist treatment in numerous animal models of systolic heart failure have demonstrated improvement in cardiac function with decreased fibrosis, improved contractility and endothelial function. However, considerable controversy exists on the cardiac safety profile of PPAR agonists, particularly concern for inducing lipotoxicty and precipitating or worsening heart failure. In addition during pre-clinical testing, many compounds have been associated with increased death and adverse cardiovascular outcomes casting a pall over their future use for treating disorders of myocardial function. This article will review cardiac pathways involved in PPAR activation and their potential regulation of maladaptive pathways involved in heart failure and highlight molecular mechanisms that may contribute to adverse events and raise safety concerns. Specific attention will be focused on PPAR alpha and gamma, subtypes for which commercially available PPAR agonists are currently available.

  10. The therapeutic potential of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for pain control.

    PubMed

    Decker, M W; Meyer, M D; Sullivan, J P

    2001-10-01

    Due to the limitations of currently available analgesics, a number of novel alternatives are currently under investigation, including neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists. During the 1990s, the discovery of the antinociceptive properties of the potent nAChR agonist epibatidine in rodents sparked interest in the analgesic potential of this class of compounds. Although epibatidine also has several mechanism-related toxicities, the identification of considerable nAChR diversity suggested that the toxicities and therapeutic actions of the compound might be mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. Consistent with this view, a number of novel nAChR agonists with antinociceptive activity and improved safety profiles in preclinical models have now been identified, including A-85380, ABT-594, DBO-83, SIB-1663 and RJR-2403. Of these, ABT-594 is the most advanced and is currently in Phase II clinical evaluation. Nicotinically-mediated antinociception has been demonstrated in a variety of rodent pain models and is likely mediated by the activation of descending inhibitory pathways originating in the brainstem with the predominant high-affinity nicotine site in brain, the alpha4beta2 subtype, playing a critical role. Thus, preclinical findings suggest that nAChR agonists have the potential to be highly efficacious treatments in a variety of pain states. However, clinical proof-of-principle studies will be required to determine if nAChR agonists are active in pathological pain.

  11. CAR and PXR agonists stimulate hepatic bile acid and bilirubin detoxification and elimination pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Zollner, Gernot; Fickert, Peter; Langner, Cord; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Induction of hepatic phase I/II detoxification enzymes and alternative excretory pumps may limit hepatocellular accumulation of toxic biliary compounds in cholestasis. Because the nuclear xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate involved enzymes and transporters, we aimed to induce adaptive alternative pathways with different CAR and PXR agonists in vivo. Mice were treated with the CAR agonists phenobarbital and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene, as well as the PXR agonists atorvastatin and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile. Hepatic bile acid and bilirubin-metabolizing/detoxifying enzymes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Sult2a1), their regulatory nuclear receptors (CAR, PXR, farnesoid X receptor), and bile acid/organic anion and lipid transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1,2,4, Bsep, Mrp2-4, Mdr2, Abcg5/8, Asbt) in the liver and kidney were analyzed via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Potential functional relevance was tested in common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CAR agonists induced Mrp2-4 and Oatp2; PXR agonists induced only Mrp3 and Oatp2. Both PXR and CAR agonists profoundly stimulated bile acid-hydroxylating/detoxifying enzymes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. In addition, CAR agonists upregulated bile acid-sulfating Sult2a1 and bilirubin-glucuronidating Ugt1a1. These changes were accompanied by reduced serum levels of bilirubin and bile acids in healthy and CBDL mice and by increased levels of polyhydroxylated bile acids in serum and urine of cholestatic mice. Atorvastatin significantly increased Oatp2, Mdr2, and Asbt, while other transporters and enzymes were moderately affected. In conclusion, administration of specific CAR or PXR ligands results in coordinated stimulation of major hepatic bile acid/bilirubin metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes and hepatic key alternative efflux systems, effects that are predicted to counteract cholestasis. PMID:15986414

  12. Olfactory Bulb [alpha][subscript 2]-Adrenoceptor Activation Promotes Rat Pup Odor-Preference Learning via a cAMP-Independent Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakhawat, Amin MD.; Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three lines of evidence suggest a role for [alpha][subscript 2]-adrenoreceptors in rat pup odor-preference learning: olfactory bulb infusions of the [alpha][subscript 2]-antagonist, yohimbine, prevents learning; the [alpha][subscript 2]-agonist, clonidine, paired with odor, induces learning; and subthreshold clonidine paired with…

  13. Relationship between alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor occupancy and regulation of intracellular Ca/sup + +/ in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Berger, K.D.; Button, D.; Taylor, P.

    1986-05-01

    The relationship between ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and functional response was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist (/sup 3/H)prazosin, and correlated with agonist-elicited unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) activated /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux with the order of potency expected for ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptors (E greater than or equal to NE > PE). A parabolic relationship suggesting the presence of a modest receptor reserve was observed between the number of activatable receptors after equilibration with specified (/sup 3/H)prazosin concentrations and residual /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux responses elicited by E or NE. A linear relationship was previously observed for PE. Agonist occupancy was independently measured by competition with the initial rate of (/sup 3/H)prazosin association. Both E and NE inhibited (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding over higher concentration ranges than those required to elicit /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux. Equilibration of cultures with agonist prior to measurement of (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding resulted in small decreases in apparent agonist affinities. These results indicate that BC3H-1 cells possess a small ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor reserve for agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux which is reflected in the catecholamine agonists, and that exposure to agonist converts receptors to a state of reduced agonist affinity.

  14. The evolution of beta2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Sears, M R

    2001-08-01

    Beta-agonists have been widely used in the treatment of asthma for many years Although concerns have been expressed over their safety based largely upon epidemics of increased mortality in asthmatics associated with high doses of isoprenaline in the 1960s and fenoterol in the 1970s and 1980s, the specific beta2-agonists are vital drugs in asthma management. The short-acting beta2-agonists have an important prophylactic role in the prevention of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and are essential in the emergency treatment of severe asthma. However, little if any benefit seems to be derived from regular use of short-acting beta2-agonists and regular or frequent use can increase the severity of the condition. The development of beta2-agonists with long-acting properties, such as salmeterol and formoterol, has provided advantages over short-acting beta-agonists, such as prolonged bronchodilation, reduced day- and night-time symptoms and improved quality of sleep, and has reduced the requirement for short-acting beta2-agonists as relief medication. Both drugs are well tolerated and, when added to inhaled corticosteroids, produce greater mprovement in lung function than increased steroid dose alone. Because of its rapid onset of action, formoterol also has the potential to be used for as-needed bronchodilator therapy in asthma.

  15. Modification of TLR-induced activation of human dendritic cells by type I IFN: synergistic interaction with TLR4 but not TLR3 agonists.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Tough, David F

    2006-07-01

    Upon detection of direct and indirect signs of infection, dendritic cells (DC) undergo functional changes that modify their ability to elicit immune responses. Type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta), which includes a large family of closely related infection-inducible cytokines, represents one indirect signal that can act as a DC stimulus. We have investigated the ability of IFN-alpha/beta subtypes to affect DC function and to influence DC responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists (i.e., direct infection-associated signals). Subtle differences were observed among 15 subtypes of IFN-alpha/beta in the ability to stimulate expression of maturation markers and chemokines by human monocyte-derived DC, with IFN-omega being the most unique in its effects. Pre-treatment with IFN-alpha/beta did not alter the ability of DC to mature in response to subsequent contact with TLR agonists, but did modulate their secretion of chemokines. Conversely, IFN-alpha/beta was shown to act synergistically with TLR4 but not TLR3 agonists for the induction of maturation and chemokine production when DC were exposed to IFN-alpha/beta and TLR ligands simultaneously. Taken together, these results indicate a complex role for IFN-alpha/beta in regulating DC function during the course an infection, which varies according to IFN-alpha/beta subtype and the timing of exposure to other stimuli. PMID:16783851

  16. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego; Relat, Joana

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  17. Interaction among mu-opioid receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lameh, J; Eiger, S; Sadée, W

    1992-09-01

    The clonal human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH-SY5Y was previously shown to express mu-opioid and alpha 2-adrenoceptors which are both negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Because of the potential use of alpha 2-agonists in the treatment of narcotic dependence, we tested the interactions among he alpha 2-agonists, clonidine and norepinephrine, and morphine on AC in SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with retinoic acid resulting in partial neuronal differentiation greatly enhanced the cells' sensitivity towards adenylyl cyclase stimulation by prostaglandin E1, and its inhibition by morphine and alpha 2-agonists. Norepinephrine (EC50 = 69 nM) maximally inhibited prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation (by approximately 83%), and the alpha 2-agonist yohimbine reversed these effects. Clonidine (EC50 = 32 nM) was a partial agonist, with 50 to 60% maximal inhibition. The combined effects of morphine (maximum approximately 70% inhibition) and norepinephrine exceeded the effect of either agent alone, yielding more than 90% inhibition of prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation. As previously reported for morphine, only a partial tolerance was observed for adenylyl cyclase inhibition by norepinephrine. Further, no cross-tolerance was observed between clonidine and morphine. The combined results indicate that mu-opioid receptors and an alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype are colocalized on the same cells in SH-SY5Y culture, which hence serves as a model to study opioid-alpha 2-adrenergic interactions.

  18. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  19. Relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and response in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Berger, K.D.; Taylor, P.

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and the regulation of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist (/sup 3/H)prazosin and correlated with agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) coordinately activated Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, reflecting a substantial mobilization of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/, as well as a smaller /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. The agonist concentration dependences for influx and efflux were similar, with the order of potency expected for alpha 1 receptors (E greater than or equal to NE greater than PE). To determine the relationship between receptor occupancy and response, the slowly dissociating antagonist prazosin was used to inactivate specified fractions of the receptor population. A linear relationship was observed between the remaining activatable receptors and residual /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux elicited by E or NE, except at saturating agonist concentrations where some curvature was observed. Moreover, the concentration dependence for agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was shifted toward slightly higher concentrations of E or NE following prazosin inactivation. These results suggest the presence of a modest receptor reserve which is revealed by E or NE, but not by PE. Agonist occupation was measured over the same interval as receptor activation by competition with the initial rate of (/sup 3/H)prazosin association. All three agonists exhibited the major fraction of receptor occupation over the same concentration ranges required for the functional response. Exposure of receptors to specified agonist concentrations for 30 min had little effect on the number of receptors or their ligand affinities, whereas a 2.5-hr exposure to agonist decreased apparent agonist affinity as well as the number of receptors recognized by (/sup 3/H)prazosin.

  20. Monoterpenoid agonists of TRPV3

    PubMed Central

    Vogt-Eisele, A K; Weber, K; Sherkheli, M A; Vielhaber, G; Panten, J; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 is a thermosensitive ion channel expressed predominantly in the skin and neural tissues. It is activated by warmth and the monoterpene camphor and has been hypothesized to be involved in skin sensitization. A selection of monoterpenoid compounds was tested for TRPV3 activation to establish a structure-function relationship. The related channel TRPM8 is activated by cool temperatures and a number of chemicals, among them the monoterpene (-)-menthol. The overlap of the receptor pharmacology between the two channels was investigated. Experimental approach: Transfected HEK293 cells were superfused with the test substances. Evoked currents were measured in whole cell patch clamp measurements. Dose-response curves for the most potent agonists were obtained in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key results: Six monoterpenes significantly more potent than camphor were identified: 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol, carvacrol, dihydrocarveol, thymol, carveol and (+)-borneol. Their EC50 is up to 16 times lower than that of camphor. All of these compounds carry a ring-located hydroxyl group and neither activates TRPM8 to a major extent. Conclusions and implications: Terpenoids have long been recognized as medically and pharmacologically active compounds, although their molecular targets have only partially been identified. TRPV3 activation may be responsible for several of the described effects of terpenoids. We show here that TRPV3 is activated by a number of monoterpenes and that a secondary hydroxyl-group is a structural requirement. PMID:17420775

  1. The Implication of the First Agonist Bound Activated GPCR X-ray Structure on GPCR in Silico Modeling.

    PubMed

    Tautermann, Christofer S; Pautsch, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    The very recently published first X-ray structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor in its active state hosting a small molecule (PDB ID: 3P0G) reveals a lot of information about the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation process from a structural point of view. When compared to the inactive state crystal structure of β2, large differences are seen in the GPCR helical structure at the cytoplasmatic side, whereas very subtle changes occur at the ligand binding site. The observation that there are hardly any differences in the binding site of agonists and inverse agonists implies that in silico predictions of the efficacy of ligands will be very hard. This is illustrated by the example of an already published binding mode of a β2 agonist, which has been modeled into the inactive state X-ray structure of the β2 receptor. When comparing the modeled structure to the new activated X-ray structure, quantitative agreement of the binding mode is found, implying that the subtle changes between agonist binding to the activated state and inverse agonist binding to the inactive state can currently not be captured by standard in silico modeling methods.

  2. Seismic Inversion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-01

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  3. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  4. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  5. Pharmacological properties of the homomeric alpha 7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, D; Bertrand, S; Ballivet, M

    1992-10-26

    The pharmacological properties of the alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) were studied upon reconstitution in Xenopus oocytes. Channels formed by alpha 7 are about 10-fold more sensitive to nicotine and cytisine than to ACh but are little, if at all, activated by the ganglionic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP). Tubocurarine (TC) was found to act as a non-competitive inhibitor, whereas dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) behaves as a pure competitive inhibitor whose blockade is fast and fully reversible. In addition, the alpha 7 receptor displays a poor sensitivity to methonium salts. The pharmacological properties of the alpha 7 channels are readily distinguishable from those of other identified neuronal nicotinic receptors.

  6. [Safety of beta-agonists in asthma].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2014-01-01

    Beta 2 agonist bronchodilators (β2A) are very important part in the pharmacotherapy of bronchial asthma, a disease that progresses in the world in an epidemic way. The β2A are prescribed to millions of people around the world, therefore the safety aspects is of public interest. Short-Acting β2 Agonists (SABAs), such as albuterol inhaler, according to current evidence, confirming its safety when used as a quick-relief or rescue medication. The long-acting β2 agonists (LABAs) The long-acting bronchodilators β2A (Long acting β2 Agonists or LABAs) are used associated with inhaled corticosteroids as controller drugs for asthma exacerbationsaccess, for safety reasons LABAs are not recommended for use as monotherapy.

  7. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  8. Dopamine receptor partial agonists and addiction.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabricio A; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Many drugs abused by humans acutely facilitate, either directly or indirectly, dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic pathway. As a consequence dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists have been widely investigated as putative pharmacological therapies for addiction. This general strategy, however, has had only limited success due in part to poor treatment adherence and efficacy and the significant adverse effects of dopaminergic medications. In this perspective, we discuss the potential therapeutic use of dopamine receptor partial agonists in addiction, developed initially as antipsychotic agents. Recent research indicates that the dopamine D2 receptor partial agonists, such as aripiprazole, also shows useful ancillary efficacy in several animal models of psychostimulant and opioid addiction. Notably, these findings suggest that unlike full dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists these compounds have low abuse liability and are generally well tolerated. Indeed, partial dopamine agonists attenuate the rewarding properties of opioids without interfering with their analgesic effects. Herein we discuss the utility and potential of dopamine receptor partial agonists as treatments for both stimulant and non-stimulant drug addiction.

  9. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Thomas, Merlin C

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARalpha agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARgamma agonists, and more recently dual PPARalpha/gamma coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARgamma receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  10. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  11. Chirality inversion in the bilirubin molecular exciton.

    PubMed

    Boiadjiev, S E; Lightner, D A

    2001-05-15

    The bichromophoric pigment bilirubin acts as a molecular exciton in its UV-visible and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. In both polar and nonpolar solvents, an optically active analog, (beta R,beta 'R)-dimethylmesobilirubin-XIII alpha (1), exhibits intense bisignate CD Cotton effects in the region of its long wavelength UV-vis absorption near 400 nm: Delta epsilon(434)(max) + 337, Delta epsilon(389)(max) - 186 (CHCl(3)), and Delta epsilon(431)(max) + 285, Delta epsilon(386)(max) - 177 (CH(3)OH). However, introduction of an amine into a CHCl(3) solution of 1 causes the Cotton effect signs to become inverted, e.g., after addition of NH(3), Delta epsilon(433)(max) - 345, Delta epsilon(389)(max) + 243, and after addition of ethylene diamine, Delta epsilon(435)(max) - 420, Delta epsilon(390)(max) + 299. The sign inversions imply inversion of molecular chirality of the bilirubin and the phenomenon appears to be general for amines, including alpha,omega-diamines. 1,8-Diaminooctane was found to be more effective than longer or shorter chain analogs in producing CD sign inversion.

  12. Interactions of the alpha2A-adrenoceptor with multiple Gi-family G-proteins: studies with pertussis toxin-resistant G-protein mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, A; Watson-Koken, M A; Rees, S; Lee, M; Milligan, G

    1997-01-01

    The alpha2A-adrenoceptor is the prototypic example of the family of G-protein-coupled receptors which function by activation of 'Gi-like' pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. A number of members of this subfamily of G-proteins are often co-expressed in a single cell type. To examine the interaction of this receptor with individual Gi-family G-proteins the porcine alpha2A-adrenoceptor was transiently transfected into COS-7 cells either alone or with each of wild-type Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha or mutations of each of these G-proteins in which the cysteine residue which is the target for pertussis toxin-catalysed ADP-ribosylation was exchanged for a glycine residue. The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 stimulated both high-affinity GTPase activity and the binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-35thio]-triphosphate (GTP[35S]), when expressed without any additional G-protein. These effects were greatly reduced by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. Co-expression of each of the wild-type Gi-like G-protein alpha-subunits resulted in enhanced agonist activation of the cellular G-protein population which was fully prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Co-expression of the receptor along with the cysteine-to-glycine mutations of Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha resulted in agonist stimulation of these G-proteins, which was as great as that of the wild type proteins, but now the agonist stimulation produced over that due to the activation of endogenously expressed Gi-like G-proteins was resistant to pertussis toxin treatment. The Cys --> Gly mutations of Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha were each also able to limit agonist-mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. The degree of agonist-mediated activation of the pertussis toxin-resistant mutant of Gi1alpha was correlated highly both with the level of expression of this G-protein and with the level of expression of the alpha2A-adrenoceptor. Half-maximal stimulation of high-affinity GTPase

  13. Solar inverse theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, D.

    1984-12-01

    Helioseismological inversion, as with the inversion of any other data, is divided into three phases. The first is the solution of the so-called forward problem: namely, the calculation of the eigenfrequencies of a theoretical equilibrium state. The second is an attempt to understand the results, either empirically by determining how those frequencies vary as chosen parameters defining the equilibrium model are varied, or analytically from asymptotic expansions in limiting cases of high order or degree. The third phase is to pose and solve an inverse problem, which seeks to find a plausible equilibrium model of the Sun whose eigenfrequencies are consistent with observation. The three phases are briefly discussed in this review, and the third, which is not yet widely used in helioseismology, is illustrated with some selected inversions of artificial solar data.

  14. nAChR agonist-induced cognition enhancement: integration of cognitive and neuronal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Parikh, Vinay; Howe, William M

    2009-10-01

    The identification and characterization of drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders has been hampered by the absence of comprehensive hypotheses. Such hypotheses consist of (a) a precisely defined cognitive operation that fundamentally underlies a range of cognitive abilities and capacities and, if impaired, contributes to the manifestation of diverse cognitive symptoms; (b) defined neuronal mechanisms proposed to mediate the cognitive operation of interest; (c) evidence indicating that the putative cognition enhancer facilitates these neuronal mechanisms; (d) and evidence indicating that the cognition enhancer facilitates cognitive performance by modulating these underlying neuronal mechanisms. The evidence on the neuronal and attentional effects of nAChR agonists, specifically agonists selective for alpha4beta2* nAChRs, has begun to support such a hypothesis. nAChR agonists facilitate the detection of signals by augmenting the transient increases in prefrontal cholinergic activity that are necessary for a signal to gain control over behavior in attentional contexts. The prefrontal microcircuitry mediating these effects include alpha4beta2* nAChRs situated on the terminals of thalamic inputs and the glutamatergic stimulation of cholinergic terminals via ionotropic glutamate receptors. Collectively, this evidence forms the basis for hypothesis-guided development and characterization of cognition enhancers.

  15. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A; Lynch, Joseph W

    2007-12-01

    Models describing the structural changes mediating Cys loop receptor activation generally give little attention to the possibility that different agonists may promote activation via distinct M2 pore-lining domain structural rearrangements. We investigated this question by comparing the effects of different ligands on the conformation of the external portion of the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor M2 domain. Conformational flexibility was assessed by tethering a rhodamine fluorophore to cysteines introduced at the 19' or 22' positions and monitoring fluorescence and current changes during channel activation. During glycine activation, fluorescence of the label attached to R19'C increased by approximately 20%, and the emission peak shifted to lower wavelengths, consistent with a more hydrophobic fluorophore environment. In contrast, ivermectin activated the receptors without producing a fluorescence change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus, results from two separate labeled residues support the conclusion that the glycine receptor M2 domain responds with distinct conformational changes to activation by different agonists. PMID:17911099

  16. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations.

