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Sample records for alpha motifs regulate

  1. The serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha cytoplasmic tail negatively regulate immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Wienands, J; Reth, M

    2000-07-18

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is a multiprotein complex consisting of the membrane-bound Ig molecule and the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. On BCR engagement, Ig-alpha and Ig-beta become phosphorylated not only on tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif but also on serine and threonine residues. We have mutated all serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha tail to alanine and valine, respectively. The mutated Ig-alpha sequence was expressed either as a single-chain Fv/Ig-alpha molecule or in the context of the complete BCR. In both cases, the mutated Ig-alpha showed a stronger tyrosine phosphorylation than the wild-type Ig-alpha and initiated increased signaling on stimulation. These findings suggest that serine/threonine kinases can negatively regulate signal transduction from the BCR.

  2. Litopenaeus vannamei sterile-alpha and armadillo motif containing protein (LvSARM) is involved in regulation of Penaeidins and antilipopolysaccharide factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Gu, Zhi-Hua; Wan, Ding-Hui; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Qiu, Wei; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; He, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated NF-κB pathway is tightly controlled because overactivation may result in severe damage to the host, such as in the case of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. In mammals, sterile-alpha and armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) plays an important role in negatively regulating this pathway. While Caenorhabditis elegans SARM is crucial for an efficient immune response against bacterial and fungal infections, it is still unknown whether Drosophila SARM participates in immune responses. Here, Litopenaeus vannamei SARM (LvSARM) was cloned and functionally characterized. LvSARM shared signature domains with and exhibited significant similarities to mammalian SARM. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the expression of LvSARM was responsive to Vibrio alginolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infections in the hemocyte, gill, hepatopancreas and intestine. In Drosophila S2 cells, LvSARM was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and could significantly inhibit the promoters of the NF-κB pathway-controlled antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs). Silencing of LvSARM using dsRNA-mediated RNA interference increased the expression levels of Penaeidins and antilipopolysaccharide factors, which are L.vannamei AMPs, and increased the mortality rate after V. alginolyticus infection. Taken together, our results reveal that LvSARM may be a novel component of the shrimp Toll pathway that negatively regulates shrimp AMPs, particularly Penaeidins and antilipopolysaccharide factors.

  3. An E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif and cognate binding protein(s) regulate the basal muscle-specific and cAMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M P; Gupta, M; Zak, R

    1994-11-25

    Expression of the cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes is regulated developmentally and by numerous epigenetic factors. Here we report the identification of a cis-regulatory element and cognate nuclear binding protein(s) responsible for cAMP-induced expression of the rat cardiac alpha-MHC gene. By Northern blot analysis, we found that, in primary cultures of fetal rat heart myocytes, the elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP results in up-regulation of alpha-MHC and down-regulation of beta-MHC mRNA expression. This effect of cAMP was dependent upon the basal level of expression of both MHC transcripts and was sensitive to cycloheximide. In transient expression analysis employing a series of alpha-MHC/CAT constructs, we identified a 31-base pair fragment located in the immediate upstream region (-71 to -40), which confers both muscle-specific and cAMP-inducible expression of the gene. Within this 31-base pair fragment there are two regions, an AT-rich portion and a hybrid motif which contains overlapping sequences of E-box and M-CAT binding sites (GGCACGTGGAATG). By substitution mutation analysis, both elements were found important for the basal muscle-specific expression; however, the cAMP-inducible expression of the gene is conferred only by the E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif (EM element). Using mobility gel shift competition assay, immunoblotting, and UV-cross-linking analyses, we found that a protein binding to the EM element is indistinguishable from the transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) in terms of sequence recognition, molecular mass, and immunoreactivity. Methylation interference and point mutation analyses indicate that, besides M-CAT sequences, center CG dinucleotides of the E-box motif CACGTG are essential for protein binding to the EM element and for its functional activity. Furthermore, our data also show that, in addition to TEF-1, another HF-1a-related factor may be recognized by the alpha-MHC gene EM element. These results are first to

  4. The two phenylalanines in the GFFKR motif of the integrin alpha6A subunit are essential for heterodimerization.

    PubMed Central

    De Melker, A A; Kramer, D; Kuikman, I; Sonnenberg, A

    1997-01-01

    The membrane-proximal domain of the integrin alpha subunit contains a conserved motif of five amino acid residues, GFFKR. We deleted this motif from the human alpha6A subunit and found that in COS-7 cells this mutant cannot associate with the beta1 subunit and is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Point mutations in the GFFKR motif of the glycine residue or the two highly charged amino acids, or deletion of the lysine and arginine residues, had no effect on the ability of alpha6 to interact with beta1 and to be expressed at the cell surface. In contrast, by replacing either of the two phenylalanines with alanine, or by deletion of both of these residues, alpha6 was incapable of associating with beta1. The alpha6 point mutants that associated with beta1 were expressed in K562 cells and their responsiveness to integrin-activating factors was determined. None of these transfectants bound spontaneously to laminin-1, but binding could be induced by either PMA or the stimulating anti-beta1 antibody TS2/16 to the same extent as that of the wild-type transfectant. The ability of these mutants to initiate focal-contact formation in CHO cells plated on laminin-1 substrates also appeared to be unaltered. Thus the behaviour of alpha6 mutants involving the glycine, lysine or arginine residues was indistinguishable from that of wild-type alpha6 both in inside-out and outside-in signalling. In contrast, deletion of the cytoplasmic domain of alpha6 C-terminal of the GFFKR motif resulted in a loss of responsiveness of alpha6beta1 to PMA stimulation and formation of focal contacts on laminin-1. However, this mutant was targeted to focal contacts formed by other integrins, even when they had not bound ligand. Together, these results suggest that the two phenylalanine residues of the GFFKR motif provide a site for interaction of the alpha6A subunit with beta1, whereas the cytoplasmic domain C-terminal of this motif is involved in the regulation of bidirectional signalling via

  5. Cofunctional Subpathways Were Regulated by Transcription Factor with Common Motif, Common Family, or Common Tissue.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Shang, Desi; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Yang, Haixiu; Liu, Baoquan; Su, Shengyang; Chen, Lina; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting the characteristics of the transcription factor (TF) regulatory subpathway is helpful for understanding the TF underlying regulatory function in complex biological systems. To gain insight into the influence of TFs on their regulatory subpathways, we constructed a global TF-subpathways network (TSN) to analyze systematically the regulatory effect of common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs on subpathways. We performed cluster analysis to show that the common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs that regulated the same pathway classes tended to cluster together and contribute to the same biological function that led to disease initiation and progression. We analyzed the Jaccard coefficient to show that the functional consistency of subpathways regulated by the TF pairs with common motif, common family, or common tissue was significantly greater than the random TF pairs at the subpathway level, pathway level, and pathway class level. For example, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha) and NR1I3 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3) were a pair of TFs with common motif, common family, and common tissue. They were involved in drug metabolism pathways and were liver-specific factors required for physiological transcription. In short, we inferred that the cofunctional subpathways were regulated by common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs.

  6. Tankyrase Polymerization Is Controlled by Its Sterile Alpha Motif and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Domains

    PubMed Central

    De Rycker, Manu; Price, Carolyn M.

    2004-01-01

    Tankyrases are novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases that have SAM and ankyrin protein-interaction domains. They are found at telomeres, centrosomes, nuclear pores, and Golgi vesicles and have been shown to participate in telomere length regulation. Their other function(s) are unknown, and it has been difficult to envision a common role at such diverse cellular locations. We have shown that tankyrase 1 polymerizes through its sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain to assemble large protein complexes. In vitro polymerization is reversible and still allows interaction with ankyrin-domain binding proteins. Polymerization can also occur in vivo, with SAM-dependent association of overexpressed tankyrase leading to formation of large tankyrase-containing vesicles, disruption of Golgi structure, and inhibition of apical secretion. Finally, tankyrase polymers are dissociated efficiently by poly(ADP-ribosy)lation. This disassembly is prevented by mutation of the PARP domain. Our findings indicate that tankyrase 1 has the unique capacity to promote both assembly and disassembly of large protein complexes. Thus, tankyrases appear to be master scaffolding proteins that regulate the formation of dynamic protein networks at different cellular locations. This implies a common scaffolding function for tankyrases at each location, with specific tankyrase interaction partners conferring location-specific roles to each network, e.g., telomere compaction or regulation of vesicle trafficking. PMID:15509784

  7. Stable proline box motif at the N-terminal end of alpha-helices.

    PubMed Central

    Viguera, A. R.; Serrano, L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a novel N-terminal alpha-helix local motif that involves three hydrophobic residues and a Pro residue (Pro-box motif). Database analysis shows that when Pro is the N-cap of an alpha-helix the distribution of amino acids in adjacent positions changes dramatically with respect to the average distribution in an alpha-helix, but not when Pro is at position N1. N-cap Pro residues are usually associated to Ile and Leu, at position N', Val at position N3 and a hydrophobic residue (h) at position N4. The side chain of the N-cap Pro packs against Val, while the hydrophobic residues at positions N' and N4 make favorable interactions. To analyze the role of this putative motif (sequence fingerprint hPXXhh), we have synthesized a series of peptides and analyzed them by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR. We find that this motif is formed in peptides, and that the accompanying hydrophobic interactions contribute up to 1.2 kcal/mol to helix stability. The fact that some of the residues in this fingerprint are not good N-cap and helix formers results in a small overall stabilization of the alpha-helix with respect to other peptides having Gly as the N-cap and Ala at N3 and N4. This suggests that the Pro-box motif will not specially contribute to protein stability but to the specificity of its fold. In fact, 80% of the sequences that contain the fingerprint sequence in the protein database are adopting the described structural motif, and in none of them is the helix extended to place Pro at the more favorable N1 position. PMID:10493574

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei-induced expression of a negative regulator, sterile-alpha and Armadillo motif-containing protein, in mouse macrophages: a possible mechanism for suppression of the MyD88-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Pudla, M; Limposuwan, K; Utaisincharoen, P

    2011-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a causative agent of melioidosis, is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium that can survive and multiply in macrophages. Previously, we demonstrated that B. pseudomallei failed to activate gene expression downstream of the MyD88-independent pathway, particularly the expression of beta interferon (IFN-β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), leading to the inability of macrophages to kill this bacterium. In the present report, we extended our study to show that B. pseudomallei was able to activate sterile-α and Armadillo motif (SARM)-containing protein, a known negative regulator of the MyD88-independent pathway. Both live B. pseudomallei and heat-killed B. pseudomallei were able to upregulate SARM expression in a time-dependent manner in mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. The expression of SARM required bacterial internalization, as it could be inhibited by cytochalasin D. In addition, the intracellular survival of B. pseudomallei was suppressed in SARM-deficient macrophages. Increased expression of IFN-β and iNOS and degradation of IκBα correlated with enhanced macrophage killing capability. These results demonstrated that B. pseudomallei modulated macrophage defense mechanisms by upregulating SARM, thus leading to the suppression of IFN-β and iNOS needed for bacterial elimination.

  9. The PPFLMLLKGSTR motif in globular domain 3 of the human laminin-5 {alpha}3 chain is crucial for integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Won Ho; Min, Byung-Moo . E-mail: bmmin@snu.ac.kr

    2005-03-10

    Laminin-5 regulates various cellular functions, including cell adhesion, spreading, and motility. Here, we expressed the five human laminin {alpha}3 chain globular (LG) domains as monomeric, soluble fusion proteins, and examined their biological functions and signaling. Recombinant LG3 (rLG3) protein, unlike rLG1, rLG2, rLG4, and rLG5, played roles in cell adhesion, spreading, and integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding. More significantly, we identified a novel motif (PPFLMLLKGSTR) in the LG3 domain that is crucial for these responses. Studies with the synthetic peptides delineated the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within LG3 domain as a major site for both integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion. Substitution mutation experiments suggest that the Arg residue is important for these activities. rLG3 protein- and PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide-induced keratinocyte adhesion triggered cell signaling through FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine-397 and -577. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within the LG3 domain is a novel motif that is capable of supporting integrin {alpha}3{beta}1-dependent cell adhesion and spreading.

  10. Identifying combinatorial regulation of transcription factors and binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Hata, Naoya; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Futcher, Bruce; Zhang, Michael Q

    2004-01-01

    Background Combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs) is important for gene regulation. Although various genomic datasets are relevant to this issue, each dataset provides relatively weak evidence on its own. Developing methods that can integrate different sequence, expression and localization data have become important. Results Here we use a novel method that integrates chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data with microarray expression data and with combinatorial TF-motif analysis. We systematically identify combinations of transcription factors and of motifs. The various combinations of TFs involved multiple binding mechanisms. We reconstruct a new combinatorial regulatory map of the yeast cell cycle in which cell-cycle regulation can be drawn as a chain of extended TF modules. We find that the pairwise combination of a TF for an early cell-cycle phase and a TF for a later phase is often used to control gene expression at intermediate times. Thus the number of distinct times of gene expression is greater than the number of transcription factors. We also see that some TF modules control branch points (cell-cycle entry and exit), and in the presence of appropriate signals they can allow progress along alternative pathways. Conclusions Combining different data sources can increase statistical power as demonstrated by detecting TF interactions and composite TF-binding motifs. The original picture of a chain of simple cell-cycle regulators can be extended to a chain of composite regulatory modules: different modules may share a common TF component in the same pathway or a TF component cross-talking to other pathways. PMID:15287978

  11. The noncatalytic triad of alpha-amylases: a novel structural motif involved in conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Marx, Jean-Claude; Poncin, Johan; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Ramteke, Pramod W; Feller, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Chloride-activated alpha-amylases contain a noncatalytic triad, independent of the glycosidic active site, perfectly mimicking the catalytic triad of serine-proteases and of other active serine hydrolytic enzymes. Mutagenesis of Glu, His, and Ser residues in various alpha-amylases shows that this pattern is a structural determinant of the enzyme conformation that cannot be altered without losing the intrinsic stability of the protein. (1)H-(15)N NMR spectra of a bacterial alpha-amylase reveal proton signals that are identical with the NMR signature of catalytic triads and especially a deshielded proton involving a protonated histidine and displaying properties similar to that of a low barrier hydrogen bond. It is proposed that the H-bond between His and Glu of the noncatalytic triad is an unusually strong interaction, responsible for the observed NMR signal and for the weak stability of the triad mutants. Furthermore, a stringent template-based search of the Protein Data Bank demonstrated that this motif is not restricted to alpha-amylases, but is also found in 80 structures from 33 different proteins, amongst which SH2 domain-containing proteins are the best representatives.

  12. Decavanadate possesses alpha-adrenergic agonist activity and a structural motif common with trans-beta form of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, B V; Ravishankar, H N; Rao, A V; Kalyani, P; Sharada, G; Namboodiri, K; Gabor, B; Ramasarma, T

    1997-04-01

    Decavanadate, an inorganic polymer of vanadate, produced contraction of rat aortic rings at a relatively high concentration compared to phenylephrine, an agonist of alpha-adrenergic receptor. This effect was blocked by two known alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonists, prazosin and phenoxybenzamine. Decavanadate, formed by possible dimerization of V5 under acid conditions, possessed a structural feature of two pairs of unshared oxygen atoms at a distance of 3.12 A, not found in its constituents of V4 or V5. A structural motif of O..O..O using such oxygen atoms is recognized in decavanadate. This matches with a similar motif of N..O..O that uses the essential amino and hydroxyl groups of the side-chain and the m-hydroxyl group in trans-beta form of noradrenaline. The interaction of such a structural motif with the membrane receptor is likely to be the basis of the unusual noradrenaline-mimic action of decavanadate.

  13. Binding of the C-terminal sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain of human p73 to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Francisco N; Poveda, José A; González-Ros, José M; Neira, José L

    2003-11-21

    The alpha splice variant of p73 (p73alpha), a homologue of the tumor suppressor p53, has close to its C terminus a sterile alpha motif (SAM), SAMp73, that is thought to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Here, we report the lipid binding properties of this domain. Binding was assayed against zwitterionic (phosphatidylcholine) and anionic (phosphatidic acid) lipids and was studied by different biophysical techniques, namely, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies and differential scanning calorimetry. These techniques unambiguously indicate that SAMp73 binds to lipids. The binding involves protein surface attachment and partial membrane penetration, accompanied by changes in SAMp73 structure.

  14. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  15. A potential alpha-helix motif in the amino terminus of LANA encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is critical for nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha in normoxia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiliang; Murakami, Masanao; Si, Huaxin; Robertson, Erle S

    2007-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator involved in induction of numerous genes associated with angiogenesis and tumor growth. Kaposi's sarcoma, associated with increased angiogenesis, is a highly vascularized, endothelial cell-derived tumor. Previously, we have shown that the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) targets the HIF-1alpha suppressors von Hippel-Lindau protein and p53 for degradation via its suppressor of cytokine signaling-box motif, which recruits the EC5S ubiquitin complex. Here we further show that HIF-1alpha was aberrantly accumulated in KSHV latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, as well as HEK293 cells infected with KSHV, and also show that a potential alpha-helical amino-terminal domain of LANA was important for HIF-1alpha nuclear accumulation in normoxic conditions. Moreover, we have now determined that this association was dependent on the residues 46 to 89 of LANA and the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha. Introduction of specific small interfering RNA against LANA into PEL cells also resulted in a diminished nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha. Therefore, these data show that LANA can function not only as an inhibitor of HIF-1alpha suppressor proteins but can also induce nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha during KSHV latent infection.

  16. Transcription factor and microRNA-regulated network motifs for cancer and signal transduction networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular networks are the basis of biological processes. Such networks can be decomposed into smaller modules, also known as network motifs. These motifs show interesting dynamical behaviors, in which co-operativity effects between the motif components play a critical role in human diseases. We have developed a motif-searching algorithm, which is able to identify common motif types from the cancer networks and signal transduction networks (STNs). Some of the network motifs are interconnected which can be merged together and form more complex structures, the so-called coupled motif structures (CMS). These structures exhibit mixed dynamical behavior, which may lead biological organisms to perform specific functions. Results In this study, we integrate transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs), miRNA targets and network motifs information to build the cancer-related TF-miRNA-motif networks (TMMN). This allows us to examine the role of network motifs in cancer formation at different levels of regulation, i.e. transcription initiation (TF → miRNA), gene-gene interaction (CMS), and post-transcriptional regulation (miRNA → target genes). Among the cancer networks and STNs we considered, it is found that there is a substantial amount of crosstalking through motif interconnections, in particular, the crosstalk between prostate cancer network and PI3K-Akt STN. Conclusions To validate the role of network motifs in cancer formation, several examples are presented which demonstrated the effectiveness of the present approach. A web-based platform has been set up which can be accessed at: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/pathway/. It is very likely that our results can supply very specific CMS missing information for certain cancer types, it is an indispensable tool for cancer biology research. PMID:25707690

  17. New melanocortin 1 receptor binding motif based on the C-terminal sequence of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Muceniece, Ruta; Mutule, Ilga; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2006-10-01

    The C-terminal tripeptide of the alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH11-13) possesses strong antiinflammatory activity without known cellular target. In order to better understand the structural requirements for function of such motif, we designed, synthesized and tested out Trp- and Tyr-containing analogues of the alpha-MSH11-13. Seven alpha-MSH11-13 analogues were synthesized and characterized for their binding to the melanocortin receptors recombinantly expressed in insect (Sf9) cells, infected with baculovirus carrying corresponding MC receptor DNA. We also tested these analogues on B16-F1 mouse melanoma cells endogenously expressing the MC1 receptor for binding and for ability to increase cAMP levels as well as on COS-7 cells transfected with the human MC receptors. The data indicate that HS401 (Ac-Tyr-Lys-Pro-Val-NH2) and HS402 (Ac-Lys-Pro-Val-Tyr-NH2) selectively bound to the MC1 receptor and stimulated cAMP generation in a concentration dependent way while the other Tyr- and Trp-containing alpha-MSH11-13 analogues neither bound to MC receptors nor stimulated cAMP. We have thus identified new MC receptor binding motif derived from the C-terminal sequence of alpha-MSH. The tetrapeptides have novel properties as the both act via MC-ergic pathways and also carry the anti-inflammatory alpha-MSH11-13 message sequence.

  18. The signal peptide of the IgE receptor alpha-chain prevents surface expression of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-free receptor pool.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Fiebiger, Edda

    2010-05-14

    The high affinity receptor for IgE, Fc epsilon receptor I (FcepsilonRI), is an activating immune receptor and key regulator of allergy. Antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE-loaded FcepsilonRI alpha-chains induces cell activation via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in associated signaling subunits, such as FcepsilonRI gamma-chains. Here we show that the human FcepsilonRI alpha-chain can efficiently reach the cell surface by itself as an IgE-binding receptor in the absence of associated signaling subunits when the endogenous signal peptide is swapped for that of murine major histocompatibility complex class-I H2-K(b). This single-chain isoform of FcepsilonRI exited the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), trafficked to the Golgi and, subsequently, trafficked to the cell surface. Mutational analysis showed that the signal peptide regulates surface expression in concert with other described ER retention signals of FcepsilonRI-alpha. Once the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain reached the cell surface by itself, it formed a ligand-binding receptor that stabilized upon IgE contact. Independently of the FcepsilonRI gamma-chain, this single-chain FcepsilonRI was internalized after receptor cross-linking and trafficked into a LAMP-1-positive lysosomal compartment like multimeric FcepsilonRI. These data suggest that the single-chain isoform is capable of shuttling IgE-antigen complexes into antigen loading compartments, which plays an important physiologic role in the initiation of immune responses toward allergens. We propose that, in addition to cytosolic and transmembrane ER retention signals, the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain signal peptide contains a negative regulatory signal that prevents expression of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-free IgE receptor pool, which would fail to induce cell activation.

  19. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  20. Mutagenesis and peptide analysis of the DRY motif in the alpha2A adrenergic receptor: evidence for alternate mechanisms in G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Duane A; Wade, Susan M; Fowler, Carol B; Woods, Danielle D; Abada, Paolo B; Mosberg, Henry I; Neubig, Richard R

    2002-05-17

    In G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a conserved aspartic acid in the DRY motif at the cytoplasmic end of helix 3 regulates the transition to the active state, while the adjacent arginine is crucial for G protein activation. To examine the functions of these two residues, we made D130I and R131Q mutations in the alpha2A adrenergic receptor (AR). We demonstrate that, unlike other GPCRs, the alpha2A AR is not constitutively activated by the D130I mutation, although the mutation increases agonist affinity. While the R131Q mutation severely disrupts function, it decreases rather than increasing agonist affinity as seen in other GPCRs. We then investigated the molecular effects of the same mutations in a peptide model and showed that Arg131 is not required for peptide-mediated G protein activation. These results indicate that the alpha2A AR does not follow the conventional GPCR mechanistic paradigm with respect to the function of the DRY motif.

  1. PfEMP1-DBL1alpha amino acid motifs in severe disease states of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nilsson, Daniel; Ribacke, Ulf; Winter, Gerhard; Moll, Kirsten; Wheelock, Craig E; Bayarugaba, Justus; Kironde, Fred; Egwang, Thomas G; Chen, Qijun; Andersson, Björn; Wahlgren, Mats

    2007-10-02

    An infection with Plasmodium falciparum may lead to severe malaria as a result of excessive binding of infected erythrocytes in the microvasculature. Vascular adhesion is mediated by P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP1), which is encoded for by highly polymorphic members of the var-gene family. Here, we profile var gene transcription in fresh P. falciparum trophozoites from Ugandan children with malaria through var-specific DBL1alpha-PCR amplification and sequencing. A method for subsectioning region alignments into homology areas (MOTIFF) was developed to examine collected sequences. Specific PfEMP1-DBL1alpha amino acid motifs correlated with rosetting and severe malaria, with motif location corresponding to distinct regions of receptor interaction. The method is potentially applicable to other families of variant proteins and may be useful in identifying sequence-phenotype relationships. The results suggest that certain PfEMP1 sequences are predisposed to inducing severe malaria.

  2. The PXDLS linear motif regulates circadian rhythmicity through protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Aviram, Rona; Adamovich, Yaarit; Kraut-Cohen, Judith; Shamia, Tal; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golik, Marina; Asher, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The circadian core clock circuitry relies on interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops that largely count on multiple protein interactions. The molecular mechanisms implicated in the assembly of these protein complexes are relatively unknown. Our bioinformatics analysis of short linear motifs, implicated in protein interactions, reveals an enrichment of the Pro-X-Asp-Leu-Ser (PXDLS) motif within circadian transcripts. We show that the PXDLS motif can bind to BMAL1/CLOCK and disrupt circadian oscillations in a cell-autonomous manner. Remarkably, the motif is evolutionary conserved in the core clock protein REV-ERBα, and additional proteins implicated in the clock's function (NRIP1, CBP). In this conjuncture, we uncover a novel cross talk between the two principal core clock feedback loops and show that BMAL/CLOCK and REV-ERBα interact and that the PXDLS motif of REV-ERBα participates in their binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PXDLS motifs of NRIP1 and CBP are involved in circadian rhythmicity. Our findings suggest that the PXDLS motif plays an important role in circadian rhythmicity through regulation of protein interactions within the clock circuitry and that short linear motifs can be employed to modulate circadian oscillations. PMID:25260595

  3. Single-molecule study of thymidine glycol and i-motif through the alpha-hemolysin ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lidong

    Nanopore-based devices have emerged as a single-molecule detection and analysis tool for a wide range of applications. Through electrophoretically driving DNA molecules across a nanosized pore, a lot of information can be received, including unfolding kinetics and DNA-protein interactions. This single-molecule method has the potential to sequence kilobase length DNA polymers without amplification or labeling, approaching "the third generation" genome sequencing for around $1000 within 24 hours. alpha-Hemolysin biological nanopores have the advantages of excellent stability, low-noise level, and precise site-directed mutagenesis for engineering this protein nanopore. The first work presented in this thesis established the current signal of the thymidine glycol lesion in DNA oligomers through an immobilization experiment. The thymidine glycol enantiomers were differentiated from each other by different current blockage levels. Also, the effect of bulky hydrophobic adducts to the current blockage was investigated. Secondly, the alpha-hemolysin nanopore was used to study the human telomere i-motif and RET oncogene i-motif at a single-molecule level. In Chapter 3, it was demonstrated that the alpha-hemolysin nanopore can differentiate an i-motif form and single-strand DNA form at different pH values based on the same sequence. In addition, it shows potential to differentiate the folding topologies generated from the same DNA sequence.

  4. Prevalence of the EH1 Groucho interaction motif in the metazoan Fox family of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yaklichkin, Sergey; Vekker, Alexander; Stayrook, Steven; Lewis, Mitchell; Kessler, Daniel S

    2007-01-01

    Background The Fox gene family comprises a large and functionally diverse group of forkhead-related transcriptional regulators, many of which are essential for metazoan embryogenesis and physiology. Defining conserved functional domains that mediate the transcriptional activity of Fox proteins will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the biological function of Fox family genes. Results Systematic analysis of 458 protein sequences of the metazoan Fox family was performed to identify the presence of the engrailed homology-1 motif (eh1), a motif known to mediate physical interaction with transcriptional corepressors of the TLE/Groucho family. Greater than 50% of Fox proteins contain sequences with high similarity to the eh1 motif, including ten of the nineteen Fox subclasses (A, B, C, D, E, G, H, I, L, and Q) and Fox proteins of early divergent species such as marine sponge. The eh1 motif is not detected in Fox proteins of the F, J, K, M, N, O, P, R and S subclasses, or in yeast Fox proteins. The eh1-like motifs are positioned C-terminal to the winged helix DNA-binding domain in all subclasses except for FoxG proteins, which have an N-terminal motif. Two similar eh1-like motifs are found in the zebrafish FoxQ1 and in FoxG proteins of sea urchin and amphioxus. The identification of eh1-like motifs by manual sequence alignment was validated by statistical analyses of the Swiss protein database, confirming a high frequency of occurrence of eh1-like sequences in Fox family proteins. Structural predictions suggest that the majority of identified eh1-like motifs are short α-helices, and wheel modeling revealed an amphipathicity that supports this secondary structure prediction. Conclusion A search for eh1 Groucho interaction motifs in the Fox gene family has identified eh1-like sequences in greater than 50% of Fox proteins. The results predict a physical and functional interaction of TLE/Groucho corepressors with many members of the Fox family of transcriptional

  5. The transcription factor Spn1 regulates gene expression via a highly conserved novel structural motif

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Venugopal; Radebaugh, Catherine A.; Chodaparambil, Jayanth V.; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Almeida, Adam R.; Fischbeck, Julie A.; Luger, Karolin; Stargell, Laurie A.

    2010-01-01

    Spn1 plays essential roles in the regulation of gene expression by RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII), and it is highly conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. Spn1 physically and/or genetically interacts with RNAPII, TBP, TFIIS and a number of chromatin remodeling factors (Swi/Snf and Spt6). The central domain of Spn1 (residues 141-305 out of 410) is necessary and sufficient for performing the essential functions of SPN1 in yeast cells. Here we report the high-resolution (1.85Å) crystal structure of the conserved central domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spn1. The central domain is comprised of eight alpha-helices in a right handed super helical arrangement, and exhibits structural similarity to domain I of TFIIS. A unique structural feature of Spn1 is a highly conserved loop, which defines one side of a pronounced cavity. The loop and the other residues forming the cavity are highly conserved at the amino acid level among all Spn1 family members, suggesting that this is a signature motif for Spn1 orthologs. The locations and the molecular characterization of temperature-sensitive mutations in Spn1 indicate that the cavity is a key attribute of Spn1 that is critical for its regulatory functions during RNAPII-mediated transcriptional activity. PMID:20875428

  6. The VQ Motif-Containing Protein Family of Plant-Specific Transcriptional Regulators1

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanjun; Lin, Rongcheng

    2015-01-01

    The VQ motif-containing proteins (designated as VQ proteins) are a class of plant-specific proteins with a conserved and single short FxxhVQxhTG amino acid sequence motif. VQ proteins regulate diverse developmental processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed development, and photomorphogenesis. In this Update, we summarize and discuss recent advances in our understanding of the regulation and function of VQ proteins and the role of the VQ motif in mediating transcriptional regulation and protein-protein interactions in signaling pathways. Based on the accumulated evidence, we propose a general mechanism of action for the VQ protein family, which likely defines a novel class of transcriptional regulators specific to plants. PMID:26220951

  7. Understanding eukaryotic linear motifs and their role in cell signaling and regulation.

    PubMed

    Diella, Francesca; Haslam, Niall; Chica, Claudia; Budd, Aidan; Michael, Sushama; Brown, Nigel P; Trave, Gilles; Gibson, Toby J

    2008-05-01

    It is now clear that a detailed picture of cell regulation requires a comprehensive understanding of the abundant short protein motifs through which signaling is channeled. The current body of knowledge has slowly accumulated through piecemeal experimental investigation of individual motifs in signaling. Computational methods contributed little to this process. A new generation of bioinformatics tools will aid the future investigation of motifs in regulatory proteins, and the disordered polypeptide regions in which they frequently reside. Allied to high throughput methods such as phosphoproteomics, signaling networks are becoming amenable to experimental deconstruction. In this review, we summarise the current state of linear motif biology, which uses low affinity interactions to create cooperative, combinatorial and highly dynamic regulatory protein complexes. The discrete deterministic properties implicit to these assemblies suggest that models for cell regulatory networks in systems biology should neither be overly dependent on stochastic nor on smooth deterministic approximations.

  8. Alpha-actinin structure and regulation.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, B; Salmazo, A; Djinović-Carugo, K

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-actinin is a cytoskeletal actin-binding protein and a member of the spectrin superfamily, which comprises spectrin, dystrophin and their homologues and isoforms. It forms an anti-parallel rod-shaped dimer with one actin-binding domain at each end of the rod and bundles actin filaments in multiple cell-type and cytoskeleton frameworks. In non-muscle cells, alpha-actinin is found along the actin filaments and in adhesion sites. In striated, cardiac and smooth muscle cells, it is localized at the Z-disk and analogous dense bodies, where it forms a lattice-like structure and stabilizes the muscle contractile apparatus. Besides binding to actin filaments alpha-actinin associates with a number of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, rendering it important structural and regulatory roles in cytoskeleton organization and muscle contraction. This review reports on the current knowledge on structure and regulation of alpha-actinin.

  9. SarA, a global regulator of virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus, binds to a conserved motif essential for sar-dependent gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Y; Manna, A C; Projan, S J; Cheung, A L

    1999-12-24

    The expression of many virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus including alpha-hemolysin-, protein A-, and fibronectin-binding proteins is controlled by global regulatory loci such as sar and agr. In addition to controlling target gene expression via agr (e.g. alpha-hemolysin), the sar locus can also regulate target gene transcription via agr-independent mechanisms. In particular, we have found that SarA, the major regulatory protein encoded within sar, binds to a conserved sequence, homologous to the SarA-binding site on the agr promoter, upstream of the -35 promoter boxes of several target genes including hla (alpha-hemolysin gene), spa (protein A gene), fnb (fibronectin-binding protein genes), and sec (enterotoxin C gene). Deletion of the SarA recognition motif in the promoter regions of agr and hla in shuttle plasmids rendered the transcription of these genes undetectable in agr and hla mutants, respectively. Likewise, the transcription activity of spa (a gene normally repressed by sar), as measured by a XylE reporter fusion assay, became derepressed in a wild type strain containing a shuttle plasmid in which the SarA recognition site had been deleted from the spa promoter region. However, DNase I footprinting assays demonstrated that the SarA-binding region on the spa and hla promoter is more extensive than the predicted consensus sequence, thus raising the possibility that the consensus sequence is an activation site within a larger binding region. Because the sar and agr regulate an assortment of virulence factors in S. aureus, we propose, based on our data, a unifying hypothesis for virulence gene activation in S. aureus whereby SarA is a regulatory protein that binds to its consensus SarA recognition motif to activate (e.g. hla) or repress (e.g. spa) the transcription of sar target genes, thus accounting for both agr-dependent and agr-independent mode of regulation.

  10. VCD study of alpha-methylbenzyl amine derivatives: detection of the unchanged chiral motif.

    PubMed

    Merten, Christian; Amkreutz, Marc; Hartwig, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Chiral alpha-methylbenzyl amine is a well known and often used chiral auxiliary, e.g., in the resolution of racemates or asymmetric catalysis. In this work, alpha-methylbenzyl amine and its derivatives N,alpha-dimethylbenzyl amine, N,N,alpha-trimethylbenzyl amine, and bis[alpha-methylbenzyl] amine were investigated by vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). For all compounds, stable low energy conformers were obtained by the DFT calculations and based on those, the theoretical vibrational absorption (VA) and VCD spectra were calculated and compared with experimental spectra. Hence, the absolute configurations and conformational preferences were determined. A qualitative comparison of all the experimental VCD spectra of the investigated chiral molecules supported by the calculated ones is given which clearly shows similarities between the spectra of the different chiral amines. These can be assigned to vibrations of the unchanged chiral center.

  11. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  12. Cellular microRNAs up-regulate transcription via interaction with promoter TATA-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Fan, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xue; Huang, Feng; Wu, Kang; Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Jun; Huang, Zhuoqiong; Luo, Haihua; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The TATA box represents one of the most prevalent core promoters where the pre-initiation complexes (PICs) for gene transcription are assembled. This assembly is crucial for transcription initiation and well regulated. Here we show that some cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Among them, let-7i sequence specifically binds to the TATA-box motif of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene and elevates IL-2 mRNA and protein production in CD4(+) T-lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Through direct interaction with the TATA-box motif, let-7i facilitates the PIC assembly and transcription initiation of IL-2 promoter. Several other cellular miRNAs, such as mir-138, mir-92a or mir-181d, also enhance the promoter activities via binding to the TATA-box motifs of insulin, calcitonin or c-myc, respectively. In agreement with the finding that an HIV-1-encoded miRNA could enhance viral replication through targeting the viral promoter TATA-box motif, our data demonstrate that the interaction with core transcription machinery is a novel mechanism for miRNAs to regulate gene expression.

  13. Some motifs were important for myostatin transcriptional regulation in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Du, Rong; An, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Yong-Fu; Qin, Jian

    2007-07-31

    Many motifs along the 1.2 kb myostatin promoter (MSTNpro) in sheep have been found by the MatInspecter program in our recent study. To further verify the role of the motifs and better understand the transcriptional regulation mechanism of the myostatin gene in sheep, the reporter gene EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) was selected and the wild-type (W) vector MSTNPro(W)-EGFP or motif-mutational (M) vector MSTNPro(M)-EGFP were constructed. The transcriptional regulation activities were analyzed by detecting the fluorescence strength of EGFP in C2C12 myoblasts transfected with the vectors. The results showed that E-box (E) 3, E4, E5 and E7, particularly E3, E5 and E7, had important effects on the activity of the 1.2 kb sheep myostatin promoter. In addition, we also detected several other important motifs such as MTBF (muscle-specific Mt binding factor), MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2), GRE (glucocorticoid response elements) and PRE (progesterone response elements) along the sheep myostatin promoter by the mutational analysis.

  14. Karyopherin Alpha Proteins Regulate Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, John N.; Zhang, Chi; Sawai, Setsu; John, Gareth R.

    2017-01-01

    Proper regulation of the coordinated transcriptional program that drives oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation is essential for central nervous system myelin formation and repair. Nuclear import, mediated in part by a group of karyopherin alpha (Kpna) proteins, regulates transcription factor access to the genome. Understanding how canonical nuclear import functions to control genomic access in OL differentiation may aid in the creation of novel therapeutics to stimulate myelination and remyelination. Here, we show that members of the Kpna family regulate OL differentiation, and may play distinct roles downstream of different pro-myelinating stimuli. Multiple family members are expressed in OLs, and their pharmacologic inactivation dose-dependently decreases the rate of differentiation. Additionally, upon differentiation, the three major Kpna subtypes (P/α2, Q/α3, S/α1) display differential responses to the pro-myelinating cues T3 and CNTF. Most notably, the Q/α3 karyopherin Kpna4 is strongly upregulated by CNTF treatment both compared with T3 treatment and other Kpna responses. Kpna4 inactivation results in inhibition of CNTF-induced OL differentiation, in the absence of changes in proliferation or viability. Collectively, these findings suggest that canonical nuclear import is an integral component of OL differentiation, and that specific Kpnas may serve vital and distinct functions downstream of different pro-myelinating cues. PMID:28107514

  15. Karyopherin Alpha Proteins Regulate Oligodendrocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Benjamin M; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Chi; Sawai, Setsu; John, Gareth R

    2017-01-01

    Proper regulation of the coordinated transcriptional program that drives oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation is essential for central nervous system myelin formation and repair. Nuclear import, mediated in part by a group of karyopherin alpha (Kpna) proteins, regulates transcription factor access to the genome. Understanding how canonical nuclear import functions to control genomic access in OL differentiation may aid in the creation of novel therapeutics to stimulate myelination and remyelination. Here, we show that members of the Kpna family regulate OL differentiation, and may play distinct roles downstream of different pro-myelinating stimuli. Multiple family members are expressed in OLs, and their pharmacologic inactivation dose-dependently decreases the rate of differentiation. Additionally, upon differentiation, the three major Kpna subtypes (P/α2, Q/α3, S/α1) display differential responses to the pro-myelinating cues T3 and CNTF. Most notably, the Q/α3 karyopherin Kpna4 is strongly upregulated by CNTF treatment both compared with T3 treatment and other Kpna responses. Kpna4 inactivation results in inhibition of CNTF-induced OL differentiation, in the absence of changes in proliferation or viability. Collectively, these findings suggest that canonical nuclear import is an integral component of OL differentiation, and that specific Kpnas may serve vital and distinct functions downstream of different pro-myelinating cues.

  16. A compendium of RNA-binding motifs for decoding gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Debashish; Kazan, Hilal; Cook, Kate B.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Li, Xiao; Gueroussov, Serge; Albu, Mihai; Zheng, Hong; Yang, Ally; Na, Hong; Irimia, Manuel; Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Smith, Sarah A.; Yarosh, Christopher A.; Kelly, Seth M.; Nabet, Behnam; Mecenas, Desirea; Li, Weimin; Laishram, Rakesh S.; Qiao, Mei; Lipshitz, Howard D.; Piano, Fabio; Corbett, Anita H.; Carstens, Russ P.; Frey, Brendan J.; Anderson, Richard A.; Lynch, Kristen W.; Penalva, Luiz O. F.; Lei, Elissa P.; Fraser, Andrew G.; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Morris, Quaid D.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are key regulators of gene expression, yet only a small fraction have been functionally characterized. Here we report a systematic analysis of the RNA motifs recognized by RNA-binding proteins, encompassing 205 distinct genes from 24 diverse eukaryotes. The sequence specificities of RNA-binding proteins display deep evolutionary conservation, and the recognition preferences for a large fraction of metazoan RNA-binding proteins can thus be inferred from their RNA-binding domain sequence. The motifs that we identify in vitro correlate well with in vivo RNA-binding data. Moreover, we can associate them with distinct functional roles in diverse types of post-transcriptional regulation, enabling new insights into the functions of RNA-binding proteins both in normal physiology and in human disease. These data provide an unprecedented overview of RNA-binding proteins and their targets, and constitute an invaluable resource for determining post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotes. PMID:23846655

  17. Folate receptor {alpha} regulates cell proliferation in mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Congjun; Evans, Chheng-Orn; Stevens, Victoria L.; Owens, Timothy R.; Oyesiku, Nelson M.

    2009-11-01

    We have previously found that the mRNA and protein levels of the folate receptor alpha (FR{alpha}) are uniquely over-expressed in clinically human nonfunctional (NF) pituitary adenomas, but the mechanistic role of FR{alpha} has not fully been determined. We investigated the effect of FR{alpha} over-expression in the mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cell line as a model for NF pituitary adenomas. We found that the expression and function of FR{alpha} were strongly up-regulated, by Western blotting and folic acid binding assay. Furthermore, we found a higher cell growth rate, an enhanced percentage of cells in S-phase by BrdU assay, and a higher PCNA staining. These observations indicate that over-expression of FR{alpha} promotes cell proliferation. These effects were abrogated in the same {alpha}T3-1 cells when transfected with a mutant FR{alpha} cDNA that confers a dominant-negative phenotype by inhibiting folic acid binding. Finally, by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that mRNA expression of NOTCH3 was up-regulated in FR{alpha} over-expressing cells. In summary, our data suggests that FR{alpha} regulates pituitary tumor cell proliferation and mechanistically may involve the NOTCH pathway. Potentially, this finding could be exploited to develop new, innovative molecular targeted treatment for human NF pituitary adenomas.

  18. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  19. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  20. DNA consensus sequence motif for binding response regulator PhoP, a virulence regulator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Shuishu

    2014-12-30

    Tuberculosis has reemerged as a serious threat to human health because of the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains and synergetic infection with HIV, prompting an urgent need for new and more efficient treatments. The PhoP-PhoR two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in the virulence of the pathogen and thus represents a potential drug target. To study the mechanism of gene transcription regulation by response regulator PhoP, we identified a high-affinity DNA sequence for PhoP binding using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The sequence contains a direct repeat of two 7 bp motifs separated by a 4 bp spacer, TCACAGC(N4)TCACAGC. The specificity of the direct-repeat sequence for PhoP binding was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PhoP binds to the direct repeat as a dimer in a highly cooperative manner. We found many genes previously identified to be regulated by PhoP that contain the direct-repeat motif in their promoter sequences. Synthetic DNA fragments at the putative promoter-binding sites bind PhoP with variable affinity, which is related to the number of mismatches in the 7 bp motifs, the positions of the mismatches, and the spacer and flanking sequences. Phosphorylation of PhoP increases the affinity but does not change the specificity of DNA binding. Overall, our results confirm the direct-repeat sequence as the consensus motif for PhoP binding and thus pave the way for identification of PhoP directly regulated genes in different mycobacterial genomes.

  1. The interaction of titin and alpha-actinin is controlled by a phospholipid-regulated intramolecular pseudoligand mechanism.

    PubMed

    Young, P; Gautel, M

    2000-12-01

    The assembly of stable cytoskeletal structures from dynamically recycled molecules requires developmental and spatial regulation of protein interactions. In muscle, titin acts as a molecular ruler organizing the actin cytoskeleton via interactions with many sarcomeric proteins, including the crosslinking protein alpha-actinin. An interaction between the C-terminal domain of alpha-actinin and titin Z-repeat motifs targets alpha-actinin to the Z-disk. Here we investigate the cellular regulation of this interaction. alpha-actinin is a rod shaped head-to-tail homodimer. In contrast to C-terminal fragments, full-length alpha-actinin does not bind Z-repeats. We identify a 30-residue Z-repeat homologous sequence between the actin-binding and rod regions of alpha-actinin that binds the C-terminal domain with nanomolar affinity. Thus, Z-repeat binding is prevented by this 'pseudoligand' interaction between the subunits of the alpha-actinin dimer. This autoinhibition is relieved upon binding of the Z-disk lipid phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate to the actin-binding domain. We suggest that this novel mechanism is relevant to control the site-specific interactions of alpha-actinin during sarcomere assembly and turnover. The intramolecular contacts defined here also constrain a structural model for intrasterical regulation of all alpha-actinin isoforms.

  2. TCR-induced Akt serine 473 phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinase C-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lifen; Qiao, Guilin; Ying, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian; Yin, Fei

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Conventional PKC positively regulates TCR-induced phosphorylation of Akt. {yields} PKC-alpha is the PDK-2 responsible for phosphorylating Akt at Ser{sup 473} upon TCR stimulation. {yields} Knockdown of PKC-alpha decreases TCR-induced Akt phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Akt signaling plays a central role in T cell functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and regulatory T cell development. Phosphorylation at Ser{sup 473} in the hydrophobic motif, along with Thr{sup 308} in its activation loop, is considered necessary for Akt function. It is widely accepted that phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1) phosphorylates Akt at Thr{sup 308}, but the kinase(s) responsible for phosphorylating Akt at Ser{sup 473} (PDK-2) remains elusive. The existence of PDK-2 is considered to be specific to cell type and stimulus. PDK-2 in T cells in response to TCR stimulation has not been clearly defined. In this study, we found that conventional PKC positively regulated TCR-induced Akt Ser{sup 473} phosphorylation. PKC-alpha purified from T cells can phosphorylate Akt at Ser{sup 473} in vitro upon TCR stimulation. Knockdown of PKC-alpha in T-cell-line Jurkat cells reduced TCR-induced phosphorylation of Akt as well as its downstream targets. Thus our results suggest that PKC-alpha is a candidate for PDK-2 in T cells upon TCR stimulation.

  3. Identification of a pKa-regulating motif stabilizing imidazole-modified double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Buyst, Dieter; Gheerardijn, Vicky; Fehér, Krisztina; Van Gasse, Bjorn; Van Den Begin, Jos; Martins, José C.; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    The predictable 3D structure of double-stranded DNA renders it ideally suited as a template for the bottom-up design of functionalized nucleic acid-based active sites. We here explore the use of a 14mer DNA duplex as a scaffold for the precise and predictable positioning of catalytic functionalities. Given the ubiquitous participation of the histidine-based imidazole group in protein recognition and catalysis events, single histidine-like modified duplexes were investigated. Tethering histamine to the C5 of the thymine base via an amide bond, allows the flexible positioning of the imidazole function in the major groove. The mutual interactions between the imidazole and the duplex and its influence on the imidazolium pKaH are investigated by placing a single modified thymine at four different positions in the center of the 14mer double helix. Using NMR and unrestrained molecular dynamics, a structural motif involving the formation of a hydrogen bond between the imidazole and the Hoogsteen side of the guanine bases of two neighboring GC base pairs is established. The motif contributes to a stabilization against thermal melting of 6°C and is key in modulating the pKaH of the imidazolium group. The general features, prerequisites and generic character of the new pKaH-regulating motif are described. PMID:25520197

  4. Positional effects of AAN motifs in rpoS regulation by sRNAs and Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Soper, Toby J.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    The E. coli stationary phase transcription factor RpoS is translated in response to small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), which base pair with the rpoS mRNA leader. The bacterial Sm-like protein Hfq anneals sRNAs with their mRNA targets by simultaneously binding the mRNA and sRNA. Intriguingly, Hfq is recruited to the rpoS leader via AAN motifs far upstream of the sRNA. SHAPE chemical footprinting showed that the rpoS leader is divided into a far upstream domain, an Hfq binding domain, and a downstream inhibitory stem-loop containing the sRNA and ribosome binding sites. To investigate how Hfq promotes sRNA-mRNA base pairing from a distance, the natural AAN Hfq binding site was deleted, and artificial AAN binding sites were inserted at various positions in the rpoS leader. All the relocated AAN motifs restored tight Hfq binding in vitro, but only insertion at the natural position restored Hfq-dependent sRNA annealing in vitro and sRNA regulation of rpoS translation in vivo. Furthermore, U-rich motifs in the downstream inhibitory domain stabilized the rpoS mRNA-Hfq complex and contributed to regulation of rpoS expression. We propose that the natural Hfq binding domain is optimal for positive regulation because it recruits Hfq to the mRNA and allows it to act on incoming sRNAs without opening the inhibitory stem-loop when sRNA are absent. PMID:24051417

  5. A G-Protein Subunit Translocation Embedded Network Motif Underlies GPCR Regulation of Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K.; Karunarathne, W.K. Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K.V.; Gautam, N.

    2014-01-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  6. Trifluoroethanol-induced conformational transition of the C-terminal sterile alpha motif (SAM) of human p73.

    PubMed

    Neira, José L; Cámara-Artigas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    The alpha splice variant of p73 (p73α), a homologue of the tumour suppressor p53, has at its C terminus a sterile alpha motif (SAM); this domain, SAMp73, is involved in lipid binding and it is thought to mediate in protein-protein interactions. As SAMp73 is a 68-residue-long helical bundle, it could be a good model to study the (2,2,2-trifluoroethanol) TFE-induced conformational transitions of α-helical proteins. Furthermore, as SAMp73 binds to lipids through a well-known polypeptide patch, we can test whether TFE is a good mimic of lipids and membranes. To address those questions, we used several biophysical probes, namely, fluorescence, circular dichroism, 1D, 2D and 3D-NMR spectroscopies, and dynamic light scattering. The TFE-induced conformational transition of SAMp73 was complex, involving several species as detected by the biophysical probes. The last TFE-induced transition occurred at a concentration of TFE of ∼20% (v/v), where the protein lost its compactness. None of those TFE-induced species accumulated during the two-state folding of SAMp73 in aqueous solution. The final state at 40% TFE was highly helical, but its structure was not rigid. For SAMp73, TFE did not properly mimic a membrane-like environment, since at very low TFE concentrations, other residues, together with those known to interact with lipids, were also affected by the co-solvent. Comparison with studies on isolated peptides, comprising the helical regions of SAMp73, suggests that peptides were good models of the intact protein in TFE.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKKEE), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  8. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  9. Cloning and targeted mutations of G alpha 7 and G alpha 8, two developmentally regulated G protein alpha-subunit genes in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Gaskins, C; Zhou, K; Firtel, R A; Devreotes, P N

    1994-01-01

    GTP-binding protein (G protein)-mediated signal transduction pathways play essential roles during the aggregation and differentiation process of Dictyostelium. In addition to the five known G protein alpha-subunit genes, we recently identified three novel alpha-subunit genes, G alpha 6, G alpha 7, and G alpha 8, using the polymerase chain reaction technique. We present here a more complete analysis of G alpha 7 and G alpha 8. The cDNAs of these two genes were cloned, and their complete nucleotide sequences were determined. Sequence analyses indicate that G alpha 8 possesses some unusual features. It lacks the "TCATDT" motif, a sequence of amino acids highly conserved among G alpha subunits, and has an additional 50 amino acids at its C-terminus consisting of long stretches of asparagine. Moreover, G alpha 8 is unusually resistant to protease digestion, which may indicate a slow GTP hydrolysis rate. The possible functions of these alpha-subunits were assessed by generating mutants lacking G alpha 7 or G alpha 8 by gene targeting through homologous recombination and by overexpressing G alpha 7 or G alpha 8 protein. Overexpression of G alpha 7 resulted in abnormal morphogenesis starting at the slug stage, whereas analysis of the other strains failed to reveal any obvious growth or developmental defects under either normal or stressful conditions. The implications of these results are discussed. Images PMID:7949425

  10. An Alpha Motif at Tas3C Terminus Mediates RITS Cis Spreading and Promotes Heterochromatic Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Motamedi, M; Yip, C; Wang, Z; Walz, T; Patel, D; Moazed, D

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) plays a pivotal role in the formation of heterochromatin at the fission yeast centromeres. The RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex, composed of heterochromatic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), the siRNA-binding protein Ago1, the chromodomain protein Chp1, and the Ago1/Chp1-interacting protein Tas3, provides a physical tether between the RNAi and heterochromatin assembly pathways. Here, we report the structural and functional characterization of a C-terminal Tas3 {alpha}-helical motif (TAM), which self-associates into a helical polymer and is required for cis spreading of RITS in centromeric DNA regions. Site-directed mutations of key residues within the hydrophobic monomer-monomer interface disrupt Tas3-TAM polymeric self-association in vitro and result in loss of gene silencing, spreading of RITS, and a dramatic reduction in centromeric siRNAs in vivo. These results demonstrate that, in addition to the chromodomain of Chp1 and siRNA-loaded Ago1, Tas3 self-association is required for RITS spreading and efficient heterochromatic gene silencing at centromeric repeat regions.

  11. Mutation of FVS1, encoding a protein with a sterile alpha motif domain, affects asexual reproduction in the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Iida, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuki; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Tsuge, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Fusarium oxysporum produces three kinds of asexual spores: microconidia, macroconidia and chlamydospores. We previously analysed expressed sequence tags during vegetative growth and conidiation in F. oxysporum and found 42 genes that were markedly upregulated during conidiation compared to vegetative growth. One of the genes, FVS1, encodes a protein with a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, which functions in protein-protein interactions that are involved in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation and signal transduction. Here, we made FVS1-disrupted mutants from the melon wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis. Although the mutants produced all three kinds of asexual spores with normal morphology, they formed markedly fewer microconidia and macroconidia than the wild type. The mutants appeared to have a defect in the development of the conidiogenesis cells, conidiophores and phialides, required for the formation of microconidia and macroconidia. In contrast, chlamydospore formation was dramatically promoted in the mutants. The growth rates of the mutants on media were slightly reduced, indicating that FVS1 is also involved in, but not essential for, vegetative growth. We also observed that mutation of FVS1 caused defects in conidial germination and virulence, suggesting that the Fvs1 has pleiotropic functions in F. oxysporum.

  12. A double mutant knockin of the CD28 YMNM and PYAP motifs reveals a critical role for the YMNM motif in regulation of T cell proliferation and Bcl-Xl expression1

    PubMed Central

    Boomer, Jonathan S.; Deppong, Christine M.; Shah, Dulari D.; Bricker, Traci L.; Green, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    CD28 is a critical regulator of T cell function, augmenting proliferation, cytokine secretion and cell survival. Our previous work using knockin mice expressing point mutations in CD28 had demonstrated that the distal proline motif was primarily responsible for much of CD28 function, whereas in marked contrast to prior studies, mutation of the PI3-kinase binding motif had little discernible effect. In this study, we examined the phenotype of mice in which both motifs are simultaneously mutated. We found that mutation of the PYAP motif unmasks a critical role for the proximal tyrosine motif in regulating T cell proliferation and expression of Bcl-Xl, but not cytokine secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that while function is more severely impaired in the double mutant than in either single mutant, there remained residual CD28-dependent responses, definitively establishing that additional motifs can partially mediate CD28 function. PMID:24639356

  13. Trans-regulation of RNA-binding protein motifs by microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Francis; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The wide array of vital functions that RNA performs is dependent on its ability to dynamically fold into different structures in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. RNA-binding proteins regulate much of this activity by targeting specific RNA structures or motifs. One of these structures, the 3-way RNA junction, is characteristically found in ribosomal RNA and results from the RNA folding in cis, to produce three separate helices that meet around a central unpaired region. Here we demonstrate that 3-way junctions can also form in trans as a result of the binding of microRNAs in an unconventional manner with mRNA by splinting two non-contiguous regions together. This may be used to reinforce the base of a stem-loop motif being targeted by an RNA-binding protein. Trans interactions between non-coding RNA and mRNA may be used to control the post-transcriptional regulatory code and suggests a possible role for some of the recently described transcripts of unknown function expressed from the human genome. PMID:24795744

  14. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-12-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules.

  15. Regulation of PPAR{gamma} function by TNF-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jianping

    2008-09-26

    The nuclear receptor PPAR{gamma} is a lipid sensor that regulates lipid metabolism through gene transcription. Inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activity by TNF-{alpha} is involved in pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer cachexia. PPAR{gamma} activity is regulated by TNF-{alpha} at pre-translational and post-translational levels. Activation of serine kinases including IKK, ERK, JNK, and p38 may be involved in the TNF-regulation of PPAR{gamma}. Of the four kinases, IKK is a dominant signaling molecule in the TNF-regulation of PPAR{gamma}. IKK acts through at least two mechanisms: inhibition of PPAR{gamma} expression and activation of PPAR{gamma} corepressor. In this review article, literature is reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms of PPAR{gamma} inhibition by TNF-{alpha}.

  16. The ABBA motif binds APC/C activators and is shared by APC/C substrates and regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hagting, Anja; Izawa, Daisuke; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gibson, Toby J.; Pines, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    The APC/C is the ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis by targeting specific proteins for degradation at specific times under the control of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC). How the APC/C recognises its different substrates is a key problem in the control of cell division. Here, we have identified the ABBA motif in Cyclin A, BUBR1, BUB1 and Acm1, and show that it binds to the APC/C co-activator CDC20. The ABBA motif in Cyclin A is required for its proper degradation in prometaphase through competing with BUBR1 for the same site on CDC20. Moreover, the ABBA motifs in BUBR1 and BUB1 are necessary for the SAC to work at full strength and to recruit CDC20 to kinetochores. Thus, we have identified a conserved motif integral to the proper control of mitosis that connects APC/C substrate recognition with the SAC. PMID:25669885

  17. Multiple motifs regulate the trafficking of GABA(B) receptors at distinct checkpoints within the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Restituito, Sophie; Couve, Andrés; Bawagan, Hinayana; Jourdain, Sabine; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Freeman, Katie B; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the mechanisms that regulate receptor surface expression remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that access to the cell surface for GABA(B)R1 is sequentially controlled by an RSR(R) motif and a LL motif within its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we reveal that msec7-1, a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of GTPases, critical regulators of vesicular membrane trafficking, interacts with GABA(B)R1 via the LL motif in this subunit. Finally, we establish that msec7-1 modulates the cell surface expression of GABA(B) receptors, a process that is dependent upon the integrity of the LL motif in GABA(B)R1. Together, our results demonstrate that the cell surface expression of the GABA(B)R1 subunit is regulated by multiple motifs, which act at distinct checkpoints in the secretory pathway, and also suggest a novel role for msec7-1 in regulating the membrane trafficking of GABA(B)R1 subunits.

  18. Targeting a Proteinase-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) Carboxyl Terminal Motif to Regulate Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Thibeault, Pierre; Vanderboor, Christina M; Petri, Björn; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Bouvier, Michel; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2017-04-01

    Thrombin initiates human platelet aggregation by coordinately activating proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. However, targeting PAR1 with an orthosteric-tethered ligand binding-site antagonist results in bleeding, possibly owing to the important role of PAR1 activation on cells other than platelets. Because of its more restricted tissue expression profile, we have therefore turned to PAR4 as an antiplatelet target. We have identified an intracellular PAR4 C-terminal motif that regulates calcium signaling and β-arrestin interactions. By disrupting this PAR4 calcium/β-arrestin signaling process with a novel cell-penetrating peptide, we were able to inhibit both thrombin-triggered platelet aggregation in vitro and clot consolidation in vivo. We suggest that targeting PAR4 represents an attractive alternative to blocking PAR1 for antiplatelet therapy in humans.

  19. Nuclear Drosophila CerS Schlank regulates lipid homeostasis via the homeodomain, independent of the lag1p motif.

    PubMed

    Voelzmann, André; Wulf, Anna-Lena; Eckardt, Franka; Thielisch, Melanie; Brondolin, Mirco; Pesch, Yanina-Yasmin; Sociale, Mariangela; Bauer, Reinhard; Hoch, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drosophila Ceramide Synthase (CerS) Schlank regulates both ceramide synthesis and fat metabolism. Schlank contains a catalytic lag1p motif and, like many CerS in other species, a homeodomain of unknown function. Here, we show that the Drosophila CerS Schlank is imported into the nucleus and requires two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) within its homeodomain and functional Importin-β import machinery. Expression of Schlank variants containing the homeodomain without functional lag1p motif rescued the fat metabolism phenotype of schlank mutants whereas a variant with a mutated NLS site did not rescue. Thus, the homeodomain of Schlank is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism independent of the catalytic lag1p motif.