  17. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  18. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  19. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  20. Complex cardiovascular actions of alpha-adrenergic receptors expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarii of rats.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad E R; Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Takagishi, Miwa; Cui, He; Yamazaki, Toshiya; Kohsaka, Akira; Maeda, Masanobu

    2009-07-01

    Although both alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are known to be expressed in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the functional significance of these receptors is still not fully established. In this study, we microinjected alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-AR agonists into the NTS of urethane-anaesthetized Wister rats to study the cardiovascular effects in response to their activation. When the alpha(1)-AR agonist phenylephrine was microinjected into the area where barosensitive neurons are dominantly located (baro-NTS), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were significantly elevated. When tested in the area where chemosensitive neurons are dominantly located (chemo-NTS), however, MAP and HR were significantly decreased. Pretreatment with the non-specific alpha-AR antagonist phentolamine into the NTS inhibited the phenylephrine-induced cardiovascular responses. In contrast, microinjection of the alpha(2)-AR agonist clonidine into either the baro-NTS or the chemo-NTS decreased MAP and HR; they were also inhibited by the alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine. Moreover, we immunohistochemically identified that cardiovascular responses induced by alpha(1)-ARs may be mediated by NTS neurons while those induced by alpha(2)-ARs may be mediated by astrocytes located in the barosensitive and chemosensitive areas of the NTS. These results suggest that both types of alpha-AR expressed in the NTS may be involved in regulating cardiovascular homeostasis via modulation of input signals from baroreceptor and chemoreceptor afferents; however, cardiovascular responses produced by stimulation of alpha(1)-ARs are strictly location specific within the NTS.

  1. Conversion of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist into an agonist by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ju, G; Labriola-Tompkins, E; Campen, C A; Benjamin, W R; Karas, J; Plocinski, J; Biondi, D; Kaffka, K L; Kilian, P L; Eisenberg, S P

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is a naturally occurring protein that binds to the IL-1 receptor present on T cells, fibroblasts, and other cell types and acts to block IL-1-induced responses. IL-1ra is a pure antagonist and has no agonist activity in in vitro or in vivo systems. By site-specific mutagenesis, an analog of IL-1ra was created that contained a substitution of a single amino acid, Lys-145----Asp. This analog, IL-1ra K145D, exhibited partial agonist activity in the D10.G4.1 cell proliferation assay. The newly acquired agonist activity could not be neutralized by antisera to IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta, but it could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody to the T-cell IL-1 receptor. The analog also showed agonist activity as assayed by increased prostaglandin E2 synthesis from CHO cells expressing recombinant mouse IL-1 receptor. These results with IL-1ra K145D demonstrate the importance of the region surrounding the corresponding Asp-145 residue in IL-1 beta for triggering the biological response to IL-1. Images PMID:1826365

  2. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L.

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  3. The cardiovascular effects of PFRFamide and PFR(Tic)amide, a possible agonist and antagonist of neuropeptide FF (NPFF).

    PubMed

    Huang, E Y; Li, J Y; Tan, P P; Wong, C H; Chen, J C

    2000-02-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF), an endogenous opioid-related neuromodulater, has been reported to show significant effects on the cardiovascular system, namely elevation of arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in rats. In the present study, we synthesized two novel NPFF analogs, PFRFamide (putative NPFF agonist) and PFR(Tic)amide (putative NPFF antagonist), and examined their cardiovascular effect on BP and HR in anesthetized rats. The arterial mean BP and HR were measured by way of direct femoral artery catheterization. The data showed that PFRFamide increased BP in a dose-dependent manner, while PFR(Tic)amide decreased BP dose-dependently. These results revealed the possibility of PFRFamide and PFR(Tic)amide to be NPFF agonist and antagonist (or inverse agonist), respectively. These two NPFF analogs may possess potential in new drug design, and the NPFF system could be very important in mammalian cardiovascular function.

  4. Evidence that nicotinic alpha(7) receptors are not involved in the hyperlocomotor and rewarding effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grottick, A J; Trube, G; Corrigall, W A; Huwyler, J; Malherbe, P; Wyler, R; Higgins, G A

    2000-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic receptors are comprised of combinations of alpha(2-9) and beta(2-4) subunits arranged to form a pentameric receptor. Currently, the principal central nervous system (CNS) subtypes are believed to be alpha(4)beta(2) and a homomeric alpha(7) receptor, although other combinations almost certainly exist. The identity of the nicotinic receptor subtype(s) involved in the rewarding effects of nicotine are unknown. In the present study, using some recently described subtype selective nicotinic agonists and antagonists, we investigated the role of the alpha(7) nicotinic receptor in the mediation of nicotine-induced hyperactivity and self-administration in rats. The alpha(7) receptor agonists AR-R 17779 and DMAC failed to stimulate locomotor activity in both nicotine-nontolerant and -sensitized rats. In contrast, nicotine and the putative alpha(4)beta(2) subtype selective agonist SIB1765F increased activity in both experimental conditions. In nicotine-sensitized rats, the high affinity (including the alpha(4)beta(2) subtype) nicotinic antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE), but not the selective alpha(7) antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), antagonized a nicotine-induced hyperactivity. Similarly, DHbetaE, but not MLA, pretreatment reduced nicotine self-administration. Electrophysiology experiments using Xenopus oocytes expressing the human alpha(7) receptor confirmed AR-R 17779 and DMAC to be potent agonists at this site, and further studies demonstrated the ability of systemically administered AR-R 17779 to penetrate into the CNS. Taken together, these results indicate a negligible role of alpha(7) receptors in nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion and reward in the rat, and support the view for an involvement of a member from the high-affinity nicotinic receptor subclass, possibly alpha(4)beta(2). Issues such as drug potency, CNS penetration, and desensitization of the alpha(7) receptor are discussed.

  5. Mapping of the acetylcholine binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: ( sup 3 H)nicotine as an agonist photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, R.E.; Cohen, J.B. )

    1991-07-16

    The agonist ({sup 3}H)nicotine was used as a photoaffinity label for the acetylcholine binding sties on the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). ({sup 3}H)Nicotine binds at equilibrium with K{sub eq} = 0.6 {mu}M to the agonist binding sites. Irradiation with 254-nm light of AChR-rich membranes equilibrated with ({sup 3}H)nicotine resulted in covalent incorporation into the {alpha}- and {gamma}-subunits, which was inhibited by agonists and competitive antagonists but not by noncompetitive antagonists. Inhibition of labeling by d-tubocurarine demonstrated that the {alpha}-subunit was labeled via both agonist sites but the {gamma}-subunit was labeled only via the site that binds d-tubocurarine with high affinity. Chymotryptic digestion of the {alpha}-subunit confirmed that Try-198 was the principal amino acid labeled by ({sup 3}H)nicotine. This confirmation required a novel radiosequencing strategy employing o-phthalaldehyde ({sup 3}H)Nicotine, which is the first photoaffinity agonist used, labels primarily Tyr-198 in contrast to competitive antagonist affinity labels, which label primarily Tyr-190 and Cys-192/Cys-193.

  6. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E.

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  7. beta2-Agonists at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kenneth D

    2006-01-01

    The different approaches that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had adopted to beta2-agonists and the implications for athletes are reviewed by a former Olympic team physician who later became a member of the Medical Commission of the IOC (IOC-MC). Steadily increasing knowledge of the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on health, is concerned with the fact that oral beta2-agonists may be anabolic, and rapid increased use of inhaled beta2-agonists by elite athletes has contributed to the changes to the IOC rules. Since 2001, the necessity for athletes to meet IOC criteria (i.e., that they have asthma and/or exercise-induced asthma [EIA]) has resulted in improved management of athletes. The prevalence of beta2-agonist use by athletes mirrors the known prevalence of asthma symptoms in each country, although athletes in endurance events have the highest prevalence. The age-of-onset of asthma/EIA in elite winter athletes may be atypical. Of the 193 athletes at the 2006 Winter Olympics who met th IOC's criteria, only 32.1% had childhood asthma and 48.7% of athletes reported onset at age 20 yr or older. These findings lead to speculation that years of intense endurance training may be a causative factor in bronchial hyperreactivity. The distinction between oral (prohibited in sports) and inhaled salbutamol is possible, but athletes must be warned that excessive use of inhaled salbutamol can lead to urinary concentrations similar to those observed after oral administration. This article provides justification that athletes should provide evidence of asthma or EIA before being permitted to use inhaled beta2-agonists. PMID:17085798

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha control of lipid and glucose metabolism in human white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribet, Carole; Montastier, Emilie; Valle, Carine; Bezaire, Véronic; Mazzucotelli, Anne; Mairal, Aline; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)alpha in human white adipocyte metabolism and at comparing PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma actions in these cells. Primary cultures of human fat cells were treated with the PPAR alpha agonist GW7647 or the PPAR gamma agonist rosiglitazone. Changes in gene expression were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot and metabolic studies were performed to identify the biological effects elicited by PPAR agonist treatments. GW7647 induced an up-regulation of beta-oxidation gene expression and increased palmitate oxidation. Unexpectedly, glycolysis was strongly reduced at transcriptional and functional levels by GW7647 leading to a decrease in pyruvate and lactate production. Glucose oxidation was decreased. Triglyceride esterification and de novo lipogenesis were inhibited by the PPAR alpha agonist. GW7647-induced alterations were abolished by a treatment with a PPAR alpha antagonist. Small interfering RNA-mediated extinction of PPAR alpha gene expression in hMADS adipocytes attenuated GW7647 induction of palmitate oxidation. Rosiglitazone had no major impact on glycolysis and beta-oxidation. Altogether these results show that PPAR alpha can selectively up-regulate beta-oxidation and decrease glucose utilization in human white adipocytes.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha control of lipid and glucose metabolism in human white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribet, Carole; Montastier, Emilie; Valle, Carine; Bezaire, Véronic; Mazzucotelli, Anne; Mairal, Aline; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)alpha in human white adipocyte metabolism and at comparing PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma actions in these cells. Primary cultures of human fat cells were treated with the PPAR alpha agonist GW7647 or the PPAR gamma agonist rosiglitazone. Changes in gene expression were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot and metabolic studies were performed to identify the biological effects elicited by PPAR agonist treatments. GW7647 induced an up-regulation of beta-oxidation gene expression and increased palmitate oxidation. Unexpectedly, glycolysis was strongly reduced at transcriptional and functional levels by GW7647 leading to a decrease in pyruvate and lactate production. Glucose oxidation was decreased. Triglyceride esterification and de novo lipogenesis were inhibited by the PPAR alpha agonist. GW7647-induced alterations were abolished by a treatment with a PPAR alpha antagonist. Small interfering RNA-mediated extinction of PPAR alpha gene expression in hMADS adipocytes attenuated GW7647 induction of palmitate oxidation. Rosiglitazone had no major impact on glycolysis and beta-oxidation. Altogether these results show that PPAR alpha can selectively up-regulate beta-oxidation and decrease glucose utilization in human white adipocytes. PMID:19887568

  10. Stimulation of microglial metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu2 triggers tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced neurotoxicity in concert with microglial-derived Fas ligand.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Deanna L; Jones, Fleur; Kubota, Eva S F Chen Seho; Pocock, Jennifer M

    2005-03-16

    Activated microglia may be detrimental to neuronal survival in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, strategies that reduce microglial neurotoxicity may have therapeutic benefit. Stimulation of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors on rat primary microglia with the specific group II agonist 2S,2'R,3'R-2-(2',3'-dicarboxy-cyclopropyl)glycine for 24 h induced microglial activation and resulted in a neurotoxic microglial phenotype. These effects were attributable to preferential mGlu2 stimulation, because N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate, a specific mGlu3 agonist, did not induce microglial activation or neurotoxicity. Stimulation of microglial mGlu2 but not mGlu3 induced caspase-3 activation in cerebellar granule neurons in culture, using microglial-conditioned media as well as cocultures. Stimulation of microglial mGlu2 induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) release, which contributed to microglial neurotoxicity mediated via neuronal TNF receptor 1 and caspase-3 activation. Stimulation of microglial group I or III mGlu receptors did not induce TNFalpha release. TNFalpha was only neurotoxic in the presence of microglia or microglial-conditioned medium. The toxicity of TNFalpha could be prevented by coexposure of neurons to conditioned medium from microglia stimulated by the specific group III agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphono-butyric acid. The neurotoxicity of TNFalpha derived from mGlu2-stimulated microglia was potentiated by microglial-derived Fas ligand (FasL), the death receptor ligand. FasL was constitutively expressed in microglia and shed after mGlu2 stimulation. Our data suggest that selective and inverse modulation of microglial mGlu2 and mGlu3 may prove a therapeutic target in neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. PMID:15772355

  11. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity. PMID:12398339

  12. Three-dimensional common-feature hypotheses for octopamine agonist arylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Hirashim, Akinori; Morimoto, Masako; Kuwano, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Eto, Morifusa

    2002-10-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 12 octopamine (OA) agonist arylethanolamines (AEAs). Among the 10 common-featured models generated by program catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid (HBA1) features was considered to be important in evaluating the OA activity. OA mapped well onto all the HBD and HBA1 features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, for some inactive compounds, their lack of affinity is primarily due to their inability to achieve an energetically favorable conformation shared by the active compounds. Taken together, structures of a 4-OH-Ph, alpha-OH, and a primary amine are important for OA activities. The present studies on OA agonists demonstrate that an HBD and an HBA1 sites located on the molecule seem to be essential for OA activity.

  13. Recent advances in the development of farnesoid X receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are nuclear hormone receptors expressed in high amounts in body tissues that participate in bilirubin metabolism including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. Bile acids (BAs) are the natural ligands of the FXRs. FXRs regulate the expression of the gene encoding for cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis. In addition, FXRs play a critical role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin sensitivity. FXRs also modulate live growth and regeneration during liver injury. Preclinical studies have shown that FXR activation protects against cholestasis-induced liver injury. Moreover, FXR activation protects against fatty liver injury in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and improved hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Obeticholic acid (OCA), a 6α-ethyl derivative of the natural human BA chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the first-in-class selective FXR agonist that is ~100-fold more potent than CDCA. Preliminary human clinical trials have shown that OCA is safe and effective. In a phase II clinical trial, administration of OCA was well-tolerated, increased insulin sensitivity and reduced markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In two clinical trials of OCA in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a progressive cholestatic liver disease, OCA significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, an important disease marker that correlates well with clinical outcomes of patients with PBC. Together, these studies suggest that FXR agonists could potentially be used as therapeutic tools in patients suffering from nonalcoholic fatty and cholestatic liver diseases. Larger and Longer-term studies are currently ongoing. PMID:25705637

  14. Temporal modulations of agonist and antagonist muscle activities accompanying improved performance of ballistic movements.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nan; Yamashita, Takamasa; Ni, Zhen; Takahashi, Makoto; Murakami, Tsuneji; Yahagi, Susumu; Kasai, Tatsuya

    2008-02-01

    Although many studies have examined performance improvements of ballistic movement through practice, it is still unclear how performance advances while maintaining maximum velocity, and how the accompanying triphasic electromyographic (EMG) activity is modified. The present study focused on the changes in triphasic EMG activity, i.e., the first agonist burst (AG1), the second agonist burst (AG2), and the antagonist burst (ANT), that accompanied decreases in movement time and error. Twelve healthy volunteers performed 100 ballistic wrist flexion movements in ten 10-trial sessions under the instruction to "maintain maximum velocity throughout the experiment and to stop the limb at the target as fast and accurately as possible". Kinematic parameters (position and velocity) and triphasic EMG activities from the agonist (flexor carpi radialis) and antagonist (extensor carpi radialis) muscles were recorded. Comparison of the results obtained from the first and the last 10 trials, revealed that movement time, movement error, and variability of amplitudes reduced with practice, and that maximum velocity and time to maximum velocity remained constant. EMG activities showed that AG1 and AG2 durations were reduced, whereas ANT duration did not change. Additionally, ANT and AG2 latencies were reduced. Integrated EMG of AG1 was significantly reduced as well. Analysis of the alpha angle (an index of the rate of recruitment of the motoneurons) showed that there was no change in either AG1 or AG2. Correlation analysis of alpha angles between these two bursts further revealed that the close relationship of AG1 and AG2 was kept constant through practice. These findings led to the conclusion that performance improvement in ballistic movement is mainly due to the temporal modulations of agonist and antagonist muscle activities when maximum velocity is kept constant. Presumably, a specific strategy is consistently applied during practice.

  15. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  16. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W. )

    1989-02-21

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid {sup 86}Rb{sup +} quenched-flux assays at 4 {degree}C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k{sub d} observed without procaine. The dependence of k{sub r} on (procaine) is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of {alpha}-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k{sub r}'s dependence on (ACh) in channel-activating range closely parallels that of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux response to ACh.

  17. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans. PMID:27039035

  18. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

  19. Gene expression in hypothalamus, liver and adipose tissues and food intake reponse to melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) agonist in pigs expressing MC4R mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional profiling was used to identify genetic mechanisms that respond to alpha- melanocortin stimulating hormone (MSH), a melanocortin-3 and 4-receptor (MC3/4-R) agonist. Three MC4R genotypes (2 homozygous and the heterozygous for MC4R) were selected. Six pigs per genotype per treatment wer...

  20. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  1. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  2. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  3. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  4. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064

    SciTech Connect

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  5. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  6. Alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta adrenergic signal transduction in cultured uterine myocytes.

    PubMed

    Phillippe, M; Saunders, T; Bangalore, S

    1990-04-01

    The following studies were undertaken to develop a cultured uterine myocyte model which would allow further clarification of the adrenergic signal transduction mechanisms utilized by these myocytes. After mechanical removal of the endometrium, rabbit uterine myocytes were isolated by an overnight enzymatic disaggregation using collagenase and DNase I. The isolated myocytes were maintained in culture in 75-cm2 flasks containing Waymouth's MB 751/1 medium-10% fetal bovine serum along with 10(-8) M estradiol, penicillin, streptomycin, and Fungizone. The phase contrast and electron micrographic appearance of these cells was consistent with that previously reported for smooth muscle myocytes in culture. Immunocytochemical studies utilizing monoclonal anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin antibodies confirmed the presence of smooth muscle actin in these cultured myocytes. Western blot studies similarly confirmed the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin in rabbit myometrial tissue and the cultured myocytes, both the primary and F1 generation. After prelabeling the myocytes with [3H]inositol, adrenergic stimulation experiments demonstrated alpha-1 receptor mediated stimulation of inositol phosphates. Beta receptor stimulation experiments confirmed cAMP production in these cultured myocytes, and the ability of clonidine, an alpha-2 agonist, to inhibit forskolin stimulated cAMP production confirmed the presence of functional alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in these myocytes. In conclusion, these cultured rabbit uterine myocytes have provided an in vitro model which can be utilized to further clarify the adrenergic receptor signal transduction mechanisms in genital tract smooth muscle.

  7. Inversion of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, R. B.; Levinger, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    We use the formalism of hyperspherical harmonics to calculate several moments for the triton photoeffect, for a Volkov spin-independent potential. First, we improve the accuracy of Maleki's calculations of the moments σ2 and σ3 by including more terms in the hyperspherical expansion. We also calculate moments σ0 and σ1 for a Serber mixture. We find reasonable agreement between our moments found by sum rules and those found from the cross sections calculated by Fang et al. and Levinger-Fitzgibbon. We then develop a technique of inversion of a finite number of moments by making the assumption that the cross section can be written as a sum of several Laguerre polynomials multiplied by a decreasing exponential. We test our inversion technique successfully on several model potentials. We then modify it and apply it to the five moments (σ-1 to σ3) for a force without exchange, and find fair agreement with Fang's values of the cross section. Finally, we apply the inversion technique to our three moments (σ-1,σ0,and σ1) for a Serber mixture, and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffects, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure the ...

  10. Opioid agonist maintenance for probationers: patient-level predictors of treatment retention, drug use, and crime.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Kinlock, Timothy W; Kelly, Sharon M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Gordon, Michael S; Schwartz, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    This study examined outcomes and their predictors among 181 probationers enrolling in opioid agonist maintenance with methadone or levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM). Participants were interviewed at treatment entry and 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. Treatment retention and frequency of heroin use, cocaine use, and income-generating criminal activity were examined using survival and longitudinal analyses. Participants reported marked reductions in drug use and crime relative to treatment entry. A number of patient characteristics associated with various outcomes were identified. The findings support engaging probationers in treatment and highlight patient factors that might influence outcomes.