  20. A Novel Cytoplasmic Tail Motif Regulates Mouse Corin Expression on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Lina; Dong, Ningzheng; Qi, Xiaofei; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are important in many biological processes. Cell surface expression is critical for TTSP activation and function. To date, the mechanism underlying TTSP cell surface expression is poorly understood. Corin is a TTSP and acts as the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide convertase that is essential for sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure. In this study, we investigated how cytoplasmic tail sequences may regulate corin expression and activation on the cell surface. By site-directed mutagenesis, we made mouse corin proteins with truncations or point-mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. We expressed the mutants in transfected HEK293 cells and analyzed corin cell surface expression and activation by Western blotting and flow cytometry. We found that corin truncation mutants lacking a Lys-Phe-Gln sequence at residues 71–73 had higher levels of cell surface expression and activation compared with that in wild-type corin. When Lys-71, Phe-72 and Gln-73 residues were mutated together, but not individually, in corin with the full-length cytoplasmic tail, increased levels of cell surface expression and zymogen activation were also observed. These results indicate that residues Lys-71, Phe-72 and Gln-73 serve as a novel retention motif in the intracellular pathway to regulate corin cell surface expression and activation. PMID:26241673

  1. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Michael Rex; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Beliaev, Alexander S; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  3. Involvement of the clock gene Rev-erb alpha in the regulation of glucagon secretion in pancreatic alpha-cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elaine; Marroquí, Laura; Figueroa, Ana Lucia C; Merino, Beatriz; Fernandez-Ruiz, Rebeca; Nadal, Angel; Burris, Thomas P; Gomis, Ramon; Quesada, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of pancreatic clock genes impairs pancreatic beta-cell function, leading to the onset of diabetes. Despite the importance of pancreatic alpha-cells in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and in diabetes pathophysiology, nothing is known about the role of clock genes in these cells. Here, we identify the clock gene Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion. Rev-erb alpha down-regulation by siRNA (60-70% inhibition) in alphaTC1-9 cells inhibited low-glucose induced glucagon secretion (p<0.05) and led to a decrease in key genes of the exocytotic machinery. The Rev-erb alpha agonist GSK4112 increased glucagon secretion (1.6 fold) and intracellular calcium signals in alphaTC1-9 cells and mouse primary alpha-cells, whereas the Rev-erb alpha antagonist SR8278 produced the opposite effect. At 0.5 mM glucose, alphaTC1-9 cells exhibited intrinsic circadian Rev-erb alpha expression oscillations that were inhibited by 11 mM glucose. In mouse primary alpha-cells, glucose induced similar effects (p<0.001). High glucose inhibited key genes controlled by AMPK such as Nampt, Sirt1 and PGC-1 alpha in alphaTC1-9 cells (p<0.05). AMPK activation by metformin completely reversed the inhibitory effect of glucose on Nampt-Sirt1-PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha. Nampt inhibition decreased Sirt1, PGC-1 alpha and Rev-erb alpha mRNA expression (p<0.01) and glucagon release (p<0.05). These findings identify Rev-erb alpha as a new intracellular regulator of glucagon secretion via AMPK/Nampt/Sirt1 pathway.

  4. Characterization of a novel alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase of Escherichia coli O128:b12 and functional investigation of its common motif.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Liu, Xian-Wei; Shao, Jun; Shen, Jie; Jia, Qiang; Yi, Wen; Song, Jing K; Woodward, Robert; Chow, Christine S; Wang, Peng George

    2008-01-08

    The wbsJ gene from Escherichia coli O128:B12 encodes an alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase responsible for adding a fucose onto the galactose residue of the O-antigen repeating unit via an alpha1,2 linkage. The wbsJ gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST) at its N-terminus. GST-WbsJ fusion protein was purified to homogeneity via GST affinity chromatography followed by size exclusion chromatography. The enzyme showed broad acceptor specificity with Galbeta1,3GalNAc (T antigen), Galbeta1,4Man and Galbeta1,4Glc (lactose) being better acceptors than Galbeta-O-Me and galactose. Galbeta1,4Fru (lactulose), a natural sugar, was furthermore found to be the best acceptor for GST-WbsJ with a reaction rate four times faster than that of lactose. Kinetic studies showed that GST-WbsJ has a higher affinity for lactose than lactulose with apparent Km values of 7.81 mM and 13.26 mM, respectively. However, the kcat/appKm value of lactose (6.36 M(-1) x min(-1)) is two times lower than that of lactulose (13.39 M(-1) x min(-1)). In addition, the alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase activity of GST-WbsJ was found to be independent of divalent metal ions such as Mn2+ or Mg2+. This activity was competitively inhibited by GDP with a Ki value of 1.41 mM. Site-directed mutagenesis and a GDP-bead binding assay were also performed to investigate the functions of the highly conserved motif H152xR154R155xD157. In contrast to alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases, none of the mutants of WbsJ within this motif exhibited a complete loss of enzyme activity. However, residues R154 and D157 were found to play critical roles in donor binding and enzyme activity. The results suggest that the common motif shared by both alpha1,2-fucosyltransferases and alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases have similar functions. Enzymatic synthesis of fucosylated sugars in milligram scale was successfully performed using Galbeta-O-Me and Galbeta1,4Glcbeta-N3 as acceptors.

  5. The C-terminal dimerization motif of cyclase-associated protein is essential for actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-12-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein that functions together with actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin to enhance actin filament dynamics. CAP has multiple functional domains, and the function to regulate actin monomers is carried out by its C-terminal half containing a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain, a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 (CARP) domain, and a dimerization motif. WH2 and CARP are implicated in binding to actin monomers and important for enhancing filament turnover. However, the role of the dimerization motif is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of the dimerization motif of CAS-2, a CAP isoform in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in actin monomer regulation. CAS-2 promotes ATP-dependent recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers for polymerization by enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. The C-terminal half of CAS-2 (CAS-2C) has nearly as strong activity as full-length CAS-2. Maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CAS-2C is a dimer. However, MBP-CAS-2C with a truncation of either one or two C-terminal β-strands is monomeric. Truncations of the dimerization motif in MBP-CAS-2C nearly completely abolish its activity to sequester actin monomers from polymerization and enhance nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. As a result, these CAS-2C variants, also in the context of full-length CAS-2, fail to compete with ADF/cofilin to release actin monomers for polymerization. CAS-2C variants lacking the dimerization motif exhibit enhanced binding to actin filaments, which is mediated by WH2. Taken together, these results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved dimerization motif of CAP is essential for its C-terminal region to exert the actin monomer-specific regulatory function.

  6. The Fli-1 transcription factor is a critical regulator for controlling the expression of chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 2 (CXCL2).

    PubMed

    Lou, Ning; Lennard Richard, Mara L; Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark; Zhang, Xian K

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cells produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to innate immune signals and their expression is tightly regulated. Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), also known as macrophage inflammatory protein 2-alpha (MIP2-alpha), is an inflammatory chemokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family. CXCL2 is chemotactic for neutrophils and elevated expression of CXCL2 is associated with many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The Fli-1 gene belongs to the large Ets transcription factor family, whose members regulate a wide variety of cellular functions including the immune response. In this study, we demonstrate that endothelial cells transfected with Fli-1 specific siRNA produce significantly less CXCL2 compared to cells transfected with control siRNA after stimulation by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligands, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The production of CXCL2 in endothelial cells stimulated with LPS stimulation is dose-dependent. We found that Fli-1 binds to the CXCL2 promoter as established by Chromatin immunoprecipitation‎ (ChIP) assay. Transient transfection assays show that Fli-1 drives transcription from the CXCL2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner and Fli-1 regulates the expression of CXCL2 largely by directly binding to the promoter. Targeted knockdown and transient transfection experiments suggest that both Fli-1 and the p65 subunit of NF-κB affect the activation of CXCL2 in an additive manner. These results indicate that Fli-1 is a novel, critical transcription factor that regulates the expression of the inflammatory chemokine CXCL2.

  7. The transcription factor Spn1 regulates gene expression via a highly conserved novel structural motif.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Venugopal; Radebaugh, Catherine A; Chodaparambil, Jayanth V; Muthurajan, Uma M; Almeida, Adam R; Fischbeck, Julie A; Luger, Karolin; Stargell, Laurie A

    2010-11-19

    Spn1/Iws1 plays essential roles in the regulation of gene expression by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), and it is highly conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. Spn1 physically and/or genetically interacts with RNAPII, TBP (TATA-binding protein), TFIIS (transcription factor IIS), and a number of chromatin remodeling factors (Swi/Snf and Spt6). The central domain of Spn1 (residues 141-305 out of 410) is necessary and sufficient for performing the essential functions of SPN1 in yeast cells. Here, we report the high-resolution (1.85 Å) crystal structure of the conserved central domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spn1. The central domain is composed of eight α-helices in a right-handed superhelical arrangement and exhibits structural similarity to domain I of TFIIS. A unique structural feature of Spn1 is a highly conserved loop, which defines one side of a pronounced cavity. The loop and the other residues forming the cavity are highly conserved at the amino acid level among all Spn1 family members, suggesting that this is a signature motif for Spn1 orthologs. The locations and the molecular characterization of temperature-sensitive mutations in Spn1 indicate that the cavity is a key attribute of Spn1 that is critical for its regulatory functions during RNAPII-mediated transcriptional activity.

  8. Lamin A reassembly at the end of mitosis is regulated by its SUMO-interacting motif.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masaki; Kusumoto, Fumiya; Osumi, Takashi; Hirose, Fumiko

    2016-03-01

    Modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO; SUMOylation) is involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncovalent associations between SUMOylated proteins and co-operative proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) are important for the spatiotemporal organization of many protein complexes. In this study, we demonstrate that interactions between lamin A, a major component of the nuclear lamina, and SUMO isoforms are dependent on one of the four SIMs (SIM3) resided in lamin A polypeptide in vitro. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that SIM3 is required for accumulation of lamin A on the chromosomes during telophase, and subsequent evaluation of a panel of deletion mutants determined that a 156-amino acid region spanning the carboxyl-terminal Ig-fold domain of lamin A is sufficient for this accumulation. Notably, mutation of SIM3 abrogated the dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific phosphorylation at Ser-22 of lamin A, which normally occurs during telophase, and the subsequent nuclear lamina reorganization. Furthermore, expression of a conjugation-defective SUMO2 mutant, which was previously shown to inhibit endogenous SUMOylation in a dominant-negative manner, also impaired the accumulation of wild type lamin A on telophase chromosomes. These findings suggest that interactions between SIM3 of lamin A and a putative SUMO2-modified protein plays an important role in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina at the end of mitosis.

  9. A novel motif in telomerase reverse transcriptase regulates telomere repeat addition rate and processivity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingyi; Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Qi, Xiaodong; Bley, Christopher J.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase that adds telomeric DNA repeats onto chromosome termini. Here, we characterize a new telomerase-specific motif, called motif 3, in the catalytic domain of telomerase reverse transcriptase, that is crucial for telomerase function and evolutionally conserved between vertebrates and ciliates. Comprehensive mutagenesis of motif 3 identified mutations that remarkably increase the rate or alter the processivity of telomere repeat addition. Notably, the rate and processivity of repeat addition are affected independently by separate motif 3 mutations. The processive telomerase action relies upon a template translocation mechanism whereby the RNA template and the telomeric DNA strand separate and realign between each repeat synthesis. By analyzing the mutant telomerases reconstituted in vitro and in cells, we show that the hyperactive mutants exhibit higher repeat addition rates and faster enzyme turnovers, suggesting higher rates of strand-separation during template translocation. In addition, the strong correlation between the processivity of the motif 3 mutants and their ability to use an 8 nt DNA primer, suggests that motif 3 facilitates realignment between the telomeric DNA and the template RNA following strand-separation. These findings support motif 3 as a key determinant for telomerase activity and processivity. PMID:20044353

  10. A new calmodulin-binding motif for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Franco-Echevarría, Elsa; Baños-Sanz, Jose I; Monterroso, Begoña; Round, Adam; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; González, Beatriz

    2014-11-01

    IP3-3K [Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase] is a key enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, using Ins(1,4,5)P3 and ATP as substrates. Both inositides, substrate and product, present crucial roles in the cell. Ins(1,4,5)P3 is a key point in Ca2+ metabolism that promotes Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and together with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 regulates Ca2+ homoeostasis. In addition, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 is involved in immune cell development. It has been proved that Ca2+/CaM (calmodulin) regulates the activity of IP3-3K, via direct interaction between both enzymes. Although we have extensive structural knowledge of the kinase domains of the three IP3-3K isoforms, no structural information is available about the interaction between IP3-3K and Ca2+/CaM. In the present paper we describe the crystal structure of the complex between human Ca2+/CaM and the CaM-binding region of human IP3-3K isoform A (residues 158-183) and propose a model for a complex including the kinase domain. The structure obtained allowed us to identify all of the key residues involved in the interaction, which have been evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis, pull-down and fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The results allowed the identification of a new CaM-binding motif, expanding our knowledge about how CaM interacts with its partners.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif-containing transcriptional regulators in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kagale, Sateesh; Links, Matthew G; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    The ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif is a transcriptional regulatory motif identified in members of the ethylene-responsive element binding factor, C2H2, and auxin/indole-3-acetic acid families of transcriptional regulators. Sequence comparison of the core EAR motif sites from these proteins revealed two distinct conservation patterns: LxLxL and DLNxxP. Proteins containing these motifs play key roles in diverse biological functions by negatively regulating genes involved in developmental, hormonal, and stress signaling pathways. Through a genome-wide bioinformatics analysis, we have identified the complete repertoire of the EAR repressome in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising 219 proteins belonging to 21 different transcriptional regulator families. Approximately 72% of these proteins contain a LxLxL type of EAR motif, 22% contain a DLNxxP type of EAR motif, and the remaining 6% have a motif where LxLxL and DLNxxP are overlapping. Published in vitro and in planta investigations support approximately 40% of these proteins functioning as negative regulators of gene expression. Comparative sequence analysis of EAR motif sites and adjoining regions has identified additional preferred residues and potential posttranslational modification sites that may influence the functionality of the EAR motif. Homology searches against protein databases of poplar (Populus trichocarpa), grapevine (Vitis vinifera), rice (Oryza sativa), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) revealed that the EAR motif is conserved across these diverse plant species. This genome-wide analysis represents the most extensive survey of EAR motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis to date and provides a resource enabling investigations into their biological roles and the mechanism of EAR motif-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  12. Transcription enhancer factor 1 interacts with a basic helix-loop-helix zipper protein, Max, for positive regulation of cardiac alpha-myosin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, M P; Amin, C S; Gupta, M; Hay, N; Zak, R

    1997-01-01

    The M-CAT binding factor transcription enhancer factor 1 (TEF-1) has been implicated in the regulation of several cardiac and skeletal muscle genes. Previously, we identified an E-box-M-CAT hybrid (EM) motif that is responsible for the basal and cyclic AMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) gene in cardiac myocytes. In this study, we report that two factors, TEF-1 and a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper protein, Max, bind to the alpha-MHC EM motif. We also found that Max was a part of the cardiac troponin T M-CAT-TEF-1 complex even when the DNA template did not contain an apparent E-box binding site. In the protein-protein interaction assay, a stable association of Max with TEF-1 was observed when glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TEF-1 or GST-Max was used to pull down in vitro-translated Max or TEF-1, respectively. In addition, Max was coimmunoprecipitated with TEF-1, thus documenting an in vivo TEF-1-Max interaction. In the transient transcription assay, overexpression of either Max or TEF-1 resulted a mild activation of the alpha-MHC-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene at lower concentrations and repression of this gene at higher concentrations. However, when Max and TEF-1 expression plasmids were transfected together, the repression mediated by a single expression plasmid was alleviated and a three- to fourfold transactivation of the alpha-MHC-CAT reporter gene was observed. This effect was abolished once the EM motif in the promoter-reporter construct was mutated, thus suggesting that the synergistic transactivation function of the TEF-1-Max heterotypic complex is mediated through binding of the complex to the EM motif. These results demonstrate a novel association between Max and TEF-1 and indicate a positive cooperation between these two factors in alpha-MHC gene regulation. PMID:9199327

  13. Oligonucleotide motifs that disappear during the evolution of influenza virus in humans increase alpha interferon secretion by plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Baranda, Sonia; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Manches, Olivier; Handler, Jesse; Rabadán, Raúl; Levine, Arnold; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2011-04-01

    CpG motifs in an A/U context have been preferentially eliminated from classical H1N1 influenza virus genomes during virus evolution in humans. The hypothesis of the current work is that CpG motifs in a uracil context represent sequence patterns with the capacity to induce an immune response, and the avoidance of this immunostimulatory signal is the reason for the observed preferential decline. To analyze the immunogenicity of these domains, we used plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). pDCs express pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), which recognizes guanosine- and uridine-rich viral single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), including influenza virus ssRNA. The signaling through TLR7 results in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon (IFN-I), an essential process for the induction of specific adaptive immune responses and for mounting a robust antiviral response mediated by IFN-α. Secretion of IFN-α is also linked to the activation of other immune cells, potentially amplifying the effect of an initial IFN-α secretion. We therefore also examined the role of IFN-α-driven activation of NK cells as another source of selective pressure on the viral genome. We found direct evidence that CpG RNA motifs in a U-rich context control pDC activation and IFN-α-driven activation of NK cells, likely through TLR7. These data provide a potential explanation for the loss of CpG motifs from avian influenza viruses as they adapt to mammalian hosts. The selective decrease of CpG motifs surrounded by U/A may be a viral strategy to avoid immune recognition, a strategy likely shared by highly expressed human immune genes.

  14. EAR motif mutation of rice OsERF3 alters the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiwen; Zhang, Jianfei; Quan, Ruidang; Pan, Xiaowu; Wan, Liyun; Huang, Rongfeng

    2013-06-01

    OsERF3 is a transcriptional repressor with an ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif (F/LDLNxxP), which transcriptionally represses the ethylene emission and drought tolerance in rice. However, its molecular mechanism to explore repression function remains unknown. Here, we first revealed that the expression of OsERF3 was induced by drought, salt, ACC and ABA treatment. In addition, it showed a higher expression level in the root and sheath than that in the leaf. Then, we generated transgenic rice overexpressing full-length OsERF3 (OE) and its mutation of EAR motif with the A 680/C substitution (mEAR), respectively. The physiological analyses showed that mEAR lines showed better drought tolerance and more ethylene emission compared with those of OE lines and wild type plants. Consistent with our previous research, the expression of ethylene synthesis genes, including ACO2, ACS2, and ACS6 was down-regulated in OE lines. However, the repression of OsERF3 was eliminated in mEAR lines. Specifically, ACS2 was up-regulated in mEAR lines compared with that in OE lines and WT plants, suggesting that the Leu/Ala substitution within the EAR motif resulted in loss of repression of OsERF3. Thus, our data reveal that the EAR motif is required for OsERF3 to transcriptionally regulate the ethylene synthesis and drought tolerance in rice, providing new insight to the roles of ethylene-response factor proteins in regulating ethylene biosynthesis and stress response.

  15. LAR, liprin alpha and the regulation of active zone morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Emily; Johnson, Karl G

    2007-11-01

    Active zones are protein-rich regions of neurons that act as sites of synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release at the pre-synaptic terminus. Although the discovery that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR and its cytoplasmic binding partner liprin alpha are essential for proper active zone formation is nearly a decade old, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies have identified a number of binding partners for both LAR and liprin alpha, several of which play key roles in active zone assembly. These include nidogen, dallylike and syndecan--extracellular ligands for LAR that regulate synapse morphogenesis. In addition, liprin-alpha-interacting proteins such as ERC2, RIM and the MALS/Veli-Cask-Mint1 complex cooperate to form a dense molecular scaffold at the active zone that is crucial for proper synaptic function. These studies allow us to propose testable models of LAR and liprin alpha function, and provide insights into the fundamental molecular mechanisms of synapse formation and stabilization.

  16. The muscle-specific laminin receptor alpha7 beta1 integrin negatively regulates alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, D; Echtermayer, F; Schöber, S; Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1999-02-01

    alpha7 beta1 is the major integrin complex expressed in differentiated muscle cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. In this work we have expressed the alpha7 integrin subunit in CHO cells to investigate the functional properties of this receptor. After transfection with alpha7 CHO cells acquired the ability to adhere and spread on laminin 1 consistent with the laminin receptor activity of the alpha7 beta1. alpha7 transfectants, however, showed a 70% reduction in the ability to adhere to fibronectin and were unable to assemble a fibronectin matrix. The degree of reduction was inversely related to the level of alpha7 expression. To define the mechanisms underlying this adhesive defect we analyzed surface expression and functional properties of the alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor. Although cell surface expression of alpha5 beta1 was reduced by a factor of 20-25% in alpha7 transfectants compared to control untransfected cells, this slight reduction was not sufficient to explain the dramatic reduction in cell adhesion (70%) and matrix assembly (close to 100%). Binding studies showed that the affinity of 125I-fibronectin for its surface receptor was decreased by 50% in alpha7 transfectants, indicating that the alpha5 beta1 integrin is partially inactivated in these cells. Inactivation can be reversed by Mn2+, a cation known to increase integrin affinity for their ligands. In fact, incubation of cells with Mn2+ restored fibronectin binding affinity, adhesion to fibronectin, and assembly of fibronectin matrix in alpha7 transfectants. These data indicate that alpha7 expression leads to the functional down regulation of alpha5beta1 integrin by decreasing ligand binding affinity and surface expression. In conclusion, the data reported establish the existence of a negative cooperativity between alpha7 and alpha5 integrins that may be important in determining functional regulation of integrins during myogenic differentiation.

  17. Integrin alpha v beta 3 differentially regulates adhesive and phagocytic functions of the fibronectin receptor alpha 5 beta 1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The plasma protein fibronectin is an important opsonin in wound repair and host defense. To better understand the process of fibronectin- mediated phagocytosis, we have transfected K562 cells, which endogenously express alpha 5 beta 1, with alpha v beta 3. In these transfectants, antibodies to alpha v beta 3 block phagocytosis of fibronectin-opsonized beads completely, even though half the ingestion occurs through endogenous alpha 5 beta 1 receptors. alpha 5 beta 1- mediated adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces is unaffected by alpha v beta 3 ligation. Neither alpha v beta 5 nor alpha M beta 2 ligation affects alpha 5 beta 1 phagocytic function in transfectants expressing these receptors. Pharmacologic data suggest that alpha v beta 3 ligation suppresses the phagocytic competence of high affinity alpha 5 beta 1 receptors through a signal transduction pathway, perhaps involving protein kinase C. In addition to its significance for phagocytosis, alpha v beta 3 regulation of alpha 5 beta 1 function may be significant for its roles in cell migration, metastasis, and angiogenesis. PMID:7525603

  18. Vgl-4, a novel member of the vestigial-like family of transcription cofactors, regulates alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Huei; Mullett, Steven J; Stewart, Alexandre F R

    2004-07-16

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle genes are regulated by the transcriptional enhancer factor (TEF-1) family of transcription factors. In skeletal muscle, TEF-1 factors interact with a skeletal muscle-specific cofactor called Vestigial-like 2 (Vgl-2) that is related to the Drosophila protein Vestigial. Here, we characterize Vgl-4, the only member of the Vestigial-like family expressed in the heart. Unlike other members of the Vgl family that have a single TEF-1 interaction domain called the tondu (TDU) motif, Vgl-4 has two TDU motifs in its carboxyl-terminal domain. Like other Vgl factors, Vgl-4 physically interacts with TEF-1 in an immunoprecipitation assay. Vgl-4 functionally interacts with TEF-1 and also with myocyte enhancer factor 2 in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Overexpression of Vgl-4 in cardiac myocytes interfered with the basal expression and alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of a TEF-1-dependent skeletal alpha-actin promoter. In cardiac myocytes cultured in serum and in serum-free medium, a myc-tagged Vgl-4 protein was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm but was exported from the nucleus when cells were treated with alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist. A chimeric nuclear-retained Vgl-4 protein inhibited alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation. In contrast, deletion of the TDU motifs of Vgl-4 prevented Vgl-4 nuclear localization, relieved Vgl-4 interference of basal activity, and enhanced alpha1-adrenergic up-regulation of the skeletal alpha-actin promoter. Nuclear export of Vgl-4 is dependent on the nuclear exportin CRM-1. These results suggest that Vgl-4 modulates the activity of TEF-1 factors and counteracts alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

  19. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon; Rifkin, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located 527bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo.

  20. The comparison of mouse full metallothionein-1 versus alpha and beta domains and metallothionein-1-to-3 mutation following traumatic brain injury reveals different biological motifs.

    PubMed

    Manso, Yasmina; Serra, Montserrat; Comes, Gemma; Giralt, Mercedes; Carrasco, Javier; Cols, Neus; Vasák, Milan; González-Duarte, Pilar; Hidalgo, Juan

    2010-06-01

    Traumatic injury to the brain is one of the leading causes of injury-related death or disability, but current therapies are limited. Previously it has been shown that the antioxidant proteins metallothioneins (MTs) are potent neuroprotective factors in animal models of brain injury. The exogenous administration of MTs causes effects consistent with the roles proposed from studies in knock-out mice. We herewith report the results comparing full mouse MT-1 with the independent alpha and beta domains, alone or together, in a cryoinjury model. The lesion of the cortex caused the mice to perform worse in the horizontal ladder beam and the rota-rod tests; all the proteins showed a modest effect in the former test, while only full MT-1 improved the performance of animals in the rota-rod, and the alpha domain showed a rather detrimental effect. Gene expression analysis by RNA protection assay demonstrated that all proteins may alter the expression of host-response genes such as GFAP, Mac1 and ICAM, in some cases being the beta domain more effective than the alpha domain or even the full MT-1. A MT-1-to-MT-3 mutation blunted some but not all the effects caused by the normal MT-1, and in some cases increased its potency. Thus, splitting the two MT-1 domains do not seem to eliminate all MT functions but certainly modifies them, and different motifs seem to be present in the protein underlying such functions.

  1. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenbao; Vogel, Gillian; Coulombe, Yan; Dubeau, Danielle; Spehalski, Elizabeth; Hébert, Josée; Ferguson, David O; Masson, Jean Yves; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif. In this study, we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines. The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability. Moreover, the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites. The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR. The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR. Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair, and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing, as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling. PMID:21826105

  2. Negative regulation of defence and stress genes by EAR-motif-containing repressors.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal

    2006-03-01

    Although positive control or activation mechanism(s) involved in plant defence- and stress-related gene expression is relatively well studied, little is known about what keeps defensive armoury under control when not needed. Recent reports suggest that transcriptional repression of gene expression by EAR-motif-containing repressor proteins plays a key role in modulating plant defence and stress responses.

  3. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2012-05-30

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

  4. Regulation of α2B-Adrenerigc Receptor Export Trafficking by Specific Motifs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangyu; Davis, Jason E; Zhang, Maoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking and precise targeting to specific locations of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control the physiological functions of the receptors. Compared to the extensive efforts dedicated to understanding the events involved in the endocytic and recycling pathways, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport of the GPCR superfamily from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the Golgi to the plasma membrane are relatively less well defined. Over the past years, we have used α(2B)-adrenergic receptor (α(2B)-AR) as a model to define the factors that control GPCR export trafficking. In this chapter, we will review specific motifs identified to mediate the export of nascent α(2B)-AR from the ER and the Golgi and discuss the possible underlying mechanisms. As these motifs are highly conserved among GPCRs, they may provide common mechanisms for export trafficking of these receptors.

  5. AlphaB-crystallin regulates remyelination after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Erin-Mai F.; Nakanishi, Stan T.; Hoghooghi, Vahid; Eaton, Shane E. A.; Palmer, Alexandra L.; Frederick, Ariana; Stratton, Jo A.; Stykel, Morgan G.; Zochodne, Douglas W.; Biernaskie, Jeffrey; Ousman, Shalina S.

    2017-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin (αBC) is a small heat shock protein that is constitutively expressed by peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons and Schwann cells. To determine what role this crystallin plays after peripheral nerve damage, we found that loss of αBC impaired remyelination, which correlated with a reduced presence of myelinating Schwann cells and increased numbers of nonmyelinating Schwann cells. The heat shock protein also seems to regulate the cross-talk between Schwann cells and axons, because expected changes in neuregulin levels and ErbB2 receptor expression after PNS injury were disrupted in the absence of αBC. Such dysregulations led to defects in conduction velocity and motor and sensory functions that could be rescued with therapeutic application of the heat shock protein in vivo. Altogether, these findings show that αBC plays an important role in regulating Wallerian degeneration and remyelination after PNS injury. PMID:28137843

  6. Artificial antifreeze polypeptides: alpha-helical peptides with KAAK motifs have antifreeze and ice crystal morphology modifying properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Laursen, R A

    1999-07-23

    Antifreeze polypeptides from fish are generally thought to inhibit ice crystal growth by specific adsorption onto ice surfaces and preventing addition of water molecules to the ice lattice. Recent studies have suggested that this adsorption results from hydrogen bonding through the side chains of polar amino acids as well as hydrophobic interactions between the non-polar domains on the ice-binding side of antifreeze polypeptides and the clathrate-like surfaces of ice. In order to better understand the activity of one of the antifreeze polypeptide families, namely the alpha-helical type I antifreeze polypeptides, four alpha-helical peptides having sequences not directly analogous to those of known antifreeze polypeptides and containing only positively charged and non-polar side chains were synthesized. Two peptides with regularly spaced lysine residues, GAAKAAKAAAAAAAKAAKAAAAAAAKAAKAAGGY-NH2 and GAALKAAKAAAAAALKAAKAAAAAALKAAKAAGGY-NH2, showed antifreeze activity, albeit weaker than seen in natural antifreeze polypeptides, by the criteria of freezing point depression (thermal hysteresis) and ice crystal modification to a hexagonal trapezohedron. Peptides with irregular spacing of Lys residues were completely inactive. Up to now, lysine residues have not been generally associated with antifreeze activity, though they have been implicated in some antifreeze polypeptides. This work also shows that lysine residues in themselves, when properly positioned on an alpha-helical polyalanine scaffold, have all the requisite properties needed for such an activity.

  7. alpha-Ketobutyrate metabolism in perfused rat liver: regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate decarboxylation and effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, D S; Olson, M S

    1985-11-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate were studied using perfused livers from fasted rats. The production of 14CO2 from alpha-keto-[1-14C]butyrate increased monotonically while the production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate was biphasic as the perfusate concentration of alpha-ketobutyrate was increased. The biphasic gluconeogenic response using alpha-ketobutyrate as the gluconeogenic precursor was similar to that observed with propionate. The decarboxylation of alpha-ketobutyrate was found to be exquisitely sensitive to the effects of the monocarboxylate transport inhibitor, alpha-cyanocinnamate. Infusion of beta-hydroxybutyrate caused a substantial inhibition of alpha-ketobutyrate decarboxylation while dichloroacetate, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor, did not stimulate the metabolism of alpha-ketobutyrate but was inhibitory. The effects of alpha-ketobutyrate infusion on pyruvate decarboxylation were tested and it was found that at low perfusate pyruvate concentrations (ca. 0.25 mM) increasing alpha-ketobutyrate led to increasing inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation, while at high perfusate pyruvate concentrations (ca. 2.5 mM) an initial inhibition was apparent which did not increase substantially with increasing alpha-ketobutyrate concentrations. The results obtained indicate that the regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate metabolism by oxidative decarboxylation differs significantly from that of pyruvate. In addition, while the rate of gluconeogenesis using alpha-ketobutyrate as a precursor was remarkably similar to that using propionate as a gluconeogenic precursor, the effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate were qualitatively different from the effects of propionate on pyruvate metabolism.

  8. alpha-Ketobutyrate metabolism in perfused rat liver: regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate decarboxylation and effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Olson, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate were studied using perfused livers from fasted rats. The production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from alpha-keto-(1-/sup 14/C)butyrate increased monotonically while the production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate was biphasic as the perfusate concentration of alpha-ketobutyrate was increased. The biphasic gluconeogenic response using alpha-ketobutyrate as the gluconeogenic precursor was similar to that observed with propionate. The effects of alpha-ketobutyrate infusion on pyruvate decarboxylation were tested and it was found that at low perfusate pyruvate concentrations increasing alpha-ketobutyrate led to increasing inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation, while at high perfusate pyruvate concentrations an initial inhibition was apparent which did not increase substantially with increasing alpha-ketobutyrate concentrations. The results obtained indicate that the regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate metabolism by oxidative decarboxylation differs significantly from that of pyruvate. In addition, while the rate of gluconeogenesis using alpha-ketobutyrate as a precursor was remarkably similar to that using propionate as a gluconeogenic precursor, the effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate were qualitatively different from the effects of propionate on pyruvate metabolism.

  9. A conserved MADS-box phosphorylation motif regulates differentiation and mitochondrial function in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mughal, W; Nguyen, L; Pustylnik, S; da Silva Rosa, S C; Piotrowski, S; Chapman, D; Du, M; Alli, N S; Grigull, J; Halayko, A J; Aliani, M; Topham, M K; Epand, R M; Hatch, G M; Pereira, T J; Kereliuk, S; McDermott, J C; Rampitsch, C; Dolinsky, V W; Gordon, J W

    2015-10-29

    Exposure to metabolic disease during fetal development alters cellular differentiation and perturbs metabolic homeostasis, but the underlying molecular regulators of this phenomenon in muscle cells are not completely understood. To address this, we undertook a computational approach to identify cooperating partners of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors, known regulators of muscle differentiation and metabolic function. We demonstrate that MEF2 and the serum response factor (SRF) collaboratively regulate the expression of numerous muscle-specific genes, including microRNA-133a (miR-133a). Using tandem mass spectrometry techniques, we identify a conserved phosphorylation motif within the MEF2 and SRF Mcm1 Agamous Deficiens SRF (MADS)-box that regulates miR-133a expression and mitochondrial function in response to a lipotoxic signal. Furthermore, reconstitution of MEF2 function by expression of a neutralizing mutation in this identified phosphorylation motif restores miR-133a expression and mitochondrial membrane potential during lipotoxicity. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that miR-133a regulates mitochondrial function through translational inhibition of a mitophagy and cell death modulating protein, called Nix. Finally, we show that rodents exposed to gestational diabetes during fetal development display muscle diacylglycerol accumulation, concurrent with insulin resistance, reduced miR-133a, and elevated Nix expression, as young adult rats. Given the diverse roles of miR-133a and Nix in regulating mitochondrial function, and proliferation in certain cancers, dysregulation of this genetic pathway may have broad implications involving insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and cancer biology.

  10. Two alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes regulating the vasopressor response have differential roles in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Oikawa, Ryo; Tomabechi, Takashi; Fukuda, Shinya; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Takeo, Satoshi; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2005-03-01

    To study the functional role of individual alpha1-adrenergic (AR) subtypes in blood pressure (BP) regulation, we used mice lacking the alpha1B-AR and/or alpha1D-AR with the same genetic background and further studied their hemodynamic and vasoconstrictive responses. Both the alpha1D-AR knockout and alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice, but not the alpha1B-AR knockout mice, had significantly (p < 0.05) lower levels of basal systolic and mean arterial BP than wild-type mice in nonanesthetized condition, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. All mutants showed a significantly (p < 0.05) reduced catecholamine-induced pressor and vasoconstriction responses. It is noteworthy that the infusion of norepinephrine did not elicit any pressor response at all in alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice. In an attempt to further examine alpha1-AR subtype, which is involved in the genesis or maintenance of hypertension, BP after salt loading was monitored by tail-cuff readings and confirmed at the endpoint by direct intra-arterial recording. After salt loading, alpha1B-AR knockout mice developed a comparable level of hypertension to wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking alpha1D-AR had significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated BP and lower levels of circulating catecholamines. Our data indicated that alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR subtypes participate cooperatively in BP regulation; however, the deletion of the functional alpha1D-AR, not alpha1B-AR, leads to an antihypertensive effect. The study shows differential contributions of alpha1B- and alpha1D-ARs in BP regulation.

  11. An Alpha Motif at Tas3 C Terminus Mediates RITS cis Spreading and Promotes Heterochromatic Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haitao; Motamedi, Mohammad R.; Yip, Calvin K.; Wang, Zhanxin; Walz, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Moazed, Danesh

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA interference (RNAi) plays a pivotal role in the formation of heterochromatin at the fission yeast centromeres. The RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex, composed of heterochromatic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), the siRNA-binding protein Ago1, the chromodomain protein Chp1, and the Ago1/Chp1-interacting protein Tas3, provides a physical tether between the RNAi and heterochromatin assembly pathways. Here, we report the structural and functional characterization of a C-terminal Tas3 α-helical motif (TAM), which self-associates into a helical polymer and is required for cis spreading of RITS in centromeric DNA regions. Site-directed mutations of key residues within the hydrophobic monomer-monomer interface disrupt Tas3-TAM polymeric self-association in vitro and result in loss of gene silencing, spreading of RITS, and a dramatic reduction in centromeric siRNAs in vivo. These results demonstrate that, in addition to the chromodomain of Chp1 and siRNA-loaded Ago1, Tas3 self-association is required for RITS spreading and efficient heterochromatic gene silencing at centromeric repeat regions. PMID:19394293

  12. Evolutionarily Conserved Dual Lysine Motif Determines the Non-Chaperone Function of Secreted Hsp90alpha in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Divya; Hou, Yingping; Tsen, Fred; Tong, Chang; O’Brien, Kathryn; Situ, Alan J.; Schmidt, Thomas; Chen, Mei; Ying, Qilong; Ulmer, Tobias S.; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Both intracellular and extracellular heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) family proteins (α and β) have been shown to support tumor progression. The tumor-promoting activity of the intracellular Hsp90 proteins is attributed to their N-terminal ATPase-driven chaperone function. What determines the extracellular function of secreted Hsp90 was unclear. Here we show that knocking out Hsp90α nullifies tumor cell abilities to migrate, invade and metastasize without affecting cell survival and growth. Knocking out Hsp90β leads to cell death. Extracellular supplementation with recombinant Hsp90α, but not Hsp90β, protein recovers the tumorigenicity of Hsp90α-knockout cells. Sequential mutagenesis identifies two evolutionarily conserved lysine residues, lys-270 and lys-277, in Hsp90α subfamily that determine the extracellular Hsp90α function. Hsp90β subfamily lacks the dual lysine motif and does not show the same extracellular function. Substitutions of gly-262 and thr-269 in Hsp90β with lysines convert Hsp90β to act as Hsp90α outside the cells. Monoclonal antibody, 1G6-D7, against the dual lysine region of secreted Hsp90α blocks de novo tumor formation and significantly inhibits expansion of already formed tumors. This study suggests an alternative therapeutic approach to selectively target the extracellular Hsp90α to the conventional approach targeting the ATPase of intracellular Hsp90α and Hsp90β in cancer. PMID:27721406

  13. Distinct Pathways Regulate Syk Protein Activation Downstream of Immune Tyrosine Activation Motif (ITAM) and hemITAM Receptors in Platelets*

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Dangelmaier, Carol; Eble, Johannes A.; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Kahn, Mark; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase pathways are known to play an important role in the activation of platelets. In particular, the GPVI and CLEC-2 receptors are known to activate Syk upon tyrosine phosphorylation of an immune tyrosine activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM, respectively. However, unlike GPVI, the CLEC-2 receptor contains only one tyrosine motif in the intracellular domain. The mechanisms by which this receptor activates Syk are not completely understood. In this study, we identified a novel signaling mechanism in CLEC-2-mediated Syk activation. CLEC-2-mediated, but not GPVI-mediated, platelet activation and Syk phosphorylation were abolished by inhibition of PI3K, which demonstrates that PI3K regulates Syk downstream of CLEC-2. Ibrutinib, a Tec family kinase inhibitor, also completely abolished CLEC-2-mediated aggregation and Syk phosphorylation in human and murine platelets. Furthermore, embryos lacking both Btk and Tec exhibited cutaneous edema associated with blood-filled vessels in a typical lymphatic pattern similar to CLEC-2 or Syk-deficient embryos. Thus, our data show, for the first time, that PI3K and Tec family kinases play a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation and Syk phosphorylation downstream of the CLEC-2 receptor. PMID:25767114

  14. Phosphoinositides differentially regulate alpha-actinin flexibility and function.

    PubMed

    Corgan, Anne Marie; Singleton, CoreyAyne; Santoso, Cynthia B; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2004-03-15

    Alpha-actinin is a cell-adhesion and cytoskeletal protein that bundles actin microfilaments and links these filaments directly to integrin-adhesion receptors. Phosphoinositides bind to and regulate the interaction of a-actinin with actin filaments and integrin receptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 inhibits and disrupts a-actinin-bundling activity, whereas PtdIns(4,5)P2 can only inhibit activity. In addition, a protease-sensitivity assay was developed to examine the flexibility of the linker region between the actin-binding domain and the spectrin repeats of a-actinin. Both phosphoinositides influenced the extent of proteolysis and the cleavage sites. PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding decreased the proteolysis of a-actinin, suggesting a role in stabilizing the structure of the protein. In contrast, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding enhanced a-actinin proteolysis, indicating an increase in the flexibility of the protein. Furthermore, phosphoinositide binding influenced the proteolysis of the N- and C-terminal domains of a-actinin, indicating regulation of structure within both domains. These results support the hypothesis that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 differentially regulate a-actinin function by modulating the structure and flexibility of the protein.

  15. Determinants of the higher order association of the restriction factor TRIM5alpha and other tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Yeung, Darwin F; Fiegen, Ann M; Sodroski, Joseph

    2011-08-12

    Many tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins self-associate, forming dimers and higher order complexes. For example, dimers of TRIM5α, a host factor that restricts retrovirus infection, assemble into higher order arrays on the surface of the viral capsid, resulting in an increase in avidity. Here we show that the higher order association of different TRIM proteins exhibits a wide range of efficiencies. Homologous association (self-association) was more efficient than the heterologous association of different TRIM proteins, indicating that specificity determinants of higher order self-association exist. To investigate the structural determinants of higher order self-association, we studied TRIM mutants and chimeras. These studies revealed the following: 1) the RING domain contributes to the efficiency of higher order self-association, which enhances the binding of TRIM5α to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) capsid; 2) the RING and B-box 2 domains work together as a homologous unit to promote higher order association of dimers; 3) dimerization is probably required for efficient higher order self-association; 4) the Linker 2 region contributes to higher order self-association, independently of effects of Linker 2 changes on TRIM dimerization; and 5) for efficiently self-associating TRIM proteins, the B30.2(SPRY) domain is not required for higher order self-association. These results support a model in which both ends of the core TRIM dimer (RING-B-box 2 at one end and Linker 2 at the other) contribute to the formation of higher order arrays.

  16. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  17. Partnership of PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rhee, James; Ge, Hongfei; Yang, Wenli; Fan, Melina; Handschin, Christoph; Cooper, Marcus; Lin, Jiandie; Li, Cai; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2006-05-26

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a transcriptional coactivator involved in several aspects of energy metabolism. It is induced or activated under different stimuli in a highly tissue-specific manner and subsequently partners with certain transcription factors in those tissues to execute various biological programs. In the fasted liver, PGC-1alpha is induced and interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) and other transcription factors to activate gluconeogenesis and increase hepatic glucose output. Given the broad spectrum of liver genes responsive to HNF4alpha, we sought to determine those that were specifically targeted by the combination of PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha. Coexpression of these two molecules in murine stem cells reveals a high induction of mRNA for apolipoproteins A-IV and C-II. Forced expression of PGC-1alpha in mouse and human hepatoma cells increases the mRNA of a subset of apolipoproteins implicated in very low density lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism, including apolipoproteins A-IV, C-II, and C-III. Coactivation of the apoC-III/A-IV promoter region by PGC-1alpha occurs through a highly conserved HNF4alpha response element, the loss of which completely abolishes activation by PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha. Adenoviral infusion of PGC-1alpha into live mice increases hepatic expression of apolipoproteins A-IV, C-II, and C-III and increases serum and very low density lipoprotein triglyceride levels. Conversely, knock down of PGC-1alpha in vivo causes a decrease in both apolipoprotein expression and serum triglyceride levels. These data point to a crucial role for the PGC-1alpha/HNF4alpha partnership in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism.

  18. Structure-Specific Nucleic Acid Recognition by L-motifs And Their Diverse Roles in Expression And Regulation Of The Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    The high-mobility group (HMG) domain containing proteins regulate transcription, DNA replication and recombination. They adopt L-shaped folds and are structure-specific DNA binding motifs. Here, I define the L-motif super-family that consists of DNA-binding HMG-box proteins and the L-motif of the histone mRNA binding domain of Stem-Loop Binding Protein (SLBP). The SLBP L-motif and HMG-box domains adopt similar L-shaped folds with three α-helices and two or three small hydrophobic cores that stabilize the overall fold, but have very different and distinct modes of nucleic acid recognition. A comparison of the structure, dynamics, protein-protein and nucleic acid interactions, and regulation by PTMs of the SLBP and the HMG-box L-motifs reveals the versatile and diverse modes by which L-motifs utilize their surfaces for structure-specific recognition of nucleic acids to regulate gene expression. PMID:25748361

  19. SARM1-specific motifs in the TIR domain enable NAD+ loss and regulate injury-induced SARM1 activation.

    PubMed

    Summers, Daniel W; Gibson, Daniel A; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-10-11

    Axon injury in response to trauma or disease stimulates a self-destruction program that promotes the localized clearance of damaged axon segments. Sterile alpha and Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR) motif-containing protein 1 (SARM1) is an evolutionarily conserved executioner of this degeneration cascade, also known as Wallerian degeneration; however, the mechanism of SARM1-dependent neuronal destruction is still obscure. SARM1 possesses a TIR domain that is necessary for SARM1 activity. In other proteins, dimerized TIR domains serve as scaffolds for innate immune signaling. In contrast, dimerization of the SARM1 TIR domain promotes consumption of the essential metabolite NAD(+) and induces neuronal destruction. This activity is unique to the SARM1 TIR domain, yet the structural elements that enable this activity are unknown. In this study, we identify fundamental properties of the SARM1 TIR domain that promote NAD(+) loss and axon degeneration. Dimerization of the TIR domain from the Caenorhabditis elegans SARM1 ortholog TIR-1 leads to NAD(+) loss and neuronal death, indicating these activities are an evolutionarily conserved feature of SARM1 function. Detailed analysis of sequence homology identifies canonical TIR motifs as well as a SARM1-specific (SS) loop that are required for NAD(+) loss and axon degeneration. Furthermore, we identify a residue in the SARM1 BB loop that is dispensable for TIR activity yet required for injury-induced activation of full-length SARM1, suggesting that SARM1 function requires multidomain interactions. Indeed, we identify a physical interaction between the autoinhibitory N terminus and the TIR domain of SARM1, revealing a previously unrecognized direct connection between these domains that we propose mediates autoinhibition and activation upon injury.

  20. SARM1-specific motifs in the TIR domain enable NAD+ loss and regulate injury-induced SARM1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Daniel W.; Gibson, Daniel A.; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury in response to trauma or disease stimulates a self-destruction program that promotes the localized clearance of damaged axon segments. Sterile alpha and Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR) motif-containing protein 1 (SARM1) is an evolutionarily conserved executioner of this degeneration cascade, also known as Wallerian degeneration; however, the mechanism of SARM1-dependent neuronal destruction is still obscure. SARM1 possesses a TIR domain that is necessary for SARM1 activity. In other proteins, dimerized TIR domains serve as scaffolds for innate immune signaling. In contrast, dimerization of the SARM1 TIR domain promotes consumption of the essential metabolite NAD+ and induces neuronal destruction. This activity is unique to the SARM1 TIR domain, yet the structural elements that enable this activity are unknown. In this study, we identify fundamental properties of the SARM1 TIR domain that promote NAD+ loss and axon degeneration. Dimerization of the TIR domain from the Caenorhabditis elegans SARM1 ortholog TIR-1 leads to NAD+ loss and neuronal death, indicating these activities are an evolutionarily conserved feature of SARM1 function. Detailed analysis of sequence homology identifies canonical TIR motifs as well as a SARM1-specific (SS) loop that are required for NAD+ loss and axon degeneration. Furthermore, we identify a residue in the SARM1 BB loop that is dispensable for TIR activity yet required for injury-induced activation of full-length SARM1, suggesting that SARM1 function requires multidomain interactions. Indeed, we identify a physical interaction between the autoinhibitory N terminus and the TIR domain of SARM1, revealing a previously unrecognized direct connection between these domains that we propose mediates autoinhibition and activation upon injury. PMID:27671644

  1. Do products of the myc proto-oncogene play a role in transcriptional regulation of the prothymosin alpha gene?

    PubMed Central

    Mol, P C; Wang, R H; Batey, D W; Lee, L A; Dang, C V; Berger, S L

    1995-01-01

    The Myc protein has been reported to activate transcription of the rat prothymosin alpha gene by binding to an enhancer element or E box (CACGTG) located in the first intron (S. Gaubatz et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:3853-3862, 1994). The human prothymosin alpha gene contains two such motifs: in the promoter region at kb -1.2 and in intron 1, approximately 2 kb downstream of the transcriptional start site in a region which otherwise bears little homology to the rat gene. Using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter constructs driven either by the 5-kb human prothymosin alpha promoter or by a series of truncated promoters, we showed that removal of the E-box sequence had no effect on transient expression of CAT activity in mouse L cells. When intron 1 of the prothymosin alpha gene was inserted into the most extensive promoter construct downstream of the CAT coding region, a diminution in transcription, which remained virtually unchanged upon disruption of the E boxes, was observed. CAT constructs driven by the native prothymosin alpha promoter or the native promoter and intron were indifferent to Myc; equivalent CAT activity was observed in the presence of ectopic normal or mutant Myc genes. Similarly, expression of a transiently transfected wild-type prothymosin alpha gene as the reporter was not affected by a repertoire of myc-derived genes, including myc itself and dominant or recessive negative myc mutants. In COS-1 cells, equivalent amounts of the protein were produced from transfected prothymosin alpha genes regardless of whether genomic E boxes were disrupted, intron 1 was removed, or a repertoire of myc-derived genes was included in the transfection cocktail. More importantly, cotransfection of a dominant negative Max gene failed to reduce transcription of the endogenous prothymosin alpha gene in COS cells or the wild-type transfected gene in COS or L cells. Taken together, the data do not support the idea that Myc activates transcription of the

  2. Analysis of a cAMP regulated coactivator family reveals an alternative phosphorylation motif for AMPK family members

    PubMed Central

    Moresco, James J.; Vaughan, Joan M.; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Yates, John R.; Montminy, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP stimulates cellular gene expression via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB and through dephosphorylation of the cAMP-responsive transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs). Under basal conditions, CRTCs are phosphorylated by members of the AMPK family of Ser/Thr kinases and sequestered in the cytoplasm via a phosphorylation-dependent association with 14-3-3 proteins. Increases in cAMP promote the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of CRTCs, where they bind to CREB and stimulate relevant target genes. Although they share considerable sequence homology, members of the CRTC family exert non-overlapping effects on cellular gene expression through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Here we show that the three CRTCs exhibit distinct patterns of 14-3-3 binding at three conserved sites corresponding to S70, S171, and S275 (in CRTC2). S171 functions as the gatekeeper site for 14-3-3 binding; it acts cooperatively with S275 in stabilizing this interaction following its phosphorylation by the cAMP-responsive SIK and the cAMP-nonresponsive MARK kinases. Although S171 contains a consensus recognition site for phosphorylation by AMPK family members, S70 and S275 carry variant motifs (MNTGGS275LPDL), lacking basic residues that are otherwise critical for SIK/MARK recognition as well as 14-3-3 binding. Correspondingly, the activity of these motifs differs between CRTC family members. As the variant (SLPDL) motif is present and apparently phosphorylated in other mammalian proteins, our studies suggest that the regulation of cellular targets by AMPK family members is more extensive than previously appreciated. PMID:28235073

  3. The Golgi-localization of yeast Emp47p depends on its di-lysine motif but is not affected by the ret1-1 mutation in alpha-COP

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae EMP47 gene encodes a nonessential type-I transmembrane protein with sequence homology to a class of intracellular lectins defined by ERGIC-53 and VIP36. The 12-amino acid COOH-terminal cytoplasmic tail of Emp47p ends in the sequence KTKLL, which conforms with the consensus for di-lysine-based ER-localization signals. Despite the presence of this motif, Emp47p was shown to be a Golgi protein at steady-state. The di-lysine motif of Emp47p was functional when transplanted onto Ste2p, a plasma membrane protein, conferring ER localization. Nevertheless, the di-lysine motif was required for Golgi-localization of Emp47p and showed the same charge- independent, position-dependent characteristics of other di-lysine motifs. Alpha-COP has been shown to be required for ER localization of di-lysine-tagged proteins. Consistent with this finding, the Ste2p- Emp47p hybrid protein was mislocalized to the cell surface in the alpha- COP mutant, ret1-1. Surprisingly, the Golgi-localization of Emp47p was unaffected by the ret1-1 mutation. To investigate whether Emp47p undergoes retrograde transport from the Golgi to the ER like other di- lysine-tagged proteins we developed an assay to measure this step after block of forward transport in a sec12 mutant. Under these conditions retrograde transport led to a specific redistribution of Emp47p from the Golgi to the ER. This recycling occurred from a Golgi subcompartment containing alpha 1,3 mannose-modified oligosaccharides suggesting that it originated from a medial-or later Golgi compartment. Thus Emp47p cycles between the Golgi apparatus and the ER and requires a di-lysine motif for its alpha-COP-independent, steady state localization in the Golgi. PMID:7490292

  4. Mapping of transcription factor motifs in active chromatin identifies IRF5 as key regulator in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kreher, Stephan; Bouhlel, M. Amine; Cauchy, Pierre; Lamprecht, Björn; Li, Shuang; Grau, Michael; Hummel, Franziska; Köchert, Karl; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna; Hummel, Michael; Hiscott, John; Wenzel, Sören-Sebastian; Lenz, Peter; Schneider, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Scheidereit, Claus; Giefing, Maciej; Siebert, Reiner; Rajewsky, Klaus; Lenz, Georg; Cockerill, Peter N.; Janz, Martin; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated transcription factor (TF) activities are commonly observed in hematopoietic malignancies. Understanding tumorigenesis therefore requires determining the function and hierarchical role of individual TFs. To identify TFs central to lymphomagenesis, we identified lymphoma type-specific accessible chromatin by global mapping of DNaseI hypersensitive sites and analyzed enriched TF-binding motifs in these regions. Applying this unbiased approach to classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a common B-cell–derived lymphoma with a complex pattern of deregulated TFs, we discovered interferon regulatory factor (IRF) sites among the top enriched motifs. High-level expression of the proinflammatory TF IRF5 was specific to HL cells and crucial for their survival. Furthermore, IRF5 initiated a regulatory cascade in human non-Hodgkin B-cell lines and primary murine B cells by inducing the TF AP-1 and cooperating with NF-κB to activate essential characteristic features of HL. Our strategy efficiently identified a lymphoma type-specific key regulator and uncovered a tumor promoting role of IRF5. PMID:25288773

  5. Mapping of transcription factor motifs in active chromatin identifies IRF5 as key regulator in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kreher, Stephan; Bouhlel, M Amine; Cauchy, Pierre; Lamprecht, Björn; Li, Shuang; Grau, Michael; Hummel, Franziska; Köchert, Karl; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna; Hummel, Michael; Hiscott, John; Wenzel, Sören-Sebastian; Lenz, Peter; Schneider, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Scheidereit, Claus; Giefing, Maciej; Siebert, Reiner; Rajewsky, Klaus; Lenz, Georg; Cockerill, Peter N; Janz, Martin; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2014-10-21

    Deregulated transcription factor (TF) activities are commonly observed in hematopoietic malignancies. Understanding tumorigenesis therefore requires determining the function and hierarchical role of individual TFs. To identify TFs central to lymphomagenesis, we identified lymphoma type-specific accessible chromatin by global mapping of DNaseI hypersensitive sites and analyzed enriched TF-binding motifs in these regions. Applying this unbiased approach to classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a common B-cell-derived lymphoma with a complex pattern of deregulated TFs, we discovered interferon regulatory factor (IRF) sites among the top enriched motifs. High-level expression of the proinflammatory TF IRF5 was specific to HL cells and crucial for their survival. Furthermore, IRF5 initiated a regulatory cascade in human non-Hodgkin B-cell lines and primary murine B cells by inducing the TF AP-1 and cooperating with NF-κB to activate essential characteristic features of HL. Our strategy efficiently identified a lymphoma type-specific key regulator and uncovered a tumor promoting role of IRF5.

  6. Estrogen-mediated regulation of Igf1 transcription and uterine growth involves direct binding of estrogen receptor alpha to estrogen-responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Yin; Li, Leping; Korach, Kenneth S

    2010-01-22

    Estrogen enables uterine proliferation, which depends on synthesis of the IGF1 growth factor. This proliferation and IGF1 synthesis requires the estrogen receptor (ER), which binds directly to target DNA sequences (estrogen-responsive elements or EREs), or interacts with other transcription factors, such as AP1, to impact transcription. We observe neither uterine growth nor an increase in Igf1 transcript in a mouse with a DNA-binding mutated ER alpha (KIKO), indicating that both Igf1 regulation and uterine proliferation require the DNA binding function of the ER. We identified several potential EREs in the Igf1 gene, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed ER alpha binding to these EREs in wild type but not KIKO chromatin. STAT5 is also reported to regulate Igf1; uterine Stat5a transcript is increased by estradiol (E(2)), but not in KIKO or alpha ERKO uteri, indicating ER alpha- and ERE-dependent regulation. ER alpha binds to a potential Stat5a ERE. We hypothesize that E(2) increases Stat5a transcript through ERE binding; that ER alpha, either alone or together with STAT5, then acts to increase Igf1 transcription; and that the resulting lack of IGF1 impairs KIKO uterine growth. Treatment with exogenous IGF1, alone or in combination with E(2), induces proliferation in wild type but not KIKO uteri, indicating that IGF1 replacement does not rescue the KIKO proliferative response. Together, these observations suggest in contrast to previous in vitro studies of IGF-1 regulation involving AP1 motifs that direct ER alpha-DNA interaction is required to increase Igf1 transcription. Additionally, full ER alpha function is needed to mediate other cellular signals of the growth factor for uterine growth.

  7. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Aizawa, Ryo; Miyazono, Agasa; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Morimura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM gene expression. {yields} Inhibition of POEM gene expression is caused by NF-{kappa}B activation by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Over-expression of POEM recovers inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-{alpha}-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-{alpha} in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-{alpha}-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM expression through the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}.

  8. Membrane targeting of TIRAP is negatively regulated by phosphorylation in its phosphoinositide-binding motif

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaolin; Xiong, Wen; Xiao, Shuyan; Tang, Tuo-Xian; Ellena, Jeffrey F.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Capelluto, Daniel G. S.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-activated Toll-like receptors (TLRs), such as TLR2 and TLR4, dimerize and move laterally across the plasma membrane to phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate-enriched domains. At these sites, TLRs interact with the TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP), triggering a signaling cascade that leads to innate immune responses. Membrane recruitment of TIRAP is mediated by its phosphoinositide (PI)-binding motif (PBM). We show that TIRAP PBM transitions from a disordered to a helical conformation in the presence of either zwitterionic micelles or monodispersed PIs. TIRAP PBM bound PIs through basic and nonpolar residues with high affinity, favoring a more ordered structure. TIRAP is phosphorylated at Thr28 within its PBM, which leads to its ubiquitination and degradation. We demonstrate that phosphorylation distorts the helical structure of TIRAP PBM, reducing PI interactions and cell membrane targeting. Our study provides the basis for TIRAP membrane insertion and the mechanism by which it is removed from membranes to avoid sustained innate immune responses. PMID:28225045

  9. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  10. A G-Box-Like Motif Is Necessary for Transcriptional Regulation by Circadian Pseudo-Response Regulators in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Linsey; Liu, Ming-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORs (PRRs) play overlapping and distinct roles in maintaining circadian rhythms and regulating diverse biological processes, including the photoperiodic control of flowering, growth, and abiotic stress responses. PRRs act as transcriptional repressors and associate with chromatin via their conserved C-terminal CCT (CONSTANS, CONSTANS-like, and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 [TOC1/PRR1]) domains by a still-poorly understood mechanism. Here, we identified genome-wide targets of PRR9 using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) and compared them with PRR7, PRR5, and TOC1/PRR1 ChIP-seq data. We found that PRR binding sites are located within genomic regions of low nucleosome occupancy and high DNase I hypersensitivity. Moreover, conserved noncoding regions among Brassicaceae species are enriched around PRR binding sites, indicating that PRRs associate with functionally relevant cis-regulatory regions. The PRRs shared a significant number of binding regions, and our results indicate that they coordinately restrict the expression of target genes to around dawn. A G-box-like motif was overrepresented at PRR binding regions, and we showed that this motif is necessary for mediating transcriptional regulation of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and PRR9 by the PRRs. Our results further our understanding of how PRRs target specific promoters and provide an extensive resource for studying circadian regulatory networks in plants. PMID:26586835

  11. Differential regulation of constitutive androstane receptor expression by hepatocyte nuclear factor4alpha isoforms.

    PubMed

    Pascussi, Jean Marc; Robert, Agnes; Moreau, Amelie; Ramos, Jeanne; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Navarro, Francis; Blanc, Pierre; Assenat, Eric; Maurel, Patrick; Vilarem, Marie Jose

    2007-05-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) controls the metabolism and elimination of endogenous and exogenous toxic compounds by up-regulating a battery of genes. In this work, we analyzed the expression of human CAR (hCAR) in normal liver during development and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the effect of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha isoforms (HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha7) on the hCAR gene promoter. By performing functional analysis of hCAR 5'-deletions including mutants, chromatin immunoprecipitation in human hepatocytes, electromobility shift and cotransfection assays, we identified a functional and species-conserved HNF4alpha response element (DR1: ccAGGCCTtTGCCCTga) at nucleotide -144. Both HNF4alpha isoforms bind to this element with similar affinity. However, HNF4alpha1 strongly enhanced hCAR promoter activity whereas HNF4alpha7 was a poor activator and acted as a repressor of HNF4alpha1-mediated transactivation of the hCAR promoter. PGC1alpha stimulated both HNF4alpha1-mediated and HNF4alpha7-mediated hCAR transactivation to the same extent, whereas SRC1 exhibited a marked specificity for HNF4alpha1. Transduction of human hepatocytes by HNF4alpha7-expressing lentivirus confirmed this finding. In addition, we observed a positive correlation between CAR and HNF4alpha1 mRNA levels in human liver samples during development, and an inverse correlation between CAR and HNF4alpha7 mRNA levels in HCC. These observations suggest that HNF4alpha1 positively regulates hCAR expression in normal developing and adult livers, whereas HNF4alpha7 represses hCAR gene expression in HCC.