  11. Agonist-induced ADP-ribosylation of a cytosolic protein in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bruene, B.; Molina Y Vedia, L.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-05-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate stimulated the mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of a 42-kDa cytosolic protein of human platelets. This effect was mediated by protein kinase C activation and was inhibited by protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. It also was prevented by prostacyclin, which is known to inhibit the phospholipase C-induced formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol, which is one of the endogenous activators of protein kinase C. On sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 42-kDa protein that is ADP-ribosylated by {alpha}-thrombin was clearly distinct from the {alpha} subunits of membrane-bound inhibitory and stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins, respectively G{sub i{alpha}} and G{sub s{alpha}}; the 47-kDa protein that is phosphorylated by protein kinase C in platelets; and the 39-kDa protein that has been shown to be endogenously ADP-ribosylated by agents that release nitric oxide. This information shows that agonist-induced activation of protein kinase leads to the ADP-ribosylation of a specific protein. This covalent modification might have a functional role in platelet activation.

  12. Down-regulation of the G-proteins Gq alpha and G11 alpha by transfected human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells is independent of receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed Central

    van de Westerlo, E; Yang, J; Logsdon, C; Williams, J A

    1995-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors show a 40-50% reduction in the immunoreactive G-proteins Gq alpha and G11 alpha when stimulated with the cholinergic agonist carbachol. This effect is seen after 9 h, is maximal after 24 h, and occurs over a range of carbachol concentrations that activate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in these cells. The effect is specific for Gq alpha family proteins as Gs alpha was slightly increased after carbachol treatment and G13 alpha was unchanged. Using a urea gel system, we were able to resolve Gq alpha and G11 alpha, both of which were down-regulated by carbachol. An M3 receptor mutant, with C-terminal threonines changed to alanines as described previously, binds ligand and activates phosphoinositide hydrolysis normally but is not down-regulated in response to carbachol. This receptor, however, induces Gq alpha/G11 alpha down-regulation similarly to wild-type M3 receptors, indicating that G-protein down-regulation is not directly coupled to receptor down-regulation. Thus down-regulation of Gq alpha and G11 alpha may contribute to heterologous desensitization particularly at longer times of agonist exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7654194

  13. Alpha-MSH and coat color changes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Thody, A J; Ridley, K; Carter, R J; Lucas, A M; Shuster, S

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alpha-MSH on coat color was examined in viable yellow mice (C3H/He-A*vy). These mice normally grow a coat of darkly pigmented hair at puberty. This darkening effect was also evident in hair that grew in a region that had been plucked at 13 days of age. Administration of alpha-MSH increased the darkness of this hair and the hair which grew naturally in an unplucked area. However, the natural coat darkening that occurred at puberty was not associated with an increase in plasma immunoreactive alpha-MSH levels. Moreover, although bromocryptine, a dopamine agonist that inhibits alpha-MSH release from the pituitary reduced the darkness of the coat that grew after plucking the reduction in coat darkening was unrelated to changes in plasma alpha-MSH. Nevertheless, this effect of bromocryptine was reversed when alpha-MSH was administered together with the drug. Apomorphine had no effect on coat darkening and produced only a slight decrease in plasma alpha-MSH. Melatonin reduced coat darkening slightly but, like apomorphine, had little effect on plasma alpha-MSH concentrations. Although alpha-MSH may have a physiological role in coat darkening in the C3H/He-A*vy mouse at puberty the response seems to be unrelated to an increase in circulating alpha-MSH. Thus, other factors, such as changes in melanocyte sensitivity to alpha-MSH or inhibitory mechanisms that prevent coat darkening during prepubertal and adult life may be involved in regulation of coat color in the viable yellow mouse. PMID:6531269

  14. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  15. Distribution and function of peripheral alpha-adrenoceptors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ruffolo, R R

    1985-05-01

    alpha-Adrenoceptors may be subdivided based on their anatomical distribution within the synapse. Presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors are generally of the alpha 2-subtype and modulate neurotransmitter liberation via a negative feedback mechanism. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors are usually of the alpha 1-subtype and mediate the response of the effector organ. Although this "anatomical" subclassification is generally applicable, many exceptions exist. A more useful classification of alpha-adrenoceptor subtypes is based on a pharmacological characterization in which selective agonists and antagonists are used. Peripheral alpha-adrenoceptors are critical in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in arteries and veins represent a mixed population of alpha 1/alpha 2-adrenoceptors, with both subtypes mediating vasoconstriction. In the peripheral arterial circulation, postsynaptic vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors are found in the adrenergic neuroeffector junction, whereas postsynaptic vascular alpha 2-adrenoceptors are located extrajunctionally. In the venous circulation, it appears that alpha 2-adrenoceptors may be predominantly junctional, whereas alpha 1-adrenoceptors may be predominantly extrajunctional. It has been proposed that junctional alpha-adrenoceptors will respond predominantly to norepinephrine liberated from sympathetic neurons, whereas extrajunctional alpha-adrenoceptors likely respond to circulating catecholamines. The functional role of extrajunctional alpha-adrenoceptors may be more important in disease states such as hypertension and congestive heart failure where circulating levels of catecholamines may be high and contribute to the maintenance of elevated vascular resistance. alpha 2-Adrenoceptors are also associated with the intima and may play a role in the release of an endogenous relaxing factor from the endothelium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2989947

  16. alpha. -Adrenergic vasoconstriction and receptor subtypes in large coronary arteries of calves

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.A.; Vatner, D.E.; Knight, D.R.; Graham, R.M.; Homcy, C.J.; Vatner, S.F. New England Regional Primate Research Center, Southborough, MA )

    1988-12-01

    The authors investigated {alpha}-adrenoceptor subtype distribution in large coronary arteries from both functional and biochemical perspectives. The effects of intracoronary administration of the selective {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, of the selective {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor agonist B-HT 920 and of the mixed {alpha}{sub 1+2}-adrenoceptor agonist norepinephrine were examined on measurements of left circumflex coronary artery diameter in conscious calves. After {beta}-adrenergic blockade, equivalent reductions in large coronary artery diameter were observed with phenylephrine, B-HT, and norepinephrine. Phenylephrine-induced constrictions were abolished by prazosin, an {alpha}{sub 1}-selective antagonist, but unaffected by rauwolscine, an {alpha}{sub 2}-selective antagonist. Conversely, the B-HT-induced constriction was abolished by rauwolscine but unaffected by prazosin. Coronary constriction with norepinephrine was attenuated with either prazosin or rauwolscine and abolished by the two antagonists combined. Ligand-binding studies in which ({sup 3}H)prazosin and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and sarcolemmal membranes were used revealed an {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptor density of 15 {plus minus} 3.1 fmol/mg protein with a dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of 0.7 {plus minus} 0.2 nM and an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor density of 68 {plus minus} 5.1 fmol/mg protein, with a K{sub D} of 7.4 {plus minus} 1.2 nM. Thus large coronary arteries of the calf contain both {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor subtypes, each of which elicits constriction of the large coronary artery in the conscious animal.

  17. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  18. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  19. Inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlande, Helcio Rangel Barreto

    We present the solution of the following inverse problems: (1) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance Between Periodically Contacting Surfaces; (2) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance During Solidification via Conjugate Gradient Method; (3) Determination of the Reaction Function in a Reaction-Diffusion Parabolic Problem; and (4) Simultaneous Estimation of Thermal Diffusivity and Relaxation Time with Hyperbolic Heat Conduction Model. Also, we present the solution of a direct problem entitled: Transient Thermal Constriction Resistance in a Finite Heat Flux Tube. The Conjugate Gradient Method with Adjoint Equation was used in chapters 1-3. The more general function estimation approach was treated in these chapters. In chapter 1, we solve the inverse problem of estimating the timewise variation of the interface conductance between periodically contacting solids, under quasi-steady-state conditions. The present method is found to be more accurate than the B-Spline approach for situations involving small periods, which are the most difficult on which to perform the inverse analysis. In chapter 2, we estimate the timewise variation of the interface conductance between casting and mold during the solidification of aluminum. The experimental apparatus used in this study is described. In chapter 3, we present the estimation of the reaction function in a one dimensional parabolic problem. A comparison of the present function estimation approach with the parameter estimation technique, wing B-Splines to approximate the reaction function, revealed that the use of function estimation reduces the computer time requirements. In chapter 4 we present a finite difference solution for the transient constriction resistance in a cylinder of finite length with a circular contact surface. A numerical grid generation scheme was used to concentrate grid points in the regions of high temperature gradients in order to reduce discretization errors. In chapter 6, we

  20. [alpha]2A-Adrenoceptor Stimulation Improves Prefrontal Cortical Regulation of Behavior through Inhibition of cAMP Signaling in Aging Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verduzco, Luis; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Ramos, Brian P.; Stark, David

    2006-01-01

    The working-memory functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are improved by stimulation of postsynaptic, [alpha]2A-adrenoceptors, especially in aged animals with PFC cognitive deficits. Thus, the [alpha]2A-adrenoceptor agonist, guanfacine, greatly improves working-memory performance in monkeys and rats following systemic administration or…

  1. Behavioral action of ethanol in Porsolt's forced swim test: modulation by 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnan-20-one.

    PubMed

    Hirani, K; Khisti, R T; Chopde, C T

    2002-12-01

    Ethanol is known to increase cortical and plasma content of GABAergic neurosteroid 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP) which is responsible for some of its behavioral and electrophysiological effects. We have previously demonstrated the antidepressant like effect of 3alpha,5alpha-THP in mice. This study investigated the role of 3alpha,5alpha-THP in acute, chronic and withdrawal effects of ethanol using mouse forced swim test (FST) paradigm. While acute systemic ethanol (2 or 2.5 g/kg) administration exhibited an antidepressant like effect, its prolonged consumption produced tolerance to this effect and its withdrawal, on the other hand, elicited enhanced behavioral despair (depression). The antidepressant like effect of ethanol was potentiated by GABA(A) receptor agonist, muscimol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), 3alpha,5alpha-THP (0.5, 1 or 2 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) and by neurosteroidogenic drugs viz. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine (5 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.), agonist at mitochondrial diazepam binding inhibitor receptor, FGIN 1-27 (0.5 or 1 microg/mouse, i.c.v.), or 11beta-hydroxylase inhibitor, metyrapone (0.5 or 1 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) which are known to increase endogenous 3alpha,5alpha-THP content. Furthermore, inhibition of the endogenous neurosteroid biosynthesis by drugs like 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, finasteride (50 mg/kg, s.c.), 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitor, trilostane (30 mg/kg i.p.) or 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.p.) and GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline (1 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the antidepressant like effect of ethanol. Withdrawal of ethanol from mice consuming it chronically displayed enhanced behavioral despair and elicited tolerance to antidepressant like action of acute ethanol (2.5, 3 or 3.5 g/kg). Moreover, sub-antidepressant doses (0.25 or 0.5 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) but not imipramine (1 mg/kg, i

  2. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, Giovanna; Rechler, Matthew M.

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.

  3. alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor mechanisms in spontaneous contractile activity of rat ileal longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Roland; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Shaw, Sidney; Balsiger, Bruno M

    2005-02-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is influenced by adrenergic modulation. Our aim was to identify specific subtypes of adrenergic receptors involved in inhibitory mechanisms that modulate gut smooth muscle contractile activity. Muscle strips of rat ileal longitudinal muscle were evaluated for spontaneous contractile activity and for equimolar dose-responses (10(-7) to 3 x 10(-5) M) to the adrenergic agents norepinephrine (nonselective agonist), phenylephrine (alpha(1)-agonist), clonidine (alpha(2)-agonist), prenalterol (beta(1)-agonist), ritodrine (beta(2)-agonist), and ZD7114 (beta(3)-agonist) in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin (nonselective nerve blocker). Norepinephrine (3 x 10(-5) M) inhibited 65 +/- 6% (mean +/- SEM) of spontaneous contractile activity. The same molar dose of ritodrine, phenylephrine, or ZD7114 resulted in less inhibition (46 +/- 7%, 31 +/- 5%, and 39 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05). The calculated molar concentration of ZD7114 needed to induce 50% inhibition was similar to that of norepinephrine, whereas higher concentrations of phenylephrine or ritodrine were required. Clonidine and prenalterol had no effect on contractile activity. Blockade of intramural neural transmission by tetrodotoxin affected the responses to ritodrine and phenylephrine (but not to norepinephrine or ZD7114), suggesting that these agents exert part of their effects via neurally mediated enteric pathways. Our results suggest that adrenergic modulation of contractile activity in the rat ileum is mediated primarily by muscular beta(3)-, beta(2)-, and alpha(1)-receptor mechanisms; the latter two also involve neural pathways. PMID:15694819

  4. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  5. Inverse Functions and their Derivatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapper, Ernst

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method of interchanging the x-axis and y-axis for viewing the graph of the inverse function. Discussed are the inverse function and the usual proofs that are used for the function. (KR)

  6. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  7. Bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) selectively stimulate intracellular calcium signaling in different cat iris sphincter cells.

    PubMed

    Spada, Clayton S; Krauss, Achim H-P; Woodward, David F; Chen, June; Protzman, Charles E; Nieves, Amelia L; Wheeler, Larry A; Scott, David F; Sachs, George

    2005-01-01

    Bimatoprost is a synthetic analog of prostaglandin F(2 alpha) ethanolamide (prostamide F(2 alpha)), and shares a pharmacological profile consistent with that of the prostamides. Like prostaglandin F(2 alpha) carboxylic acid, bimatoprost potently lowers intraocular pressure in dogs, primates and humans. In order to distinguish its mechanism of action from prostaglandin F(2 alpha), fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine the effects of bimatoprost, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) on calcium signaling in resident cells of digested cat iris sphincter, a tissue which exhibits contractile responses to both agonists. Constant superfusion conditions obviated effective conversion of bimatoprost. Serial challenge with 100 nM bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) consistently evoked responses in different cells within the same tissue preparation, whereas prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) elicited signaling responses in the same cells. Bimatoprost-sensitive cells were consistently re-stimulated with bimatoprost only, and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) sensitive cells could only be re-stimulated with prostaglandin F(2 alpha). The selective stimulation of different cells in the same cat iris sphincter preparation by bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha), along with the complete absence of observed instances in which the same cells respond to both agonists, strongly suggests the involvement of distinct receptors for prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and bimatoprost. Further, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) but not bimatoprost potently stimulated calcium signaling in isolated human embryonic kidney cells stably transfected with the feline- and human-prostaglandin F(2 alpha) FP-receptor and in human dermal fibroblast cells, and only prostaglandin F(2 alpha) competed with radioligand binding in HEK-feFP cells. These studies provide further evidence for the existence of a bimatoprost-sensitive receptor that is distinct from

  8. Agonistic and reproductive interactions in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, P M

    1984-12-01

    Reproductive and agonistic behaviors in Siamese fighting fish were investigated in eight experiments, and some consequences and determinants of these sequences were isolated. First, fights and the formation of dominance-subordinancy relations were studied. Second, it was determined that large body size as well as males' prior residency in a tank produced an agonistic advantage; the magnitude of this advantage was positively related to the duration of residency. Third, the prior-residency effect in Bettas was determined by males' familiarity with visual and/or tactile cues in their home tanks. Fourth, dominant males had greater access to living space and were more likely to display at a mirror, build nests, and approach females than were subordinates. Finally, it was discovered that chemical cues associated with presumedly inert plastic tank dividers influence Bettas' social behavior.

  9. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia.

  10. Alpha 1-adrenoceptors mediating contraction in arteries of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats are of the alpha 1D or alpha 1A subtypes.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; Ibarra, M

    1996-03-18

    Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor subtypes mediating contraction in carotid, aorta, mesenteric and caudal arteries from both Wistar Kyoto (WKY) normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats were investigated by using the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine and antagonized with selective, competitive antagonists WB-4101, 5-methyl urapidil or BMY 7378 (8-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-8-azaspiro(4,5)decane -7,9-dione dihydrochloride). Isometric tension changes were recorded after methoxamine addition to the arterial rings, and the effects of the antagonists determined. All the antagonists shifted to the right the concentration-response curve to methoxamine. pA2 values indicate that all arteries but caudal express the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype, since BMY 7378 values were high in these arteries. Due to the high pA2 values for 5-methyl urapidil and WB-4101 and the low values for BMY 7378 we conclude that the tail artery expresses the alpha 1A and not the alpha 1B subtype. No differences were found between both strains of rats, suggesting that hypertension does not modify the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in conductance arteries. PMID:8846824

  11. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. PMID:26832440

  12. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits.

  13. Chloride is an Agonist of Group II and III Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    DiRaddo, John O; Miller, Eric J; Bowman-Dalley, Carrie; Wroblewska, Barbara; Javidnia, Monica; Grajkowska, Ewa; Wolfe, Barry B; Liotta, Dennis C; Wroblewski, Jarda T

    2015-09-01

    The elemental anion chloride is generally considered a passive participant in neuronal excitability, and has never been shown to function as an agonist in its own right. We show that the antagonist-mediated, glutamate-independent inverse agonism of group II and III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors results from inhibition of chloride-mediated activation. In silico molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and functional assays demonstrate (1) that chloride is an agonist of mGlu3, mGlu4, mGlu6, and mGlu8 receptors with its own orthosteric site, and (2) that chloride is not an agonist of mGlu2 receptors. Molecular modeling-predicted and site-directed mutagenesis supported that this unique property of mGlu2 receptors results from a single divergent amino acid, highlighting a molecular switch for chloride insensitivity that is transduced through an arginine flip. Ultimately, these results suggest that activation of group II and III mGlu receptors is mediated not only by glutamate, but also by physiologically relevant concentrations of chloride. PMID:26089372

  14. Not Just a Drop in the Bucket-Inversion of Oxymetazoline Nasal Decongestant Container Increases Potential for Severe Pediatric Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Vivero, Lisa E; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    Oxymetazoline is an over-the-counter nasal decongestant with potent alpha agonist properties. In overdoses as small as 1-2 mL, toxicity can be seen including bradycardia and respiratory depression. We demonstrated that inverting the container increased the volume delivered 20- to 30-fold compared with holding it upright in an in vitro model.

  15. Accumbal noradrenaline that contributes to the alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated release of dopamine from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles in the nucleus accumbens is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools.

    PubMed

    Verheij, M M M; Cools, A R

    2009-04-01

    Alpha-adrenoceptors in the nucleus accumbens are known to inhibit accumbal dopamine release from reserpine-sensitive pools. The aim of this study was to test our previously reported hypothesis that accumbal noradrenaline that controls the dopamine release from these storage vesicles is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools. The sensitivity of accumbal alpha-adrenoceptors to noradrenergic agents depends on the amount of noradrenaline that is available in the synapse. In case the synaptic noradrenaline levels decrease, the conformation of alpha-adrenoceptors changes into a state that makes these receptors more sensitive to its agonists. The effects of alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, respectively reserpine, on the alpha-adrenoceptor-agonist-induced changes of accumbal dopamine release were investigated. Alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, but not reserpine, made accumbal postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors more sensitive to phenylephrine. These results indicate that noradrenaline that inhibits the release of dopamine from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles, via stimulation of accumbal postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools. The clinical impact of these data is discussed.

  16. The relative contribution of affinity and efficacy to agonist activity: organ selectivity of noradrenaline and oxymetazoline with reference to the classification of drug receptors.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, T P

    1984-01-01

    Oxymetazoline demonstrated a pronounced organ selectivity, when compared to noradrenaline, by being a potent full agonist in rat anococcygeus muscle and a partial agonist in rat vas deferens. Responses of rat anococcygeus muscles to oxymetazoline were relatively more sensitive to antagonism by phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) an alkylating alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. Therefore, although oxymetazoline was more potent than noradrenaline in this tissue, after Pbz (0.3 microM for 10 min), the responses to oxymetazoline were completely inhibited while those to noradrenaline were only partially inhibited. Schild analysis with phentolamine, corynanthine, prazosin and yohimbine indicated no alpha-adrenoceptor heterogeneity within the rat anococcygeus muscle or between this tissue and rat vas deferens. Measurement of agonist Kd values and Schild analysis of oxymetazoline antagonism of responses to noradrenaline (after alkylation) confirmed the homogeneity of alpha-adrenoceptors with respect to these two agonists. The above profiles of activity would be predicted if oxymetazoline had a higher affinity but lower efficacy than noradrenaline. Experimentally this was confirmed when it was found that oxymetazoline had 5 times the affinity but 0.2 to 0.3 times the efficacy of noradrenaline. These results serve as a caveat to the use of selective receptor desensitization and/or selective receptor alkylation (or protection from alkylation) as means of differentiating drug receptors. Theoretical modelling and these experimental results indicate that high affinity/low efficacy agonists are much more sensitive to receptor coupling. The implications for therapeutic selectivity could be important in that high affinity/low efficacy agonists theoretically have a much greater potential for organ selectivity.