  12. The LD4 motif of paxillin regulates cell spreading and motility through an interaction with paxillin kinase linker (PKL).

    PubMed

    West, K A; Zhang, H; Brown, M C; Nikolopoulos, S N; Riedy, M C; Horwitz, A F; Turner, C E

    2001-07-09

    The small GTPases of the Rho family are intimately involved in integrin-mediated changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany cell spreading and motility. The exact means by which the Rho family members elicit these changes is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the interaction of paxillin via its LD4 motif with the putative ARF-GAP paxillin kinase linker (PKL) (Turner et al., 1999), is critically involved in the regulation of Rac-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany cell spreading and motility. Overexpression of a paxillin LD4 deletion mutant (paxillinDeltaLD4) in CHO.K1 fibroblasts caused the generation of multiple broad lamellipodia. These morphological changes were accompanied by an increase in cell protrusiveness and random motility, which correlated with prolonged activation of Rac. In contrast, directional motility was inhibited. These alterations in morphology and motility were dependent on a paxillin-PKL interaction. In cells overexpressing paxillinDeltaLD4 mutants, PKL localization to focal contacts was disrupted, whereas that of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin was not. In addition, FAK activity during spreading was not compromised by deletion of the paxillin LD4 motif. Furthermore, overexpression of PKL mutants lacking the paxillin-binding site (PKLDeltaPBS2) induced phenotypic changes reminiscent of paxillinDeltaLD4 mutant cells. These data suggest that the paxillin association with PKL is essential for normal integrin-mediated cell spreading, and locomotion and that this interaction is necessary for the regulation of Rac activity during these events.

  13. A Pyranose-2-Phosphate Motif Is Responsible for Both Antibiotic Import and Quorum-Sensing Regulation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    El Sahili, Abbas; Li, Si-Zhe; Lang, Julien; Virus, Cornelia; Planamente, Sara; Ahmar, Mohammed; Guimaraes, Beatriz G.; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Vigouroux, Armelle; Soulère, Laurent; Reader, John; Queneau, Yves; Faure, Denis; Moréra, Solange

    2015-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) in association with ABC transporters select and import a wide variety of ligands into bacterial cytoplasm. They can also take up toxic molecules, as observed in the case of the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58. This organism contains a PBP called AccA that mediates the import of the antibiotic agrocin 84, as well as the opine agrocinopine A that acts as both a nutrient and a signalling molecule for the dissemination of virulence genes through quorum-sensing. Here, we characterized the binding mode of AccA using purified agrocin 84 and synthetic agrocinopine A by X-ray crystallography at very high resolution and performed affinity measurements. Structural and affinity analyses revealed that AccA recognizes an uncommon and specific motif, a pyranose-2-phosphate moiety which is present in both imported molecules via the L-arabinopyranose moiety in agrocinopine A and the D-glucopyranose moiety in agrocin 84. We hypothesized that AccA is a gateway allowing the import of any compound possessing a pyranose-2-phosphate motif at one end. This was structurally and functionally confirmed by experiments using four synthetic compounds: agrocinopine 3’-O-benzoate, L-arabinose-2-isopropylphosphate, L-arabinose-2-phosphate and D-glucose-2-phosphate. By combining affinity measurements and in vivo assays, we demonstrated that both L-arabinose-2-phosphate and D-glucose-2-phosphate, which are the AccF mediated degradation products of agrocinopine A and agrocin 84 respectively, interact with the master transcriptional regulator AccR and activate the quorum-sensing signal synthesis and Ti plasmid transfer in A. tumefaciens C58. Our findings shed light on the role of agrocinopine and antibiotic agrocin 84 on quorum-sensing regulation in A. tumefaciens and reveal how the PBP AccA acts as vehicle for the importation of both molecules by means of a key-recognition motif. It also opens future possibilities for the rational design of

  14. Furin gene (fur) regulation in differentiating human megakaryoblastic Dami cells: involvement of the proximal GATA recognition motif in the P1 promoter and impact on the maturation of furin substrates.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Marie-Hélène; Grondin, Francine; Cayer, Pauline; McDonald, Patrick P; Dubois, Claire M

    2002-11-15

    The convertase furin is involved in the maturation of key growth/aggregation mediators synthesized by the platelet producers, megakaryocytes, but the regulation of furin in these cells remains unknown. Computer-assisted search of the furin promoter sequence revealed multiple potential binding motifs for GATA-1, suggesting that furin is expressed and regulated in these cells. Using megakaryoblastic Dami cells, we observed that fur mRNA expression increased gradually on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced differentiation, reaching maximum levels (8.3-fold increase) at 10 days. Transient transfections with P1, P1A, or P1B fur-LUC-promoter constructs revealed that in Dami cells, the P1 promoter is the strongest and the most sensitive to forced expression of GATA-1. Coexpression of GATA-1 and its comodulator, Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1), resulted in a cooperative increase in P1 activity. Deletion analysis indicated that important GATA-1-regulated sequences are located in the most proximal region of the P1 promoter. Further analysis revealed 2 potential GATA-binding motifs at positions -66 and +62. Point mutation of each of the 2 motifs indicated that the intactness of the first GATA site is required for full basal and GATA-1-stimulated promoter activity. Finally, the inhibition of furin activity through gene transfer of the inhibitor alpha1-AT-PDX led to a block in maturation of the furin substrates transforming growth factor-beta1 and platelet-derived growth factor. Taken together, these results indicate that the most proximal GATA element in the P1 promoter is needed for fur gene expression in megakaryoblastic cells. They also suggest that proper regulation of the fur gene in megakaryocytes has an impact on the activation of furin substrates involved in megakaryocyte maturation and platelet functions.

  15. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  16. The inter-alpha-inhibitor family: from structure to regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Salier, J P; Rouet, P; Raguenez, G; Daveau, M

    1996-01-01

    Inter-alpha-inhibitor (IalphaI) and related molecules, collectively referred to as the IalphaI family, are a group of plasma protease inhibitors. They display attractive features such as precursor polypeptides that give rise to mature chains with quite distinct fates and functions, and inter-chain glycosaminoglycan bonds within the various molecules. The discovery of an ever growing number of such molecules has raised pertinent questions about their pathophysiological functions. The knowledge of this family has long been structure-oriented, whereas the structure/function and structure/regulation relationships of the family members and their genes have been largely ignored. These relationships are now being elucidated in events such as gene transcription, precursor processing, changes in plasma protein levels in health and disease and binding capacities that involve hyaluronan as well as other plasma proteins as ligands. This review presents some recent progress made in these fields that paves the way for an understanding of the functions of IalphaI family members in vivo. Finally, given the wealth of heterogeneous, complicated and sometimes contradictory nomenclatures and acronyms currently in use for this family, a new, uniform, nomenclature is proposed for IalphaI family genes, precursor polypeptides and assembled proteins. PMID:8670091

  17. Cytoskeletal polarization of T cells is regulated by an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lowin-Kropf, B; Shapiro, V S; Weiss, A

    1998-02-23

    Binding of a T cell to an appropriate antigen-presenting cell (APC) induces the rapid reorientation of the T cell cytoskeleton and secretory apparatus towards the cell-cell contact site in a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and peptide/major histocompatibility complex-dependent process. Such T cell polarization directs the delivery of cytokines and cytotoxic mediators towards the APC and contributes to the highly selective and specific action of effector T cells. To study the signaling pathways that regulate cytoskeletal rearrangements in T lymphocytes, we set up a conjugate formation assay using Jurkat T cells as effectors and cell-sized latex beads coated with various antibodies as artificial APCs. Here, we report that beads coated with antibodies specific for the TCR-CD3 complex were sufficient to induce T cell polarization towards the bead attachment site, as judged by reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and localized actin polymerization. Thus, these cytoskeletal changes did not depend on activation of additional coreceptors. Moreover, single subunits of the TCR complex, namely TCR-zeta and CD3epsilon, were equally effective in inducing cytoskeletal polarization. However, mutagenesis of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs), present three times in TCR-zeta and once in CD3epsilon, revealed that the induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements required the presence of at least one intact ITAM. In agreement with this result, lack of functional Lck, the protein tyrosine kinase responsible for ITAM phosphorylation, abolished both MTOC reorientation and polarized actin polymerization. Both inhibitor and transient overexpression studies demonstrated that MTOC reorientation could occur in the absence of Ras activation. Our results suggest that APC-induced T cell polarization is a TCR-mediated event that is coupled to the TCR by the same signaling motif as TCR-induced gene activation, but diverges in its distal signaling

  18. Overexpression of the chimeric gene of the floral regulator CONSTANS and the EAR motif repressor causes late flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takase, Tomoyuki; Yasuhara, Masahiro; Geekiyanage, Sudarshanee; Ogura, Yasunobu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2007-06-01

    The transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) plays a central role in the photoperiod pathway by integrating the circadian clock and light signals into a control for flowering time. CO induces flowering locus T (FT) and suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1) expression, and thereby promotes flowering. The ethylene-responsive element-binding factor associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif was used to construct a CONSTANS-EAR motif repressor gene (CO-Rep), which was overexpressed in Arabidopsis under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in order to test its potential for flowering time regulation under inductive long day conditions. Morphological abnormalities in the root and cotyledon formation, and dwarfness were frequently seen in the transgenic plants, suggesting that the proper timing, location, and/or level of CO-Rep expression are important for its application. In morphologically normal CO-Rep plants, both bolting and flowering times under inductive long day conditions were twofold greater than in controls. As a result of the delay in flowering, rosette leaf number at bolting, and rosette and cauline leaf number at flowering increased significantly in CO-Rep plants. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that FT expression was greatly reduced in the CO-Rep plants, while endogenous CO and SOC1 expression levels were not markedly affected. Conservation of CO among a diverse range of plant species, and its involvement in a variety of photoperiodic responses including flowering, suggests a high potential for use of CO-Rep to manipulate such responses in an agronomically desirable manner.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1alpha increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1alpha and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1alpha also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1alpha is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1alpha downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1alpha in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage.

  20. Delayed secondary glucocorticoid response elements. Unusual nucleotide motifs specify glucocorticoid receptor binding to transcribed regions of alpha 2u-globulin DNA.

    PubMed

    Chan, G C; Hess, P; Meenakshi, T; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Payvar, F

    1991-11-25

    Glucocorticoids stimulate the transcription of rat alpha 2u-globulin (RUG) genes. Because this induction occurs after a time lag of several hours and is blocked by inhibitors of protein synthesis, it exemplifies a delayed secondary response to steroid hormones. In this report, we show that a region of RUG-transcribed DNA (approximately +1800 to +2174) contains multiple footprint sites for glucocorticoid receptor that are, apparently, organized into at least three independent binding clusters. The DNA sequences bound by the receptor and the location of binding sites were determined. A family of sequences related to half-sites of the consensus primary glucocorticoid response element (GRE) is discernible at each cluster of sites. Compared to the consensus GRE, which contains two pseudo-palindromic hexanucleotides arranged in a tail-to-tail fashion and separated by three bases, the arrangements of hexanucleotides within this segment of RUG DNA are unusual and heterogeneous. Methylation interference of a binding cluster containing three receptor footprints demonstrates that certain guanines of the GRE-like hexanucleotides are essential for efficient receptor binding. A synthetic 29-base pair (bp) RUG element, containing one receptor footprint from this cluster, selectively binds the receptor. Within this 29-bp element, six nucleotides separate two directly repeated copies of GRE-like hexanucleotides. RUG DNA fragments containing all or part of the three binding clusters, including the 29-bp element, confer a delayed secondary hormone responsiveness upon a linked heterologous promoter and reporter gene in stably transfected cell lines. We speculate that the unusual DNA sequence motifs of the receptor-binding sites are crucial for the generation of certain delayed secondary responses.

  1. A Novel SUMO1-specific Interacting Motif in Dipeptidyl Peptidase 9 (DPP9) That Is Important for Enzymatic Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Esther; Möller, Ulrike; Sauer, Guido; Mattiroli, Francesca; Melchior, Frauke; Geiss-Friedlander, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Sumoylation affects many cellular processes by regulating the interactions of modified targets with downstream effectors. Here we identified the cytosolic dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) as a SUMO1 interacting protein. Surprisingly, DPP9 binds to SUMO1 independent of the well known SUMO interacting motif, but instead interacts with a loop involving Glu67 of SUMO1. Intriguingly, DPP9 selectively associates with SUMO1 and not SUMO2, due to a more positive charge in the SUMO1-loop. We mapped the SUMO-binding site of DPP9 to an extended arm structure, predicted to directly flank the substrate entry site. Importantly, whereas mutants in the SUMO1-binding arm are less active compared with wild-type DPP9, SUMO1 stimulates DPP9 activity. Consistent with this, silencing of SUMO1 leads to a reduced cytosolic prolyl-peptidase activity. Taken together, these results suggest that SUMO1, or more likely, a sumoylated protein, acts as an allosteric regulator of DPP9. PMID:23152501

  2. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  3. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance.

    PubMed

    Wilbert, Melissa L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chen, Stella X; Yan, Bernice Y; Nathanson, Jason L; Hutt, Kasey R; Lovci, Michael T; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-10-26

    LIN28 is a conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming, and oncogenesis. It was previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, but here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28-binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions.

  4. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance

    PubMed Central

    Wilbert, Melissa L.; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Chen, Stella X.; Yan, Bernice Y.; Nathanson, Jason L.; Hutt, Kasey R.; Lovci, Michael T.; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B.; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY LIN28 is a conserved RNA binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming and oncogenesis. Previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through cross-linking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28 binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions. PMID:22959275

  5. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-bearing receptors regulate the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-induced activation of immune competent cells.

    PubMed

    Gergely, J; Pecht, I; Sármay, G

    1999-05-03

    ITIM-bearing receptors, a family which only recently has been recognized, play a key role in the regulation of the ITAM-induced activation of immune competent cells. The mechanism of ITM-mediated regulation in various cells was recently clarified. The present review focuses on ITIM bearing membrane proteins that negatively regulate the activation of cells when co-crosslinked with ITAM containing receptors, illustrates the inhibitory processes by the negative regulation of B-, NK-, T-cells and mast cells and summarizes current views on the mechanism of ITIM-mediated inhibition.

  6. Evidence for regulation of mitotic progression through temporal phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of CK2alpha.

    PubMed

    St-Denis, Nicole A; Derksen, D Richard; Litchfield, David W

    2009-04-01

    Proper mitotic progression is crucial for maintenance of genomic integrity in proliferating cells and is regulated through an intricate series of events, including protein phosphorylation governed by a complex network of protein kinases. One kinase family implicated in the regulation of mitotic progression is protein kinase CK2, a small family of enzymes that is overexpressed in cancer and induces transformation in mice and cultured fibroblasts. CK2alpha, one isoform of the catalytic subunits of CK2, is maximally phosphorylated at four sites in nocodazole-treated cells. To investigate the effects of CK2alpha phosphorylation on mitotic progression, we generated phosphospecific antibodies against its mitotic phosphorylation sites. In U2OS cells released from S-phase arrest, these antibodies reveal that CK2alpha is most highly phosphorylated in prophase and metaphase. Phosphorylation gradually decreases during anaphase and becomes undetectable during telophase and cytokinesis. Stable expression of phosphomimetic CK2alpha (CK2alpha-4D, CK2alpha-4E) results in aberrant centrosome amplification and chromosomal segregation defects and loss of mitotic cells through mitotic catastrophe. Conversely, cells expressing nonphosphorylatable CK2alpha (CK2alpha-4A) show a decreased ability to arrest in mitosis following nocodazole treatment, suggesting involvement in the spindle assembly checkpoint. Collectively, these studies indicate that reversible phosphorylation of CK2alpha requires precise regulation to allow proper mitotic progression.

  7. Cell cycle regulation and p53 activation by protein phosphatase 2C alpha.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Paula; Ben-Meir, Daniella; Kariv-Inbal, Zehavit; Oren, Moshe; Lavi, Sara

    2003-04-18

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) dephosphorylates a broad range of substrates, regulating stress response and growth-related pathways in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We now demonstrate that PP2C alpha, a major mammalian isoform, inhibits cell growth and activates the p53 pathway. In 293 cell clones, in which PP2C alpha expression is regulated by a tetracycline-inducible promoter, PP2C alpha overexpression led to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, PP2C alpha induced the expression of endogenous p53 and the p53-responsive gene p21. Activation of the p53 pathway by PP2C alpha took place both in cells harboring endogenous p53, as well as in p53-null cells transfected with exogenous p53. Induction of PP2C alpha resulted in an increase in the overall levels of p53 protein as well as an augmentation of p53 transcription activity. The dephosphorylation activity of PP2C alpha is essential to the described phenomena, as none of these effects was detected when an enzymatically inactive PP2C alpha mutant was overexpressed. p53 plays an important role in PP2C alpha-directed cell cycle arrest and apoptosis because perturbation of p53 expression in human 293 cells by human papillomavirus E6 led to a significant increase in cell survival. The role of PP2C alpha in p53 activation is discussed.

  8. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  9. Isoform-specific regulation of adipocyte differentiation by Akt/protein kinase B{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Tucker, David F.; Kim, Chi Dae; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Bae, Sun Sik

    2008-06-20

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway tightly regulates adipose cell differentiation. Here we show that loss of Akt1/PKB{alpha} in primary mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells results in a defect of adipocyte differentiation. Adipocyte differentiation in vitro and ex vivo was restored in cells lacking both Akt1/PKB{alpha} and Akt2/PKB{beta} by ectopic expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha} but not Akt2/PKB{beta}. Akt1/PKB{alpha} was found to be the major regulator of phosphorylation and nuclear export of FoxO1, whose presence in the nucleus strongly attenuates adipocyte differentiation. Differentiation-induced cell division was significantly abrogated in Akt1/PKB{alpha}-deficient cells, but was restored after forced expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha}. Moreover, expression of p27{sup Kip1}, an inhibitor of the cell cycle, was down regulated in an Akt1/PKB{alpha}-specific manner during adipocyte differentiation. Based on these data, we suggest that the Akt1/PKB{alpha} isoform plays a major role in adipocyte differentiation by regulating FoxO1 and p27{sup Kip1}.

  10. Cloning of a yeast alpha-amylase promoter and its regulated heterologous expression

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR; Hooker, Brian S [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Daniel B [Pasco, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  11. Down-regulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) isoform in denervated rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Quintas, L E; Caricati-Neto, A; Lafayette, S S; Jurkiewicz, A; Noël, F

    2000-09-15

    In the rat vas deferens, an organ richly innervated by peripheral sympathetic neurons, we have demonstrated recently the expression of alpha(1) and alpha(2), but not alpha(3) isoforms of the alpha subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.37), a membrane-bound enzyme of vital function for living cells (Noël et al., Biochem Pharmacol 55: 1531-1535, 1998). In the present work, we characterized, qualitatively and quantitatively, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha isoforms in denervated rat vasa deferentia. [(3)H]Ouabain binding at concentrations defined for high-affinity isoforms (alpha(2) and/or alpha(3)) detected only one class of specific binding sites in control (C) and denervated (D) vas deferens. Although the dissociation constant was similar for both groups [K(d) = 138 +/- 14 nM (C) and 125 +/- 8 nM (D)], a marked decrease in density was observed after denervation [716 +/- 81 fmol.mg protein(-1) (C) and 445 +/- 34 fmol.mg protein(-1) (D), P < 0.05]. In addition, western blotting revealed that denervated vasa deferentia produce the alpha(1) and alpha(2) isoforms but not alpha(3), just as we reported for the controls previously (Noël et al., Biochem Pharmacol 55: 1531-1535, 1998). Densitometric analysis showed a decrease of the alpha(2) isoform by about 40% in denervated organs, in very good agreement with what was shown with the [(3)H]ouabain binding technique, but no significant change in alpha(1) isoform density. Truncated alpha(1) (alpha(1)T), an isoform suggested to exist in the guinea pig vas deferens, was not detected. Altogether, our results demonstrated that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) is down-regulated after sympathetic denervation of the rat vas deferens.

  12. Subunit regulation of the neuronal alpha 1A Ca2+ channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    De Waard, M; Campbell, K P

    1995-01-01

    1. Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are multi-protein complexes composed of at least three subunits: alpha 1, alpha 2 delta and beta. Ba2+ currents were recorded in Xenopus oocytes expressing the neuronal alpha 1A Ca2+ channel, using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Various subunit combinations were studied: alpha 1A, alpha 1A alpha 2 delta b, alpha 1A beta or alpha 1A alpha 2 delta b beta. 2. The alpha 1A subunit alone directs the expression of functional Ca2+ channels. It carries all the properties of the channel: gating, permeability, voltage dependence of activation and inactivation, and pharmacology. The alpha 1A channel is activated by low voltages when physiological concentrations of the permeant cation are used. Both ancillary subunits alpha 2 delta and beta induced considerable changes in the biophysical properties of the alpha 1A current. The subunit specificity of the changes in current properties was analysed for all four beta gene products by coexpressing beta 1b, beta 2a, beta 3 and beta 4. 3. All beta subunits induce a stimulation in the current amplitude, a change in inactivation kinetics, and two hyperpolarizing shifts--one in the voltage dependence of activation and a second in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation. The most significant difference in regulation among beta subunits is the induction of variable rate constants of current inactivation. Rates of inactivation were induced in the following order (fastest to slowest): beta 3 > beta 1b = beta 4 > beta 2a. 4. The alpha 2 delta b subunit does not modify the properties of alpha 1A Ca2+ channels in the absence of beta subunits. However, this subunit increases the beta-induced stimulation in current amplitude and also regulates the beta-induced change in inactivation kinetics. 5. Of all the subunit combinations tested, Ca2+ channels that included a beta subunit were the most prone to decrease in activity. It is concluded that beta subunits are the primary target for the

  13. Transcriptional regulation of human retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-{alpha}) by Wilms` tumour gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Goodyer, P.R.; Torban, E.; Dehbi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The Wilms` tumor gene encodes a 47-49 kDa transcription factor expressed in kidney, gonads and mesothelium during embryogenesis. Inherited mutations of WT1 lead to aberrant urogenital development and Wilms` tumor, but the role of WT1 in development is not fully understood. Since the human RAR-{alpha} gene contains a potential WT1 binding site at its 5{prime} end, we studied the effect of WT1 co-transfection on expression of an RAR-{alpha} promoter/CAT reporter construct in COS cells. COS cells were plated at 5X10{sup 5} cells/dish in DMEM with 10% FBS and transfected by the Ca/PO4 method with an expression plasmid containing the full-length WT1 (-/-) cDNA under the control of the CMV promoter, plasmid containing the RAR-{alpha} promoter (-519 to +36)/CAT reporter and TK/growth hormone plasmid to control for efficiency of transfection. CAT/GH activity at 48 hours was inhibited by co-transfection with increasing amounts of WT1 (-/-); maximum inhibition = 5% of control. WT1 co-transfection did not affect expression of TKGH, nor of a CMV-CAT vector. Expression of WT1 protein in tranfected COS cells was demonstrated by Western blotting. Minimal inhibiton of RAR-{alpha}/CAT activity was seen when cells were co-transfected with vectors containing WT1 deletion mutants, alternate WT1 splicing variants, or WT1 (-/-) cDNA bearing a mutation identified in a patient with Drash syndrome. Gel shift assays indicated binding of WT1 to RAR-{alpha} cDNA but not to an RAR-{alpha} deletion mutant lacking the GCGGGGGGCG site. These observations suggest that WT1 may function to regulate RAR-{alpha} expression during normal development.

  14. Human ADA3 regulates RARα transcriptional activity through direct contact between LxxLL motifs and the receptor coactivator pocket

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia-Wei; Ai, Ni; Dinh, Gia Khanh; Welsh, William J.; Chen, J. Don

    2010-01-01

    The alternation/deficiency in activation-3 (ADA3) is an essential component of the human p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) and yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) histone acetyltransferase complexes. These complexes facilitate transactivation of target genes by association with transcription factors and modification of local chromatin structure. It is known that the yeast ADA3 is required for nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transactivation in yeast cells; however, the role of mammalian ADA3 in NR signaling remains elusive. In this study, we have investigated how the human (h) ADA3 regulates retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α-mediated transactivation. We show that hADA3 interacts directly with RARα in a hormone-dependent manner and this interaction contributes to RARα transactivation. Intriguingly, this interaction involves classical LxxLL motifs in hADA3, as demonstrated by both ‘loss’ and ‘gain’ of function mutations, as well as a functional coactivator pocket of the receptor. Additionally, we show that hADA3 associates with RARα target gene promoter in a hormone-dependent manner and ADA3 knockdown impairs RARβ2 expression. Furthermore, a structural model was established to illustrate an interaction network within the ADA3/RARα complex. These results suggest that hADA3 is a bona fide transcriptional coactivator for RARα, acting through a conserved mechanism involving direct contacts between NR boxes and the receptor’s co-activator pocket. PMID:20413580

  15. NFAM1, an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing molecule that regulates B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Arase, Hisashi; Takeuchi, Arata; Yamasaki, Sho; Shiina, Ritsuko; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Sakurai, Daiju; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Arase, Noriko; Iwashima, Makio; Kitamura, Toshio; Moriya, Hideshige; Saito, Takashi

    2004-05-25

    A functional cDNA cloning system was developed by using a retrovirus library encoding CD8-chimeric proteins and a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-GFP reporter cell line to identify molecules inducing NFAT activation. By using this strategy, NFAT activating molecule 1 (NFAM1) was cloned as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing cell surface molecule belonging to the Ig superfamily and is predominantly expressed in spleen B and T cells. NFAM1 crosslinking induced ITAM phosphorylation, ZAP-70/Syk recruitment, NFAT activation, and cytokine production. In vivo overexpression of NFAM1 in bone marrow chimeras and transgenic mice induced severe impairment of early B cell development in an ITAM-dependent manner. In NFAM1-expressing B cells, B cell antigen receptor stimulation induced NFAM1 translocation to lipid raft, and NFAM1 co-crosslinking augmented B cell antigen receptor signaling. The results suggest that NFAM1 modulates B cell signaling through its ITAM, which regulates B cell development.

  16. Dual requirement for the Ig alpha immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and a conserved non-Ig alpha ITAM tyrosine in supporting Ig alpha beta-mediated B cell development.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kelly A; Ratcliffe, Michael J H

    2005-02-15

    Surface Ig (sIg) expression is a critical checkpoint during avian B cell development. Only cells that express sIg colonize bursal follicles, clonally expand, and undergo Ig diversification by gene conversion. Expression of a heterodimer, in which the extracellular and transmembrane domains of murine CD8alpha or CD8beta are fused to the cytoplasmic domains of chicken Igalpha (chIgalpha) or Igbeta, respectively (murine CD8alpha (mCD8alpha):chIgalpha + mCD8beta:chIgbeta), or an mCD8alpha:chIgalpha homodimer supported bursal B cell development as efficiently as endogenous sIg. In this study we demonstrate that B cell development, in the absence of chIgbeta, requires both the Igalpha ITAM and a conserved non-ITAM Igalpha tyrosine (Y3) that has been associated with binding to B cell linker protein (BLNK). When associated with the cytoplasmic domain of Igbeta, the Igalpha ITAM is not required for the induction of strong calcium mobilization or BLNK phosphorylation, but is still necessary to support B cell development. In contrast, mutation of the Igalpha Y3 severely compromised calcium mobilization when expressed as either a homodimer or a heterodimer with the cytoplasmic domain of Igbeta. However, coexpression of the cytoplasmic domain of Igbeta partially complemented the Igalpha Y3 mutation, rescuing higher levels of BLNK phosphorylation and, more strikingly, supporting B cell development.

  17. PPAR{alpha} is a key regulator of hepatic FGF21

    SciTech Connect

    Lundasen, Thomas; Hunt, Mary C.; Nilsson, Lisa-Mari; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Angelin, Bo; Alexson, Stefan E.H.; Rudling, Mats . E-mail: mats.rudling@cnt.ki.se

    2007-08-24

    The metabolic regulator fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has antidiabetic properties in animal models of diabetes and obesity. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we here show that the hepatic gene expression of FGF21 is regulated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). Fasting or treatment of mice with the PPAR{alpha} agonist Wy-14,643 induced FGF21 mRNA by 10-fold and 8-fold, respectively. In contrast, FGF21 mRNA was low in PPAR{alpha} deficient mice, and fasting or treatment with Wy-14,643 did not induce FGF21. Obese ob/ob mice, known to have increased PPAR{alpha} levels, displayed 12-fold increased hepatic FGF21 mRNA levels. The potential importance of PPAR{alpha} for FGF21 expression also in human liver was shown by Wy-14,643 induction of FGF21 mRNA in human primary hepatocytes, and PPAR{alpha} response elements were identified in both the human and mouse FGF21 promoters. Further studies on the mechanisms of regulation of FGF21 by PPAR{alpha} in humans will be of great interest.

  18. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Sansing, Hope A.; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Berrier, Allison L.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  19. Regulation of protein kinase CK1alphaLS by dephosphorylation in response to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Bedri, Shahinaz; Cizek, Stephanie M; Rastarhuyeva, Iryna; Stone, James R

    2007-10-15

    Low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are mitogenic to mammalian cells and stimulate the hyperphosphorylation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP-C) by protein kinase CK1alpha. However, the mechanisms by which CK1alpha is regulated have been unclear. Here it is demonstrated that low levels of H(2)O(2) stimulate the rapid dephosphorylation of CK1alphaLS, a nuclear splice form of CK1alpha. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that either treatment of endothelial cells with H(2)O(2), or dephosphorylation of CK1alphaLS in vitro enhances the association of CK1alphaLS with hnRNP-C. In addition, dephosphorylation of CK1alphaLS in vitro enhances the kinase's ability to phosphorylate hnRNP-C. While CK1alpha appears to be present in all metazoans, analysis of CK1alpha genomic sequences from several species reveals that the alternatively spliced nuclear localizing L-insert is unique to vertebrates, as is the case for hnRNP-C. These observations indicate that CK1alphaLS and hnRNP-C represent conserved components of a vertebrate-specific H(2)O(2)-responsive nuclear signaling pathway.

  20. Isolation of a gene encoding a developmentally regulated T cell-specific protein with a guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding motif

    SciTech Connect

    Carlow, D.A.; Teh, H.S.; Marth, J.

    1995-02-15

    In this study, we describe a novel full length cDNA clone designated Tgtp that encodes a predicted 415-amino acid a T cell-specific guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding protein (TGTP) bearing the characteristic motifs of a guanine nucleotide triphosphate (GTP) binding protein. Tgtp is expressed preferentially, if not exclusively, in T cells, and is up-regulated in both unfractionated and in purified CD4{sup +}8{sup +} thymocytes upon TCR cross-linking. In contrast, expression of Tgtp in peripheral T cells is maintained at relatively high levels and is not grossly affected by TCR cross-linking. Antiserum generated against synthetic peptides from the predicted TGTP amino acid sequence recognized a single protein with a molecular mass of {approx}50 kDa, corresponding well with the computed molecular mass of 47 kDa. The only known relative of Tgtp is MUSGTP, which is reportedly expressed in B cells and bears a GTP binding motif. Thus, the discovery of Tgtp resolves a subfamily of molecules with GTP binding motifs and apparent lymphoid lineage-restricted expression. Given the restricted expression pattern in T cells, the up-regulated expression observed in response to TCR signaling in immature thymocytes, and the presence of the motifs characteristic of GTP binding proteins, we suggest that TGTP may have an important function in T cell development and/or T cell activation. 51 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Role of dioxin response element and nuclear factor-kappaB motifs in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated regulation of Fas and Fas ligand expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra P; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) up-regulates Fas and FasL in immune cells, although the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the regulation of Fas or FasL promoter by TCDD in EL4 T cells using luciferase reporter constructs. We observed 20 +/- 5- and 14 +/- 4-fold induction of promoter activity for Fas and FasL, respectively, after TCDD exposure. The induction of luciferase was significantly reduced (2 +/- 1-fold) in the presence of alpha-naphthoflavone, an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist. We noted the presence of a dioxin response element (DRE) and five nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) motifs on Fas promoter, and no DRE but two NF-kappaB motifs on FasL promoter. When we investigated the role of DRE and NF-kappaB, we observed varying levels of luciferase induction (9 +/- 2-fold for DRE and 8 +/- 2-fold for NF-kappaBs of Fas promoter and 6 +/- 3-fold for NF-kappaBs of FasL promoter). Mutations in DRE of Fas promoter or NF-kappaBs of FasL promoter led to decreased luciferase induction, further supporting our results. Probes for DRE or NF-kappaB motifs of Fas and/or FasL promoters demonstrated mobility shift in the presence of nuclear extract from TCDD-treated EL4 cells. Furthermore, we observed supershift in mobility when DRE and NF-kappaB probes were incubated in the presence of anti-mouse AhR, and anti-NF-kappaB (RelA/p65 and p50) antibodies, respectively. Administration of TCDD into mice caused significant increase in Fas and FasL transcripts in thymus and liver. These data demonstrate that TCDD regulates Fas and FasL promoters through DRE and/or NF-kappaB motifs via AhR.

  2. Cobalt chloride-induced estrogen receptor alpha down-regulation involves hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungyoon; Kim, Dukkyung; Lee, SeungKi; Lee, YoungJoo

    2005-05-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is down-regulated under hypoxia via a proteasome-dependent pathway. We studied the mechanism of ERalpha degradation under hypoxic mimetic conditions. Cobalt chloride-induced ERalpha down-regulation was dependent on the expression of newly synthesized protein(s), one possibility of which was hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha). To examine the role of HIF-1alpha expression in ERalpha down-regulation under hypoxic-mimetic conditions, we used a constitutively active form of HIF-1alpha, HIF-1alpha/herpes simplex viral protein 16 (VP16), constructed by replacing the transactivation domain of HIF-1alpha with that of VP16. Western blot analysis revealed that HIF-1alpha/VP16 down-regulated ERalpha in a dose-dependent manner via a proteasome-dependent pathway. The kinase pathway inhibitors PD98059, U0126, wortmannin, and SB203580 did not affect the down-regulation. A mammalian two-hybrid screen and immunoprecipitation assays indicated that ERalpha interacted with HIF-1alpha physically. These results suggest that ERalpha down-regulation under hypoxia involves protein-protein interactions between the ERalpha and HIF-1alpha.

  3. Integrin Engagement by the Helical RGD Motif of the Helicobacter pylori CagL Protein Is Regulated by pH-induced Displacement of a Neighboring Helix*

    PubMed Central

    Bonsor, Daniel A.; Pham, Kieu T.; Beadenkopf, Robert; Diederichs, Kay; Haas, Rainer; Beckett, Dorothy; Fischer, Wolfgang; Sundberg, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-aspartate-glycine (RGD) motifs are recognized by integrins to bridge cells to one another and the extracellular matrix. RGD motifs typically reside in exposed loop conformations. X-ray crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori protein CagL revealed that RGD motifs can also exist in helical regions of proteins. Interactions between CagL and host gastric epithelial cell via integrins are required for the translocation of the bacterial oncoprotein CagA. Here, we have investigated the molecular basis of the CagL-host cell interactions using structural, biophysical, and functional analyses. We solved an x-ray crystal structure of CagL that revealed conformational changes induced by low pH not present in previous structures. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, we found that pH-induced conformational changes in CagL occur in solution and not just in the crystalline environment. By designing numerous CagL mutants based on all available crystal structures, we probed the functional roles of CagL conformational changes on cell surface integrin engagement. Together, our data indicate that the helical RGD motif in CagL is buried by a neighboring helix at low pH to inhibit CagL binding to integrin, whereas at neutral pH the neighboring helix is displaced to allow integrin access to the CagL RGD motif. This novel molecular mechanism of regulating integrin-RGD motif interactions by changes in the chemical environment provides new insight to H. pylori-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:25837254

  4. Integrin engagement by the helical RGD motif of the Helicobacter pylori CagL protein is regulated by pH-induced displacement of a neighboring helix.

    PubMed

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Pham, Kieu T; Beadenkopf, Robert; Diederichs, Kay; Haas, Rainer; Beckett, Dorothy; Fischer, Wolfgang; Sundberg, Eric J

    2015-05-15

    Arginine-aspartate-glycine (RGD) motifs are recognized by integrins to bridge cells to one another and the extracellular matrix. RGD motifs typically reside in exposed loop conformations. X-ray crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori protein CagL revealed that RGD motifs can also exist in helical regions of proteins. Interactions between CagL and host gastric epithelial cell via integrins are required for the translocation of the bacterial oncoprotein CagA. Here, we have investigated the molecular basis of the CagL-host cell interactions using structural, biophysical, and functional analyses. We solved an x-ray crystal structure of CagL that revealed conformational changes induced by low pH not present in previous structures. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, we found that pH-induced conformational changes in CagL occur in solution and not just in the crystalline environment. By designing numerous CagL mutants based on all available crystal structures, we probed the functional roles of CagL conformational changes on cell surface integrin engagement. Together, our data indicate that the helical RGD motif in CagL is buried by a neighboring helix at low pH to inhibit CagL binding to integrin, whereas at neutral pH the neighboring helix is displaced to allow integrin access to the CagL RGD motif. This novel molecular mechanism of regulating integrin-RGD motif interactions by changes in the chemical environment provides new insight to H. pylori-mediated oncogenesis.

  5. Mechanism of developmental regulation of alpha pi, the chicken embryonic alpha-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Knezetic, J A; Felsenfeld, G

    1993-01-01

    The chicken alpha pi-globin gene is expressed during development only in the primitive erythrocyte lineage and not in the definitive lineage. We show that stage-specific expression is maintained when plasmids containing the alpha pi promoter are transfected into primitive and definitive lineage primary erythroid cells and that the information contained in the promoter is sufficient to confer this specificity. Detailed analysis of binding sites in the promoter for trans-acting factors, together with studies of the effects of mutagenesis on expression, reveals that the factors critical to stage-specific expression are all present in both primitive and definitive lineages, but at various concentrations. We identify three proteins, an NF1 family member, a Y-box factor, and an Sp1-like factor, which interact to stimulate or inhibit transcription. We propose that the concentration-dependent action of these factors, together with the general erythroid factor GATA-1, is responsible for the stage-specific expression of the alpha pi-globin gene. Images PMID:8336706

  6. Ginsenoside Rf, a component of ginseng, regulates lipoprotein metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunghee; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yoon, Michung . E-mail: yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    We investigated whether ginseng regulates lipoprotein metabolism by altering peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})-mediated pathways, using a PPAR{alpha}-null mouse model. Administration of ginseng extract, ginsenosides, and ginsenoside Rf (Rf) to wild-type mice not only significantly increased basal levels of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and C-III mRNA compared with wild-type controls, but also substantially reversed the reductions in mRNA levels of apo A-I and C-III expected following treatment with the potent PPAR{alpha} ligand Wy14,643. In contrast, no effect was detected in the PPAR{alpha}-null mice. Testing of eight main ginsenosides on PPAR{alpha} reporter gene expression indicated that Rf was responsible for the effects of ginseng on lipoprotein metabolism. Furthermore, the inhibition of PPAR{alpha}-dependent transactivation by Rf seems to occur at the level of DNA binding. These results demonstrate that ginseng component Rf regulates apo A-I and C-III mRNA and the actions of Rf on lipoprotein metabolism are mediated via interactions with PPAR{alpha}.

  7. [Prediction of Promoter Motifs in Virophages].

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhou, Xuewen; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-07-01

    Virophages have crucial roles in ecosystems and are the transport vectors of genetic materials. To shed light on regulation and control mechanisms in virophage--host systems as well as evolution between virophages and their hosts, the promoter motifs of virophages were predicted on the upstream regions of start codons using an analytical tool for prediction of promoter motifs: Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation. Seventeen potential promoter motifs were identified based on the E-value, location, number and length of promoters in genomes. Sputnik and zamilon motif 2 with AT-rich regions were distributed widely on genomes, suggesting that these motifs may be associated with regulation of the expression of various genes. Motifs containing the TCTA box were predicted to be late promoter motif in mavirus; motifs containing the ATCT box were the potential late promoter motif in the Ace Lake mavirus . AT-rich regions were identified on motif 2 in the Organic Lake virophage, motif 3 in Yellowstone Lake virophage (YSLV)1 and 2, motif 1 in YSLV3, and motif 1 and 2 in YSLV4, respectively. AT-rich regions were distributed widely on the genomes of virophages. All of these motifs may be promoter motifs of virophages. Our results provide insights into further exploration of temporal expression of genes in virophages as well as associations between virophages and giant viruses.

  8. Hydrophobic motif site-phosphorylated protein kinase CβII between mTORC2 and Akt regulates high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    PKCβII controls the pathologic features of diabetic nephropathy, including glomerular mesangial cell hypertrophy. PKCβII contains the COOH-terminal hydrophobic motif site Ser-660. Whether this hydrophobic motif phosphorylation contributes to high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy has not been determined. Here we show that, in mesangial cells, high glucose increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner. Using siRNAs to downregulate PKCβII, dominant negative PKCβII, and PKCβII hydrophobic motif phosphorylation-deficient mutant, we found that PKCβII regulates activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mesangial cell hypertrophy by high glucose. PKCβII via its phosphorylation at Ser-660 regulated phosphorylation of Akt at both catalytic loop and hydrophobic motif sites, resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of its substrate PRAS40. Specific inhibition of mTORC2 increased mTORC1 activity and induced mesangial cell hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of mTORC2 decreased the phosphorylation of PKCβII and Akt, leading to inhibition of PRAS40 phosphorylation and mTORC1 activity and prevented mesangial cell hypertrophy in response to high glucose; expression of constitutively active Akt or mTORC1 restored mesangial cell hypertrophy. Moreover, constitutively active PKCβII reversed the inhibition of high glucose-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and mesangial cell hypertrophy induced by suppression of mTORC2. Finally, using renal cortexes from type 1 diabetic mice, we found that increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 was associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation. Collectively, our findings identify a signaling route connecting PI3-kinase to mTORC2 to phosphorylate PKCβII at the hydrophobic motif site necessary for Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation, leading to mesangial cell hypertrophy.

  9. Processing of alpha4 integrin by the proprotein convertases: histidine at position P6 regulates cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Eric; Basak, Ajoy; Decroly, Etienne; Seidah, Nabil G

    2003-01-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) participate in the limited proteolysis of integrin alpha4 subunit at the H(592)VISKR(597) downward arrow ST site (where underlined residues indicate positively charged amino acids important for PC-mediated cleavage and downward arrow indicates the cleavage site), since this cleavage is inhibited by the serpin alpha1-PDX (alpha1-antitrypsin Portland). Co-expression of alpha4 with each convertase in LoVo (furin-deficient human colon carcinoma) cells revealed that furin and proprotein convertase 5A (PC5A) are the best pro-alpha4 convertases. In agreement, processing of endogenous pro-alpha4 in human lymphoblastoid CEM-T4 cells was enhanced greatly in stable transfectants overexpressing either enzyme. In many leucocyte cell lines, the expression of furin closely correlated with the endogenous processing efficacy, suggesting that furin is a candidate pro-alpha4 convertase. Mutational analysis showed that replacement of P1 Arg(597) with alanine (R597A) abrogated cleavage, whereas the P6 mutant H592R is even better processed by the endogenous convertases of Chinese-hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells. In vitro kinetic studies using synthetic peptides confirmed the importance of a positively charged residue at P6 and showed that wild-type alpha4 processing is performed best by furin and PC5A at acidic and neutral pHs, respectively. Biosynthetic analysis of pro-alpha4 and its H592R and H592K mutants in the presence or absence of the weak base, NH(4)Cl, revealed that the P6 histidine residue renders its processing by furin sensitive to cellular pH. This suggests that pro-alpha4 cleavage occurs preferentially in acidic compartments. In conclusion, although the accepted furin processing motif is Arg-Xaa-(Lys/Arg)-Arg downward arrow, our data further extend it to include a regulatory histidine residue at P6 in precursors that lack a basic residue at P4. PMID:12691605

  10. Leucine zipper motif in RRS1 is crucial for the regulation of Arabidopsis dual resistance protein complex RPS4/RRS1

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iuchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins RPS4 and RRS1, known as dual resistance proteins, confer resistance to multiple pathogen isolates, such as the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Ralstonia solanacearum and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. RPS4 is a typical Toll/interleukin 1 Receptor (TIR)-type NLR, whereas RRS1 is an atypical TIR-NLR that contains a leucine zipper (LZ) motif and a C-terminal WRKY domain. RPS4 and RRS1 are localised near each other in a head-to-head orientation. In this study, direct mutagenesis of the C-terminal LZ motif in RRS1 caused an autoimmune response and stunting in the mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that full-length RPS4 and RRS1 are physically associated with one another. Furthermore, virus-induced gene silencing experiments showed that hypersensitive-like cell death triggered by RPS4/LZ motif-mutated RRS1 depends on EDS1. In conclusion, we suggest that the RRS1-LZ motif is crucial for the regulation of the RPS4/RRS1 complex. PMID:26750751

  11. Retinoic acid-induced down-regulation of the interleukin-2 promoter via cis-regulatory sequences containing an octamer motif.

    PubMed Central

    Felli, M P; Vacca, A; Meco, D; Screpanti, I; Farina, A R; Maroder, M; Martinotti, S; Petrangeli, E; Frati, L; Gulino, A

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is known to influence the proliferation and differentiation of a wide variety of transformed and developing cells. We found that RA and the specific RA receptor (RAR) ligand Ch55 inhibited the phorbol ester and calcium ionophore-induced expression of the T-cell growth factor interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene. Expression of transiently transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase vectors containing the 5'-flanking region of the IL-2 gene was also inhibited by RA. RA-induced down-regulation of the IL-2 enhancer is mediated by RAR, since overexpression of transfected RARs increased RA sensitivity of the IL-2 promoter. Functional analysis of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase vectors containing either internal deletion mutants of the region from -317 to +47 bp of the IL-2 enhancer or multimerized cis-regulatory elements showed that the RA-responsive element in the IL-2 promoter mapped to sequences containing an octamer motif. RAR also inhibited the transcriptional activity of the octamer motif of the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer. In spite of the transcriptional inhibition of the IL-2 octamer motif, RA did not decrease the in vitro DNA-binding capability of octamer-1 protein. These results identify a regulatory pathway within the IL-2 promoter which involves the octamer motif and RAR. Images PMID:1652063

  12. Biophysical analysis of binding of WW domains of the YAP2 transcriptional regulator to PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 adaptors.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; McIntosh, Samantha K N; Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Saeed, Ali M; Buffa, Laura; Sudol, Marius; Nawaz, Zafar; Farooq, Amjad

    2011-11-08

    The YAP2 transcriptional regulator mediates a plethora of cellular functions, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of its ability to recognize WBP1 and WBP2 signaling adaptors among a wide variety of other ligands. Herein, using isothermal titration calorimery and circular dichroism in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics, we provide evidence that the WW1 and WW2 domains of YAP2 recognize various PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 in a highly promiscuous and subtle manner. Thus, although both WW domains strictly require the integrity of the consensus PPXY sequence, nonconsensus residues within and flanking this motif are not critical for high-affinity binding, implying that they most likely play a role in stabilizing the polyproline type II helical conformation of the PPXY ligands. Of particular interest is the observation that both WW domains bind to a PPXYXG motif with highest affinity, implicating a preference for a nonbulky and flexible glycine one residue to the C-terminal side of the consensus tyrosine. Importantly, a large set of residues within both WW domains and the PPXY motifs appear to undergo rapid fluctuations on a nanosecond time scale, suggesting that WW-ligand interactions are highly dynamic and that such conformational entropy may be an integral part of the reversible and temporal nature of cellular signaling cascades. Collectively, our study sheds light on the molecular determinants of a key WW-ligand interaction pertinent to cellular functions in health and disease.

  13. Genome-wide prediction and functional validation of promoter motifs regulating gene expression in spore and infection stages of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Kagda, Meenakshi; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-03-01

    Most eukaryotic pathogens have complex life cycles in which gene expression networks orchestrate the formation of cells specialized for dissemination or host colonization. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, major shifts in mRNA profiles during developmental transitions were identified using microarrays. We used those data with search algorithms to discover about 100 motifs that are over-represented in promoters of genes up-regulated in hyphae, sporangia, sporangia undergoing zoosporogenesis, swimming zoospores, or germinated cysts forming appressoria (infection structures). Most of the putative stage-specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) thus identified had features typical of TFBSs such as position or orientation bias, palindromy, and conservation in related species. Each of six motifs tested in P. infestans transformants using the GUS reporter gene conferred the expected stage-specific expression pattern, and several were shown to bind nuclear proteins in gel-shift assays. Motifs linked to the appressoria-forming stage, including a functionally validated TFBS, were over-represented in promoters of genes encoding effectors and other pathogenesis-related proteins. To understand how promoter and genome architecture influence expression, we also mapped transcription patterns to the P. infestans genome assembly. Adjacent genes were not typically induced in the same stage, including genes transcribed in opposite directions from small intergenic regions, but co-regulated gene pairs occurred more than expected by random chance. These data help illuminate the processes regulating development and pathogenesis, and will enable future attempts to purify the cognate transcription factors.

  14. Testosterone regulates alpha-synuclein mRNA in the avian song system.

    PubMed

    Hartman, V N; Miller, M A; Clayton, D F; Liu, W C; Kroodsma, D E; Brenowitz, E A

    2001-04-17

    Alpha-synuclein is a small, highly conserved protein in vertebrates that has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. The avian song control system is one of the model systems in which the protein was independently discovered. Alpha-synuclein is dynamically regulated in the song system during song learning, a process in which sex steroids play a central role. We compared alpha-synuclein mRNA expression in the brains of 12 adult male chipping sparrows (Spizella passerina) treated with either testosterone or blank s.c. implants. We saw pronounced upregulation of alpha-synuclein mRNA in, as well as an increase in the volume of, the song control nucleus area X in response to exogenous testosterone. To our knowledge this is the first report of steroid regulation of synuclein gene expression in any model system.

  15. Differential regulation of alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) expression in schizophrenic smokers.

    PubMed

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the alpha7* receptor, as measured by [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene expression in schizophrenic hippocampus. We examined the effects of smoking on CHRNA7 expression in the same tissue and find that smoking differentially regulates expression of both mRNA and protein for this gene. CHRNA7 mRNA and protein levels are significantly lower in schizophrenic nonsmokers compared to control nonsmokers and are brought to control levels in schizophrenic smokers. Sufficient protein but low surface expression of the alpha7* receptor, seen in the autoradiographic studies, suggests aberrant assembly or trafficking of the receptor.

  16. PKC{alpha} expression regulated by Elk-1 and MZF-1 in human HCC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Y.-H.; Wu, T.-T.; Tsai, J.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Liu, J.-Y. . E-mail: jyl@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-01-06

    Our previous study found that PKC{alpha} was highly expressed in the poor-differentiated human HCC cells and associated with cell migration and invasion. In this study, we further investigated the gene regulation of this enzyme. We showed that PKC{alpha} expression enhancement in the poor-differentiated human HCC cells was found neither by DNA amplification nor by increasing mRNA stability using differential PCR and mRNA decay assays. After screening seven transcription factors in the putative cis-acting regulatory elements of human PKC{alpha} promoters, only Elk-1 and MZF-1 antisense oligonucleotide showed a significant reduction in the PKC{alpha} mRNA level. They also reduced cell proliferation, cell migratory and invasive capabilities, and DNA binding activities in the PKC{alpha} promoter region. Over-expression assay confirmed that the PKC{alpha} expression may be modulated by these two factors at the transcriptional level. Therefore, these results may provide a novel mechanism for PKC{alpha} expression regulation in human HCC cells.

  17. Structural and functional insights into the regulation of Helicobacter pylori arginase activity by an evolutionary nonconserved motif.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Meena, Shiv Kumar; Alam, Mashkoor; Nayeem, Shahid M; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2013-01-22

    Urea producing bimetallic arginases are essential for the synthesis of polyamine, DNA, and RNA. Despite conservation of the signature motifs in all arginases, a nonconserved ¹⁵³ESEEKAWQKLCSL¹⁶⁵ motif is found in the Helicobacter pylori enzyme, whose role is yet unknown. Using site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic assays, metal analyses, circular dichroism, heat-induced denaturation, molecular dynamics simulations and truncation studies, we report here the significance of this motif in catalytic function, metal retention, structural integrity, and stability of the protein. The enzyme did not exhibit detectable activity upon deletion of the motif as well as on individual mutation of Glu155 and Trp159 while Cys163Ala displayed significant decrease in the activity. Trp159Ala and Glu155Ala show severe loss of thermostability (14-17°) by a decrease in the α-helical structure. The role of Trp159 in stabilization of the structure with the surrounding aromatic residues is confirmed when Trp159Phe restored the structure and stability substantially compared to Trp159Ala. The simulation studies support the above results and show that the motif, which was previously solvent exposed, displays a loop-cum-small helix structure (Lys161-Cys163) and is located near the active-site through a novel Trp159-Asp126 interaction. This is consistent with the mutational analyses, where Trp159 and Asp126 are individually critical for retaining a bimetallic center and thereby for function. Furthermore, Cys163 of the helix is primarily important for dimerization, which is crucial for stimulation of the activity. Thus, these findings not only provide insights into the role of this motif but also offer a possibility to engineer it in human arginases for therapeutics against a number of carcinomas.

  18. A karyopherin alpha2 nuclear transport pathway is regulated by glucose in hepatic and pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Cassany, Aurélia; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Klein, Christophe; Dalet, Véronique; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2004-01-01

    We studied the role of the karyopherin alpha2 nuclear import carrier (also known as importin alpha2) in glucose signaling. In mhAT3F hepatoma cells, GFP-karyopherin alpha2 accumulated massively in the cytoplasm within minutes of glucose extracellular addition and returned to the nucleus after glucose removal. In contrast, GFP-karyopherin alpha1 distribution was unaffected regardless of glucose concentration. Glucose increased GFP-karyopherin alpha2 nuclear efflux by a factor 80 and its shuttling by a factor 4. These glucose-induced movements were not due to glycolytic ATP production. The mechanism involved was leptomycin B-insensitive, but phosphatase- and energy-dependent. HepG2 and COS-7 cells displayed no glucose-induced GFP-karyopherin alpha2 movements. In pancreatic MIN-6 cells, the glucose-induced movements of karyopherin alpha2 and the stimulation of glucose-induced gene transcription were simultaneously lost between passages 28 and 33. Thus, extracellular glucose regulates a nuclear transport pathway by increasing the nuclear efflux and shuttling of karyopherin alpha2 in cells in which glucose can stimulate the transcription of sugar-responsive genes.

  19. Contribution of position alpha4S336 on functional expression and up-regulation of alpha4beta2 neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, Gretchen Y; Biaggi-Labiosa, Nilza M; Torres-Cintrón, Alexis; Ortiz-Acevedo, Alejandro; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2009-02-01

    Phosphorylation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is believed to play a critical role in its nicotine-induced desensitization and up-regulation. We examined the contribution of a consensus PKC site in the alpha4 M3/M4 intracellular loop (alpha4S336) on the desensitization and up-regulation of alpha4beta2 nAChRs expressed in oocytes. Position alpha4S336 was replaced with either alanine to abolish potential phosphorylation at this site or with aspartic acid to mimic phosphorylation at this same site. Mutations alpha4S336A and alpha4S336D displayed a threefold increase in the ACh-induced response and an increase in ACh EC(50). Epibatidine binding revealed a three and sevenfold increase in surface expression for the alpha4S336A and alpha4S336D mutations, respectively, relative to wild-type, therefore, both mutations enhanced expression of the alpha4beta2 nAChR. Interestingly, the EC(50)'s and peak currents for nicotine activation remained unaffected in both mutants. Both mutations abolished the nicotine-induced up-regulation that is normally observed in the wild-type. The present data suggest that adding or removing a negative charge at this phosphorylation site cannot be explained by a simple straightforward on-and-off mechanism; rather a more complex mechanism(s) may govern the functional expression of the alpha4beta2 nAChR. Along the same line, our data support the idea that phosphorylation at multiple consensus sites in the alpha4 subunit could play a remarkable role on the regulation of the functional expression of the alpha4beta2 nAChR.

  20. Motif enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-07-01

    The Motif Enrichment Tool (MET) provides an online interface that enables users to find major transcriptional regulators of their gene sets of interest. MET searches the appropriate regulatory region around each gene and identifies which transcription factor DNA-binding specificities (motifs) are statistically overrepresented. Motif enrichment analysis is currently available for many metazoan species including human, mouse, fruit fly, planaria and flowering plants. MET also leverages high-throughput experimental data such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq from ENCODE and ModENCODE to identify the regulatory targets of a transcription factor with greater precision. The results from MET are produced in real time and are linked to a genome browser for easy follow-up analysis. Use of the web tool is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. ADDRESS: http://veda.cs.uiuc.edu/MET/.

  1. Regulation of 5alpha-reductase isoforms by oxytocin in the rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Assinder, S J; Johnson, C; King, K; Nicholson, H D

    2004-12-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is present in the male reproductive tract, where it is known to modulate contractility, cell growth, and steroidogenesis. Little is known about how OT regulates these processes. This study describes the localization of OT receptor in the rat ventral prostate and investigates if OT regulates gene expression and/or activity of 5alpha-reductase isoforms I and II. The ventral prostates of adult male Wistar rats were collected following daily sc administration of saline (control), OT, a specific OT antagonist or both OT plus antagonist for 3 d. Expression of the OT receptor was identified in the ventral prostate by RT-PCR and Western blot, and confirmed to be a single active binding site by radioreceptor assay. Immunohistochemistry localized the receptor to the epithelium of prostatic acini and to the stromal tissue. Real-time RT-PCR determined that OT treatment significantly reduced expression of 5alpha-reductase I but significantly increased 5alpha-reductase II expression in the ventral prostate. Activity of both isoforms of 5alpha-reductase was significantly increased by OT, resulting in increased concentration of prostatic dihydrotestosterone. In conclusion, OT is involved in regulating conversion of testosterone to the biologically active dihydrotestosterone in the rat ventral prostate. It does so by differential regulation of 5alpha-reductase isoforms I and II.

  2. Regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in sciatic motor neurons following axotomy.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, A J; Devlin, B K; Neitzel, K L; McLaurin, D L; Anderson, K J; Lee, N

    1999-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons are one of the few classes of neurons capable of regenerating axons following axotomy. Injury-induced expression of neurotrophic factors and corresponding receptors may play an important role in this rare ability. A wide variety of indirect data suggests that ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha may critically contribute to the regeneration of injured spinal motor neurons. We used immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and retrograde tracing techniques to study the regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in axotomized sciatic motor neurons. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha immunoreactivity, detected with two independent antisera, is increased in a subpopulation of caudal sciatic motor neuron soma one, two and six weeks after sciatic nerve transection and reattachment, while no changes are detected at one day and 15 weeks post-lesion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA levels are augmented in the same classes of neurons following an identical lesion, suggesting that increased synthesis contributes, at least in part, to the additional ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein. Separating the proximal and distal nerve stumps with a plastic barrier does not noticeably affect the injury-induced change in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha regulation, thereby indicating that this injury response is not dependent on signals distal to the lesion traveling retrogradely through the nerve or signals generated by axonal growth through the distal nerve. The prolonged increases in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein and messenger RNA found in regenerating sciatic motor neurons contrast with the responses of non-regenerating central neurons, which are reported to display, at most, a short-lived increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA expression following injury. The present data are the first to demonstrate, in vivo, neuronal regulation of

  3. The cytoplasmic end of transmembrane domain 3 regulates the activity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae G-protein-coupled alpha-factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, William; Eilers, Markus; Ying, Weiwen; Konopka, James B

    2002-01-01

    The binding of alpha-factor to its receptor (Ste2p) activates a G-protein-signaling pathway leading to conjugation of MATa cells of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. We conducted a genetic screen to identify constitutively activating mutations in the N-terminal region of the alpha-factor receptor that includes transmembrane domains 1-5. This approach identified 12 unique constitutively activating mutations, the strongest of which affected polar residues at the cytoplasmic ends of transmembrane domains 2 and 3 (Asn84 and Gln149, respectively) that are conserved in the alpha-factor receptors of divergent yeast species. Targeted mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling studies, suggested that Gln149 is oriented toward the core of the transmembrane helix bundle where it may be involved in mediating an interaction with Asn84. These residues appear to play specific roles in maintaining the inactive conformation of the protein since a variety of mutations at either position cause constitutive receptor signaling. Interestingly, the activity of many mammalian G-protein-coupled receptors is also regulated by conserved polar residues (the E/DRY motif) at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane domain 3. Altogether, the results of this study suggest a conserved role for the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane domain 3 in regulating the activity of divergent G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:11861550

  4. Down-regulating alpha-galactosidase enhances freezing tolerance in transgenic petunia.

    PubMed

    Pennycooke, Joyce C; Jones, Michelle L; Stushnoff, Cecil

    2003-10-01

    Alpha-galactosidase (alpha-Gal; EC 3.2.1.22) is involved in many aspects of plant metabolism, including hydrolysis of the alpha-1,6 linkage of raffinose oligosaccharides during deacclimation. To examine the relationship between endogenous sugars and freezing stress, the expression of alpha-Gal was modified in transgenic petunia (Petunia x hybrida cv Mitchell). The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Lea-Gal gene under the control of the Figwort Mosaic Virus promoter was introduced into petunia in the sense and antisense orientations using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. RNA gel blots confirmed that alpha-Gal transcripts were reduced in antisense lines compared with wild type, whereas sense plants had increased accumulation of alpha-Gal mRNAs. alpha-Gal activity followed a similar trend, with reduced activity in antisense lines and increased activity in all sense lines evaluated. Raffinose content of nonacclimated antisense plants increased 12- to 22-fold compared with wild type, and 22- to 53-fold after cold acclimation. Based upon electrolyte leakage tests, freezing tolerance of the antisense lines increased from -4 degrees C for cold-acclimated wild-type plants to -8 degrees C for the most tolerant antisense line. Down-regulating alpha-Gal in petunia results in an increase in freezing tolerance at the whole-plant level in nonacclimated and cold-acclimated plants, whereas overexpression of the alpha-Gal gene caused a decrease in endogenous raffinose and impaired freezing tolerance. These results suggest that engineering raffinose metabolism by transformation with alpha-Gal provides an additional method for improving the freezing tolerance of plants.

  5. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei; Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  6. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  7. HNF1alpha is involved in tissue-specific regulation of CFTR gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Mouchel, Nathalie; Henstra, Sytse A; McCarthy, Victoria A; Williams, Sarah H; Phylactides, Marios; Harris, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene shows a complex pattern of expression with tissue-specific and temporal regulation. However, the genetic elements and transcription factors that control CFTR expression are largely unidentified. The CFTR promoter does not confer tissue specificity on gene expression, suggesting that there are regulatory elements outside the upstream region. Analysis of potential regulatory elements defined as DNase 1-hypersensitive sites within introns of the gene revealed multiple predicted binding sites for the HNF1alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha) transcription factor. HNF1alpha, which is expressed in many of the same epithelial cell types as CFTR and shows similar differentiation-dependent changes in gene expression, bound to these sites in vitro. Overexpression of heterologous HNF1alpha augmented CFTR transcription in vivo. In contrast, antisense inhibition of HNF1 alpha transcription decreased the CFTR mRNA levels. Hnf1 alpha knockout mice showed lower levels of CFTR mRNA in their small intestine in comparison with wild-type mice. This is the first report of a transcription factor, which confers tissue specificity on the expression of this important disease-associated gene. PMID:14656222

  8. Osteoblastic regulation of B lymphopoiesis is mediated by Gs{alpha}-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Joy Y; Purton, Louise E; Rodda, Stephen J; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; McMahon, Andrew P; Scadden, David T; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2008-11-04

    Osteoblasts play an increasingly recognized role in supporting hematopoietic development and recently have been implicated in the regulation of B lymphopoiesis. Here we demonstrate that the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit G(s)alpha is required in cells of the osteoblast lineage for normal postnatal B lymphocyte production. Deletion of G(s)alpha early in the osteoblast lineage results in a 59% decrease in the percentage of B cell precursors in the bone marrow. Analysis of peripheral blood from mutant mice revealed a 67% decrease in the number of circulating B lymphocytes by 10 days of age. Strikingly, other mature hematopoietic lineages are not decreased significantly. Mice lacking G(s)alpha in cells of the osteoblast lineage exhibit a reduction in pro-B and pre-B cells. Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-7 expression is attenuated in G(s)alpha-deficient osteoblasts, and exogenous IL-7 is able to restore B cell precursor populations in the bone marrow of mutant mice. Finally, the defect in B lymphopoiesis can be rescued by transplantation into a WT microenvironment. These findings confirm that osteoblasts are an important component of the B lymphocyte niche and demonstrate in vivo that G(s)alpha-dependent signaling pathways in cells of the osteoblast lineage extrinsically regulate bone marrow B lymphopoiesis, at least partially in an IL-7-dependent manner.

  9. Statins enhance peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha activity to regulate energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxian; Wong, Chi-Wai

    2010-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) serves as an inducible coactivator for a number of transcription factors to control energy metabolism. Insulin signaling through Akt kinase has been demonstrated to phosphorylate PGC-1alpha at serine 571 and downregulate its activity in the liver. Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that reduce cholesterol synthesis in the liver. In this study, we found that statins reduced the active form of Akt and enhanced PGC-1alpha activity. Specifically, statins failed to activate an S571A mutant of PGC-1alpha. The activation of PGC-1alpha by statins selectively enhanced the expression of energy metabolizing enzymes and regulators including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4. Importantly, a constitutively active form of Akt partially reduced the statin-enhanced gene expression. Our study thus provides a plausible mechanistic explanation for the hypolipidemic effect of statin through elevating the rate of beta-oxidation and mitochondrial Kreb's cycle capacity to enhance fatty acid utilization while reducing the rate of glycolysis.

  10. AMPK activation regulates apoptosis, adipogenesis, and lipolysis by eIF2{alpha} in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dagon, Yossi; Avraham, Yosefa; Berry, Elliot M. . E-mail: Berry@md.huji.ac.il

    2006-02-03

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic master switch regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, AMPK has been implicated in the control of adipose tissue content. Yet, the nature of this action is controversial. We examined the effect on F442a adipocytes of the AMPK activator-AICAR. Activation of AMPK induced dose-dependent apoptotic cell death, inhibition of lipolysis, and downregulatation key adipogenic genes, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP{alpha}). We have identified the {alpha}-subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2{alpha}) as a target gene which is phosphorylated following AICAR treatment. Such phosphorylation is one of the best-characterized mechanisms for downregulating protein synthesis. 2-Aminopurine (2-AP), an inhibitor of eIF2{alpha} kinases, could overcome the apoptotic effect of AICAR, abolishing the reduction of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha} and the lipolytic properties of AMPK. Thus, AMPK may diminish adiposity via reduction of fat cell number through eIF2{alpha}-dependent translation shutdown.

  11. Regulation of ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in human fetal adrenals by rTNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Jäättelä, M; Carpén, O; Stenman, U H; Saksela, E

    1990-01-22

    The presence of tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha) in different fetal tissue and adult adrenal extracts was investigated by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Measurable levels of TNF-alpha were found in 12/22 fetal adrenals, but in none of the seven adult adrenals studied. Since it is known that (i) steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals differs greatly from that in adult glands by having higher androgen/corticosteroid ratio, (ii) and that macrophage-derived factors may cause adrenocortical suppression, the effect of TNF-alpha on corticotropin-induced steroidogenesis in primary cultures of human fetal adrenals was studied. Results show that TNF-alpha effectively suppresses the production of cortisol and shifts the steroid synthesis towards androgen production. The effect was not accompanied by any change in cell viability and could be neutralized by addition of polyclonal rabbit anti-TNF-alpha antiserum to cell cultures. These results suggest that TNF-alpha may take part in the regulation of human fetal steroidogenesis within the network of the fetoplacental unit via inhibition of the cortisol synthesis.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  13. Analysis of Ca2+ Signaling Motifs That Regulate Proton Signaling through the Na+/H+ Exchanger NHX-7 during a Rhythmic Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Erik; Waters, Korrie; Ackroyd, Sarah; Nehrke, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proton transporters contribute to pH homeostasis but have also been shown to transmit information between cells in close proximity through regulated proton secretion. For example, the nematode intestinal Na+/H+ exchanger NHX-7 causes adjacent muscle cells to contract by transiently acidifying the extracellular space between the intestine and muscle. NHX-7 operates during a Ca2+-dependent rhythmic behavior and contains several conserved motifs for regulation by Ca2+ input, including motifs for calmodulin and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding, protein kinase C- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II phosphorylation, and a binding site for calcineurin homologous protein. Here, we tested the idea that Ca2+ input differentiates proton signaling from pH housekeeping activity. Each of these motifs was mutated, and their contribution to NHX-7 function was assessed. These functions included pH recovery from acidification in cells in culture expressing recombinant NHX-7, extracellular acidification measured during behavior in live moving worms, and muscle contraction strength as a result of this acidification. Our data suggest that multiple levels of Ca2+ input regulate NHX-7, whose transport capacity normally exceeds the minimum necessary to cause muscle contraction. Furthermore, extracellular acidification limits NHX-7 proton transport through feedback inhibition, likely to prevent metabolic acidosis from occurring. Our findings are consistent with an integrated network whereby both Ca2+ and pH contribute to proton signaling. Finally, our results obtained by expressing rat NHE1 in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that a conserved mechanism of regulation may contribute to cell-cell communication or proton signaling by Na+/H+ exchangers in mammals. PMID:23319594

  14. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs

    PubMed Central

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.—Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. PMID:27451412

  15. A far upstream Oct-1 motif regulates cytokine-induced transcription of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Soo; Guo, Zhong; Shao, Lifang; Du, Qiang; Geller, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of human iNOS (hiNOS) gene is highly complex and requires an orchestrated flow of positive and negative transcription factors that bind to specific cis-acting upstream response elements. Very little specific information exists about the far upstream region of the hiNOS gene. Oct-1 protein belongs to the POU domain transcription factor family and is constitutively expressed in all dividing cells. It's essential for proliferation, differentiation and other key cell processes. However, the role of Oct-1 in regulating human iNOS gene expression has not been reported. In this work, the octamer sequence 5′-ATGCAAAT-3′ at -10.2 kb in the hiNOS promoter was identified as high-affinity Oct-1 binding by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) in vitro and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay in vivo. Mutation of Oct-1 motif at -10.2 kb in the hiNOS promoter decreased cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity by 40%. Cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity was also significantly reduced by Oct-1 siRNA targeting. Overexpression of Oct-1 increased cytokine-induced hiNOS protein expression in primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, the Oct-1 motif at -10.2 kb of the hiNOS promoter conferred increased transcriptional activity to the heterologous thymidine kinase (TK) promoter irrespective of cytokine induction. Taken together, this work identifies a far-upstream functional Oct-1 enhancer motif at -10.2 kb in the hiNOS promoter that regulates cytokine-induced hiNOS gene transcription, and further underscores the tight control mechanisms regulating expression of the human iNOS gene. PMID:19467240

  16. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

  17. Interaction between the N-terminal SH3 domain of Nck-alpha and CD3-epsilon-derived peptides: non-canonical and canonical recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Santiveri, Clara M; Borroto, Aldo; Simón, Luis; Rico, Manuel; Alarcón, Balbino; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2009-01-01

    The first SH3 domain (SH3.1) of Nckalpha specifically recognizes the proline-rich region of CD3varepsilon, a subunit of the T cell receptor complex. We have solved the NMR structure of Nckalpha SH3.1 that shows the characteristic SH3 fold consisting of two antiparallel beta-sheets tightly packed against each other. According to chemical shift mapping analysis, a peptide encompassing residues 150-166 of CD3varepsilon binds at the canonical SH3 binding site. An exhaustive comparison with the structures of other SH3 domains able and unable to bind CD3varepsilon reveals that Nckalpha SH3.1 recognises a non-canonical PxxPxxDY motif that orientates at the binding site as a class II ligand. A positively charged residue (K/R) at position -2 relative to the WW sequence at the beginning of strand beta3 is crucial for PxxDY recognition. A 14-mer optimised Nckalpha SH3.1 ligand was found using a multi-substitution approach. Based on NMR data, this improved ligand binds Nckalpha SH3.1 through a PxxPxRDY motif that combines specific stabilising interactions corresponding to both canonical class II, PxxPx(K/R), and non-canonical PxxPxxDY motifs. This explains its higher capacity for Nckalpha SH3.1 binding relative to the wild type sequence.

  18. A generic approach to identify Transcription Factor-specific operator motifs; Inferences for LacI-family mediated regulation in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Christof; Kerkhoven, Robert; Wels, Michiel; Siezen, Roland J

    2008-01-01

    Background A key problem in the sequence-based reconstruction of regulatory networks in bacteria is the lack of specificity in operator predictions. The problem is especially prominent in the identification of transcription factor (TF) specific binding sites. More in particular, homologous TFs are abundant and, as they are structurally very similar, it proves difficult to distinguish the related operators by automated means. This also holds for the LacI-family, a family of TFs that is well-studied and has many members that fulfill crucial roles in the control of carbohydrate catabolism in bacteria including catabolite repression. To overcome the specificity problem, a comprehensive footprinting approach was formulated to identify TF-specific operator motifs and was applied to the LacI-family of TFs in the model gram positive organism, Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. The main premise behind the approach is that only orthologous sequences that share orthologous genomic context will share equivalent regulatory sites. Results When the approach was applied to the 12 LacI-family TFs of the model species, a specific operator motif was identified for each of them. With the TF-specific operator motifs, potential binding sites were found on the genome and putative minimal regulons could be defined. Moreover, specific inducers could in most cases be linked to the TFs through phylogeny, thereby unveiling the biological role of these regulons. The operator predictions indicated that the LacI-family TFs can be separated into two subfamilies with clearly distinct operator motifs. They also established that the operator related to the 'global' regulator CcpA is not inherently distinct from that of other LacI-family members, only more degenerate. Analysis of the chromosomal position of the identified putative binding sites confirmed that the LacI-family TFs are mostly auto-regulatory and relate mainly to carbohydrate uptake and catabolism. Conclusion Our approach to identify

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα, directly regulates transcription of cytochrome P450 CYP2C8

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maria; Winter, Stefan; Klumpp, Britta; Turpeinen, Miia; Klein, Kathrin; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, CYP2C8, metabolizes more than 60 clinically used drugs as well as endogenous substances including retinoic acid and arachidonic acid. However, predictive factors for interindividual variability in the efficacy and toxicity of CYP2C8 drug substrates are essentially lacking. Recently we demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a nuclear receptor primarily involved in control of lipid and energy homeostasis directly regulates the transcription of CYP3A4. Here we investigated the potential regulation of CYP2C8 by PPARα. Two linked intronic SNPs in PPARα (rs4253728, rs4823613) previously associated with hepatic CYP3A4 status showed significant association with CYP2C8 protein level in human liver samples (N = 150). Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knock-down of PPARα in HepaRG human hepatocyte cells resulted in up to ∼60 and ∼50% downregulation of CYP2C8 mRNA and activity, while treatment with the PPARα agonist WY14,643 lead to an induction by >150 and >100%, respectively. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation scanning assay we identified a specific upstream gene region that is occupied in vivo by PPARα. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated direct binding of PPARα to a DR-1 motif located at positions –2762/–2775 bp upstream of the CYP2C8 transcription start site. We further validated the functional activity of this element using luciferase reporter gene assays in HuH7 cells. Moreover, based on our previous studies we demonstrated that WNT/β-catenin acts as a functional inhibitor of PPARα-mediated inducibility of CYP2C8 expression. In conclusion, our data suggest direct involvement of PPARα in both constitutive and inducible regulation of CYP2C8 expression in human liver, which is further modulated by WNT/β-catenin pathway. PPARA gene polymorphism could have a modest influence on CYP2C8 phenotype. PMID:26582990

  20. Regulation of Cl- secretion by alpha2-adrenergic receptors in mouse colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lam, Rebecca S; App, Ernst M; Nahirney, Drew; Szkotak, Artur J; Vieira-Coelho, Maria A; King, Malcolm; Duszyk, Marek

    2003-04-15

    Previous studies have shown that alpha2 adrenoceptor (alpha2AR) agonists inhibit electrolyte secretion in colonic epithelia, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this study we examined the effect of alpha2AR activation on transepithelial anion secretion across isolated murine colonic epithelium. We found that alpha2AR agonists, UK 14,304, clonidine and medetomidine were potent inhibitors of anion secretion, especially in the proximal colon. Short circuit current measurements (Isc) in colonic epithelia from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) mice showed that alpha2AR agonists inhibited basal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated Cl- secretion but had no effect on CFTR activation by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. Apical administration of an ionophore, nystatin (90 microg ml-1), was used to investigate the effect of UK 14,304 on basolateral K+ transport. The Na+-K+-ATPase current, measured as ouabain-sensitive current in the absence of ion gradients, was unaltered by pretreatment of the tissue with UK 14,304 (1 microM). In the presence of a basolaterally directed K+ gradient, UK 14,304 significantly reduced nystatin-activated Isc indicating that activation of alpha2ARs inhibits basolateral K+ channels. Studies with selective K+ channel inhibitors and openers showed that alpha2AR agonists inhibited KATP channels that were tonically active in mouse colonic epithelia. RT-PCR and pharmacological studies suggested that these channels could be similar to vascular smooth muscle KATP channels comprising Kir6.1/SUR2B or Kir6.2/SUR2B subunits. Inhibition of anion secretion by alpha2AR agonists required activation of pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins, but did not involve classical second messengers, such as cAMP or Ca2+. In summary, alpha2ARs inhibit anion secretion in colonic epithelia by acting on basolateral KATP channels, through a process that does not involve classical second messengers.

  1. Substitution of a conserved cysteine-996 in a cysteine-rich motif of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in congenital muscular dystrophy with partial deficiency of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nissinen, M.; Xu Zhang; Tryggvason, K.

    1996-06-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are autosomal recessive muscle disorders of early onset. Approximately half of CMD patients present laminin {alpha}2-chain (merosin) deficiency in muscle biopsies, and the disease locus has been mapped to the region of the LAMA2 gene (6q22-23) in several families. Recently, two nonsense mutations in the laminin {alpha}2-chain gene were identified in CMD patients exhibiting complete deficiency of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in muscle biopsies. However, a subset of CMD patients with linkage to LAMA2 show only partial absence of the laminin {alpha}2-chain around muscle fibers, by immunocytochemical analysis. In the present study we have identified a homozygous missense mutation in the {alpha}2-chain gene of a consanguineous Turkish family with partial laminin {alpha}2-chain deficiency. The T{r_arrow}C transition at position 3035 in the cDNA sequence results in a Cys996{r_arrow}Arg substitution. The mutation that affects one of the conserved cysteine-rich repeats in the short arm of the laminin {alpha}2-chain should result in normal synthesis of the chain and in formation and secretion of a heterotrimeric laminin molecule. Muscular dysfunction is possibly caused either by abnormal disulfide cross-links and folding of the laminin repeat, leading to the disturbance of an as yet unknown binding function of the laminin {alpha}2-chain and to shorter half-life of the muscle-specific laminin-2 and laminin-4 isoforms, or by increased proteolytic sensitivity, leading to truncation of the short arm. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Identification of a novel prenyl and palmitoyl modification at the CaaX motif of Cdc42 that regulates RhoGDI binding.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akiyuki; Linder, Maurine E

    2013-04-01

    Membrane localization of Rho GTPases is essential for their biological functions and is dictated in part by a series of posttranslational modifications at a carboxyl-terminal CaaX motif: prenylation at cysteine, proteolysis of the aaX tripeptide, and carboxymethylation. The fidelity and variability of these CaaX processing steps are uncertain. The brain-specific splice variant of Cdc42 (bCdc42) terminates in a CCIF sequence. Here we show that brain Cdc42 undergoes two different types of posttranslational modification: classical CaaX processing or novel tandem prenylation and palmitoylation at the CCaX cysteines. In the dual lipidation pathway, bCdc42 was prenylated, but it bypassed proteolysis and carboxymethylation to undergo modification with palmitate at the second cysteine. The alternative postprenylation processing fates were conserved in the GTPases RalA and RalB and the phosphatase PRL-3, proteins terminating in a CCaX motif. The differentially modified forms of bCdc42 displayed functional differences. Prenylated and palmitoylated brain Cdc42 did not interact with RhoGDIα and was enriched in the plasma membrane relative to the classically processed form. The alternative processing of prenylated CCaX motif proteins by palmitoylation or by endoproteolysis and methylation expands the diversity of signaling GTPases and enables another level of regulation through reversible modification with palmitate.

  3. Role of IKK-alpha in the EGFR Signaling Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    2002) (Huber et al., 2005). To date, several transcriptional repressors, such as Zeb-1/2, Twist1, and Snail -1/2, are known to be involved in EMT...nature of AKT1 in the EMT, we asked whether AKT1 represses EMT via the regulation of EMT mediators, such as Twist1, FOXC2, E12, and Snail . To do this...we transiently transfected HEK-293T cells with HA-myr-AKT1 together with Flag-Twist1, Flag- Snail , Flag-FOXC2, or Flag-E12 and investigated the

  4. Sex-dependent expression of mouse testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase (cytochrome P-450(16) alpha): cDNA cloning and pretranslational regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Negishi, M

    1985-01-01

    By using both double-colony hybridization and an in situ immunostaining assay for transformants, 39 cDNA clones (clone p-16 alpha) encoding mouse liver microsomal testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase (cytochrome P-450(16) alpha) were isolated from a cDNA library constructed in the cloning vector pUC-9 with poly(A)+ RNA immunoenriched from total liver polysomes of male 129/J mice. mRNA selected by hybridization with clone p-16 alpha translated the P-450(16) alpha apoprotein in vitro. Total cellular proteins, which were prepared from immunopositive transformant Escherichia coli cells, were conjugated with Sepharose 4B. Antibody purified with the Sepharose 4B conjugate from mixed antiserum to P-450(16) alpha and P-450(15) alpha specifically inhibited testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity in microsomes. The cDNA insert of one recombinant plasmid (clone P-16 alpha-1) was 1.75 kilobases in size and contained one or more internal restriction sites for HindIII, BamHI, Bgl I, Pst I, Alu I, HinpI, and Rsa I. 32P-labeled clone p-16 alpha-1 hybridized with a single mRNA (2000 bases) that was 10 times more concentrated in liver cells from male 129/J mice than in female mice. This result was consistent with the finding that poly(A)+ RNA from male mice translated 10 times as much P-450(16) alpha in vitro as did the poly(A)+ RNA from females. Thus, the predominant expression of testosterone 16 alpha-hydroxylase in male 129/J mice is regulated pretranslationally, presumably at the transcriptional level of the P-450(16) alpha gene. Images PMID:3856880

  5. TFII-I regulates target genes in the PI-3K and TGF-β signaling pathways through a novel DNA binding motif.

    PubMed

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Campuzano, Victoria

    2013-09-25

    General transcription factor (TFII-I) is a multi-functional protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of critical developmental genes, encoded by the GTF2I gene located on chromosome 7q11.23. Haploinsufficiency at GTF2I has been shown to play a major role in the neurodevelopmental features of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). Identification of genes regulated by TFII-I is thus critical to detect molecular determinants of WBS as well as to identify potential new targets for specific pharmacological interventions, which are currently absent. We performed a microarray screening for transcriptional targets of TFII-I in cortex and embryonic cells from Gtf2i mutant and wild-type mice. Candidate genes with altered expression were verified using real-time PCR. A novel motif shared by deregulated genes was found and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in embryonic fibroblasts were used to document in vitro TFII-I binding to this motif in the promoter regions of deregulated genes. Interestingly, the PI3K and TGFβ signaling pathways were over-represented among TFII-I-modulated genes. In this study we have found a highly conserved DNA element, common to a set of genes regulated by TFII-I, and identified and validated novel in vivo neuronal targets of this protein affecting the PI3K and TGFβ signaling pathways. Overall, our data further contribute to unravel the complexity and variability of the different genetic programs orchestrated by TFII-I.

  6. Structure and allosteric regulation of the alpha X beta 2 integrin I domain.

    PubMed

    Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Ostermeier, Christian; Shimaoka, Motomu; Hommel, Ulrich; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-02-18

    The integrin alpha X beta 2 (CD11c/CD18, p150,95) binds ligands through the I domain of the alpha X subunit. Ligands include the complement factor fragment iC3b, a key component in the innate immune defense, which, together with the expression of alpha X beta 2 on dendritic cells and on other leukocytes, suggests a role in the immune response. We now report the structure of the alpha X I domain resolved at 1.65 A by x-ray crystallography. To analyze structural requirements for ligand binding we made a mutation in the alpha X I domain C-terminal helix, which increased the affinity for iC3b approximately 200-fold to 2.4 microM compared with the wild-type domain affinity of approximately 400 microM. Gel permeation chromatography supported a conformational change between the wild-type and mutated domains. Conservation of allosteric regulation in the alpha X I domain points to the functional importance of this phenomenon.

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans Elongator complex regulates neuronal alpha-tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Solinger, Jachen A; Paolinelli, Roberta; Klöss, Holger; Scorza, Francesco Berlanda; Marchesi, Stefano; Sauder, Ursula; Mitsushima, Dai; Capuani, Fabrizio; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Cassata, Giuseppe

    2010-01-22

    Although acetylated alpha-tubulin is known to be a marker of stable microtubules in neurons, precise factors that regulate alpha-tubulin acetylation are, to date, largely unknown. Therefore, a genetic screen was employed in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that identified the Elongator complex as a possible regulator of alpha-tubulin acetylation. Detailed characterization of mutant animals revealed that the acetyltransferase activity of the Elongator is indeed required for correct acetylation of microtubules and for neuronal development. Moreover, the velocity of vesicles on microtubules was affected by mutations in Elongator. Elongator mutants also displayed defects in neurotransmitter levels. Furthermore, acetylation of alpha-tubulin was shown to act as a novel signal for the fine-tuning of microtubules dynamics by modulating alpha-tubulin turnover, which in turn affected neuronal shape. Given that mutations in the acetyltransferase subunit of the Elongator (Elp3) and in a scaffold subunit (Elp1) have previously been linked to human neurodegenerative diseases, namely Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Familial Dysautonomia respectively highlights the importance of this work and offers new insights to understand their etiology.

  8. The endocytosis and signaling of the γδ T cell coreceptor WC1 are regulated by a dileucine motif.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Haoting; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-03-01

    WC1 proteins, which are specifically expressed by bovine γδ T cells from a gene array containing 13 members, are part of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family. WC1 cytoplasmic domains contains multiple tyrosines, one of which is required to be phosphorylated for TCR coreceptor activity, and a dileucine endocytosis motif. Like the TCR coreceptor CD4, WC1 is endocytosed in response to PMA. Because WC1 endocytosis may play a role in the activation of γδ T cells, we examined WC1 endocytosis in the adherent cell 293T and Jurkat T cell lines using a fusion protein of extracellular CD4 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain of WC1. Individual mutation of the two leucine residues of the endocytic dileucine motif in the WC1 cytoplasmic domain significantly reduced PMA-induced endocytosis in both cell types and enhanced IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1 in Jurkat cells, suggesting that the sustained membrane coligation of CD3/TCR with WC1 caused by a decrease in endocytosis increases T cell activation. Mutation of two serines upstream of the endocytic dileucine motif affected endocytosis only in adherent 293T cells. Although the two upstream serines were not required for WC1 endocytosis in Jurkat cells, the pan-protein kinase C inhibitor Gö6983 blocked endocytosis of CD4/WC1, and mutation of the upstream serines in WC1 inhibited IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1. These studies provide insights into the signaling of WC1 gene arrays that are present in most mammals and play critical roles in γδ T cell responses to bacterial pathogens.

  9. Differential regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta5 integrins upon smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Paulhe, F; Racaud-Sultan, C; Ragab, A; Albiges-Rizo, C; Chap, H; Iberg, N; Morand, O; Perret, B

    2001-11-09

    Smooth muscle cell migration is a key step of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. We demonstrate that alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(5) integrins synergistically regulate smooth muscle cell migration onto vitronectin. Using an original haptotactic cell migration assay, we measured a strong stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in migrating vascular smooth muscle cells. Phosphatidic acid production and phosphoinositide 3-kinase IA activation were triggered only upon alpha(V)beta(3) engagement. Blockade of alpha(V)beta(3) engagement or phospholipase C activity resulted in a strong inhibition of smooth muscle cell spreading on vitronectin. By contrast, blockade of alpha(V)beta(5) reinforced elongation and polarization of cell shape. Moreover, Pyk2-associated tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 4-kinase activities measured in Pyk2 immunoprecipitates were stimulated upon cell migration. Blockade of either alpha(V)beta(3) or alpha(V)beta(5) function, as well as inhibition of phospholipase C activity, decreased both Pyk2-associated activities. We demonstrated that the Pyk2-associated phosphoinositide 4-kinase corresponded to the beta isoform. Our data point to the metabolism of phosphoinositides as a regulatory pathway for the differential roles played by alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(5) upon cell migration and identify the Pyk2-associated phosphoinositide 4-kinase beta as a common target for both integrins.

  10. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/.

  11. Large Putative PEST-like Sequence Motif at the Carboxyl Tail of Human Calcium Receptor Directs Lysosomal Degradation and Regulates Cell Surface Receptor Level*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Northup, John K.; Ray, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    A deletion between amino acid residues Ser895 and Val1075 in the carboxyl terminus of the human calcium receptor (hCaR), which causes autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, showed enhanced signaling activity and increased cell surface expression in HEK293 cells (Lienhardt, A., Garabédian, M. G., Bai, M., Sinding, C., Zhang, Z., Lagarde, J. P., Boulesteix, J., Rigaud, M., Brown, E. M., and Kottler, M. L. (2000) J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 85, 1695–1702). To identify the underlying mechanism(s) for these increases, we investigated the effects of carboxyl tail truncation and deletion in hCaR mutants using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging approaches to define motifs that participate in regulating cell surface numbers of this G protein-coupled receptor. Our data indicate a rapid constitutive receptor internalization of the cell surface hCaR, accumulating in early (Rab7 positive) and late endosomal (LAMP1 positive) sorting compartments, before targeting to lysosomes for degradation. Recycling of hCaR back to the cell surface was also evident. Truncation and deletion mapping defined a 51-amino acid sequence between residues 920 and 970 that is required for targeting to lysosomes and degradation but not for internalization or recycling of the receptor. No singular sequence motif was identified, instead the required sequence elements seem to distribute throughout this entire interval. This interval includes a high proportion of acidic and hydroxylated amino acid residues, suggesting a similarity to PEST-like degradation motif (PESTfind score of +10) and several glutamine repeats. The results define a novel large PEST-like sequence that participates in the sorting of internalized hCaR routed to the lysosomal/degradation pathway that regulates cell surface receptor numbers. PMID:22158862

  12. Alpha2 adrenoceptors regulate proliferation of human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaak, S; Cussac, D; Cayla, C; Devedjian, J; Guyot, R; Paris, H; Denis, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Previous studies on rodents have suggested that catecholamines stimulate proliferation of the intestinal epithelium through activation of α2 adrenoceptors located on crypt cells. The occurrence of this effect awaits demonstration in humans and the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of α2 agonists on a clone of Caco2 cells expressing the human α2A adrenoceptor.
METHODS—Cells were transfected with a bicistronic plasmid containing the α2C10 and neomycin phosphotransferase genes. G418 resistant clones were assayed for receptor expression using radioligand binding. Receptor functionality was assessed by testing its ability to couple Gi proteins and to inhibit cAMP production. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was followed by western blot, and cell proliferation was estimated by measuring protein and DNA content.
RESULTS—Permanent transfection of Caco2 cells allowed us to obtain a clone (Caco2-3B) expressing α2A adrenoceptors at a density similar to that found in normal human intestinal epithelium. Caco2-3B retained morphological features and brush border enzyme expression characteristic of enterocytic differentiation. The receptor was coupled to Gi2/Gi3 proteins and its stimulation caused marked diminution of forskolin induced cAMP production. Treatment of Caco2-3B with UK14304 (α2 agonist) induced a rapid increase in the phosphorylation state of MAPK, extracellular regulated protein kinase 1 (Erk1), and 2 (Erk2). This event was totally abolished in pertussis toxin treated cells and in the presence of kinase inhibitors (genistein or PD98059). It was unaffected by protein kinase C downregulation but correlated with a transient increase in Shc tyrosine phosphorylation. Finally, sustained exposure of Caco2-3B to UK14304 resulted in modest but significant acceleration of cell proliferation. None of these effects was observed in the parental cell line Caco2.

  13. Testing the role of the FcγRIIB immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif in regulation of the B cell immune response.

    PubMed

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Shen, Shixue; Manser, Tim

    2015-09-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) of the inhibitory Fc receptor FcγRIIB is critical for mediating attenuation of signaling via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) containing receptors, such as the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), when FcγRIIB is co-cross-linked to these activation receptors. To test the role of the FcγRIIB ITIM motif in regulation of the B cell immune response in vivo, we constructed lines of transgenic mice expressing a form of FcγRIIB with an inactivating tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) mutation in the ITIM motif. Detailed studies of one of these lines, in which the mutant FcγRIIB was expressed on B cells and other cell types that normally express this receptor, were performed. No quantitative differences in germinal center (GC) B cell responses were observed between the mutant FcγRIIB transgenic line and control mice. However, serum antibody and antibody forming cell responses were often observed to be elevated in the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB transgenic mice as compared to controls, though not to the same extent as mice deficient in expression of FcγRIIB. Moreover, primary B cells from the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB line did not display the same level of augmented BCR signaling as primary FcγRIIB deficient B cells under conditions inducing co-cross-linking of FcγRIIB and the BCR. In total, these data suggest that a functional ITIM motif is not required for all in vivo inhibitory activity of this receptor. However, we also found that the transgenic ITIM mutant FcγRIIB receptor was expressed at abnormal levels in several hematopoietic lineages. Thus, confirmation of our findings will require the generation and analysis of mice in which an ITIM mutant form of FcγRIIB is expressed in vivo as is the endogenous receptor.

  14. Interference with immunoglobulin (Ig)alpha immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) phosphorylation modulates or blocks B cell development, depending on the availability of an Igbeta cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Pao, L I; Reichlin, A; Hu, Y; Canono, B; Cambier, J C; Nussenzweig, M C; Rajewsky, K

    2001-08-20

    To determine the function of immunoglobulin (Ig)alpha immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) phosphorylation, we generated mice in which Igalpha ITAM tyrosines were replaced by phenylalanines (Igalpha(FF/FF)). Igalpha(FF/FF) mice had a specific reduction of B1 and marginal zone B cells, whereas B2 cell development appeared to be normal, except that lambda1 light chain usage was increased. The mutants responded less efficiently to T cell-dependent antigens, whereas T cell-independent responses were unaffected. Upon B cell receptor ligation, the cells exhibited heightened calcium flux, weaker Lyn and Syk tyrosine phosphorylation, and phosphorylation of Igalpha non-ITAM tyrosines. Strikingly, when the Igalpha ITAM mutation was combined with a truncation of Igbeta, B cell development was completely blocked at the pro-B cell stage, indicating a crucial role of ITAM phosphorylation in B cell development.

  15. The NAP motif of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) regulates dendritic spines through microtubule end binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Oz, S; Kapitansky, O; Ivashco-Pachima, Y; Malishkevich, A; Giladi, E; Skalka, N; Rosin-Arbesfeld, R; Mittelman, L; Segev, O; Hirsch, J A; Gozes, I

    2014-10-01

    The NAP motif of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) enhanced memory scores in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment and protected activities of daily living in schizophrenia patients, while fortifying microtubule (MT)-dependent axonal transport, in mice and flies. The question is how does NAP fortify MTs? Our sequence analysis identified the MT end-binding protein (EB1)-interacting motif SxIP (SIP, Ser-Ile-Pro) in ADNP/NAP and showed specific SxIP binding sites in all members of the EB protein family (EB1-3). Others found that EB1 enhancement of neurite outgrowth is attenuated by EB2, while EB3 interacts with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) to modulate dendritic plasticity. Here, NAP increased PSD-95 expression in dendritic spines, which was inhibited by EB3 silencing. EB1 or EB3, but not EB2 silencing inhibited NAP-mediated cell protection, which reflected NAP binding specificity. NAPVSKIPQ (SxIP=SKIP), but not NAPVAAAAQ mimicked NAP activity. ADNP, essential for neuronal differentiation and brain formation in mouse, a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and a major protein mutated in autism and deregulated in schizophrenia in men, showed similar EB interactions, which were enhanced by NAP treatment. The newly identified shared MT target of NAP/ADNP is directly implicated in synaptic plasticity, explaining the breadth and efficiency of neuroprotective/neurotrophic capacities.

  16. The AT-hook Motif-containing Protein AHL22 Regulates Flowering Initiation by Modifying FLOWERING LOCUS T Chromatin in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ju; Kim, Youn-Sung; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Coordination of the onset of flowering with developmental status and seasonal cues is critical for reproductive success in plants. Molecular genetic studies on Arabidopsis mutants that have alterations in flowering time have identified a wide array of genes that belong to distinct genetic flowering pathways. The flowering time genes are regulated through versatile molecular and biochemical mechanisms, such as controlled RNA metabolism and chromatin modifications. Recent studies have shown that a group of AT-hook DNA-binding motif-containing proteins plays a role in plant developmental processes and stress responses. Here, we demonstrate that the AT-hook protein AHL22 (AT-hook motif nuclear localized 22) regulates flowering time by modifying FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) chromatin in Arabidopsis. AHL22 binds to a stretch of the AT-rich sequence in the FT locus. It interacts with a subset of histone deacetylases. An Arabidopsis mutant overexpressing the AHL22 gene (OE-AHL22) exhibited delayed flowering, and FT transcription was significantly reduced in the mutant. Consistent with the delayed flowering and FT suppression in the OE-AHL22 mutant, histone 3 (H3) acetylation was reduced and H3 lysine 9 dimethylation was elevated in the FT chromatin. We propose that AHL22 acts as a chromatin remodeling factor that modifies the architecture of FT chromatin by modulating both H3 acetylation and methylation. PMID:22442143

  17. Allosteric regulation of helicase core activities of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by RNA binding to its RNA recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Samatanga, Brighton; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2017-01-23

    DEAD-box proteins share a structurally similar core of two RecA-like domains (RecA_N and RecA_C) that contain the conserved motifs for ATP-dependent RNA unwinding. In many DEAD-box proteins the helicase core is flanked by ancillary domains. To understand the regulation of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by its C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM), we investigated the effect of RNA binding to the RRM on its position relative to the core, and on core activities. RRM/RNA complex formation substantially shifts the RRM from a position close to the RecA_C to the proximity of RecA_N, independent of RNA contacts with the core. RNA binding to the RRM is communicated to the core, and stimulates ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The conformational space of the core depends on the identity of the RRM-bound RNA. Allosteric regulation of core activities by RNA-induced movement of ancillary domains may constitute a general regulatory mechanism of DEAD-box protein activity.

  18. SMAX1-LIKE7 Signals from the Nucleus to Regulate Shoot Development in Arabidopsis via Partially EAR Motif-Independent Mechanisms[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are hormonal signals that regulate multiple aspects of shoot architecture, including shoot branching. Like many plant hormonal signaling systems, SLs act by promoting ubiquitination of target proteins and their subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Recently, SMXL6, SMXL7, and SMXL8, members of the SMAX1-LIKE (SMXL) family of chaperonin-like proteins, have been identified as proteolytic targets of SL signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanisms by which these proteins regulate downstream events remain largely unclear. Here, we show that SMXL7 functions in the nucleus, as does the SL receptor, DWARF14 (D14). We show that nucleus-localized D14 can physically interact with both SMXL7 and the MAX2 F-box protein in a SL-dependent manner and that disruption of specific conserved domains in SMXL7 affects its localization, SL-induced degradation, and activity. By expressing and overexpressing these SMXL7 protein variants, we show that shoot tissues are broadly sensitive to SMXL7 activity, but degradation normally buffers the effect of increasing SMXL7 expression. SMXL7 contains a well-conserved EAR (ETHYLENE-RESPONSE FACTOR Amphiphilic Repression) motif, which contributes to, but is not essential for, SMXL7 functionality. Intriguingly, different developmental processes show differential sensitivity to the loss of the EAR motif, raising the possibility that there may be several distinct mechanisms at play downstream of SMXL7. PMID:27317673

  19. The Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase negatively regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis through immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing phagocytic receptors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Malykhin, Alexander; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2002-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms by which the Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulates phagocytosis in macrophages are unclear. We addressed the issue using bone marrow-derived macrophages from FcgammaR- or SHIP-deficient mice. Phagocytic activities of macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) and SHIP(-/-) mice were enhanced to a similar extent, relative to those from wild type. However, calcium influx was only marginally affected in FcgammaRII(b)(-/-), but greatly enhanced in SHIP(-/-) macrophages. Furthermore, SHIP was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon FcgammaR aggregation even in macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) mice or upon clustering of a chimeric receptor containing CD8 and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing gamma-chain or human-restricted FcgammaRIIa. These findings indicate that, unlike B cells, SHIP is efficiently phosphorylated in the absence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-bearing receptor. We further demonstrate that SHIP directly bound to phosphorylated peptides derived from FcgammaRIIa with a high affinity, comparable to that of FcgammaRII(b). Lastly, FcgammaRIIa-mediated phagocytosis was significantly enhanced in THP-1 cells overexpressing dominant-negative form of SHIP in the absence of FcgammaRII(b). These results indicate that SHIP negatively regulates FcgammaR-mediated phagocytosis through all ITAM-containing IgG receptors using a molecular mechanism distinct from that in B cells.

  20. SMAX1-LIKE7 Signals from the Nucleus to Regulate Shoot Development in Arabidopsis via Partially EAR Motif-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yueyang; Ward, Sally; Li, Ping; Bennett, Tom; Leyser, Ottoline

    2016-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are hormonal signals that regulate multiple aspects of shoot architecture, including shoot branching. Like many plant hormonal signaling systems, SLs act by promoting ubiquitination of target proteins and their subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Recently, SMXL6, SMXL7, and SMXL8, members of the SMAX1-LIKE (SMXL) family of chaperonin-like proteins, have been identified as proteolytic targets of SL signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana However, the mechanisms by which these proteins regulate downstream events remain largely unclear. Here, we show that SMXL7 functions in the nucleus, as does the SL receptor, DWARF14 (D14). We show that nucleus-localized D14 can physically interact with both SMXL7 and the MAX2 F-box protein in a SL-dependent manner and that disruption of specific conserved domains in SMXL7 affects its localization, SL-induced degradation, and activity. By expressing and overexpressing these SMXL7 protein variants, we show that shoot tissues are broadly sensitive to SMXL7 activity, but degradation normally buffers the effect of increasing SMXL7 expression. SMXL7 contains a well-conserved EAR (ETHYLENE-RESPONSE FACTOR Amphiphilic Repression) motif, which contributes to, but is not essential for, SMXL7 functionality. Intriguingly, different developmental processes show differential sensitivity to the loss of the EAR motif, raising the possibility that there may be several distinct mechanisms at play downstream of SMXL7.

  1. Nicotine-induced up-regulation and desensitization of alpha4beta2 neuronal nicotinic receptors depend on subunit ratio.

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, Gretchen Y; Sánchez-Padilla, Javier; Ortiz-Acevedo, Alejandro; Lizardi-Ortiz, José; Salas-Vincenty, Janice; Rojas, Legier V; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2004-09-03

    Desensitization induced by chronic nicotine exposure has been hypothesized to trigger the up-regulation of the alpha4beta2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in the central nervous system. We studied the effect of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on the desensitization and up-regulation of different alpha4beta2 subunit ratios (1alpha:4beta, 2alpha:3beta, and 4alpha:1beta) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The presence of alpha4 subunit in the oocyte plasmatic membrane increased linearly with the amount of alpha4 mRNA injected. nAChR function and expression were assessed during acute and after chronic nicotine exposure using a two-electrode voltage clamp and whole-mount immunofluorescence assay along with confocal imaging for the detection of the alpha4 subunit. The 2alpha4:3beta2 subunit ratio displayed the highest ACh sensitivity. Nicotine dose-response curves for the 1alpha4:4beta2 and 2alpha4:3beta2 subunit ratios displayed a biphasic behavior at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 300 microm. A biphasic curve for 4alpha4:1beta2 was obtained at nicotine concentrations higher than 300 microm. The 1alpha4:4beta2 subunit ratio exhibited the lowest ACh- and nicotine-induced macroscopic current, whereas 4alpha4:1beta2 presented the largest currents at all agonist concentrations tested. Desensitization by acute nicotine exposure was more evident as the ratio of beta2:alpha4 subunits increased. All three alpha4beta2 subunit ratios displayed a reduced state of activation after chronic nicotine exposure. Chronic nicotine-induced up-regulation was obvious only for the 2alpha4: 3beta2 subunit ratio. Our data suggest that the subunit ratio of alpha4beta2 determines the functional state of activation, desensitization, and up-regulation of this neuronal nAChR. We propose that independent structural sites regulate alpha4beta2 receptor activation and desensitization.

  2. Regulation of the Drosophila hypoxia-inducible factor alpha Sima by CRM1-dependent nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Romero, Nuria M; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Roth, Peggy; Cauerhff, Ana; Samakovlis, Christos; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-alpha) proteins are regulated by oxygen levels through several different mechanisms that include protein stability, transcriptional coactivator recruitment, and subcellular localization. It was previously reported that these transcription factors are mainly nuclear in hypoxia and cytoplasmic in normoxia, but so far the molecular basis of this regulation is unclear. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster HIF-alpha protein Sima shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the relevant nuclear localization signal and two functional nuclear export signals (NESs). These NESs are in the Sima basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and promote CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Site-directed mutagenesis of either NES provoked Sima nuclear retention and increased transcriptional activity, suggesting that nuclear export contributes to Sima regulation. The identified NESs are conserved and probably functional in the bHLH domains of several bHLH-PAS proteins. We propose that rapid nuclear export of Sima regulates the duration of cellular responses to hypoxia.

  3. Insulin-regulated hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1-PGC-1alpha interaction.

    PubMed

    Puigserver, Pere; Rhee, James; Donovan, Jerry; Walkey, Christopher J; Yoon, J Cliff; Oriente, Francesco; Kitamura, Yukari; Altomonte, Jennifer; Dong, Hengjiang; Accili, Domenico; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2003-05-29

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is absolutely required for survival during prolonged fasting or starvation, but is inappropriately activated in diabetes mellitus. Glucocorticoids and glucagon have strong gluconeogenic actions on the liver. In contrast, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Two components known to have important physiological roles in this process are the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 (also known as FKHR) and peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1alpha; also known as PPARGC1), a transcriptional co-activator; whether and how these factors collaborate has not been clear. Using wild-type and mutant alleles of FOXO1, here we show that PGC-1alpha binds and co-activates FOXO1 in a manner inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation. Furthermore, FOXO1 function is required for the robust activation of gluconeogenic gene expression in hepatic cells and in mouse liver by PGC-1alpha. Insulin suppresses gluconeogenesis stimulated by PGC-1alpha but co-expression of a mutant allele of FOXO1 insensitive to insulin completely reverses this suppression in hepatocytes or transgenic mice. We conclude that FOXO1 and PGC-1alpha interact in the execution of a programme of powerful, insulin-regulated gluconeogenesis.

  4. BDNF up-regulates alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels on subpopulations of hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Massey, Kerri A; Zago, Wagner M; Berg, Darwin K

    2006-12-01

    In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a number of synaptic components. Among these are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha7 subunits (alpha7-nAChRs), which are interesting because of their relative abundance in the hippocampus and their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that BDNF elevates surface and intracellular pools of alpha7-nAChRs on cultured hippocampal neurons and that glutamatergic activity is both necessary and sufficient for the effect. Blocking transmission through NMDA receptors with APV blocked the BDNF effect; increasing spontaneous excitatory activity with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline replicated the BDNF effect. BDNF antibodies blocked the BDNF-mediated increase but not the bicuculline one, consistent with enhanced glutamatergic activity acting downstream from BDNF. Increased alpha7-nAChR clusters were most prominent on interneuron subtypes known to directly innervate excitatory neurons. The results suggest that BDNF, acting through glutamatergic transmission, can modulate hippocampal output in part by controlling alpha7-nAChR levels.

  5. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPAR{alpha} activation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Prabhakaran, K.; Zhang, L.; Leavesley, H.B.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPAR{alpha} antagonist) or PPAR{alpha} knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPAR{alpha} activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPAR{alpha} did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPAR{alpha}-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPAR{alpha}-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPAR{alpha}-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPAR{alpha} mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  6. The impact of RNA binding motif protein 4-regulated splicing cascade on the progression and metabolism of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-11-10

    Dysregulated splicing of pre-messenger (m)RNA is considered a molecular occasion of carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is complex and remains to be investigated. Herein, we report that the upregulated miR-92a reduced the RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) protein expression, leading to the imbalanced expression of the neuronal polypyrimidine tract-binding (nPTB) protein through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense mediated decay (NMD) mechanism. Increase in nPTB protein enhances the relative level of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc (FGFR2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) transcripts which contribute to the progression and metabolic signature of CRC cells. Expression profiles of RBM4 and downstream alternative splicing events are consistently observed in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. These results constitute a mechanistic understanding of RBM4 on repressing the carcinogenesis of colorectal cells.

  7. Glutathione regulation of redox-sensitive signals in tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Chen, Jein-Wen; Chiang, Huai-Chih

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the regulatory role of glutathione in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by using vascular endothelial adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. Since TNF-alpha induces various biological effects on vascular cells, TNF-alpha dosage could be a determinant factor directing vascular cells into different biological fates. Based on the adhesion molecule expression patterns responding to different TNF-alpha concentrations, we adopted the lower TNF-alpha (0.2 ng/ml) to rule out the possible involvement of other TNF-alpha-induced biological effects. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) resulted in down-regulations of the TNF-alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. BSO attenuated the TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, however, with no detectable effect on AP-1 and its related mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Deletion of an AP-1 binding site in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) promoter totally abolished its constitutive promoter activity and its responsiveness to TNF-alpha. Inhibition of ERK, JNK, or NF-kappaB attenuates TNF-alpha-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding. Our study indicates that TNF-alpha induces adhesion molecule expression and monocyte-endothelial monolayer binding mainly via activation of NF-kappaB in a glutathione-sensitive manner. We also demonstrated that intracellular glutathione does not modulate the activation of MAPKs and/or their downstream AP-1 induced by lower TNF-alpha. Although AP-1 activation by the lower TNF-alpha was not detected in our systems, we could not rule out the possible involvement of transiently activated MAPKs/AP-1 in the regulation of TNF-alpha-induced adhesion molecule expression.

  8. 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: three dimensional structure and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Penning, T M

    1996-09-01

    Mammalian 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3 alpha-HSDs) regulate steroid hormone levels. cDNA cloning indicates that the rat and human liver isoforms display high sequence identity and that they belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. Of these the most extensively characterized is rat liver 3 alpha-HSD. The recently solved X-ray crystal structure shows that this enzyme adopts an (alpha/beta)8-barrel scaffold (Hoog et al. 1994). NAD(P)H binds in an extended anti-conformation and lies along the inner surface of the barrel. The nicotinamide ring is stabilized by interaction with Y216. The 4-pro(R)-hydrogen transferred in the reaction is in close proximity to Y55. K84, D50 and H117 which are implicated in catalysis. These residues are located at the base of a hydrophobic pocket which is presumed to be involved in binding steroid hormone. This catalytic tetrad is conserved in members of the AKR superfamily. Mutant enzymes support roles for Y55 in steroid binding and for K84 as the general acid involved in catalysis. The gene for rat 3 alpha-HSD has been cloned and is 47 kb in length and contains 9 exon-intron boundaries which are highly conserved in the human gene(s). The 5'-flanking regions of the rat and human genes contain consensus sequences for AP-1, Oct-1 and multiple copies of perfect and imperfect steroid hormone response elements (REs) (estrogen, glucocorticoid (GRE), and progesterone) which may comprise a steroid response unit (SRU) (Lin & Penning 1995). Constitutive and regulated expression of the rat 3 alpha-HSD gene has been studied by transiently transfecting reporter gene (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, CAT) constructs into human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. With respect to the transcription start-site (+1), a proximal (-498 to -199bp) and distal (-20 to -4.0kb) enhancer, as well as a powerful silencer (-755 to -498 bp) were located in the promoter. Band-shift and supershift assays provide evidence that Oct-1 binds to the silencer

  9. The alpha 4 integrin chain is a ligand for alpha 4 beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 1

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterodimeric alpha 4 integrins alpha 4 beta 7 lymphocyte Peyer's patch adhesion molecule ([LPAM]-1) and alpha 4 beta 1 (very late antigen-4) are cell surface adhesion molecules involved in lymphocyte trafficking and lymphocyte-cell and matrix interactions. Known cellular ligands include vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, which binds to alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 7, and the mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM)-1, which binds to alpha 4 beta 7. Here we show that the alpha 4 chain of these integrins can itself serve as a ligand. The alpha 4 chain, immunoaffinity purified and immobilized on glass slides, binds thymocytes and T lymphocytes. Binding exhibits divalent cation requirements and temperature sensitivity which are characteristic of integrin-mediated interactions, and is specifically inhibited by anti-alpha 4 integrin antibodies, which exert their effect at the cell surface. Cells expressing exclusively alpha 4 beta 7 (TK-1) or alpha 4 beta 1 (L1-2) both bound avidly, whereas alpha 4-negative cells did not. A soluble 34-kD alpha 4 chain fragment retained binding activity, and it inhibited lymphocyte adhesion to alpha 4 ligands. It has been shown that alpha 4 integrin binding to fibronectin involves an leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) motif in the HepII/IIICS region of fibronectin (CS-1 peptide), and homologous sequences are important in binding to VCAM-1 and MAdCAM-1. Three conserved LDV motifs occur in the extracellular sequence of alpha 4. A synthetic LDV-containing alpha 4- derived oligopeptide supports alpha 4-integrin-dependent lymphocyte adhesion and blocks binding to the 34-kD alpha 4 chain fragment. Our results suggest that alpha 4 beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins may be able to bind to the alpha 4 subunit on adjacent cells, providing a novel mechanism for alpha 4 integrin-mediated and activation-regulated lymphocyte interactions during immune responses. PMID:7629498

  10. Nephrocystin-1 Forms a Complex with Polycystin-1 via a Polyproline Motif/SH3 Domain Interaction and Regulates the Apoptotic Response in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Wodarczyk, Claas; Bricoli, Barbara; Muorah, Mordi; Spitaleri, Andrea; Mannella, Valeria; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pema, Monika; Castelli, Maddalena; Casanova, Ariel E.; Mollica, Luca; Banzi, Manuela; Boca, Manila; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Musco, Giovanna; Boletta, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3). A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1) as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP). We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation. PMID:20856870

  11. Nephrocystin-1 forms a complex with polycystin-1 via a polyproline motif/SH3 domain interaction and regulates the apoptotic response in mammals.

    PubMed

    Wodarczyk, Claas; Distefano, Gianfranco; Rowe, Isaline; Gaetani, Massimiliano; Bricoli, Barbara; Muorah, Mordi; Spitaleri, Andrea; Mannella, Valeria; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pema, Monika; Castelli, Maddalena; Casanova, Ariel E; Mollica, Luca; Banzi, Manuela; Boca, Manila; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Musco, Giovanna; Boletta, Alessandra

    2010-09-14

    Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3). A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1) as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP). We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation.

  12. Up-regulation of the alpha-secretase ADAM10 by retinoic acid receptors and acitretin.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, Frank; Hundt, Jana; Schneider, Anja; Endres, Kristina; Fahrenholz, Falk

    2009-06-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease is often connected with nutritional misbalance, such as enhanced cholesterol intake, deficiency in polyunsaturated fatty acids, or hypovitaminosis. The alpha-secretase ADAM10 has been found to be regulated by retinoic acid, the bioreactive metabolite of vitamin A. Here we show that retinoids induce gene expression of ADAM10 and alpha-secretase activity by nonpermissive retinoid acid receptor/retinoid X receptor (RAR/RXR) heterodimers, whereby alpha- and beta-isotypes of RAR play a major role. However, ligands of other RXR binding partners, such as the vitamin D receptor, do not stimulate alpha-secretase activity. On the basis of these findings, we examined the effect of synthetic retinoids and found a strong enhancement of nonamyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein by the vitamin A analog acitretin: it stimulated ADAM10 promoter activity with an EC(50) of 1.5 microM and led to an increase of mature ADAM10 protein that resulted in a two- to three-fold increase of the ratio between alpha- and beta-secretase activity in neuroblastoma cells. The alpha-secretase stimulation by acitretin was completely inhibited by the ADAM10-specific inhibitor GI254023X. Intracerebral injection of acitretin in APP/PS1-21 transgenic mice led to a reduction of Abeta(40) and Abeta(42). The results of this study may have clinical relevance because acitretin has been approved for the treatment of psoriasis since 1997 and found generally safe for long-term use in humans.

  13. Regulation of the human SLC25A20 expression by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in human hepatoblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Inada, Hirohiko; Yamasaki, Daisuke; Ishimoto, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Doi, Takefumi

    2009-11-20

    Solute carrier family 25, member 20 (SLC25A20) is a key molecule that transfers acylcarnitine esters in exchange for free carnitine across the mitochondrial membrane in the mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of {beta}-oxidation. We previously established tetracycline-regulated human cell line that can be induced to express PPAR{alpha} and found that PPAR{alpha} induces the SLC25A20 expression. In this study, we analyzed the promoter region of the human slc25a20 gene and showed that PPAR{alpha} regulates the expression of human SLC25A20 via the peroxisome proliferator responsive element.

  14. Multiple motifs regulate apical sorting of p75 via a mechanism that involves dimerization and higher-order oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Costa, Simone A; Rbaibi, Youssef; Lanni, Frederick; Kashlan, Ossama B; Teng, Haibing; Weisz, Ora A

    2013-06-01

    The sorting signals that direct proteins to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells are complex and can include posttranslational modifications, such as N- and O-linked glycosylation. Efficient apical sorting of the neurotrophin receptor p75 is dependent on its O-glycosylated membrane proximal stalk, but how this domain mediates targeting is unknown. Protein oligomerization or clustering has been suggested as a common step in the segregation of all apical proteins. Like many apical proteins, p75 forms dimers, and we hypothesized that formation of higher-order clusters mediated by p75 dimerization and interactions of the stalk facilitate its apical sorting. Using fluorescence fluctuation techniques (photon-counting histogram and number and brightness analyses) to study p75 oligomerization status in vivo, we found that wild-type p75-green fluorescent protein forms clusters in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but not at the plasma membrane. Disruption of either the dimerization motif or the stalk domain impaired both clustering and polarized delivery. Manipulation of O-glycan processing or depletion of multiple galectins expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells had no effect on p75 sorting, suggesting that the stalk domain functions as a structural prop to position other determinants in the lumenal domain of p75 for oligomerization. Additionally, a p75 mutant with intact dimerization and stalk motifs but with a dominant basolateral sorting determinant (Δ250 mutant) did not form oligomers, consistent with a requirement for clustering in apical sorting. Artificially enhancing dimerization restored clustering to the Δ250 mutant but was insufficient to reroute this mutant to the apical surface. Together these studies demonstrate that clustering in the TGN is required for normal biosynthetic apical sorting of p75 but is not by itself sufficient to reroute a protein to the apical surface in the presence of a strong basolateral sorting determinant. Our studies

  15. Alternative Splicing in CaV2.2 Regulates Neuronal Trafficking via Adaptor Protein Complex-1 Adaptor Protein Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Macabuag, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channels are expressed in neurons and targeted to the plasma membrane of presynaptic terminals, facilitating neurotransmitter release. Here, we find that the adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1) mediates trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface. Examination of splice variants of CaV2.2, containing either exon 37a (selectively expressed in nociceptors) or 37b in the proximal C terminus, reveal that canonical AP-1 binding motifs, YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI], present only in exon 37a, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to the axons and plasma membrane of rat DRG neurons. Finally, we identify differential effects of dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) and its agonist-induced activation on trafficking of CaV2.2 isoforms. D2R slowed the endocytosis of CaV2.2 containing exon 37b, but not exon 37a, and activation by the agonist quinpirole reversed the effect of the D2R. Our work thus reveals key mechanisms involved in the trafficking of N-type calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CaV2.2 channels are important for neurotransmitter release, but how they are trafficked is still poorly understood. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface which is mediated by the adaptor protein AP-1. Alternative splicing of exon 37 produces CaV2.2-exon 37a, selectively expressed in nociceptors, or CaV2.2-exon 37b, which is the major splice isoform. Our study reveals that canonical AP-1 binding motifs (YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI]), present in exon 37a, but not 37b, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to axons and plasma membrane of DRG neurons. Interaction of APs with CaV2.2 channels may also be key underlying mechanisms for differential effects of the dopamine D2 receptor on trafficking of CaV2.2 splice variants. PMID:26511252

  16. Multiple motifs regulate apical sorting of p75 via a mechanism that involves dimerization and higher-order oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Youker, Robert T.; Bruns, Jennifer R.; Costa, Simone A.; Rbaibi, Youssef; Lanni, Frederick; Kashlan, Ossama B.; Teng, Haibing; Weisz, Ora A.

    2013-01-01

    The sorting signals that direct proteins to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells are complex and can include posttranslational modifications, such as N- and O-linked glycosylation. Efficient apical sorting of the neurotrophin receptor p75 is dependent on its O-glycosylated membrane proximal stalk, but how this domain mediates targeting is unknown. Protein oligomerization or clustering has been suggested as a common step in the segregation of all apical proteins. Like many apical proteins, p75 forms dimers, and we hypothesized that formation of higher-order clusters mediated by p75 dimerization and interactions of the stalk facilitate its apical sorting. Using fluorescence fluctuation techniques (photon-counting histogram and number and brightness analyses) to study p75 oligomerization status in vivo, we found that wild-type p75–green fluorescent protein forms clusters in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but not at the plasma membrane. Disruption of either the dimerization motif or the stalk domain impaired both clustering and polarized delivery. Manipulation of O-glycan processing or depletion of multiple galectins expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells had no effect on p75 sorting, suggesting that the stalk domain functions as a structural prop to position other determinants in the lumenal domain of p75 for oligomerization. Additionally, a p75 mutant with intact dimerization and stalk motifs but with a dominant basolateral sorting determinant (Δ250 mutant) did not form oligomers, consistent with a requirement for clustering in apical sorting. Artificially enhancing dimerization restored clustering to the Δ250 mutant but was insufficient to reroute this mutant to the apical surface. Together these studies demonstrate that clustering in the TGN is required for normal biosynthetic apical sorting of p75 but is not by itself sufficient to reroute a protein to the apical surface in the presence of a strong basolateral sorting determinant. Our studies

  17. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of branched chain alpha-ketoacid (BCKA) catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal...