  17. {alpha} resonance structure in {sup 11}B studied via resonant scattering of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kawabata, T.; Teranishi, T.

    2011-03-15

    A new measurement of {alpha} resonant scattering on {sup 7}Li was performed over the excitation energy of 10.2-13.0 MeV in {sup 11}B at the low-energy RI beam facility CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator (CRIB) of the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 7}Li+{alpha} at 180 deg. in the center-of-mass system was successfully measured for the first time with the inverse kinematics method, providing important information on the {alpha} cluster structure in {sup 11}B and the reaction rate of {sup 7}Li({alpha},{gamma}), which is relevant to the {sup 11}B production in the {nu} process in core-collapse supernovae. The excitation function of the {sup 7}Li({alpha},p) reaction cross section for 11.7-13.1 MeV was also measured.

  18. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  19. [Amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease and alpha 7 nicotinic receptor].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2002-04-01

    It is known that beta amyloid protein (A beta) plays an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, the role of cellular signaling in the protective action of nicotine for A beta-induced neurotoxicity is described. Recent biochemical and functional studies have demonstrated that A beta interacts directly with the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor, suggesting that A beta might have a function as an endogenous ligand for this receptor. Thus the role of alpha 7 nicotinic receptor in the A beta cascade hypothesis of AD and the possibility of alpha 7 nicotine receptor agonists as the therapeutic drugs for AD are discussed.

  20. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-12-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors.

  1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine(1F) receptors do not participate in vasoconstriction: lack of vasoconstriction to LY344864, a selective serotonin(1F) receptor agonist in rabbit saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M L; Schenck, K

    1999-09-01

    Recently, several novel approaches to the treatment of migraine have been advanced, including selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (or serotonin) 1B/1D (5-HT(1B/1D)) receptor agonists such as sumatriptan and 5-HT(1F) receptor agonists such as LY344864. Many 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists have been identified based on their ability to produce cerebral vascular contraction, whereas LY344864 was identified as an inhibitor of trigeminal nerve-mediated dural extravasation. In our study, several triptan derivatives were compared with LY344864 for their ability to contract the rabbit saphenous vein, a tissue used in the preclinical identification of sumatriptan-related agonists. Sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, and naratriptan all contracted the rabbit saphenous vein from baseline tone, whereas LY344864 in concentrations up to 10(-4) M did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein. Furthermore, vascular contractions to sumatriptan were markedly augmented in the presence of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)). However, even in the presence of PGF(2alpha) (3 x 10(-7) M), LY344864 did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein in concentrations well in excess of its 5-HT(1F) receptor affinity (pK(i) = 8.2). Only when concentrations exceeded those likely to activate 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors (>10(-5) M) did modest contractile responses occur in the presence of PGF(2alpha). Use of these serotonergic agonists revealed a significant correlation between the contractile potency in the rabbit saphenous vein and the affinities of these agonists at 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors, although contractile agonist potencies were not quantitatively similar to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(1D) receptor affinities. In contrast, no significant correlation existed between the contractile potencies of these serotonergic agonists in the rabbit saphenous vein and their affinity at 5-HT(1F) receptors. These data support the contention that activation of 5-HT(1F) receptors will not result in vascular

  2. The actin cytoskeleton differentially regulates platelet alpha-granule and dense-granule secretion.

    PubMed

    Flaumenhaft, Robert; Dilks, James R; Rozenvayn, Nataliya; Monahan-Earley, Rita A; Feng, Dian; Dvorak, Ann M

    2005-05-15

    Stimulation of platelets with strong agonists results in centralization of cytoplasmic organelles and secretion of granules. These observations have led to the supposition that cytoskeletal contraction facilitates granule release by promoting the interaction of granules with one another and with membranes of the open canalicular system. Yet, the influence of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling the membrane fusion events that mediate granule secretion remains largely unknown. To evaluate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in platelet granule secretion, we have assessed the effects of latrunculin A and cytochalasin E on granule secretion. Exposure of platelets to low concentrations of these reagents resulted in acceleration and augmentation of agonist-induced alpha-granule secretion with comparatively modest effects on dense granule secretion. In contrast, exposure of platelets to high concentrations of latrunculin A inhibited agonist-induced alpha-granule secretion but stimulated dense granule secretion. Incubation of permeabilized platelets with low concentrations of latrunculin A primed platelets for Ca(2+)- or guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-gamma-S-induced alpha-granule secretion. Latrunculin A-dependent alpha-granule secretion was inhibited by antibodies directed at vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), demonstrating that latrunculin A supports soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein-dependent membrane fusion. These results indicate that the actin cytoskeleton interferes with platelet exocytosis and differentially regulates alpha-granule and dense granule secretion. PMID:15671445

  3. Selective agonists of retinoic acid receptors: comparative toxicokinetics and embryonic exposure.

    PubMed

    Arafa, H M; Elmazar, M M; Hamada, F M; Reichert, U; Shroot, B; Nau, H

    2000-01-01

    Three biologically active synthetic retinoids were investigated that bind selectively to retinoic acid receptors RARs (alpha, beta and gamma). The retinoids were previously demonstrated to have different teratogenic effects in the mouse in terms of potency and regioselectivity. The teratogenic potency rank order (alpha >beta >gamma) was found to be more or less compatible with the receptor binding affinities and transactivation potencies of the retinoid ligands to their respective receptors. The RARalpha agonist (Am580; CD336) induced a wide spectrum of malformations; CD2019 (RARbeta agonist) and especially CD437 (RARgamma agonist) produced more restricted defects. In the current study we tried to address whether the differences in teratogenic effects are solely related to binding affinity and transactivation differences or also due to differences in embryonic exposure. Therefore, transplacental kinetics of the ligands were assessed following administration of a single oral dose of 15 mg/kg of either retinoid given to NMRI mice on day 11 of gestation. Am580 was rapidly transferred to the embryo resulting in the highest embryonic exposure [embryo to maternal plasma area under the time vs concentration curve (AUC)(0-24 h )ratio (E/M) was 1.7], in accordance with its highest teratogenic potency. The low placental transfer of CD2019 (E/M of 0.3) was compatible with its lower teratogenic potential. Of major interest was the finding that the CD437, though being least teratogenic, exhibited considerable embryonic exposure (E/M of 0.6). These findings suggest that both the embryonic exposure and receptor binding transactivation selectivity are crucial determinants of the teratogenicity of these retinoid ligands.

  4. Binding affinity and agonist activity of putative endogenous cannabinoids at the human neocortical CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Marc; Zentner, Josef; Honegger, Jürgen; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the affinity of putative endocannabinoids (2-arachidonylglycerol, 2-AG; noladin ether, virodhamine) for the human neocortical CB1 receptor. Functional activity of these compounds (including anandamide, AEA) was determined by examining basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation. Assays were performed with synaptosomes, prepared from fresh human neocortical tissue. Receptor affinity was assessed from competition binding experiments with the CB1/2 agonist [3H]-CP55.940 in absence or presence of a protease inhibitor to assess enzymatic stability. Noladin ether and virodhamine inhibited [3H]-CP55.940 binding (Ki: 98, 1740 nM, respectively). Protease inhibition decreased the Ki value of virodhamine (Ki: 912 nM), but left that of noladin ether unchanged. 2-AG almost lacked affinity (Ki lymphoblasic )10 microM). Basal cAMP formation was unaffected by AEA and noladin ether, but strongly enhanced by 2-AG and virodhamine. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was inhibited by AEA and noladin ether (IC50: 69, 427 nM, respectively) to the same extent as by CP55.940 (Imax each approximately 30%). Inhibitions by AEA or noladin ether were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Virodhamine increased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, also in presence of AM251, by approximately 20%. 2-AG had no effect; in presence of AM251, however, 10 microM 2-AG stimulated cAMP formation by approximately 15%. Our results suggest, that AEA and noladin ether are full CB1 receptor agonists in human neocortex, whereas virodhamine may act as a CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Particularly the (patho)physiological role of 2-AG should be further investigated, since its CB1 receptor affinity and agonist activity especially in humans might be lower than generally assumed. PMID:15588725

  5. Functional properties of homomeric, human alpha 7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors heterologously expressed in the SH-EP1 human epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingke; Kuo, Yen-Ping; George, Andrew A; Peng, Jian-Hong; Purandare, Madhuri Singh; Schroeder, Katherine M; Lukas, Ronald J; Wu, Jie

    2003-06-01

    alpha 7-Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha 7-nAChRs) are broadly distributed in the central nervous system, where they play important roles in chemical and electrical signaling, and perhaps in neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal death/survival. To help elucidate their normal and pathophysiological roles, we have heterologously expressed human alpha 7-nAChR in transfected SH-EP1 human epithelial cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses demonstrate expression of human alpha 7 subunits as messenger RNA. Patch-clamp recordings exploiting a novel strategy to prevent functional rundown of whole-cell peak current responses to repeated acute challenges with nicotinic agonists show successful expression of functional alpha 7-nAChR that mediate inward currents characterized by rapid phases of activation and inactivation. Concentration-response curves show that nicotine, acetylcholine, and choline are efficacious agonists at human alpha 7-nAChRs. Current-voltage relationships show inward rectification for agonist-induced currents. Human alpha 7-nAChRs exhibit some sensitivity to alpha 7-nAChR antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin (Bgt) or methyllycaconitine (MLA) when applied coincidentally with agonist, but much higher affinity block occurs when cells and alpha 7-nAChRs are pre-exposed to antagonists for 2 min before challenge with agonist. Both Bgt and MLA are competitive inhibitors of alpha 7-nAChR function. Whole-cell current peak amplitudes and half-times for inactivation of alpha 7-nAChR functional responses to nicotine are dramatically reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggestive of high Ca2+ permeability of the alpha 7-nAChR channel. Thus, heterologously expressed human alpha 7-nAChR in mammalian cells have properties of native alpha 7-nAChR or of alpha 7-nAChR heterologously expressed in other systems and serve as excellent models for studies of molecular bases of alpha 7-n

  6. Influences of the endothelium and hypoxia on alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in the rabbit isolated pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; McCulloch, K. M.; McGrath, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M), mechanical disruption of the endothelium and hypoxia on contraction to noradrenaline (alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist), phenylephrine (alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist) and UK 14304 (alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist) were compared in the rabbit isolated pulmonary artery. The effects of the selective antagonists rauwolscine (10(-6) M, alpha 2-adrenoceptors) and prazosin (10(-7) M, alpha 1-adrenoceptors) on the contractions to noradrenaline before and after exposure to L-NAME were also assessed. 2. Noradrenaline, phenylephrine and UK 14304 all produced concentration-dependent increases in vascular tone. The responses to noradrenaline were sensitive to both rauwolscine and prazosin (effect of prazosin >> rauwolscine). L-NAME increased the potency of both noradrenaline and UK 14304, and also the maximum tension achieved. It had no effect on the responses to phenylephrine. After L-NAME, contractions to noradrenaline, although still sensitive to both rauwolscine and prazosin, were now more sensitive to inhibition by rauwolscine. 3. Endothelium removal augmented the potency and maximum contractions to noradrenaline, phenylephrine and UK 14304. 4. Hypoxia decreased both the potency of phenylephrine and its maximum contractile response, but increased the maximum response to noradrenaline without effecting responses to UK 14304. 5. In conclusion, in the rabbit pulmonary artery, augmentation of contractile responses to noradrenaline by L-NAME involves a potentiation of alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction probably through an effect on the synthesis of endothelium-derived nitric oxide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8094023

  7. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  8. Ontogenic increase in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha receptor density in brain microvessels of pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D. Y.; Varma, D. R.; Chemtob, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the relative vasoconstrictor ineffectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGF2 alpha on cerebral vessels of newborn pigs might be due to fewer receptors for these prostanoids was tested by comparing receptors for PGE2 (EP) and PGF2 alpha (FP) in cerebral microvessels from newborn and adult pigs. 2. Specific binding of [3H]-PGE2 and [3H]-PGF2 alpha to membranes prepared from brain microvessels showed that EP and FP receptor density (Bmax) in tissues from newborn animals was less than 50% of that determined in tissues from adults. By contrast, estimates of affinity (KD) were unchanged. 3. Specifically bound [3H]-PGE2 to brain microvessels from both the newborn and adult was displaced by AH 6809 (EP1-selective antagonist) by 80-90%, and only by approximately 30-35% by both 11-deoxy PGE1 (EP2/EP3 agonist) and M&B 28,767 (EP3 agonist); butaprost (EP2 agonist) was completely ineffective. 4. PGE2, 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (EP1 agonist), PGF2 alpha and fenprostalene (PGF2 alpha analogue) caused significantly less increase in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) in brain microvessels from the newborn than in those from adult pigs. The stimulation of IP3 by PGE2 and 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 was almost completely inhibited by the EP1 antagonist, AH 6809. 5. PGE2, 11-deoxy PGE1 and M&B 28,767 produced small reduction of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in adult vessels but no effect in newborn tissues. 6. The lower density of EP and FP receptors in microvessels of newborn pigs compared to adults may explain the reduced ability of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha to stimulate production of IP3 in tissues from newborn animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032662

  9. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  10. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  11. Norepinephrine and brain damage: alpha noradrenergic pharmacology alters functional recovery after cortical trauma.

    PubMed

    Feeney, D M; Westerberg, V S

    1990-06-01

    The goal of these experiments was to evaluate the effects of some drugs affecting noradrenergic (NE) synaptic transmission, commonly prescribed following stroke or traumatic brain injury, on functional recovery. Measurement of recovery from a transient hemiplegia produced by a traumatic unilateral focal contusion in sensorimotor cortex (SMCX) of rats was used to assess the effects of chronic haloperidol (HAL) treatment begun early (1 day) or late (18 days to recovered animals) after injury. Additionally, using the same model, the effects of a single administration of drugs with selective action at NE receptors were also evaluated early or late (30 days) after injury. These drugs were: phenoxybenzamine (PBZ), an alpha 1-NE antagonist; prazosin (PRAZ), an alpha 1-NE antagonist; yohimbine (YOH), an alpha 2-NE antagonist; propranolol (PROP), a beta 1- and 2-NE receptor antagonist; methoxymine (METHOX), an alpha 1-NE agonist; and clonidine (CLON), an alpha 2-NE agonist. The data indicate that drugs with antagonistic effects at alpha 1 NE receptors, including HAL and PRAZ but not PROP, administered early after SMCX contusion retard locomotor recovery. Beneficial effects of enhancing NE transmission by METHOX or YOH were not observed. In animals recovered from beam walk (BW) deficits, a single administration of PBZ or PRAZ (alpha 1 NE antagonists) or CLON (alpha 2 NE agonist) transiently reinstated hemiplegic symptoms. The nonspecific beta NE receptor antagonist PROP had no effect in recovered animals. A single dose of HAL had no effect in recovered animals, but a BW deficit transiently developed in some animals following chronic treatment. The data are discussed with reference to drug contraindications noted in clinical studies of recovery from poststroke aphasia and cognition in demented patients with degenerative brain disease. PMID:2166617

  12. Alpha-adrenergic stimulation of thermogenesis in a rat kangaroo (Marsupialia, Bettongia gaimardi).

    PubMed

    Ye, J M; Edwards, S J; Rose, R W; Steen, J T; Clark, M G; Colquhoun, E Q

    1996-09-01

    The Tasmanian bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is a small rat kangaroo without detectable brown adipose tissue (BAT). In view of our previous findings of norepinephrine-mediated increase in O2 consumption (Vo2) in the perfused hindlimb of this species, the present study examined the effect of alpha-adrenoceptors on the thermogenesis of conscious bettongs at rest by infusing adrenergic agents via an indwelling catheter in the tail vein. The resting Vo2 was 22.9 +/- 1.9 mmol.kg-1.h-1. Norepinephrine (10-80 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) stimulated Vo2 in a dose-dependent manner with the maximal increment of 46.7%. Naphazoline (an alpha 1,alpha 2-adrenergic agonist) and phenylephrine (an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist) also elicited increases in Vo2 with maximal values of 29.6 and 34.8%, respectively. In contrast, the alpha 2-adrenergic agonist clonidine had no significant effects. Both alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockers were used to antagonize the submaximal increase in Vo2 elicited by norepinephrine. As a dose of 10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, the alpha-adrenergic blocker phentolamine abolished the effects of naphazoline and phenylephrine and reduced norepinephrine-induced Vo2 by 45.5%. The beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol inhibited the norepinephrine-induced Vo2 by 58.8% at 20 micrograms.kg-1.min-1. A combination of the two antagonists blocked 82.5% of the norepinephrine-induced Vo2. Pretreatment of the animal with indomethacin (1 mg/kg), a known inhibitor of prostaglandin cyclooxygenase, had no effect on phenylephrine-elicited Vo2. Taken together, these results indicate that alpha 1-adrenoceptors are directly involved in norepinephrine-induced thermogenesis in non-BAT tissue(s).

  13. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  14. Enhancement of the inducible NO synthase activation by retinoic acid is mimicked by RARalpha agonist in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Devaux, Yvan; Latger-Cannard, Véronique; Grosjean, Sandrine; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Zannad, Faiez; Meistelman, Claude; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Longrois, Dan

    2002-09-01

    We have previously shown that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, enhances the activation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) pathway, a component of innate immunity, in rats in vivo. We investigated the relative contribution of retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RARalpha) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) to NOS II activation triggered by LPS. Five-day supplementation with 10 mg/kg of either atRA or the RARalpha selective agonist Ro-40-6055, but not with 10 mg/kg of the pan-RXR agonist Ro-25-7386, enhanced the LPS-induced NOS II mRNA, protein expression in liver, and plasma nitrite/nitrate concentration. Both atRA and the RARalpha agonist (but not the RXR agonist) increased the number of peripheral T helper lymphocytes and plasma interferon-gamma concentration. Synergism between retinoids and LPS on NOS II activation within an organ coincided with synergism on interferon regulatory factor-1 mRNA expression but not with the level of expression of the RARalpha protein. These results suggest that, in vivo, atRA activates NOS II through RARalpha and contributes to characterizing the complex effect of retinoids on the host inflammatory/immune response.

  15. Determination of Alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeissani, Mokhtar Abdallah

    The determination of the strong coupling constant alpha_ s, using Energy-Energy Correlation Asymmetry and jet mass difference with Mark II data at SLC (91 GeV) is presented. In Energy-Energy Correlation Asymmetry (EECA), we used the same systematic procedure used to determine alpha_ s with MARK II data at PEP (29 GeV). The chi^2 fit suggests that alpha_ s = 0.119 +/- 0.007(stat.) +/- 0.007(syst.). In addition, we used the EECA method to determine the QCD scale parameter Lambda_{LLA}. The chi^2 fit suggests that Lambda _{LLA} = 420 +/- 90(stat.) MeV. In the jet mass difference method, the determination of alpha_ s is based on QCD calculations up to 2nd order. We showed that in this method we are able to reproduce the value of alpha _ s from a Monte Carlo sample to a very high accuracy. The result with this method is alpha _ s = 0.134 +/- 0.085(stat.) +/- 0.004(syst.). The two values of alpha_ s presented in this work are in agreement within the error bars and in a good agreement with recent results of alpha_ s published from other e^+e^- experiments.

  16. Correlation between phosphatidylinositol labeling and contraction in rabbit aorta: effect of alpha-1 adrenergic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Uc, M.; Hong, E.; Garcia-Sainz, J.A.

    1982-07-01

    Activation of rabbit aortic strips with alpha adrenergic agonists increased the labeling (with (/sup 32/P)Pi) of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid and contracted the vascular preparations in dose-related fashion. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and methoxamine produced maximal effects, whereas clonidine behaved as partial agonist and B-HT 933 (2-amino-6-ethyl-4,5,7,8-tetrahydro-6H-oxazole-(5,4-d) azepin dihydrochloride) was almost without activity in the two experimental models used. Phenylephrine was a full agonist in producing contraction, but failed to elicit the maximal increase in PI labeling. The EC50 values to produce contraction of aortic strips were lower for all agonists than those required to increase the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into PI, but there was a good correlation between the two sets of data. The increased PI labeling and contraction of aortic strips induced by epinephrine were antagonized by prazosin and yohimbine in dose-related fashion, but the first alpha blocker was about three orders of magnitude more potent than the second in antagonizing the two effects. The present results indicate that both stimulation of PI labeling and contraction are mediated through activation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors in rabbit aorta.

  17. Stress inversion assumptions review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejri, Mostfa; Maerten, Frantz; Maerten, Laurent; Joonnenkindt, Jean Pierre; Soliva, Roger

    2014-05-01

    Wallace (1951) and Bott (1959) were the first to introduce the idea that the slip on each fault surface has the same direction and sense as the maximum shear stress resolved on that surface. This hypothesis are based on the assumptions that (i) faults are planar, (ii) blocks are rigid, (iii) neither stress perturbations nor block rotations along fault surfaces occur and (iv), the applied stress state is uniform. However, this simplified hypothesis is questionable since complex fault geometries, heterogeneous fault slip directions, evidences of stress perturbations in microstructures and block rotations along fault surfaces were reported in the literature. Earlier numerical geomechanical models confirmed that the striation lines (slip vectors) are not necessarily parallel to the maximum shear stress vector but is consistent with local stress perturbations. This leads us to ask as to what extent the Wallace and Bott simplifications are reliable as a basis hypothesis for stress inversion. In this presentation, a geomechanical multi-parametric study using 3D boundary element method (BEM), covering (i) fault geometries such as intersected faults or corrugated fault surfaces, (ii) the full range of Andersonian state of stress, (iii) fault friction, (iv) half space effect and (v), rock properties, is performed in order to understand the effect of each parameter on the angular misfit between geomechanical slip vectors and the resolved shear stresses. It is shown that significant angular misfits can be found under specific configurations and therefore we conclude that stress inversions based on the Wallace-Bott hypothesis might sometime give results that should be interpreted with care. Major observations are that (i) applying optimum tectonic stress conditions on complex fault geometries can increase the angular misfit, (ii) elastic material properties, combined to half-space effect, can enhance this effect, and (iii) an increase of the sliding friction leads to a

  18. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  19. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  20. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  1. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  2. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  3. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11C.

  4. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  5. Small Molecule Bax Agonists for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Meiguo; Li, Rui; Xie, Maohua; Park, Dongkyoo; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Zhou, Jia; Ding, Chunyong; White, Mark A.; Magis, Andrew T.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    Bax, a central death regulator, is required at the decisional stage of apoptosis. We recently identified serine 184 (S184) of Bax as a critical functional switch controlling its proapoptotic activity. Here, we employed the structural pocket around S184 as a docking site to screen the NCI library of small molecules using the UCSF-DOCK program suite. Three compounds, small molecule Bax agonists SMBA1, SMBA2 and SMBA3, induce conformational changes in Bax by blocking S184 phosphorylation, facilitating Bax insertion into mitochondrial membranes and forming Bax oligomers. The latter leads to cytochrome c release and apoptosis in human lung cancer cells, which occurs in a Bax- but not Bak-dependent fashion. SMBA1 potently suppresses lung tumor growth via apoptosis by selectively activating Bax in vivo without significant normal tissue toxicity. Development of Bax agonists as a new class of anti-cancer drugs offers a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer and other Bax-expressing malignancies. PMID:25230299

  6. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  7. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  8. Both alpha2 and alpha3 GABAA receptor subtypes mediate the anxiolytic properties of benzodiazepine site ligands in the conditioned emotional response paradigm.

    PubMed

    Morris, H V; Dawson, G R; Reynolds, D S; Atack, J R; Stephens, D N

    2006-05-01

    Mice with point-mutated alpha2 GABAA receptor subunits (rendering them diazepam insensitive) are resistant to the anxiolytic-like effects of benzodiazepines (BZs) in unconditioned models of anxiety. We investigated the role of the alpha2 GABAA subtype in a model of conditioned anxiety. alpha2(H101R) and wildtype mice were trained in a conditioned emotional response (CER) task, in which lever-pressing for food on a variable interval (VI) schedule was suppressed during the presentation of a conditioned stimulus (CS+) that predicted footshock. The ability of diazepam, ethanol and pentobarbital to reduce suppression during the CS+ was interpreted as an anxiolytic response. Diazepam (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent anxiolytic-like effect in wildtype mice. At high doses, diazepam (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) was sedative in alpha2(H101R) mice. Analysis of the anxiolytic properties of nonsedative diazepam doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), showed that alpha2(H101R) mice were resistant to the anxiolytic effects of diazepam. Equivalent anxiolytic properties of pentobarbital (20 mg/kg) and ethanol (1 and 2 g/kg) were seen in both genotypes. These findings confirm the critical importance of the alpha2 GABAA subtype in mediating BZ anxiolysis. However, as a compound, L-838417, with agonist properties at alpha2, alpha3 and alpha5-containing receptors, gave rise to anxiolytic-like activity in alpha2(H101R) mice in the CER test, alpha3-containing GABA receptors are also likely to contribute to anxiolysis. Observations that alpha2(H101R) mice were more active, and displayed a greater suppression of lever pressing in response to fear-conditioned stimuli than wildtype mice, suggests that the alpha2(H101R) mutation may not be behaviourally silent.

  9. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in the medial preoptic area are involved in the induction of sleep.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Vetrivelan, Ramalingam; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2006-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent studies that led to the conclusion that the noradrenergic neurons projecting to the medial preoptic area (mPOA) are hypnogenic and that they mediate this action through alpha(1) adrenergic receptors. Microinjection of noradrenaline (NA) into the mPOA induced arousal. Studies using alpha(2) adrenergic drugs showed that the arousal induced by intrapreoptic injection of NA was due to its action on presynaptic alpha(2) adrenergic receptors. A combination of lesion and chemical stimulation techniques demonstrated that when NA acted on the postsynaptic alpha(1 )receptors in the mPOA, it induced sleep. Intrapreoptic injection of alpha(1) agonist, methoxamine could induce sleep, when the hypothermia, which was simultaneously produced, was behaviorally compensated for by the animal. Increased arousal produced by the destruction of noradrenergic fibers in the mPOA further confirmed the hypnogenic role of these fibers.

  10. Triple-alpha reaction rate studied with the Faddeev three-body formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Souichi

    2012-11-12

    The triple-alpha (3{alpha}) reaction, {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+{sup 4}He{yields}{sup 12}C+{gamma}, which plays a significant role in the stellar evolution scenarios, is studied in terms of a three-alpha (3-{alpha}) model. The reaction rate of the process is calculated via an inverse process, 3-{alpha} photodisintegration of a {sup 12}C nucleus. Both of 3-{alpha} bound and-continuum states are calculated by a Faddeev method with accommodating the long range Coulomb interaction. With being adjusted to the empirical E2-strength for {sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}){yields}{sup 12}C(2{sub 1}{sup +}) transition, results of the 3{alpha} reaction rate <{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}> at higher temperature (T > 10{sup 8} K), where the reaction proceeds mainly through the {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}) resonant states, almost agree with those of the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE). On the other hand, calculated values of <{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}> are about 10{sup 3} times larger than the NACRE rate at a low temperature (T= 10{sup 7} K), which means our results are remarkably smaller than recent CDCC results.

  11. A novel positive allosteric modulator of the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: in vitro and in vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Raymond S; Hajós, Mihaly; Raggenbass, Mario; Wall, Theron M; Higdon, Nicole R; Lawson, Judy A; Rutherford-Root, Karen L; Berkenpas, Mitchell B; Hoffmann, W E; Piotrowski, David W; Groppi, Vincent E; Allaman, Geraldine; Ogier, Roch; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Arneric, Stephen P

    2005-04-27

    Several lines of evidence suggest a link between the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and brain disorders including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and traumatic brain injury. The present work describes a novel molecule, 1-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(5-methyl-isoxazol-3-yl)-urea (PNU-120596), which acts as a powerful positive allosteric modulator of the alpha7 nAChR. Discovered in a high-throughput screen, PNU-120596 increased agonist-evoked calcium flux mediated by an engineered variant of the human alpha7 nAChR. Electrophysiology studies confirmed that PNU-120596 increased peak agonist-evoked currents mediated by wild-type receptors and also demonstrated a pronounced prolongation of the evoked response in the continued presence of agonist. In contrast, PNU-120596 produced no detectable change in currents mediated by alpha4beta2, alpha3beta4, and alpha9alpha10 nAChRs. PNU-120596 increased the channel mean open time of alpha7 nAChRs but had no effect on ion selectivity and relatively little, if any, effect on unitary conductance. When applied to acute hippocampal slices, PNU-120596 increased the frequency of ACh-evoked GABAergic postsynaptic currents measured in pyramidal neurons; this effect was suppressed by TTX, suggesting that PNU-120596 modulated the function of alpha7 nAChRs located on the somatodendritic membrane of hippocampal interneurons. Accordingly, PNU-120596 greatly enhanced the ACh-evoked inward currents in these interneurons. Systemic administration of PNU-120596 to rats improved the auditory gating deficit caused by amphetamine, a model proposed to reflect a circuit level disturbance associated with schizophrenia. Together, these results suggest that PNU-120596 represents a new class of molecule that enhances alpha7 nAChR function and thus has the potential to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders. PMID:15858066

  12. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  13. Infrared spectra of olivine polymorphs - Alpha, beta phase and spinel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.

    1980-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of several olivines (alpha phase) and their corresponding beta phase (modified spinel) and spinel (gamma) high-pressure polymorphs are determined. Spectra were measured for ground and pressed samples of alpha and gamma A2SiO4, where A = Fe, Ni, Co; alpha and gamma Mg2GeO4; alpha Mg2SiO4; and beta Co2SiO4. The spectra are interpreted in terms of internal, tetrahedral and octagonal, and lattice vibration modes, and the spinel results are used to predict the spectrum of gamma Mg2SiO4. Analysis of spectra obtained from samples of gamma Mg2GeO4 heated to 730 and 1000 C provides evidence that partial inversion could occur in silicate spinels at elevated temperatures and pressures.

  14. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors: targets for agonist drugs to treat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; O'Connell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Evidence from cell, animal, and human studies demonstrates that α1-adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive and protective effects in the heart. These effects may be particularly important in chronic heart failure, when catecholamine levels are elevated and β-adrenergic receptors are down-regulated and dysfunctional. This review summarizes these data and proposes that selectively activating α1-adrenergic receptors in the heart might represent a novel and effective way to treat heart failure. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure."

  15. Role of alpha-1 adrenoceptor subtypes mediating constriction of the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Silver, W P; Koman, L A; Strandhoy, J W; Rosencrance, E; Gordon, S; Smith, T L

    2000-01-01

    An acute in vivo preparation of the microvasculature of the rabbit ear was used to evaluate the functional role of alpha1 (alpha1)-adrenoceptor subtypes in thermoregulatory microcirculation. The effect of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype blockade on phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was assessed with the alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D-adrenoceptor-selective antagonists 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-8) M), chloroethylclonidine (10(-5) M), and 8-[2-[4(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-8-azaspirol[4.5]deca ne-7,9-dione dihydrochloride (BMY7378) (10(-6) M), respectively. The results demonstrated that pretreatment of the ear microvasculature with 5-methyl-urapidil or BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve rightward and significantly changed the log of the phenylephrine concentration, causing half-maximum stimulation (EC50) in arterioles (p < 0.05). BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve of the arteriovenous anastomoses about 100-fold rightward (p < 0.05). All three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists eliminated the vasoconstrictive effects of phenylephrine on venules. The results indicate that the ear microvasculature has a heterogenous distribution of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. The alpha1A and alpha1D-adrenoceptor subtypes appear to have a greater influence on constrictive function in arterioles, whereas the alpha1D-adrenoceptor is the dominant constrictor of arteriovenous anastomoses. In general, the alpha1-adrenoceptor does not play a major vasoconstrictor role in venules. Chloroethylclonidine, an irreversible alpha1B-adrenoceptor antagonist, induced contractile responses in the ear microvasculature, probably due to its alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist effects. This study extended our understanding of the adrenergic receptor control mechanisms of a cutaneous thermoregulatory end organ characterized by two parallel perfusion circuits providing nutritional and thermoregulatory functions. PMID:10716292

  16. Modular theory of inverse systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between multivariable zeros and inverse systems was explored. A definition of zero module is given in such a way that it is basis independent. The existence of essential right and left inverses were established. The way in which the abstract zero module captured previous definitions of multivariable zeros is explained and examples are presented.

  17. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  18. ERβ-specific agonists and genistein inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in the large and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Schleipen, B; Hertrampf, T; Fritzemeier, K H; Kluxen, F M; Lorenz, A; Molzberger, A; Velders, M; Diel, P

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that intake of estrogens and isoflavones may be beneficial for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). Based on this data, the aim of the study was to investigate estrogen receptor (ER) subtype-specific effects on intestinal homeostasis. Ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were either treated with 17β-estradiol (4 μg/kg body wt/day) (E2), an ERα-specific agonist (ALPHA) (10 μg/kg body wt/day), an ERβ-specific agonist (BETA) (100 μg/kg body wt/day) or genistein (GEN) (10 mg/kg body wt/day) for three weeks. Vehicle-treated OVX and SHAM animals and those cotreated with BETA and the pure antiestrogen Fulvestrant (ICI 182780) (100 μg/kg body wt/day and 3 mg/kg body wt/day) served as controls. GEN and BETA treatment but not E2 and ALPHA administration reduced proliferation in ileal and colonic mucosa cells. The rate of apoptosis in the small intestine and colon was increased by treatment with BETA and GEN, but not by E2. BETA induced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity also in SHAM animals. The effects were antagonized by the pure antiestrogen Fulvestrant. Polymerase chain reaction gene array analysis revealed that BETA resulted in the downregulation of the oncogene transformation-related protein 63 (p63). Our data indicate that activation of the ERβ by specific ERβ agonists and GEN induces antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in the intestinal tract. This observation can be taken as an indication that intake of GEN and specific ERβ agonists may protect the ileal and colonic epithelium from tumor development via modulation of tissue homeostasis.

  19. A comparison of lidar inversion methods for cirrus applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elouragini, Salem; Flamant, Pierre H.

    1992-01-01

    Several methods for inverting the lidar equation are suggested as means to derive the cirrus optical properties (beta backscatter, alpha extinction coefficients, and delta optical depth) at one wavelength. The lidar equation can be inverted in a linear or logarithmic form; either solution assumes a linear relationship: beta = kappa(alpha), where kappa is the lidar ratio. A number of problems prevent us from calculating alpha (or beta) with a good accuracy. Some of these are as follows: (1) the multiple scattering effect (most authors neglect it); (2) an absolute calibration of the lidar system (difficult and sometimes not possible); (3) lack of accuracy on the lidar ratio k (taken as constant, but in fact it varies with range and cloud species); and (4) the determination of boundary condition for logarithmic solution which depends on signal to noise ration (SNR) at cloud top. An inversion in a linear form needs an absolute calibration of the system. In practice one uses molecular backscattering below the cloud to calibrate the system. This method is not permanent because the lower atmosphere turbidity is variable. For a logarithmic solution, a reference extinction coefficient (alpha(sub f)) at cloud top is required. Several methods to determine alpha(sub f) were suggested. We tested these methods at low SNR. This led us to propose two new methods referenced as S1 and S2.

  20. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  1. GLP-1 agonist treatment: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Hariman, Christian; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control induced by GLP-1 agonist therapy could be yet another illustration of transient or permanent progression of diabetic retinopathy, similar to documented examples such as pregnancy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Specific guidelines would be needed to monitor this paradoxical phenomenon during treatment with GLP-1 agonists. PMID:21906831

  2. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  3. Inverse Problems of Thermoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Luste, O. J.; Kuz, R. V.; Strutinsky, M. N.

    2011-05-01

    Classical thermoelectricity is based on the use of the Seebeck and Thomson effects that occur in the near-contact areas between n- and p-type materials. A conceptually different approach to thermoelectric power converter design that is based on the law of thermoelectric induction of currents is also known. The efficiency of this approach has already been demonstrated by its first applications. More than 10 basically new types of thermoelements were discovered with properties that cannot be achieved by thermocouple power converters. Therefore, further development of this concept is of practical interest. This paper provides a classification and theory for solving the inverse problems of thermoelectricity that form the basis for devising new thermoelement types. Computer methods for their solution for anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are elaborated. Regularities related to thermoelectric current excitation in anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are established. The possibility of obtaining eddy currents of a particular configuration through control of the temperature field and material parameters for the creation of new thermo- element types is demonstrated for three-dimensional (3D) models of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media.

  4. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  5. Polarization of inverse plasmon scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windsor, R. A.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The scattering of electrostatic plasma waves by a flux of ultrarelativistic electrons passing through a plasma gives rise to a radiation spectrum which is similar to a synchrotron radiation spectrum. This mechanism, first considered by Gailitis and Tsytovich, is analagous to inverse Compton scattering, and we have named it inverse plasmon scattering. For a power-law electron flux, both inverse plasmon scattering and synchrotron radiation have the same spectral index. In an attempt to distinguish between these mechanisms, we have calculated the polarization level expected from inverse plasmon scattering. The polarization level found is similar to that obtained from a synchrotron radiation source. This means that the radiation produced by two mechanisms, synchrotron radiation and inverse plasmon scattering, is indistinguishable; and this attempt to differentiate between them by polarization effects has been unsuccessful.

  6. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  7. A Role for Presynaptic alpha(sub 2)-Adrenoceptors in Angiotensin 2-Induced Drinking in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that either central or peripheral administration of clonidine, the alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, can attenuate a variety of dipsogenic stimuli in rats. Further, yohimbine and tolazoline, alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor antagonists, augment the drinking response to both peripherally administered isoproterenol and angiotensin 2. Studies reported here establish a dose-inhibition relationship between the dose of clonidine administered (2 to 32 micrograms/kg) intracerebroventricularly (IVT) and inhibition of the drinking response to peripherally administered angiotensin 2 (200 micrograms/kg, SC). DI(sub 50) was approximately 4 micrograms/kg. Yohimbine (300 micrograms/kg, SC) reversed the antidipsogenic effect of centrally administered clonidine (32 micrograms/kg, IVT) on angiotensin 2-induced (200 micrograms/kg, SC) water intake. Phenylephrine, an alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, administered IVT (40 and 80 micrograms/kg) also inhibited angiotensin 2-induced drinking in a dose-related fashion. The antidipsogenic effect of phenylephfine (80 micrograms/kg) was blocked by administration of yohimbine (100 micrograms/kg, SC). Thus, this effect of phenylephrine most likely occurs by way of alpha(sub 2)- adrenoceptors. These results support a role for the pre-synaptic alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor in the mediation of drinking in rats. Activation of alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptors is accompanied by reduced water intake while inhibition of these receptors enhances water intake.

  8. Impact of the Tamsulosin in Alpha Adrenergic Receptor of Airways at Patients with Increased Bronchial Reactibility

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Lirim; Ilazi, Ali; Dauti, Arta; Islami, Pellumb; Kastrati, Bashkim; Islami, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this work, effect of tamsulosin as antagonist of alpha1A and alpha1B adrenergic receptor and effect of agonists of beta2 adrenergic receptor–salbutamol in patients with increased bronchial reactibility was studied. Methods: Parameters of the lung function are determined with Body plethysmography six (6) hours after administration of tamsulosin. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was calculated as well. Tamsulosin was administered in per os manner as a preparation in the shape of the capsules with a brand name of “Prolosin”, produced by Niche Generics Limited, Hitchin, Herts. Results: After six (6) hours of administration of tamsulosin, results gained indicate that blockage of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor (0.8 mg per os) has not changed significantly (p > 0.1) the bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial tree in comparison to the check-up that has inhaled salbutamol agonist of adrenergic beta2 receptor (2 inh. x 0.2 mg), (p < 0.05). Blood pressure suffered no significant decrease following administration of the 0.8 mg dose of tamsulosin. Conclusion: This suggests that even after six hours of administration of tamsulosin, and determining of lung function parameters, the activity of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor in the smooth bronchial musculature has not changed in patients with increased bronchial reactibility. PMID:26543414

  9. Conformational states of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica induced by the binding of agonists, antagonists, and local anesthetics. Equilibrium measurements using tritium-hydrogen exchange

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.P.; Stroud, R.M.