  18. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  19. A Conserved Motif within RAP1 Plays Diversified Roles in Telomere Protection and Regulation in Different Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Rai, Rekha; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Kanoh, Junko; Ribeyre, Cyril; Yang, Yuting; Zheng, Hong; Damay, Pascal; Wang, Feng; Tsujii, Hisayo; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Shore, David; Hu, Hong-Yu; Chang, Sandy; Lei, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Repressor activator protein 1 (RAP1) is the most highly conserved telomere protein. It is involved in protecting chromosome ends in fission yeast, promoting gene silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae while in Kluyveromyces lactis it is required to repress homology directed recombination (HDR) at telomeres. Since mammalian RAP1 requires TRF2 for stable expression, its role in telomere function has remained obscure. To understand how RAP1 plays such diverse functions at telomeres, we solved the crystal or solution structures of the C-terminal RCT domains of RAP1 from multiple organisms in complex with their respective protein-binding partners. Our comparative structural analysis establishes the RCT domain of RAP1 as an evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction module. In mammalian and fission yeast cells, this module interacts with TRF2 and Taz1, respectively, targeting RAP1 to chromosome ends for telomere end protection. While RAP1 repress NHEJ at fission yeast telomeres, at mammalian telomeres it is required to repress HDR. In contrast, S. cerevisiae RAP1 utilizes the RCT domain to recruit Sir3 to telomeres to mediate gene silencing. Together, our results reveal that depending on the organism, the evolutionarily conserved RAP1 RCT motif plays diverse functional roles at telomeres. PMID:21217703

  20. Interlocked positive and negative feedback network motifs regulate β-catenin activity in the adherens junction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Horvath, Nicholas; Cuppett, Vanessa; Wu, Yueting; Deng, Wentao; Kanj, Rania

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial tissue architecture is maintained through adherens junctions that are created through extracellular homotypic protein–protein interactions between cadherin molecules. Cadherins also provide an intracellular scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein complex that contains signaling proteins, including β-catenin. Environmental factors and controlled tissue reorganization disrupt adherens junctions by cleaving the extracellular binding domain and initiating a series of transcriptional events that aim to restore tissue homeostasis. However, it remains unclear how alterations in cell adhesion coordinate transcriptional events, including those mediated by β-catenin in this pathway. Here were used quantitative single-cell and population-level in vitro assays to quantify the endogenous pathway dynamics after the proteolytic disruption of the adherens junctions. Using prior knowledge of isolated elements of the overall network, we interpreted these data using in silico model-based inference to identify the topology of the regulatory network. Collectively the data suggest that the regulatory network contains interlocked network motifs consisting of a positive feedback loop, which is used to restore the integrity of adherens junctions, and a negative feedback loop, which is used to limit β-catenin–induced gene expression. PMID:26224311

  1. A family of cyclin D homologs from plants differentially controlled by growth regulators and containing the conserved retinoblastoma protein interaction motif.

    PubMed Central

    Soni, R; Carmichael, J P; Shah, Z H; Murray, J A

    1995-01-01

    A new family of three related cyclins has been identified in Arabidopsis by complementation of a yeast strain deficient in G1 cyclins. Individual members show tissue-specific expression and are conserved in other plant species. They form a distinctive group of plant cyclins, which we named delta-type cyclins to indicate their similarities with mammalian D-type cyclins. The sequence relationships between delta and D cyclins include the N-terminal sequence LXCXE. This motif was originally identified in certain viral oncoproteins and is strongly implicated in binding to the retinoblastoma protein pRb. By analogy to mammalian cyclin D, these plant homologs may mediate growth and phytohormonal signals into the plant cell cycle. In support of this hypothesis, we show that, on restimulation of suspension-cultured cells, cyclin delta 3 is rapidly induced by the plant growth regulator cytokinin and cyclin delta 2 is induced by carbon source. PMID:7696881

  2. Regulation of the alpha-glucuronidase-encoding gene ( aguA) from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R P; van de Vondervoort, P J I; Hendriks, L; van de Belt, M; Visser, J

    2002-09-01

    The alpha-glucuronidase gene aguA from Aspergillus niger was cloned and characterised. Analysis of the promoter region of aguA revealed the presence of four putative binding sites for the major carbon catabolite repressor protein CREA and one putative binding site for the transcriptional activator XLNR. In addition, a sequence motif was detected which differed only in the last nucleotide from the XLNR consensus site. A construct in which part of the aguA coding region was deleted still resulted in production of a stable mRNA upon transformation of A. niger. The putative XLNR binding sites and two of the putative CREA binding sites were mutated individually in this construct and the effects on expression were examined in A. niger transformants. Northern analysis of the transformants revealed that the consensus XLNR site is not actually functional in the aguA promoter, whereas the sequence that diverges from the consensus at a single position is functional. This indicates that XLNR is also able to bind to the sequence GGCTAG, and the XLNR binding site consensus should therefore be changed to GGCTAR. Both CREA sites are functional, indicating that CREA has a strong influence on aguA expression. A detailed expression analysis of aguA in four genetic backgrounds revealed a second regulatory system involved in activation of aguA gene expression. This system responds to the presence of glucuronic and galacturonic acids, and is not dependent on XLNR.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulation of the Id gene family in astrocytes and microglia during CNS inflammatory injury.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, S F; Kahn, M; Liva, S; De Vellis, J

    1999-04-01

    The inhibitors of DNA binding (Id) gene family is highly expressed during embryogenesis and throughout adulthood in the rat central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies suggest that the Id gene family is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Recently, Id gene expression was shown to be expressed in immature and mature astrocytes during development and upregulated in reactive astrocytes after spinal cord injury. These results suggest that the Id gene family may play an important role in regulating astrocyte development and reactivity; however, the factors regulating Id expression in astrocytes remain undefined. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine, is thought to play a crucial role in astrocyte/microglia activation after injury to the CNS. To determine if TNF alpha plays a role in Id gene expression, we exogenously administered TNF alpha into developing postnatal rats. We report that TNF alpha injections resulted in a rapid and transient increase in both cell number and mRNA expression for Id2 and Id3 when compared to levels observed in noninjected or control-injected animals. Id1 mRNA levels were also upregulated after TNF alpha treatment, but to a lesser degree. Significant increases in TNF alpha-induced Id2 and Id3 mRNA were observed in the ventricular/subventricular zone, cingulum and corpus callosum. TNF alpha also increased Id2 mRNA expression in the caudate putamen and hippocampus at the injection site. Id2 and Id3 mRNA+ cells were identified as GFAP+ and S100 alpha + astrocytes as well as ED1+ microglia. This is the first report to show TNF-alpha-induced modulation of the Id gene family and suggests that Id may be involved in the formation of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia in the rodent brain. These results suggest a putative role for the Id family in the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular responsiveness to TNF alpha and CNS inflammation.

  4. PDZ Domain Dependent Regulation of NHE3 Occurs by Both Internal Class II and C-terminal Class I PDZ Binding Motifs.

    PubMed

    Cha, Boyoung; Yang, Jianbo; Singh, Varsha; Zachos, Nicholas C; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Chen, Tian-E; Chakraborty, Molee; Tse, Chung-Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-03-10

    NHE3 directly binds NHERF family scaffolding proteins that are required for many aspects of NHE3 regulation. The NHERFs bind both to an internal region (aa. 586-660) of the NHE3 C-terminus and to the NHE3 C-terminal four amino acids. The internal NHERF binding region contains both putative Class I (-592SAV-) and Class II (-595CLDM-) PDZ binding motifs (PBM). Point mutagenesis showed that only the Class II motif contributes to NHERF binding. In this study, the roles in regulation of NHE3 activity of these two PBMs were investigated, revealing: 1) Interaction between these binding sites since mutation of either removed nearly all NHERF binding. 2) Mutations in either significantly reduced basal NHE3 activity. Total and percent plasma membrane (PM) NHE3 protein expression were reduced in the C-terminal but not in the internal PBD mutation. 3) cGMP and Ca2+-mediated inhibition of NHE3 were impaired both in the internal and in the C-terminal PBM mutations. 4) A significant reduction in half-life of the PM pool of NHE3 in only the internal PBM mutation but no change in total NHE3 half-life in either. 5) Some difference in NHE3 associating proteins in the two PBM mutations. In conclusion, NHE3 binds to NHERF proteins via both an internal Class II and C-terminal Class I PBM, which interact. The former appears to determine NHE3 stability of a pool in the PM and the letter determines total expression and percent PM expression.

  5. Divergent Roles of CAAX Motif-signaled Posttranslational Modifications in the Regulation and Subcellular Localization of Ral GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Leanna R.; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Cox, Adrienne D.; Martin, Timothy D.; Tsygankov, Denis; Nishida, Motohiro; Elston, Timothy C.; Der, Channing J.

    2015-01-01

    The Ras-like small GTPases RalA and RalB are well validated effectors of RAS oncogene-driven human cancer growth, and pharmacologic inhibitors of Ral function may provide an effective anti-Ras therapeutic strategy. Intriguingly, although RalA and RalB share strong overall amino acid sequence identity, exhibit essentially identical structural and biochemical properties, and can utilize the same downstream effectors, they also exhibit divergent and sometimes opposing roles in the tumorigenic and metastatic growth of different cancer types. These distinct biological functions have been attributed largely to sequence divergence in their carboxyl-terminal hypervariable regions. However, the role of posttranslational modifications signaled by the hypervariable region carboxyl-terminal tetrapeptide CAAX motif (C = cysteine, A = aliphatic amino acid, X = terminal residue) in Ral isoform-selective functions has not been addressed. We determined that these modifications have distinct roles and consequences. Both RalA and RalB require Ras converting CAAX endopeptidase 1 (RCE1) for association with the plasma membrane, albeit not with endomembranes, and loss of RCE1 caused mislocalization as well as sustained activation of both RalA and RalB. In contrast, isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (ICMT) deficiency disrupted plasma membrane localization only of RalB, whereas RalA depended on ICMT for efficient endosomal localization. Furthermore, the absence of ICMT increased stability of RalB but not RalA protein. Finally, palmitoylation was critical for subcellular localization of RalB but not RalA. In summary, we have identified striking isoform-specific consequences of distinct CAAX-signaled posttranslational modifications that contribute to the divergent subcellular localization and activity of RalA and RalB. PMID:26216878

  6. Pharmacological characterization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor regulated serotonin release in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, R; Yoshioka, M; Matsumoto, M; Togashi, H; Kemmotsu, O; Saito, H

    1995-06-16

    The purpose of the present study was to confirm the functional regulation by alpha 2-adrenoceptors of the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the rat hippocampus in vivo. Under several pharmacological conditions, extracellular levels of 5-HT were estimated by assaying its concentrations in the perfusate by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Extracellular 5-HT in the hippocampus was reduced by tetrodotoxin (10 microM) co-perfusion, but increased by perfusion of a selective 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10 microM). Addition of potassium (K+, 120 mM) to the perfusion fluid evoked an approximately 3-fold increase in 5-HT release. When the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK14,304 (0.1-10 microM) was added to the perfusion solution, the K(+)-evoked 5-HT release was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner. This inhibitory action of UK14,304 was reversed by pretreatment with an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (5 mg/kg, i.p.). In rats which were catecholaminergically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine, UK14,304 (10 microM) still inhibited the K(+)-evoked 5-HT release. Treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) did not alter the K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT but abolished the inhibitory effect of UK14,304. These findings suggest that 5-HT release is functionally modulated via alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on the serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus and furthermore, the possibility that the inhibitory of alpha 2-adrenoceptors is linked to G-proteins which are substrates of PTX.

  7. [Pharmacological characterization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor regulated 5-HT release in the rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Numazawa, R

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to confirm the functional regulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptor on the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the rat hippocampus in vivo. Under several pharmacological conditions, extracellular levels of 5-HT were estimated by assaying its concentrations in the perfusion fluid through the use of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Extracellular 5-HT in the hippocampus was reduced by tetrodotoxin, 10 microM co-perfusion and was increased by perfusion with a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, 10 microM. Addition of potassium (K+; 120 mM) to the perfusion fluid evoked an approximately 3-fold increase in 5-HT release, and a calcium free medium completely prevented this K(+)-evoked 5-HT release. Potassium-evoked 5-HT release from the hippocampus of freely moving rats was significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited when alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK14,304, 0.1 microM to 10 microM was added to the perfusion solution, while the output of a 5-HT major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), remained unchanged. This action of UK14,304 was prevented by pretreatment with idazoxan, 5 mg/kg, i. p., an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. In rats that were catecholaminergically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine, UK14,304, 10 microM also inhibited the potassium-evoked 5-HT release, but had no effect on the 5-HIAA output. The UK14,304-induced inhibition of 5-HT release was prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX). These findings suggest that 5-HT release is functionally modulated via alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on the serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus. They also indicate the possibility that the inhibition of 5-HT release via alpha 2-adrenoceptors is linked to G-proteins which are substrates of PTX.

  8. MeCP2 involvement in the regulation of neuronal alpha-tubulin production.

    PubMed

    Abuhatzira, Liron; Shemer, Ruth; Razin, Aharon

    2009-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a dominant mutation in the X-linked methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. Neuroanatomically, RTT is characterized by a reduction in dendritic arborization and perikaryal size in the brain. MECP2 binds methylated promoters and facilitates assembly of a multiprotein repressor complex that includes Sin3A and the histone deacetylases HDAC1/HDAC2. MeCP2 has recently been found to be downregulated in autistic spectrum disorders such as Angelman syndrome (AS) and RTT, which share some phenotypic manifestations. We have conducted expression analysis of cytoskeleton-related genes in brain tissue of RTT and AS patients. Striking examples of genes with reduced expression were TUBA1B and TUBA3 that encode the ubiquitous alpha-tubulin and the neuronal specific alpha-tubulin, respectively. In accordance with the downregulation of expression of these genes, we have observed a reduction in the level of the corresponding protein product-tyrosinated alpha-tubulin. Low levels of alpha-tubulin and deteriorated cell morphology were also observed in MeCP2(-/y) MEF cells. The effects of MeCP2 deficiency in these cells were completely reversed by introducing and expressing the human MeCP2 gene. These results imply that MeCP2 is involved in the regulation of neuronal alpha-tubulin and add molecular evidence that reversal of the effects of MeCP2 deficiency is achievable. This raises hopes for a cure of Rett syndrome and related MeCP2 deficiency disorders of the autistic spectrum.

  9. Activation of constitutive 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) receptor by a series of mutations in the BBXXB motif: positioning of the third intracellular loop distal junction and its G(o)alpha protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, P J; Gouble, A; Wurch, T

    1999-01-01

    Constitutive activity of the recombinant human 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) (5-HT(1B)) receptor (RC code 2.1.5HT.01.B) was investigated by mutagenesis of the BBXXB motif (in which B represents a basic residue and X a non-basic residue) located in the C-terminal portion of the third intracellular loop. In contrast with wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptors, three receptor mutants (Thr(313)-->Lys, Thr(313)-->Arg and Thr(313)-->Gln) increased their agonist-independent guanosine 5'-[gamma-[(35)S]thio]triphosphate binding response by 26-41%. This activity represented approx. 30% of the maximal response induced by 5-HT and could be reversed by the inverse agonists methiothepin and 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-4-hydroxy-N-(4-pyridin-4-yl phenyl)-benzenamide (GR 55562). Enhanced agonist-independent and agonist-dependent 5-HT(1B) receptor activation was provided by co-expression of a pertussis toxin-resistant rat G(o)alpha Cys(351)-->Ile protein. The wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptor displayed a doubling in basal activity, whereas a spectrum of enhanced basal activities (313-571%) was observed with a series of diverse amino acid substitutions (isoleucine, glycine, asparagine, alanine, lysine, phenylalanine, glutamine and arginine) at the 5-HT(1B) receptor position 313 in the presence of pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml). Consequently, the constitutive 5-HT(1B) receptor activity can be modulated by the mutation of Thr(313), and displays a graded range between 11% and 59% of maximal 5-HT(1B) receptor activation by 5-HT. No clear pattern is apparent in the framework of traditionally cited amino acid characteristics (i.e. residue size, charge or hydrophobicity) to explain the observed constitutive activities. The various amino acid substitutions that yielded enhanced activity are unlikely to make similar intramolecular interactions within the 5-HT(1B) receptor. It is hypothesized that the positioning of the junction between the third intracellular loop and transmembrane domain VI is altered by mutation of

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha phosphorylates and regulates the osteogenic activity of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Jeong, Hyung Min; Choi, You Hee; Lee, Sung Ho; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2013-05-10

    Osteoblast-specific transcription factor Osterix is a zinc-finger transcription factor that required for osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation. The function of Osterix can be modulated by post-translational modification. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha (GSK3α) is a multifunctional serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a role in the Wnt signaling pathways and is implicated in the control of several regulatory proteins and transcription factors. In the present study, we investigated how GSK3α regulates Osterix during osteoblast differentiation. Wide type GSK3α up-regulated the protein level, protein stability and transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that GSK3α regulates osteogenic activity of Osterix.

  11. Banana fruit VQ motif-containing protein5 represses cold-responsive transcription factor MaWRKY26 involved in the regulation of JA biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yu-Jie; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Han, Yan-Chao; Shan, Wei; Fan, Zhong-Qi; Xu, Qun-Gang; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Lu, Wang-Jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Chen, Jian-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Most harvested fruits and vegetables are stored at low temperature but many of them are highly sensitive to chilling injury. Jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone associated with various stress responses, is known to reduce chilling injury in fruits. However, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of JA biosynthesis in relation to cold response of fruits. Here, we show the involvement of a Group I WRKY transcription factor (TF) from banana fruit, MaWRKY26, in regulating JA biosynthesis. MaWRKY26 was found to be nuclear-localized with transcriptional activation property. MaWRKY26 was induced by cold stress or by methyl jasmonate (MeJA), which enhances cold tolerance in banana fruit. More importantly, MaWRKY26 transactivated JA biosynthetic genes MaLOX2, MaAOS3 and MaOPR3 via binding to their promoters. Further, MaWRKY26 physically interacted with a VQ motif-containing protein MaVQ5, and the interaction attenuated MaWRKY26-induced transactivation of JA biosynthetic genes. These results strongly suggest that MaVQ5 might act as a repressor of MaWRKY26 in activating JA biosynthesis. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into the transcriptional regulation of JA biosynthesis in response to cold stress and a better understanding of the molecular aspects of chilling injury in banana fruit. PMID:27004441

  12. Effects of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} on human melanocytes and regulation of the FP receptor by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis . E-mail: Glynis_Scott@urmc.rochester.edu; Jacobs, Stacey; Leopardi, Sonya; Anthony, Frank A.; Learn, Doug; Malaviya, Rama; Pentland, Alice

    2005-04-01

    Prostaglandins are potent lipid hormones that activate multiple signaling pathways resulting in regulation of cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the skin, prostaglandins are rapidly released by keratinocytes following ultraviolet radiation and are chronically present in inflammatory skin lesions. We have shown previously that melanocytes, which provide photoprotection to keratinocytes through the production of melanin, express several receptors for prostaglandins, including the PGE{sub 2} receptors EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} and the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor FP, and that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates melanocyte dendricity. We now show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates the activity and expression of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. Analysis of FP receptor regulation showed that the FP receptor is regulated by ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. We also show that ultraviolet irradiation stimulates production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by melanocytes. These results show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} binding to the FP receptor activates signals that stimulate a differentiated phenotype (dendricity and pigmentation) in melanocytes. The regulation of the FP receptor and the stimulation of production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} in melanocytes in response to ultraviolet radiation suggest that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} could act as an autocrine factor for melanocyte differentiation.

  13. PPARγ regulates the mitochondrial dysfunction in human neural stem cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Chiang, M-C; Cheng, Y-C; Lin, K-H; Yen, C-H

    2013-01-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) belongs to a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, and its ligands are known to control many physiological and pathological conditions. The hypothesis of our study was that the PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) could mediate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) related to the regulation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs), by which TNFα possibly fulfills important roles in neuronal impairment. The results show that PPARγ mediates the cell viability of hNSCs via the downregulation of the activity of caspase 3, indicating that this rescue effect of PPARγ could improve the reduced levels of two mitochondrial regulators, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in the hNSCs with TNFα. The stimulation of mitochondrial function by PPARγ was associated with activation of the PPAR coactivator1 alpha (PGC1α) pathway by up-regulation of oxidative defense and mitochondrial systems. The above protective effects appeared to be exerted by a direct activation of the rosiglitazone, because it protected hNSCs from TNFα-evoked oxidative stress and mitochondrial deficiency. Here we show that the rosiglitazone protects hNSCs against Aβ-induced apoptosis and promotes cell survival. These findings extend our understanding of the central role of PPARγ in TNFα-related neuronal impairment, which probably increases risks of neurodegenerative diseases. The anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in the hNSCs with TNFα, and the involved mechanisms were also characterized.

  14. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Traube, Leah; Jindal, Shawn; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Sticht, Heinrich; Backert, Steffen; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT) in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  15. Identification of promoter motifs regulating ZmeIF4E expression level involved in maize rough dwarf disease resistance in maize (Zea Mays L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Liyu; Weng, Jianfeng; Liu, Changlin; Song, Xinyuan; Miao, Hongqin; Hao, Zhuanfang; Xie, Chuanxiao; Li, Mingshun; Zhang, Degui; Bai, Li; Pan, Guangtang; Li, Xinhai; Zhang, Shihuang

    2013-04-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD, a viral disease) results in significant grain yield losses, while genetic basis of which is largely unknown. Based on comparative genomics, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) was considered as a candidate gene for MRDD resistance, validation of which will help to understand the possible genetic mechanism of this disease. ZmeIF4E (orthologs of eIF4E gene in maize) encodes a protein of 218 amino acids, harboring five exons and no variation in the cDNA sequence is identified between the resistant inbred line, X178 and susceptible one, Ye478. ZmeIF4E expression was different in the two lines plants treated with three plant hormones, ethylene, salicylic acid, and jasmonates at V3 developmental stage, suggesting that ZmeIF4E is more likely to be involved in the regulation of defense gene expression and induction of local and systemic resistance. Moreover, four cis-acting elements related to plant defense responses, including DOFCOREZM, EECCRCAH1, GT1GAMSCAM4, and GT1CONSENSUS were detected in ZmeIF4E promoter for harboring sequence variation in the two lines. Association analysis with 163 inbred lines revealed that one SNP in EECCRCAH1 is significantly associated with CSI of MRDD in two environments, which explained 3.33 and 9.04 % of phenotypic variation, respectively. Meanwhile, one SNP in GT-1 motif was found to affect MRDD resistance only in one of the two environments, which explained 5.17 % of phenotypic variation. Collectively, regulatory motifs respectively harboring the two significant SNPs in ZmeIF4E promoter could be involved in the defense process of maize after viral infection. These results contribute to understand maize defense mechanisms against maize rough dwarf virus.

  16. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated inhibitory signaling is regulated by sequential phosphorylation mediated by distinct nonreceptor tyrosine kinases: a case study involving PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Brenner, Michelle K; Keough, Kathleen C; Holyst, Trudy; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2013-04-16

    The activation state of many blood and vascular cells is tightly controlled by a delicate balance between receptors that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and those that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Precisely how the timing of cellular activation by ITAM-coupled receptors is regulated by ITIM-containing receptors is, however, poorly understood. Using platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) as a prototypical ITIM-bearing receptor, we demonstrate that initiation of inhibitory signaling occurs via a novel, sequential process in which Src family kinases phosphorylate the C-terminal ITIM, thereby enabling phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of PECAM-1 by other Src homology 2 domain-containing nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). NRTKs capable of mediating the second phosphorylation event include C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk and Csk function downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation during ITAM-dependent platelet activation. In ITAM-activated platelets that were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, PECAM-1 was phosphorylated but did not bind the tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, indicating that it was not phosphorylated on its N-terminal ITIM. Csk bound to and phosphorylated PECAM-1 more efficiently than did Btk and required its SH2 domain to perform these functions. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of Siglec-9 by Csk is enhanced by the prior phosphorylation of its C-terminal ITIM, providing evidence that the ITIMs of other dual ITIM-containing receptors are also sequentially phosphorylated. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sequential ITIM phosphorylation provides a general mechanism for precise temporal control over the recruitment and activation of tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases that dampen ITAM-dependent signals.

  17. PU.1 (Spi-1) and C/EBP alpha regulate expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, S; Petrovick, M S; Voso, M T; Sun, Z; Zhang, D E; Tenen, D G

    1995-01-01

    Growth factor receptors play an important role in hematopoiesis. In order to further understand the mechanisms directing the expression of these key regulators of hematopoiesis, we initiated a study investigating the transcription factors activating the expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha gene. Here, we demonstrate that the human GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter directs reporter gene activity in a tissue-specific fashion in myelomonocytic cells, which correlates with its expression pattern as analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter contains an important functional site between positions -53 and -41 as identified by deletion analysis of reporter constructs. We show that the myeloid and B cell transcription factor PU.1 binds specifically to this site. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a CCAAT site located upstream of the PU.1 site between positions -70 and -54 is involved in positive-negative regulation of the GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter activity. C/EBP alpha is the major CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) form binding to this site in nuclear extracts of U937 cells. Point mutations of either the PU.1 site or the C/EBP site that abolish the binding of the respective factors result in a significant decrease of GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter activity in myelomonocytic cells only. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in myeloid and B cell extracts, PU.1 forms a novel, specific, more slowly migrating complex (PU-SF) when binding the GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter PU.1 site. This is the first demonstration of a specific interaction with PU.1 on a myeloid PU.1 binding site. The novel complex is distinct from that described previously as binding to B cell enhancer sites and can be formed by addition of PU.1 to extracts from certain nonmyeloid cell types which do not express PU.1, including T cells and epithelial cells, but not from erythroid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PU

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the mouse alpha A-crystallin gene: binding of USF to the -7/+5 region.

    PubMed

    Sax, C M; Cvekl, A; Piatigorsky, J

    1997-02-07

    Lens preferred-expression of the mouse alpha A-crystallin gene (alpha A-cry) is regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple elements located in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Here we present the first analysis of the functional role of the mouse alpha A-cry +1 region and the protein(s) which bind to it. The -7/+5 region of this promoter exhibits sequence similarity with the consensus upstream stimulating factor (USF) transcription factor binding site. A wild type oligodeoxyribonucleotide (oligo) spanning the mouse alpha A-cry -15/+15 region specifically inhibited the activity of a mouse alpha A-cry promoter-cat gene fusion (p alpha A 111aCAT) in competitive co-transfection studies in the mouse alpha TN4-1 lens cell line, as did an oligo containing the adenovirus 2 major late promoter strong USF binding site. In contrast, an alpha A-cry oligo mutated (-3/+3) within the USF-like binding site did not inhibit p alpha A111aCAT activity. Western blot analysis indicated that alpha TN4-1 cells express USF1. Co-transfection of p alpha A111aCAT and a USF1 cDNA expression vector into alpha TN4-1 cells resulted in a repression of mouse alpha A-cry promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses (EMSA) demonstrated that proteins in an alpha TN4-1 nuclear extract form a single major complex on synthetic oligos spanning the mouse alpha A-cry -15/+15 region. The formation of this complex was inhibited by the presence of unlabeled -15/+15 oligos or an anti-USF1 antibody. In addition, purified USF1 bound to this region, producing a complex similar in size to that observed with alpha TN4-1 nuclear extracts. Taken together, our findings show that USF can bind to the mouse alpha A-cry +1 site, and support the possibility that USF plays a role in promoter activity of this gene. Sequence similarities surrounding the +1 region of the alpha A-cry gene of the mouse, mole rat, hamster, and human, as well as the previously observed utilization of USF by different cry

  19. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  20. Coactivator PGC-1{alpha} regulates the fasting inducible xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme CYP2A5 in mouse primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Arpiainen, Satu; Jaervenpaeae, Sanna-Mari; Manninen, Aki; Viitala, Pirkko; Lang, Matti A.; Pelkonen, Olavi; Hakkola, Jukka

    2008-10-01

    The nutritional state of organisms and energy balance related diseases such as diabetes regulate the metabolism of xenobiotics such as drugs, toxins and carcinogens. However, the mechanisms behind this regulation are mostly unknown. The xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A5 enzyme has been shown to be induced by fasting and by glucagon and cyclic AMP (cAMP), which mediate numerous fasting responses. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} triggers many of the important hepatic fasting effects in response to elevated cAMP levels. In the present study, we were able to show that cAMP causes a coordinated induction of PGC-1{alpha} and CYP2A5 mRNAs in murine primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the elevation of the PGC-1{alpha} expression level by adenovirus mediated gene transfer increased CYP2A5 transcription. Co-transfection of Cyp2a5 5' promoter constructs with the PGC-1{alpha} expression vector demonstrated that PGC-1{alpha} is able to activate Cyp2a5 transcription through the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} response element in the proximal promoter of the Cyp2a5 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that PGC-1{alpha} binds, together with HNF-4{alpha}, to the same region at the Cyp2a5 proximal promoter. In conclusion, PGC-1{alpha} mediates the expression of CYP2A5 induced by cAMP in mouse hepatocytes through coactivation of transcription factor HNF-4{alpha}. This strongly suggests that PGC-1{alpha} is the major factor mediating the fasting response of CYP2A5.

  1. Interferons alpha and beta down-regulate the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in human carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R K; Gutman, M; Bucana, C D; Sanchez, R; Llansa, N; Fidler, I J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the influence of interferons alpha, beta, and gamma (IFN-alpha, -beta, and -gamma) on the production of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) by human renal carcinoma cells. The human renal carcinoma cell metastatic line SN12PM6 was established in culture from a lung metastasis and SN12PM6-resistant cells were selected in vitro for resistance to the antiproliferative effects of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, but not IFN-gamma, down-regulated the expression of bFGF at the mRNA and protein levels by a mechanism independent of their antiproliferative effects. Down-regulation of bFGF required a long exposure (> 4 days) of cells to low concentrations (> 10 units/ml) of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. The withdrawal of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta from the medium permitted SN12PM6-resistant cells to resume production of bFGF. The incubation of human bladder, prostate, colon, and breast carcinoma cells with noncytostatic concentrations of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta also produced down-regulation of bFGF production. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7753843

  2. Structural Fine-Tuning of MIT-Interacting Motif 2 (MIM2) and Allosteric Regulation of ESCRT-III by Vps4 in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Rieko; Obita, Takayuki; Onoue, Kousuke; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki

    2016-06-05

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) facilitates roles in membrane remodeling, such as multivesicular body biogenesis, enveloped virus budding and cell division. In yeast, Vps4 plays a crucial role in intraluminal vesicle formation by disassembling ESCRT proteins. Vps4 is recruited by ESCRT-III proteins to the endosomal membrane through the interaction between the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain of Vps4 and the C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM) of ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of Vps4-MIT in a complex with Vps20, a member of ESCRT-III, and revealed that Vps20 adopts a unique MIM2 conformation. Based on structural comparisons with other known MIM2s, we have refined the consensus sequence of MIM2. We have shown that another ESCRT-III protein, Ist1, binds to Vps4-MIT via its C-terminal MIM1 with higher affinity than Vps2, but lacks MIM2 by surface plasmon resonance. Surprisingly, the Ist1 MIM1 competed with the MIM2 of Vfa1, a regulator of Vps4, for binding to Vps4-MIT, even though these MIMs bind in non-overlapping sites on the MIT. These findings provide insight into the allosteric recognition of MIMs of ESCRT-III by Vps4 and also the regulation of ESCRT machinery at the last step of membrane remodeling.

  3. A survey of DNA motif finding algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Modan K; Dai, Ho-Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Background Unraveling the mechanisms that regulate gene expression is a major challenge in biology. An important task in this challenge is to identify regulatory elements, especially the binding sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for transcription factors. These binding sites are short DNA segments that are called motifs. Recent advances in genome sequence availability and in high-throughput gene expression analysis technologies have allowed for the development of computational methods for motif finding. As a result, a large number of motif finding algorithms have been implemented and applied to various motif models over the past decade. This survey reviews the latest developments in DNA motif finding algorithms. Results Earlier algorithms use promoter sequences of coregulated genes from single genome and search for statistically overrepresented motifs. Recent algorithms are designed to use phylogenetic footprinting or orthologous sequences and also an integrated approach where promoter sequences of coregulated genes and phylogenetic footprinting are used. All the algorithms studied have been reported to correctly detect the motifs that have been previously detected by laboratory experimental approaches, and some algorithms were able to find novel motifs. However, most of these motif finding algorithms have been shown to work successfully in yeast and other lower organisms, but perform significantly worse in higher organisms. Conclusion Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif finding remains a complex challenge for biologists and computer scientists. Researchers have taken many different approaches in developing motif discovery tools and the progress made in this area of research is very encouraging. Performance comparison of different motif finding tools and identification of the best tools have proven to be a difficult task because tools are designed based on algorithms and motif models that are diverse and complex and our incomplete understanding of

  4. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego; Relat, Joana

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  5. The orphan estrogen-related receptor alpha and metabolic regulation: new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Ranhotra, Harmit S

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis during long-term adaptation in animals is primarily achieved by controlling the expression of metabolic genes by a plethora of cellular transcription factors. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily in eukaryotes is an assembly of diverse receptors working as transcriptional regulators of multiple genes. The orphan estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is one such receptor of the NR superfamily with significant influence on numerous metabolic and other genes. Although it is presently unknown as to which endogenous hormones or ligands activate ERRα, nevertheless it regulates a host of genes whose products participate in various metabolic pathways. Studies over the years show new and interesting data that add to the growing knowledge on ERRα and metabolic regulation. For instance, novel findings indicate existence of mTOR/ERRα regulatory axis and also that ERRα control PGC-1α expression which potentially have significant impact on cellular metabolism. Data show that ERRα exerts its metabolic control by regulating the expression of SIRT5 that influences oxygen consumption and ATP generation. Moreover, ERRα has a role in creatine and lactate uptake in skeletal muscle which is important towards energy generation and contraction. This review is focused on the new insights gained into ERRα regulation of metabolism, networks and pathways that have important consequences in maintaining metabolic homeostasis including development of cancer.

  6. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Del Moral-Chávez, Víctor; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-04

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for 'neighborhood' genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments.

  7. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Moral-Chávez, Víctor Del; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for ‘neighborhood’ genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments. PMID:26527724

  8. Selenium regulates gene expression for estrogen sulfotransferase and alpha 2U-globulin in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Christensen, M J

    1998-03-01

    Dietary intake of the essential trace element selenium (Se) regulates expression of genes for selenoproteins and certain non-Se-containing proteins. However, these proteins do not account for all of Se's biological effects. The objective of this work was to identify additional genes whose expression is regulated by Se. Identification of these genes may reveal new functions for Se or define mechanisms for its biological effects. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a Torula yeast-based Se-deficient basal diet or the same diet supplemented with 0.5 mg Se/kg diet as sodium selenite for 13 weeks. Total RNA was used as template for RNA fingerprinting. Two differentially expressed cDNA fragments were identified and cloned. The first had 99% nucleotide identity with rat liver estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) isoform-6. The second had 99% nucleotide sequence identity with rat liver alpha 2u-globulin. The mRNA levels for both were markedly reduced in Se deficiency. Laser densitometry showed that EST mRNA in Se deficiency was 7.3% of that in Se-adequate rat liver. The level of alpha 2u-globulin mRNA in Se-deficient rat liver was only 12.6% of that in Se-adequate rat liver. These results indicate that dietary Se may play a role in steroid hormone metabolism in rat liver.

  9. NF-kappaB links innate immunity to the hypoxic response through transcriptional regulation of HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Rius, Jordi; Guma, Monica; Schachtrup, Christian; Akassoglou, Katerina; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S; Haddad, Gabriel G; Karin, Michael

    2008-06-05

    The hypoxic response is an ancient stress response triggered by low ambient oxygen (O2) (ref. 1) and controlled by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1), whose alpha subunit is rapidly degraded under normoxia but stabilized when O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) that target its O2-dependent degradation domain are inhibited. Thus, the amount of HIF-1alpha, which controls genes involved in energy metabolism and angiogenesis, is regulated post-translationally. Another ancient stress response is the innate immune response, regulated by several transcription factors, among which NF-kappaB plays a central role. NF-kappaB activation is controlled by IkappaB kinases (IKK), mainly IKK-beta, needed for phosphorylation-induced degradation of IkappaB inhibitors in response to infection and inflammation. IKK-beta is modestly activated in hypoxic cell cultures when PHDs that attenuate its activation are inhibited. However, defining the relationship between NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha has proven elusive. Using in vitro systems, it was reported that HIF-1alpha activates NF-kappaB, that NF-kappaB controls HIF-1alpha transcription and that HIF-1alpha activation may be concurrent with inhibition of NF-kappaB. Here we show, with the use of mice lacking IKK-beta in different cell types, that NF-kappaB is a critical transcriptional activator of HIF-1alpha and that basal NF-kappaB activity is required for HIF-1alpha protein accumulation under hypoxia in cultured cells and in the liver and brain of hypoxic animals. IKK-beta deficiency results in defective induction of HIF-1alpha target genes including vascular endothelial growth factor. IKK-beta is also essential for HIF-1alpha accumulation in macrophages experiencing a bacterial infection. Hence, IKK-beta is an important physiological contributor to the hypoxic response, linking it to innate immunity and inflammation.

  10. PPAR{alpha} gene expression is up-regulated by LXR and PXR activators in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Jun; Satoh, Shin-ichi; Kita, Mariko; Nakahara, Mayuko; Hachimura, Satoshi; Miyata, Masaaki; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2008-07-11

    LXR, PXR, and PPAR{alpha} are members of a nuclear receptor family which regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Here, we show the administration of T0901317 stimulates PPAR{alpha} gene expression in the small intestine but not in the liver of both normal and FXR-null mice. The administration of LXR specific ligand GW3965, or PXR specific ligand PCN has the same effect, indicating that ligand-dependent activation of LXR and PXR, but not FXR, is responsible for the increased gene expression of PPAR{alpha} in the mouse small intestine.

  11. Identification of common motifs in the regulation of light harvesting: The case of cyanobacteria IsiA.

    PubMed

    Wahadoszamen, Md; D'Haene, Sandrine; Ara, Anjue Mane; Romero, Elisabet; Dekker, Jan P; Grondelle, Rienk van; Berera, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    When cyanobacteria are grown under iron-limited or other oxidative stress conditions the iron stress inducible pigment-protein IsiA is synthesized in variable amounts. IsiA accumulates in aggregates inside the photosynthetic membrane that strongly dissipate chlorophyll excited state energy. In this paper we applied Stark fluorescence (SF) spectroscopy at 77K to IsiA aggregates to gain insight into the nature of the emitting and energy dissipating state(s). Our study shows that two emitting states are present in the system, one emitting at 684 nm and the other emitting at about 730 nm. The new 730 nm state exhibits strongly reduced fluorescence (F) together with a large charge transfer character. We discuss these findings in the light of the energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the regulation of photosynthesis in plants, cyanobacteria and diatoms. Our results suggest that photosynthetic organisms have adopted common mechanisms to cope with the deleterious effects of excess light under unfavorable growth conditions.

  12. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhecheng

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients.

  13. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients. PMID:28251164

  14. In vivo regulation of replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection by endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J K; Remick, D G; Freeman, P T; Hurley, M C; Fantone, J C; Engleberg, N C

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) in modulation of growth of Legionella pneumophila in the lung was assessed using a murine model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection. Intratracheal inoculation of mice with L. pneumophila resulted in induction of endogenous TNF-alpha, which preceded clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Inhibition of endogenous TNF-alpha activity, via in vivo administration of TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody, or inhibition of endogenous RNIs, via administration of the nitric oxide (NO) synthetase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), resulted in enhanced growth of L. pneumophila in the lung at > or = 3 days postinfection (when compared with untreated L. pneumophila-infected mice). Because of the similar kinetics of enhanced pulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in mice treated in vivo with either anti-TNF-alpha antibody or NMMA, the immunomodulatory effect of NO on endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung was assessed. Administration of NMMA to L. pneumophila-infected mice resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung during replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo. However, administration of exogenous TNF-alpha to NMMA-treated mice failed to significantly enhance clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Results of these studies indicate that both endogenous NO and TNF-alpha facilitate resolution of replicative L. pneumophila lung infections and that regulation of L. pneumophila replication by TNF-alpha is mediated, at least in part, by NO. PMID:7642253

  15. Brain-specific regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 selectively interacts with alpha-actinin-2 to regulate calcium-dependent inactivation of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Bouhamdan, Mohamad; Yan, Hai-Dun; Yan, Xiu-Hua; Bannon, Michael J; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2006-03-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 9-1 (RGS9-1) and RGS9-2 are highly related RGS proteins with distinctive C termini arising from alternative splicing of RGS9 gene transcripts. RGS9-1 is expressed in photoreceptors where it functions as a regulator of transducin. In contrast, RGS9-2 is abundantly expressed in the brain, especially in basal ganglia, where its specific function remains poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RGS9-2, we screened a human cDNA library for potential interacting proteins. This screen identified a strong interaction between RGS9-2 and alpha-actinin-2, suggesting a possible functional relationship between these proteins. Consistent with this idea, RGS9-2 and alpha-actinin-2 coimmunoprecipitated after coexpression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells. Furthermore, endogenous RGS9-2 and alpha-actinin-2 could also be coimmunoprecipitated from extracts of rat striatum, an area highly enriched in both these proteins. These results supported the idea that RGS9-2 and alpha-actinin-2 could act in concert in central neurons. Like alpha-actinin-2, RGS9-2 coimmunoprecipitated NMDA receptors from striatal extracts, suggesting an interaction between RGS9-2, alpha-actinin-2, and NMDA receptors. Previous studies have shown that alpha-actinin mediates calcium-dependent inactivation of NMDA receptors. In HEK-293 cells expressing NMDA receptors, expression of RGS9-2 significantly modulated this form of NMDA receptor inactivation. Furthermore, this modulation showed remarkable preference for NMDA receptor inactivation mediated by alpha-actinin-2. Using a series of deletion constructs, we localized this effect to the RGS domain of the protein. These results identify an unexpected functional interaction between RGS9-2 and alpha-actinin-2 and suggest a potential novel role for RGS9-2 in the regulation of NMDA receptor function.

  16. Regulation of monocyte MMP-9 production by TNF-alpha and a tumour-derived soluble factor (MMPSF).

    PubMed Central

    Leber, T. M.; Balkwill, F. R.

    1998-01-01

    The matrix metalloprotease MMP-9 localizes to tumour-associated macrophages in human ovarian cancer but little is known of its regulation. Co-culture of human ovarian cancer cells (PEO-1) and a monocytic cell line (THP-1) led to production of 92-kDa proMMP-9. PEO-1-conditioned medium (CM) also stimulated THP-1 cells or isolated peripheral blood monocytes to produce proMMP-9. Expression of TIMP-1, however, remained unaffected. There was evidence that tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was involved in tumour-stimulated monocytic proMMP-9 production. Antibody to TNF-alpha inhibited proMMP-9 production, and synthesis of TNF-alpha mRNA and protein preceded proMMP-9 release. In addition, the synthetic matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPI) BB-2116, which blocks TNF-alpha shedding, inhibited proMMP-9 release in the co-cultures and from CM-stimulated monocytic cells. Further experiments suggested that the stimulating factor present in CM was not TNF-alpha, but acted synergistically with autocrine monocyte-derived TNF-alpha to release monocytic proMMP-9. Thus, ovarian cancer cells can stimulate monocytic cells in vitro to make proMMP-9 without affecting the expression of its inhibitor TIMP-1. This induction is mediated via a soluble factor (provisionally named MMPSF) that requires synergistic action of autocrine or paracrine TNF-alpha. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9743290

  17. KRÜPPEL-LIKE FACTOR 9 AND REGULATION OF ENDOMETRIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA SIGNALING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endometrial cancer risk is linked to aberrant estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha) signaling caused by increased ER alpha activation due to hyper-estrogenic environments or mutations in growth-regulatory factors. We had shown that ER alpha signaling is attenuated by the Sp1-related transcription facto...

  18. Tmem27 dimerization, deglycosylation, plasma membrane depletion, and the extracellular Phe-Phe motif are negative regulators of cleavage by Bace2.

    PubMed

    Esterházy, Daria; Akpinar, Pinar; Stoffel, Markus

    2012-05-01

    The pancreatic β-cell surface protein Tmem27 is promotes the preservation of functional β-cell mass. It is a selective substrate of the protease Bace2, yet the intramolecular features of Tmem27 that regulate its processing by this sheddase have not been characterized. In particular, the importance of homodimerization, glycosylation, trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM), the existence of multiple cleavage sites, and the amino acid residues that govern these features are currently unknown. Using Tmem27 mutational analysis and multiple biochemical approaches, we here show that Tmem27 dimerization is a dynamic process mediated by its intracellular cysteine residue and that prevents Tmem27 cleavage, that extracellular asparagine glycosylation is essential for Tmem27 trafficking to the PM and its processing by Bace2, that the amount of Tmem27 at the PM is proportional to its total cell levels upon glucose stimulation and Bace2 inhibition, and that the double phenylalanine motif in the Tmem27 cleavage site is an intramolecular Bace2 inhibitor. These findings define structural properties of Tmem27 that affect the susceptibility to its protease Bace2 and have implications for the efficiency with which Tmem27 and other Bace2 substrates are cleaved in normal and disease states.

  19. Swimming Exercise Alleviated Insulin Resistance by Regulating Tripartite Motif Family Protein 72 Expression and AKT Signal Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed with High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether swimming exercise could improve insulin resistance (IR) by regulating tripartite motif family protein 72 (TRIM72) expression and AKT signal pathway in rats fed with high-fat diet. Five-week-old rats were classified into 3 groups: standard diet as control (CON), high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD plus swimming exercise (Ex-HFD). After 8 weeks, glucose infusion rate (GIR), markers of oxidative stress, mRNA and protein expression of TRIM72, protein of IRS, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were determined in quadriceps muscles. Compared with HFD, the GIR, muscle SOD, and GSH-Px were significantly increased (p < 0.05, resp.), whereas muscle MDA and 8-OHdG levels were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01) in Ex-HFD. Expression levels of TRIM72 mRNA and protein in muscles were significantly reduced (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01), whereas protein expression levels of IRS-1, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were significantly increased in Ex-HFD compared with HFD (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05). These results suggest that an 8-week swimming exercise improves HFD-induced insulin resistance maybe through a reduction of TRIM72 in skeletal muscle and enhancement of AKT signal transduction. PMID:27843952

  20. Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah; Kim, Eui Tae; Lee, Seung-Rock; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2011-04-15

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

  1. Structure of GrlR and the Implication of its EDED Motif in Mediating the Regulation of Type III Secretion System in EHEC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobichen,C.; Li, M.; Yerushalmi, G.; Tan, Y.; Mok, Y.; Rosenshine, I.; Leung, K.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a common cause of severe hemorrhagic colitis. EHEC's virulence is dependent upon a type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded by 41 genes. These genes are organized in several operons clustered in the locus of enterocyte effacement. Most of the locus of enterocyte effacement genes, including grlA and grlR, are positively regulated by Ler, and Ler expression is positively and negatively modulated by GrlA and GrlR, respectively. However, the molecular basis for the GrlA and GrlR activity is still elusive. We have determined the crystal structure of GrlR at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. It consists of a typical {beta}-barrel fold with eight {beta}-strands containing an internal hydrophobic cavity and a plug-like loop on one side of the barrel. Strong hydrophobic interactions between the two {beta}-barrels maintain the dimeric architecture of GrlR. Furthermore, a unique surface-exposed EDED (Glu-Asp-Glu-Asp) motif is identified to be critical for GrlA-GrlR interaction and for the repressive activity of GrlR. This study contributes a novel molecular insight into the mechanism of GrlR function.

  2. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  3. Regulation of pulsatile secretion of prostaglandin F2 alpha from the ovine uterus by ovarian steroids.

    PubMed

    Silvia, W J; Raw, R E

    1993-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine how progesterone and oestradiol regulate pulsatile secretion of PGF2 alpha from the ovine uterus. In Expt 1, ovariectomized ewes received: (1) no treatment, (2) oestradiol, (3) progesterone, or (4) oestradiol and progesterone (n = 5 ewes per treatment group) to approximate the changes in steroids that occur during the oestrous cycle. Jugular venous blood samples were collected at 30 min intervals for 48 h beginning at 08:00 on day 14 of steroid replacement. Blood samples were collected from five intact ewes at a comparable time of the oestrous cycle for comparison. The number and magnitude of pulses in 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGF2 alpha (PGFM) in jugular venous blood samples were used to assess uterine secretion of PGF2 alpha. Experiment 2 was conducted as Expt 1, except that the progesterone replacement protocol was modified to duplicate more closely the temporal pattern of progesterone observed in intact ewes. Results were similar in both experiments. Intact ewes averaged 4.4 +/- 0.6 pulses per 48 h blood sampling period. The frequency of pulses was less in ovariectomized ewes (P < 0.05). The number of pulses was increased by progesterone treatment (P < 0.01); the number of pulses in ovariectomized ewes receiving progesterone replacement was similar to that observed in intact ewes. There was a tendency for oestradiol to have a positive effect on the number of pulses (P = 0.12). The magnitude of pulses in intact ewes averaged 419 +/- 38 pg ml-1 and was much less in ovariectomized ewes (P < 0.05) than in intact ewes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Cooperative signaling by alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins regulates metalloproteinase gene expression in fibroblasts adhering to fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit synovial fibroblasts (RSF) express basal levels of the metalloproteinases (MMP) collagenase, stromelysin-1 and 92-kD gelatinase when plated on intact fibronectin (FN), but elevated levels when plated on either the central RGD-containing cell-binding region of FN (120FN) or antibody against the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin, suggesting that domains outside 120FN may suppress the induction of MMP (Werb, Z., P. M. Tremble, O. Behrendtsen, E. Crowley, and C.H. Damsky. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:877-889). We therefore attempted to reconstitute the basal signaling of intact FN by plating RSF on 120FN together with domains of FN outside this region. Large COOH-terminal fragments containing both the heparin-binding and HICS domains suppressed MMP when combined with 120FN. To map the active sequences, peptides from this region and larger fragments that did, or did not, include the CS-1 portion of IIICS were tested. Only CS-1 peptide, or larger fragments containing CS-1, suppressed MMP expression induced by 120FN. In contrast, peptide V from the heparin-binding region, shown previously to stimulate focal contact formation, further enhanced MMP expression by RSF when present on the substrate with 120FN. RSF expressed alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, the receptor for CS-1, and the anti-alpha 4 mAb blocked the ability of CS-1 to suppress MMP induction by 120FN. These results show that signals modulating MMP expression and focal contact assembly are regulated independently, and that cooperative signaling by alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins plays a dominant role in regulating expression of these extracellular matrix-remodeling genes in response to FN. This work demonstrates directly the modular way in which information in the extracellular matrix is detected and processed by cell surface receptors. PMID:7537277

  5. PPAR{alpha} regulates the hepatotoxic biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT1) gene expression in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Thulin, Petra; Rafter, Ingalill; Stockling, Kenneth; Tomkiewicz, Celine; Norjavaara, Ensio; Aggerbeck, Martine; Hellmold, Heike; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Andersson, Ulf; Cotgreave, Ian; Glinghammar, Bjoern

    2008-08-15

    In this work, we investigated a potential mechanism behind the observation of increased aminotransferase levels in a phase I clinical trial using a lipid-lowering drug, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, AZD4619. In healthy volunteers treated with AZD4619, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were elevated without an increase in other markers for liver injury. These increases in serum aminotransferases have previously been reported in some patients receiving another PPAR{alpha} agonist, fenofibrate. In subsequent in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of ALT1 protein and mRNA in human hepatocytes after treatment with fenofibric acid. The PPAR effect on ALT1 expression was shown to act through a direct transcriptional mechanism involving at least one PPAR response element (PPRE) in the proximal ALT1 promoter, while no effect of fenofibrate and AZD4619 was observed on the ALT2 promoter. Binding of PPARs to the PPRE located at - 574 bp from the transcriptional start site was confirmed on both synthetic oligonucleotides and DNA in hepatocytes. These data show that intracellular ALT expression is regulated by PPAR agonists and that this mechanism might contribute to increased ALT activity in serum.

  6. Down-regulation of. alpha. sub 2 adrenoceptors in ventrolateral medulla of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, A. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of ({sup 3}H)idaxazon to imidazole sites and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine to {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptors of neuronal membranes prepared from cerebral cortex and ventrolateral medulla of 10 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. ({sup 3}H)idaxazon bound to the membranes of cerebral cortex and ventrolateral medulla at a single high affinity site. The binding of ({sup 3}H)idaxazon in ventrolateral medulla and cerebral cortex was found to be similar in SHR and WKY rats. ({sup 3}H)Rauwolscine bound to the membranes of cerebral cortex and ventrolateral medulla at a single high affinity site. The binding of ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine in the cerebral cortex was found to be similar in SHR and WKY rats. However, in the ventrolateral medulla ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine binding was found to be significantly lower in SHR as compared to WKY rats. The decreased binding was due a decrease (32%) in the B{sub max} value in SHR rats as compared to WKY rats. The K{sub d} values were similar in SHR and WKY rats. It is concluded that imidazole binding sites are not affected while, {alpha}{sub 2} adrenergic binding sites are decreased in the ventrolateral medulla of SHR rats and may be contributing to the regulation of blood pressure.

  7. Regulation of polycystin-1 ciliary trafficking by motifs at its C-terminus and polycystin-2 but not by cleavage at the GPS site.

    PubMed

    Su, Xuefeng; Wu, Maoqing; Yao, Gang; El-Jouni, Wassim; Luo, Chong; Tabari, Azadeh; Zhou, Jing

    2015-11-15

    Failure to localize membrane proteins to the primary cilium causes a group of diseases collectively named ciliopathies. Polycystin-1 (PC1, also known as PKD1) is a large ciliary membrane protein defective in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Here, we developed a large set of PC1 expression constructs and identified multiple sequences, including a coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal tail of PC1, regulating full-length PC1 trafficking to the primary cilium. Ciliary trafficking of wild-type and mutant PC1 depends on the dose of polycystin-2 (PC2, also known as PKD2), and the formation of a PC1-PC2 complex. Modulation of the ciliary trafficking module mediated by the VxP ciliary-targeting sequence and Arf4 and Asap1 does not affect the ciliary localization of full-length PC1. PC1 also promotes PC2 ciliary trafficking. PC2 mutations truncating its C-terminal tail but not those changing the VxP sequence to AxA or impairing the pore of the channel, leading to a dead channel, affect PC1 ciliary trafficking. Cleavage at the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) of PC1 is not required for PC1 trafficking to cilia. We propose a mutually dependent model for the ciliary trafficking of PC1 and PC2, and that PC1 ciliary trafficking is regulated by multiple cis-acting elements. As all pathogenic PC1 mutations tested here are defective in ciliary trafficking, ciliary trafficking might serve as a functional read-out for ADPKD.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Oakes, Christopher C.; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B.; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A.; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy. PMID:26964756

  9. Regulation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis hypoxic response gene encoding alpha -crystallin.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D R; Voskuil, M; Schnappinger, D; Liao, R; Harrell, M I; Schoolnik, G K

    2001-06-19

    Unlike many pathogens that are overtly toxic to their hosts, the primary virulence determinant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appears to be its ability to persist for years or decades within humans in a clinically latent state. Since early in the 20th century latency has been linked to hypoxic conditions within the host, but the response of M. tuberculosis to a hypoxic signal remains poorly characterized. The M. tuberculosis alpha-crystallin (acr) gene is powerfully and rapidly induced at reduced oxygen tensions, providing us with a means to identify regulators of the hypoxic response. Using a whole genome microarray, we identified >100 genes whose expression is rapidly altered by defined hypoxic conditions. Numerous genes involved in biosynthesis and aerobic metabolism are repressed, whereas a high proportion of the induced genes have no known function. Among the induced genes is an apparent operon that includes the putative two-component response regulator pair Rv3133c/Rv3132c. When we interrupted expression of this operon by targeted disruption of the upstream gene Rv3134c, the hypoxic regulation of acr was eliminated. These results suggest a possible role for Rv3132c/3133c/3134c in mycobacterial latency.

  10. GRO-alpha in normal and pathological thyroid tissues and its regulation in thyroid-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Aust, G; Steinert, M; Boltze, C; Kiessling, S; Simchen, C

    2001-09-01

    Thyroid glands affected by Graves' disease (GD) show striking leukocytic infiltration, mainly by T-cells. The mechanisms by which the various leukocytes are maintained in the thyroid are unknown. Growth-regulated oncogene-alpha (GRO-alpha) in interaction with its receptor CXCR2 is a chemoattractant for both T-cells and neutrophils and may be one of the chemokines involved in the cell maintenance. GRO-alpha and CD18 mRNA as a marker of leukocytic infiltration were quantified in thyroid tissue using competitive RT-PCR. We found very high GRO-alpha mRNA levels in all thyroid tissues. In GD patients (n=16), the GRO-alpha mRNA did not correlate with the CD18 mRNA level or thyroid peroxidase and TSH-receptor antibodies in patients' sera. In thyroid autonomy (n=10), the GRO-alpha mRNA levels were significantly lower in autonomous single adenomas compared with the corresponding normal tissue. In order to define the cellular source of GRO-alpha mRNA and protein, we examined various thyroid-derived cells. Thyrocytes, thyroid-derived leukocytes and fibroblasts showed basal GRO-alpha mRNA and protein expression, which was remarkably upregulated by different stimuli in vitro. The expression of GRO-alpha by thyroid carcinoma cell lines confirms that thyrocytes may actually produce GRO-alpha. As shown by flow cytometry and immunohistology, CD68+ monocytes/macrophages are the only cell population strongly expressing CXCR2 in the thyroid.

  11. Regulation of neuronal function by choline and 4OH-GTS-21 through alpha 7 nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Uteshev, Vladimir V; Meyer, Edwin M; Papke, Roger L

    2003-04-01

    A unique feature of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor physiology is that, under normal physiological conditions, alpha7 receptors are constantly perfused with their natural selective agonist, choline. Studying neurons of hypothalamic tuberomammillary (TM) nucleus, we show that choline and the selective alpha7 receptor agonist 4OH-GTS-21 can regulate neuronal functions directly, via activation of the native alpha7 receptors, and indirectly, via desensitizing those receptors or transferring them into a state "primed" for desensitization. The direct action produces depolarization and thereby increases the TM neuron spontaneous firing (SF) rate. The regulation of the spontaneous firing rate is robust in a nonphysiological range of choline concentrations >200 microM. However, modest effects persist at concentrations of choline that are likely to be attained perineuronally under some conditions (20-100 microM). At high physiological concentration levels, the indirect choline action reduces or even eliminates the responsiveness of alpha7 receptors and their availability to other strong cholinergic inputs. Similarly to choline, 4OH-GTS-21 increases the TM neuron spontaneous firing rate via activation of alpha7 receptors, and this regulation is robust in the range of clinically relevant concentrations of 4OH-GTS-21. We conclude that factors that regulate choline accumulation in the brain and in experimental slices such as choline uptake, hydrolysis of ACh, membrane phosphatidylcholine catabolism, and solution perfusion rate influence alpha7 nAChR neuronal and synaptic functions, especially under pathological conditions such as stroke, seizures, Alzheimer's disease, and head trauma, when the choline concentration in the CSF is expected to rise.

  12. Efficient motif search in ranked lists and applications to variable gap motifs.

    PubMed

    Leibovich, Limor; Yakhini, Zohar

    2012-07-01

    Sequence elements, at all levels-DNA, RNA and protein, play a central role in mediating molecular recognition and thereby molecular regulation and signaling. Studies that focus on -measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition make use of statistical and computational tools, including approaches to searching sequence motifs. State-of-the-art motif searching tools are limited in their coverage and ability to address large motif spaces. We develop and present statistical and algorithmic approaches that take as input ranked lists of sequences and return significant motifs. The efficiency of our approach, based on suffix trees, allows searches over motif spaces that are not covered by existing tools. This includes searching variable gap motifs-two half sites with a flexible length gap in between-and searching long motifs over large alphabets. We used our approach to analyze several high-throughput measurement data sets and report some validation results as well as novel suggested motifs and motif refinements. We suggest a refinement of the known estrogen receptor 1 motif in humans, where we observe gaps other than three nucleotides that also serve as significant recognition sites, as well as a variable length motif related to potential tyrosine phosphorylation.

  13. Hyperthermia inhibits platelet haemostatic functions and selectively regulates the release of alpha-granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Etulain, J; Lapponi, MJ; Patrucchi, SJ; Romaniuk, MA; Benzadón, R; Klement, GL; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Hyperthermia is one of the main disturbances of homeostasis occurring during sepsis or hypermetabolic states such as cancer. Platelets are important mediators of the inflammation that accompany these processes, but very little is known about the changes in platelet function that occur at different temperatures. Objectives To explore the effect of higher temperatures on platelet physiology. Methods Platelet responses including adhesion, spreading (fluorescence microscopy), αIIbbeta;3 activation (flow cytometry), aggregation (turbidimetry), ATP release (luminescence), thromboxane A2 generation, alpha-granule protein secretion (ELISA), and protein phosphorylation from different signaling pathways (immunoblotting) were studied. Results Preincubation of platelets at temperatures higher than 37°C (38.5°–42°C) inhibited thrombin-induced haemostasis including platelet adhesion, aggregation, ATP release, and thromboxane A2 generation. The expression of P-selectin and CD63, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release were completely inhibited by hyperthermia, whereas von Willebrand factor (vWF) and endostatin levels remained substantially increased at high temperatures. This suggested that release of proteins from platelet granules is modulated not only by classical platelet agonists but also by microenvironmental factors. The observed gradation of response involved not only antiangiogenesis regulators, but also other cargo proteins. Some signaling pathways were more stable than others. While ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation were resistant to changes in temperature, Src, Syk, p38 phosphorylation as well as IkappaB degradation were decreased in a temperature-dependent fashion. Conclusions Higher temperatures, such as those observed with fever or tissue invasion, inhibit the haemostatic functions of platelets and selectively regulate the release of alpha-granule proteins. PMID:21649851

  14. Alpha 1,3 fucosyltransferases are master regulators of prostate cancer cell trafficking.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Steven R; Wiese, Georg K; Cho, Jaehyung; Opperman, Matthew J; Hays, Danielle L; Siddiqui, Javed; Pienta, Kenneth J; Furie, Bruce; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2009-11-17

    How cancer cells bind to vascular surfaces and extravasate into target organs is an underappreciated, yet essential step in metastasis. We postulate that the metastatic process involves discrete adhesive interactions between circulating cancer cells and microvascular endothelial cells. Sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)) on prostate cancer (PCa) cells is thought to promote metastasis by mediating PCa cell binding to microvascular endothelial (E)-selectin. Yet, regulation of sLe(X) and related E-selectin ligand expression in PCa cells is a poorly understood factor in PCa metastasis. Here, we describe a glycobiological mechanism regulating E-selectin-mediated adhesion and metastatic potential of PCa cells. We demonstrate that alpha1,3 fucosyltransferases (FT) 3, 6, and 7 are markedly elevated in bone- and liver-metastatic PCa and dictate synthesis of sLe(X) and E-selectin ligands on metastatic PCa cells. Upregulated FT3, FT6, or FT7 expression induced robust PCa PC-3 cell adhesion to bone marrow (BM) endothelium and to inflamed postcapillary venules in an E-selectin-dependent manner. Membrane proteins, CD44, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), podocalyxin-like protein (PCLP), and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) were major scaffolds presenting E-selectin-binding determinants on FT-upregulated PC-3 cells. Furthermore, elevated FT7 expression promoted PC-3 cell trafficking to and retention in BM through an E-selectin dependent event. These results indicate that alpha1,3 FTs could enhance metastatic efficiency of PCa by triggering an E-selectin-dependent trafficking mechanism.

  15. A tyrosine kinase regulates alpha-adrenoceptor-stimulated contraction and phospholipase D activation in the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Jinsi, A; Paradise, J; Deth, R C

    1996-04-29

    Since previous studies had indicated a role for tyrosine kinases in alpha 2-adrenoceptor-induced contractile responses in other blood vessels, as well as in the activation of phospholipase D, we examined the sensitivity of these responses in rat aorta to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Contractions induced by both noradrenaline and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist UK14304 (5-bromo-6-[2-imidazolin-2-yl-amino]-quinoxaline) were fully inhibited by genistein, with the latter responses being more sensitive. Contractions induced by high K+ buffer were also inhibited, but to a lesser extent. Both agonists caused a stimulation of phospholipase D activity, which could be blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating involvement of either Gi or Go. Genistein completely inhibited the agonist-induced phospholipase D activity and also substantially reduced the basal level of phospholipase D activity. Pretreatment with either the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin or the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine was also effective in eliminating the agonist-induced increase of phospholipase D. These results indicate that a tyrosine kinase-regulated phospholipase D plays a critical role in alpha-adrenoceptor-induced contractions of the rat aorta and that stimulation of both alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors is essential to allow phospholipase activation.

  16. Species-specific mechanisms for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) regulation by drugs and bile acids.

    PubMed

    Handschin, Christoph; Gnerre, Carmela; Fraser, David J; Martinez-Jimenez, Celia; Jover, Ramiro; Meyer, Urs A

    2005-02-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated in order to control intrahepatic cholesterol and bile acid levels. Ligands of the xenobiotic-sensing pregnane X receptor inhibit CYP7A1 expression. To retrace the evolution of the molecular mechanisms underlying CYP7A1 inhibition, we used a chicken hepatoma cell system that retains the ability to be induced by phenobarbital and other drugs. Whereas bile acids regulate CYP7A1 via small heterodimer partner and liver receptor homolog-1, mRNA expression of these nuclear receptors is unchanged by xenobiotics. Instead, drugs repress chicken hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) transcript levels concomitant with a reduction in CYP7A1 expression. Importantly, no reduction of HNF4alpha levels is found in mouse liver in vivo and in human primary hepatocyte cultures, respectively. Thus, besides the importance of HNF4alpha in CYP7A1 regulation in all species, birds and mammals use different signaling pathways to adjust CYP7A1 levels after exposure to xenobiotics.

  17. Synapse loss regulated by matrix metalloproteinases in traumatic brain injury is associated with hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jamie Y; Kreipke, Christian W; Schafer, Patrick; Schafer, Steven; Speirs, Susan L; Rafols, José A

    2009-05-01

    The present study assessed the role of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 in synapse loss after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the role of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), a transcription factor up-regulated during hypoxia, in the regulation of MMP-2 and -9 expression post-TBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6 per group, 400 g-425 g) were injured using Marmarou's closed-head acceleration impact model and allowed to survive for 1, 4, 24 and 48 h. In another set of experiments, 30 min after TBI, animals were treated with Minocycline (inhibitor of MMPs), or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, inhibitor of HIF-1alpha) and sacrificed at 4 h after injury. Relative amounts of synaptophysin, a presynaptic vesicular protein, HIF-1alpha, as well as MMP-2 and -9 were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Activity levels of MMP-2 and -9 were determined by zymography. Synaptophysin expression was significantly (p<0.05) decreased at 1 h through 48 h after TBI. A significant increase in gene and protein expressions of HIF-1alpha, MMP-2 and -9, as well as enzyme activity of MMP-2 and -9 at the same time points was also detected. Inhibition of either MMPs or HIF-1alpha significantly reversed the TBI-induced decrease in synaptophysin. Inhibition of HIF-1alpha reduced expression of MMP-2 and -9. This study showed an early detection of a correlation between synaptic loss and MMP expression after TBI. The data also supports a role for HIF-1alpha in the MMP regulatory cascade in synapse loss after TBI, suggesting potential targets for reducing loss of synaptic terminals.

  18. Disease-associated mutant alpha-actinin-4 reveals a mechanism for regulating its F-actin-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Weins, Astrid; Schlondorff, Johannes S; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Denker, Bradley M; Hartwig, John H; Stossel, Thomas P; Pollak, Martin R

    2007-10-09

    Alpha-actinin-4 is a widely expressed protein that employs an actin-binding site with two calponin homology domains to crosslink actin filaments (F-actin) in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner in vitro. An inherited, late-onset form of kidney failure is caused by point mutations in the alpha-actinin-4 actin-binding domain. Here we show that alpha-actinin-4/F-actin aggregates, observed in vivo in podocytes of humans and mice with disease, likely form as a direct result of the increased actin-binding affinity of the protein. We document that exposure of a buried actin-binding site 1 in mutant alpha-actinin-4 causes an increase in its actin-binding affinity, abolishes its Ca(2+) regulation in vitro, and diverts its normal localization from actin stress fibers and focal adhesions in vivo. Inactivation of this buried actin-binding site returns the affinity of the mutant to that of the WT protein and abolishes aggregate formation in cells. In vitro, actin filaments crosslinked by the mutant alpha-actinin-4 exhibit profound changes of structural and biomechanical properties compared with WT alpha-actinin-4. On a molecular level, our findings elucidate the physiological importance of a dynamic interaction of alpha-actinin with F-actin in podocytes in vivo. We propose that a conformational change with full exposure of actin-binding site 1 could function as a switch mechanism to regulate the actin-binding affinity of alpha-actinin and possibly other calponin homology domain proteins under physiological conditions.

  19. Perilipin, a critical regulator of fat storage and breakdown, is a target gene of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Mst. Hasina; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Fumiko; Osumi, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    Perilipin is a protein localized on lipid droplet surfaces in adipocytes and steroidogenic cells, playing a central role in regulated lipolysis. Expression of the perilipin gene is markedly induced during adipogenesis. We found that transcription from the perilipin gene promoter is activated by an orphan nuclear receptor, estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR){alpha}. A response element to this receptor was identified in the promoter region by a gene reporter assay, the electrophoretic-gel mobility-shift assay and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} enhanced, whereas small heterodimer partner (SHP) repressed, the transactivating function of ERR{alpha} on the promoter. Thus, the perilipin gene expression is regulated by a transcriptional network controlling energy metabolism, substantiating the functional importance of perilipin in the maintenance of body energy balance.

  20. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF-alpha production through down-regulation of IRF4.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Barun; Ki, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF-alpha on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- alpha inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- alpha production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF-alpha therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  1. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  2. The Ankrd13 Family of Ubiquitin-interacting Motif-bearing Proteins Regulates Valosin-containing Protein/p97 Protein-mediated Lysosomal Trafficking of Caveolin 1*

    PubMed Central

    Burana, Daocharad; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Tanno, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an oligomeric protein that forms flask-shaped, lipid-rich pits, termed caveolae, on the plasma membrane. Cav-1 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in ubiquitination- and valosin-containing protein (VCP)-dependent manners. VCP, an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities that remodels or segregates ubiquitinated protein complexes, has been proposed to disassemble Cav-1 oligomers on the endosomal membrane, facilitating the trafficking of Cav-1 to the lysosome. Genetic mutations in VCP compromise the lysosomal trafficking of Cav-1, leading to a disease called inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Here we identified the Ankrd13 family of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM)-containing proteins as novel VCP-interacting molecules on the endosome. Ankrd13 proteins formed a ternary complex with VCP and Cav-1 and exhibited high binding affinity for ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers in an UIM-dependent manner. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that Cav-1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination, which serves as a lysosomal trafficking signal, and that the UIMs of Ankrd13 proteins bind preferentially to this ubiquitin chain type. The overexpression of Ankrd13 caused enlarged hollow late endosomes, which was reminiscent of the phenotype of the VCP mutations in IBMPFD. Overexpression of Ankrd13 proteins also stabilized ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers on the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes. The interaction with Ankrd13 was abrogated in IMBPFD-associated VCP mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ankrd13 proteins cooperate with VCP to regulate the lysosomal trafficking of ubiquitinated Cav-1. PMID:26797118

  3. The Ankrd13 Family of Ubiquitin-interacting Motif-bearing Proteins Regulates Valosin-containing Protein/p97 Protein-mediated Lysosomal Trafficking of Caveolin 1.

    PubMed

    Burana, Daocharad; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Tanno, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-03-18

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an oligomeric protein that forms flask-shaped, lipid-rich pits, termed caveolae, on the plasma membrane. Cav-1 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in ubiquitination- and valosin-containing protein (VCP)-dependent manners. VCP, an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities that remodels or segregates ubiquitinated protein complexes, has been proposed to disassemble Cav-1 oligomers on the endosomal membrane, facilitating the trafficking of Cav-1 to the lysosome. Genetic mutations in VCP compromise the lysosomal trafficking of Cav-1, leading to a disease called inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Here we identified the Ankrd13 family of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM)-containing proteins as novel VCP-interacting molecules on the endosome. Ankrd13 proteins formed a ternary complex with VCP and Cav-1 and exhibited high binding affinity for ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers in an UIM-dependent manner. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that Cav-1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination, which serves as a lysosomal trafficking signal, and that the UIMs of Ankrd13 proteins bind preferentially to this ubiquitin chain type. The overexpression of Ankrd13 caused enlarged hollow late endosomes, which was reminiscent of the phenotype of the VCP mutations in IBMPFD. Overexpression of Ankrd13 proteins also stabilized ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers on the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes. The interaction with Ankrd13 was abrogated in IMBPFD-associated VCP mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ankrd13 proteins cooperate with VCP to regulate the lysosomal trafficking of ubiquitinated Cav-1.

  4. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings.

  5. ERR{alpha} regulates osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Pollock, Hanna; Aarnisalo, Piia

    2010-05-28

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-{alpha} (ERR{alpha}) has been reported to have both a positive and a negative regulatory role in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. We have studied the role of ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from ERR{alpha} deficient mice and their differentiation capacities were compared to that of the wild-type cells. ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced cellular proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralization. In the complementary experiment, overexpression of ERR{alpha} in MC3T3-E1 cells increased the expression of osteoblastic markers and mineralization. Alterations in the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) may at least partially explain the effects on mineralization as BSP expression was reduced in ERR{alpha} deficient MSCs and enhanced upon ERR{alpha} overexpression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter construct driven by the BSP promoter was efficiently transactivated by ERR{alpha}. Under adipogenic conditions, ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced adipocytic differentiation. Our data thus propose a positive role for ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. The variability in the results yielded in the different studies implies that ERR{alpha} may play different roles in bone under different physiological conditions.

  6. TRIM28 regulates the nuclear accumulation and toxicity of both alpha-synuclein and tau

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Maxime WC; de Haro, Maria; Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; De Maio, Antonia; Park, Jeehye; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Sharma, Ajay; See, Lauren; Lu, Nan; Vilanova-Velez, Luis; Klisch, Tiemo J; Westbrook, Thomas F; Troncoso, Juan C; Botas, Juan; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are driven by the toxic gain-of-function of specific proteins within the brain. Elevated levels of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) appear to drive neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease (PD); neuronal accumulation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD); and their increased levels cause neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms. Despite the clinical differences between AD and PD, several lines of evidence suggest that α-Syn and tau overlap pathologically. The connections between α-Syn and tau led us to ask whether these proteins might be regulated through a shared pathway. We therefore screened for genes that affect post-translational levels of α-Syn and tau. We found that TRIM28 regulates α-Syn and tau levels and that its reduction rescues toxicity in animal models of tau- and α-Syn-mediated degeneration. TRIM28 stabilizes and promotes the nuclear accumulation and toxicity of both proteins. Intersecting screens across comorbid proteinopathies thus reveal shared mechanisms and therapeutic entry points. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19809.001 PMID:27779468

  7. Hepatic triacylglycerol hydrolysis regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Sapiro, Jessica M; Mashek, Mara T; Greenberg, Andrew S; Mashek, Douglas G

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that fatty acids generated from intracellular triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolysis may have important roles in intracellular signaling. This study was conducted to determine if fatty acids liberated from TAG hydrolysis regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Primary rat hepatocyte cultures were treated with adenoviruses overexpressing adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) or adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) or treated with short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted against ADRP. Subsequent effects on TAG metabolism and PPARalpha activity and target gene expression were determined. Overexpressing ADRP attenuated TAG hydrolysis, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of ADRP or ATGL overexpression resulted in enhanced TAG hydrolysis. Results from PPARalpha reporter activity assays demonstrated that decreasing TAG hydrolysis by ADRP overexpression resulted in a 35-60% reduction in reporter activity under basal conditions or in the presence of fatty acids. As expected, PPARalpha target genes were also decreased in response to ADRP overexpression. However, the PPARalpha ligand, WY-14643, was able to restore PPARalpha activity following ADRP overexpression. Despite its effects on PPARalpha, overexpressing ADRP did not affect PPARgamma activity. Enhancing TAG hydrolysis through ADRP knockdown or ATGL overexpression increased PPARalpha activity. These results indicate that TAG hydrolysis and the consequential release of fatty acids regulate PPARalpha activity.

  8. The helical domain of a G protein alpha subunit is a regulator of its effector.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Northup, J K

    1998-10-27

    The alpha subunit (Galpha) of heterotrimeric G proteins is a major determinant of signaling selectivity. The Galpha structure essentially comprises a GTPase "Ras-like" domain (RasD) and a unique alpha-helical domain (HD). We used the vertebrate phototransduction model to test for potential functions of HD and found that the HD of the retinal transducin Galpha (Galphat) and the closely related gustducin (Galphag), but not Galphai1, Galphas, or Galphaq synergistically enhance guanosine 5'-gamma[-thio]triphosphate bound Galphat (GalphatGTPgammaS) activation of bovine rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). In addition, both HDt and HDg, but not HDi1, HDs, or HDq attenuate the trypsin-activated PDE. GalphatGDP and HDt attenuation of trypsin-activated PDE saturate with similar affinities and to an identical 38% of initial activity. These data suggest that interaction of intact Galphat with the PDE catalytic core may be caused by the HD moiety, and they indicate an independent site(s) for the HD moiety of Galphat within the PDE catalytic core in addition to the sites for the inhibitory Pgamma subunits. The HD moiety of GalphatGDP is an attenuator of the activated catalytic core, whereas in the presence of activated GalphatGTPgammaS the independently expressed HDt is a potent synergist. Rhodopsin catalysis of Galphat activation enhances the PDE activation produced by subsaturating levels of Galphat, suggesting a HD-moiety synergism from a transient conformation of Galphat. These results establish HD-selective regulations of vertebrate retinal PDE, and they provide evidence demonstrating that the HD is a modulatory domain. We suggest that the HD works in concert with the RasD, enhancing the efficiency of G protein signaling.

  9. Neural regulation of muscle acetylcholine receptor epsilon- and alpha- subunit gene promoters in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of denervation were investigated in mice with transgenes containing promoter elements from the muscle acetylcholine receptor epsilon- and alpha-subunit genes. The promoter sequences were coupled to a nuclear localization signal-beta-galactosidase fusion gene (nlacZ) as a reporter. While many postsynaptic specializations form in the embryo, expression of the epsilon subunit is induced during the first two postnatal weeks. When muscles were denervated at birth, before the onset of epsilon expression, epsilon nlacZ still appeared at the former synaptic sites on schedule. This result suggests that the nerve leaves a localized "trace" in the muscle that can continue to regulate transcription. An additional finding was that epsilon nlacZ expression was much stronger in denervated than in intact muscles. This suggests that the epsilon promoter is similar to the other subunits in containing elements that are activated on cessation of neural activity. However, even after denervation, epsilon nlacZ expression was always confined to the synaptic region whereas alpha nlacZ expression increased in nuclei along the entire length of the fiber. This suggests that while the epsilon gene is similar in its activity dependence to other subunit genes, it is unique in that local nerve-derived signals are essential for its expression. Consequently, inactivity enhances epsilon expression only in synaptic nuclei where such signals are present, but enhances expression throughout the muscle fiber. Truncations and an internal deletion of the epsilon promoter indicate that cis-elements essential for the response to synaptic signals are contained within 280 bp of the transcription start site. In contrast to these results in young animals, denervation in older animals leads to an unexpected reduction in nlacZ activity. However, mRNA measurements indicated that transgene expression was increased in these animals. This discordance between nlacZ mRNA and enzyme activity, demonstrates a

  10. A T-cell specific transcriptional enhancer element 3 prime of C sub. alpha. in the human T-cell receptor. alpha. locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Icheng; Yang, Lihsuan; Morle, G.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1989-09-01

    A transcriptional enhancer element has been identified 4.5 kilobases 3{prime} of C{sub {alpha}} (constant region {alpha} chain) in the human T-cell receptor (TCR) {alpha}-chain locus. This enhancer is active on both a TCR V{sub {alpha}} (variable region {alpha} chain) promoter and the minimal simian virus 40 promoter in TCR {alpha}/{beta} Jurkat and EL4 cells but is inactive on a V{sub {alpha}} promoter TCR {gamma}/{delta} PEER and Molt-13 cells, clone 13 B cells, and HeLa fibroblasts. The enhancer has been localized to a 116-base-pair BstXI/Dra I restriction enzyme fragment, which lacks immunoglobulin octamer and {kappa}B enhancer motifs but does contain a consensus cAMP-response element (CRE). DNase I footprint analyses demonstrated that the minimal enhancer contains two binding sites for Jurkat nuclear proteins. One of these sites corresponds to the CRE, while the other does not correspond to a known transcriptional enhancer motif. These data support a model in which TCR {alpha} gene transcription is regulated by a unique set of cis-acting sequences and trans-acting factors, which are differentially active in cells of the TCR {alpha}/{beta} lineage. In addition, the TCR {alpha} enhancer may play a role in activating oncogene expression in T-lymphoblastoid tumors that have previously been shown to display chromosomal translocations into the human TCR {alpha} locus.

  11. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P < 0.05) compared with unliganded conditions. The alterations in cell cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P < 0.05) compared with parental cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens revealed that tamoxifen yields a slower cell cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  12. Karyopherin Alpha 1 Regulates Satellite Cell Proliferation and Survival by Modulating Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cutler, Alicia; Pavlath, Grace K

    2016-07-19

    Satellite cells are stem cells with an essential role in skeletal muscle repair. Precise regulation of gene expression is critical for proper satellite cell quiescence, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal. Nuclear proteins required for gene expression are dependent on the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery to access to nucleus, however little is known about regulation of nuclear transport in satellite cells. The best characterized nuclear import pathway is classical nuclear import which depends on a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS) in a cargo protein and the heterodimeric import receptors, karyopherin alpha (KPNA) and beta (KPNB). Multiple KPNA1 paralogs exist and can differ in importing specific cNLS proteins required for cell differentiation and function. We show that transcripts for six Kpna paralogs underwent distinct changes in mouse satellite cells during muscle regeneration accompanied by changes in cNLS proteins in nuclei. Depletion of KPNA1, the most dramatically altered KPNA, caused satellite cells in uninjured muscle to prematurely activate, proliferate and undergo apoptosis leading to satellite cell exhaustion with age. Increased proliferation of satellite cells led to enhanced muscle regeneration at early stages of regeneration. In addition, we observed impaired nuclear localization of two key KPNA1 cargo proteins: p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor associated with cell cycle control and lymphoid enhancer factor 1, a critical cotranscription factor for β-catenin. These results indicate that regulated nuclear import of proteins by KPNA1 is critical for satellite cell proliferation and survival and establish classical nuclear import as a novel regulatory mechanism for controlling satellite cell fate. Stem Cells 2016.

  13. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Caperna, T J; Shannon, A E; Stoll, M; Blomberg, L A; Ramsay, T G

    2015-07-01

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP, orosomucoid, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute-phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute-phase protein in this species, and its circulating concentration appears to be associated with growth rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regulation of AGP synthesis in hepatocytes prepared from suckling piglets and to provide a framework to compare its regulation with that of haptoglobin (HP), a positive acute-phase protein. Hepatocytes were isolated from preweaned piglets and maintained in serum-free monolayer culture for up to 72 h. The influences of hormones, cytokines, and redox modifiers on the expression and secretion of AGP and HP were determined by relative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring the concentration of each protein secreted into culture medium. The messenger RNA abundance and/or secretion of AGP protein was enhanced by interleukin (IL)-17a, IL-1, and resveratrol and inhibited by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), oncostatin M, and thyroid hormone (P < 0.05). HP expression and synthesis were upregulated by oncostatin M, IL-6, and dexamethasone and downregulated by TNF (P < 0.01). The overall messenger RNA expression at 24 h was in agreement with the secreted protein patterns confirming that control of these proteins in hepatocytes is largely transcriptional. Moreover, these data support the consideration that AGP is a negative acute-phase reactant and appears to be regulated by cytokines (with the exception of TNF) and hormones primarily in a manner opposite to that of the positive acute-phase protein, HP.

  14. Efficient motif search in ranked lists and applications to variable gap motifs

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, Limor; Yakhini, Zohar

    2012-01-01

    Sequence elements, at all levels—DNA, RNA and protein, play a central role in mediating molecular recognition and thereby molecular regulation and signaling. Studies that focus on measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition make use of statistical and computational tools, including approaches to searching sequence motifs. State-of-the-art motif searching tools are limited in their coverage and ability to address large motif spaces. We develop and present statistical and algorithmic approaches that take as input ranked lists of sequences and return significant motifs. The efficiency of our approach, based on suffix trees, allows searches over motif spaces that are not covered by existing tools. This includes searching variable gap motifs—two half sites with a flexible length gap in between—and searching long motifs over large alphabets. We used our approach to analyze several high-throughput measurement data sets and report some validation results as well as novel suggested motifs and motif refinements. We suggest a refinement of the known estrogen receptor 1 motif in humans, where we observe gaps other than three nucleotides that also serve as significant recognition sites, as well as a variable length motif related to potential tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:22416066

  15. Sequential regulation of alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 5 beta 1 integrin avidity by CC chemokines in monocytes: implications for transendothelial chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Leukocyte emigration possibly requires dynamic regulation of integrin adhesiveness for endothelial and extracellular matrix ligands. Adhesion assays on purified vascular cell adhension molecule (VCAM)-1, fibronectin, and fibronectin fragments revealed distinct kinetic patterns for the regulation of very late antigen (VLA)-4 (alpha 4 beta 1) and VLA-5 (alpha 5 beta 1) avidity by the CC chemokines monocyte inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted), or monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in monocytes. CC chemokines induced early activation and subsequent deactivation of VLA-4, whereas upregulation of VLA-5 avidity occurred later and persisted. Controlled detachment assays in shear flow suggested that adhesive strength of VLA-4 for VCAM-1 or the 40-kD fragment of fibronectin (FN40) is more rapidly increased and subsequently reduced by MCP-1 than by MIP-1 alpha, and confirmed late and sustained activation of the adhesive strength of VLA-5 for the 120- kD fragment of fibronectin (FN120). Mn2+ or the stimulating beta 1 mAb TS2/16 strongly and stably enhanced monocyte binding to VCAM-1 or fibronectin, and locked beta 1 integrins in a high avidity state, which was not further modulated by CC chemokines. Mn2+ and mAb TS2/16 inhibited CC chemokine-induced transendothelial migration, particularly chemotaxis across stimulated endothelium that involved VLA-4 and VCAM- 1. VLA-4 on Jurkat cells is of constitutively high avidity and interfered with migration across barriers expressing VCAM-1. Low but not high site densities of VCAM-1 or FN40 promoted, while FN120 impaired, beta 1 integrin-dependent monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 across filters coated with these substrates. Thus, we show that CC chemokines can differentially and selectively regulate avidity of integrins sharing common beta subunits. Transient activation and deactivation of VLA-4 may serve to facilitate transendothelial diapedesis, whereas late and

  16. Developmentally regulated enzymes and cyclic AMP-binding sites in Dictyostelium discoideum cells blocked during development by alpha-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J A; Stirling, J L

    1982-01-01

    When cells of the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum are allowed to starve in the presence of alpha-chymotrypsin, they are blocked in development at the stage where tight aggregates form tips. Analysis of developmentally regulated enzymes has shown that alpha-mannosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, threonine deaminase, tyrosine aminotransferase, beta-glucosidase and the carbohydrate-binding protein discoidin are unaffected, but enzymes that show an increase in specific activity during post-aggregative development, namely glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, UDP-galactose 4-epimerase, UDP-galactose polysaccharide transferase and alkaline phosphatase, did not show the characteristic increase when development was blocked by alpha-chymotrypsin. Recovery of cells from the effects of alpha-chymotrypsin was accompanied by the formation of fruiting bodies and a concomitant increase in the specific activity of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Uptake or efflux of 45Ca2+ was not altered in the presence of alpha-chymotrypsin. Cells allowed to develop in alpha-chymotrypsin, or treated with the enzyme for 15 min, had a markedly reduced ability to bind cyclic AMP with low affinity; high-affinity binding was unaffected. Pronase had a similar effect on cyclic AMP binding, but trypsin, which does not alter developmental processes, has no effect on cyclic AMP binding to D. discoideum cells. PMID:7150239

  17. The cytoskeletal protein alpha-actinin regulates acid-sensing ion channel 1a through a C-terminal interaction.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, Mikael K; Schnizler, Katrin; Zha, Xiang-Ming; Hall, Duane D; Wemmie, John A; Hell, Johannes W; Welsh, Michael J

    2009-01-30

    The acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons where it generates transient cation currents when extracellular pH falls. ASIC1a confers pH-dependent modulation on postsynaptic dendritic spines and has critical effects in neurological diseases associated with a reduced pH. However, knowledge of the proteins that interact with ASIC1a and influence its function is limited. Here, we show that alpha-actinin, which links membrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, associates with ASIC1a in brain and in cultured cells. The interaction depended on an alpha-actinin-binding site in the ASIC1a C terminus that was specific for ASIC1a versus other ASICs and for alpha-actinin-1 and -4. Co-expressing alpha-actinin-4 altered ASIC1a current density, pH sensitivity, desensitization rate, and recovery from desensitization. Moreover, reducing alpha-actinin expression altered acid-activated currents in hippocampal neurons. These findings suggest that alpha-actinins may link ASIC1a to a macromolecular complex in the postsynaptic membrane where it regulates ASIC1a activity.

  18. A-type lamins bind both hetero- and euchromatin, the latter being regulated by lamina-associated polypeptide 2 alpha

    PubMed Central

    Gesson, Kevin; Rescheneder, Philipp; Skoruppa, Michael P.; von Haeseler, Arndt; Dechat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are components of the peripheral nuclear lamina and interact with heterochromatic genomic regions, termed lamina-associated domains (LADs). In contrast to lamin B1 being primarily present at the nuclear periphery, lamin A/C also localizes throughout the nucleus, where it associates with the chromatin-binding protein lamina-associated polypeptide (LAP) 2 alpha. Here, we show that lamin A/C also interacts with euchromatin, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation of euchromatin- and heterochromatin-enriched samples. By way of contrast, lamin B1 was only found associated with heterochromatin. Euchromatic regions occupied by lamin A/C overlap with those bound by LAP2alpha, and lack of LAP2alpha in LAP2alpha-deficient cells shifts binding of lamin A/C toward more heterochromatic regions. These alterations in lamin A/C-chromatin interactions correlate with changes in epigenetic histone marks in euchromatin but do not significantly affect gene expression. Loss of lamin A/C in heterochromatic regions in LAP2alpha-deficient cells, however, correlated with increased gene expression. Our data show a novel role of nucleoplasmic lamin A/C and LAP2alpha in regulating euchromatin. PMID:26798136

  19. The liver-enriched transcription factor CREBH is nutritionally regulated and activated by fatty acids and PPAR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, Hirosuke; Ishii, Kiyo-aki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Mikami, Motoki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Kumadaki, Shin; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2010-01-08

    To elucidate the physiological role of CREBH, the hepatic mRNA and protein levels of CREBH were estimated in various feeding states of wild and obesity mice. In the fast state, the expression of CREBH mRNA and nuclear protein were high and profoundly suppressed by refeeding in the wild-type mice. In ob/ob mice, the refeeding suppression was impaired. The diet studies suggested that CREBH expression was activated by fatty acids. CREBH mRNA levels in the mouse primary hepatocytes were elevated by addition of the palmitate, oleate and eicosapenonate. It was also induced by PPAR{alpha} agonist and repressed by PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that the CREBH promoter activity was induced by fatty acids and co-expression of PPAR{alpha}. Deletion studies identified the PPRE for PPAR{alpha} activation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay confirmed that PPAR{alpha} directly binds to the PPRE. Activation of CREBH at fasting through fatty acids and PPAR{alpha} suggest that CREBH is involved in nutritional regulation.

  20. The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) gene is regulated by HNF-4{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Klapper, Maja . E-mail: klapper@molnut.uni-kiel.de; Boehme, Mike; Nitz, Inke; Doering, Frank

    2007-04-27

    The cytosolic human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) is proposed to be involved in intestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of hFABP2 by the endodermal hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF-4{alpha}), involved in regulation of genes of fatty acid metabolism and differentiation. Electromobility shift assays demonstrated that HNF-4{alpha} binds at position -324 to -336 within the hFABP2 promoter. Mutation of this HNF-4 binding site abolished the luciferase reporter activity of hFABP2 in postconfluent Caco-2 cells. In HeLa cells, this mutation reduced the activation of the hFABP2 promoter by HNF-4{alpha} by about 50%. Thus, binding element at position -336/-324 essentially determines the transcriptional activity of promoter and may be important in control of hFABP2 expression by dietary lipids and differentiation. Studying genotype interactions of hFABP2 and HNF-4{alpha}, that are both candidate genes for diabetes type 2, may be a powerful approach.

  1. The role of RAP1 in the regulation of the MAT alpha locus.

    PubMed Central

    Giesman, D; Best, L; Tatchell, K

    1991-01-01

    The RAP1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an abundant DNA-binding protein, also known as GRF1, TBA, or TUF, that binds to many sites in the yeast genome in vitro. These sites define a consensus sequence, [sequence: see text], and deletion analyses of genes that contain this sequence have implicated the involvement of RAP1 in numerous cellular processes, including gene activation and repression. The MAT alpha locus, required for determination of the alpha cell type in yeast cells, contains a RAP1 binding site; this site coincides with the MAT alpha upstream activating sequence (UAS) and is necessary for expression of the two genes encoded by the MAT alpha locus, MAT alpha 1 and MAT alpha 2. We show that the MAT alpha UAS is sufficient to activate transcription from a promoterless gene fusion of the yeast CYC1 upstream region and the lacZ gene. Constructs containing only the MAT alpha UAS generated elevated levels of beta-galactosidase activity which were indistinguishable from those of constructs containing the entire MAT alpha intergenic region. Further, the MAT alpha UAS has an intrinsic polarity of transcriptional activation; transcription of CYC1-lacZ was six- to sevenfold higher when the UAS was oriented in the direction normally associated with MAT alpha 2 transcription. Point mutations in the MAT alpha UAS that reduce MAT alpha expression three- to fivefold resulted in a bi-mating phenotype, while a mutation that reduced MAT alpha expression still further resulted in an a-mating phenotype. We isolated plasmids from a high-copy-number yeast library that suppressed the bi-mating defect of point mutations in the MAT alpha UAS, and the most effective dosage suppressor contained the gene encoding RAP1. A temperature-sensitive rap1 mutant bi-mates at the semipermissive temperature. Double mutants at rap1 and mat alpha mate exclusively as a cells, at all temperatures, and do not express detectable levels of MAT alpha RNA. These data provide evidence that the

  2. Disruption by interferon-alpha of an autocrine interleukin-6 growth loop in IL-6-dependent U266 myeloma cells by homologous and heterologous down-regulation of the IL-6 receptor alpha- and beta-chains.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, M; Brini, A T; Bosco, M C; Rubboli, F; Egawa, M; Zhao, J; Princler, G L; Kung, H F

    1994-01-01

    IL-6 is an autocrine growth factor for U266 myeloma cells and their growth is inhibited by IFN-alpha or IL-6 mAb. We asked, therefore, whether IFN-alpha-induced growth inhibition involved IL-6. IFN-alpha and mAb against IL-6, the IL-6R alpha-(gp80) or beta-chain (gp130) potently inhibited U266 cells. Remarkably, this effect occurred despite IFN-alpha-augmented secretion of endogenous IL-6. However, examining the IL-6R revealed that IFN-alpha drastically curtailed expression of the IL-6R alpha- and beta-chain. This effect occurred on two different levels (protein and mRNA) and by two different mechanisms (directly and indirectly through IL-6). First, IFN-alpha, but not IL-6, greatly decreased gp80 and, to a lesser extent, gp130 mRNA levels which resulted in a loss of IL-6 binding sites. Second, IFN-alpha-induced IL-6 predominantly down-regulated membrane-bound gp130. IFN-alpha-mediated decrease of gp80 levels was not detected on IL-6-independent myeloma (RPMI 8226) or myeloid cells (U937). We conclude that IFN-alpha inhibited IL-6-dependent myeloma cell growth by depriving U266 cells of an essential component of their autocrine growth loop, a functional IL-6R. Images PMID:7989587

  3. Proteomic Studies of Nitrated Alpha-Synuclein Microglia Regulation by CD4+CD25+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Ashley D.; Stone, David K.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2009-01-01

    Microglial inflammatory responses affect Parkinson's disease (PD) associated nigrostriatal degeneration. This is triggered, in measure, by misfolded, nitrated alpha-synuclein (N-α-syn) contained within Lewy bodies that are released from dying or dead dopaminergic neurons into the extravascular space. N-α-syn-stimulated microglial immunity is regulated by CD4+ T cells. Indeed, CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Treg) induce neuroprotective immune responses. This is seen in rodent models of stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and PD. To elucidate the mechanism for Treg-mediated microglial responses, we used a proteomic platform integrating difference gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry peptide sequencing. These tests served to determine the consequences of Treg on the N-α-syn stimulated microglia. The data demonstrated that Treg substantially alter the microglial proteome in response to N-α-syn. This is seen through Treg's abilities to suppress microglial neurotoxic proteins linked to cell metabolism, migration, protein transport and degradation, redox biology, cytoskeletal, and bioenergetic activities. We conclude that Treg modulate the N-α-syn microglial proteome and, in this way, can slow the tempo and course of PD. PMID:19432400

  4. Interferon alpha-inducible protein 6 regulates NRASQ61K-induced melanomagenesis and growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Forloni, Matteo; Bisserier, Malik; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Yang, Qiaohong; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the NRAS oncogene are present in up to 20% of melanoma. Here, we show that interferon alpha-inducible protein 6 (IFI6) is necessary for NRASQ61K-induced transformation and melanoma growth. IFI6 was transcriptionally upregulated by NRASQ61K, and knockdown of IFI6 resulted in DNA replication stress due to dysregulated DNA replication via E2F2. This stress consequentially inhibited cellular transformation and melanoma growth via senescence or apoptosis induction depending on the RB and p53 pathway status of the cells. NRAS-mutant melanoma were significantly more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of DNA replication stress-inducing drugs, and knockdown of IFI6 increased sensitivity to these drugs. Pharmacological inhibition of IFI6 expression by the MEK inhibitor trametinib, when combined with DNA replication stress-inducing drugs, blocked NRAS-mutant melanoma growth. Collectively, we demonstrate that IFI6, via E2F2 regulates DNA replication and melanoma development and growth, and this pathway can be pharmacologically targeted to inhibit NRAS-mutant melanoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16432.001 PMID:27608486

  5. Network Analysis Implicates Alpha-Synuclein (Snca) in the Regulation of Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Gina; Mesner, Larry D.; Foley, Patricia L.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Farber, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The postmenopausal period in women is associated with decreased circulating estrogen levels, which accelerate bone loss and increase the risk of fracture. Here, we gained novel insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, a model of human menopause, using co-expression network analysis. Specifically, we generated a co-expression network consisting of 53 gene modules using expression profiles from intact and OVX mice from a panel of inbred strains. The expression of four modules was altered by OVX, including module 23 whose expression was decreased by OVX across all strains. Module 23 was enriched for genes involved in the response to oxidative stress, a process known to be involved in OVX-induced bone loss. Additionally, module 23 homologs were co-expressed in human bone marrow. Alpha synuclein (Snca) was one of the most highly connected “hub” genes in module 23. We characterized mice deficient in Snca and observed a 40% reduction in OVX-induced bone loss. Furthermore, protection was associated with the altered expression of specific network modules, including module 23. In summary, the results of this study suggest that Snca regulates bone network homeostasis and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. PMID:27378017

  6. D2HGDH regulates alpha-ketoglutarate levels and dioxygenase function by modulating IDH2

    PubMed Central

    Lin, An-Ping; Abbas, Saman; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ortega, Manoela; Bouamar, Hakim; Escobedo, Yissela; Varadarajan, Prakash; Qin, Yuejuan; Sudderth, Jessica; Schulz, Eduard; Deutsch, Alexander; Mohan, Sumitra; Ulz, Peter; Neumeister, Peter; Rakheja, Dinesh; Gao, Xiaoli; Hinck, Andrew; Weintraub, Susan T.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Sill, Heinz; Dahia, Patricia L. M.; Aguiar, Ricardo C. T.

    2015-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH) convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG). In cancer, mutant IDH1/2 reduces α-KG to D2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG) disrupting α-KG-dependent dioxygenases. However, the physiological relevance of controlling the interconversion of D2-HG into α-KG, mediated by D2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D2HGDH), remains obscure. Here we show that wild-type D2HGDH elevates α-KG levels, influencing histone and DNA methylation, and HIF1α hydroxylation. Conversely, the D2HGDH mutants that we find in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are enzymatically inert. D2-HG is a low-abundance metabolite, but we show that it can meaningfully elevate α-KG levels by positively modulating mitochondrial IDH activity and inducing IDH2 expression. Accordingly, genetic depletion of IDH2 abrogates D2HGDH effects, whereas ectopic IDH2 rescues D2HGDH-deficient cells. Our data link D2HGDH to cancer and describe an additional role for the enzyme: the regulation of IDH2 activity and α-KG-mediated epigenetic remodelling. These data further expose the intricacies of mitochondrial metabolism and inform on the pathogenesis of D2HGDH-deficient diseases. PMID:26178471

  7. A Novel Alpha Kinase EhAK1 Phosphorylates Actin and Regulates Phagocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Mansuri, M. Shahid; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Bhattacharya, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Phagocytosis plays a key role in nutrient uptake and virulence of the protist parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Phagosomes have been characterized by proteomics, and their maturation in the cells has been studied. However, there is so far not much understanding about initiation of phagocytosis and formation of phagosomes at the molecular level. Our group has been studying initiation of phagocytosis and formation of phagosomes in E. histolytica, and have described some of the molecules that play key roles in the process. Here we show the involvement of EhAK1, an alpha kinase and a SH3 domain containing protein in the pathway that leads to formation of phagosomes using red blood cell as ligand particle. A number of approaches, such as proteomics, biochemical, confocal imaging using specific antibodies or GFP tagged molecules, expression down regulation by antisense RNA, over expression of wild type and mutant proteins, were used to understand the role of EhAK1 in phagocytosis. EhAK1 was found in the phagocytic cups during the progression of cups, until closure of phagosomes, but not in the phagosomes themselves. It is recruited to the phagosomes through interaction with the calcium binding protein EhCaBP1. A reduction in phagocytosis was observed when EhAK1 was down regulated by antisense RNA, or by over expression of the kinase dead mutant. G-actin was identified as one of the major substrates of EhAK1. Phosphorylated actin preferentially accumulated at the phagocytic cups and over expression of a phosphorylation defective actin led to defects in phagocytosis. In conclusion, we describe an important component of the pathway that is initiated on attachment of red blood cells to E. histolytica cells. The main function of EhAK1 is to couple signalling events initiated after accumulation of EhC2PK to actin dynamics. PMID:25299184

  8. BKCa channel regulates calcium oscillations induced by alpha-2-macroglobulin in human myometrial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakle-Prabagaran, Monali; Lorca, Ramón A.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Stamnes, Susan J.; Amazu, Chinwendu; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Wright, Michael E.; England, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, voltage-gated, calcium (Ca2+)-activated potassium channel (BKCa) plays an important role in regulating Ca2+ signaling and is implicated in the maintenance of uterine quiescence during pregnancy. We used immunopurification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that interact with BKCa in myometrium samples from term pregnant (≥37 wk gestation) women. From this screen, we identified alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M). We then used immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot and the proximity ligation assay to confirm the interaction between BKCa and both α2M and its receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), in cultured primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells (hMSMCs). Single-channel electrophysiological recordings in the cell-attached configuration demonstrated that activated α2M (α2M*) increased the open probability of BKCa in an oscillatory pattern in hMSMCs. Furthermore, α2M* caused intracellular levels of Ca2+ to oscillate in oxytocin-primed hMSMCs. The initiation of oscillations required an interaction between α2M* and LRP1. By using Ca2+-free medium and inhibitors of various Ca2+ signaling pathways, we demonstrated that the oscillations required entry of extracellular Ca2+ through store-operated Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that the specific BKCa blocker paxilline inhibited the oscillations, whereas the channel opener NS11021 increased the rate of these oscillations. These data demonstrate that α2M* and LRP1 modulate the BKCa channel in human myometrium and that BKCa and its immunomodulatory interacting partners regulate Ca2+ dynamics in hMSMCs during pregnancy. PMID:27044074

  9. A novel alpha kinase EhAK1 phosphorylates actin and regulates phagocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Mansuri, M Shahid; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Bhattacharya, Alok

    2014-10-01

    Phagocytosis plays a key role in nutrient uptake and virulence of the protist parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Phagosomes have been characterized by proteomics, and their maturation in the cells has been studied. However, there is so far not much understanding about initiation of phagocytosis and formation of phagosomes at the molecular level. Our group has been studying initiation of phagocytosis and formation of phagosomes in E. histolytica, and have described some of the molecules that play key roles in the process. Here we show the involvement of EhAK1, an alpha kinase and a SH3 domain containing protein in the pathway that leads to formation of phagosomes using red blood cell as ligand particle. A number of approaches, such as proteomics, biochemical, confocal imaging using specific antibodies or GFP tagged molecules, expression down regulation by antisense RNA, over expression of wild type and mutant proteins, were used to understand the role of EhAK1 in phagocytosis. EhAK1 was found in the phagocytic cups during the progression of cups, until closure of phagosomes, but not in the phagosomes themselves. It is recruited to the phagosomes through interaction with the calcium binding protein EhCaBP1. A reduction in phagocytosis was observed when EhAK1 was down regulated by antisense RNA, or by over expression of the kinase dead mutant. G-actin was identified as one of the major substrates of EhAK1. Phosphorylated actin preferentially accumulated at the phagocytic cups and over expression of a phosphorylation defective actin led to defects in phagocytosis. In conclusion, we describe an important component of the pathway that is initiated on attachment of red blood cells to E. histolytica cells. The main function of EhAK1 is to couple signalling events initiated after accumulation of EhC2PK to actin dynamics.

  10. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  11. Cyclin C regulates adipogenesis by stimulating transcriptional activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyi; Xiaoli, Alus M; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Sven; Chang, Rui; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yang, Gongshe; Strich, Randy; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2017-03-28

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for maintaining energy homeostasis and adaptive thermogenesis in rodents and humans. As disorders arising from dysregulated energy metabolism, such as obesity and metabolic diseases, have increased, so has interest in the molecular mechanisms in adipocyte biology. Using a functional screen, we identified cyclin C (CycC), a conserved subunit of the Mediator complex, as a novel regulator for brown adipocyte formation. siRNA-mediated CycC knockdown (KD) in brown preadipocytes impaired the early transcriptional program of differentiation, and genetic knockout (KO) of CycC completely blocked the differentiation process. RNA-seq analyses of CycC-KD revealed a critical role of CycC in activating genes co-regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). Overexpression of PPARγ2 or addition of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone rescued the defects in CycC-KO brown preadipocytes, and efficiently activated the PPARγ-responsive promoters in both wild-type (WT) and CycC-KO cells, suggesting that CycC is not essential for PPARγ transcriptional activity. In contrast, CycC-KO significantly reduced C/EBPα-dependent gene expression. Unlike for PPARγ, overexpression of C/EBPα could not induce C/EBPα target gene expression in CycC-KO cells or rescue the CycC-KO defects in brown adipogenesis, suggesting that CycC is essential for C/EBPα-mediated gene activation. CycC physically interacted with C/EBPα and this interaction was required for C/EBPα transactivation domain activity. Consistent with the role of C/EBPα in white adipogenesis, CycC-KD also inhibited differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into white adipocytes. Together, these data indicate that CycC activates adipogenesis by stimulating the transcriptional activity of C/EBPα.

  12. The crystal structure of the actin binding domain from alpha-actinin in its closed conformation: structural insight into phospholipid regulation of alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Franzot, Giacomo; Sjöblom, Björn; Gautel, Mathias; Djinović Carugo, Kristina

    2005-04-22

    Alpha-actinin is the major F-actin crosslinking protein in both muscle and non-muscle cells. We report the crystal structure of the actin binding domain of human muscle alpha-actinin-3, which is formed by two consecutive calponin homology domains arranged in a "closed" conformation. Structural studies and available biochemical data on actin binding domains suggest that two calponin homology domains come in a closed conformation in the native apo-form, and that conformational changes involving the relative orientation of the two calponin homology domains are required for efficient binding to actin filaments. The actin binding activity of muscle isoforms is supposed to be regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2), which binds to the second calponin homology domain. On the basis of structural analysis we propose a distinct binding site for PtdIns(4,5)P2, where the fatty acid moiety would be oriented in a direction that allows it to interact with the linker sequence between the actin binding domain and the first spectrin-like repeat, regulating thereby the binding of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain to this linker.

  13. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  14. The Gα4 G protein subunit interacts with the MAP kinase ERK2 using a D-motif that regulates developmental morphogenesis in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Hadwiger, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    G protein Gα subunits contribute to the specificity of different signal transduction pathways in Dictyostelium discoideum but Gα subunit-effector interactions have not been previously identified. The requirement of the Dictyostelium Gα4 subunit for MAP kinase (MAPK) activation and the identification of a putative MAPK docking site (D-motif) in this subunit suggested a possible interaction between the Gα4 subunit and MAPKs. In vivo association of the Gα4 subunit and ERK2 was demonstrated by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Alteration of the D-motif reduced Gα4 subunit-ERK2 interactions but only slightly altered MAPK activation in response to folate. Expression of the Gα4 subunit with the altered D-motif in gα4− cells allowed for slug formation but not the morphogenesis associated with culmination. Expression of this mutant Gα4 subunit was sufficient to rescue chemotactic movement to folate. Alteration of the D-motif also reduced the aggregation defect associated with constitutively active Gα4 subunits. These results suggest Gα4 subunit-MAPK interactions are necessary for developmental morphogenesis but not for chemotaxis to folate. PMID:19765570

  15. Regulation of Alpha-Secretase ADAM10 In vitro and In vivo: Genetic, Epigenetic, and Protein-Based Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Kristina; Deller, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 10) has been identified as the major physiological alpha-secretase in neurons, responsible for cleaving APP in a non-amyloidogenic manner. This cleavage results in the production of a neuroprotective APP-derived fragment, APPs-alpha, and an attenuated production of neurotoxic A-beta peptides. An increase in ADAM10 activity shifts the balance of APP processing toward APPs-alpha and protects the brain from amyloid deposition and disease. Thus, increasing ADAM10 activity has been proposed an attractive target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and it appears to be timely to investigate the physiological mechanisms regulating ADAM10 expression. Therefore, in this article, we will (1) review reports on the physiological regulation of ADAM10 at the transcriptional level, by epigenetic factors, miRNAs and/or protein interactions, (2) describe conditions, which change ADAM10 expression in vitro and in vivo, (3) report how neuronal ADAM10 expression may be regulated in humans, and (4) discuss how this knowledge on the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of ADAM10 may help to preserve or restore brain function. PMID:28367112

  16. Regulation of the L-type calcium channel by alpha 5beta 1 integrin requires signaling between focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Davis, G E; Meininger, G A; Wilson, E; Davis, M J

    2001-08-10

    The L-type calcium channel is the major calcium influx pathway in vascular smooth muscle and is regulated by integrin ligands, suggesting an important link between extracellular matrix and vascular tone regulation in tissue injury and remodeling. We examined the role of integrin-linked tyrosine kinases and focal adhesion proteins in regulation of L-type calcium current in single vascular myocytes. Soluble tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked the increase in current produced by alpha(5) integrin antibody or fibronectin, whereas tyrosine phosphatase inhibition enhanced the effect. Cell dialysis with an antibody to focal adhesion kinase or with FRNK, the C-terminal noncatalytic domain of focal adhesion kinase, produced moderate (24 or 18%, respectively) inhibition of basal current but much greater inhibition (63 or 68%, respectively) of integrin-enhanced current. A c-Src antibody and peptide inhibitors of the Src homology-2 domain or a putative Src tyrosine phosphorylation site on the channel produced similar inhibition. Antibodies to the cytoskeletal proteins paxillin and vinculin, but not alpha-actinin, inhibited integrin-dependent current by 65-80%. Therefore, alpha(5)beta(1) integrin appears to regulate a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade involving Src and various focal adhesion proteins that control the function of the L-type calcium channel. This interaction may represent a novel mechanism for control of calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types.

  17. Regulation of miR-200c by nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha}, LRH-1 and SHP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yang, Zhihong; Whitby, Richard; Wang, Li

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1 abolishes miR-200c inhibition of HCC cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP represses miR-200c expression via inhibition of the activity of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RJW100 exhibits strong ability to downregulate ZEB1 and ZEB2 proteins. -- Abstract: We investigated regulation of miR-200c expression by nuclear receptors. Ectopic expression of miR-200c inhibited MHCC97H cell migration, which was abrogated by the synergistic effects of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1 siRNAs. The expression of miR-200c was decreased by PPAR{alpha}/LRH-1 siRNAs and increased by SHP siRNAs, and overexpression of the receptors reversed the effects of their respective siRNAs. SHP siRNAs also drastically enhanced the ability of the LRH-1 agonist RJW100 to induce miR-200c and downregulate ZEB1 and ZEB2 proteins. Co-expression of PPAR{alpha} and LRH-1 moderately transactivated the miR-200c promoter, which was repressed by SHP co-expression. RJW100 caused strong activation of the miR-200c promoter. This is the first report to demonstrate that miR-200c expression is controlled by nuclear receptors.

  18. Mechanisms of alpha-adrenergic regulation of the renal sodium/proton antiporter

    SciTech Connect

    Gesek, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Some controversy exists concerning the relative roles of the {alpha}-adrenoceptor subtypes which mediate proximal tubular Na reabsorption. We hypothesized both {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptors may act to stimulate Na transport. We improved upon existing isolation techniques to obtain a highly enriched fraction of rat proximal tubule segments with which to test our hypothesis. Oxygen consumption measurements were first used to monitor alterations in transcellular transport stimulated by selective {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} adrenergic agonists and demonstrated both adrenoceptor subtypes increased transcellular Na transport. To examine if the enhancement of Na transport by {alpha}-adrenergic agonists were through a luminal Na//H exchange mechanism, the uptake of {sup 22}Na which was suppressible by the Na/H inhibitor, ethylisopropyl amiloride was utilized. The final sequence of experiments were designed to examine why {alpha}{sub 2} specific adrenoceptor agonists produced a range of stimulation extending from 22% with guanabenz to 98% with B-HT 933. After inhibition of a guanine nucleotide binding protein with pertussis toxin pretreatment, we were able to attenuate the {alpha}{sub 2} agonists responses. However, when a phorbol ester was used to stimulate Na/H exchange directly by activation of protein kinase C, the uptake of {sup 22}Na was inhibited by guanabenz.

  19. In vivo regulation of gene transcription by alpha- and gamma-Tocopherol in murine T lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the 8 different analogues (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-tocopherols and tocotrienols) designated as vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol (a-T) has been mostly studied, together with gamma-tocopherol (g-T) which is abundant in the US diet. We compared the effect of dietary supplementation with adequate or ...

  20. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  1. Protospacer recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shiraz A.; Erdmann, Susanne; Mojica, Francisco J.M.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) were originally characterized for CRISPR-Cas systems that were classified on the basis of their CRISPR repeat sequences. A few short 2–5 bp sequences were identified adjacent to one end of the protospacers. Experimental and bioinformatical results linked the motif to the excision of protospacers and their insertion into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, evidence accumulated from different virus- and plasmid-targeting assays, suggesting that these motifs were also recognized during DNA interference, at least for the recently classified type I and type II CRISPR-based systems. The two processes, spacer acquisition and protospacer interference, employ different molecular mechanisms, and there is increasing evidence to suggest that the sequence motifs that are recognized, while overlapping, are unlikely to be identical. In this article, we consider the properties of PAM sequences and summarize the evidence for their dual functional roles. It is proposed to use the terms protospacer associated motif (PAM) for the conserved DNA sequence and to employ spacer acqusition motif (SAM) and target interference motif (TIM), respectively, for acquisition and interference recognition sites. PMID:23403393

  2. Prolylcarboxypeptidase regulates food intake by inactivating alpha-MSH in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Nicholas; Perroud, Bertrand; Gao, Qian; Coppola, Anna; Gyengesi, Erika; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diament, Adam; Haus, Kari A; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Mahdi, Fakhri; Wardlaw, Sharon L; Schmaier, Alvin H; Warden, Craig H; Diano, Sabrina

    2009-08-01

    The anorexigenic neuromodulator alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH; referred to here as alpha-MSH1-13) undergoes extensive posttranslational processing, and its in vivo activity is short lived due to rapid inactivation. The enzymatic control of alpha-MSH1-13 maturation and inactivation is incompletely understood. Here we have provided insight into alpha-MSH1-13 inactivation through the generation and analysis of a subcongenic mouse strain with reduced body fat compared with controls. Using positional cloning, we identified a maximum of 6 coding genes, including that encoding prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP), in the donor region. Real-time PCR revealed a marked genotype effect on Prcp mRNA expression in brain tissue. Biochemical studies using recombinant PRCP demonstrated that PRCP removes the C-terminal amino acid of alpha-MSH1-13, producing alpha-MSH1-12, which is not neuroactive. We found that Prcp was expressed in the hypothalamus in neuronal populations that send efferents to areas where alpha-MSH1-13 is released from axon terminals. The inhibition of PRCP activity by small molecule protease inhibitors administered peripherally or centrally decreased food intake in both wild-type and obese mice. Furthermore, Prcp-null mice had elevated levels of alpha-MSH1-13 in the hypothalamus and were leaner and shorter than the wild-type controls on a regular chow diet; they were also resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Our results suggest that PRCP is an important component of melanocortin signaling and weight maintenance via control of active alpha-MSH1-13 levels.

  3. Oestrogen receptor-alpha regulates non-canonical Hedgehog-signalling in the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Okolowsky, Nadia; Furth, Priscilla A.; Hamel, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal dysplasia (mes) mice harbour a truncation in the C-terminal region of the Hh-ligand receptor, Patched-1 (mPtch1). While the mes variant of mPtch1 binds to Hh-ligands with an affinity similar to that of wild type mPtch1 and appears to normally regulate canonical Hh-signalling via smoothened, the mes mutation causes, among other non-lethal defects, a block to mammary ductal elongation at puberty. We demonstrated previously Hh-signalling induces the activation of Erk1/2 and c-src independently of its control of smo activity. Furthermore, mammary epithelial cell-directed expression of an activated allele of c-src rescued the block to ductal elongation in mes mice, albeit with delayed kinetics. Given that this rescue was accompanied by an induction in estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) expression and that complex regulatory interactions between ERα and c-src are required for normal mammary gland development, it was hypothesized that expression of ERα would also overcome the block to mammary ductal elongation at puberty in the mes mouse. We demonstrate here that conditional expression of ERα in luminal mammary epithelial cells on the mes background facilitates ductal morphogenesis with kinetics similar to that of the MMTV-c-srcAct mice. We demonstrate further that Erk1/2 is activated in primary mammary epithelial cells by Shh-ligand and that this activation is blocked by the inhibitor of c-src, PP2, is partially blocked by the ERα inhibitor, ICI 182780 but is not blocked by the smo-inhibitor, SANT-1. These data reveal an apparent Hh-signalling cascade operating through c-src and ERα that is required for mammary gland morphogenesis at puberty. PMID:24769368

  4. The C-Terminal Sequence and PI motif of the Orchid (Oncidium Gower Ramsey) PISTILLATA (PI) Ortholog Determine its Ability to Bind AP3 Orthologs and Enter the Nucleus to Regulate Downstream Genes Controlling Petal and Stamen Formation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Hsing-Fun; Hsu, Wei-Han; Li, Jen-Ying; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-11-01

    This study focused on the investigation of the effects of the PI motif and C-terminus of the Oncidium Gower Ramsey MADS box gene 8 (OMADS8), a PISTILLATA (PI) ortholog, on floral organ formation. 35S::OMADS8 completely rescued and 35S::OMADS8-PI (with the PI motif deleted) partially rescued petal/stamen formation, whereas these deficiencies were not rescued by 35S::OMADS8-C (C-terminal 29 amino acids deleted) in pi-1 mutants. OMADS8 could interact with Arabidopsis APETALA3 (AP3) and enter the nucleus. The nuclear entry efficiency was reduced for OMADS8-PI/AP3 and OMADS8-C/AP3. OMADS8 could also interact with OMADS5/OMADS9 (the Oncidium AP3 ortholog) and enter the nucleus with an efficiency only slightly affected by the deletion of the C-terminal sequence or PI motif. However, the stability of the OMADS8/OMADS5 and OMADS8/OMADS9 complexes was significantly reduced by deletion of the C-terminal sequence or PI motif. Further analysis indicated that the expression of genes downstream of AP3/PI (BNQ1/BNQ2/GNC/At4g30270) was compensated by 35S::OMADS8 and 35S::OMADS8-PI to a level similar to wild-type plants but was not affected by 35S::OMADS8-C in the pi-1 mutants. A similar FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) efficiency was observed for Arabidopsis AGAMOUS (AG) and the Oncidium AG ortholog OMADS4 for OMADS8, OMADS8-PI and OMADS8-C. These results indicated that the OMADS8 PI motif and C-terminus were valuable for the interaction of OMADS8 with the AP3 orthologs to form higher order heterotetrameric complexes that regulated petal/stamen formation in both Oncidium orchids and transgenic Arabidopsis. However, the C-terminal sequence and PI motif were dispensable for the interaction of OMADS8 with the AG orthologs.

  5. Developmental regulation of {beta}-hexosaminidase {alpha}- and {beta}-subunit gene expression in the rat reproductive system

    SciTech Connect

    Trasler, J.M.; Wakamatsu, N.; Gravel, R.A.; Benoit, G.

    1994-09-01

    {beta}-Hexosaminidase is an essential lysosomal enzyme whose absence in man results in a group of disorders, the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses. Enzyme activity for {beta}-hexosaminidase is many fold higher in the epididymis than in other tissues, is present in sperm and is postulated to be required for mammalian fertilization. To better understand how {beta}-hexosaminidase is regulated in the reproductive system, we quantitated the mRNA expression of the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits (Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta}) of the enzyme in the developing rat testis and epididymis. Hex {alpha} mRNA was differentially expressed and abundant in adult rat testis and epididymis, 13- and 2-fold brain levels, respectively. In contrast, Hex {beta} mRNA levels in the testis and epididymis were .3- and 5-fold brain levels. Within the epididymis both Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta} mRNA concentrations were highest in the corpus, 1.5-fold and 9-fold initial segment values, respectively. During testis development from 7-91 days of age, testis levels of Hex {alpha} mRNA increased 10-fold and coincided with the appearance of spermatocytes and spermatids in the epithelium. In isolated male germ cells, Hex {alpha} expression was most abundant in haploid round spermatids. Hex {alpha} mRNA was undetectable after hypophysectomy and returned to normal after testosterone administration and the return of advanced germ cells to the testis. Hex {beta} mRNA was expressed at constant low levels throughout testis development. In the caput-corpus and cauda regions of the epididymis Hex {alpha} mRNA levels increased 2-fold between 14 and 91 days; during the same developmental period epididymal Hex {beta} mRNA levels increased dramatically, by 10-20 fold. In summary, Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta} mRNAs are differentially and developmentally expressed at high levels in the rat testis and epididymis and augur for an important role for {beta}-hexosaminidase in normal male reproductive function.

  6. Pretranslational regulation of ectopic hCG alpha production in ChaGo lung cancer cells by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Nagelberg, S B; Burnside, J; Maniatis, A; Lippman, S S; Weintraub, B D

    1985-12-31

    Ectopic production of hCG and its free alpha subunit by ChaGo lung cancer cells is stimulated by sodium butyrate. To investigate pretranslational regulation in this system, we examined the response of the hCG alpha and beta subunit mRNAs in ChaGo-K1 cells, a clone that produces free hCG alpha but no hCG or hCG beta in the basal state. When a Northern blot of total RNA from ChaGo cells was hybridized to a [32P]- labeled hCG alpha cDNA probe, a single band was detected that was identical in size (approximately 850 bases) to placental hCG alpha mRNA. RNA from butyrate-stimulated (5 mM, 24 h) ChaGo cells contained 7.7 times as much hCG alpha mRNA as RNA from control ChaGo cells. This increase appeared to be relatively selective since no difference in total polyA-containing mRNA levels was detected between butyrate-treated and control cells by [32P]oligo(dT) hybridization. In addition, no hCG beta mRNA was detected when Northern and dot blots were hybridized to an hCG beta cDNA probe. In a time course experiment, hCG alpha mRNA accumulation in butyrate-treated cells increased significantly by 8 h with a maximum increase of 6.1-fold at 24 h compared to control values. Major differences in immunoactive hCG alpha accumulation were not apparent, however, until after 24 h. These studies show that stimulation of ChaGo hCG alpha production by butyrate can be completely accounted for by pretranslational events and that failure to detect hCG or free hCG beta production by these cells is not due to poorly translatable RNA or post-translational protein degradation. Thus, exclusive ectopic production of only one of the hCG subunits is likely to be due to selective genomic expression.

  7. Redundant ERF-VII Transcription Factors Bind to an Evolutionarily Conserved cis-Motif to Regulate Hypoxia-Responsive Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gasch, Philipp; Fundinger, Moritz; Müller, Jana T.; Lee, Travis; Mustroph, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana to low-oxygen stress (hypoxia), such as during shoot submergence or root waterlogging, includes increasing the levels of ∼50 hypoxia-responsive gene transcripts, many of which encode enzymes associated with anaerobic metabolism. Upregulation of over half of these mRNAs involves stabilization of five group VII ethylene response factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are routinely degraded via the N-end rule pathway of proteolysis in an oxygen- and nitric oxide-dependent manner. Despite their importance, neither the quantitative contribution of individual ERF-VIIs nor the cis-regulatory elements they govern are well understood. Here, using single- and double-null mutants, the constitutively synthesized ERF-VIIs RELATED TO APETALA2.2 (RAP2.2) and RAP2.12 are shown to act redundantly as principle activators of hypoxia-responsive genes; constitutively expressed RAP2.3 contributes to this redundancy, whereas the hypoxia-induced HYPOXIA RESPONSIVE ERF1 (HRE1) and HRE2 play minor roles. An evolutionarily conserved 12-bp cis-regulatory motif that binds to and is sufficient for activation by RAP2.2 and RAP2.12 is identified through a comparative phylogenetic motif search, promoter dissection, yeast one-hybrid assays, and chromatin immunopurification. This motif, designated the hypoxia-responsive promoter element, is enriched in promoters of hypoxia-responsive genes in multiple species. PMID:26668304

  8. Regulation of hepatic microRNA expression by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Lei, Xiaohong; Liu, Jerry; Klaassen, Curtis

    2017-01-01

    AIM To uncover the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) in regulating hepatic expression of microRNAs. METHODS Microarray and real-time PCR were used to determine hepatic expression of microRNAs in young-adult mice lacking Hnf4α expression in liver (Hnf4α-LivKO). Integrative genomics viewer software was used to analyze the public chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing datasets for DNA-binding of HNF4α, RNA polymerase-II, and histone modifications to loci of microRNAs in mouse liver and human hepatoma cells. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was conducted to determine effects of HNF4α on the promoters of mouse and human microRNAs as well as effects of microRNAs on the untranslated regions (3’UTR) of two genes in human hepatoma cells. RESULTS Microarray data indicated that most microRNAs remained unaltered by Hnf4α deficiency in Hnf4α-LivKO mice. However, certain liver-predominant microRNAs were down-regulated similarly in young-adult male and female Hnf4α-LivKO mice. The down-regulation of miR-101, miR-192, miR-193a, miR-194, miR-215, miR-802, and miR-122 as well as induction of miR-34 and miR-29 in male Hnf4α-LivKO mice were confirmed by real-time PCR. Analysis of public chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data indicates that HNF4α directly binds to the promoters of miR-101, miR-122, miR-194-2/miR-192 and miR-193, which is associated with histone marks of active transcription. Luciferase reporter assay showed that HNF4α markedly activated the promoters of mouse and human miR-101b/miR-101-2 and the miR-194/miR-192 cluster. Additionally, miR-192 and miR-194 significantly decreased activities of luciferase reporters for the 3’UTR of histone H3F3 and chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 1 (CHD1), respectively, suggesting that miR-192 and miR-194 might be important in chromosome remodeling through directly targeting H3F3 and CHD1. CONCLUSION HNF4α is essential for hepatic basal expression of a group of liver-enriched micro

  9. Tetraspanin CD151 regulates alpha6beta1 integrin adhesion strengthening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lammerding, Jan; Kazarov, Alexander R.; Huang, Hayden; Lee, Richard T.; Hemler, Martin E.

    2003-01-01

    The tetraspanin CD151 molecule associates specifically with laminin-binding integrins, including alpha6beta1. To probe strength of alpha6beta1-dependent adhesion to laminin-1, defined forces (0-1.5 nN) were applied to magnetic laminin-coated microbeads bound to NIH 3T3 cells. For NIH 3T3 cells bearing wild-type CD151, adhesion strengthening was observed, as bead detachment became more difficult over time. In contrast, mutant CD151 (with the C-terminal region replaced) showed impaired adhesion strengthening. Static cell adhesion to laminin-1, and detachment of beads coated with fibronectin or anti-alpha6 antibody were all unaffected by CD151 mutation. Hence, CD151 plays a key role in selectively strengthening alpha6beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion to laminin-1.

  10. Regulation by interferon alpha of immunoglobulin isotype selection and lymphokine production in mice

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Antigens and infectious agents that stimulate interferon alpha(IFN- alpha) production in mice induce antibody responses that are predominantly of the immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a isotype and contain little or no IgE. This suggested the possibility that IFN-alpha might have a role in directing Ig isotype selection. Consistent with this possibility, we have found that injection of mice with recombinant mouse IFN-alpha suppresses IgE secretion, enhances IgG2a secretion, and has no independent effect on IgG1 secretion in mice stimulated with a foreign anti-IgD antibody. Injection of mice with polyinosinic acid.polycytidylic acid (poly I.C), an inducer of macrophage IFN-alpha production, also suppresses the anti-IgD antibody-induced IgE response and stimulates the IgG2a response; these effects are blocked by a sheep antibody that neutralizes mouse IFN-alpha/beta. Both recombinant IFN- alpha and poly I.C have maximum IgE suppressive and IgG2a stimulatory effects when injected early in the anti-IgD antibody-induced immune response. Addition of IFN-alpha to mouse B cells cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) + interleukin 4 (IL-4) suppresses both IgG1 and IgE production, but much less potently than IFN-gamma. IFN-alpha suppresses anti-IgD antibody-induced increases in the level of splenic IL-4 mRNA, but enhances the anti-IgD antibody-induced increase in the splenic level of IFN-gamma mRNA. These results are consistent with the effect of IFN-alpha on Ig isotype expression in mice, as IL-4 stimulates IgE and suppresses IgG2a secretion while IFN-gamma exerts opposite effects. These observations suggest that antigen presenting cells, by secreting IFN-alpha early in the course of an immune response, can influence the nature of that response both through direct effects on B cells and by influencing the differentiation of T cells. PMID:1940796

  11. Integrin alpha6beta1-laminin interactions regulate early myotome formation in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Luz, Marta; Raymond, Karine; Martins, Gabriel G; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Buckingham, Margaret; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sólveig

    2006-05-01

    We addressed the potential role of cell-laminin interactions during epaxial myotome formation in the mouse embryo. Assembly of the myotomal laminin matrix occurs as epaxial myogenic precursor cells enter the myotome. Most Myf5-positive and myogenin-negative myogenic precursor cells localise near assembled laminin, while myogenin-expressing cells are located either away from this matrix or in areas where it is being assembled. In Myf5(nlacZ/nlacZ) (Myf5-null) embryos, laminin, collagen type IV and perlecan are present extracellularly near myogenic precursor cells, but do not form a basement membrane and cells are not contained in the myotomal compartment. Unlike wild-type myogenic precursor cells, Myf5-null cells do not express the alpha6beta1 integrin, a laminin receptor, suggesting that integrin alpha6beta1-laminin interactions are required for myotomal laminin matrix assembly. Blocking alpha6beta1-laminin binding in cultured wild-type mouse embryo explants resulted in dispersion of Myf5-positive cells, a phenotype also seen in Myf5(nlacZ/nlacZ) embryos. Furthermore, inhibition of alpha6beta1 resulted in an increase in Myf5 protein and ectopic myogenin expression in dermomyotomal cells, suggesting that alpha6beta1-laminin interactions normally repress myogenesis in the dermomyotome. We conclude that Myf5 is required for maintaining alpha6beta1 expression on myogenic precursor cells, and that alpha6beta1 is necessary for myotomal laminin matrix assembly and cell guidance into the myotome. Engagement of laminin by alpha6beta1 also plays a role in maintaining the undifferentiated state of cells in the dermomyotome prior to their entry into the myotome.

  12. Regulation of valine and. alpha. -ketoisocaproate metabolism in rat kidney mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Harper, A.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) aminotransferase (BCAT) and {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) were assayed in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of rats. Rates of transamination of valine and oxidation of keto acids {alpha}-ketoisocaproate (KIC) or {alpha}-ketoisovalerate (KIV) were estimated using radioactive tracers of the appropriate substrate from amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled products formed. Because of the high mitochondrial BCAT activity, an amino acceptor for BCAT, {alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}-KG) or KIC, was added to the assay medium when valine was the substrate. Rates of valine transamination and subsequent oxidation of the KIV formed were determined with 0.5 mM {alpha}-KG as the amino acceptor; these rates were 5- to 50-fold those without added {alpha}-KG. Rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine also increased when KIC was present; however, with KIC concentrations above 0.2 mM, rates of CO{sub 2} evolution from valine declined although rates of transamination continued to rise. When 0.05 mM KIC was added to the assay medium, oxidation of KIC was suppressed by inclusion of valine or glutamate in the medium. When valine was present KIC was not oxidized preferentially, presumably because it was also serving as an amino acceptor for BCAT. These results indicate that as the supply of amino acceptor, {alpha}-KG or KIC, is increased in mitochondria not only is the rate of valine transamination stimulated but also the rate of oxidation of the KIV formed from valine. Thus the rate of oxidation of BCAA can be controlled by factors that influence the rate and direction of BCAA transamination and, thereby, the supply of substrate for BCKD.

  13. Regulation and function of the alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic autoreceptor in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes observed in the number of alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors in the brain as measured by radioligand binding experiments reflect changes in the function of alpha/sub 2/ autoregulatory receptors which are located on noradrenergic nerve terminals. Inhibition by clonidine of field stimulated /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (/sup 3/H-NE) release from rat hippocampal slices before and after several drug treatments was analyzed to investigate changes in alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptor function. Clonidine in a concentration-dependent manner inhibited /sup 3/H-NE release. The effect of clonidine was blocked by the specific alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptor antagonist, idazoxan. The cumulative administration of clonidine generated a smooth and well-fitted log-concentration-effect curve. Results are presented which demonstrate that this technique can be employed to investigate the role of changes in the function of the alpha/sub 2/ autoregulatory receptor. The present investigation also examined representatives of four drug classes which have been shown to alter the specific binding of /sup 3/H-clonidine to neural membranes to determine whether changes in the alpha/sub 2/ autoregulatory receptor function also occur.

  14. Regulation of TNF-alpha secretion by a specific melanocortin-1 receptor peptide agonist.

    PubMed

    Ignar, Diane M; Andrews, John L; Jansen, Marilyn; Eilert, Michelle M; Pink, Heather M; Lin, Peiyuan; Sherrill, Ronald G; Szewczyk, Jerzy R; Conway, James G

    2003-05-01

    The lack of specific pharmacological tools has impeded the evaluation of the role of each melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtype in the myriad physiological effects of melanocortins. 154N-5 is an octapeptide (MFRdWFKPV-NH(2)) that was first identified as an MC1R antagonist in Xenopus melanophores [J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 29846]. In this manuscript, we show that 154N-5 is a specific agonist for human and murine MC1R. The peptide has negligible activity at MC3R and MC4R and is 25-fold less potent and a weak agonist at MC5R. 154N-5 was tested in both a cellular and an animal model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion. The inhibitory efficacy of 154N-5 on TNF-alpha secretion in both models was similar to the nonselective agonist NDP-alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-alphaMSH), thus, we conclude that inhibition of TNF-alpha secretion by melanocortin peptides is mediated by MC1R. 154N-5 is a valuable new tool for the evaluation of specific contribution of MC1R agonism to physiological and pathological processes.

  15. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene regulation by virus and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, A E; Doyle, C; Maniatis, T

    1990-12-01

    We have identified a region of the human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter that is necessary for maximal constitutive, virus-induced, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription. This region contains three sites that match an NF-kappa B binding-site consensus sequence. We show that these three sites specifically bind NF-kappa B in vitro, yet each of these sites can be deleted from the TNF-alpha promoter with little effect on the induction of the gene by virus or LPS. Moreover, when multimers of these three sites are placed upstream from a truncated TNF-alpha promoter, or a heterologous promoter, an increase in the basal level of transcription is observed that is influenced by sequence context and cell type. However, these multimers are not sufficient for virus or LPS induction of either promoter. Thus, unlike other virus- and LPS-inducible promoters that contain NF-kappa B binding sites, these sites from the TNF-alpha promoter are neither required nor sufficient for virus or LPS induction. Comparison of the sequence requirements of virus induction of the human TNF-alpha gene in mouse L929 and P388D1 cells reveals significant differences, indicating that the sequence requirements for virus induction of the gene are cell type-specific. However, the sequences required for virus and LPS induction of the gene in a single cell type, P388D1, overlap.

  16. Down regulation of RNA binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 3, along with up regulation of nuclear HIF1A correlates with poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Youliang; Yun, Dapeng; Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Yuqi; Sun, Ruochuan; Yan, Qiang; Zhang, Shangxin; Lu, Mingdian; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Daru; Li, Yongxiang

    2017-01-03

    Frequent loss of multiple regions in short arm of chromosome 3 is found in various tumors including gastric cancer (GC). RNA binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 3 (RBMS3) is a tumor suppressor gene located in this region and mediates cancer angiogenesis. However, the role of RBMS3 in GC remains unclear.To evaluate whether RBMS3, together with HIF1A, another key regulator of angiogenesis, predicts GC prognosis, the levels of RBMS3 and HIF1A were first examined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot from 27 fresh frozen GC and paired normal gastric tissues and then tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC) from 191 GC and 46 normal controls. Moreover, uni- and multivariate analysis were employed to assess the correlations between their levels and microvessel density (MVD) and clinical prognosis. To further identify RBMS3 function in vitro, cell proliferation assay, clonogenic assay, flow cytometry analysis and endothelial cell tube formation assay were employed.We found that RBMS3 level was decreased, whereas HIF1A was elevated in GC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RBMS3 was an independent prognostic factor and the levels of RBMS3 and HIF1A were associated with GC angiogenesis and histopathological differentiation: patients with lower RBMS3 level and higher nuclear HIF1A expression had poorer prognosis. Besides, gain- and loss-of-function study revealed RBMS3 regulation on G1/S progression, cell proliferation and the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. These findings implicated that RBMS3 and nuclear HIF1A could act as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for GC.

  17. Down regulation of RNA binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 3, along with up regulation of nuclear HIF1A correlates with poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Yuqi; Sun, Ruochuan; Yan, Qiang; Zhang, Shangxin; Lu, Mingdian; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Daru; Li, Yongxiang

    2017-01-01

    Frequent loss of multiple regions in short arm of chromosome 3 is found in various tumors including gastric cancer (GC). RNA binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 3 (RBMS3) is a tumor suppressor gene located in this region and mediates cancer angiogenesis. However, the role of RBMS3 in GC remains unclear. To evaluate whether RBMS3, together with HIF1A, another key regulator of angiogenesis, predicts GC prognosis, the levels of RBMS3 and HIF1A were first examined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot from 27 fresh frozen GC and paired normal gastric tissues and then tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC) from 191 GC and 46 normal controls. Moreover, uni- and multivariate analysis were employed to assess the correlations between their levels and microvessel density (MVD) and clinical prognosis. To further identify RBMS3 function in vitro, cell proliferation assay, clonogenic assay, flow cytometry analysis and endothelial cell tube formation assay were employed. We found that RBMS3 level was decreased, whereas HIF1A was elevated in GC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RBMS3 was an independent prognostic factor and the levels of RBMS3 and HIF1A were associated with GC angiogenesis and histopathological differentiation: patients with lower RBMS3 level and higher nuclear HIF1A expression had poorer prognosis. Besides, gain- and loss-of-function study revealed RBMS3 regulation on G1/S progression, cell proliferation and the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. These findings implicated that RBMS3 and nuclear HIF1A could act as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for GC. PMID:27902480

  18. Regulation of the synthesis of barley aleurone. cap alpha. -amylase by gibberellic acid and calcium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Carbonell, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) and calcium ions on the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase and acid phosphatase by isolated aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. Aleurone layers not previously exposed to GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ show qualitative and quantitative changes in hydrolase production following incubation in either GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ or both. In cubation in H/sub 2/O or CA/sup 2 +/ results in the production of low levels of ..cap alpha..-amylase or acid phosphatase. The addition of GA/sub 3/ to the incubation medium causes 10- to 20-fold increase in the amounts of these enzymes released from the tissue, and addition of CA/sup 2 +/ at 10 millimolar causes a further 8- to 9-fold increase in ..cap alpha..-amylase release and a 75% increase in phosphatase release. Production of ..cap alpha..-amylase isoenzymes is also modified by the levels of GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. ..cap alpha..-amylase 2 is produced under all conditions of incubation, while ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 appears only when layers are incubated in GA/sub 3/ or GA/sub 3/ plus CA/sup 2 +/. The synthesis of ..cap alpha..-amylases 3 and 4 requires the presence of both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis shows that two distinct groups of ..cap alpha..-amylase antigens are present in incubation media of aleurone layers incubated with both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/, while only one group of antigens is found in media of layers incubated in GA/sub 3/ alone. Strontium ions can be substituted for CA/sup 2 +/ in increasing hydrolase production, although higher concentrations of Sr/sup 2 +/ are requried for maximal response. We conclude that GA/sub 3/ is required for the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 and that both GA/sub 3/ and either CA/sup 2 +/ or Sr/sup 2 +/ are required for the production of isoenzymes 3 and 4 of barley aleurone ..cap alpha..-amylase. 22 references, 8

  19. Regulation of hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression by dietary psyllium in the hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J D; Cuthbert, J A; Spady, D K

    1994-01-01

    Soluble fiber consistently lowers plasma total and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations in humans and various animal models including the hamster; however, the mechanism of this effect remains incompletely defined. We performed studies to determine the activity of dietary psyllium on hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase and LDL receptor expression in the hamster. In animals fed a cholesterol-free semisynthetic diet containing 7.5% cellulose (avicel) as a fiber source, substitution of psyllium for avicel increased hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA levels by 3-4-fold. Comparable effects on 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression were observed with 1% cholestyramine. Psyllium also increased hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA in animals fed a diet enriched with cholesterol and triglyceride. Activation of 7 alpha-hydroxylase was associated with an increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis that was apparently not fully compensatory since the cholesterol content of the liver declined. Although dietary psyllium did not increase hepatic LDL receptor expression in animals fed the cholesterol-free, very-low-fat diet, it did increase (or at least restore) receptor expression that had been downregulated by dietary cholesterol and triglyceride. Thus, 7.5% dietary psyllium produced effects on hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase and LDL metabolism that were similar to those of 1% cholestyramine. Induction of hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity by dietary psyllium may account, in large part, for the hypocholesterolemic effect of this soluble fiber. Images PMID:8182140

  20. DNA elements regulating alpha1-tubulin gene induction during regeneration of eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Periz, G; Keller, L R

    1997-07-01

    Eukaryotic flagella are complex organelles composed of more than 200 polypeptides. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing synthesis of the flagellar protein subunits and their assembly into this complex organelle. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the premier experimental model system for studying such cellular processes. When acid shocked, C. reinhardtii excises its flagella, rapidly and coordinately activates transcription of a set of flagellar genes, and ultimately regenerates a new flagellar pair. To define functionally the regulatory sequences that govern induction of the set of genes after acid shock, we analyzed the alpha1-tubulin gene promoter. To simplify transcriptional analysis in vivo, we inserted the selectable marker gene ARG7 on the same plasmid with a tagged alpha1-tubulin gene and stably introduced it into C. reinhardtii cells. By deletion of various sequences, two promoter regions (-176 to -122 and -85 to -16) were identified as important for induction of the tagged alpha1-tubulin gene. Deleting the region between -176 and -122 from the transcription start site resulted in an induction level which was only 45 to 70% of that of the resident gene. Deleting the region upstream of -56 resulted in a complete loss of inducibility without affecting basal expression. The alpha1-tubulin promoter region from -85 to -16 conferred partial acid shock inducibility to an arylsulfatase (ARS) reporter gene. These results show that induction of the alpha1-tubulin gene after acid shock is a complex response that requires diverse sequence elements.

  1. Pheromone action regulates G-protein alpha-subunit myristoylation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, H G; Goldsmith, P; Spiegel, A M; Thorner, J

    1993-01-01

    Myristic acid (C14:0) is added to the N-terminal glycine residue of the alpha subunits of certain receptor-coupled guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). The G alpha subunit (GPA1 gene product) coupled to yeast pheromone receptors exists as a pool of both myristoylated and unmyristolyated species. After treatment of MATa cells with alpha factor, the myristoylated form of Gpa1p increases dramatically, and the unmyristoylated form decreases concomitantly. This pheromone-stimulated shift depends on the function of STE2 (alpha-factor receptor), STE11 (a protein kinase in the response pathway), and NMT1 (myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase) genes and uses the existing pool of fatty acids (is not blocked by cerulenin). Myristoylated Gpa1p persists long after pheromone is removed. Because myristoylation is essential for proper G alpha-G beta gamma association and receptor coupling, pheromone-dependent stimulation of Gpa1p myristoylation may be an important contributing factor in adaptation after signal transmission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8415763

  2. Erythroid cell-specific alpha-globin gene regulation by the CP2 transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chae, Ji Hyung; Lee, Yeon Ho; Park, Mi-Ae; Shin, June Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Cho, Yoon Shin; Fiering, Steven; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that ubiquitously expressed CP2c exerts potent erythroid-specific transactivation of alpha-globin through an unknown mechanism. This mechanism is reported here to involve specific CP2 splice variants and protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1). We identify a novel murine splice isoform of CP2, CP2b, which is identical to CP2a except that it has an additional 36 amino acids encoded by an extra exon. CP2b has an erythroid cell-specific transcriptional activation domain, which requires the extra exon and can form heteromeric complexes with other CP2 isoforms, but lacks the DNA binding activity found in CP2a and CP2c. Transcriptional activation of alpha-globin occurred following dimerization between CP2b and CP2c in erythroid K562 and MEL cells, but this dimerization did not activate the alpha-globin promoter in nonerythroid 293T cells, indicating that an additional erythroid factor is missing in 293T cells. PIAS1 was confirmed as a CP2 binding protein by the yeast two-hybrid screen, and expression of CP2b, CP2c, and PIAS1 in 293T cell induced alpha-globin promoter activation. These results show that ubiquitously expressed CP2b exerts potent erythroid cell-specific alpha-globin gene expression by complexing with CP2c and PIAS1.

  3. PPAR{alpha} agonists up-regulate organic cation transporters in rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luci, Sebastian; Geissler, Stefanie; Koenig, Bettina; Koch, Alexander; Stangl, Gabriele I.; Hirche, Frank; Eder, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.eder@landw.uni-halle.de

    2006-11-24

    It has been shown that clofibrate treatment increases the carnitine concentration in the liver of rats. However, the molecular mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we observed for the first time that treatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} agonist clofibrate increases hepatic mRNA concentrations of organic cation transporters (OCTNs)-1 and -2 which act as transporters of carnitine into the cell. In rat hepatoma (Fao) cells, treatment with WY-14,643 also increased the mRNA concentration of OCTN-2. mRNA concentrations of enzymes involved in carnitine biosynthesis were not altered by treatment with the PPAR{alpha} agonists in livers of rats and in Fao cells. We conclude that PPAR{alpha} agonists increase carnitine concentrations in livers of rats and cells by an increased uptake of carnitine into the cell but not by an increased carnitine biosynthesis.

  4. The lesional skin of linear IgA bullous dermatosis expresses growth-regulated peptide (GRO)-alpha.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Ihn, Hironobu; Saeki, Hidehisa; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2004-07-01

    The patient was a 62-year-old man with erythema with tense vesiculobullae and erosions on the bilateral elbows, right knee, and one buttock. A skin biopsy specimen revealed subepidermal blister formation with a predominant infiltration of neutrophils and papillary neutrophilic microabscesses. Direct immunofluorescence study showed linear deposition of IgA and weak deposition of IgG at the basement membrane zone of the lesional skin, and indirect immunofluorescence study showed linear deposition of IgA at the epidermal side of the 1M NaCl-separated normal skin. He was diagnosed with linear IgA bullous dermatosis. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the lesional and perilesional keratinocytes expressed growth-regulated peptide (GRO) -alpha, a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. This suggests that GRO-alpha plays a role in the infiltration of neutrophils into the lesional skin and in bulla formation in linear IgA bullous dermatosis.

  5. Identification of a binding motif specific to HNF4 by comparative analysis of multiple nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Bolotin, Eugene; Jiang, Tao; Sladek, Frances M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences consisting of AG[G/T]TCA or AGAACA half site motifs in a variety of configurations. However, those motifs/configurations alone do not adequately explain the diversity of NR function in vivo. Here, a systematic examination of DNA binding specificity by protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) of three closely related human NRs—HNF4α, retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) and COUPTF2—reveals an HNF4-specific binding motif (H4-SBM), xxxxCAAAGTCCA, as well as a previously unrecognized polarity in the classical DR1 motif (AGGTCAxAGGTCA) for HNF4α, RXRα and COUPTF2 homodimers. ChIP-seq data indicate that the H4-SBM is uniquely bound by HNF4α but not 10 other NRs in vivo, while NRs PXR, FXRα, Rev-Erbα appear to bind adjacent to H4-SBMs. HNF4-specific DNA recognition and transactivation are mediated by residues Asp69 and Arg76 in the DNA-binding domain; this combination of amino acids is unique to HNF4 among all human NRs. Expression profiling and ChIP data predict ∼100 new human HNF4α target genes with an H4-SBM site, including several Co-enzyme A-related genes and genes with links to disease. These results provide important new insights into NR DNA binding. PMID:22383578

  6. Regulation of noradrenaline release from rat occipital cortex tissue chops by alpha 2-adrenergic agonists.

    PubMed

    Ong, M L; Ball, S G; Vaughan, P F

    1991-04-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) and the alpha 2-adrenergic agonists clonidine, BHT-920, and UK 14304-18 inhibit potassium-evoked release of [3H]NA from rat occipital cortex tissue chops with similar potencies. NA (10(-5) M) was most effective as up to 85% inhibition could be observed compared with 75%, 55%, and 35% for UK 14304-18, clonidine, and BHT-920, respectively, all at 10(-5) M. Potassium-evoked release was enhanced by both forskolin (10(-5) M) and 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Pretreatment of tissue chops with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine partially reversed the alpha 2-adrenergic agonist inhibition of NA release. No reversal of inhibition was observed following pretreatment with 10(-5) M forskolin. The effects of clonidine, BHT-920, UK-14308-18, and NA on cyclic AMP formation stimulated by (a) forskolin, (b) isoprenaline, (c) adenosine, (d) potassium, and (e) NA were examined. Only cAMP formation stimulated by NA was inhibited by these alpha 2-adrenergic agonists. These results suggest that only a small fraction of adenylate cyclase in rat occipital cortex is coupled to alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that several alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtypes occur, not all of which are coupled to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, and that alpha 2-adrenergic receptors inhibit NA release in rat occipital cortex by a mechanism that does not involve decreasing cyclic AMP levels.

  7. Copper binding regulates intracellular alpha-synuclein localisation, aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Moualla, Dima; Wright, Josephine A; Brown, David R

    2010-05-01

    Alpha-synuclein is a natively unfolded protein that aggregates and forms inclusions that are associated with a range of diseases that include Parkinson's Disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies. The mechanism behind the formation of these inclusions and their possible role in disease remains unclear. Alpha-synuclein has also been shown to bind metals including copper and iron. We used a cell culture model of alpha-synuclein aggregation to examine the relationship between metals and formation of aggregates of the protein. While the levels of iron appear to have no role in aggregate formation or localisation of the protein in cells, copper appears to be important for both aggregation and cellular localisation of alpha-synuclein. Reduction in cellular copper resulted in a great decrease in aggregate formation both in terms of large aggregates visible in cells and oligomers observed in western blot analysis of cell extracts. Reduction in copper also resulted in a change in localisation of the protein which became more intensely localised to the plasma membrane in medium with low copper. These changes were reversed when copper was restored to the cells. Mutants of the copper binding domains altered the response to copper. Deletion of either the N- or C-termini resulted in a loss of aggregation while deletion of the C-termini also resulted in a loss of membrane association. Increased expression of alpha-synuclein also increased cell sensitivity to the toxicity of copper. These results suggest that the potential pathological role of alpha-synuclein aggregates is dependent upon the copper binding capacity of the protein.

  8. Physiological covalent regulation of rat liver branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A.; Powell, S.M.; Paxton, R.; Gillim, S.E.; Nagae, H.

    1985-12-01

    A radiochemical assay was developed for measuring branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity of Triton X-100 extracts of freeze-clamped rat liver. The proportion of active (dephosphorylated) enzyme was determined by measuring enzyme activities before and after activation of the complex with a broad-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatase. Hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity in normal male Wistar rats was 97% active but decreased to 33% active after 2 days on low-protein (8%) diet and to 13% active after 4 days on the same diet. Restricting protein intake of lean and obese female Zucker rats also caused inactivation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. Essentially all of the enzyme was in the active state in rats maintained for 14 days on either 30 or 50% protein diets. This was also the case for rats maintained on a commercial chow diet (minimum 23% protein). However, maintaining rats on 20, 8, and 0% protein diets decreased the percentage of the active form of the enzyme to 58, 10, and 7% of the total, respectively. Fasting of chow-fed rats for 48 h had no effect on the activity state of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase, i.e., 93% of the enzyme remained in the active state compared to 97% for chow-fed rats. However, hepatic enzyme of rats maintained on 8% protein diet was 10% active before starvation and 83% active after 2 days of starvation. Thus, dietary protein deficiency results in inactivation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex, presumably as a consequence of low hepatic levels of branched-chain alpha-ketoacids.

  9. The laminin-binding activity of the alpha 7 integrin receptor is defined by developmentally regulated splicing in the extracellular domain.

    PubMed Central

    Ziober, B L; Chen, Y; Kramer, R H

    1997-01-01

    The expression pattern of the laminin-binding alpha 7 beta 1 integrin is developmentally regulated in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. The X1/X2 alternative splicing in the extracellular domain of alpha 7 is found in the variable region between conserved alpha-chain homology repeat domains III and IV, a site implicated in ligand binding. To assess differences in X1/X2 isoform activity, we generated MCF-7 cell lines transfected with alpha 7-X1/X2 cDNAs. Transfectants expressing the alpha 7-X2 variant adhered rapidly to laminin 1, whereas those expressing alpha 7-X1 failed to attach. That alpha 7-X1 exists in an inactive state was established in assays using an activating beta 1 antibody that induced X1-dependent cell adhesion and spreading. Furthermore, the activation of alpha 7-X1 was cell type specific, and when expressed in HT1080 cells, the integrin was converted into a fully functional receptor capable of promoting adhesion. Thus, the expression of the alpha 7-X1/X2 integrin is a novel mechanism that regulates receptor affinity states in a cell-specific context and may modulate integrin-dependent events during muscle development and repair. Images PMID:9307969

  10. Pathway-specific profiling identifies the NF-kappa B-dependent tumor necrosis factor alpha-regulated genes in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Banno, Tomohiro; Gazel, Alix; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2005-05-13

    Identification of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) as the key agent in inflammatory disorders led to new therapies specifically targeting TNF alpha and avoiding many side effects of earlier anti-inflammatory drugs. However, because of the wide spectrum of systems affected by TNF alpha, drugs targeting TNF alpha have a potential risk of delaying wound healing, secondary infections, and cancer. Indeed, increased risks of tuberculosis and carcinogenesis have been reported as side effects after anti-TNF alpha therapy. TNF alpha regulates many processes (e.g. immune response, cell cycle, and apoptosis) through several signal transduction pathways that convey the TNF alpha signals to the nucleus. Hypothesizing that specific TNF alpha-dependent pathways control specific processes and that inhibition of a specific pathway may yield even more precisely targeted therapies, we used oligonucleotide microarrays and parthenolide, an NF-kappa B-specific inhibitor, to identify the NF-kappa B-dependent set of the TNF alpha-regulated genes in human epidermal keratinocytes. Expression of approximately 40% of all TNF alpha-regulated genes depends on NF-kappa B; 17% are regulated early (1-4 h post-treatment), and 23% are regulated late (24-48 h). Cytokines and apoptosis-related and cornification proteins belong to the "early" NF-kappa B-dependent group, and antigen presentation proteins belong to the "late" group, whereas most cell cycle, RNA-processing, and metabolic enzymes are not NF-kappa B-dependent. Therefore, inflammation, immunomodulation, apoptosis, and differentiation are on the NF-kappa B pathway, and cell cycle, metabolism, and RNA processing are not. Most early genes contain consensus NF-kappaB binding sites in their promoter DNA and are, presumably, directly regulated by NF-kappa B, except, curiously, the cornification markers. Using siRNA silencing, we identified cFLIP/CFLAR as an essential NF-kappa B-dependent antiapoptotic gene. The results confirm our

  11. Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction.

    PubMed

    Craig, David H; Haimovich, Beatrice; Basson, Marc D

    2007-12-01

    Physical forces including pressure, strain, and shear can be converted into intracellular signals that regulate diverse aspects of cell biology. Exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulates colon cancer cell adhesion by a beta(1)-integrin-dependent mechanism that requires an intact cytoskeleton and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. alpha-Actinin facilitates focal adhesion formation and physically links integrin-associated focal adhesion complexes with the cytoskeleton. We therefore hypothesized that alpha-actinin may be necessary for the mechanical response pathway that mediates pressure-stimulated cell adhesion. We reduced alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 expression with isoform-specific small interfering (si)RNA. Silencing of alpha-actinin-1, but not alpha-actinin-4, blocked pressure-stimulated cell adhesion in human SW620, HT-29, and Caco-2 colon cancer cell lines. Cell exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulated alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and alpha-actinin-1 interaction with FAK and/or Src, and enhanced FAK phosphorylation at residues Y397 and Y576. The requirement for alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation in the pressure response was investigated by expressing the alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation mutant Y12F in the colon cancer cells. Expression of Y12F blocked pressure-mediated adhesion and inhibited the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 with FAK and Src, as well as FAK activation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated reduction of alpha-actinin-1 eliminated the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 and Src with beta(1)-integrin receptor, as well as FAK-Src complex formation. These results suggest that alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation at Y12 plays a crucial role in pressure-activated cell adhesion and mechanotransduction by facilitating Src recruitment to beta(1)-integrin, and consequently the association of FAK with Src, to enhance FAK phosphorylation.

  12. Beta3 subunits promote expression and nicotine-induced up-regulation of human nicotinic alpha6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in transfected cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tumkosit, Prem; Kuryatov, Alexander; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2006-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) containing alpha6 subunits are typically found at aminergic nerve endings where they play important roles in nicotine addiction and Parkinson's disease. alpha6* AChRs usually contain beta3 subunits. beta3 subunits are presumed to assemble only in the accessory subunit position within AChRs where they do not participate in forming acetylcholine binding sites. Assembly of subunits in the accessory position may be a critical final step in assembly of mature AChRs. Human alpha6 AChRs subtypes were permanently transfected into human tsA201 human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. alpha6beta2beta3 and alpha6beta4beta3 cell lines were found to express much larger amounts of AChRs and were more sensitive to nicotine-induced increase in the amount of AChRs than were alpha6beta2 or alpha6beta4 cell lines. The increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced up-regulation was due not to a beta3-induced increase in affinity for nicotine but probably to a direct effect on assembly of AChR subunits. HEK cells express only a small amount of mature alpha6beta2 AChRs, but many of these subunits are on the cell surface. This contrasts with Xenopus laevis oocytes, which express a large amount of incorrectly assembled alpha6beta2 subunits that bind cholinergic ligands but form large amorphous intracellular aggregates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were made to the alpha6 and beta3 subunits to aid in the characterization of these AChRs. The alpha6 mAbs bind to epitopes C-terminal of the extracellular domain. These data demonstrate that both cell type and the accessory subunit beta3 can play important roles in alpha6* AChR expression, stability, and up-regulation by nicotine.

  13. IL-13 receptor alpha-2 regulates the immune and functional response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IL-13 has a prominent role in host defense against the gastrointestinal nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis; however, the role of IL-13 alpha2 in the immune and functional response to enteric infection is not known. In the current study, we investigated changes in smooth muscle and epithelial ce...

  14. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute phase protein in this ...

  15. Opposite effects of the acute promyelocytic leukemia PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins on retinoic acid signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Ruthardt, M; Testa, U; Nervi, C; Ferrucci, P F; Grignani, F; Puccetti, E; Grignani, F; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1997-01-01

    Fusion proteins involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and the PML or PLZF nuclear protein are the genetic markers of acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs). APLs with the PML-RAR alpha or the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein are phenotypically indistinguishable except that they differ in their sensitivity to retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation: PML-RAR alpha blasts are sensitive to RA and patients enter disease remission after RA treatment, while patients with PLZF-RAR alpha do not. We here report that (i) like PML-RAR alpha expression, PLZF-RAR alpha expression blocks terminal differentiation of hematopoietic precursor cell lines (U937 and HL-60) in response to different stimuli (vitamin D3, transforming growth factor beta1, and dimethyl sulfoxide); (ii) PML-RAR alpha, but not PLZF-RAR alpha, increases RA sensitivity of hematopoietic precursor cells and restores RA sensitivity of RA-resistant hematopoietic cells; (iii) PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar RA binding affinities; and (iv) PML-RAR alpha enhances the RA response of RA target genes (those for RAR beta, RAR gamma, and transglutaminase type II [TGase]) in vivo, while PLZF-RAR alpha expression has either no effect (RAR beta) or an inhibitory activity (RAR gamma and type II TGase). These data demonstrate that PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar (inhibitory) effects on RA-independent differentiation and opposite (stimulatory or inhibitory) effects on RA-dependent differentiation and that they behave in vivo as RA-dependent enhancers or inhibitors of RA-responsive genes, respectively. Their different activities on the RA signalling pathway might underlie the different responses of PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha APLs to RA treatment. The PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein contains an approximately 120-amino-acid N-terminal motif (called the POZ domain), which is also found in a variety of zinc finger proteins and a group of poxvirus proteins and which mediates protein

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of CFT1, a developmentally regulated avian alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, K P; Carlson, L M; Woodcock, J B; Ramachandra, N; Schultz, T L; Davis, T A; Lowe, J B; Thompson, C B; Larsen, R D

    1996-12-20

    Although coordinate expression of carbohydrate epitopes during development is well described, mechanisms which regulate this expression remain largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that developing chicken B cells express the LewisX terminal oligosaccharide structure in a stage-specific manner. To examine regulation of this expression, we have cloned and expressed the chicken alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase gene involved in LewisX biosynthesis, naming it chicken fucosyltransferase 1 (CFT1). CFT1 is characterized by a single long open reading frame of 356 amino acids encoding a type II transmembrane glycoprotein. The domain structure and predicted amino acid sequence are highly conserved between CFT1 and mammalian FucTIV genes (52.8% and 46.3% identity to mouse and human respectively). In vitro CFT1 fucosyltransferase activity utilizes LacNAc > 3'sialyl-LacNAc acceptors with almost no utilization of other neutral type II (lactose, 2-fucosyllactose), or type I (lacto-N-biose I) acceptors. CFT1-transfected cells make cell surface LewisX (COS-7) and LewisX + VIM-2 structures (Chinese hamster ovary). CFT1 gene expression is tissue-specific and includes embryonic thymus and bursa. Furthermore, expression of the CFT1 gene and cell surface LewisX structures are closely linked during B cell development. These findings reveal the evolutionary conservation between nonmammalian and mammalian alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase genes and demonstrate a role for fucosyltransferase gene regulation in the developmental expression of oligosaccharide structures.

  17. Modeling gene regulatory network motifs using statecharts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks are widely used by biologists to describe the interactions among genes, proteins and other components at the intra-cellular level. Recently, a great effort has been devoted to give gene regulatory networks a formal semantics based on existing computational frameworks. For this purpose, we consider Statecharts, which are a modular, hierarchical and executable formal model widely used to represent software systems. We use Statecharts for modeling small and recurring patterns of interactions in gene regulatory networks, called motifs. Results We present an improved method for modeling gene regulatory network motifs using Statecharts and we describe the successful modeling of several motifs, including those which could not be modeled or whose models could not be distinguished using the method of a previous proposal. We model motifs in an easy and intuitive way by taking advantage of the visual features of Statecharts. Our modeling approach is able to simulate some interesting temporal properties of gene regulatory network motifs: the delay in the activation and the deactivation of the "output" gene in the coherent type-1 feedforward loop, the pulse in the incoherent type-1 feedforward loop, the bistability nature of double positive and double negative feedback loops, the oscillatory behavior of the negative feedback loop, and the "lock-in" effect of positive autoregulation. Conclusions We present a Statecharts-based approach for the modeling of gene regulatory network motifs in biological systems. The basic motifs used to build more complex networks (that is, simple regulation, reciprocal regulation, feedback loop, feedforward loop, and autoregulation) can be faithfully described and their temporal dynamics can be analyzed. PMID:22536967

  18. Modulating alpha-actinin-4 dynamics in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jean-Louis R; Hosseini-Abardeh, Mona; Farah, Kevin; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2009-03-01

    Podocytes are epithelial cells that line the outer aspect of renal blood vessels and provide a platform for the kidney's filtering apparatus, the slit diaphragm. Mutations in alpha-actinin-4, an actin bundling protein highly expressed in podocytes, result in increased affinity for actin and cause a familial form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We hypothesized that such gain-of-affinity mutations would override alpha-actinin-4's sensitivity to regulatory factors such as calcium (acting via two EF-hand motifs), and phosphoinositides. We generated calcium- (mutEF) and phosphoinositide- (mutPI) insensitive variants of alpha-actinin-4, comparing their properties to a disease-associated mutant (K256E) and to the wildtype (wt) protein. alpha-Actinin-4(mutPI) displayed increased affinity for actin, while the affinity of alpha-actinin-4(mutEF) was unchanged. Addition of calcium to actin sedimentation assays caused a decrease in the association of alpha-actinin-4(wt) with filamentous actin, while phosphoinositides generally increased this association. Similar to alpha-actinin-4(K256E), alpha-actinin-4(mutPI) was mislocalized in cultured podocytes, being preferentially associated with filamentous actin and focal adhesions. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed a rapid turnover of alpha-actinin-4(wt) and alpha-actinin-4(mutEF) along stress fibers and focal adhesions, while the turnover of alpha-actinin-4(K256E) and alpha-actinin-4(mutPI) was dramatically reduced at these subcellular locales. Equibiaxial mechanical stimulation of podocytes, a mimic of intraglomerular forces, reduced podocyte surface area by 50%; this decrease was more severe (70%) in the presence of high-affinity mutants of alpha-actinin-4. These data suggest that dynamic regulation of alpha-actinin-4/actin interactions may be necessary for maintaining podocyte structure in response to glomerular hydrostatic forces.

  19. Erythrocytosis-associated HIF-2alpha mutations demonstrate a critical role for residues C-terminal to the hydroxylacceptor proline.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Percy, Melanie J; Sutherland, Scott; Bierl, Charlene; McMullin, Mary Frances; Master, Stephen R; Lappin, Terence R J; Lee, Frank S

    2009-04-03

    A classic physiologic response to hypoxia in humans is the up-regulation of the ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO) gene, which is the central regulator of red blood cell mass. The EPO gene, in turn, is activated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). HIF is a transcription factor consisting of an alpha subunit (HIF-alpha) and a beta subunit (HIF-beta). Under normoxic conditions, prolyl hydroxylase domain protein (PHD, also known as HIF prolyl hydroxylase and egg laying-defective nine protein) site specifically hydroxylates HIF-alpha in a conserved LXXLAP motif (where underlining indicates the hydroxylacceptor proline). This provides a recognition motif for the von Hippel Lindau protein, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets hydroxylated HIF-alpha for degradation. Under hypoxic conditions, this inherently oxygen-dependent modification is arrested, thereby stabilizing HIF-alpha and allowing it to activate the EPO gene. We previously identified and characterized an erythrocytosis-associated HIF2A mutation, G537W. More recently, we reported two additional erythrocytosis-associated HIF2A mutations, G537R and M535V. Here, we describe the functional characterization of these two mutants as well as a third novel erythrocytosis-associated mutation, P534L. These mutations affect residues C-terminal to the LXXLAP motif. We find that all result in impaired degradation and thus aberrant stabilization of HIF-2alpha. However, each exhibits a distinct profile with respect to their effects on PHD2 binding and von Hippel Lindau interaction. These findings reinforce the importance of HIF-2alpha in human EPO regulation, demonstrate heterogeneity of functional defects arising from these mutations, and point to a critical role for residues C-terminal to the LXXLAP motif in HIF-alpha.

  20. [Personal motif in art].

    PubMed

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy.

  1. Two PEST-like motifs regulate Ca2+/calpain-mediated cleavage of the CaVβ3 subunit and provide important determinants for neuronal Ca2+ channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Alejandro; Oviedo, Norma; Tadmouri, Abir; Avila, Traudy; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Increase in intracellular Ca2+ due to voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channel opening represents an important trigger for a number of second-messenger mediated effects ranging from neurotransmitter release to gene activation. Ca2+ entry occurs through the principal pore-forming protein, but several ancillary subunits are known to more precisely tune ion influx. Among them, the CaVβ subunits are perhaps the most important given that they largely influence the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel. Notably, several functional features may be associated with specific structural regions of the CaVβ subunits emphasizing the relevance of intramolecular domains in the physiology of these proteins. In the current report, we show that CaVβ3 contains two PEST motifs and undergoes Ca2+-dependent degradation which can be prevented by the specific calpain inhibitor calpeptin. Using mutant constructs lacking the PEST motifs, we present evidence that they are necessary for the cleavage of CaVβ3 by calpain. Furthermore, the deletion of the PEST sequences did not affect the binding of CaVβ3 to the ionconducting CaV2.2 subunit, and when expressed in HEK-293 cells, the PEST motif-deleted CaVβ3 significantly increased whole-cell current density and retarded channel inactivation. Consistent with this observation, calpeptin treatment of HEK-293 cells expressing wild-type CaVβ3 resulted in an increase in current amplitude. Together, these findings suggest that calpainmediated CaVβ3 proteolysis may be an essential process for Ca2+ channel functional regulation. PMID:16706839

  2. PANP is a novel O-glycosylated PILR{alpha} ligand expressed in neural tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Kogure, Amane; Shiratori, Ikuo; Wang, Jing; Lanier, Lewis L.; Arase, Hisashi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} A Novel molecule, PANP, was identified to be a PILR{alpha} ligand. {yields} Sialylated O-glycan structures on PANP were required for PILR{alpha} recognition. {yields} Transcription of PANP was mainly observed in neural tissues. {yields} PANP seems to be involved in immune regulation as a ligand for PILR{alpha}. -- Abstract: PILR{alpha} is an immune inhibitory receptor possessing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in its cytoplasmic domain enabling it to deliver inhibitory signals. Binding of PILR{alpha} to its ligand CD99 is involved in immune regulation; however, whether there are other PILR{alpha} ligands in addition to CD99 is not known. Here, we report that a novel molecule, PILR-associating neural protein (PANP), acts as an additional ligand for PILR{alpha}. Transcription of PANP was mainly observed in neural tissues. PILR{alpha}-Ig fusion protein bound cells transfected with PANP and the transfectants stimulated PILR{alpha} reporter cells. Specific O-glycan structures on PANP were found to be required for PILR recognition of this ligand. These results suggest that PANP is involved in immune regulation as a ligand of the PILR{alpha}.

  3. An SOS Regulon under Control of a Noncanonical LexA-Binding Motif in the Betaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Campoy, Susana; Emerson, David; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SOS response is a transcriptional regulatory network governed by the LexA repressor that activates in response to DNA damage. In the Betaproteobacteria, LexA is known to target a palindromic sequence with the consensus sequence CTGT-N8-ACAG. We report the characterization of a LexA regulon in the iron-oxidizing betaproteobacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus. In silico and in vitro analyses show that LexA targets six genes by recognizing a binding motif with the consensus sequence GAACGaaCGTTC, which is strongly reminiscent of the Bacillus subtilis LexA-binding motif. We confirm that the closely related Gallionella capsiferriformans shares the same LexA-binding motif, and in silico analyses indicate that this motif is also conserved in the Nitrosomonadales and the Methylophilales. Phylogenetic analysis of LexA and the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III (DnaE) reveal that the organisms harboring this noncanonical LexA form a compact taxonomic cluster within the Betaproteobacteria. However, their lexA gene is unrelated to the standard Betaproteobacteria lexA, and there is evidence of its spread through lateral gene transfer. In contrast to other reported cases of noncanonical LexA-binding motifs, the regulon of S. lithotrophicus is comparable in size and function to that of many other Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that a convergent SOS regulon has reevolved under the control of a new LexA protein. Analysis of the DNA-binding domain of S. lithotrophicus LexA reveals little sequence similarity with that of other LexA proteins targeting similar binding motifs, suggesting that network structure may limit site evolution or that structural constrains make the B. subtilis-type motif an optimal interface for multiple LexA sequences. IMPORTANCE Understanding the evolution of transcriptional systems enables us to address important questions in microbiology, such as the emergence and transfer potential of different regulatory systems to regulate virulence or

  4. Heterogeneity of Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: SAD, a novel developmentally regulated alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sawruk, E; Schloss, P; Betz, H; Schmitt, B

    1990-01-01

    Two genes, ard and als, are known to encode subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Drosophila. Here we describe the isolation of cDNA clones encoding a novel member (SAD, or alpha 2) of this receptor protein family. The deduced amino acid sequence displays high homology to the ALS protein and shares structural features with ligand binding nAChR alpha-subunits. Sad transcripts accumulate during major periods of neuronal differentiation and, in embryos, are localized in the central nervous system. Expression of SAD cRNA in Xenopus oocytes generates cation channels that are gated by nicotine. These data indicate heterogeneity of nAChRs in Drosophila. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697262

  5. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the interleukin-1 receptor II by alpha-, beta-, and gamma-secretase.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Marjaux, Els; Imhof, Axel; De Strooper, Bart; Haass, Christian; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2007-04-20

    Ectodomain shedding and intramembrane proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by alpha-, beta- and gamma-secretase are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Increased proteolytic processing and secretion of another membrane protein, the interleukin-1 receptor II (IL-1R2), have also been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. IL-1R2 is a decoy receptor that may limit detrimental effects of IL-1 in the brain. At present, the proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 remains little understood. Here we show that IL-1R2 can be proteolytically processed in a manner similar to APP. IL-1R2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells first undergoes ectodomain shedding in an alpha-secretase-like manner, resulting in secretion of the IL-1R2 ectodomain and the generation of an IL-1R2 C-terminal fragment. This fragment undergoes further intramembrane proteolysis by gamma-secretase, leading to the generation of the soluble intracellular domain of IL-1R2. Intramembrane cleavage of IL-1R2 was abolished by a highly specific inhibitor of gamma-secretase and was absent in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in gamma-secretase activity. Surprisingly, the beta-secretase BACE1 and its homolog BACE2 increased IL-1R2 secretion resulting in C-terminal fragments nearly identical to the ones generated by the alpha-secretase-like cleavage. This suggests that both proteases may act as alternative alpha-secretase-like proteases. Importantly, BACE1 and BACE2 did not cleave several other membrane proteins, demonstrating that both proteases do not contribute to general membrane protein turnover but only cleave specific proteins. This study reveals a similar proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 and APP and may provide an explanation for the increased IL-1R2 secretion observed in AD.

  6. Regulation of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase expression by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in adipocytes: functional consequences on glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Nathalie; Moldes, Marthe; El Hadri, Khadija; Fève, Bruno

    2003-03-01

    Membrane-associated semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) is mainly present in the media of aorta and in adipose tissue. Recent works have reported that SSAO activation can stimulate glucose transport of fat cells and promote adipose conversion. In this study, the murine 3T3-L1 preadipose cell line was used to investigate SSAO regulation by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine that is synthesized in fat cells and known to be involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance. SSAO mRNA and protein levels, and enzyme activity were decreased by TNF-alpha in a dose- and time-dependent manner, without any change of SSAO affinity for substrates or inhibitors. SSAO inhibition caused by TNF-alpha was spontaneously reversed along the time after TNF-alpha removal. The decrease in SSAO expression also occurred in white adipose tissue of C57BL/6 mice treated with mTNF-alpha. Overall, we demonstrated that reduction in SSAO expression induced by the cytokine had marked repercussions on amine-stimulated glucose transport, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was more pronounced than the inhibiting effect of TNF-alpha on insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Moreover, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists thiazolidinediones did not reverse either TNF-alpha effect on amine-sensitive glucose transport or the inhibition of SSAO activity, whereas they antagonized TNF-alpha effects on insulin-sensitive glucose transport. These results demonstrate that TNF-alpha can strongly down-regulate SSAO expression and activity, and through this mechanism can dramatically reduce amine-stimulated glucose transport. This suggests a potential role of this regulatory process in the pathogenesis of glucose homeostasis dysregulations observed during diseases accompanied by TNF-alpha overproduction, such as cachexia or obesity.

  7. Alpha-conotoxin MII-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell regulate progressive ratio responding maintained by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Brunzell, Darlene H; Boschen, Karen E; Hendrick, Elizabeth S; Beardsley, Patrick M; McIntosh, J Michael

    2010-02-01

    Beta2 subunit containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (beta2(*)nAChRs; asterisk ((*)) denotes assembly with other subunits) are critical for nicotine self-administration and nicotine-associated dopamine (DA) release that supports nicotine reinforcement. The alpha6 subunit assembles with beta2 on DA neurons where alpha6beta2(*)nAChRs regulate nicotine-stimulated DA release at neuron terminals. Using local infusion of alpha-conotoxin MII (alpha-CTX MII), an antagonist with selectivity for alpha6beta2(*)nAChRs, the purpose of these experiments was to determine if alpha6beta2(*)nAChRs in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell are required for motivation to self-administer nicotine. Long-Evans rats lever-pressed for 0.03 mg/kg, i.v., nicotine accompanied by light+tone cues (NIC) or for light+tone cues unaccompanied by nicotine (CUEonly). Following extensive training, animals were tested under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule that required an increasing number of lever presses for each nicotine infusion and/or cue delivery. Immediately before each PR session, rats received microinfusions of alpha-CTX MII (0, 1, 5, or 10 pmol per side) into the NAc shell or the overlying anterior cingulate cortex. alpha-CTX MII dose dependently decreased break points and number of infusions earned by NIC rats following infusion into the NAc shell but not the anterior cingulate cortex. Concentrations of alpha-CTX MII that were capable of attenuating nicotine self-administration did not disrupt locomotor activity. There was no effect of infusion on lever pressing in CUEonly animals and NAc infusion alpha-CTX MII did not affect locomotor activity in an open field. These data suggest that alpha6beta2(*)nAChRs in the NAc shell regulate motivational aspects of nicotine reinforcement but not nicotine-associated locomotor activation.

  8. The effects of alpha-adrenergic stimulation on the regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R A; Tanabe, S; Buxton, D B; Olson, M S

    1985-08-05

    The regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex was investigated during alpha-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine in the isolated perfused rat liver. The metabolic flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was monitored by measuring the production of 14CO2 from infused [1-14C] pyruvate. In livers from fed animals perfused with a low concentration of pyruvate (0.05 mM), phenylephrine infusion significantly inhibited the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation without affecting the amount of pyruvate dehydrogenase in its active form. Also, phenylephrine caused no significant effect on tissue NADH/NAD+ and acetyl-CoA/CoASH ratios or on the kinetics of pyruvate decarboxylation in 14CO2 washout experiments. Phenylephrine inhibition of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation was, however, closely associated with a decrease in the specific radioactivity of perfusate lactate, suggesting that the pyruvate decarboxylation response simply reflected dilution of the labeled pyruvate pool due to phenylephrine-stimulated glycogenolysis. This suggestion was confirmed in additional experiments which showed that the alpha-adrenergic-mediated inhibitory effect on pyruvate decarboxylation was reduced in livers perfused with a high concentration of pyruvate (1 mM) and was absent in livers from starved rats. Thus, alpha-adrenergic agonists do not exert short term regulatory effects on pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver. Furthermore, the results suggest either that the rat liver pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is insensitive to changes in mitochondrial calcium or that changes in intramitochondrial calcium levels as a result of alpha-adrenergic stimulation are considerably less than suggested by others.

  9. The alpha-chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex binds to and regulates FADD function.

    PubMed

    Stilo, Romania; Liguoro, Domenico; di Jeso, Bruno; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale

    2003-04-18

    FADD protein is a critical mediator of signal transduction pathways activated by several members of the TNF-receptor gene superfamily. Recently, an induced proximity model has been proposed to interpret FADD-mediated signaling events. According to this model, FADD facilitates signaling by inducing clusters of effector molecules in proximity of the activated receptor complex. An important corollary of the induced-proximity model is that FADD protein should not form oligomers in the absence of receptor stimulation. Here we show that, in the absence of death receptor stimulation, FADD is found associated to the alpha chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC). Exposure to TNF results in disruption of FADD/NAC complex. Expression of NAC regulates formation of FADD oligomers and modulates FADD-mediated signaling. Thus, our observation indicates that NAC may serve as an intracellular regulator of FADD function.

  10. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  11. Anchorage mediated by integrin alpha6beta4 to laminin 5 (epiligrin) regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of a membrane-associated 80-kD protein

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Detachment of basal keratinocytes from basement membrane signals a differentiation cascade. Two integrin receptors alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1 mediate adhesion to laminin 5 (epiligrin), a major extracellular matrix protein in the basement membrane of epidermis. By establishing a low temperature adhesion system at 4 degrees C, we were able to examine the exclusive role of alpha6beta4 in adhesion of human foreskin keratinocyte (HFK) and the colon carcinoma cell LS123. We identified a novel 80-kD membrane-associated protein (p80) that is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to dissociation of alpha6beta4 from laminin 5. The specificity of p80 phosphorylation for laminin 5 and alpha6beta4 was illustrated by the lack of regulation of p80 phosphorylation on collagen, fibronectin, or poly-L-lysine surfaces. We showed that blocking of alpha3beta1 function using inhibitory mAbs, low temperature, or cytochalasin D diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase but not p80 phosphorylation. Therefore, under our assay conditions, p80 phosphorylation is regulated by alpha6beta4, while motility via alpha3beta1 causes phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Consistent with a linkage between p80 dephosphorylation and alpha6beta4 anchorage to laminin 5, we found that phosphatase inhibitor sodium vanadate, which blocked the p80 dephosphorylation, prevented the alpha6beta4-dependent cell anchorage to laminin 5 at 4degreesC. In contrast, adhesion at 37 degrees C via alpha3beta1 was unaffected. Furthermore, by in vitro kinase assay, we identified a kinase activity for p80 phosphorylation in suspended HFKs but not in attached cells. The kinase activity, alpha6beta4, and its associated adhesion structure stable anchoring contacts were all cofractionated in the Triton- insoluble cell fraction that lacks alpha3beta1. Thus, regulation of p80 phosphorylation, through the activities of p80 kinase and phosphatase, correlates with alpha6beta4-SAC anchorage to laminin 5 at 4

  12. HNF4alpha and NF-E2 are key transcriptional regulators of the murine Abcc6 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Douet, Vanessa; VanWart, Christopher M; Heller, Matthew B; Reinhard, Sabrina; Le Saux, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in an ABC transporter gene called ABCC6 are responsible for pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a rare heritable disease characterized by elastic fiber calcification in skin, ocular and vascular tissues. The presumed function of this ABC transporter is to export metabolites from polarized cells. However, the endogenous substrate(s) are unknown and the exact relationship with elastic fibers is unclear. As ABCC6 is only expressed at high level in liver and kidneys, tissues seemingly unrelated to the PXE phenotype, we explored the transcriptional regulation of the murine Abcc6 gene to define the transcriptional signal conferring tissue specificity and to gather clues on its possible biological function. We cloned 2.9 kb of the mAbcc6 5'-flanking region and several deletion constructs linked to a luciferase reporter gene. We delineated a proximal promoter and a liver-specific enhancer region. We also demonstrated that the proximal region is a TATA-less promoter requiring an intact CCAAT-box and Sp1 binding for its basal activity. By using reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitations, we showed that HNF4alpha and surprisingly, NF-E2, enhanced the mAbcc6 promoter activity. The involvement of both HNF4alpha and NF-E2 in the mAbcc6 gene regulation suggests that Abcc6 might be involved in a detoxification processes related to hemoglobin or heme.

  13. Regulation of diurnal variation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) activity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kovár, J; Lenícek, M; Zimolová, M; Vítek, L; Jirsa, M; Pitha, J

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, displays a pronounced diurnal variation. To better understand the regulation of CYP7A1 activity, three day-long examinations were carried out in 12 healthy men. The concentrations of 7alpha-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one (C4), a surrogate marker of CYP7A1 activity, bile acids (BA), insulin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol were measured in serum in 90-min intervals from 7 AM till 10 PM. To lower and to increase BA concentration during the study, the subjects received cholestyramine and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), respectively, in two examinations. No drug was used in the control examination. There was a pronounced diurnal variation of C4 concentration with a peak around 1 PM in most of the subjects. The area under the curve (AUC) of C4 concentration was five times higher and three times lower when subjects were treated with cholestyramine and CDCA, respectively. No relationship was found between AUC of C4 and AUC of BA concentration, but AUC of C4 correlated positively with that of insulin. Moreover, short-term treatment with cholestyramine resulted in about 10 % suppression of glycemia throughout the day. Our results suggest that insulin is involved in the regulation of diurnal variation of CYP7A1 activity in humans.

  14. Regulation of constitutive androstane receptor and its target genes by fasting, cAMP, hepatocyte nuclear factor alpha, and the coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xunshan; Lichti, Kristin; Kim, Insook; Gonzalez, Frank J; Staudinger, Jeff L

    2006-09-08

    Animal studies reveal that fasting and caloric restriction produce increased activity of specific metabolic pathways involved in resistance to weight loss in liver. Evidence suggests that this phenomenon may in part occur through the action of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3). Currently, the precise molecular mechanisms that activate CAR during fasting are unknown. We show that fasting coordinately induces expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), CAR, cytochrome P-450 2b10 (Cyp2b10), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1a1 (Ugt1a1), sulfotransferase 2a1 (Sult2a1), and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 2 (Oatp2) in liver in mice. Treatments that elevate intracellular cAMP levels also produce increased expression of these genes in cultured hepatocytes. Our data show that PGC-1alpha interaction with hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha, NR2A1) directly regulates CAR gene expression through a novel and evolutionarily conserved HNF4-response element (HNF4-RE) located in its proximal promoter. Expression of PGC-1alpha in cells increases CAR expression and ligand-independent CAR activity. Genetic studies reveal that hepatic expression of HNF4alpha is required to produce fasting-inducible CAR expression and activity. Taken together, our data show that fasting produces increased expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes and an uptake transporter protein through a network of interactions involving cAMP, PGC-1alpha, HNF4alpha, CAR, and CAR target genes in liver. Given the recent finding that mice lacking CAR exhibit a profound decrease in resistance to weight loss during extended periods of caloric restriction, our findings have important implications in the development of drugs for the treatment of obesity and related diseases.

  15. Novel Epigenetic Regulation of Alpha-Synuclein Expression in Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Narayan; Meeker, Harry C; Brown, W Ted

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA), a presynaptic protein, is significantly reduced in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model of DS. Methylation analyses of promoter proximal CpG sites indicate similar reduction in Ts65Dn mice compared to control mice. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic catechin present in green tea extract, increases methylation of SNCA promoter proximal CpG sites and expression in Ts65Dn mice. These results suggest a positive link between CpG methylation and SNCA expression in Down syndrome.

  16. Network motifs modulate druggability of cellular targets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Ma, Cong; Tan, Cheemeng

    2016-01-01

    Druggability refers to the capacity of a cellular target to be modulated by a small-molecule drug. To date, druggability is mainly studied by focusing on direct binding interactions between a drug and its target. However, druggability is impacted by cellular networks connected to a drug target. Here, we use computational approaches to reveal basic principles of network motifs that modulate druggability. Through quantitative analysis, we find that inhibiting self-positive feedback loop is a more robust and effective treatment strategy than inhibiting other regulations, and adding direct regulations to a drug-target generally reduces its druggability. The findings are explained through analytical solution of the motifs. Furthermore, we find that a consensus topology of highly druggable motifs consists of a negative feedback loop without any positive feedback loops, and consensus motifs with low druggability have multiple positive direct regulations and positive feedback loops. Based on the discovered principles, we predict potential genetic targets in Escherichia coli that have either high or low druggability based on their network context. Our work establishes the foundation toward identifying and predicting druggable targets based on their network topology. PMID:27824147

  17. New type of starch-binding domain: the direct repeat motif in the C-terminal region of Bacillus sp. no. 195 alpha-amylase contributes to starch binding and raw starch degrading.

    PubMed Central

    Sumitani, J; Tottori, T; Kawaguchi, T; Arai, M

    2000-01-01

    The alpha-amylase from Bacillus sp. no. 195 (BAA) consists of two domains: one is the catalytic domain similar to alpha-amylases from animals and Streptomyces in the N-terminal region; the other is the functionally unknown domain composed of an approx. 90-residue direct repeat in the C-terminal region. The gene coding for BAA was expressed in Streptomyces lividans TK24. Three active forms of the gene products were found. The pH and thermal profiles of BAAs, and their catalytic activities for p-nitrophenyl maltopentaoside and soluble starch, showed almost the same behaviours. The largest, 69 kDa, form (BAA-alpha) was of the same molecular mass as that of the mature protein estimated from the nucleotide sequence, and had raw-starch-binding and -degrading abilities. The second largest, 60 kDa, form (BAA-beta), whose molecular mass was the same as that of the natural enzyme from Bacillus sp. no. 195, was generated by proteolytic processing between the two repeat sequences in the C-terminal region, and had lower activities for raw starch binding and degrading than those of BAA-alpha. The smallest, 50 kDa, form (BAA-gamma) contained only the N-terminal catalytic domain as a result of removal of the C-terminal repeat sequence, which led to loss of binding and degradation of insoluble starches. Thus the starch adsorption capacity and raw-starch-degrading activity of BAAs depends on the existence of the repeat sequence in the C-terminal region. BAA-alpha was specifically adsorbed on starch or dextran (alpha-1,4 or alpha-1,6 glucan), and specifically desorbed with maltose or beta-cyclodextrin. These observations indicated that the repeat sequence of the enzyme was functional in the starch-binding domain (SBD). We propose the designation of the homologues to the SBD of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger as family I SBDs, the homologues to that of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae as family II, and the homologues of this repeat sequence of BAA as family III. PMID:10947962

  18. New type of starch-binding domain: the direct repeat motif in the C-terminal region of Bacillus sp. no. 195 alpha-amylase contributes to starch binding and raw starch degrading.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, J; Tottori, T; Kawaguchi, T; Arai, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha-amylase from Bacillus sp. no. 195 (BAA) consists of two domains: one is the catalytic domain similar to alpha-amylases from animals and Streptomyces in the N-terminal region; the other is the functionally unknown domain composed of an approx. 90-residue direct repeat in the C-terminal region. The gene coding for BAA was expressed in Streptomyces lividans TK24. Three active forms of the gene products were found. The pH and thermal profiles of BAAs, and their catalytic activities for p-nitrophenyl maltopentaoside and soluble starch, showed almost the same behaviours. The largest, 69 kDa, form (BAA-alpha) was of the same molecular mass as that of the mature protein estimated from the nucleotide sequence, and had raw-starch-binding and -degrading abilities. The second largest, 60 kDa, form (BAA-beta), whose molecular mass was the same as that of the natural enzyme from Bacillus sp. no. 195, was generated by proteolytic processing between the two repeat sequences in the C-terminal region, and had lower activities for raw starch binding and degrading than those of BAA-alpha. The smallest, 50 kDa, form (BAA-gamma) contained only the N-terminal catalytic domain as a result of removal of the C-terminal repeat sequence, which led to loss of binding and degradation of insoluble starches. Thus the starch adsorption capacity and raw-starch-degrading activity of BAAs depends on the existence of the repeat sequence in the C-terminal region. BAA-alpha was specifically adsorbed on starch or dextran (alpha-1,4 or alpha-1,6 glucan), and specifically desorbed with maltose or beta-cyclodextrin. These observations indicated that the repeat sequence of the enzyme was functional in the starch-binding domain (SBD). We propose the designation of the homologues to the SBD of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger as family I SBDs, the homologues to that of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae as family II, and the homologues of this repeat sequence of BAA as family III.

  19. Downregulation of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4{alpha} and its role in regulation of gene expression by TGF-{beta} in mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Nose, Kiyoshi; Shibanuma, Motoko

    2008-06-10

    We found that a specific isoform of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF-4{alpha}), HNF-4{alpha}8, was expressed in mouse mammary epithelial NMuMG cells, and that its expression was repressed by TGF-{beta}. The repression was interfered by dominant negative forms of activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) and Smad3, and sensitive to cycloheximide, suggesting the involvement of additional protein(s) as well as ALK5 and Smad3 in the repression. Further study showed that high mobility group A2 (HMGA2), which is reported to be directly upregulated by Smads, repressed HNF-4{alpha}8 expression. Therefore, it is likely that HMGA2 mediates the downregulation of HNF-4{alpha}8 downstream of ALK5 and Smads To determine the significance of the downregulation of HNF-4{alpha}8 in TGF-{beta} signaling, we performed DNA microarray analysis and extracted a subgroup of TGF-{beta}1-regulated genes, including tenascin C and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP-3), whose regulation by TGF-{beta}1 was attenuated by forced expression of HNF-4{alpha}8. HMGA2 has recently emerged as a transcriptional organizer of TGF-{beta} signaling, regulating several key factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we identified an isoform of HNF-4{alpha} as a new target downstream of HMGA2 and assigned a new role to HNF-4{alpha} in the TGF-{beta} signaling/transcriptional cascade driven by ALK5/Smad/HMGA2 and associated with the malignant transformation of cells.

  20. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Expression by the Nuclear Receptor ROR alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Genoux, Annelise; Dehondt, Helene; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Duhem, Christian; Hum, Dean W.; Martin, Genevieve; Pennacchio, Len; Staels, Bart; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2004-10-01

    Apolipoprotein A5 has recently been identified as a crucial determinant of plasma triglyceride levels. Our results showed that RORa up-regulates human APOA5 but has no effect on mouse apoa5 promoter. These data suggest an additional important physiological role for RORa in the regulation of genes involved in plasma triglyceride homeostasis in human and probably in the development of atherosclerosis

  2. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treatment. Chronic flunitrazepam treatment did not significantly alter the GABAA receptor alpha 6 subunit protein over the 2-12 day period. 2. GABA treatment for 2 days down-regulates the alpha 1 subunit protein in a dose-dependent (10 microM-1 mM) manner that was prevented by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). At 10 microM and 1 mM GABA the reduction in alpha 1 subunit expression compared to controls was 31% and 66%, respectively. 3. The flunitrazepam-induced decrease in alpha 1 subunit protein is independent of GABA, which suggests that it involves a mechanism distinct from the GABA-dependent action of benzodiazepines on GABAA receptor channel activity. 4. Simultaneous treatment with flunitrazepam and GABA did not produce an additive down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein, but produced an effect of the same magnitude as that of flunitrazepam alone. This down-regulation induced by the combination of flunitrazepam and GABA was inhibited by flumazenil (78%), but unaffected by bicuculline. 5. The flunitrazepam-induced down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein at 2 days was completely reversed by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine (0.3 microM). 6. This study has shown that both flunitrazepam and GABA treatment, via their respective binding sites, caused a reduction in the expression of the GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein; an effect mediated through the same neurochemical mechanism. The results also imply that the benzodiazepine effect

  3. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  4. Stress, emotion regulation and cognitive performance: the predictive contributions of trait and state relative frontal EEG alpha asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Ronald N; Rietschel, Jeremy C; Lo, Li-Chuan; Costanzo, Michelle E; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between trait and state measures of frontal lobe EEG alpha-band asymmetry in regard to indexing the approach-withdrawal dimension of emotion is unclear. The comparative predictive power of these constructs to explain emotion regulation and cognitive performance was examined under varying degrees of emotional challenge. The Capability Model posits the neural underpinnings of the relative difference in electrical activity between the left and right frontal lobes as a situational mechanism possibly indexing prefrontal-amygdalar interactions and psychological state. EEG, skin conductance, heart rate and acoustic startle amplitude were collected during a working memory task under three increasing levels of stress (final level was threat of shock). During threat of shock participants with higher state asymmetry exhibited greater emotion regulation compared to those with lower scores as indexed by significant attenuation of eyeblink startle magnitudes. The trait measure of frontal EEG asymmetry failed to account for significant variability in emotion regulation. Results implicate state-specific relative left frontal lobe activity as having an adaptive role in the regulation of emotion during cognitive challenge, but only under conditions of sufficient stress.

  5. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The N-terminus region of the putative C2H2 transcription factor Ada1 harbors a species-specific activation motif that regulates asexual reproduction in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Jung-Eun; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important plant pathogenic fungus causing maize ear and stalk rots. In addition, the fungus is directly associated with fumonisin contamination of food and feeds. Here, we report the functional characterization of Ada1, a putative Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor with a high level of similarity to Aspergillus nidulans FlbC, which is required for the activation of the key regulator of conidiation brlA. ADA1 is predicted to encode a protein with two DNA binding motifs at the C terminus and a putative activator domain at the N terminus region. Deletion of the flbC gene in A. nidulans results in "fluffy" cotton-like colonies, with a defect in transition from vegetative growth to asexual development. In this study we show that Ada1 plays a key role in asexual development in F. verticillioides. Conidia production was significantly reduced in the knockout mutant (Δada1), in which aberrant conidia and conidiophores were also observed. We identified genes that are predicted to be downstream of ADA1, based on A. nidulans conidiation signaling pathway. Among them, the deletion of stuA homologue, FvSTUA, resulted in near absence of conidia production. To further investigate the functional conservation of this transcription factor, we complemented the Δada1 strain with A. nidulans flbC, F. verticillioides ADA1, and chimeric constructs. A. nidulans flbC failed to restore conidia production similar to the wild-type level. However, the Ada1N-terminal domain, which contains a putative activator, fused to A. nidulans FlbC C-terminal motif successfully complemented the Δada1 mutant. Taken together, Ada1 is an important transcriptional regulator of asexual development in F. verticillioides and that the N-terminus domain is critical for proper function of this transcription factor.

  7. Gene expression profiling reveals novel regulation by bisphenol-A in estrogen receptor-{alpha}-positive human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, David W.; Feng, Yuxin; Yang, Jun; Puga, Alvaro; Lee, Adrian V.; Khan, Sohaib A. . E-mail: sohaib.khan@uc.edu

    2006-01-15

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) shows proliferative actions in uterus and mammary glands and may influence the development of male and female reproductive tracts in utero or during early postnatal life. Because of its ability to function as an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, BPA has the potential to disrupt normal endocrine signaling through regulation of ER target genes. Some genes are regulated by both estradiol (E2) and BPA, but those exclusive to either agent have not been described. Using a yeast strain incorporating a vitellogenin A2 ERE-LacZ reporter gene into the genome, we found that BPA induced expression of the reporter in colonies transformed with the ER{alpha} expression plasmid, illustrating BPA-mediated regulation within a chromatin context. Additionally, a reporter gene transiently transfected into the endometrial cancer (Ishikawa) cell line also showed BPA activity, although at 100-fold less potency than E2. To compare global gene expression in response to BPA and E2, we used a variant of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line stably expressing HA-tagged ER{alpha}. Cultures were treated for 3 h with an ethanol vehicle, E2 (10{sup -8} M), or BPA (10{sup -6} M), followed by isolation of RNA and microarray analysis with the human U95A probe array (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA). More than 300 genes were changed 2-fold or more by either or both agents, with roughly half being up-regulated and half down-regulated. A number of growth- and development-related genes, such as HOXC1 and C6, Wnt5A, Frizzled, TGF{beta}-2, and STAT inhibitor 2, were found to be affected exclusively by BPA. We used quantitative real-time PCR to verify regulation of the HOXC6 gene, which showed decreased expression of approximately 2.5-fold by BPA. These results reveal novel effects by BPA and E2, raising interesting possibilities regarding the role of endocrine disruptors in sexual development.

  8. Glucagon and cAMP inhibit cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene expression in human hepatocytes: discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang-Hoon; Chiang, John Y L

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated to control bile acid synthesis and maintain lipid homeostasis. Recent studies in mice suggest that bile acid synthesis is regulated by the fasted-to-fed cycle, and fasting induces CYP7A1 gene expression in parallel to the induction of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). How glucagon regulates CYP7A1 gene expression in the human liver is not clear. Here we show that glucagon and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) strongly repressed CYP7A1 mRNA expression in human primary hepatocytes. Reporter assays confirmed that cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited human CYP7A1 gene transcription, in contrast to their stimulation of the PEPCK gene. Mutagenesis analysis identified a PKA-responsive region located within the previously identified HNF4alpha binding site in the human CYP7A1 promoter. Glucagon and cAMP increased HNF4alpha phosphorylation and reduced the amount of HNF4alpha present in CYP7A1 chromatin. Our findings suggest that glucagon inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression via PKA phosphorylation of HNF4alpha, which lost its ability to bind the CYP7A1 gene and resulted in inhibition of human CYP7A1 gene transcription. In conclusion, this study unveils a species difference in nutrient regulation of the human and mouse CYP7A1 gene and suggests a discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis by glucagon in human livers during fasting.

  9. De Novo Regulatory Motif Discovery Identifies Significant Motifs in Promoters of Five Classes of Plant Dehydrin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarov, Yevgen; Strömvik, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Plants accumulate dehydrins in response to osmotic stresses. Dehydrins are divided into five different classes, which are thought to be regulated in different manners. To better understand differences in transcriptional regulation of the five dehydrin classes, de novo motif discovery was performed on 350 dehydrin promoter sequences from a total of 51 plant genomes. Overrepresented motifs were identified in the promoters of five dehydrin classes. The Kn dehydrin promoters contain motifs linked with meristem specific expression, as well as motifs linked with cold/dehydration and abscisic acid response. KS dehydrin promoters contain a motif with a GATA core. SKn and YnSKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match elements connected with cold/dehydration, abscisic acid and light response. YnKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match abscisic acid and light response elements, but not cold/dehydration response elements. Conserved promoter motifs are present in the dehydrin classes and across different plant lineages, indicating that dehydrin gene regulation is likely also conserved. PMID:26114291

  10. Expression and hypoxic regulation of hif1alpha and hif2alpha during early blood and endothelial cell differentiation in chick.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kanako; Nagai, Hiroki; Sheng, Guojun

    2007-08-01

    HIF1 and HIF2 are major mediators for hypoxia sensing and response. Their roles in early differentiation of two key cell types involved in oxygen supply in amniotes, the primitive blood cells and endothelial cells, are unclear. We show that, in pre-circulation avian embryos, hif1alpha and hif2alpha are expressed in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues, respectively. hif2alpha, first identified as epas1, is not present in endothelial cells at any pre-circulation stage under either normoxia or hypoxia conditions. Differentiating blood cells express low levels of hif2alpha under normoxia, but show a strong and rapid upregulation under hypoxia. Blood cell differentiation, however, is not affected under either hypoxia or hyperoxia conditions.

  11. Alpha-adrenergic regulation of androgen receptor concentration in the preoptic area of the rat.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Resko, J A

    1989-04-03

    We examined the effect of the pharmacological disruption of the catecholaminergic system on the concentration of nuclear androgen receptor, as measured by the in vitro binding of methyltrienolone ([3H]R1881) to salt extracts of anterior pituitary (AP), preoptic area (POA) and medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Treatment of gonadectomized male and female rats with the dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (400 mg/kg b. wt.), 30 min before treatment with dihydrotestosterone (1 mg/animal) produced a decrease in the number of nuclear androgen receptor compared with saline-treated controls (P less than 0.05). This effect was specific for the POA and was not present 15 h after DHT treatment. There was no effect on cytosolic androgen receptor nor was there a drug effect on the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of [3H]R1881 binding to hypothalamus-preoptic area cytosols. Treatment of intact males and castrated, testosterone-treated males with the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, prazosin (5 mg/kg b. wt.) and yohimbine (2 mg/kg b. wt.), respectively, resulted in a significant decrease in the number of nuclear AR 2 h following drug treatment (P less than 0.05). There was no effect of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol (10 mg/kg b. wt.) when given to intact animals, nor was there an effect of idazoxan (5 mg/kg) when given to testosterone-treated animals. The effects of yohimbine and prazosin were restricted to the POA. None of the drugs competed with the binding of [3H]R1881 for the androgen receptor nor did they alter the Kd of cytosol or nuclear androgen receptor. These data provide evidence for an adrenergic interaction with the POA androgen receptor and suggest a role for catecholamines in modulating androgen sensitivity in the rat brain.

  12. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-I-related regulation of procollagen I ({alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2}) by antitransforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} treatment during radiation-impaired wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Thorwarth, Michael; Roedel, Franz; Melnychenko, Ivan; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G.; Amann, Kerstin; Wehrhan, Falk

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 mediates transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1})-related signaling by stimulating collagen Type I synthesis in radiation-impaired wound healing. The regulation of {alpha}(I)-procollagen is contradictory in fibroblasts of different fibrotic lesions. It is not known whether anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment specifically inhibits {alpha}(I)-procollagen synthesis. We used an experimental wound healing study to address anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-associated influence on {alpha}(I)-procollagen synthesis. Methods and Materials: A free flap was transplanted into the preirradiated (40 Gy) or nonirradiated neck region of Wistar rats: Group 1 (n = 8) surgery alone; Group 2 (n = 14) irradiation and surgery; Group 3 (n = 8) irradiation and surgery and anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment. On the 14th postoperative day, skin samples were processed for fibroblast culture, in situ hybridization for TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting for PAI-1, {alpha}{sub 1}/{alpha}{sub 2}(I)-procollagen. Results: Anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} significantly reduced TGF-{beta}{sub 1} mRNA (p < 0.05) and PAI-1 expression (p < 0.05). Anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment in vivo significantly reduced {alpha}{sub 1}(I)-procollagen protein (p < 0.05) and the number of expressing cells (p < 0.05) in contrast to significantly increased (p < 0.05) {alpha}{sub 2}(I)-procollagen expression. Conclusion: These results emphasize anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis by decreasing {alpha}{sub 1}(I)-procollagen synthesis in vivo. {alpha}{sub 1}(I)-procollagen and {alpha}{sub 2}(I)-procollagen might be differentially regulated by anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment. Increased TGF-{beta} signaling in irradiated skin fibroblasts seemed to be reversible, as shown by a reduction in PAI-1 expression after anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment.

  13. Addition of interferon-alpha to a standard maturation cocktail induces CD38 up-regulation and increases dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Trepiakas, Redas; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Met, Ozcan; Svane, Inge Marie

    2009-04-06

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) are used as adjuvant cells in cancer immunotherapy and have shown promising results. In order to obtain full functional capacity, these DCs need to be maturated, and the current "gold standard" for this process is maturation with TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and PGE(2) used for generating standard DCs (sDC). Several studies indicate that IFN-alpha might also be important for DC differentiation and maturation. In this study, we tested the effect of IFN-alpha alone or as addition to the gold standard sDC cocktail. We observed that maturation by IFN-alpha differs from sDC maturation: The major phenotypic change after IFN-alpha maturation was dose-dependent up-regulation of CD38 but not CD83, while sDCs expressed the opposite profile with low CD38 and high CD83 expression. Similarly, maturation by Poly I:C leads to CD38high, CD83low DCs indicating a functional relationship between CD38, IFN-alpha and TLR3. Thus, CD38 appear to be a relevant marker for activation by TLR3 or IFN-alpha. Addition of IFN-alpha to the sDC cocktail results in up-regulation of both CD38 and CD83 and improved capacity for induction of autologous T-cell responses despite few other changes in DC phenotype and cytokine secretion. Our observations suggest that IFN-alpha could be included in maturation protocols for clinical grade DCs used for immunotherapy against cancer and should be included if DCs are used for CD8+ T-cell stimulation in vitro.

  14. WASP plays a novel role in regulating platelet responses dependent on alphaIIbbeta3 integrin outside-in signalling.

    PubMed

    Shcherbina, Anna; Cooley, Jessica; Lutskiy, Maxim I; Benarafa, Charaf; Gilbert, Gary E; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2010-02-01

    The most consistent feature of Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is profound thrombocytopenia with small platelets. The responsible gene encodes WAS protein (WASP), which functions in leucocytes as an actin filament nucleating agent -yet- actin filament nucleation proceeds normally in patient platelets regarding shape change, filopodia and lamellipodia generation. Because WASP localizes in the platelet membrane skeleton and is mobilized by alphaIIbbeta3 integrin outside-in signalling, we questioned whether its function might be linked to integrin. Agonist-induced alphaIIbbeta3 activation (PAC-1 binding) was normal for patient platelets, indicating normal integrin inside-out signalling. Inside-out signalling (fibrinogen, JON/A binding) was also normal for wasp-deficient murine platelets. However, adherence/spreading on immobilized fibrinogen was decreased for patient platelets and wasp-deficient murine platelets, indicating decreased integrin outside-in responses. Another integrin outside-in dependent response, fibrin clot retraction, involving contraction of the post-aggregation actin cytoskeleton, was also decreased for patient platelets and wasp-deficient murine platelets. Rebleeding from tail cuts was more frequent for wasp-deficient mice, suggesting decreased stabilisation of the primary platelet plug. In contrast, phosphatidylserine exposure, a pro-coagulant response, was enhanced for WASP-deficient patient and murine platelets. The collective results reveal a novel function for WASP in regulating pro-aggregatory and pro-coagulant responses downstream of integrin outside-in signalling.

  15. Activity regulates the levels of acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit mRNA in cultured chicken myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Klarsfeld, A; Changeux, J P

    1985-01-01

    In vitro blocking the spontaneous activity of primary cultures of chicken embryo myotubes with tetrodotoxin increases approximately equal to 2-fold their content in surface acetylcholine receptor. To investigate this effect at the level of gene expression, chicken genomic DNA sequences coding for the acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were isolated and characterized. They were shown to belong to a single-copy, polymorphic gene with at least two alleles in the chicken strain utilized. Probes derived from these genomic clones were used to quantitate levels of alpha-subunit mRNA. In culture, a 2-day exposure to tetrodotoxin increased these mRNA levels up to 13-fold, a value similar to that observed after denervation of chick leg muscle (approximately equal to 17-fold). Actin mRNA levels varied little in any of these experiments. These results support the notion that membrane electrical activity affects acetylcholine receptor expression by regulating the accumulation of the corresponding mRNAs. Images PMID:2989833

  16. Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect growth regulation of human mesothelioma cells: role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Trombino, Sonya; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, PierLuigi; Motta, Giovanni; Falugi, Carla; Russo, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    This study presents data suggesting that both human mesothelioma (cell lines and human mesothelioma biopsies) and human normal mesothelial cells express receptors for acetylcholine and that stimulation of these receptors by nicotine prompted cell growth via activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Thus, these data demonstrate that: (a) human mesothelioma cells and human biopsies of mesothelioma as well as of normal pleural mesothelial cells express functionally alpha-7 nicotinic acethlycholine receptors, evaluated by alpha-bungarotoxin-FITC binding, receptor binding assay, Western blot, and reverse transcription-PCR; (b) choline acetyltransferase immunostaining is present in mesothelioma cells; (c) mesothelioma cell growth is modulated by the cholinergic system in which agonists (i.e., nicotine) has a proliferative effect, and antagonists (i.e., curare) has an inhibitory effect, evaluated by cell cloning, DNA synthesis and cell cycle; (d) nicotine induces Ca(+2) influx, evaluated by [(45)Ca(2+)] uptake, and consequently activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p90(RSK) phosphorylation), evaluated by Western blot; and (e) apoptosis mechanisms in mesothelioma cells are under the control of the cholinergic system (nicotine antiapoptotic via induction of nuclear factor-kappaB complexes and phosphorylation of Bad at Ser(112); curare proapoptotic via G(0)-G(1) arrest p21(waf-1) dependent but p53 independent). The involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in mesothelioma appears reasonable and open up new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha is essential for hepatic outgrowth and functions via the regulation of leg1 transcription in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chou, Chi-Fu; Chung, Hsin-Yu; Chiang, Chia-Yin; Li, Chung-Hao; Wu, Jen-Leih; Lin, Han-Jia; Pai, Tun-Wen; Hu, Chin-Hwa; Tzou, Wen-Shyong

    2014-01-01

    The liver plays a vital role in metabolism, detoxification, digestion, and the maintenance of homeostasis. During development, the vertebrate embryonic liver undergoes a series of morphogenic processes known as hepatogenesis. Hepatogenesis can be separated into three interrelated processes: endoderm specification, hepatoblast differentiation, and hepatic outgrowth. Throughout this process, signaling molecules and transcription factors initiate and regulate the coordination of cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, intercellular adhesion, and cell migration. Hifs are already recognized to be essential in embryonic development, but their role in hepatogenesis remains unknown. Using the zebrafish embryo as a model organism, we report that the lack of Hif2-alpha but not Hif1-alpha blocks hepatic outgrowth. While Hif2-alpha is not involved in hepatoblast specification, this transcription factor regulates hepatocyte cell proliferation during hepatic outgrowth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the lack of Hif2-alpha can reduce the expression of liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1), which encodes a secretory protein essential for hepatic outgrowth. Additionally, exogenous mRNA expression of leg1 can rescue the small liver phenotype of hif2-alpha morphants. We also showed that Hif2-alpha directly binds to the promoter region of leg1 to control leg1 expression. Interestingly, we discovered overrepresented, high-density Hif-binding sites in the potential upstream regulatory sequences of leg1 in teleosts but not in terrestrial mammals. We concluded that hif2-alpha is a key factor required for hepatic outgrowth and regulates leg1 expression in zebrafish embryos. We also proposed that the hif2-alpha-leg1 axis in liver development may have resulted from the adaptation of teleosts to their environment.

  18. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Alpha Is Essential for Hepatic Outgrowth and Functions via the Regulation of leg1 Transcription in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chou, Chi-Fu; Chung, Hsin-Yu; Chiang, Chia-Yin; Li, Chung-Hao; Wu, Jen-Leih; Lin, Han-Jia; Pai, Tun-Wen; Hu, Chin-Hwa; Tzou, Wen-Shyong

    2014-01-01

    The liver plays a vital role in metabolism, detoxification, digestion, and the maintenance of homeostasis. During development, the vertebrate embryonic liver undergoes a series of morphogenic processes known as hepatogenesis. Hepatogenesis can be separated into three interrelated processes: endoderm specification, hepatoblast differentiation, and hepatic outgrowth. Throughout this process, signaling molecules and transcription factors initiate and regulate the coordination of cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, intercellular adhesion, and cell migration. Hifs are already recognized to be essential in embryonic development, but their role in hepatogenesis remains unknown. Using the zebrafish embryo as a model organism, we report that the lack of Hif2-alpha but not Hif1-alpha blocks hepatic outgrowth. While Hif2-alpha is not involved in hepatoblast specification, this transcription factor regulates hepatocyte cell proliferation during hepatic outgrowth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the lack of Hif2-alpha can reduce the expression of liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1), which encodes a secretory protein essential for hepatic outgrowth. Additionally, exogenous mRNA expression of leg1 can rescue the small liver phenotype of hif2-alpha morphants. We also showed that Hif2-alpha directly binds to the promoter region of leg1 to control leg1 expression. Interestingly, we discovered overrepresented, high-density Hif-binding sites in the potential upstream regulatory sequences of leg1 in teleosts but not in terrestrial mammals. We concluded that hif2-alpha is a key factor required for hepatic outgrowth and regulates leg1 expression in zebrafish embryos. We also proposed that the hif2-alpha-leg1 axis in liver development may have resulted from the adaptation of teleosts to their environment. PMID:25000307

  19. Regulation of PGE2 signaling pathways and TNF-alpha signaling pathways on the function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and the effects of CP-25.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Sheng, Kangliang; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Yujing; Zhang, Feng; Chang, Yan; Wu, Huaxun; Fu, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2015-12-15

    This study was to investigate PGE2 and TNF-alpha signaling pathway involving in the maturation and activation of bone marrow dendritic cells (DCs) and the effect of CP-25. Bone marrow DCs were isolated and stimulated by PGE2 and TNF-alpha respectively. The markers of maturation and activation expressed on DCs, such as CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, MHC-II, and the ability of antigen uptake of DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. The proliferation of T cells co-cultured with DCs, the signaling pathways of PGE2-EP4-cAMP and TNF-alpha-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB in DCs were analyzed. The results showed that both PGE2 and TNF-alpha up-regulated the expressions of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, and MHC-II, decreased the antigen uptake of DCs, and DCs stimulated by PGE2 or TNF-alpha could increase T cell proliferation. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) decreased significantly the expressions of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and MHC-II, increased the antigen uptake of DCs, and suppressed T cell proliferation induced by DCs. PGE2 increased the expressions of EP4, NF-κB and down-regulated cAMP level of DCs. TNF-alpha could also up-regulate TNFR1, TRADD, TRAF2, and NF-κB expression of DCs. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) decreased the expressions of EP4 and NF-κB, increased cAMP level in DCs stimulated by PGE2. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) also could down-regulate significantly TNFR1, TRADD, TRAF2, and NF-κB expression in DCs stimulated by TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that PGE2 and TNF-alpha could enhance DCs functions by mediating PGE2-EP4-cAMP pathway, TNF-alpha-TNFR1-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB pathway respectively. CP-25 might inhibit the function of DCs through regulating PGE2-EP4-cAMP and TNF-alpha-TNFR1-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB pathways.

  20. A motif rich in charged residues determines product specificity in isomaltulose synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daohai; Li, Nan; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Zhang, Lian Hui

    2003-01-16

    Isomaltulose synthase (PalI) catalyzes hydrolysis of sucrose and formation of alpha-1,6 and alpha-1,1 bonds to produce isomaltulose (alpha-D-glucosylpyranosyl-1,6-D-fructofranose) and small amount of trehalulose (alpha-D-glucosylpyranosyl-1,1-D-fructofranose). A potential isomaltulose synthase-specific motif ((325)RLDRD(329)), that contains a 'DxD' motif conserved in many glycosyltransferases, was identified based on sequence comparison with reference to the secondary structural features of PalI and homologs. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the motif showed that the four charged amino acid residues (Arg(325), Arg(328), Asp(327) and Asp(329)) influence the enzyme kinetics and determine the product specificity. Mutation of these four residues increased trehalulose formation by 17-61% and decreased isomaltulose by 26-67%. We conclude that the 'RLDRD' motif controls the product specificity of PalI.

  1. The haem-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha kinase: a molecular indicator of lead-toxicity anaemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjay; Pal, Jayanta K

    2002-08-01

    The haem-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha kinase, also called the haem-regulated inhibitor (HRI), has been shown to increase in the peripheral blood cells as a function of drug-induced anaemia in rabbits, suggesting that it could be a molecular indicator of drug-induced anaemia [Anand and Pal (1997) J. Biosci. 22, 287-298]. In the present investigation, we have determined the expression of HRI during lead-induced anaemia in rabbits. The level of anaemia has been determined by routine procedures such as reticulocyte count, haemoglobin content and packed cell volume. These values were compared with the results obtained for a quantitative Western blot of HRI in the blood cell lysates of drug- and lead-induced anaemic rabbits. These results indicate that HRI could be used as a molecular marker for lead-induced anaemia since a progressive increase in HRI levels could be detected as a function of the time of lead exposure. In order to understand the role of stress proteins, heat-shock protein (Hsp) 70 and Hsp90, in inducing anaemia during lead exposure, levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90, and their interaction with HRI, have been determined. Increased levels of these proteins and their intermolecular complexes with HRI suggest their role in regulating protein synthesis during lead-induced anaemia. These observations further reiterate the use of HRI as a potential indicator for drug- and heavy-metal-induced anaemia in humans.

  2. A Feed Forward Loop Involving Protein Kinase C Alpha and MicroRNAs Regulates Tumor Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra Eddy Wyssam; Zhu, Hongyan; Lingen, Mark W.; Martin, Leslie E.; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Choi, Eugene A.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Parker, Joel S.; Chung, Christine H.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-01-01

    Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) has been implicated in cancer but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that PKCα promotes head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCHN) by a feed forward network leading to cell cycle deregulation. PKCα inhibitors decrease proliferation in SCCHN cell lines and xenografted tumors. PKCα inhibition or depletion in tumor cells decreases DNA synthesis by suppressing ERK phosphorylation and cyclin E synthesis. Additionally, PKCα down-regulates miR-15a, a microRNA that directly inhibits protein synthesis of cyclin E as well as other cell cycle regulators. Furthermore, both PKCα and cyclin E protein expression are increased in primary tumors, and PKCα inversely correlates with miR15a expression in primary tumors. Finally, PKCα is associated with poor prognosis in SCCHN. These results identify PKCα as a key regulator of HNSCC tumor cell growth by a mechanism involving activation of MAP kinase, an initiator of the cell cycle, and suppression of miR-15a, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. Although the specific components may be different, this type of feed forward loop network, consisting of a stimulus that activates a positive signal and removes a negative brake, is likely to be a general one that enables induction of DNA synthesis by a variety of growth or oncogenic stimuli. PMID:19117988

  3. 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 is an autocrine regulator of extracellular matrix turnover and growth factor release via ERp60 activated matrix vesicle metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Wong, Kevin L; Fang, Mimi; Schwartz, Zvi

    2007-03-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes produce proteoglycan-rich type II collagen extracellular matrix (ECM). During cell maturation and hypertrophy, ECM is reorganized via a process regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) and involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-3 and MMP-2. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) regulates MMP incorporation into matrix vesicles (MVs), where they are stored until released. Like plasma membranes (PM), MVs contain the 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-binding protein ERp60, phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), and caveolin-1, but appear to lack nuclear Vitamin D receptors (VDRs). Chondrocytes produce 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) (10(-8)M), which binds ERp60, activating PLA(2), and resulting lysophospholipids lead to MV membrane disorganization, releasing active MMPs. MV MMP-3 activates TGF-beta1 stored in the ECM as large latent TGF-beta1 complexes, consisting of latent TGF-beta1 binding protein, latency associated peptide, and latent TGF-beta1. Others have shown that MMP-2 specifically activates TGF-beta2. TGF-beta1 regulates 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-production, providing a mechanism for local control of growth factor activation. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates PKCalpha in the PM via ERp60-signaling through PLA(2), lysophospholipid production, and PLCbeta. It also regulates distribution of phospholipids and PKC isoforms between MVs and PMs, enriching the MVs in PKCzeta. Direct activation of MMP-3 in MVs requires ERp60. However, when MVs are treated with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), PKCzeta activity is decreased and PKCalpha is unaffected, suggesting a more complex feedback mechanism, potentially involving MV lipid signaling.

  4. Role of ornithine decarboxylase in regulation of estrogen receptor alpha expression and growth in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qingsong; Jin, Lihua; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that specific polyamine analogues, oligoamines, down-regulated the activity of a key polyamine biosynthesis enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and suppressed expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in human breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism underlying the potential regulation of ERα expression by polyamine metabolism has not been explored. Here, we demonstrated that RNAi-mediated knockdown of ODC (ODC KD) down-regulated the polyamine pool, and hindered growth in ERα-positive MCF7 and T47D and ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. ODC KD significantly induced the expression and activity of the key polyamine catabolism enzymes, spermine oxidase (SMO) and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT). However, ODC KD-induced growth inhibition could not be reversed by exogenous spermidine or overexpression of antizyme inhibitor (AZI), suggesting that regulation of ODC on cell proliferation may involve the signaling pathways independent of polyamine metabolism. In MCF7 and T47D cells, ODC KD, but not DFMO treatment, diminished the mRNA and protein expression of ERα. Overexpression of antizyme (AZ), an ODC inhibitory protein, suppressed ERα expression, suggesting that ODC plays an important role in regulation of ERα expression. Decrease of ERα expression by ODC siRNA altered the mRNA expression of a subset of ERα response genes. Our previous analysis showed that oligoamines disrupt the binding of Sp1 family members to an ERα minimal promoter element containing GC/CA-rich boxes. By using DNA affinity precipitation and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified ZBTB7A, MeCP2, PARP-1, AP2, and MAZ as co-factors of Sp1 family members that are associated with the ERα minimal promoter element. Taken together, these data provide insight into a novel antiestrogenic mechanism for polyamine biosynthesis enzymes in breast cancer. PMID:22976807

  5. Characterization of the Promoter Motif Regulated by PSPTO_1209 a FecI-like ECF Sigma Factor of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomanads are renowned for their capacity to adapt to diverse environments, a fact that is reflected in the fraction of their genomes dedicated to encoding transcription regulators. Members of the Pseudomonas genus include species that are adapted to pathogenic and symbiotic lifestyles in associ...

  6. TNF-alpha increases ubiquitin-conjugating activity in skeletal muscle by up-regulating UbcH2/E220k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Lecker, Stewart H.; Chen, Yuling; Waddell, Ian D.; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Reid, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    In some inflammatory diseases, TNF-alpha is thought to stimulate muscle catabolism via an NF-kappaB-dependent process that increases ubiquitin conjugation to muscle proteins. The transcriptional mechanism of this response has not been determined. Here we studied the potential role of UbcH2, a ubiquitin carrier protein and homologue of murine E220k. We find that UbcH2 is constitutively expressed by human skeletal and cardiac muscles, murine limb muscle, and cultured myotubes. TNF-alpha stimulates UbcH2 expression in mouse limb muscles in vivo and in cultured myotubes. The UbcH2 promoter region contains a functional NF-kappaB binding site; NF-kappaB binding to this sequence is increased by TNF-alpha stimulation. A dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation blocks both UbcH2 up-regulation and the increase in ubiquitin-conjugating activity stimulated by TNF-alpha. In extracts from TNF-alpha-treated myotubes, ubiquitin-conjugating activity is limited by UbcH2 availability; activity is inhibited by an antiserum to UbcH2 or a dominant negative mutant of UbcH2 and is enhanced by wild-type UbcH2. Thus, UbcH2 up-regulation is a novel response to TNF-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle that appears to be essential for the increased ubiquitin conjugation induced by this cytokine.

  7. Integrin alpha1beta1 controls reactive oxygen species synthesis by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiwu; Abair, Tristin D; Ibanez, Maria R; Su, Yan; Frey, Mark R; Dise, Rebecca S; Polk, D Brent; Singh, Amar B; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2007-05-01

    Integrins control many cell functions, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of collagen synthesis. Mesangial cells, found in the glomerulus of the kidney, are able to produce large amounts of ROS via the NADPH oxidase. We previously demonstrated that integrin alpha1-null mice develop worse fibrosis than wild-type mice following glomerular injury and this is due, in part, to excessive ROS production by alpha1-null mesangial cells. In the present studies, we describe the mechanism whereby integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells produce excessive ROS. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells have constitutively increased basal levels of activated Rac1, which result in its increased translocation to the cell membrane, excessive ROS production, and consequent collagen IV deposition. Basal Rac1 activation is a direct consequence of ligand-independent increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in alpha1-null mesangial cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that integrin alpha1beta1-EGFR cross talk is a key step in negatively regulating Rac1 activation, ROS production, and excessive collagen synthesis, which is a hallmark of diseases characterized by irreversible fibrosis.

  8. c-Jun transcriptionally regulates alpha 1, 2-fucosyltransferase 1 (FUT1) in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Na; Liu, Juanjuan; Liu, Dawo; Hao, Yingying; Yan, Limei; Ma, Yanan; Zhuang, Huiyu; Hu, Zhenhua; Gao, Jian; Yang, Zhihai; Shi, Hong; Lin, Bei

    2014-12-01

    Alpha 1, 2-fucosyltransferase (FUT 1/2) is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of Lewis y, a cell membrane-associated carbohydrate antigen. In human ovarian cancer, the upregulated expression of FUT1 and Lewis y is associated with advanced pathological stages and involved in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. However, the mechanism underlying the upregulation of FUT1 is largely unknown. Here, we identify an AP-1 binding site in FUT1 promoter in ovarian cancer cells. c-Jun promotes FUT1 expression, thereby enhancing Lewis y biosynthesis in various ovarian cancer cell lines. Moreover, EMSA, luciferase activity and ChIP assays demonstrate c-Jun directly interacts with FUT1 promoter. Furthermore, FUT1 mediates c-Jun-induced cell proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. In human ovarian cancer samples, c-Jun overexpression is linked to malignant degree and positively correlated to FUT1 and Lewis y expression. Taken together, c-Jun could transcriptionally modulate FUT1 expression in ovarian cancer, implicating the potential application of c-Jun inhibitors for human ovarian cancer therapy.

  9. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor [alpha] by the SET7 Lysine Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Krithika; Jia, Da; Kapoor-Vazirani, Priya; Powell, Doris R.; Collins, Robert E.; Sharma, Dipali; Peng, Junmin; Cheng, Xiaodong; Vertino, Paula M.

    2008-09-12

    Estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor. Upon binding estrogen, ER recruits coactivator complexes with histone acetyltransferase or methyltransferase activities to activate downstream target genes. In addition to histones, coactivators can modify ER itself and other proteins in the transactivation complex. Here, we show that ER is directly methylated at lysine 302 (K302) by the SET7 methyltransferase. SET7-mediated methylation stabilizes ER and is necessary for the efficient recruitment of ER to its target genes and for their transactivation. The SET7-ER complex structure reveals the molecular basis for ER peptide recognition and predicts that modifications or mutations of nearby residues would affect K302 methylation. Indeed, a breast cancer-associated mutation at K303 (K303R) alters methylation at K302 in vitro and in vivo. These findings raise the possibility that generation, recognition, and removal of modifications within the ER hinge region generate 'ER modification cassettes' that yield distinct patterns for signaling downstream events.

  10. Postjunctional regulation by angiotensin II of alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated pressor responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marano, G; Argiolas, L

    1994-08-11

    The effects of angiotensin II on the vasopressor responses to the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, in intact and sympathectomized rats were investigated. Infusion of angiotensin II at subpressor doses significantly enhanced the pressor effects of phenylephrine in intact rats. We also found that in the chemically sympathectomized rat, where prejunctional sympathetic function is impaired, the effects of angiotensin II infusion on the pressor effects of phenylephrine were similar to those obtained in intact rats. Furthermore, pretreatment with valsartan ((S)-N-valeryl-N-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]-methyl)-val ine), a new selective angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist, antagonized the effects of angiotensin II on phenylephrine-mediated pressor responses, whereas the administration of the selective angiotensin AT2 receptor antagonist, PD 123319 (1-[[4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]-methyl]-5-(diphenylacetyl)- 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]-pyridine-6-carboxylic acid, ditriflouroacetate, monohydrate), injected in bolus doses of 100 micrograms/kg, did not antagonize the enhancing effect of angiotensin II. Collectively, these data suggest that angiotensin II modulates the response to phenylephrine primarily at a postjunctional level through the activation of angiotensin AT1 receptors and that the suggested prejunctional facilitation mediated by angiotensin receptors is quantitatively much less important in the intact animal.

  11. SVIP regulates Z variant alpha-1 antitrypsin retro-translocation by inhibiting ubiquitin ligase gp78

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Nazli; Wang, Rejean liqun; Marek, George; Krotova, Karina; Kirst, Mariana; Liu, Chen; Rouhani, Farshid; Brantly, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an inherited disorder characterized by early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common disease-causing mutation is a single amino acid substitution (Glu/Lys) at amino acid 342 of the mature protein, resulting in disruption of the 290–342 salt bridge (an electrophoretic abnormality defining the mutation [Z allele, or ZAAT]), protein misfolding, polymerization, and accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and monocytes. The Z allele causes a toxic gain of function, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase gp78 promotes degradation and increased solubility of endogenous ZAAT. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ZAAT is influenced by modulation of gp78 E3 ligase and SVIP (small VCP-interacting protein) interaction with p97/VCP in ZAAT-expressing hepatocytes. We showed that the SVIP inhibitory effect on ERAD due to overexpression causes the accumulation of ZAAT in a human Z hepatocyte–like cell line (AT01). Overexpression of gp78, as well as SVIP suppression, induces gp78-VCP/p97 interaction in AT01 cells. This interaction leads to retro-translocation of ZAAT and reduction of the SVIP inhibitory role in ERAD. In this context, overexpression of gp78 or SVIP suppression may eliminate the toxic gain of function associated with polymerization of ZAAT, thus providing a potential new therapeutic approach to the treatment of AATD. PMID:28301499

  12. Developmentally Regulated RNA-binding Protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding Motif Protein 45 (RBM45), a Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking Protein, Forms TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43)-mediated Cytoplasmic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takafumi; Sakashita, Eiji; Kasashima, Katsumi; Tominaga, Kaoru; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Tohru; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Endo, Hitoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cytoplasmic protein aggregates are one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Several RNA-binding proteins have been identified as components of inclusion bodies. Developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding motif protein 45 is an RNA-binding protein that was recently described as a component in ALS- and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cytoplasmic Drb1 aggregation remains unclear. Here, using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that Drb1 co-localizes with cytoplasmic aggregates mediated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43, a major component of ALS and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. We also defined the domains involved in the subcellular localization of Drb1 to clarify the role of Drb1 in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in ALS and FTLD. Drb1 predominantly localized in the nucleus via a classical nuclear localization signal in its carboxyl terminus and is a shuttling protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identify a double leucine motif serving as a nuclear export signal. The Drb1 mutant, presenting mutations in both nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal, is prone to aggregate in the cytoplasm. The mutant Drb1-induced cytoplasmic aggregates not only recruit TAR DNA-binding protein 43 but also decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these results indicate that perturbation of Drb1 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking induces toxic cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that mislocalization of Drb1 is involved in the cause of cytotoxicity in neuronal cells.

  13. Changes in the regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine release by alpha2-adrenoceptors in the rat hippocampus after long-term desipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, M; Matsumoto, M; Numazawa, R; Togashi, H; Smith, C B; Saito, H

    1995-12-29

    In vivo microdialysis was used to measure the effects of long-term treatment of rats with desipramine upon the regulation by alpha2-adrenoceptors of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) release from the serotonergic neurons in the hippocampus. Rats were injected with saline or desipramine, 10 mg/kg, i.p., every 12 h for 14 days. When added to the perfusion solution, brimonidine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, significantly inhibited the K+-evoked release of 5-HT in the hippocampi of saline-treated, control rats. This action of brimonidine was prevented by pretreating the rats with idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Long-term desipramine treatment significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of brimonidine upon the K+-evoked 5-HT release. With long-term administration of desipramine, noradrenaline content in the hippocampi was significantly decreased as compared with that of the control rats, whereas the basal noradrenaline concentration in the dialysate was significantly increased. On the other hand, both the 5-HT content of the hippocampus and the basal 5-HT concentration in the dialysate were significantly increased. The present study suggests that long-term administration of desipramine causes a functional subsensitivity of the presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors that regulate serotonergic neuronal function in the rat hippocampus. It also supports the concept that changes in the sensitivity of alpha2-adrenoceptors that regulate neurotransmitter release play an important role in the mechanism of antidepressant drug action.

  14. Class II histone deacetylases are associated with VHL-independent regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Qian, David Z; Kachhap, Sushant K; Collis, Spencer J; Verheul, Henk M W; Carducci, Michael A; Atadja, Peter; Pili, Roberto

    2006-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) plays a critical role in transcriptional gene activation involved in tumor angiogenesis. A novel class of agents, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, has been shown to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and HIF-1 alpha protein expression. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this inhibition remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the molecular link between HIF-1 alpha inhibition and HDAC inhibition. Treatment of the VHL-deficient human renal cell carcinoma cell line UMRC2 with the hydroxamic HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of HIF-1 alpha protein via a VHL-independent mechanism and reduction of HIF-1 alpha transcriptional activity. HIF-1 alpha inhibition by LAQ824 was associated with HIF-1 alpha acetylation and polyubiquitination. HIF-1 alpha immunoprecipitates contained HDAC activity. Then, we tested different classes of HDAC inhibitors with diverse inhibitory activity of class I versus class II HDACs and assessed their capability of targeting HIF-1 alpha. Hydroxamic acid derivatives with known activity against both class I and class II HDACs were effective in inhibiting HIF-1 alpha at low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast, valproic acid and trapoxin were able to inhibit HIF-1 alpha only at concentrations that are effective against class II HDACs. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that class II HDAC4 and HDAC6 were associated with HIF-1 alpha protein. Inhibition by small interfering RNA of HDAC4 and HDAC6 reduced HIF-1 alpha protein expression and transcriptional activity. Taken together, these results suggest that class II HDACs are associated with HIF-1 alpha stability and provide a rationale for targeting HIF-1 alpha with HDAC inhibitors against class II isozymes.

  15. Andrographolide down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chou, Fen-Pi; Wang, Chau-Jong; Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2011-02-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In our previous study, Andro had been shown to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell migration and invasion via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Here we demonstrated that Andro inhibited the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in A549 cells. HIF-1{alpha} plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC. The Andro-induced decrease of cellular protein level of HIF-1{alpha} was correlated with a rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of HIF-1{alpha}, and was accompanied by increased expressions of hydroxyl-HIF-1{alpha} and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD2), and a later decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon the treatment of Andro. The Andro-inhibited VEGF expression appeared to be a consequence of HIF-1{alpha} inactivation, because its DNA binding activity was suppressed by Andro. Molecular data showed that all these effects of Andro might be mediated via TGF{beta}1/PHD2/HIF-1{alpha} pathway, as demonstrated by the transfection of TGF{beta}1 overexpression vector and PHD2 siRNA, and the usage of a pharmacological MG132 inhibitor. Furthermore, we elucidated the involvement of Andro in HIF-1{alpha} transduced VEGF expression in A549 cells and other NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which may be developed as a chemotherapeutic or an anti-angiogenesis agent for NSCLC in the future.

  16. The role of nitric-oxide synthase in the regulation of UVB light-induced phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; László, Csaba F; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao; Wu, Shiyong

    2009-09-04

    UV light induces phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) and inhibits global protein synthesis. Both eIF2 kinases, protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and general control of nonderepressible protein kinase 2 (GCN2), have been shown to phosphorylate eIF2alpha in response to UV irradiation. However, the roles of PERK and GCN2 in UV-induced eIF2alpha phosphorylation are controversial. The one or more upstream signaling pathways that lead to the activation of PERK or GCN2 remain unknown. In this report we provide data showing that both PERK and GCN2 contribute to UV-induced eIF2alpha phosphorylation in human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Reduction of expression of PERK or GCN2 by small interfering RNA decreases phosphorylation of eIF2alpha after UV irradiation. These data also show that nitric-oxide synthase (NOS)-mediated oxidative stress plays a role in regulation of eIF2alpha phosphorylation upon UV irradiation. Treating the cells with the broad NOS inhibitor N(G)-methyl-l-arginine, the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine, or the NOS substrate l-arginine partially inhibits UV-induced eIF2alpha phosphorylation. The results presented above led us to propose that NOS mediates UV-induced eIF2alpha phosphorylation by activation of both PERK and GCN2 via oxidative stress and l-arginine starvation signaling pathways.

  17. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  18. The TRTGn motif stabilizes the transcription initiation open complex.

    PubMed

    Voskuil, Martin I; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2002-09-20

    The effect on transcription initiation by the extended -10 motif (5'-TRTG(n)-3'), positioned upstream of the -10 region, was investigated using a series of base substitution mutations in the alpha-amylase promoter (amyP). The extended -10 motif, previously referred to as the -16 region, is found frequently in Gram-positive bacterial promoters and several extended -10 promoters from Escherichia coli. The inhibitory effects of the non-productive promoter site (amyP2), which overlaps the upstream region of amyP, were eliminated by mutagenesis of the -35 region and the TRTG motif of amyP2. Removal by mutagenesis of the competitive effects of amyP2 resulted in a reduced dependence of amyP on the TRTG motif. In the absence of the second promoter, mutations in the TRTG motif of amyP destabilized the open complex and prevented the maintenance of open complexes at low temperatures. The open complex half-life was up to 26-fold shorter in the mutant TRTG motif promoters than in the wild-type promoter. We demonstrate that the amyP TRTG motif dramatically stabilizes the open complex intermediate during transcription initiation. Even though the open complex is less stable in the mutant promoters, the region of melted DNA is the same in the wild-type and mutant promoters. However, upon addition of the first three nucleotides, which trap RNAP (RNA polymerase) in a stable initiating complex, the melted DNA region contracts at the 5'-end in a TRTG motif promoter mutant but not at the wild-type promoter, indicating that the motif contributes to maintaining DNA-strand separation.

  19. Caspase-8 regulates TNF-alpha induced epithelial necroptosis and terminal ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Martini, Eva; Wittkopf, Nadine; Amann, Kerstin; Weigmann, Benno; Neumann, Helmut; Waldner, Maximilian; Hedrick, Stephen M.; Tenzer, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Becker, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of the intestinal epithelium is believed to result in excessive translocation of commensal bacteria into the bowel wall that drives chronic mucosal inflammation in Crohn's disease; an incurable inflammatory bowel disease in humans characterized by inflammation of the terminal ileum1. Beside the physical barrier established by the tight contact of cells, specialized epithelial cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells provide innate immune defence functions by secreting mucus and antimicrobial peptides which hamper access and survival of bacteria adjacent to the epithelium2. Epithelial cell death is a hallmark of intestinal inflammation and has been discussed as a pathogenic mechanism driving Crohn's disease (CD) in humans3. However, the regulation of epithelial cell death and its role in intestinal homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a critical role for caspase-8 in regulating necroptosis of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and terminal ileitis. Mice with a conditional deletion of caspase-8 in the intestinal epithelium (Casp8ΔIEC) spontaneously developed inflammatory lesions in the terminal ileum and were highly susceptible to colitis. Casp8ΔIEC mice lacked Paneth cells and showed reduced numbers of goblet cells suggesting dysregulated anti-microbial immune cell functions of the intestinal epithelium. Casp8ΔIEC mice showed increased cell death in the Paneth cell area of small intestinal crypts. Epithelial cell death was induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, was associated with increased expression of receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and could be inhibited upon blockade of necroptosis. Finally, we identified high levels of RIP3 in human Paneth cells and increased necroptosis in the terminal ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, suggesting a potential role of necroptosis in the pathogenesis of this disease. Taken together, our data demonstrate a critical function of caspase-8 in regulating intestinal homeostasis

  20. microRNA-155 Regulates Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Models of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Thome, Aaron D; Harms, Ashley S; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; Standaert, David G

    2016-02-24

    Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and widespread aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). Recently, microRNAs, small, noncoding RNAs involved in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, have been recognized as important regulators of the inflammatory environment. Using an array approach, we found significant upregulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in an in vivo model of PD produced by adeno-associated-virus-mediated expression of α-syn. Using a mouse with a complete deletion of miR-155, we found that loss of miR-155 reduced proinflammatory responses to α-syn and blocked α-syn-induced neurodegeneration. In primary microglia from miR-155(-/-) mice, we observed a markedly reduced inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils, with attenuation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment of these microglia with a synthetic mimic of miR-155 restored the inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils. Our results suggest that miR-155 has a central role in the inflammatory response to α-syn in the brain and in α-syn-related neurodegeneration. These effects are at least in part due to a direct role of miR-155 on the microglial response to α-syn. These data implicate miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for regulating the inflammatory response in PD.