    1989-01-10

    The tritium-hydrogen exchange kinetics of Torpedo californica AChR, in native membrane vesicles at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, have been analyzed in the presence of agonists, partial agonists, local anesthetics, and competitive antagonists. The agonists carbamylcholine (10 microM-1 mM) and suberyldicholine (10 microM) and the partial agonists decamethonium (25 microM and 1 mM) and hexamethonium (1 mM) have no effect on the exchange kinetics, although at lower concentration carbamylcholine may slightly accelerate exchange. Nondesensitizing local anesthetics do affect the exchange behavior, dependent on concentration. Procaine at 500 microM moderately retards exchange while procaine at 10 mM and tetracaine at 5 mM slightly accelerate exchange. The competitive antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin retards exchange significantly, as does d-tubocurarine although to a lesser extent. These results suggest that the resting and desensitized conformations of the AChR are very similar in overall solvent accessibility and that at lower concentrations noncompetitive blockers such as procaine may stabilize a less solvent-accessible state of the AChR. The competitive antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurare also stabilize a dynamically restricted, less solvent-accessible conformation of the acetylcholine receptor, demonstrating that a large conformational change accompanies binding of these toxins. Any change in conformation which may accompany desensitization is very different from these effects.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of the novel histamine H2 receptor agonist amthamine: interaction with the adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Coruzzi, G; Gambarelli, E; Bertaccini, G; Timmerman, H

    1996-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of the new histamine H2 receptor agonist amthamine were studied in the anaesthetized rat, with particular reference to a possible interaction with the adrenergic system. Amthamine (0.03-3 mumol/kg i.v.) caused vasodepressor responses which were antagonized by famotidine (3 mumol/kg i.v.). At higher doses (30-100 mumol/kg i.v.), amthamine induced a modest increase in the mean arterial pressure, which was significantly enhanced by the blockade of H2 receptors and significantly reduced by the alpha 2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (1 mumol/kg i.v.). The vasopressor response to amthamine was not modified in rats pre-treated with reserpine or 6-hydroxydopamine, and was only minimally modified in adrenalectomized animals, thus suggesting a predominant interaction with postjunctional alpha 2 adrenoceptors in the vascular muscle. The H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (0.3-100 mumol/kg i.v.) caused a reduction in arterial pressure, which was antagonized by famotidine, no pressor response being unmasked. Dimaprit (0.1-30 mumol/kg i.v.) did not modify heart rate but caused a modest bradycardia at 100 mumol/kg i.v. Amthamine (1-100 mumol/kg i.v.) induced a dose-dependent tachycardia, which was only partially (approximately 20%) reduced by famotidine and was totally blocked by propranolol (0.3 mg/kg i.v.). This effect was significantly reduced in rats pre-treated with reserpine or 6-hydroxydopamine and was further reduced by cocaine, thus suggesting a tyramine-like action of amthamine. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the H2 receptor agonist amthamine can also interact with the adrenergic system when used at doses higher than those necessary to activate H2 receptors. Whereas the increase in blood pressure induced by amthamine seems to be mainly mediated by a direct activation of postjunctional alpha 2 adrenoceptors, the increase in heart rate is predominantly due to neuronal release of catecholamines. These effects should be considered when

  11. Alpha One Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... related programs More News Our Number One Goal: Find a cure for Alpha-1. Website Sponsors Helpful Links 3300 Ponce de Leon Blvd. Coral Gables, FL 33134 Phone: (877) 228-7321 Email: info@alphaone.org Copyright ...

  12. Affinity modulation of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin (platelet GPIIb-IIIa) is an intrinsic property of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, T E; Loftus, J C; Du, X P; Glass, A A; Ruggeri, Z M; Shattil, S J; Plow, E F; Ginsberg, M H

    1990-01-01

    To analyze the basis of affinity modulation of integrin function, we studied cloned stable Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing recombinant integrins of the beta 3 family (alpha IIb beta 3 and alpha v beta 3). Antigenic and peptide recognition specificities of the recombinant receptors resembled those of the native receptors found in platelets or endothelial cells. The alpha IIb beta 3-expressing cell line (A5) bound RGD peptides and immobilized fibrinogen (Fg) but not soluble fibrinogen or the activation-specific monoclonal anti-alpha IIb beta 3 (PAC1), indicating that it was in the affinity state found on resting platelets. Several platelet agonists failed to alter the affinity state of ("activate") recombinant alpha IIb beta 3. The binding of soluble Fg and PAC1, however, was stimulated in both platelets and A5 cells by addition of IgG papain-digestion products (Fab) fragments of certain beta 3-specific monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies stimulated PAC1 binding to platelets fixed under conditions rendering them unresponsive to other agonists. Addition of these antibodies to detergent-solubilized alpha IIb beta 3 also stimulated specific Fg binding. These data demonstrate that certain anti-beta 3 antibodies activate alpha IIb beta 3 by acting directly on the receptor, possibly by altering its conformation. Furthermore, they indicate that the activation state of alpha IIb beta 3 is a property of the receptor itself rather than of the surrounding cell membrane microenvironment. Images PMID:2100193

  13. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  14. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  15. Stylolite stress inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Ebner, Marcus; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul; Rood, Daisy

    2014-05-01

    Stylolites are localized dissolution seams that can be found in a variety of rocks, and can form due to sediment compaction or tectonic forces. Dissolution of the host-rock next to the stylolite is a function of the applied stress on the stylolite plane. Stylolite teeth indicate the direction of the main compressive stress. Recent advances have shown that the stylolite roughness also shows a stress scaling relation that can be used to calculate magnitudes of stress. Elastic and surface energies produce a different roughness, and the transition between the two is stress dependent and can be quantified. In order to measure the roughness a two or three-dimensional section of a stylolite plane is taken and transferred to a one-dimensional function. The cross-over in the roughness is then picked with the help of an FFT plot. Using this method the burial depth of sedimentary stylolites can be determined. Moreover, tectonic stylolites can be used to determine the full three-dimensional stress tensor if the paleodepth of the tectonic stylolite is known. Stylolites can also be used to find fault offsets and to understand when these faults were active and how the paleotopography looked like at the time the stylolites grew. However, uncertainties remain since Youngs Modulus, Poisson Ratio and surface energy may vary in rocks. In addition, the stylolites record only a snapshot in time, probably the moment when they closed and stopped dissolving. We show examples of the use of stress inversion for stylolite formation conditions in different tectonic settings, and discuss the potential of the method.

  16. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  17. Quantitative analysis of the agonist and antagonist actions of some ATP analogues at P2X-purinoceptors in the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed

    Leff, P; Wood, B E; O'Connor, S E; McKechnie, K

    1993-02-01

    1. The agonist and antagonist effects of a series of beta, gamma-methylene dihalo- and 2-methylthio-substituted analogues of ATP at P2x-purinoceptors have been analysed on the rabbit isolated ear artery preparation. Cumulative and sequential dosing experimental protocols were employed in the construction of agonist concentration-effect curves in order to address the possible influence of acute receptor desensitization on subsequent analyses. 2. Using the cumulative curve design the following results were obtained: D-AMP-PCBr2P, 2-methylthio-D-AMP-PCCl2P, L-AMP-PCF2P, L-AMP-PCCl2P and LAMP-PCBr2P each behaved as partial agonists. D-AMP-CPP was used as a reference full agonist and these analogues were analysed by the comparative method of Barlow et al. (1967), to provide estimates of affinity and efficacy. 2-Methylthio-L-AMP-PCBr2P was virtually silent as an agonist and was analysed as a competitive antagonist by Schild analysis. 3. Two agonists, L-AMP-PCCl2P and L-AMP-PCBr2P, were analysed by the sequential curve design, and the antagonist effects of one of the agonists, L-AMP-PCBr2P were also analysed using this protocol. The resulting estimates of affinity and efficacy, while similar to those obtained with the cumulative design, indicated that acute desensitization may affect curve definition and estimation of these quantities. 4. The following structure-activity trends emerged: D-analogues tended to have higher efficacy but lower affinity than L-analogues; efficacy varied markedly and inversely with the atomic weight of the halogen while affinity was only minimally affected; 2-methylthio- substitution also reduced efficacy with minimal effect on affinity. 5. The results of this analysis are discussed in terms of the utility of affinity and efficacy information in the classification of purinoceptors and the design of chemical probes for them. PMID:8448598

  18. Temperature inversion in China seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jiajia; Chen, Yongli; Wang, Fan

    2010-12-01

    Temperature inversion was reported as a common phenomenon in the areas near the southeastern Chinese coast (region A), west and south of the Korean Peninsula (region B), and north and east of the Shandong Peninsula (region C) during October-May in the present study, based on hydrographic data archived from 1930 through 2001 (319,029 profiles). The inversion was found to be remarkable with obvious temporal and spatial variabilities in both magnitude and coverage, with higher probabilities in region A (up to about 60%) and region C (40%-50%) than in region B (15%-20%). The analysis shows that seasonal variation of the net air-sea heat flux is closely related to the occurrence time of the inversion in the three areas, while the Yangtze and Yellow river freshwater plumes in the surface layer and ocean origin saline water in the subsurface layer maintain stable stratification. It seems that the evaporation/excessive precipitation flux makes little contribution to maintaining the stable inversion. Advection of surface fresh water by the wind-driven coastal currents results in the expansion of inversion in regions A and C. The inversion lasts for the longest period in region A (October-May) sustained by the Taiwan Warm Current carrying the subsurface saline water, while evolution of the inversion in region B is mainly controlled by the Yellow Sea Warm Current.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of a specific alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, atipamezole, on alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype binding, brain neurochemistry and behaviour in comparison with yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Haapalinna, A; Viitamaa, T; MacDonald, E; Savola, J M; Tuomisto, L; Virtanen, R; Heinonen, E

    1997-11-01

    In the present study we evaluated the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype binding, central alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist potency, as well as effects on brain neurochemistry and behavioural pharmacology of two alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, atipamezole and yohimbine. Atipamezole had higher selectivity for alpha 2- vs. alpha 1-adrenoceptors than yohimbine regardless of the subtypes studied. Both compounds had comparable affinity for the alpha 2A-, alpha 2C- and alpha 2B-adrenoceptors, but yohimbine had significantly lower affinity for the alpha 2D-subtype. This may account for the fact that significantly higher doses of yohimbine than atipamezole were needed for reversal of alpha 2-agonist (medetomidine)-induced effects in rats (mydriasis) and mice (sedation and hypothermia). The effect on central monoaminergic activity was estimated by measuring the concentrations of transmitters and their main metabolites in whole brain homogenate. At equally effective alpha 2-antagonising doses in the rat mydriasis model, both drugs stimulated central noradrenaline turnover (as reflected by increase in metabolite levels) to the same extent. Atipamezole increased dopaminergic activity only slightly, whereas yohimbine elevated central dopamine but decreased central 5-hydroxytryptamine turnover rates. In behavioural tests, atipamezole (0.1-10 mg/kg) did not affect motor activity but stimulated food rewarded operant (FR-10) responding (0.03-3 mg/kg) whereas yohimbine both stimulated (1 mg/kg) and decreased (> or = 3 mg/kg) behaviour in a narrow dose range in these tests. In the staircase test, both antagonists increased neophobia, but in the two compartment test only yohimbine (> or = 3 mg/kg) decreased exploratory behaviour. The dissimilar effects of the antagonists on neurochemistry and behaviour are thought to be caused by non alpha 2-adrenoceptor properties of yohimbine. In conclusion, the alpha 2-antagonist atipamezole blocked all alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes at low

  20. Agonists of proteinase-activated receptor-2 enhance IFN-gamma-inducible effects on human monocytes: role in influenza A infection.

    PubMed

    Feld, Micha; Shpacovitch, Victoria M; Ehrhardt, Christina; Kerkhoff, Claus; Hollenberg, Morley D; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Ludwig, Stephan; Steinhoff, Martin

    2008-05-15

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) is expressed by different types of human leukocytes and involved in the development of inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, its precise role in the regulation of human monocyte and macrophage function during viral infection remains unclear. Also, the ability of PAR(2) agonists to enhance the effects induced by immune mediators during infection or inflammation is still poorly investigated. Therefore, we investigated the ability of a PAR(2) agonist to enhance IFN-gamma-induced suppression of influenza A virus replication in human monocytes. We found that this effect correlates with an increased abundance of IkappaBalpha after costimulation of cells with PAR(2) agonist and IFN-gamma. Remarkably, coapplication of PAR(2) agonist and IFN-gamma also enhances the effects of IFN-gamma on IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 kDa release, and CD64 and alphaVbeta3 surface expression by human monocytes. Together, these findings indicate a potentially protective role of PAR(2) activation during the progression of influenza A virus infection. This effect could be associated with the ability of PAR(2) agonists to enhance IFN-gamma-induced protective effects on human monocytes.

  1. Beam dynamics of CANDLE storage ring low alpha operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Amatuni, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.; Zanyan, G.

    2015-10-01

    The generation of the coherent THz radiation and short pulse synchrotron radiation in dedicated electron storage rings requires the study of non-standard magnetic lattices which provide low momentum compaction factor (alpha) of the ring. In the present paper two low alpha operation lattices based on modification of the original beam optics and implementation of inverse bend magnets are studied for CANDLE storage ring. For considered cases an analysis of transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics is given and the feasibility of lattices is discussed.

  2. Givental Graphs and Inversion Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin-Barkowski, Petr; Shadrin, Sergey; Spitz, Loek

    2013-05-01

    Inversion symmetry is a very non-trivial discrete symmetry of Frobenius manifolds. It was obtained by Dubrovin from one of the elementary Schlesinger transformations of a special ODE associated to a Frobenius manifold. In this paper, we review the Givental group action on Frobenius manifolds in terms of Feynman graphs and obtain an interpretation of the inversion symmetry in terms of the action of the Givental group. We also consider the implication of this interpretation of the inversion symmetry for the Schlesinger transformations and for the Hamiltonians of the associated principle hierarchy.

  3. Crystal structure of constitutively active rhodopsin: How an agonist can activate its GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Standfuss, Jörg; Edwards, Patricia C.; D’Antona, Aaron; Fransen, Maikel; Xie, Guifu; Oprian, Daniel D.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome and mediate cellular responses to an extensive array of hormones, neurotransmitters, and sensory stimuli. While some crystal structures have been determined for GPCRs, most are for modified forms, showing little basal activity, and are bound to inverse agonists or antagonists1. Consequently, these structures correspond to receptors in their inactive states. The visual pigment rhodopsin is the only GPCR for which structures exist that are thought to be in the active state2,3. However, these structures are for the apoprotein or opsin form that does not contain the agonist all-trans retinal. We present here a crystal structure for the constitutively active rhodopsin mutant E113Q4-6 in complex with a peptide derived from the C-terminus of the G protein transducin (the GαCT peptide). Importantly, the protein appears to be in an active conformation, and retinal is retained in the binding pocket after photoactivation. Comparison with the structure of ground state rhodopsin7 suggests how translocation of the retinal β-ionone ring leads to a rotational tilt of transmembrane helix 6 (TM6), the critical conformational change upon activation8. A key feature of this conformational change is a reorganization of water mediated hydrogen-bonding networks between the retinal-binding pocket and three of the most conserved GPCR sequence motifs. For the first time we thus show how an agonist ligand can activate its GPCR. PMID:21389983

  4. Hepatic AQP9 expression in male rats is reduced in response to PPARα agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Lebeck, Janne; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Skowronski, Mariusz T; Nielsen, Søren; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-02-01

    The peroxisome proliferator receptor α (PPARα) is a key regulator of the hepatic response to fasting with effects on both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. A role in hepatic glycerol metabolism has also been found; however, the results are somewhat contradictive. Aquaporin 9 (AQP9) is a pore-forming transmembrane protein that facilitates hepatic uptake of glycerol. Its expression is inversely regulated by insulin in male rodents, with increased expression during fasting. Previous results indicate that PPARα plays a crucial role in the induction of AQP9 mRNA during fasting. In the present study, we use PPARα agonists to explore the effect of PPARα activation on hepatic AQP9 expression and on the abundance of enzymes involved in glycerol metabolism using both in vivo and in vitro systems. In male rats with free access to food, treatment with the PPARα agonist WY 14643 (3 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) caused a 50% reduction in hepatic AQP9 abundance with the effect being restricted to AQP9 expressed in periportal hepatocytes. The pharmacological activation of PPARα had no effect on the abundance of GlyK, whereas it caused an increased expression of hepatic GPD1, GPAT1, and L-FABP protein. In WIF-B9 and HepG2 hepatocytes, both WY 14643 and another PPARα agonist GW 7647 reduced the abundance of AQP9 protein. In conclusion, pharmacological PPARα activation results in a marked reduction in the abundance of AQP9 in periportal hepatocytes. Together with the effect on the enzymatic apparatus for glycerol metabolism, our results suggest that PPARα activation in the fed state directs glycerol into glycerolipid synthesis rather than into de novo synthesis of glucose. PMID:25477377

  5. Source Inversion Validation: Quantifying Uncertainties in Earthquake Source Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P. M.; Page, M. T.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake source inversions image the spatio-temporal rupture evolution on one or more fault planes using seismic and/or geodetic data. Source inversion methods thus represent an important research tool in seismology to unravel the complexity of earthquake ruptures. Subsequently, source-inversion results are used to study earthquake mechanics, to develop spontaneous dynamic rupture models, to build models for generating rupture realizations for ground-motion simulations, and to perform Coulomb-stress modeling. In all these applications, the underlying finite-source rupture models are treated as “data” (input information), but the uncertainties in these data (i.e. source models obtained from solving an inherently ill-posed inverse problem) are hardly known, and almost always neglected. The Source Inversion Validation (SIV) project attempts to better understand the intra-event variability of earthquake rupture models. We plan to build a long-standing and rigorous testing platform to examine the current state-of-the-art in earthquake source inversion that also facilitates to develop robust approaches to quantify rupture-model uncertainties. Our contribution reviews the current status of the SIV project, recent forward-modeling tests for point and extended sources in layered media, and discusses the strategy of the SIV-project for the coming years.

  6. Inflammation contributes to axon reflex vasodilatation evoked by iontophoresis of an α-1 adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2011-01-20

    Iontophoresis of α(1)-adrenoceptor agonists in the human forearm evoke axon reflex vasodilatation, possibly due to an accumulation of inflammatory agents at the site of iontophoresis. To investigate this possibility, skin sites in the forearm of healthy participants were treated with an anti-inflammatory gel containing ibuprofen 5% before the iontophoresis of the α(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (350μA for 3min). Red cell flux was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry at the site of iontophoresis and 8mm away in the region of axon reflex vasodilatation. In additional experiments, skin sites were treated with the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (to counteract vasoconstriction and disperse inflammatory mediators produced during the iontophoresis of phenylephrine); local anaesthetic agent (to determine whether the axon reflex to phenylephrine was neurally-mediated); or the α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (to investigate the specificity of the adrenergic axon reflex). Phenylephrine evoked marked vasodilatation 8mm from the site of iontophoresis whereas clonidine and saline-control did not (mean flux increase±S.E. 485±132% for phenylephrine; 44±24% for clonidine; 39±19% for saline-control; p<0.05 for phenylephrine versus control). Axon reflex vasodilatation to phenylephrine was unaffected by variations in blood flow at the site of phenylephrine iontophoresis, but was reduced by ibuprofen pretreatment and abolished by local anaesthetic pretreatment. These findings suggest that prostaglandin synthesis at the site of iontophoresis contributes to but does not account entirely for axon reflex vasodilatation to phenylephrine. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor mediation of axon reflexes could play a role in aberrant sensory-sympathetic coupling in neuro-inflammatory diseases.

  7. Effects of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-δ Agonist on Cardiac Healing after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Rang; Ahn, Jong Hwa; Jung, Myeong Hee; Koh, Jin-Sin; Park, Yongwhi; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Jeong, Young-Hoon; Kwak, Choong Hwan; Lee, Young Soo; Seo, Han Geuk; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hwang, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-δ)-dependent signaling is associated with rapid wound healing in the skin. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of PPAR-δ-agonist treatment on cardiac healing in post-myocardial infarction (MI) rats. Animals were assigned to the following groups: sham-operated control group, left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (MI) group, or MI with administration of the PPAR-δ agonist GW610742 group. GW610742 (1 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally after the operation and repeated every 3 days. Echocardiographic data showed no differences between the two groups in terms of cardiac function and remodeling until 4 weeks. However, the degrees of angiogenesis and fibrosis after MI were significantly higher in the GW610742-treated rats than in the untreated MI rats at 1 week following MI, which changes were not different at 2 weeks after MI. Naturally, PPAR-δ expression in infarcted myocardium was highest increased in 3 day after MI and then disappeared in 14 day after MI. GW610742 increased myofibroblast differentiation and transforming growth factor-beta 2 expression in the infarct zone at 7 days after MI. GW610742 also increased bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) recruitment in whole myocardium, and increased serum platelet-derived growth factor B, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 levels at day 3 after MI. PPAR-δ agonists treatment have the temporal effect on early fibrosis of infarcted myocardium, which might not sustain the functional and structural beneficial effect. PMID:26862756

  8. Microbial metabolism of steviol and steviol-16alpha,17-epoxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Hsu, Feng-Lin; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Hsu, Ju-Yin; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Liu, Pan-Chun; Lin, Shwu-Jiuan

    2007-02-01

    Steviol (2) possesses a blood glucose-lowering property. In order to produce potentially more- or less-active, toxic, or inactive metabolites compared to steviol (2), its microbial metabolism was investigated. Incubation of 2 with the microorganisms Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581, Mucor recurvatus MR 36, and Aspergillus niger BCRC 32720 yielded one new metabolite, ent-7alpha,11beta,13-trihydroxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (7), together with four known related biotransformation products, ent-7alpha,13-dihydroxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (3), ent-13-hydroxykaur-16-en-19-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl ester (4), ent-13,16beta,17-trihydroxykauran-19-oic acid (5), and ent-13-hydroxy-7-ketokaur-16-en-19-oic acid (6). The preliminary testing of antihyperglycemic effects showed that 5 was more potent than the parent compound (2). Thus, the microbial metabolism of steviol-16alpha,17-epoxide (8) with M. recurvatus MR 36 was continued to produce higher amounts of 5 for future study of its action mechanism. Preparative-scale fermentation of 8 yielded 5, ent-11alpha,13,16alpha,17-tetrahydroxykauran-19-oic acid (10), ent-1beta,17-dihydroxy-16-ketobeyeran-19-oic acid (11), and ent-7alpha,17-dihydroxy-16-ketobeyeran-19-oic acid (13), together with three new metabolites: ent-13,16beta-dihydroxykauran-17-acetoxy-19-oic acid (9), ent-11beta,13-dihydroxy-16beta,17-epoxykauran-19-oic acid (12), and ent-11beta,13,16beta,17-tetrahydroxykauran-19-oic acid (14). The structures of the compounds were fully elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques, as well as HRFABMS. In addition, a GRE (glucocorticoid responsive element)-mediated luciferase reporter assay was used to initially screen the compounds 3-5, and 7 as glucocorticoid agonists. Compounds 4, 5 and 7 showed significant effects. PMID:17207824

  9. [PPAR receptors and insulin sensitivity: new agonists in development].

    PubMed

    Pégorier, J-P

    2005-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (or glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma) ligands with well recognized effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The clinical use of these PPARgamma agonists in type 2 diabetic patients leads to an improved glycemic control and an inhanced insulin sensitivity, and at least in animal models, to a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell function. However, they can produce adverse effects, generally mild or moderate, but some of them (mainly peripheral edema and weight gain) may conduct to treatment cessation. Several pharmacological classes are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development, with the objective to retain the beneficial metabolic properties of PPARgamma agonists, either alone or in association with the PPARalpha agonists (fibrates) benefit on lipid profile, but devoid of the side-effects on weight gain and fluid retention. These new pharmacological classes: partial PPARgamma agonists, PPARgamma antagonists, dual PPARalpha/PPARgamma agonists, pan PPARalpha/beta(delta)/gamma agonists, RXR receptor agonists (rexinoids), are presented in this review. Main results from in vitro cell experiments and animal model studies are discussed, as well as the few published short-term studies in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:15959400

  10. Comparative pharmacology of adrenergic alpha(2C) receptors coupled to Ca(2+) signaling through different Galpha proteins.

    PubMed

    Kurko, Dalma; Bekes, Zsófia; Gere, Anikó; Baki, Andrea; Boros, András; Kolok, Sándor; Bugovics, Gyula; Nagy, József; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Ignácz-Szendrei, Györgyi

    2009-12-01

    Adrenergic alpha(1), alpha(2) and beta receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor families (GPCRs) mediating physiological responses to adrenaline (epinephrine) and noradrenaline (norepinephrine). Since GPCRs are major targets for potential therapeutic agents, development of robust, reliable and cost effective functional screening methods for these receptors is in the focus of pharmacological research. For this reason, the aim of the present study was to develop an intracellular calcium assay for investigating the pharmacology of the alpha(2C) type of adrenergic receptors (alpha(2C)-AR). Although activation of alpha(2C)-AR is not linked to calcium mobilization, co-expression of these receptors with the chimeric Galpha(qi5) protein, containing the five carboxyl-terminal amino acids from G(i), or promiscuosus Galpha(16) protein can divert receptor signaling to the G(q) pathway generating Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. In order to assess the functional potency of alpha(2)-AR agonists and antagonists, we established a fluorometric Ca(2+) assay using cell lines stably and constitutively co-expressing alpha(2C)-AR and Galpha(qi5) or Galpha(16) proteins (Galpha(qi5)/alpha(2C) and Galpha(16)/alpha(2C)). As part of the pharmacological characterization, we measured the changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels due to activation of the chimeric Galpha(qi5) or Galpha(16) coupled recombinant alpha(2C) receptors as a function of increasing concentration of several agonists (noradrenaline, brimonidine, oxymetazoline, clonidine, moxonidine) and antagonists (MK912, yohimbine). The binding affinities of alpha(2)-AR agonist and antagonists and the inhibition of the forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in alpha(2C)-AR expressing cells were also measured. These results confirmed that the Galpha(qi5)/alpha(2C) and Galpha(16)/alpha(2C) recombinant systems can be useful for modelling the native G(i)-coupled system. Our results indicate that a plate-reader based

  11. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Node, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109TM3, Phe182ECL2, Gln257TM6, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108TM3, Ser109TM3, Ala163TM4, Phe182ECL2, Lys199TM5, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  12. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Casaburi, Ivan; Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC.

  13. Measuring relative acetylcholine receptor agonist binding by selective proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Behling, R W; Yamane, T; Navon, G; Sammon, M J; Jelinski, L W

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented that uses selective proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements of nicotine in the presence of the acetylcholine receptor to obtain relative binding constants for acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and muscarine. For receptors from Torpedo californica the results show that (a) the binding constants are in the order acetylcholine greater than nicotine greater than carbamylcholine greater than muscarine; (b) selective NMR measurements provide a rapid and direct method for monitoring both the specific and nonspecific binding of agonists to these receptors and to the lipid; (c) alpha-bungarotoxin can be used to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding to the receptor; (d) the receptor--substrate interaction causes a large change in the selective relaxation time of the agonists even at concentrations 100x greater than that of the receptor. This last observation means that these measurements provide a rapid method to monitor drug binding when only small amounts of receptor are available. Furthermore, the binding strategies presented here may be useful for the NMR determination of the conformation of the ligand in its bound state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3395661

  14. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  15. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Casaburi, Ivan; Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  16. Profound and rapid reduction in body temperature induced by the melanocortin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2014-08-22

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid reduction in both body temperature and energy expenditure, which was independent of its effect on feeding and followed by a prolonged increase in energy expenditure. The rapid reduction was at least partly mediated by brain neurons since intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist, produced a similar response. In addition, the body temperature-lowering effect of MTII was independent of the presence of MC4Rs, but in a similar fashion to the previously shown effect on body temperature by 5'AMP. Moreover, β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) were required for the recovery from low body temperature induced by MTII and further pharmacological studies showed that the MTII's effect on body temperature may be partially mediated by the vasopressin V1a receptors. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the melanocortin pathway in rapidly lowering body temperature.

  17. Reversal of endotoxic shock with the calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, N.; King, J.W.; Chernow, B.; Roth, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The hypotension and diminished myocardial function observed in sepsis and endotoxin-induced shock are difficult to overcome pharmacologically. They previously demonstrated that a down regulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors may contribute to the hypotension and diminished response to catecholamines seen in septic shock. They here demonstrate that the calcium channel agonist BAY k 8644 potently reverses the hypotension of experimental endotoxin (20 mg/kg Difico lipopolysaccharide) shock in rats. A dose as low as 10 ..mu..g/kg BAY k 8644 significantly elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) in hypotensive rats. The maximum percentage increase in MAP was greater in endotoxin-treated rats compared with saline-treated controls (153% vs 120% increase respectively). BAY k 8644 also caused a dose-dependent decrease in heart rate of 37% in endotoxin-treated rats and 39% in controls. No difference in (/sup 3/H)-nitrendipine binding sites were detected comparing control and endotoxin-treated rates. These results demonstrate that calcium channel agonists might represent unique agents in pathologic states characterized by hypotension and diminished cardiac function.

  18. Peroxidation of the dried thin film of lipid by high-energy alpha particles from a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1984-11-01

    High-energy ..cap alpha.. particles produced a dose-dependent linear increase in different lipid peroxidation products (e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA), conjugated dienes, and hydroperoxides) in the dried thin film state. An inverse dose-rate effect was observed when the dose rate was varied by changing either the ..cap alpha..-particle fluence rate or the ..cap alpha..-particle energy. The antioxidants ..cap alpha..-tocopherol and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) suppressed the ..cap alpha..-particle-induced lipid peroxidation in the dried thin film state, and in this respect ..cap alpha..-tocopherol was found superior to BHT. It was found that ..cap alpha..-tocopherol was equally efficient in inhibiting lipid peroxidations by ..cap alpha.. particles and ultraviolet light.

  19. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    PubMed

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  20. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  1. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, M.; Mai, P.M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  2. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  3. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  4. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  5. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  6. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, calcium mobilization and (/sup 3/H), 4-dihydropyridine binding in vascular smooth muscle of rat tail artery

    SciTech Connect

    Su, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Pharmacologic characterization of post-synaptic ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors in rat tail artery was examined by using selective agonists and antagonists. In this tissue, the ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor agonists employed all produced concentration-dependent mechanical responses with rank order of potency, clonidine > norepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine > UK > 14304 > B-HT 920. This order of agonists activities not consistent with a simple classification into ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors in the rat tail artery. Antagonism by prazosin and yohimbine of phenylephrine, norepinephrine and clonidine responses did not reveal the anticipated discrimination between ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors. Potassium depolarization-induced responses were very sensitive to antagonism by the Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists nifedipine and D 600. The sensitivity sequence of ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor agonist induced responses to nifedipine and D 600 is H-HT 920 (> clonidine) > phenylephrine > norepinephrine. This disagrees with the thesis that ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor mediated responses in vascular smooth muscle are more sensitive than are ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenoceptor mediated responses to Ca/sup 2 +/ channel antagonists. Radioligand binding studies of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine and (/sup 3/H)Bay K 8644 to microsomal preparations of tail artery membrane a single set of high affinity binding sites and there is a good correlation between the pharmacological potencies and binding affinities of these agents. In addition, study of the displacement of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine by Bay K 8644 revealed IC/sub 50/ and K/sub l/ values which are in approximate accord with those determined for pharmacologic experiments.

  7. Moebius inversion formula and inverting lattice sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millane, Rick P.

    2000-11-01

    The Mobius inversion formula is an interesting theorem from number theory that has application to a number inverse problems, particularly lattice problems. Specific inverse problems, however, often require related Mobius inversion formulae that can be derived from the fundamental formula. Derivation of such formulae is not easy for the non- specialist, however. Examples of the kinds of inversion formulae that can be derived and their application to inverse lattice problems are described.

  8. The liver X receptor agonist TO901317 protects mice against cisplatin-induced kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Wang, Rong; Sun, Jing; Yu, Kezhou; Chen, Bing; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptors are in the nuclear receptor superfamily and are contained in the regulation of lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Besides, liver X receptors are considered crucial regulators of the inflammatory response and innate immunity. The current study evaluates the in vivo effects that the synthetic liver X receptor agonist TO901317 protects against cisplatin-induced kidney injury in mice. Mice received cisplatin administration through a single intraperitoneal injection (20 mg/kg in saline). And then the mice were treated with the TO901317 by daily gavage (10 mg/kg/day) 12 h postcisplatin administration, and cisplatin nephrotoxicity was evaluated. At 72 h after cisplatin treatment, elevated plasma urea and creatinine levels (P < 0.05) were evidenced which indicates the renal dysfunction of the vehicle-treated mice, consistent with tubular necrosis, protein cast, dilation of renal tubules, and desquamation of epithelial cells in renal tubules. In contrast, the severity of renal dysfunction and histological damage was reduced in TO901317 treated mice (P < 0.05). In accordance, circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha levels, renal tumor necrosis factor alpha, p47phox, gp91phox, and protein expression levels and COX-2 mRNA, renal monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, VACAM-1 mRNA and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contents, and renal prostaglandin E2 amounts, were higher in samples from cisplatin-treated mice in comparison with controls (P < 0.05) but attenuated in the TO901317 treatment group (P < 0.05). Taken together, treatment with the liver X receptor agonist TO901317 ameliorated the inflammatory response and oxidative stress in cisplatin-induced kidney injury in mice. PMID:26062799

  9. Antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Bélanger, A; Kelly, P A; Séguin, C; Cusan, L; Lefebvre, F A; Reeves, J J; Lemay, A; Faure, N; Gourdeau, Y; Raynaud, J P

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. Large doses of the LHRH agonist LHRH-EA lead to a marked reduction of testicular and secondary sex organ weight, LH receptor levels, and plasma testosterone concentration. A marked inhibition of basal testicular and testosterone concentrations is obtained after daily administration of the LHRH agonists at doses greater than 10 ng. Treatment with low doses of the LHRH agonist can lead to an increased steroidogenic response to LH. Treatment with low doses of LHRH agonists could stimulate Leydig cell function while high doses are history. A study of the effects of longterm treatment with an LHRH agonsist on spermatogenesis revelaed that testis, prostate, and seminal vesicle weight decreased and plasma LH and FSH levels increased over 12 weeks. Comparison of the effects of increasing doses of LHRH agonist on testicular and ovarian gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in male rats indicates that single or repeated administration of LHRH agonists can lead to loss of testicular LH receptors in the absence of the pituitary gland. The loss of ovarian gonadotropin receptors in female rats is also investigated. Antifertility effects of LHRH ethylamide are accompanied by a marked loss of LH/hCG and FSH receptors in ovarian tissue. The injection of 1,3, or 10 ng LHRH-EA in intact rats has no significant effect on ovarian LH receptor levels. A study of the direct action of LHRH agonists at the ovarian level demonstrates a close relationship between the binding activity of a large series of LHRH agonists and antagonists in the anterior pituitary gland and the ovary. Inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis in man by treatment with a potent LHRH agonist is also demonstrated. Intranasal administration of LHRH ethylamide has luteolytic effects in normal women. Daily administration of LHRH-EA inhibited ovulation in all but 2 of 89 treatment

  10. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  11. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Raulli, R.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-05

    The potency of various alpha adrenergic compounds on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis was determined using (/sup 3/H)-inositol labelled cerebral cortical slices. Norepinephrine-induced PI hydrolysis was inhibited by the alpha/sub 1/ selective antagonist prazosin (1 ..mu..M) but not the beta receptor antagonist propranolol (1 ..mu..M). Tramazoline, (-)-ephedrine, and (+/-)-phenylpropanolamine were all found to be partial agonists at 1 mM concentrations. Clonidine, naphazoline, trazodone, and the novel antidepressant mianserin at concentrations of 100 ..mu..M to 1 mM produced no significant increase in PI hydrolysis above control levels. The relationship between responses and receptor binding will be discussed.

  12. Portable alpha spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; de la Torre Pérez, J

    2012-09-01

    Many portable devices have been designed to detect γ-rays or alpha and beta particles. Most of the α-particle detectors give the total count as a result, without identifying the radionuclides existing in the sample. The development of a device allowing rapid and straightforward α-particle spectrometry would be very useful for detecting the radioactive contents of unknown samples. This work describes the construction of a portable device using silicon semiconductor detectors designed to rapidly detect and possibly identify alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  13. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  14. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion. PMID:27209370

  15. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  16. Alpha-2 adrenergic and serotonin-1B receptors in the OK cell, an opossum kidney cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Alpha-2 adrenergic and serotonin-1B (5HT{sub 1B}) receptors, both negatively-coupled to adenylyl cyclase, were characterized in the OK cell line, a renal proximal tubule epithelial cell line derived from the kidney of a North American opossum. In membrane saturation radioligand binding experiments, ({sup 3}H)yohimbine and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine labeled an equivalent number of binding sites. Detailed pharmacological analysis of OK cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in competition binding assays indicate this receptor is neither an alpha-2A nor an alpha-2B adrenergic receptor subtype, although the alpha-2B receptor subtype-selective drugs prazosin, ARC-239 and chlorpromazine have affinities for OK cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors similar to those at the alpha-2B receptor subtype. Determinations of agonist potency for inhibition of PTH-stimulated cyclic AMP production and radioligand binding analysis using ({sup 125}I)({minus})-cyanopindolol indicate that a 5HT{sub 1B} receptor is expressed in the OK cell line. A biochemical effector system coupled to this receptor subtype has not been previously described. Several compounds appear to be potent agonists at the 5TH{sub 1B} receptor including the beta adrenergic antagonists cyanopindolol, pindolol, propranolol and alprenolol.

  17. Interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileal cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Homeidan, F.R.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El-Sabban, M.E.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    An interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor on active electrolyte transport was demonstrated in rabbit ileum. Clonidine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist, stimulated NaCl absorption apparently by Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonism since it inhibited /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake across the basolateral membrane and decreased total ileal calcium content. This stimulation was inhibited by the Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists dl- and l-verapamil and cadmium but not by nifedipine. The binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine, a specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, was studied on purified ileal cell membranes using a rapid filtration technique. dl-Verapamil and Cd/sup + +/ inhibited the specific binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine over the same concentration range in which they affected transport. In contrast, nifedipine had no effect on binding, just as it had no effect on clonidine-stimulated NaCl absorption. These data demonstrate that there is an interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channels and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in ileal basolateral membranes. Some Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists alter ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic binding to the receptor and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist binding leads to changes in Ca/sup + +/ entry. A close spatial relationship between the Ca/sup + +/-channel and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor could explain the data.

  18. Liganded RAR{alpha} and RAR{gamma} interact with but are repressed by TNIP1

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, Igor; Aneskievich, Brian J.

    2009-11-20

    Nuclear receptor (NR) transcriptional activity is controlled by agonist binding and concomitant exchange of receptor-associating corepressor proteins for NR box-containing, receptor AF-2-targeting coactivator proteins. We report here that TNIP1 is an atypical NR coregulator. Requirements for TNIP1-RAR interaction-its NR boxes, ligand, and the receptor's AF-2 domain-are characteristic of coactivators. However, TNIP1 reduces RAR activity. Repression is partially relieved by SRC1, suggesting interference with coactivator recruitment as a mechanism of TNIP1 repression. TNIP1 does not bind RXR{alpha} and RAR{alpha} AF-2 domain, necessary for that receptor's association with TNIP1, is insufficient to confer upon RXR{alpha} interaction with TNIP1. Preferential interaction of RAR{alpha} over RAR{gamma} with TNIP1 can be mapped to RAR{alpha} ligand binding domain helices 5-9 and suggests regions outside the receptor helix 12 modulate interaction of NRs and NR box-containing corepressors. TNIP1 repression of RARs in the presence of RA places it in a small category of corepressors of agonist-bound NRs.

  19. The pharmacology of spontaneously open alpha 1 beta 3 epsilon GABA A receptor-ionophores.

    PubMed

    Maksay, Gábor; Thompson, Sally A; Wafford, Keith A

    2003-06-01

    Human alpha(1)beta(3) epsilon GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined using the conventional two-electrode voltage-clamp technique and compared to alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2) receptors. The effects of several GABA(A) agonists were studied, and the allosteric modulation of the channel by a number of GABAergic modulators investigated. The presence of the epsilon subunit increased the potency and efficacy of direct activation by partial GABA(A) agonists (piperidine-4-sulphonic acid and thio-4-PIOL), pentobarbital and neuro-steroids. Direct activation by 3-hydroxylated neurosteroids was restricted to 3alpha epimers, while chirality at C5 was indifferent. The 3beta-sulfate esters of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone inhibited the spontaneous currents with efficacies higher, while bicuculline methiodide and SR 95531 did so lower than picrotoxin and TBPS. Furosemide, fipronil, triphenylcyanoborate and Zn(2+) blocked the spontaneous currents of alpha(1)beta(3) epsilon receptors with different efficacies. Flunitrazepam and 4'-chlorodiazepam inhibited the spontaneous currents with micromolar potencies. In conclusion, spontaneously active alpha(1)beta(3) epsilon GABA(A) receptors can be potentiated and blocked by GABAergic agents within a broad range of efficacy.

  20. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed Central

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-01-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7542585

  1. Second-by-second analysis of alpha 7 nicotine receptor regulation of glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Konradsson-Geuken, Asa; Gash, Clelland R; Alexander, Kathleen; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Gerhardt, Greg A; Bruno, John P

    2009-12-01

    These experiments utilized an enzyme-based microelectrode selective for the second-by-second detection of extracellular glutamate to reveal the alpha 7-based nicotinic modulation of glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of freely moving rats. Rats received intracortical infusions of the nonselective nicotinic agonist nicotine (12.0 mM, 1.0 microg/0.4 microl) or the selective alpha 7 agonist choline (2.0 mM/0.4 microl). The selectivity of drug-induced glutamate release was assessed in subgroups of animals pretreated with the alpha 7 antagonist, alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT, 10 microM), or kynurenine (10 microM) the precursor of the astrocyte-derived, negative allosteric alpha 7 modulator kynurenic acid. Local administration of nicotine increased glutamate signals (maximum amplitude = 4.3 +/- 0.6 microM) that were cleared to baseline levels in 493 +/- 80 seconds. Pretreatment with alpha-BGT or kynurenine attenuated nicotine-induced glutamate by 61% and 60%, respectively. Local administration of choline also increased glutamate signals (maximum amplitude = 6.3 +/- 0.9 microM). In contrast to nicotine-evoked glutamate release, choline-evoked signals were cleared more quickly (28 +/- 6 seconds) and pretreatment with alpha-BGT or kynurenine completely blocked the stimulated glutamate release. Using a method that reveals the temporal dynamics of in vivo glutamate release and clearance, these data indicate a nicotinic modulation of cortical glutamate release that is both alpha 7- and non-alpha 7-mediated. Furthermore, these data may also provide a mechanism underlying the recent focus on alpha 7 full and partial agonists as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cortically mediated cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  2. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer modelling of the alpha and beta subunits of echicetin from the venom of Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper).

    PubMed

    Polgár, J; Magnenat, E M; Peitsch, M C; Wells, T N; Saqi, M S; Clemetson, K J

    1997-04-15

    Echicetin, a heterodimeric protein from the venom of Echis carinatus, binds to platelet glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and so inhibits platelet aggregation or agglutination induced by various platelet agonists acting via GPIb. The amino acid sequence of the beta subunit of echicetin has been reported and found to belong to the recently identified snake venom subclass of the C-type lectin protein family. Echicetin alpha and beta subunits were purified. N-terminal sequence analysis provided direct evidence that the protein purified was echicetin. The paper presents the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer models of the alpha and beta subunits. The sequence of alpha echicetin is highly similar to the alpha and beta chains of various heterodimeric and homodimeric C-type lectins. Neither of the fully reduced and alkylated alpha or beta subunits of echicetin inhibited the platelet agglutination induced by von Willebrand factor-ristocetin or alpha-thrombin. Earlier reports about the inhibitory activity of reduced and alkylated echicetin beta subunit might have been due to partial reduction of the protein. PMID:9163349

  3. Effects of estradiol, estrogen receptor subtype-selective agonists and genistein on glucose metabolism in leptin resistant female Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats.

    PubMed

    Weigt, Carmen; Hertrampf, Torsten; Flenker, Ulrich; Hülsemann, Frank; Kurnaz, Pinar; Fritzemeier, Karl Heinrich; Diel, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The leptin resistant Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats are hyperphagic and become obese, but whereas the males develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the females remain euglycaemic. As estrogen deficiency is known to increase the risk of developing T2DM, we evaluated the role of ER subtypes alpha and beta in the development of glucose tolerance in leptin resistant ovariectomized (OVX) ZDF rats. At least six rats per group were treated with either vehicle (OVX), 17β-estradiol (E2), ER subtype-selective agonists (Alpha and Beta), or genistein (Gen) for 17 weeks. At the end of the treatment period a glucose tolerance assay was performed and the metabolic flux of (13)C-glucose for the E2 group was investigated. OVX ZDF rats treated with E2, Alpha, Beta, and Gen tolerated the glucose significantly better than untreated controls. E2 treatment increased absorbance/flux of (13)C-glucose to metabolic relevant tissues such liver, adipose tissue, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscle. Moreover, whereas Alpha treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle, Beta treatment resulted in the largest fiber sizes of the soleus muscle. Treatment with Gen increased both the mRNA expression of GLUT 4 and the fiber sizes in the skeletal muscle. In addition, E2 and Alpha treatment decreased food intake and body weight gain. In summary, estrogen-improved glucose absorption is mediated via different molecular mechanisms: while activation of ER alpha seems to stimulate muscular GLUT4 functionality, activation of ER beta results in a hypertrophy of muscle fibers. In addition, selective activation of ER alpha decreased food intake and body weight gain. Our data further indicate that ER subtype-selective agonists and genistein improve systemic glucose tolerance also in the absence of a functional leptin signaling pathway.

  4. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T.; Schultz, Niklas; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  5. PPAR{alpha} is a key regulator of hepatic FGF21

    SciTech Connect

    Lundasen, Thomas; Hunt, Mary C.; Nilsson, Lisa-Mari; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Angelin, Bo; Alexson, Stefan E.H.; Rudling, Mats . E-mail: mats.rudling@cnt.ki.se

    2007-08-24

    The metabolic regulator fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has antidiabetic properties in animal models of diabetes and obesity. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we here show that the hepatic gene expression of FGF21 is regulated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). Fasting or treatment of mice with the PPAR{alpha} agonist Wy-14,643 induced FGF21 mRNA by 10-fold and 8-fold, respectively. In contrast, FGF21 mRNA was low in PPAR{alpha} deficient mice, and fasting or treatment with Wy-14,643 did not induce FGF21. Obese ob/ob mice, known to have increased PPAR{alpha} levels, displayed 12-fold increased hepatic FGF21 mRNA levels. The potential importance of PPAR{alpha} for FGF21 expression also in human liver was shown by Wy-14,643 induction of FGF21 mRNA in human primary hepatocytes, and PPAR{alpha} response elements were identified in both the human and mouse FGF21 promoters. Further studies on the mechanisms of regulation of FGF21 by PPAR{alpha} in humans will be of great interest.

  6. Pharmacological properties of rat alpha 7 nicotinic receptors expressed in native and recombinant cell systems.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Caterina; Giacometti, Angelo; Aldegheri, Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Terstappen, Georg C

    2002-06-12

    The pharmacological properties of the rat alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor endogenously expressed in PC12 cells and recombinantly expressed in GH4C1 cells (alpha7-GH4C1 cells) were characterized and compared. Patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that activation by choline and block by methyllycaconitine and dihydro-beta-erythroidine were similar, but block by mecamylamine was different. Whereas in alpha7-GH4C1 cells the inhibition curve for mecamylamine was monophasic (IC(50) of 1.6 microM), it was biphasic in PC12 cells (IC(50) values of 341 nM and 9.6 microM). The same rank order of potency was obtained for various nicotinic agonists, while acetylcholine was 3.7-fold less potent and 1.5-fold more effective in PC12 cells. Dihydro-beta-erythroidine differentially blocked acetylcholine-evoked currents in both systems. Since reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments revealed expression of alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha7 and beta4 subunits in PC12 cells, whereas GH4C1 cells express only the beta4 subunit, our results suggest that more than one form of alpha7 containing heteromeric nicotinic receptors might be functionally expressed in PC12 cells.

  7. Phorbol esters promote alpha 1-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and receptor uncoupling from inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Leeb-Lundberg, L M; Cotecchia, S; Lomasney, J W; DeBernardis, J F; Lefkowitz, R J; Caron, M G

    1985-01-01

    DDT1 MF-2 cells, which are derived from hamster vas deferens smooth muscle, contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (54,800 +/- 2700 sites per cell) that are coupled to stimulation of inositol phospholipid metabolism. Incubation of these cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters, which stimulate calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, leads to a marked attenuation of the ability of alpha 1-receptor agonists such as norepinephrine to stimulate the turnover of inositol phospholipids. This turnover was measured by determining the 32P content of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid after prelabeling of the cellular ATP pool with 32Pi. These phorbol ester-treated cells also displayed a decrease in binding affinity of cellular alpha 1 receptors for agonists with no change in antagonist affinity. By using affinity chromatography on the affinity resin Affi-Gel-A55414, the alpha 1 receptors were purified approximately equal to 300-fold from control and phorbol ester-treated 32Pi-prelabeled cells. As assessed by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the Mr 80,000 alpha 1-receptor ligand-binding subunit is a phosphopeptide containing 1.2 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. After phorbol ester treatment this increased to 3.6 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. The effect of phorbol esters on norepinephrine-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover and alpha 1-receptor phosphorylation showed the same rapid time course with a t1/2 less than 2 min. These results indicate that calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase may play an important role in regulating the function of receptors that are coupled to the inositol phospholipid cycle by phosphorylating and deactivating them. Images PMID:2994039

  8. PPAR modulators and PPAR pan agonists for metabolic diseases: the next generation of drugs targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors?

    PubMed

    Feldman, P L; Lambert, M H; Henke, B R

    2008-01-01

    The Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors-PPAR alpha, PPAR gamma, and PPAR delta--are members of the nuclear receptor gene family that have emerged as therapeutic targets for the development of drugs to treat human metabolic diseases. The discovery of high affinity, subtype-selective agonists for each of the three PPAR subtypes has allowed elucidation of the pharmacology of these receptors and development of first-generation therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. However, despite proven therapeutic benefits of selective PPAR agonists, safety concerns and dose-limiting side effects have been observed, and a number of late-stage development failures have been reported. Scientists have continued to explore ligand-based activation of PPARs in hopes of developing safer and more effective drugs. This review highlights recent efforts on two newer approaches, the simultaneous activation of all three PPAR receptors with a single ligand (PPAR pan agonists) and the selective modulation of a single PPAR receptor in a cell or tissue specific manner (selective PPAR modulator or SPPARM) in order to induce a subset of target genes and affect a restricted number of metabolic pathways. PMID:18537685

  9. Inhibition of cation channel function at the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo: Agonist self-inhibition and anesthetic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo by cholinergic agonists, local anesthetics, and n-alkanols was studied using {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux studies in sealed native Torpedo electroplaque membrane vesicles. Reliable concentration-response and kinetic data were obtained using manual ten sec filtration assays in vesicles partially blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin to remove spare receptors and quenched-flow assays to assess initial {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux rates or the rate of drug-induced receptor inactivation. Concentration response relationships for the agonists acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, and (-)-nicotine are all bell-shape due to stimulation of cation channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channels at higher concentrations. The rate of agonist-induced fast desensitization (k{sub d}) increases with (acetylcholine) in parallel with channel activation, suggesting that desensitization proceeds from the open state and/or states in rapid equilibrium with it. At self-inhibitory acetylcholine concentrations, a new rapid inactivation (rate = k{sub f}) is observed before fast desensitization. The rate and extent of rapid inactivation is compatible with bimolecular association between acethylcholine and inhibitory site with K{sub B} = 40 mM.

  10. Differential blockade of agonist- and depolarization-induced sup 45 Ca2+ influx in smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wallnoefer, A.C.; Cauvin, C.; Lategan, T.W.; Rueegg, U.T. )

    1989-10-01

    ATP stimulated {sup 45}Ca2+ influx in rat aortic smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 3.6 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M). ADP and GTP were less effective than ATP in stimulating {sup 45}Ca2+ influx; AMP was weakly active and the adenosine agonist 5'-(N-ethyl-carboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) had no effect. ATP gamma S was about equieffective with ATP, whereas alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (APCPP) did not induce {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Stimulation of {sup 45}Ca2+ influx by ATP was not abolished by the dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonist darodipine (PY 108-068), which completely blocked depolarization-induced {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Inorganic cations (La3+, Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+) were able to inhibit both agonist- and depolarization-induced {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Cd2+, however, was approximately 20 times more selective in blocking K+-stimulated than agonist-stimulated {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. These data indicate that ATP-stimulated Ca2+ influx in rat aortic smooth muscle cells is resistant to darodipine but is reduced by La3+, Cd2+, and other inorganic blockers of Ca2+ channels.

  11. Hepatoprotection by the farnesoid X receptor agonist GW4064 in rat models of intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Binz, Jane; Numerick, Mary Jo; Dennis, Steve; Luo, Guizhen; Desai, Bhasha; MacKenzie, Kathleen I; Mansfield, Traci A; Kliewer, Steven A; Goodwin, Bryan; Jones, Stacey A

    2003-12-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor that is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Fxr-null mice exhibit a phenotype similar to Byler disease, an inherited cholestatic liver disorder. In the liver, activation of FXR induces transcription of transporter genes involved in promoting bile acid clearance and represses genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis. We investigated whether the synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 could protect against cholestatic liver damage in rat models of extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis. In the bile duct-ligation and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate models of cholestasis, GW4064 treatment resulted in significant reductions in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, as well as other markers of liver damage. Rats that received GW4064 treatment also had decreased incidence and extent of necrosis, decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, and decreased bile duct proliferation. Analysis of gene expression in livers from GW4064-treated cholestatic rats revealed decreased expression of bile acid biosynthetic genes and increased expression of genes involved in bile acid transport, including the phospholipid flippase MDR2. The hepatoprotection seen in these animal models by the synthetic FXR agonist suggests FXR agonists may be useful in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease.

  12. Pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral profile of JB-788, a new 5-HT1A agonist.

    PubMed

    Picard, M; Morisset, S; Cloix, J F; Bizot, J C; Guerin, M; Beneteau, V; Guillaumet, G; Hevor, T K

    2010-09-01

    A novel pyridine derivative, 8-{4-[(6-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-[1,4]dioxino[2,3-b]pyridine-3-ylmethyl)-amino]-butyl}-8-aza-spiro[4.5]decane-7,9-dione hydrochloride, termed JB-788, was designed to selectively target 5-HT(1A) receptors. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of JB-788 was characterized in vitro using radioligands binding tests and in vivo using neurochemical and behavioural experiments. JB-788 bound tightly to human 5-HT(1A) receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells with a K(i) value of 0.8 nM. Its binding affinity is in the same range as that observed for the (+/-)8-OH-DPAT, a reference 5HT(1A) agonist compound. Notably, JB-788 only bound weakly to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(2A) receptors and moreover the drug displayed only weak or indetectable binding to muscarinic, alpha(2), beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptors, or dopaminergic D(1) receptors. JB-788 was found to display substantial binding affinity for dopaminergic D(2) receptors and, to a lesser extend to alpha(1) adrenoreceptors. JB-788 dose-dependently decreased forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in HEK cells expressing human 5-HT(1A), thus acting as a potent 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (E(max.) 75%, EC(50) 3.5 nM). JB-788 did not exhibit any D(2) receptor agonism but progressively inhibited the effects of quinpirole, a D(2) receptor agonist, in the cAMP accumulation test with a K(i) value of 250 nM. JB-788 induced a weak change in cAMP levels in mouse brain but, like some antipsychotics, transiently increased glycogen contents in various brain regions. Behavioral effects were investigated in mice using the elevated plus-maze. JB-788 was found to increase the time duration spent by animals in anxiogenic situations. Locomotor hyperactivity induced by methamphetamine in mouse, a model of antipsychotic activity, was dose-dependently inhibited by JB-788. Altogether, these results suggest that JB-788 displays pharmacological properties, which could be of interest in the area

  13. A retinoic acid receptor alpha antagonist counteracts retinoid teratogenicity in vitro and reduced incidence and/or severity of malformations in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, K; Schmitt, G

    1994-02-15

    The role of retinoic acid receptors (RAR) in retinoid-induced teratogenesis is mainly unknown. The aim of the present studies was to demonstrate the effect of a RAR alpha antagonist on retinoid-induced teratogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. In micromass cultures of rat limb bud cells a RAR alpha antagonist was able to counteract differentiation inhibiting effects of a RAR alpha agonist. In mouse studies, the selective RAR alpha antagonist reduced frequency and/or severity of major malformations. Our observations indicate the potentiality of selective RAR agonists and antagonists in dissecting the function of nuclear receptors and in particular cases of retinoid teratogenesis, to assign to the different receptors a primary role in determining one or another of the multiple malformations.

  14. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  15. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  16. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  17. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  18. PPAR dual agonists: are they opening Pandora's Box?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Rose, Madhankumar; Ganti, Subrahmanya S; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the major cause of mortality in patients of diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of nuclear hormone receptor superfamily comprising of three subtypes such as PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta/beta. Activation of PPARalpha reduces triglycerides and involves in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPARgamma causes insulin sensitization and enhances glucose metabolism, whereas activation of PPARdelta enhances fatty acid metabolism. Current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of diabetes do not inhibit the associated secondary cardiovascular complications. Hence, the development of multimodal drugs which can reduce hyperglycemia and concomitantly inhibit the progression of secondary cardiovascular complications may offer valuable therapeutic option. Several basic and clinical studies have exemplified the beneficial effects of PPARalpha and PPARgamma ligands in preventing the cardiovascular risks. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists are developed to increase insulin sensitivity and simultaneously prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications. Such compounds are under clinical trials and proposed for treatment of Type II diabetes with secondary cardiovascular complications. However, PPARalpha/gamma dual agonists such as muraglitazar, tesaglitazar and ragaglitazar have been noted to produce several cardiovascular risks and carcinogenicity, which raised number of questions about the clinical applications of dual agonists in diabetes and its associated complications. The ongoing basic studies have elucidated the cardio protective role of PPARdelta. Therefore, further studies are on the track to develop PPARalpha/delta and PPAR gamma/delta dual agonists and PPARalpha/gamma/delta pan agonists for the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. The present review critically analyzes the protective and detrimental effect of PPAR agonists in

  19. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  20. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  1. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  2. From Alpha to Omega

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czaja, Paul Clement

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha point of the authors' life as a Montessori educator began in 1959, when he was a graduate student studying philosophy at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York. While studying the works of the great American philosopher William James, the author came across the writings of Maria Montessori and immediately became captivated by her…

  3. Pharmacogenetics of beta2 adrenergic receptor agonists in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Ortega, V E

    2014-07-01

    Beta2 (β2) adrenergic receptor agonists (beta agonists) are a commonly prescribed treatment for asthma despite the small increase in risk for life-threatening adverse responses associated with long-acting beta agonist (LABA). The concern for life-threatening adverse effects associated with LABA and the inter-individual variability of therapeutic responsiveness to LABA-containing combination therapies provide the rationale for pharmacogenetic studies of beta agonists. These studies primarily evaluated genes within the β2-adrenergic receptor and related pathways; however, recent genome-wide studies have identified novel loci for beta agonist response. Recent studies have identified a role for rare genetic variants in determining beta agonist response and, potentially, the risk for rare, adverse responses to LABA. Before genomics research can be applied to the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine, it will be necessary to continue adapting to the analysis of an increasing volume of genetic data in larger cohorts with a combination of analytical methods and in vitro studies.

  4. Pairwise agonist scanning predicts cellular signaling responses to combinatorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manash S; Purvis, Jeremy E; Brass, Lawrence F; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-07-01

    Prediction of cellular response to multiple stimuli is central to evaluating patient-specific clinical status and to basic understanding of cell biology. Cross-talk between signaling pathways cannot be predicted by studying them in isolation and the combinatorial complexity of multiple agonists acting together prohibits an exhaustive exploration of the complete experimental space. Here we describe pairwise agonist scanning (PAS), a strategy that trains a neural network model based on measurements of cellular responses to individual and all pairwise combinations of input signals. We apply PAS to predict calcium signaling responses of human platelets in EDTA-treated plasma to six different agonists (ADP, convulxin, U46619, SFLLRN, AYPGKF and PGE(2)) at three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 x EC(50)). The model predicted responses to sequentially added agonists, to ternary combinations of agonists and to 45 different combinations of four to six agonists (R = 0.88). Furthermore, we use PAS to distinguish between the phenotypic responses of platelets from ten donors. Training neural networks with pairs of stimuli across the dose-response regime represents an efficient approach for predicting complex signal integration in a patient-specific disease milieu. PMID:20562863

  5. Role of CRH in the effects of 5-HT-receptor agonists on food intake and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Bovetto, S; Rouillard, C; Richard, D

    1996-11-01

    Two series of experiments were conducted to investigate the role of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on energy intake and energy expenditure. The first set of experiments was carried out to confirm the influence of 5-HT1A-, 5-HT1B-, 5-HT2A/2C-receptor agonists on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Plasma corticosterone levels were measured, and a double-immunolabeling procedure was used to determine whether the neuronal activity marker, c-Fos protein (Fos), could be found within brain neurons containing CRH after treatments with 5-HT1A-, 5-HT1B-, 5-HT2A/2C-receptor agonists. The second series of experiments was conducted to assess the involvement of CRH in the effects of 5-HT on food intake and metabolic rate (VO2). The effects of the 5-HT1A-, 5-HT1B-, 5-HT2A/2C-receptor agonists on food intake and VO2 were measured in rats treated with the CRH antagonist, alpha-helical CRH-(9-41). In both experiments rats were intraperitoneally injected with either a vehicle (NaCl 0.9%), the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), the 5-HT1B-receptor agonist 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole succinate (RU-24969), or the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane HCl (DOI). Fos immunoreactivity was detectable within the CRH-containing neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) after injection of each of the 5-HT-receptor agonists used. The CRH antagonist alpha-helical CRH-(9-41) attenuated the increases in metabolic rate induced by DOI and 8-OH-DPAT. alpha-Helical CRH did not, however, prevent the effects of RU-24969 and DOI on either nocturnal metabolic rate or food intake. The present results provide further evidence for a role of CRH in 5-HT-mediated thermogenic effect, which likely involves the 5-HT2A/2C receptor during the day and the 5-HT1A receptor during the night

  6. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimu