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Sample records for alpha particles emitted

  1. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized.

  2. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  3. Quality factors for alpha particles emitted in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Thomas B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A concept of a mean or dose averaged quality factor was defined in ICRP Publication 26 using relationships for quality factor as a function of LET. The concept of radiation weighting factors, wR, was introduced in ICRP Publication 60 in 1990. These are meant to be generalized factors that modify absorbed dose to reflect the risk of stochastic effects as a function of the quality of the radiation incident on the body or emitted by radioactivity within the body. The values of wr are equal to 20 for all alpha particles externally or internally emitted. This note compares the dose averaged quality factor for alpha particles originating in tissue using the old and revised recommendations for quality factor as a function of LET. The dose averaged quality factor never exceeds 20 using the old recommendations and is never less than 20 with the revised recommendations.

  4. Intense alpha-particle emitting crystallites in uranium mill wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Stieff, L.R.; Germani, M.S.; Tanner, A.B.; Evans, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion microscopy has demonstrated the presence of small, intense ??-particle emitting crystallites in laboratory-produced tailings derived from the sulfuric acid milling of uranium ores. The ??-particle activity is associated with the isotope pair 210Pb 210Po, and the host mineral appears to be PbSO4 occurring as inclusions in gypsum laths. These particles represent potential inhalation hazards at uranium mill tailings disposal areas. ?? 1994.

  5. Enhanced retention of the alpha-particle-emitting daughters of Actinium-225 by liposome carriers.

    PubMed

    Sofou, Stavroula; Kappel, Barry J; Jaggi, Jaspreet S; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A; Sgouros, George

    2007-01-01

    Targeted alpha-particle emitters hold great promise as therapeutics for micrometastatic disease. Because of their high energy deposition and short range, tumor targeted alpha-particles can result in high cancer-cell killing with minimal normal-tissue irradiation. Actinium-225 is a potential generator for alpha-particle therapy: it decays with a 10-day half-life and generates three alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Retention of (225)Ac daughters at the target increases efficacy; escape and distribution throughout the body increases toxicity. During circulation, molecular carriers conjugated to (225)Ac cannot retain any of the daughters. We previously proposed liposomal encapsulation of (225)Ac to retain the daughters, whose retention was shown to be liposome-size dependent. However, daughter retention was lower than expected: 22% of theoretical maximum decreasing to 14%, partially due to the binding of (225)Ac to the phospholipid membrane. In this study, Multivesicular liposomes (MUVELs) composed of different phospholipids were developed to increase daughter retention. MUVELs are large liposomes with entrapped smaller lipid-vesicles containing (225)Ac. PEGylated MUVELs stably retained over time 98% of encapsulated (225)Ac. Retention of (213)Bi, the last daughter, was 31% of the theoretical maximum retention of (213)Bi for the liposome sizes studied. MUVELs were conjugated to an anti-HER2/neu antibody (immunolabeled MUVELs) and were evaluated in vitro with SKOV3-NMP2 ovarian cancer cells, exhibiting significant cellular internalization (83%). This work demonstrates that immunolabeled MUVELs might be able to deliver higher fractions of generated alpha-particles per targeted (225)Ac compared to the relative fractions of alpha-particles delivered by (225)Ac-labeled molecular carriers.

  6. Enhanced retention of the alpha-particle-emitting daughters of Actinium-225 by liposome carriers.

    PubMed

    Sofou, Stavroula; Kappel, Barry J; Jaggi, Jaspreet S; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A; Sgouros, George

    2007-01-01

    Targeted alpha-particle emitters hold great promise as therapeutics for micrometastatic disease. Because of their high energy deposition and short range, tumor targeted alpha-particles can result in high cancer-cell killing with minimal normal-tissue irradiation. Actinium-225 is a potential generator for alpha-particle therapy: it decays with a 10-day half-life and generates three alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Retention of (225)Ac daughters at the target increases efficacy; escape and distribution throughout the body increases toxicity. During circulation, molecular carriers conjugated to (225)Ac cannot retain any of the daughters. We previously proposed liposomal encapsulation of (225)Ac to retain the daughters, whose retention was shown to be liposome-size dependent. However, daughter retention was lower than expected: 22% of theoretical maximum decreasing to 14%, partially due to the binding of (225)Ac to the phospholipid membrane. In this study, Multivesicular liposomes (MUVELs) composed of different phospholipids were developed to increase daughter retention. MUVELs are large liposomes with entrapped smaller lipid-vesicles containing (225)Ac. PEGylated MUVELs stably retained over time 98% of encapsulated (225)Ac. Retention of (213)Bi, the last daughter, was 31% of the theoretical maximum retention of (213)Bi for the liposome sizes studied. MUVELs were conjugated to an anti-HER2/neu antibody (immunolabeled MUVELs) and were evaluated in vitro with SKOV3-NMP2 ovarian cancer cells, exhibiting significant cellular internalization (83%). This work demonstrates that immunolabeled MUVELs might be able to deliver higher fractions of generated alpha-particles per targeted (225)Ac compared to the relative fractions of alpha-particles delivered by (225)Ac-labeled molecular carriers. PMID:17935286

  7. Renal tubulointerstitial changes after internal irradiation with alpha-particle-emitting actinium daughters.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; LaPerle, Krista; Sgouros, George; Scheinberg, David A

    2005-09-01

    The effect of external gamma irradiation on the kidneys is well described. However, the mechanisms of radiation nephropathy as a consequence of targeted radionuclide therapies are poorly understood. The functional and morphologic changes were studied chronologically (from 10 to 40 wk) in mouse kidneys after injection with an actinium-225 (225Ac) nanogenerator, a molecular-sized, antibody-targeted, in vivo generator of alpha-particle-emitting elements. Renal irradiation from free, radioactive daughters of 225Ac led to time-dependent reduction in renal function manifesting as increase in blood urea nitrogen. The histopathologic changes corresponded with the decline in renal function. Glomerular, tubular, and endothelial cell nuclear pleomorphism and focal tubular cell injury, lysis, and karyorrhexis were observed as early as 10 wk. Progressive thinning of the cortex as a result of widespread tubulolysis, collapsed tubules, glomerular crowding, decrease in glomerular cellularity, interstitial inflammation, and an elevated juxtaglomerular cell count were noted at 20 to 30 wk after treatment. By 35 to 40 wk, regeneration of simplified tubules with tubular atrophy and loss with focal, mild interstitial fibrosis had occurred. A lower juxtaglomerular cell count with focal cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting increased degranulation, was also observed in this period. A focal increase in tubular and interstitial cell TGF-beta1 expression starting at 20 wk, peaking at 25 wk, and later declining in intensity with mild increase in the extracellular matrix deposition was noticed. These findings suggest that internally delivered alpha-particle irradiation-induced loss of tubular epithelial cells triggers a chain of adaptive changes that result in progressive renal parenchymal damage accompanied by a loss of renal function. These findings are dissimilar to those seen after gamma or beta irradiation of kidneys.

  8. Renal tubulointerstitial changes after internal irradiation with alpha-particle-emitting actinium daughters.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; LaPerle, Krista; Sgouros, George; Scheinberg, David A

    2005-09-01

    The effect of external gamma irradiation on the kidneys is well described. However, the mechanisms of radiation nephropathy as a consequence of targeted radionuclide therapies are poorly understood. The functional and morphologic changes were studied chronologically (from 10 to 40 wk) in mouse kidneys after injection with an actinium-225 (225Ac) nanogenerator, a molecular-sized, antibody-targeted, in vivo generator of alpha-particle-emitting elements. Renal irradiation from free, radioactive daughters of 225Ac led to time-dependent reduction in renal function manifesting as increase in blood urea nitrogen. The histopathologic changes corresponded with the decline in renal function. Glomerular, tubular, and endothelial cell nuclear pleomorphism and focal tubular cell injury, lysis, and karyorrhexis were observed as early as 10 wk. Progressive thinning of the cortex as a result of widespread tubulolysis, collapsed tubules, glomerular crowding, decrease in glomerular cellularity, interstitial inflammation, and an elevated juxtaglomerular cell count were noted at 20 to 30 wk after treatment. By 35 to 40 wk, regeneration of simplified tubules with tubular atrophy and loss with focal, mild interstitial fibrosis had occurred. A lower juxtaglomerular cell count with focal cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting increased degranulation, was also observed in this period. A focal increase in tubular and interstitial cell TGF-beta1 expression starting at 20 wk, peaking at 25 wk, and later declining in intensity with mild increase in the extracellular matrix deposition was noticed. These findings suggest that internally delivered alpha-particle irradiation-induced loss of tubular epithelial cells triggers a chain of adaptive changes that result in progressive renal parenchymal damage accompanied by a loss of renal function. These findings are dissimilar to those seen after gamma or beta irradiation of kidneys. PMID:15987754

  9. Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

    2004-01-01

    The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents.

  10. Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

    2004-01-01

    The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents. PMID:15015582

  11. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, M R; Sgouros, G; Finn, R D; Humm, J L; Jurcic, J G; Larson, S M; Scheinberg, D A

    1998-09-01

    This review discusses the application of alpha particle-emitting radionuclides in targeted radioimmunotherapy. It will outline the production and chemistry of astatine-211, bismuth-212, lead-212, actinium-225, bismuth-213, fermium-255, radium-223 and terbium-149, which at present are the most promising alpha-emitting isotopes available for human clinical use. The selective cytotoxicity offered by alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconstructs is due to the high linear energy transfer and short particle path length of these radionuclides. Based upon the pharmacokinetics of alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconstructs, both stochastic and conventional dosimetric methodology is discussed, as is the preclinical and initial clinical use of these radionuclides conjugated to monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of human neoplasia. PMID:9724387

  12. Cytotoxicity of alpha-particle-emitting astatine-211-labelled antibody in tumour spheroids: no effect of hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, M. L.; Larsen, R. H.; Welsh, P. C.; Zalutsky, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    The high linear energy transfer, alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide astatine-211 (211At) is of interest for certain therapeutic applications; however, because of the 55- to 70-microm path length of its alpha-particles, achieving homogeneous tracer distribution is critical. Hyperthermia may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of alpha-particle endoradiotherapy if it can improve tracer distribution. In this study, we have investigated whether hyperthermia increased the cytotoxicity of an 211At-labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) in tumour spheroids with a radius (approximately 100 microm) greater than the range of 211At alpha-particles. Hyperthermia for 1 h at 42 degrees C was used because this treatment itself resulted in no regrowth delay. Radiolabelled chimeric MAb 81C6 reactive with the extracellular matrix antigen tenascin was added to spheroids grown from the D-247 MG human glioma cell line at activity concentrations ranging from 0.125 to 250 kBq ml(-1). A significant regrowth delay was observed at 125 and 250 kBq ml(-1) in both hyperthermia-treated and untreated spheroids. For groups receiving hyperthermia, no increase in cytotoxicity was seen compared with normothermic controls at any activity concentration. These results and those from autoradiographs indicate that hyperthermia at 42 degrees C for 1 h had no significant effect on the uptake or distribution of this antitenascin MAb in D-247 MG spheroids. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9514054

  13. Cytotoxicity of alpha-particle-emitting astatine-211-labelled antibody in tumour spheroids: no effect of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Hauck, M L; Larsen, R H; Welsh, P C; Zalutsky, M R

    1998-03-01

    The high linear energy transfer, alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide astatine-211 (211At) is of interest for certain therapeutic applications; however, because of the 55- to 70-microm path length of its alpha-particles, achieving homogeneous tracer distribution is critical. Hyperthermia may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of alpha-particle endoradiotherapy if it can improve tracer distribution. In this study, we have investigated whether hyperthermia increased the cytotoxicity of an 211At-labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) in tumour spheroids with a radius (approximately 100 microm) greater than the range of 211At alpha-particles. Hyperthermia for 1 h at 42 degrees C was used because this treatment itself resulted in no regrowth delay. Radiolabelled chimeric MAb 81C6 reactive with the extracellular matrix antigen tenascin was added to spheroids grown from the D-247 MG human glioma cell line at activity concentrations ranging from 0.125 to 250 kBq ml(-1). A significant regrowth delay was observed at 125 and 250 kBq ml(-1) in both hyperthermia-treated and untreated spheroids. For groups receiving hyperthermia, no increase in cytotoxicity was seen compared with normothermic controls at any activity concentration. These results and those from autoradiographs indicate that hyperthermia at 42 degrees C for 1 h had no significant effect on the uptake or distribution of this antitenascin MAb in D-247 MG spheroids.

  14. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  15. Alpha-particle emitting 213Bi-anti-EGFR immunoconjugates eradicate tumor cells independent of oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wulbrand, Christian; Seidl, Christof; Gaertner, Florian C; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET α-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound α-particle emitting (213)Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with (213)Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1α. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing (213)Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml-1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5-12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by (213)Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that α-particle emitting (213)Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, (213)Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors.

  16. Alpha-Particle Emitting 213Bi-Anti-EGFR Immunoconjugates Eradicate Tumor Cells Independent of Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Florian C.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET α-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound α-particle emitting 213Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1α. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml–1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5–12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that α-particle emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:23724085

  17. Optimizing the Delivery of Short-Lived Alpha Particle-Emitting Isotopes to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Gregory P.

    2004-11-24

    The underlying hypothesis of this project was that optimal alpha emitter-based radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) could be achieved by pairing the physical half-life of the radioisotope to the biological half-life of the targeting vehicle. The project had two specific aims. The first aim was to create and optimize the therapeutic efficacy of 211At-SAPS-C6.5 diabody conjugates. The second aim was to develop bispecific-targeting strategies that increase the specificity and efficacy of alpha-emitter-based RAIT. In the performance of the first aim, we created 211At-SAPS-C6.5 diabody conjugates that specifically targeted the HER2 tumor associated antigen. In evaluating these immunoconjugates we determined that they were capable of efficient tumor targeting and therapeutic efficacy of established human tumor xenografts growing in immunodeficient mice. We also determined that therapeutic doses were associated with late renal toxicity, likely due to the role of the kidneys in the systemic elimination o f these agents. We are currently performing more studies focused on better understanding the observed toxicity. In the second aim, we successfully generated bispecific single-chain Fv (bs-scFv) molecules that co-targeted HER2 and HER3 or HER2 and HER4. The in vitro kinetics and in vivo tumor-targeting properties of these molecules were evaluated. These studies revealed that the bs-scFv molecules selectively localized in vitro on tumor cells that expressed both antigens and were capable of effective tumor localization in in vivo studies.

  18. Engineered Modular Recombinant Transporters: Application of New Platform for Targeted Radiotherapeutic Agents to {alpha}-Particle Emitting {sup 211}At

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Pozzi, Oscar R.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Zalutsky, Michael R. Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To generate and evaluate a modular recombinant transporter (MRT) for targeting {sup 211}At to cancer cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Methods and Materials: The MRT was produced with four functional modules: (1) human epidermal growth factor as the internalizable ligand, (2) the optimized nuclear localization sequence of simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen, (3) a translocation domain of diphtheria toxin as an endosomolytic module, and (4) the Escherichia coli hemoglobin-like protein (HMP) as a carrier module. MRT was labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[{sup 211}At]astato-5-guanidinomethylbenzoate (SAGMB), its {sup 125}I analogue SGMIB, or with {sup 131}I using Iodogen. Binding, internalization, and clonogenic assays were performed with EGFR-expressing A431, D247 MG, and U87MG.wtEGFR human cancer cell lines. Results: The affinity of SGMIB-MRT binding to A431 cells, determined by Scatchard analysis, was 22 nM, comparable to that measured before labeling. The binding of SGMIB-MRT and its internalization by A431 cancer cells was 96% and 99% EGFR specific, respectively. Paired label assays demonstrated that compared with Iodogen-labeled MRT, SGMIB-MRT and SAGMB-MRT exhibited more than threefold greater peak levels and durations of intracellular retention of activity. SAGMB-MRT was 10-20 times more cytotoxic than [{sup 211}At]astatide for all three cell lines. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated the initial proof of principle for the MRT approach for designing targeted {alpha}-particle emitting radiotherapeutic agents. The high cytotoxicity of SAGMB-MRT for cancer cells overexpressing EGFR suggests that this {sup 211}At-labeled conjugate has promise for the treatment of malignancies, such as glioma, which overexpress this receptor.

  19. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  1. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  2. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  3. Tissue distribution and radiation dosimetry of astatine-211-labeled chimeric 81C6, an alpha-particle-emitting immunoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Stabin, M G; Larsen, R H; Bigner, D D

    1997-04-01

    A paired-label study was performed in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to compare the localization of human/mouse anti-tenascin chimeric antibody 81C6 labeled by reaction with N-succinimidyl 3-[211At]astatobenzoate and N-succinimidyl 3-[131I]iodobenzoate. Over the 48-h observation period, the distribution of 211At- and 131I-labeled antibody were quite similar in tumor and normal tissues except stomach. These data were used to calculate human radiation doses for both intravenously and intrathecal administered 211At-labeled chimeric 81C6 using a quality factor of 5 for alpha-emissions.

  4. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  5. First In Vivo Evaluation of Liposome-encapsulated 223Ra as a Potential Alpha-particle-emitting Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasdottir, Thora J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-09-13

    Liposomes carrying chemotherapeutics have had some success in cancer treatment and may be suitable carriers for therapeutic radionuclides. This study was designed to evaluate the biodistribution of and to estimate the radiation doses from the alpha emitter 223Ra loaded into pegylated liposomes in selected tissues. 223Ra was encapsulated in pegylated liposomal doxorubicin by ionophore-mediated loading. The biodistribution of liposomal 223Ra was compared to free cationic 223Ra in Balb/C mice. We showed that liposomal 223 Ra circulated in the blood with an initial half-time in excess of 24 hours, which agreed well with that reported for liposomal doxorubicin in rodents, while the blood half-time of cationic 223Ra was considerably less than one hour. When liposomal 223 Ra was catabolized, the released 223Ra was either excreted or taken up in the skeleton. This skeletal uptake increased up to 14 days after treatment, but did not reach the level seen with free 223Ra. Pre-treatment with non-radioactive liposomal doxorubicin 4 days in advance lessened the liver uptake of liposomal 223 Ra. Dose estimates showed that the spleen, followed by bone surfaces, received the highest absorbed doses. Liposomal 223 Ra was relatively stable in vivo and may have potential for radionuclide therapy and combination therapy with chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  7. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-09-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model.

  8. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  9. N-succinimidyl 3-[211At]astato-4-guanidinomethylbenzoate: an acylation agent for labeling internalizing antibodies with alpha-particle emitting 211At.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Affleck, Donna J; Bigner, Darell D; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for labeling internalizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as those reactive to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) with the alpha-particle emitting radionuclide (211)At. Based on previous work utilizing the guanidine-containing acylation agent, N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-[(131)I]iodobenzoate ([(131)I]SGMIB), we have now investigated the potential utility of its astato analogue for labeling the anti-EGFRvIII mAb L8A4. N-succinimidyl 3-[(211)At]astato-4-guanidinomethylbenzoate ([(211)At]SAGMB) in its Boc-protected form was prepared from a tin precursor in 61.7 +/- 13.1% radiochemical yield, in situ deprotected to [(211)At]SAGMB, which was coupled to L8A4 in 36.1 +/- 1.9% yield. Paired-label internalization assays demonstrated that tumor cell retention of radioactivity for L8A4 labeled using [(211)At]SAGMB was almost identical to L8A4 labeled using [(131)I]SGMIB, and 3-4-fold higher than for mAb radioiodinated using Iodogen. Paired-label biodistribution of L8A4 labeled using [(211)At]SAGMB and [(131)I]SGMIB in athymic mice hosting U87MGdeltaEGFR xenografts resulted in identical uptake of both (211)At and (131)I in tumor tissues over 24 h. Although higher levels of (211)At compared with (131)I were sometimes seen in tissues known to sequester free astatide, these (211)At/(131)I uptake ratios were considerably lower than those seen with other labeling methods. These results suggest that [(211)At]SAGMB may be a useful acylation agent for labeling internalizing mAbs with (211)At. PMID:12767391

  10. Treatment of HER2-Expressing Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Cells With Alpha Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Trastuzumab

    SciTech Connect

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Krogh, Cecilie; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Larsen, Asmund; Dahle, Jostein

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of low-dose-rate alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate {sup 227}Th-p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-DOTA-trastuzumab ({sup 227}Th-trastuzumab [where DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]) internalized by breast and ovarian cancer cell lines in order to assess the potential of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab as a therapeutic agent against metastatic cancers that overexpress the HER2 oncogene. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival and cell growth rates of breast cancer cells treated with {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab were compared with rates of cells treated with nonbinding {sup 227}Th-rituximab, cold trastuzumab, and X-radiation. Cell growth experiments were also performed with ovarian cancer cells. Cell-associated radioactivity was measured at several time points, and the mean radiation dose to cells was calculated. Results: SKBR-3 cells got 50% of the mean absorbed radiation dose from internalized activity and 50% from cell surface-bound activity, while BT-474 and SKOV-3 cells got 75% radiation dose from internalized activity and 25% from cell surface-bound activity. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 2.5 kBq/ml {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab for 1 h at 4{sup o}C, followed by washing, resulted in mean absorbed radiation doses of 2 to 2.5 Gy. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and an increase in apoptosis were induced in all cell lines. Conclusions: Clinically relevant activity concentrations of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab induced a specific cytotoxic effect in three HER2-expressing cell lines. The cytotoxic effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab was higher than that of single-dose X-radiation (relative biological effectiveness = 1.2). These results warrant further studies of treatment of breast cancer and ovarian cancer with {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab.

  11. Cancer radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Olivier; Supiot, Stéphane; Degraef-Mougin, Marie; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Carlier, Thomas; Chatal, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Cherel, Michel

    2005-05-01

    In lymphoid malignancies and in certain solid cancers such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, somewhat mixed success has been achieved when applying radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with beta-emitters for the treatment of refractory cases. The development of novel RIT with alpha-emitters has created new opportunities and theoretical advantages due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of alpha-particles. These physical properties offer the prospect of achieving selective tumoural cell killing. Thus, RIT with alpha-emitters appears particularly suited for the elimination of circulating single cells or cell clusters or for the treatment of micrometastases at an early stage. However, to avoid non-specific irradiation of healthy tissues, it is necessary to identify accessible tumoural targets easily and rapidly. For this purpose, a small number of alpha-emitters have been investigated, among which only a few have been used for in vivo preclinical studies. Another problem is the availability and cost of these radionuclides; for instance, the low cost and the development of a reliable actinium-225/bismuth-213 generator were probably determining elements in the choice of bismuth-213 in the only human trial of RIT with an alpha-emitter. This article reviews the literature concerning monoclonal antibodies radiolabelled with alpha-emitters that have been developed for possible RIT in cancer patients. The principal radio-immunoconjugates are considered, starting with physical and chemical properties of alpha-emitters, their mode of production, the possibilities and difficulties of labelling, in vitro studies and finally, when available, in vivo preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:15841373

  12. Streptavidin in antibody pretargeting. 5. chemical modification of recombinant streptavidin for labeling with the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides 213Bi and 211At.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, D Scott; Hamlin, Donald K; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2008-01-01

    We are investigating the use of recombinant streptavidin (rSAv) as a carrier molecule for the short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides 213Bi ( t 1/2 = 45.6 min) and 211At ( t 1/2 = 7.21 h) in cancer therapy. To utilize rSAv as a carrier, it must be modified in a manner that permits rapid chelation or bonding with these short-lived radionuclides and also modified in a manner that diminishes its natural propensity for localization in the kidney. Modification for labeling with (213)Bi was accomplished by conjugation of rSAv with the DTPA derivative p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-CHX-A'' (CHX-A''), 3a. Modification for direct labeling with 211At was accomplished by conjugation of rSAv with an isothiocyanatophenyl derivative of a nido-carborane (nCB), 3b, or an isothiocyanatophenyl-dPEG/decaborate(2-) derivative, 3c. After conjugation of the chelating or bonding moiety, rSAv was further modified by reaction with an excess (50-100 equivalents) of succinic anhydride. Succinylation of the lysine amines has previously been shown to greatly diminish kidney localization. rSAv modified by conjugation with 3a and succinylated rapidly radiolabeled with 213Bi (<5 min), providing a 72% isolated yield. 211At labeling of modified rSAv was accomplished in aqueous solution using chloramine-T as the oxidant. Astatination of rSAv conjugated with 3b and succinylated occurred very rapidly (<1 min), providing a 50% isolated radiochemical yield. Astatination of rSAv conjugated with 3c and succinylated was also very rapid (<1 min) providing 66-71% isolated radiochemical yields. Astatination of succinylated rSAv, 2a, which did not have conjugated borane cage moieties, resulted in a much lower radiolabeling yield (18%). The 213Bi or 211At-labeled modified rSAv preparations were mixed with the corresponding 125 I-labeled rSAv, and dual-label in vivo distributions were obtained in athymic mice. The in vivo data show that 213Bi-labeled succinylated rSAv [ 213Bi] 6a has tissue concentrations

  13. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  14. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  15. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  16. A High-Throughput Screen for Alpha Particle Radiation Protectants

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-particle-emitting elements are of increasing importance as environmental and occupational carcinogens, toxic components of radiation dispersal devices and accidents, and potent therapeutics in oncology. Alpha particle radiation differs from radiations of lower linear energy transfer in that it predominantly damages DNA via direct action. Because of this, radical scavengers effective for other radiations have had only limited effect in mitigating alpha particle toxicity. We describe here a simple assay and a pilot screen of 3,119 compounds in a high-throughput screen (HTS), using the alpha-particle-emitting isotope, 225Ac, for the discovery of compounds that might protect mammalian cells from alpha particles through novel mechanisms. The assay, which monitored the viability of a myeloid leukemic cell line upon alpha particle exposure, was robust and reproducible, yielding a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of nearly 10 to 1. Surprisingly, 1 compound emerged from this screen, epoxy-4,5-α-dihydroxysantonin (EDHS), that showed considerable protective activity. While the value of EDHS remains to be determined, its discovery is a proof of concept and validation of the utility of this HTS methodology. Further application of the described assay could yield compounds useful in minimizing the toxicity and carcinogenesis associated with alpha particle exposure. PMID:20658946

  17. Collection and Analysis of Aircraft Emitted Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1999-01-01

    The University of Denver Aerosol Group proposed to adapt an impactor system for the collection of particles emitted by aircraft. The collection substrates were electron microscope grids which were analyzed by Dr. Pat Sheridan using a transmission electron microscope. The impactor was flown in the SNIFF behind aircraft and engine emissions were sampled. This report details the results of that work.

  18. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer.

  19. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22202153

  20. Commercial Availability of Alpha-Emitting Radionuclides for Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2008-09-15

    Alpha-emitting radionuclides provide effective cell-killing properties and have been shown to be effective in cancer treatment. The number of different alpha emitters having suitable physical and chemical characteristics for applications in medicine is relatively few. Development and testing of new radiopharmaceuticals requires a reliable supply of alpha-emitters in high quality, with timely delivery, but at reasonable cost. Applications and commercial availability of the follow alpha emitters are reviewed: Actinium-225, bismuth-213, astatine-211, radium-223, bismuth-212, radium-224, radium-226, terbium-149, and thorium-227. Recommendations for improving the supply of these alpha emitters include an increased federal commitment (through funding and joint-agency cooperation), establishing new production capabilities, and strengthening federal-private partnerships with companies involved in helping to meet critical radionuclide supplies.

  1. Effective treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ with a HER-2- targeted alpha-particle emitting radionuclide in a preclinical model of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Jin, Kideok; Song, Hong; Park, Sunju; Huso, David L; Zhang, Zhe; Liangfeng, Han; Zhu, Charles; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2016-05-31

    The standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is surgical resection, followed by radiation. Here, we tested localized therapy of DCIS in mice using the immunoconjugate 225Ac linked-trastuzumab delivered through the intraductal (i.duc) route. Trastuzumab targets HER-2/neu, while the alpha-emitter 225Ac (half-life, 10 days) delivers highly cytotoxic, focused doses of radiation to tumors. Systemic 225Ac, however, elicits hematologic toxicity and at high doses free 213Bi, generated by its decay, causes renal toxicity. I.duc delivery of the radioimmunoconjugate could bypass its systemic toxicity. Bioluminescent imaging showed that the therapeutic efficacy of intraductal 225Ac-trastuzumab (10-40 nCi per mammary gland; 30-120 nCi per mouse) in a DCIS model of human SUM225 cancer cells in NSG mice was significantly higher (p<0.0003) than intravenous (120 nCi per mouse) administration, with no kidney toxicity or loss of body weight. Our findings suggest that i.duc radioimmunotherapy using 225Ac-trastuzumab deserves greater attention for future clinical development as a treatment modality for early breast cancer.

  2. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  3. Direct analysis of air filter samples for alpha emitting isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohagheghi, A.H.; Ghanbari, F.; Ebara, S.B.; Enghauser, M.E.; Bakhtiar, S.N.

    1997-04-01

    The traditional method for determination of alpha emitting isotopes on air filters has been to process the samples by radiochemical methods. However, this method is too slow for cases of incidents involving radioactive materials where the determination of personnel received dose is urgent. A method is developed to directly analyze the air filters taken from personal and area air monitors. The site knowledge is used in combination with alpha spectral information to identify isotopes. A mathematical function is developed to estimate the activity for each isotope. The strengths and weaknesses of the method are discussed.

  4. Prospects for alpha particle studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    TFTR is expected to produce approximately 5 MW of alpha heating during the D/T Q approx. = 1 phase of operation in 1990. At that point the collective confinement properties and the heating effects of alpha particles become accessible for study for the first time. This paper outlines the potential performance of TFTR with respect to alpha particle production, the diagnostics which will be available for alpha particle measurements, and the physics issues which can be studied both before and during D/T operation.

  5. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha-particle therapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

  6. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha particle therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225 Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209 Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225 Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer.

  7. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha particle therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225 Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209 Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225 Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

  8. Counting Particles Emitted by Stratospheric Aircraft and Measuring Size of Particles Emitted by Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1994-01-01

    There were two principal objectives of the cooperative agreement between NASA and the University of Denver. The first goal was to modify the design of the ER-2 condensation nuclei counter (CNC) so that the effective lower detection limit would be improved at high altitudes. This improvement was sought because, in the instrument used prior to 1993, diffusion losses prevented the smallest detectable particles from reaching the detection volume of the instrument during operation at low pressure. Therefore, in spite of the sensor's ability to detect particles as small as 0.008 microns in diameter, many of these particles were lost in transport to the sensing region and were not counted. Most of the particles emitted by aircraft are smaller than 0.1 micron in diameter. At the start date of this work, May 1990, continuous sizing techniques available on the ER-2 were only capable of detecting particles larger than 0.17 micron. Thus, the second objective of this work was to evaluate candidate sizing techniques in an effort to gain additional information concerning the size of particles emitted by aircraft.

  9. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  10. Electrodeposition of selected alpha-emitting nuclides from ammonium acetate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shan C.; Choi, Jae G.; Hodge, Vernon F.

    1994-10-01

    The experimentally optimal conditions of the electrodeposition of selected alpha particle-emitting radionuclides, including Po-208, Ra-226, Th-228, U-238, Pu-239, Am-241 and Cm-(243, 244) with ammonium acetate electrolyte have been determined. This simple method could be used for the determination of the most important actinides in radiological waste and could be applicable to waste treatment. In addition, this method could be used for radium determination instead of the traditional radon emanation technique, which requires approximately 30 days.

  11. Alpha-emitting nuclides in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentreath, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The occurrence of alpha-emitting nuclides and their daughter products in the marine environment continues to be a subject of study for many reasons. Those nuclides which occur naturally, in the uranium, thorium and actinium series, are of interest because of their value in determining the rates of geological and geochemical processes in the oceans. Studies of them address such problems as the determination of rates of transfer of particulate matter, deposition rates, bioturbation rates, and so on. Two of the natural alpha-series nuclides in which a different interest has been expressed are 210Po and 226Ra, because their concentrations in marine organisms are such that they contribute to a significant fraction of the background dose rates sustained both by the organisms themselves and by consumers of marine fish and shellfish. To this pool of naturally-occurring nuclides, human activities have added the transuranium nuclides, both from the atmospheric testing of nuclear devices and from the authorized discharges of radioactive wastes into coastal waters and the deep sea. Studies have therefore been made to understand the chemistry of these radionuclides in sea water, their association with sedimentary materials, and their accumulation by marine organisms, the last of these being of particular interest because the transuranics are essentially "novel" elements to the marine fauna and flora. The need to predict the long-term behaviour of these nuclides has, in turn, stimulated research on those naturally-occurring nuclides which may behave in a similar manner.

  12. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (α) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two αs. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two α particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  13. High resolution alpha particle spectrometry through collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghoon; Kwak, Sung-Woo; Kang, Han-Byeol

    2015-06-01

    Alpha particle spectrometry with collimation is a useful method for identifying nuclear materials among various nuclides. A mesh type collimator reduces the low energy tail and broadened energy distribution by cutting off particles with a low incidence angle. The relation between the resolution and the counting efficiency can be investigated by changing a ratio of the mesh hole diameter and the collimator thickness. Through collimation, a target particle can be distinguished by a PIPS® detector under a mixture of various nuclides.

  14. Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

  15. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  16. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  17. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  18. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  19. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Farengo, R.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, "cold" neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  20. Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

    2004-05-13

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

  1. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  2. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  3. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  4. A practical alpha particle irradiator for studying internal alpha particle exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Man; Lee, Ui-Seob; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    An alpha particle irradiator has been built in the Radiation Bioengineering Laboratory at Seoul National University (SNU) to investigate the cellular responses to alpha emissions from radon and the progeny. This irradiator is designed to have the energy of alpha particles entering target cells similar to that of alpha emissions from the radon progeny Po-218 and Po-214 residing in the human respiratory tract. For the SNU alpha particle irradiator, an irradiation system is equipped with cell dishes of 4µm thick Mylar bottom and a special setup of cells on slide for gamma-H2AX assay. Dose calibration for the alpha particle irradiator was performed by dual approaches, detection and computer simulation, in consideration of the source-to-target distance (STD) and the size of a cell dish. The uniformity of dose among cells in a dish is achieved by keeping the STD and the size of cell dish in certain ranges. The performance of the SNU alpha particle irradiator has been proven to be reliable through the gamma-H2AX assay with the human lung epithelial cells irradiated. PMID:27475622

  5. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  7. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of the 230U decay series.

    PubMed

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Suliman, G; Stroh, H; Apostolidis, C; Abbas, K; Morgenstern, A

    2012-09-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed on the (230)U decay series. A (230)U source was prepared on a stainless steel disc by electrodeposition in an ammonium nitrate solution. Spectrometry of the alpha-particle energy spectrum was performed with ion-implanted planar silicon detectors in vacuum. A set of alpha emission probabilities is presented for (230)U and (226)Th. The measured peak intensities were corrected mathematically for coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons emitted in the same decay. A good agreement with literature data was observed. The uncertainty budget and the correlation matrix are presented. The validity of the alpha-particle energies was tested and could be confirmed for most peaks within a few keV, but discrepancies were found for the 2nd peak of (226)Th and the main peak of (218)Rn.

  8. Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    The Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα) of neutral hydrogen (Hi) is intrinsically the brightest emission feature in the spectrum of astrophysical nebulae, making it a very attractive observational feature with which to survey galaxies. Moreover as an ultraviolet resonance line, Lyα possesses several unique characteristics that make it useful to study the properties of the interstellar medium and ionising stellar population at all cosmic epochs. In this review, I present a summary of Lyα observations of galaxies in the nearby universe. By ultraviolet continuum selection, at the magnitudes reachable with current facilities, only ≈ 5% of the local galaxy population shows a Lyα equivalent width (W Lyα) that exceeds 20 Å. This fraction increases dramatically at higher redshifts, but only in the local universe can we study galaxies in detail and assemble unprecedented multi-wavelength datasets. I discuss many local Lyα observations, showing that when galaxies show net Lyα emission, they ubiquitously also produce large-scale halos of scattered Lyα, that dominate the integrated luminosity. Concerning global measurements, we discuss how W Lyα and the Lyα escape fraction (f Lyα esc) are higher (W Lyα ≳ 20 Å and f Lyα esc ≳ 10%) in galaxies that represent the less massive and younger end of the distribution for local objects. This is connected with various properties, such that Lyα-emitting galaxies have lower metal abundances (median value of 12 + log(O/H) ~ 8.1) and dust reddening. However, the presence of galactic outflows/winds is also vital to Doppler shift the Lyα line out of resonance with the atomic gas, and high W Lyα is found only among galaxies with winds faster than ~ 50 km s-1. The empirical evidence is then assembled into a coherent picture, and the requirement for star-formation-driven feedback is discussed in the context of an evolutionary sequence where the interstellar medium is accelerated and/or subject to hydrodynamical instabilities

  9. Sterically stabilized liposomes as a carrier for alpha-emitting radium and actinium radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Schoultz, B W; Michaelsen, T E; Bruland, Ø S; Larsen, R H

    2004-05-01

    The alpha-particle emitting radionuclides (223)Ra (t(1/2) = 11.4 d), (224)Ra (t(1/2) = 3.6 d), and (225)Ac(t(1/2) = 10.0 d) may have a broad application in targeted radiotherapy provided that they could be linked to vehicles with tumor affinity. The potential usefulness of liposomes as carriers was studied in the present work. Radium and actinium radionuclides could be loaded in good yields into sterically stabilized liposomes. Subsequent coating of the liposomes with a folate-F(ab')(2) construct yielded a product with affinity towards tumor cells expressing folate receptors. Radionuclide loaded liposomes showed excellent stability in serum in vitro.

  10. Sterically stabilized liposomes as a carrier for alpha-emitting radium and actinium radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Schoultz, B W; Michaelsen, T E; Bruland, Ø S; Larsen, R H

    2004-05-01

    The alpha-particle emitting radionuclides (223)Ra (t(1/2) = 11.4 d), (224)Ra (t(1/2) = 3.6 d), and (225)Ac(t(1/2) = 10.0 d) may have a broad application in targeted radiotherapy provided that they could be linked to vehicles with tumor affinity. The potential usefulness of liposomes as carriers was studied in the present work. Radium and actinium radionuclides could be loaded in good yields into sterically stabilized liposomes. Subsequent coating of the liposomes with a folate-F(ab')(2) construct yielded a product with affinity towards tumor cells expressing folate receptors. Radionuclide loaded liposomes showed excellent stability in serum in vitro. PMID:15093814

  11. THE SPATIALLY RESOLVED H{alpha}-EMITTING WIND STRUCTURE OF P CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Balan, Aurelian; Tycner, C.; Zavala, R. T.; Benson, J. A.; Hutter, D. J.; Templeton, M. E-mail: c.tycner@cmich.ed E-mail: jbenson@nofs.navy.mi E-mail: matthewt@aavso.or

    2010-06-15

    High spatial resolution observations of the H{alpha}-emitting wind structure associated with the luminous blue variable star P Cygni were obtained with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer. These observations represent the most comprehensive interferometric data set on P Cyg to date. We demonstrate how the apparent size of the H{alpha}-emitting region of the wind structure of P Cyg compares between the 2005, 2007, and 2008 observing seasons and how this relates to the H{alpha} line spectroscopy. Using the data sets from 2005, 2007, and 2008 observing seasons, we fit a circularly symmetric Gaussian model to the interferometric signature from the H{alpha}-emitting wind structure of P Cyg. Based on our results, we conclude that the radial extent of the H{alpha}-emitting wind structure around P Cyg is stable at the 10% level. We also show how the radial distribution of the H{alpha} flux from the wind structure deviates from a Gaussian shape, whereas a two-component Gaussian model is sufficient to fully describe the H{alpha}-emitting region around P Cyg.

  12. Diamond detector for alpha-particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, J A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Martín Sánchez, A; Martel, I

    2014-08-01

    An artificially grown high purity diamond was used as a detector for alpha-particle spectrometry. Diamond detectors can match the performance of silicon detectors employed in standard continuous air monitoring systems. Its radiation hardness and electronic properties make them ideal to work under extreme condition such as high temperature and ambient lights. A 50 μm thickness single-crystal diamond detector has been compared with a 300 μm passivated implanted planar silicon detector, under ambient conditions.

  13. Lunar Surface Outgassing and Alpha Particle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, R. D.; Binder, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-218 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. Once released, the radon spreads out by "bouncing" across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a randomwalk process. The half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays (depositing approximately half of the polonium-218 recoil nuclides on the lunar surface) and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to several days after they occur. The long residence time of the lead-210 precursor to polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 60 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution.

  14. Ferroelectric Devices Emit Charged Particles and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Felsteiner, Joshua; Karsik, Yakov

    2005-01-01

    Devices called solid-state ferroelectric- based sources (SSFBSs) are under development as sources of electrons, ions, ultraviolet light, and x-rays for diverse applications in characterization and processing of materials. Whereas heretofore it has been necessary to use a different device to generate each of the aforementioned species of charged particles or radiation, a single SSFBS can be configured and operated to selectively generate any of the species as needed using a single source. Relative to comparable prior sources based, variously, on field emission, thermionic emission, and gaseous discharge plasmas, SSFBSs demand less power, and are compact and lightweight. An SSFBS exploits the unique physical characteristics of a ferroelectric material in the presence of a high-frequency pulsed electric field. The basic building block of an SSFBS is a ferroelectric cathode -- a ferroelectric wafer with a solid electrode covering its rear face and a grid electrode on its front face (see figure). The application of a voltage pulse -- typically having amplitude of several kilovolts and duration of several nanoseconds -- causes dense surface plasma to form near the grid wires on the front surface.

  15. Pre-Equilibrium Alpha-Particle Emission as a Probe to Explore Alpha Clustering in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchuk, V. L.; Fotina, O. V.; Gramegna, F.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Sambi, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.

    Experimental data of the double-differential spectra of light particles emitted at pre-equilibrium stage of nuclear processes were obtained at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro for the heavy-ion reactions 130 and 250 MeV 16O + 116Sn. Light charged particles were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues in order to avoid unwanted competing mechanisms. The experimental data were collected in a wide angular range from 29 to 82 degrees in the laboratory system. Theoretical model was developed in order to describe simultaneously evaporative and pre-equilibrium emission of the light particles in heavy-ion reactions. Griffin exciton model was used for the description of the pre-equilibrium stage of the compound nucleus formation, while the equilibrium evaporation processes were analyzed in the framework of the statistical theory of heavy-ion reactions. Experimental data were compared with the results of the model calculations and new approach was suggested to take into account alpha cluster formation in the projectile nucleus by measuring and analyzing pre-equilibrium alpha-particle spectra.

  16. Alpha particle collective Thomson scattering in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Gilmore, J.; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A.; Bindslev, H.

    1993-11-01

    A collective Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented on TFTR to measure alpha particle, energetic and thermal ion densities and velocity distributions. A 60 GHz, 0.1-1 kW gyrotron will be used as the transmitter source, and the scattering geometry will be perpendicular to the magnetic field in the extraordinary mode polarization. An enhanced scattered signal is anticipated from fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range with this scattering geometry. Millimeter wave collective Thomson scattering diagnostics have the advantage of larger scattering angles to decrease the amount of stray light, and long, high power, modulated pulses to obtain improved signal to noise through synchronous detection techniques.

  17. Counting particles emitted by stratospheric aircraft and measuring size of particles emitted by stratospheric aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1994-01-01

    The ER-2 condensation nuclei counter (CNC) has been modified to reduce the diffusive losses of particles within the instrument. These changes have been successful in improving the counting efficiency of small particles at low pressures. Two techniques for measuring the size distributions of particles with diameters less than 0.17 micrometers have been evaluated. Both of these methods, the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the diffusion battery, have fundamental problems that limit their usefulness for stratospheric applications. We cannot recommend either for this application. Newly developed, alternative methods for measuring small particles include inertial separation with a low-loss critical orifice and thin-plate impactor device. This technique is now used to collect particles in the multisample aerosol collector housed in the ER-2 CNC-2, and shows some promise for particle size measurements when coupled with a CNC as a counting device. The modified focused-cavity aerosol spectrometer (FCAS) can determine the size distribution of particles with ambient diameters as small as about 0.07 micrometers. Data from this instrument indicates the presence of a nuclei mode when CNC-2 indicates high concentrations of particles, but cannot resolve important parameters of the distribution.

  18. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  19. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  20. Self-consistent alpha-particle transport in ignition scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kamelander, G.; Woloch, F.; Sdouz, G. )

    1994-05-01

    Recently, fast alpha-particle-driven kinetic Alfven waves were investigated by means of a nonlinear turbulent theory, and an analytic expression for the corresponding diffusion coefficient was derived. This diffusion coefficient is introduced in a kinetic alpha-particle transport code based on the solution of a special Fokker-Planck equation by means of a multigroup formalism. The structure of D[sub [alpha

  1. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  2. Local Control of Lung Derived Tumors by Diffusing Alpha-Emitting Atoms Released From Intratumoral Wires Loaded With Radium-224

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Tomer; Schmidt, Michael; Bittan, Hadas; Lazarov, Elinor; Arazi, Lior; Kelson, Itzhak; Keisari, Yona

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a new form of brachytherapy enabling the treatment of solid tumors with alpha radiation. The present study examines the antitumoral effects resulting from the release of alpha emitting radioisotopes into solid lung carcinoma (LL2, A427, and NCI-H520). Methods and Materials: An in vitro setup tested the dose-dependent killing of tumor cells exposed to alpha particles. In in vivo studies, radioactive wires (0.3 mm diameter, 5 mm long) with {sup 224}Ra activities in the range of 21-38 kBq were inserted into LL/2 tumors in C57BL/6 mice and into human-derived A427 or NCI-H520 tumors in athymic mice. The efficacy of the short-lived daughters of {sup 224}Ra to produce tumor growth retardation and prolong life was assessed, and the spread of radioisotopes inside tumors was measured using autoradiography. Results: The insertion of a single DART wire into the center of 6- to 7-mm tumors had a pronounced retardation effect on tumor growth, leading to a significant inhibition of 49% (LL2) and 93% (A427) in tumor development and prolongations of 48% (LL2) in life expectancy. In the human model, more than 80% of the treated tumors disappeared or shrunk. Autoradiographic analysis of the treated sectioned tissue revealed the intratumoral distribution of the radioisotopes, and histological analysis showed corresponding areas of necrosis. In vitro experiments demonstrated a dose-dependent killing of tumors cells exposed to alpha particles. Conclusions: Short-lived diffusing alpha-emitters produced tumor growth retardation and increased survival in mice bearing lung tumor implants. These results justify further investigations with improved dose distributions.

  3. Radiotoxicity of gadolinium-148 and radium-223 in mouse testes: Relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.W.; Goddu, S.M.; Narra, V.R.

    1997-03-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit {alpha} particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of {alpha}-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy {alpha} particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by {sup 148}Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 {+-} 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for {sup 210}Po and {sup 212}Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE-energy relationship for {alpha} particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBE{sub {alpha}} = 9.14 - 0.510 E{sub {alpha}}, where 3 < E{sub {alpha}} < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific {alpha}-particle emitter {sup 223}Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 {+-} 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-E{sub {alpha}} relationship to predict the biological effects of {alpha}-particle emitters in vivo. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR SPATIALLY COMPACT Ly{alpha} EMISSION IN z = 3.1 Ly{alpha}-EMITTING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Gawiser, Eric; Feldmeier, John J.; Matkovic, Ana; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: gawiser@physics.rutgers.ed E-mail: matkovic@astro.psu.ed E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2010-06-20

    We present the results of a high spatial resolution study of the line emission in a sample of z = 3.1 Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. Of the eight objects with coverage in our HST/WFPC2 narrowband imaging, two have clear detections and two are barely detected ({approx}2 {sigma}). The clear detections are within {approx}0.5 kpc of the centroid of the corresponding rest-UV continuum source, suggesting that the line-emitting gas and young stars in LAEs are spatially coincident. The brightest object exhibits extended emission with a half-light radius of {approx}1.5 kpc, but a stack of the remaining LAE surface brightness profiles is consistent with the WFPC2 point-spread function. This suggests that the Ly{alpha} emission in these objects originates from a compact ({approx}<2 kpc) region and cannot be significantly more extended than the far-UV continuum emission ({approx}<1 kpc). Comparing our WFPC2 photometry to previous ground-based measurements of their monochromatic fluxes, we find at 95% (99.7%) confidence that we cannot be missing more than 22% (32%) of the Ly{alpha} emission.

  5. Alpha-Particle Angular Distributions of At and Rn Isotopes and Their Relation to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    NICOLE Collaboration and ISOLDE Collaboration

    1996-12-01

    We report on an extensive on-line nuclear orientation study of the angular distribution of {alpha} particles emitted in the favored decay of neutron deficient At and Rn nuclei near the {ital N}=126 shell closure. Surprisingly large anisotropies were observed, showing pronounced changes from one isotope to another. Comparing these data with several theoretical models shows that anisotropic {alpha} emission in favored decays from near-spherical nuclei can well be explained within the shell model, implying that it is mainly determined by the structure of the decaying nucleus. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo at low doses

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.W.; Azure, M.T.; Narra, V.R.; Rao, D.V. )

    1994-03-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit [alpha] particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The [sup 224]Ra daughters [sup 212]Pb and [sup 212]Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of [alpha] and [beta] particles in their decay to stable [sup 208]Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of [sup 212]Pb and its daughters. When [sup 212]Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters [sup 212]Bi, [sup 212]Po and [sup 208]Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D[sub 37]) was 0.143 [+-] 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D[sub 37] for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for [sup 210]Po, was used to obtain an RBE-LET relationship for [alpha] particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBE[sub [alpha

  7. DISCOVERY OF AN H{alpha} EMITTING DISK AROUND THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2013-01-10

    Due to its proximity, the mass of the supermassive black hole in the nucleus of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the most massive black hole in the Local Group of galaxies, has been measured by several methods involving the kinematics of a stellar disk which surrounds it. We report here the discovery of an eccentric H{alpha} emitting disk around the black hole at the center of M31 and show how modeling this disk can provide an independent determination of the mass of the black hole. Our model implies a mass of 5.0{sup +0.8}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} for the central black hole, consistent with the average of determinations by methods involving stellar dynamics, and compatible (at 1{sigma} level) with measurements obtained from the most detailed models of the stellar disk around the central black hole. This value is also consistent with the M-{sigma} relation. In order to make a comparison, we applied our simulation on the stellar kinematics in the nucleus of M31 and concluded that the parameters obtained for the stellar disk are not formally compatible with the parameters obtained for the H{alpha} emitting disk. This result suggests that the stellar and the H{alpha} emitting disks are intrinsically different from each other. A plausible explanation is that the H{alpha} emission is associated with a gaseous disk. This hypothesis is supported by the detection of traces of weaker nebular lines in the nuclear region of M31. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the H{alpha} emission is, at least partially, generated by stars.

  8. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Alpha particle nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoff; Jordan, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A method developed for the proton NIEL calculation previously is extended to incident alpha particles in this study: ZBL screened potential for Coulomb interactions and MCNPX 'thin target approximation' for nuclear interactions.

  10. Full orbit calculation for lost alpha particle measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, D.; Isobe, M.; Nishiura, M.; Sato, Y.; Okamoto, A.; Kobuchi, T.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.

    2008-10-15

    An orbit following calculation code with full gyromotion under the ITER magnetic field configuration has been developed to investigate escaping alpha particle orbits in ITER and to determine the geometrical arrangement for alpha particle detection. The code contained the full geometrical information of the first wall panels. It was carefully investigated whether an alpha particle escaping from the plasma through the last closed flux surface does not touch or intersect the first wall boundary before reaching the detection point. Candidates of blanket module modification have been studied to achieve effective measurement geometry for escaping alpha particle detection. The calculations showed that direct orbit loss and banana diffusion can be detected with a probe head recessed from the first wall surface.

  11. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  12. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  13. The feasibility of 225Ac as a source of alpha-particles in radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, M W; Kaspersen, F M; Apostolidis, C; van der Hout, R

    1993-02-01

    This paper proposes the utilization of 225Ac for the alpha-radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The isotope decays with a radioactive half-life of 10 days into a cascade of short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting isotopes. In addition, when indicated by the pharmacokinetic requirements of particular clinical applications, 213Bi, with a radioactive half-life of 47 min, can be chosen as an alternative source of alpha-particles in radioimmunotherapy. This isotope is the last alpha emitter in the 225Ac decay-cascade and can be extracted from a 225Ac source at the bedside of the patient. 225Ac can quasi ad infinitum be obtained from one of its precursors, 229Th, which can be made available by various means. The indications for the use of alpha-particles as an alternative to more traditional classes of radiation are derived from the particle-kinetic characteristics and the radioactive half-life of their source isotope, as well as from the properties of the target-selective carrier moiety for the source isotope. It may be expected that useful applications, complementary to and/or in conjunction with other means of therapy will be identified.

  14. Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

  15. Raw materials influence the alpha-particle emission rate of AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, T.G.; Knudsen, A.K.; Guiton, T.A.; Quinn, T.J. III; Mills, L.K.; Dunmead, S.D.; Rigot, W.L.; Wijeyesekera, S.D.

    1996-10-01

    Most electronic devices are packaged in plastic, generally epoxy-based molding compounds. Organic compounds serve as effective barriers for alpha particles. However, sensitive or thermally stressed devices often must be packaged in ceramic packages, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, glass ceramics, BeO and AlN. Therefore, the concentration of alpha-particle-generating elements and the tendency of the material to induce soft errors in the device must be considered when selecting a ceramic package option. AlN is a relatively new packaging material. It offers high thermal conductivity ({ge}170 W/(m{center_dot}K)), dielectric and mechanical properties comparable to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to silicon. AlN substrates and packages are produced via pressureless sintering or hot pressing, using high-purity powders and sintering aids, generally alkaline- and/or rare-earth oxides. The concentration of alpha-particle-emitting elements in AlN ceramics depends on the concentration of these elements in the AlN and additive powders. In the present work, the concentration of alpha-particle-generating elements uranium and thorium in AlN powders is shown to be related to the levels of these elements in the raw materials used in AlN powder synthesis.

  16. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W; Golightly, M J; Weyland, M

    1994-01-01

    The solar particle events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in shielding discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup. PMID:11538031

  17. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work.

  18. Coordination chemistry of the sup 212 Pb/ sup 212 Bi nuclear transformation: Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Harris, W.R.; Keen, C.L.; Cooper, S.R.

    1992-07-01

    Subdivisions of this project are: (a) the synthesis of prototypical thiolate and dithiocarbamate based hexacoordinate complexes, (b) radiochemical engineering for generation of no-carrier-added lead and bismuth radioelements, (c) the first isolation of bismuth-binding proteins from in vivo studies with cyclotron produced {sup 205/206}Bi tracer, and (d) initial development of transport mechanisms for the intracellular radiobiological study of alpha emitting bismuth, and (e) the initiation of chemical equilibrium studies and biochemical pathways with cyclotron-produced, no-carrier-added, {sup 203}Pb (T{sub 1/2} = 51 hr).

  19. A Search for z>6.5 Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies with WISP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, Micaela B.; Scarlata, Claudia; Dai, Yu Sophia; Rafelski, Marc; Baronchelli, Ivano; Colbert, James W.; Dominguez, Alberto; Hathi, Nimish P.; Henry, Alaina L.; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Martin, Crystal L.; Mehta, Vihang; Pahl, Anthony; Ross, Nathaniel; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Teplitz, Harry I.; WISP Team

    2016-01-01

    The observed number density of Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at z>6 provides an important probe of the reionization history of the universe. Because Lyman-alpha photons are very sensitive to the presence of neutral hydrogen, the evolution of the galaxy number density above redshift 6 can be used as a measurement on the progress of reionization. However, the Lyman-alpha luminosity function is currently poorly constrained at high-z. We present the results of a systematic search for Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at redshifts of ~6.5 to 7.5 using the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) survey. WISP's uncorrelated fields are well-suited to the study of bright LAEs, minimizing the effects of clustering introduced by a patchy reionization. From the 30 deepest WISP fields, we compile a sample of single-line emitters, confirm redshifts with broadband colors, and identify LAE candidates that have "dropped out" (are undetected at the 1 sigma level) of the WFC3 UVIS filters. By combining our results with other z~7 studies, we determine whether the number density of LAEs evolves past z~6.5.

  20. Utility of extracting {alpha}-particle energy by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Herrmann, M.C.

    1994-05-01

    The utility of extracting {alpha}-particle power, and then diverting this power to fast fuel ions, is investigated. As power is diverted to fast ions and then to ions, a number of effects come into play, as the relative amounts of pressure taken up by electrons, fuel ions, and fast {alpha}-particles shift. In addition, if the {alpha}-particle power is diverted to fast fuel ions, there is an enhanced fusion reactivity because of the nonthermal component of the ion distribution. Some useful expressions for describing these effects are derived, and it is shown that fusion reactors with power density about twice what otherwise might be obtained can be contemplated, so long as a substantial amount of the {alpha}-particle power can be diverted. Interestingly, in this mode of operation, once the electron heat is sufficiently confined, further improvement in confinement is actually not desirable. A similar improvement in fusion power density can be obtained for advanced fuel mixtures such as D-He{sup 3}, where the power of both the energetic {alpha}-particles and the energetic protons might be diverted advantageously.

  1. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  2. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future.

  3. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets.

  4. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  5. Selective flow path alpha particle detector and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring alpha contamination are provided in which ions generated in the air surrounding the item, by the passage of alpha particles, are moved to a distant detector location. The parts of the item from which ions are withdrawn can be controlled by restricting the air flow over different portions of the apparatus. In this way, detection of internal and external surfaces separately, for instance, can be provided. The apparatus and method are particularly suited for use in undertaking alpha contamination measurements during the commissioning operations.

  6. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  7. Effects of alpha-proton drift velocity on alpha particle firehose instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seough, Jungjoon; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In situ measurements have shown that the less-abundant alpha particles are characterized by temperature anisotropy which could drive the anisotropy-driven kinetic instabilities in the solar wind. In the collisionless plasma, the differential alpha-proton flow velocity V d = V α - V p usually has a non-zero value of the order of the local Alfvén velocity. The presence of such differential flow may affect the properties of dispersion relations for anisotropy-driven instabilities. Based upon linear Vlasov dispersion theory in a homogeneous plasma, the present study investigates the effects of the alpha-proton drift velocity on the parallel and oblique firehose instabilities driven by an excessive parallel temperature anisotropy of alpha particles, where the parallel and oblique represent directions of fluctuation propagation relative to the background magnetic field. It is found that for oblique firehose mode as well as parallel mode, the dispersion properties are affected by the presence of the alpha-proton drift velocity, which in turn results in the increase of the maximum growth rates as Vd increases and consequently leads to the modification of the marginal stability conditions in the parameter space ( β ∥ α , T ⊥ α / T ∥ α ) . We discuss the relevance of our results to the measured temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind context.

  8. The effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br+.

    PubMed

    Leont'eva, G A; Akoev, I G; Grigor'ev, A E

    1983-01-01

    It is generally accepted that heavy charged particles play an important part in generating the secondary flux of nuclear particles formed by the interaction of space hadrons with nuclei. It is assumed that these particles are responsible for the high biological efficiency of space hadrons in causing cellular damage by their strong interactions. To examine this assumption we investigated the effects of 5.3 MeV alpha particles on bacteriophage T4. This energy provides a LET value of 88.6 KeV/micrometer lying in the range of the highest biological efficiency. PMID:11542756

  9. FIRE HOSE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hellinger, P.; Landi, S.

    2015-10-10

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  10. Fire Hose Instability Driven by Alpha Particle Temperature Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Hellinger, P.; Schwartz, S. J.; Landi, S.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  11. Photoluminescence detection of alpha particle using DAM-ADC nuclear detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ayman M.; Harraz, Farid A.; Ali, Atif M.; Al-Sayari, S. A.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2016-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and UV-vis spectral analysis of DAM-ADC (diallyl maleate: DAM, polyallyl diglycol carbonate: ADC) nuclear detector are demonstrated for the first time. The DAM-ADC surfaces were exposed to thin 241Am disk source that emits alpha particles with activity 333 kBq. It is found that the track density of the irradiated samples remarkably influences the PL characteristics of the DAM-ADC detector. The spectral peak heights and the integrated intensities under the peaks exhibit linear correlations with correlation coefficient R2=0.9636 and 0.9806, respectively for different alpha particle fluences ranging from 8.16-40.82×107 particles/cm2. Additionally, a correlation coefficient R2=0.9734 was achieved for the UV-vis spectral analysis. The linear fitting functions, along with the corresponding fitting parameters were evaluated in each case. Both the PL and the UV-vis data of the irradiated DAM-ADC samples showed considerable spectral differences, and hence they would be used to offer sensitive approaches for alpha particle detection.

  12. Production of α-particle emitting 211At using 45 MeV α-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyehong; Chun, Kwonsoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Byungil

    2014-06-01

    Among the α-particle emitting radionuclides, 211At is considered to be a promising radionuclide for targeted cancer therapy due to its decay properties. The range of alpha particles produced by the decay of 211At are less than 70 µm in water with a linear energy transfer between 100 and 130 keV µm-1, which are about the maximum relative biological effectiveness for heavy ions. It is important to note that at the present time, only a few of cyclotrons routinely produce 211At. The direct production method is based on the nuclear reactions 209Bi(α,2n)211At. Production of the radionuclide 211At was carried out using the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). To ensure high beam current, the α-beam was extracted with an initial energy of 45 MeV, which was degraded to obtain the appropriate α-beam energy. The calculations of beam energy degradation were performed utilizing the MCNPX. Alumina-baked targets were prepared by heating the bismuth metal powder onto a circular cavity in a furnace. When using an Eα, av of 29.17 MeV, the very small contribution of 210At confirms the right choice of the irradiation energy to obtain a pure production of 211At isotope.

  13. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  14. TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

  15. HETDEX: Developing the HET's Second Generation Low Resolution Spectrograph for Probing Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonis, Taylor S.; Hill, G. J.; Lee, H.; Tuttle, S. E.; Vattiat, B. L.; Gebhardt, K.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Adams, J. J.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    HETDEX will map the power spectrum of 0.8 million blindly discovered Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies (LAE) using a revolutionary new array of massively replicated fiber-fed spectrographs dubbed the Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS). In the era of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field upgrade and VIRUS, the current Low Resolution Spectrograph (LRS) must be replaced with a fiber instrument. We discuss the development of the second generation LRS (LRS2), which is a multi-channel instrument based on the VIRUS design. In its current design phase, it is fed by a 287 fiber microlens coupled integral field unit that covers 7” x 12” with 0.62” resolution. The instrument covers 3720 Å to 4700 Å at R ≈ 1900 and 4600 Å to 7000 Å at R ≈1200. With the purpose of making the instrument ideal for follow-up observations of LAE in the HETDEX survey, we discuss the science drivers for selecting the instrument's spectral resolution. We test the utility of the instrument and pilot a future study with LRS2 by presenting R ≈ 2000 spectra taken with the VIRUS prototype spectrograph (VIRUS-P) in a high-resolution mode at the McDonald Observatory Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope. These LAE were originally discovered in the HETDEX Pilot Survey and their Lyman-alpha line profiles are constrained by near-infrared observations of rest-frame optical emission lines that set the systemic redshift of the galaxies. We discuss the velocity offsets of the Lyman-alpha line from the systemic line center and compare the line profiles to theoretical predictions and to similar observations for Lyman-break galaxies. Our observations provide an example of how LRS2 can be used to probe Lyman-alpha emission in 2 < z < 3 star forming galaxies.

  16. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Matthew J; Carter, Jennifer C; MacLellan, Jay A; Warner, Cynthia L; Warner, Marvin G; Addleman, R Shane

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, massive numbers of people may require radiobioassay screening as triage for dose-reduction therapy or identification for longer-term follow-up. If the event released significant levels of beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive and requires significant time to prepare and analyze samples. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. The authors have demonstrated the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a novel method of extracting media for four alpha-emitting radionuclides of concern (polonium, radium, uranium and americium) from chemically-unmodified and pH-2 human urine. Herein, the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to extract radionuclides from unmodified human urine and then collect the magnetic field-induced particles for subsequent alpha-counting-source preparation. Additionally, a versatile human dose model is constructed that determines the detector count times required to estimate dose at specific protective-action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method's detection capabilities and uses fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental data as core variables. The modeling shows that, with effective sorbent materials, rapid screening for alpha-emitters is possible with a 50-mL urine sample collected within 1 wk of exposure/intake. PMID:21709509

  17. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  18. Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies at 2 < z < 3: Towards a Calibrated Probe of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Caryl Gronwall

    2012-12-03

    The goal of this project was to establish the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies from redshifts of 2 to 3 in order to better calibrate the use of LAEs as probes of the large scale structure of the universe for upcoming dark energy experiments, such as the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). We have obtained narrow-band imaging of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) in two different narrow-band filters centered at Ly{alpha} at z=2.1 and 3.1. The resulting of samples of LAEs were used to determine the LAE luminosity function, equivalent width distribution and clustering properties (bias) of LAEs at these redshifts. While the results from the ECDF-S appear robust, they are based on a single field. To explore the effects of cosmic variance and galaxy environment on the physical properties of LAEs, we have also obtained narrow-band data at both redshifts (z = 2:1 and 3:1) in three additional fields (SDSS 1030+-05, the Extended Hubble Deep Field South, and CW 1255+01). The narrow-band imaging data has been reduced and LAE catalogs are being generated. We have calculated preliminary luminosity functions, equivalent width distributions, and clustering properties. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy in the optical (using VLT/FORS) and in the near-infrared (using Magellan/MMIRS). Since individual LAEs have too little S/N to enable meaningful fits for stellar population parameters, our previous work has analyzed stacked Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). SED fitting was performed on several subsets of LAEs selected by their rest-UV luminosity, UV spectral slope, Ly alpha luminosity, Equivalent Width, or rest-optical (IRAC) luminosity.

  19. Additional {alpha}-particle optical potential tests below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2010-03-15

    New results of ({alpha},{gamma}) and ({alpha},n) reaction cross section measurements close to the reaction thresholds support the setting up of recent parameters of the {alpha}-particle optical model potential (OMP) below the Coulomb barrier. Particular features of the {alpha}-particle optical potential at energies below the Coulomb barrier explain the failure of using the OMP parameters obtained by analysis of only {alpha}-particle elastic scattering at higher energies.

  20. Alpha particle spectra in coincidence with normal and superdeformed states in {sup 150}Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Viesti, G.; Lunardon, M.; Bazzacco, D. |

    1996-12-31

    The study of correlations between particle evaporation from highly excited compound nuclei at large angular momenta and the states in the final evaporation residues (ER) is a field of investigation which has been opened, in the last years, with the advent of the new large {gamma}-ray arrays. It is now possible to correlate the evaporation spectra to various bands with shapes ranging from spherical to superdeformed (SD) in the same final nucleus. It is generally accepted that the particle evaporation from the compound nucleus is chaotic and that only in the near-yrast {gamma} cascade, where the feeding of different classes of states takes place, the ordered motion is restored. The sensitivity of the particle spectra on the feeding of specific states in the residual nuclei can be taken as an indication that additional degrees of freedom might be important in the evaporation process or that particular regions of the phase space open to the decay populate preferentially some selected structures in the final cold nucleus. This latter point is important for the understanding of the feeding mechanism of SD states. Several experiments performed so far did not find a clear dependence of the shapes of the particle spectra on the excited states having different deformations in the ER. For example, the proton spectra in coincidence with transitions in the SD bands of {sup 133}Nd and {sup 152}Dy nuclei were found to be similar to those in coincidence with transitions in the normal deformed (ND) bands. Alpha particles have been proposed since long as a sensitive probe of the deformation of the emitting nucleus. Results are presented here of an experiment in which the authors have measured the energy spectra of alpha particles associated with different classes of states (ND and SD) in the {sup 150}Tb nucleus populated in the reaction {sup 37}Cl({sup 120}Sn, {alpha}3n{gamma}){sup 150}Tb.

  1. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  2. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  3. Effective density and morphology of particles emitted from small-scale combustion of various wood fuels.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Jani; Ihalainen, Mika; Torvela, Tiina; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Tiitta, Petri; Jakobi, Gert; Grigonyte, Julija; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Virtanen, Annele; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2014-11-18

    The effective density of fine particles emitted from small-scale wood combustion of various fuels were determined with a system consisting of an aerosol particle mass analyzer and a scanning mobility particle sizer (APM-SMPS). A novel sampling chamber was combined to the system to enable measurements of highly fluctuating combustion processes. In addition, mass-mobility exponents (relates mass and mobility size) were determined from the density data to describe the shape of the particles. Particle size, type of fuel, combustion phase, and combustion conditions were found to have an effect on the effective density and the particle shape. For example, steady combustion phase produced agglomerates with effective density of roughly 1 g cm(-3) for small particles, decreasing to 0.25 g cm(-3) for 400 nm particles. The effective density was higher for particles emitted from glowing embers phase (ca. 1-2 g cm(-3)), and a clear size dependency was not observed as the particles were nearly spherical in shape. This study shows that a single value cannot be used for the effective density of particles emitted from wood combustion.

  4. Effective density and morphology of particles emitted from small-scale combustion of various wood fuels.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Jani; Ihalainen, Mika; Torvela, Tiina; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Tiitta, Petri; Jakobi, Gert; Grigonyte, Julija; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Virtanen, Annele; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2014-11-18

    The effective density of fine particles emitted from small-scale wood combustion of various fuels were determined with a system consisting of an aerosol particle mass analyzer and a scanning mobility particle sizer (APM-SMPS). A novel sampling chamber was combined to the system to enable measurements of highly fluctuating combustion processes. In addition, mass-mobility exponents (relates mass and mobility size) were determined from the density data to describe the shape of the particles. Particle size, type of fuel, combustion phase, and combustion conditions were found to have an effect on the effective density and the particle shape. For example, steady combustion phase produced agglomerates with effective density of roughly 1 g cm(-3) for small particles, decreasing to 0.25 g cm(-3) for 400 nm particles. The effective density was higher for particles emitted from glowing embers phase (ca. 1-2 g cm(-3)), and a clear size dependency was not observed as the particles were nearly spherical in shape. This study shows that a single value cannot be used for the effective density of particles emitted from wood combustion. PMID:25365741

  5. Fission studies with 140 MeV {alpha} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buttkewitz, A.; Duhm, H. H.; Strauss, W.; Goldenbaum, F.; Machner, H.

    2009-09-15

    Binary fission induced by 140 MeV {alpha} particles has been measured for {sup nat}Ag, {sup 139}La, {sup 165}Ho, and {sup 197}Au targets. The measured quantities are the total kinetic energies, fragment masses, and fission cross sections. The results are compared with other data and systematics. A minimum of the fission probability in the vicinity Z{sup 2}/A=24 is observed.

  6. An atlas of H-alpha-emitting regions in M33: A systematic search for SS433 star candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Kinney, Anne L.; Ford, Holland; Doggett, Jesse; Long, Knox S.

    1995-01-01

    We report finding charts and accurate positions for 432 compact H-alpha emitting regions in the Local Group galaxy M 33 (NGC 598), in an effort to isolate candidates for an SS433-like stellar system. The objects were extracted from narrow band images, centered in the rest-frame H-alpha (lambda 6563 A) and in the red continuum at 6100 A. The atlas is complete down to V approximately equal to 20 and includes 279 compact HII regions and 153 line emitting point-like sources. The point-like sources undoubtedly include a variety of objects: very small HII regions, early type stars with intense stellar winds, and Wolf-Rayet stars, but should also contain objects with the characteristics of SS433. This extensive survey of compact H-alpha regions in M 33 is a first step towards the identification of peculiar stellar systems like SS433 in external galaxies.

  7. TFTR 60 GHz alpha particle collective Thomson Scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Gilmore, J.; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A.; Bindslev, H.

    1995-03-01

    A 60 GHz gyrotron collective Thomson Scattering alpha particle diagnostic has been implemented for the D-T period on TFM. Gyrotron power of 0.1-1 kW in pulses of up to 1 second can be launched in X-mode. Efficient corrugated waveguides are used with antennaes and vacuum windows of the TFTR Microwave Scattering system. A multichannel synchronous detector receiver system and spectrum analyzer acquire the scattered signals. A 200 Megasample/sec digitizer is used to resolve fine structure in the frequency spectrum. By scattering nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field, this experiment will take advantage of an enhancement of the scattered signal which results from the interaction of the alpha particles with plasma resonances in the lower hybrid frequency range. Significant enhancements are expected, which will make these measurements possible with gyrotron power less than 1 kW, while maintaining an acceptable signal to noise ratio. We hope to extract alpha particle density and velocity distribution functions from the data. The D and T fuel densities and temperatures may also be obtainable by measurement of the respective ion cyclotron harmonic frequencies.

  8. A Novel Experiment to Investigate the Attenuation of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2008-01-01

    A simple student experiment investigating dependence on air pressure of the attenuation of alpha particles in air is described. An equation giving the pressure needed to absorb all alpha particles of a given energy is derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Results are presented for the attenuation of alpha particles from americium 241 and radium…

  9. HETDEX and the Evolution of The Physical Properties of Lyman-Alpha Emitting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, C.; Blanc, G.; Finkelstein, S.; Gawiser, E.; Gebhardt, K.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    Beginning in Spring 2013, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will begin a three year survey of two large regions of sky using VIRUS, an array of blue-sensitive integral-field spectrographs set to cover the wavelength range between 3500 to 5500 Angstroms at R = 800 resolution. These data will cover roughly 300 square degrees in the north (centered near 13 hours, +53 deg) and 140 square degrees along the equator (centered around 1.5 hours), have a filling factor of 1 in 4.5, and detect over 800,000 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the redshift range 1.9 < z < 3.5. While the main goal of HETDEX is to measure the expansion history of the universe via the LAE's power spectrum, these data will also revolutionize our knowledge of the emission-line universe. Using HETDEX, we will be able to explore the 3-D clustering of LAEs, measure their halo masses, and explore their physical properties over a wide range of galactic environments. In preparation for HETDEX, we have undertaken a 3 year pilot survey of the COSMOS, GOODS-N, MUNICS-S2, and XMM-LSS regions of sky using VIRUS-P, a proto-type integral-field spectrograph placed on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope. This survey covered 169 square arcmin and discovered 104 LAEs with a median line luminosity of log L = 43.03 ergs/s. We will present the physical properties of the LAEs found in the pilot survey, and discuss how their line-luminosities, equivalent widths, star-formation rates, dust content, and Ly-alpha escape fraction change with redshift. We will also discuss the implications of the these observations for the main HETDEX survey.

  10. Quality assurance of alpha-particle dosimetry using peeled-off Gafchromic EBT3® film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Chun, S. L.; Yu, K. N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel alpha-particle dosimetry technique using Gafchromic EBT3 film has recently been proposed for calibrating the activity of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. In the present paper, we outlined four measures which could further help assure the quality of the method. First, we suggested an alternative method in fabricating the peeled-off EBT3 film. Films with a chosen size were cut from the original films and all the edges were sealed with silicone. These were immersed into deionized water for 19 d and the polyester covers of the EBT3 films could then be easily peeled off. The active layers in these peeled-off EBT3 films remained intact, and these films could be prepared reproducibly with ease. Second, we proposed a check on the integrity of the peeled-off film by comparing the responses of the pristine and peeled-off EBT3 films to the same X-ray irradiation. Third, we highlighted the importance of scanning directions of the films. The "landscape" and "portrait" scanning directions were defined as the scanning directions perpendicular and parallel to the long edge of the original EBT3 films, respectively. Our results showed that the responses were different for different scanning directions. As such, the same scanning direction should be used every time. Finally, we cautioned the need to confirm the uniformity of the alpha-particle source used for calibration. Radiochromic films are well known for their capability of providing two-dimensional dosimetric information. As such, EBT3 films could also be conveniently used to check the uniformity of the alpha-particle source.

  11. Alpha particle spectra and microdosimetry of radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Caswell, R.S.; Coyne, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    We are interested in understanding the physics of the process by which radon-daughter alpha particles irradiate cells, leading to the induction of cancer. We are focusing initially on two aspects: the alpha spectra incident upon cells, which are needed for input to biophysical models of cancer induction; and microdosimetric spectra and parameters which give information on radiation quality. Adapting an analytical method previously developed for neutron radiation, we have calculated the alpha-particle slowing-down spectra (the spectra incident upon cells) and, subsequently, the microdosimetric spectra and parameters for various cell nuclei or site diameters. Results will be presented from three modes of program operation. MODE 1 is for the thin, plane source of radon-daughter activity adjacent to the epithelium. MODE 2 is for the thick source layer (the mucous-serous layer) adjacent to the epithelium. MODE4 is for cylindrical airways of various radii, lined by the mucous-serous layer. MODE 1 is most useful for understanding the problem; MODE 4 is most anatomically relevant. MODE 3 is not discussed in this paper. Alpha-particle spectra and microdosimetric spectra and parameters are studied as a function of cell depth, {sup 218}Po/{sup 214}Po ratio, airway radius, and cell nucleus or the site size. Also available from the calculation is mean dose as a function of depth below the airway surface. The results described here are available on personal computer diskettes. We are beginning to compare our studies with the calculations of other workers and plan to extend the calculations to the nanometer target level.

  12. Quantitative autoradiography of alpha particle emission in geo-materials using the Beaver™ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardini, Paul; Angileri, Axel; Descostes, Michael; Duval, Samuel; Oger, Tugdual; Patrier, Patricia; Rividi, Nicolas; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Toubon, Hervé; Donnard, Jérôme

    2016-10-01

    In rocks or artificial geo-materials, radioactive isotopes emitting alpha particles are dispersed according to the mineralogy. At hand specimen scale, the achievement of quantitative chemical mapping of these isotopes takes on a specific importance. Knowledge of the distribution of the uranium and thorium series radionuclides is of prime interest to several disciplines, from the geochemistry of uranium deposits, to the dispersion of uranium mill tailings in the biosphere. The disequilibrium of these disintegration chains is also commonly used for dating. However, some prime importance isotopes, such as 226Ra, are complicated to localize in geo-materials. Because of its high specific activity, 226Ra is found in very low concentrations (~ppq), preventing its accurate localization in rock forming minerals. This paper formulates a quantitative answer to the following question: at hand specimen scale, how can alpha emitters in geo-materials be mapped quantitatively? In this study, we tested a new digital autoradiographic method (called the Beaver™) based on a Micro Patterned Gaseous Detector (MPGD) in order to quantitatively map alpha emission at the centimeter scale rock section. Firstly, for two thin sections containing U-bearing minerals at secular equilibrium, we compared the experimental and theoretical alpha count rates, measured by the Beaver™ and calculated from the uranium content, respectively. We found that they are very similar. Secondly, for a set of eight homemade standards made up of a mixture of inactive sand and low-radioactivity mud, we compared the count rates obtained by the Beaver™ and by an alpha spectrometer. The results indicate (i) a linearity between both count rates, and (ii) that the count obtained by the Beaver™ can be estimated from the count obtained by the alpha spectrometry using a factor of 0.82.

  13. Targeted alpha therapy using short-lived alpha-particles and the promise of nanobodies as targeting vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Dekempeneer, Yana; Keyaerts, Marleen; Krasniqi, Ahmet; Puttemans, Janik; Muyldermans, Serge; Lahoutte, Tony; D’huyvetter, Matthias; Devoogdt, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The combination of a targeted biomolecule that specifically defines the target and a radionuclide that delivers a cytotoxic payload offers a specific way to destroy cancer cells. Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRNT) aims to deliver cytotoxic radiation to cancer cells and causes minimal toxicity to surrounding healthy tissues. Recent advances using α-particle radiation emphasizes their potential to generate radiation in a highly localized and toxic manner because of their high level of ionization and short range in tissue. Areas covered: We review the importance of targeted alpha therapy (TAT) and focus on nanobodies as potential beneficial vehicles. In recent years, nanobodies have been evaluated intensively as unique antigen-specific vehicles for molecular imaging and TRNT. Expert opinion: We expect that the efficient targeting capacity and fast clearance of nanobodies offer a high potential for TAT. More particularly, we argue that the nanobodies’ pharmacokinetic properties match perfectly with the interesting decay properties of the short-lived α-particle emitting radionuclides Astatine-211 and Bismuth-213 and offer an interesting treatment option particularly for micrometastatic cancer and residual disease. PMID:27145158

  14. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2001-09-26

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

  15. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Low-Dose-Rate Radioimmunotherapy by the Alpha-Emitting Radioimmunoconjugate Thorium-227-DOTA-Rituximab

    SciTech Connect

    Dahle, Jostein; Krogh, Cecilie; Melhus, Katrine B.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Larsen, Roy H.; Kvinnsland, Yngve

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the low-dose-rate alpha-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate {sup 227}Th-1,4,7,10-p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7, 10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-rituximab can be used to inactivate lymphoma cells growing as single cells and small colonies. Methods and Materials: CD20-positive lymphoma cell lines were treated with {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab for 1-5 weeks. To simulate the in vivo situation with continuous but decreasing supply of radioimmunoconjugates from the blood pool, the cells were not washed after incubation with {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab, but half of the medium was replaced with fresh medium, and cell concentration and cell-bound activity were determined every other day after start of incubation. A microdosimetric model was established to estimate the average number of hits in the nucleus for different localizations of activity. Results: There was a specific targeted effect on cell growth of the {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab treatment. Although the cells were not washed after incubation with {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab, the average contribution of activity in the medium to the mean dose was only 6%, whereas the average contribution from activity on the cells' own surface was 78%. The mean dose rates after incubation with 800 Bq/mL {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab varied from 0.01 to 0.03 cGy/min. The average delay in growing from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} cells/mL was 15 days when the cells were treated with a mean absorbed radiation dose of 2 Gy alpha-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab, whereas it was 11 days when the cells were irradiated with 6 Gy of X-radiation. The relative biologic effect of the treatment was estimated to be 2.9-3.4. Conclusions: The low-dose-rate radioimmunoconjugate {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab is suitable for inactivation of single lymphoma cells and small colonies of lymphoma cells.

  16. XRF-analysis of fine and ultrafine particles emitted from laser printing devices.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Mathias; Pedan, Vasilisa; Hahn, Oliver; Rothhardt, Monika; Bresch, Harald; Jann, Oliver; Seeger, Stefan

    2011-09-15

    In this work, the elemental composition of fine and ultrafine particles emitted by ten different laser printing devices (LPD) is examined. The particle number concentration time series was measured as well as the particle size distributions. In parallel, emitted particles were size-selectively sampled with a cascade impactor and subsequently analyzed by the means of XRF. In order to identify potential sources for the aerosol's elemental composition, materials involved in the printing process such as toner, paper, and structural components of the printer were also analyzed. While the majority of particle emissions from laser printers are known to consist of recondensated semi volatile organic compounds, elemental analysis identifies Si, S, Cl, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Fe as well as traces of Ni and Zn in different size fractions of the aerosols. These elements can mainly be assigned to contributions from toner and paper. The detection of elements that are likely to be present in inorganic compounds is in good agreement with the measurement of nonvolatile particles. Quantitative measurements of solid particles at 400 °C resulted in residues of 1.6 × 10(9) and 1.5 × 10(10) particles per print job, representing fractions of 0.2% and 1.9% of the total number of emitted particles at room temperature. In combination with the XRF results it is concluded that solid inorganic particles contribute to LPD emissions in measurable quantities. Furthermore, for the first time Br was detected in significant concentrations in the aerosol emitted from two LPD. The analysis of several possible sources identified the plastic housings of the fuser units as main sources due to substantial Br concentrations related to brominated flame retardants.

  17. Alpha particles are extremely damaging to developing hemopoiesis compared to gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T N; Lord, B I; Hendry, J H

    1994-03-01

    Estimates of risk of stochastic effects from contamination with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides are based on equivalent doses which take into account the RBE of the high-LET radiation. ICRP has recommended a dose-weighting factor, wR, of 20 for alpha-particle radiation. It is assumed that the RBEs for deterministic effects are considerably less than those for stochastic effects. However, the offspring of mice injected with 30 Bq g-1 239Pu at 13 days gestation develop a persistent deficit in hemopoietic stem cells which is primarily the result of damage to their regulatory microenvironment. Their spatial distribution in the marrow is also perturbed, and recent observations on those mice suggested a considerably higher factor than 20. To define a more realistic RBE for hemopoiesis, the effects of external gamma irradiation during the fetal development period have been compared directly with those of 239Pu incorporated via placental transfer on the development of hemopoietic tissue. Pregnant mice were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays (a) continuously from day 13 of gestation to birth at 0.15 or 0.6 Gy/day; (b) six repeated acute doses (0.6 Gy/min) at 0.1 or 0.3 Gy from day 13 of gestation; (c) one acute dose of 0.6 or 1.8 Gy on day 15 of gestation. The spatial distribution of hemopoietic stem cells in 8-week-old offspring was then determined and compared to that resulting from alpha-particle irradiation. In each case, the higher dose was required to match the results for alpha particles, suggesting an RBE for developing hemopoiesis of 250-360 compared to a continuous gamma-ray dose and a rather lower value of 130-180 compared to a single acute dose of gamma rays. This contrasts greatly to values for direct irradiation of the stem cells but argues that the effective RBE, measured for long-term effects in vivo, is the more realistic. It is concluded that an all-embracing factor can be grossly misleading in the specification of protection guidelines and can greatly

  18. Mineralogical characterization of ambient fine/ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei C1 coal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Hao, Xiaojie; Liu, Dingyu; Wang, Qiangxiang; Zhang, Wenchao; Liu, Pinwei; Zhang, Rongci; Yu, Shang; Pan, Ruiqi; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2016-03-01

    Nano-quartz in Xuanwei coal, the uppermost Permian (C1) coal deposited in the northwest of Yuanan, China, has been regarded as one of factors which caused high lung cancer incidence in the local residents. However, mineralogical characterization of the fine/ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei coal combustion has not previously been studied. In this study, PM1 and ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei coal combustion were sampled. Chemical elements in the ambient particles were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and mineralogical characterization of these ambient particles was investigated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM/EDX) and transmission electronic microscopy, coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM/EDX). Our results showed that the size distribution of mineral particles from the coal combustion emissions ranged from 20 to 200 nm. Si-containing particles and Fe-containing particles accounted for 50.7% of the 150 individual particles measured, suggesting that these two types of particles were major minerals in the ambient particles generally. The nano-mineral particles were identified as quartz (SiO2) and gypsum (CaSO4) based on their crystal parameters and chemical elements. Additionally, there also existed unidentified nano-minerals. Armed with these data, toxicity assessments of the nano-minerals will be carried out in a future study.

  19. Alpha-particle activity of apollo 11 samples.

    PubMed

    Richardson, K A; McCkay, D S; Greenwood, W R; Foss, T H

    1970-01-30

    Nine polishled thin sectionis have been exposed to nulclear track plates, three have been counted by alplia-particle spectrometry, and one has been examined by electron mocroprobe. Interpretation of the results is in a preliminary stage. Alpha track distribiutioni in the autoradiograph of a breccia forms a network that appears related to the rims of accretionary lapilli comiiposinig the breccia. Thorium in a coarse-grained crystalline rock is concenitrated in micron-sized, zirconium-rich crystals. Alplia count rates agree with what would be predicted from previously reported thorium and uranium contents of the same rocks, suggesting secular equilibriunm for the thorium and uranium decay series.

  20. Protons and alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone

    2014-05-01

    We investigate energetic consequences of ion kinetic instabilitities in the solar wind connected with beam and core protons and alpha particles drifting with respect to each other. We compare theoretical predictions, simulations and observation results. For theoretical prediction we assume drifting bi-Maxwellian ion populations and we calculate theoretical quasilinear heating rates (Hellinger et al., 2013b). The nonlinear evolution of beam-core protons, and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind we investigate using hybrid expanding box system (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2013). The expansion leads to many different kinetic instabilities. In the simulation the beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one in agreement with theoretical expectations. On the macroscopic level the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to a perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates. The simulated heating rates are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations (Hellinger et al., 2013a); furthermore, the differential velocity between core and beam protons observed by Ulysses exhibits apparent bounds which are compatible with the theoretical constaints imposed by the linear theory for the magnetosonic instability driven by beam-core differential velocity (Matteini et al., 2013). References Hellinger, P., P. M. Travnicek, S. Stverak, L. Matteini, and M. Velli (2013a), Proton thermal energetics in the solar wind: Helios reloaded, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 1351-1365, doi:10.1002/jgra.50107. Hellinger, P., T. Passot, P.-L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2013b), Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 20, 122306. Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2013), Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid

  1. Characterisation of solid particles emitted from diesel and petrol engines as a contribution to the determination of the origin of carbonaceous particles in urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalik, M.; Brzeżański, M.; Wilczyńska-Michalik, W.; Fisior, K.; Klimas, B.; Samek, L.; Pietras, B.

    2016-09-01

    Solid particles emitted from diesel and petrol engines were studied using a scanning electron microscope fitted with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The soot emitted from different engines under different operating conditions differed in particle size, and the form and size of aggregates. Identification of the soot particles emitted from diesel or petrol engines in urban aerosol based on their size and morphology was found to be impossible.

  2. White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes with solution-processed nano-particle scattering layers

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Tim; Schwab, Tobias; Lenk, Simone; Gather, Malte C.

    2015-12-07

    A random scattering approach to enhance light extraction in white top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is reported. Through solution processing from fluorinated solvents, a nano-particle scattering layer (NPSL) can be deposited directly on top of small molecule OLEDs without affecting their electrical performance. The scattering length for light inside the NPSL is determined from transmission measurements and found to be in agreement with Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, the dependence of the light outcoupling enhancement on electron transport layer thickness is studied. Depending on the electron transport layer thickness, the NPSL enhances the external quantum efficiency of the investigated white OLEDs by between 1.5 and 2.3-fold. For a device structure that has been optimized prior to application of the NPSL, the maximum external quantum efficiency is improved from 4.7% to 7.4% (1.6-fold improvement). In addition, the scattering layer strongly reduces the undesired shift in emission color with viewing angle.

  3. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies at high redshift: Direct detection of young galaxies in a young universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Steven Arthur

    An early result of galaxy formation theory was the prediction that the copious ionizing radiation produced in nascent galaxies undergoing their first starbursts should in turn produce a strong Lya emission line. We report on our efforts to detect and characterize primeval galaxies by searching for this expected Lya signature with two observational techniques: serendipitous slit spectroscopy, and narrowband imaging selection. In Part I, we describe our serendipitous slit spectroscopy survey of the Hubble Deep Field and its environs, which resulted in a catalog of 74 spectroscopic redshifts spanning 0.10 < z < 5.77, including a galaxy cluster at z = 0.85 and five galaxies at z > 5. Follow-up observations at higher resolution resulted in the additional serendipitous detection of a strong Lya-emitting galaxy at z = 5.190 (ES1). At the time of its discovery, ES1 was one of only nine known galaxies at z > 5, and was the sixth most distant known galaxy. The unprecedented spectral purity of the observation offers evidence for a galaxy-scale outflow with a. velocity of v > 300 km s -1 , consistent with wind speeds observed in powerful local starbursts (typically 10 2 to 10 3 km s -1 ), and with simulations of the late- stage evolution of Lya emission in star-forming systems. Our final serendipitous detection is the remarkable source CXOHDFN J123635.6+621424, which is both the highest redshift known spiral galaxy, and a rare example of a high redshift, hard X-ray-emitting Type II AGN. Significantly, all of these results were acquired with no direct allocation of telescope time. In Part II, we report on our implementation of narrowband imaging selection, with which we traded redshift coverage for survey volume, focusing on the systematic study of galaxies at a particular epoch in favor of chasing that rare, most-distant object. This effort resulted in a catalog of 76 z [approximate] 4.5 Lya-emitting galaxies spectroscopically-confirmed in campaigns of Keck/LRIS and Keck

  4. Alpha Particles Induce Apoptosis through the Sphingomyelin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Howell, Roger W.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET a particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with a particles emitted by the 225Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated a particles using a planar 241Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that a particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  5. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis.

  6. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  7. Observation of lunar radon emanation with the Apollo 15 alpha particle spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    The alpha particle spectrometer, a component of the orbital Sim Bay group of 'geochemistry' experiments on Apollo 15, was designed to detect alpha particles emitted during the decay of isotopes of radon gas and her daughter products. The purpose was to measure the gross activity of radon on the lunar surface and to find possible regions of increased local activity. Results are presented from a partial analysis of Apollo 15 data. For the moon as a whole, Rn220 was not observed and the upper limit on its decay rate above the lunar surface is 0.00038 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. Rn222 was marginally observed. Possible variations of radon activity on the lunar surface are being investigated. Po210 (a daughter product of Rn222) has been detected in a broad region from west of Mare Crisium to the Van de Graaff-Orlov region. The observed count rate is (4.6 plus or minus 1.4) x 0.001 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. The observed level of Po210 activity is in excess of the amount that would be in equilibrium with Rn222 by about an order of magnitude. This implies that larger levels of radon emanation have occurred on the moon within a time scale of 10 to 100 years.

  8. Code System for Analyzing Ge and Alpha-Particle Detector Spectra.

    1992-06-29

    Version 00 GRPANL (GRouP ANaLysis) is a suite of programs which analyzes and interprets regions of germanium and alpha-particle detector pulse-height spectra. GRPANL is the main peak-fitting program; the other programs included are used in conjunction with GRPANL. GRPANL is particularly useful for accurately deconvoluting and interpreting complex clusters of peaks in a spectrum. GRPANL fits peaks in specified regions of a gamma-ray, x-ray, or alpha-particle spectrum, calculates their energies and intensities, and optionally calculatesmore » the photon emission rates for the sample from which they were emitted. It can also identify and measure isotopes in a sample. GRPANL output can be immediately analyzed for quantitative isotopic assays or stored in an intermediate data file. The other programs are EDIGRP, LIBRY, and GEVAL. EDISRP (EDIt GRouP) creates and edits an analysis control file that contains input parameters and analysis options for spectral regions analyzed by GRPANL; users can repeat or modify an analysis without retyping input. LIBRY (LIBRarY) assembles and cross references selected nuclear decay scheme data and stores it in decay scheme data files for use by GRPANL and GEVAL. GEVAL (Gamma ray EVALuation) uses these data files along with GRPANL intermediate results to identify isotopes, calculate their abundance in a sample, and print the corresponding disintegration rates and abundances at counting and zero times.« less

  9. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my; Periasamy, Vengadesh E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-09-21

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current–voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  10. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current-voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  11. Preliminary results from the lunar prospector alpha particle spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) builds on Apollo heritage and maps the distribution of outgassing sites on the Moon. The APS searches for lunar surface gas release events and maps their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life) and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but remains on the surface with a 21 year half-life as lead-210), which are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon is in such small quantities that it is not released directly from the lunar interior, rather it is entrained in a stream of gases and serves as a tracer for such gases. Once released, the radon spreads out by 'bouncing' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The 3.8 day half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to a few days after they occur. The long residence time (10s of years) of the lead-210 precursor to the polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 50 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Using radioactive radon and polonium as tracers, the Apollo 15 and 16 Command Module orbital alpha particle experiments obtained evidence for the release of gases at several sites beneath the orbit tracks, especially over the Aristarchus Plateau and Mare Fecunditatis [1]. Aristarchus crater had previously been identified by ground-based observers as the site of transient optical events [2]. The Apollo 17 surface mass spectrometer showed that argon-40 is released from the lunar interior every few months, apparently in concert with some of the shallow moonquakes that are believed to be of tectonic origin [3]. The latter tectonic events could be

  12. Emission factors and real-time optical properties of particles emitted from traditional wood burning cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Roden, Christoph A; Bond, Tami C; Conway, Stuart; Pinel, Anibal Benjamin Osorto

    2006-11-01

    It is estimated that the combustion of biofuel generates 20% of all carbonaceous aerosols, yet these particles are studied less than those of other common sources. We designed and built a portable battery-operated emission-sampling cart to measure the real-time optical properties and other emission characteristics of biofuel cookstoves. In a field study in Honduras, we measured emission factors averaging 8.5 g/kg, higher than those found in previous laboratory studies. Strong flaming events emitted very dark particles with the optical properties of black particles. The elemental carbon to total carbon ratios ranged from 0.07 to 0.64, confirming that high elemental carbon fractions can be emitted from biofuel combustion and may not be used to distinguish fossil-fuel from biofuel sources when cooking is the dominant usage. Absorption Angstrom exponents, representing the dependence of absorption on wavelength, ranged from 1 (black) to 5 (yellow). Strongly absorbing particles with absorption inversely dependent on wavelength were emitted separately from particles with weak absorption and strong wavelength dependence; the latter probably contained conjugated aromatic compounds. Because combustion occurs in distinct phases, different types of carbonaceous aerosols from biofuel combustion are externally mixed at emission and may have different atmospheric fates.

  13. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  14. Particle size distribution of airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores emitted from compost using membrane filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deacon, L. J.; Pankhurst, L. J.; Drew, G. H.; Hayes, E. T.; Jackson, S.; Longhurst, P. J.; Longhurst, J. W. S.; Liu, J.; Pollard, S. J. T.; Tyrrel, S. F.

    Information on the particle size distribution of bioaerosols emitted from open air composting operations is valuable in evaluating potential health impacts and is a requirement for improved dispersion simulation modelling. The membrane filter method was used to study the particle size distribution of Aspergillus fumigatus spores in air 50 m downwind of a green waste compost screening operation at a commercial facility. The highest concentrations (approximately 8 × 10 4 CFU m -3) of culturable spores were found on filters with pore diameters in the range 1-2 μm which suggests that the majority of spores are emitted as single cells. The findings were compared to published data collected using an Andersen sampler. Results were significantly correlated ( p < 0.01) indicating that the two methods are directly comparable across all particles sizes for Aspergillus spores.

  15. INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  16. Photodiode radiation hardness, lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and photon detection in liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian

    My dissertation is comprised of three projects: 1) studies of Lyman-alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs), 2) radiation hardness studies of InGaAs photodiodes (PDs), and 3) scintillation photon detection in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors. I began work on the project that has now become WFIRST, developing a science case that would use WFIRST after launch for the observation of LAEs. The radiation hardness of PDs was as an effort to support the WFIRST calibration team. When WFIRST was significantly delayed, I joined an R&D effort that applied my skills to work on photon detection in LAr neutrino detectors. I report results on a broadband selection method developed to detect high equivalent width (EW) LAEs. Using photometry from the CFHT-Legacy Survey Deep 2 and 3 fields, I have spectroscopically confirmed 63 z=2.5-3.5 LAEs using the WIYN/Hydra spectrograph. Using UV continuum-fitting techniques I computed properties such as EWs, internal reddening and star formation rates. 62 of my LAEs show evidence to be normal dust-free LAEs. Second, I present an investigation into the effects of ionizing proton radiation on commercial off-the-shelf InGaAs PDs. I developed a monochromator-based test apparatus that utilized NIST-calibrated reference PDs. I tested the PDs for changes to their dark current, relative responsivity as a function of wavelength, and absolute responsivity. I irradiated the test PDs using 30, 52, and 98 MeV protons at the IU Cyclotron Facility. I found the InGaAs PDs showed increased dark current as the fluence increased with no evidence of broadband response degradation at the fluences expected at an L2 orbit and a 10-year mission lifetime. Finally, I detail my efforts on technology development of both optical detector technologies and waveshifting light guide construction for LAr vacuum UV scintillation light. Cryogenic neutrino detectors use photon detection for both accelerator based science and for SNe neutrino detection and proton decay. I have

  17. Selective Alpha-Particle Mediated Depletion of Tumor Vasculature with Vascular Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Seshan, Surya V.; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; May, Chad; McDevitt, Michael R.; Nolan, Daniel; Mittal, Vivek; Benezra, Robert; Scheinberg, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature. Methodology and Principal Findings Actinium-225 (225Ac)-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, 225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in 225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. Conclusions The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy. PMID:17342201

  18. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-07-19

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion-atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He(+) ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne(2)). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  19. Toxicity of particles emitted from combustion of waste crankcase oil: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Mumford, J L; Hatch, G E; Hall, R E; Jackson, M A; Merrill, R G; Lewtas, J

    1986-07-01

    The ever-rising cost of energy provides incentives for the utilization of low-cost waste crankcase oil (WCO) for space heating. Although WCO is known to contain toxic heavy metals, the potential health hazards of emissions and waste products resulting from the combustion of WCO are unknown. Thus, the toxicity of the emission particles and waste products from two different types of burners, a Dravo atomizing oil burner (AOB) and a Kroll vaporizing oil burner (VOB), is evaluated using automotive WCO. Samples are characterized by performing elemental analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Both burners emitted fine (less than or equal to 3 microns), respirable particles. The AOB emission particles contained high concentrations of toxic heavy metals, especially Pb, which showed concentrations as high as 7.5%. The VOB retained a significant amount of heavy metals in the burner residue and emitted a much smaller quantity into the air. The toxicity of AOB emission particles, VOB emission particles, and VOB waste residue is evaluated in three bioassay systems, including a rabbit alveolar macrophage (RAM) cytotoxicity in vitro assay, an intratracheal injection infectivity assay, and a peritoneal irritancy test in mice. The emission particles from both burners and leachate from VOB residue produce a dose-related reduction in viability and cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in alveolar macrophages following 20-hr exposure. Acidity of the RAM medium due to the presence of VOB emission particles and waste leachate contributes to its toxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  1. Characterization of particles emitted by incense burning in an experimental house.

    PubMed

    Ji, X; Le Bihan, O; Ramalho, O; Mandin, C; D'Anna, B; Martinon, L; Nicolas, M; Bard, D; Pairon, J-C

    2010-04-01

    The potential health effects of fine and ultrafine particles are of increasing concern. A better understanding of particle characteristics and dispersion behavior is needed. This study aims at characterizing spatial and temporal variations in fine and ultrafine particle dispersion after emission from a model source in an experimental house. Particles emitted by an incense stick burning for 15 min were characterized. Number concentration, specific surface area and mass were measured. Partial chemical analysis of particles was also realized. Near the burning incense stick, the maximum concentration was 25,500 particles/cm(3); the indoor PM(2.5) concentration reached 197 microg/m(3), and the specific surface area concentration was 180 microm(2)/cm(3). The estimated incense smoke density was 1.1 g/cm(3). Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements indicated that the organic fraction was predominant in the aerosol mass detected, and other minor components identified were K(+), NO(3)(-), and Cl(-). The combustion of an incense stick in the living room was associated with significant modifications of the concentrations of particles measured in the different rooms of the house. This demonstration of pollution by particle dispersion by a model source of moderate intensity may have significant implications in terms of assessment of indoor exposure to such particles. Practical Implications The particles emitted in a domestic environment by a source of moderate intensity such as burning incense disperse throughout the house, even in rooms with closed doors and in rooms as far away as the next floor. This dispersion has significant implications in terms of evaluating human indoor exposure to fine and ultrafine particles.

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha particles at radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikova, N; Vasilyev, A

    2015-06-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles at radon exposure is estimated by comparison of radiation risks at external gamma exposure and radon exposure in different situations. For external gamma exposure, the BEIR VII model of radiation risk assessment was used. For occupational and indoor radon exposure, models such as BEIR VI, WISMUT, Tomasek's and combined miners population were considered. It was demonstrated that RBE values are strongly dependent on models of radiation risk assessment used for RBE calculation, sex of exposed peoples and age at the exposure. The average values of RBE in dependence on model of risk assessment choice are in the range from 1.5 to 12.0 for males and in the range from 0.34 to 2.7 for females.

  3. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha particles at radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikova, N; Vasilyev, A

    2015-06-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles at radon exposure is estimated by comparison of radiation risks at external gamma exposure and radon exposure in different situations. For external gamma exposure, the BEIR VII model of radiation risk assessment was used. For occupational and indoor radon exposure, models such as BEIR VI, WISMUT, Tomasek's and combined miners population were considered. It was demonstrated that RBE values are strongly dependent on models of radiation risk assessment used for RBE calculation, sex of exposed peoples and age at the exposure. The average values of RBE in dependence on model of risk assessment choice are in the range from 1.5 to 12.0 for males and in the range from 0.34 to 2.7 for females. PMID:25979745

  4. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  5. Ultrafine particles emitted by flame and electric arc guns for thermal spraying of metals.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Régnier, Roland; Subra, Isabelle; Sutter, Benjamin; Lecler, Marie T; Morele, Yves

    2010-08-01

    The ultrafine aerosol emitted by thermal spraying of metals using flame and electric arc processes has been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and emission rates based on both particle number and mass. Thermal spraying of Zn, Zn/Al, and Al was studied. Measurements taken using an electrical low pressure impactor and a condensation nucleus counter reveal an aerosol made up of very fine particles (80-95% of number distribution <100 nm). Ultrafine particle emission rates produced by the electric arc process are very high, the largest values being recorded during spraying of pure aluminium. This process generates high particle emissions and therefore requires careful consideration and possible rethinking of currently implemented protection measures: ventilated cabins, dust collectors, and personal protective equipment.

  6. Ultrafine particles emitted by flame and electric arc guns for thermal spraying of metals.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Régnier, Roland; Subra, Isabelle; Sutter, Benjamin; Lecler, Marie T; Morele, Yves

    2010-08-01

    The ultrafine aerosol emitted by thermal spraying of metals using flame and electric arc processes has been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and emission rates based on both particle number and mass. Thermal spraying of Zn, Zn/Al, and Al was studied. Measurements taken using an electrical low pressure impactor and a condensation nucleus counter reveal an aerosol made up of very fine particles (80-95% of number distribution <100 nm). Ultrafine particle emission rates produced by the electric arc process are very high, the largest values being recorded during spraying of pure aluminium. This process generates high particle emissions and therefore requires careful consideration and possible rethinking of currently implemented protection measures: ventilated cabins, dust collectors, and personal protective equipment. PMID:20685717

  7. Laboratory Study on Water Uptake by Freshly Emitted Peat Smoke Particles in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Kuwata, M.; Itoh, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical peatland burning activities in Southeast Asia, which can keep smouldering for a long time, have been becoming rather frequent during the last few decades. These combustions have released huge amounts of greenhouse gases and aerosol particles into the atmosphere, contributing large uncertainties to the global radiative forcing estimation. In addition, the gas and aerosol particles emitted from the peat-fire have caused environmental and human health issues. These regional and global impacts are closely tied to water uptake properties of aerosol particles, which alter their physical and chemical characteristics. However, hygroscopic property of peat burning aerosol particles has rarely been investigated. Here, we utilized a self-built Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) to measure diameter growth factors of fresh peat burning particles, which were generated during laboratory peat combustion experiments under controlled conditions. Particle number size distribution and chemical composition were also measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and the Time of Flight - Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ToF-ACSM). Number size distribution demonstrated a bimodal pattern, with the mode diameters in the size ranges of 50-80 nm and 300-500 nm, respectively. The corresponding normalized volume size distribution was unimodal distributed with mode diameter at around 400-600nm. Water uptake of freshly emitted peat smoke aerosol particles was less hygroscopic, probably because fresh peat burning aerosol particles were predominantly composed of organic compounds and sulfates were negligible. The obtained information can be further applied into the studies on the influence of peat burning aerosol particles on regional and global climate.

  8. Self-consistent study of the alpha particle driven TAE mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of high energy particles with an Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a realistic kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal mode numbers and their radial mode profiles as calculated with the NOVA-K code are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The numerical simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. Particle loss is limited to devices in which the alpha particle gyro radius is a significant fraction of the minor radius.

  9. Measurement of ultrafine particles and other air pollutants emitted by cooking activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunfang; Gangupomu, Roja H; Ramirez, David; Zhu, Yifang

    2010-04-01

    Cooking emissions show a strong dependence on cooking styles and parameters. Measurements of the average ultrafine particle (UFP) concentration, PM(2.5) and black carbon concentrations emitted by cooking activities ranged from 1.34 x 10(4) to 6.04 x 10(5) particles/cm(3), 10.0 to 230.9 microg/m(3) and 0.1 to 0.8 microg/m(3), respectively. Lower UFP concentrations were observed during boiling, while higher levels were emitted during frying. The highest UFP concentrations were observed when using a gas stove at high temperature with the kitchen exhaust fan turned off. The observed UFP profiles were similar in the kitchen and in another room, with a lag of approximately 10 min.

  10. Coordination chemistry of the {sup 212}Pb/{sup 212}Bi nuclear transformation: Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Harris, W.R.; Keen, C.L.; Cooper, S.R.

    1992-07-01

    Subdivisions of this project are: (a) the synthesis of prototypical thiolate and dithiocarbamate based hexacoordinate complexes, (b) radiochemical engineering for generation of no-carrier-added lead and bismuth radioelements, (c) the first isolation of bismuth-binding proteins from in vivo studies with cyclotron produced {sup 205/206}Bi tracer, and (d) initial development of transport mechanisms for the intracellular radiobiological study of alpha emitting bismuth, and (e) the initiation of chemical equilibrium studies and biochemical pathways with cyclotron-produced, no-carrier-added, {sup 203}Pb (T{sub 1/2} = 51 hr).

  11. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the

  12. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  13. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  14. Production of α-particle emitting ²¹¹At using 45 MeV α-beam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyehong; Chun, Kwonsoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Byungil

    2014-06-01

    Among the α-particle emitting radionuclides, (211)At is considered to be a promising radionuclide for targeted cancer therapy due to its decay properties. The range of alpha particles produced by the decay of (211)At are less than 70 µm in water with a linear energy transfer between 100 and 130 keV µm(-1), which are about the maximum relative biological effectiveness for heavy ions. It is important to note that at the present time, only a few of cyclotrons routinely produce (211)At. The direct production method is based on the nuclear reactions (209)Bi(α,2n)(211)At. Production of the radionuclide (211)At was carried out using the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). To ensure high beam current, the α-beam was extracted with an initial energy of 45 MeV, which was degraded to obtain the appropriate α-beam energy. The calculations of beam energy degradation were performed utilizing the MCNPX. Alumina-baked targets were prepared by heating the bismuth metal powder onto a circular cavity in a furnace. When using an E(α, av) of 29.17 MeV, the very small contribution of (210)At confirms the right choice of the irradiation energy to obtain a pure production of (211)At isotope. PMID:24819557

  15. Production of α-particle emitting ²¹¹At using 45 MeV α-beam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyehong; Chun, Kwonsoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Byungil

    2014-06-01

    Among the α-particle emitting radionuclides, (211)At is considered to be a promising radionuclide for targeted cancer therapy due to its decay properties. The range of alpha particles produced by the decay of (211)At are less than 70 µm in water with a linear energy transfer between 100 and 130 keV µm(-1), which are about the maximum relative biological effectiveness for heavy ions. It is important to note that at the present time, only a few of cyclotrons routinely produce (211)At. The direct production method is based on the nuclear reactions (209)Bi(α,2n)(211)At. Production of the radionuclide (211)At was carried out using the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). To ensure high beam current, the α-beam was extracted with an initial energy of 45 MeV, which was degraded to obtain the appropriate α-beam energy. The calculations of beam energy degradation were performed utilizing the MCNPX. Alumina-baked targets were prepared by heating the bismuth metal powder onto a circular cavity in a furnace. When using an E(α, av) of 29.17 MeV, the very small contribution of (210)At confirms the right choice of the irradiation energy to obtain a pure production of (211)At isotope.

  16. Use of /sup 3/He/sup + +/ ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, D.E. Jr.; Hwang, D.Q.; Hovey, J.

    1983-11-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide a better understanding of alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined, energetic plasma. Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved means and method for studying and measuring the energy distribution of heated alpha particles in a confined plasma. Yet another object of the present invention is to permit detailed analysis of energetic alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined plasma for use in near term fusion reactor experiments. A still further object of the present invention is to simulate energetic alpha particle behavior in a deuterium-tritium plasma confined in a fusion reactor without producing the neutron activation associated with the thus produced alpha particles.

  17. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal {alpha}-particle irradiation of kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A. . E-mail: d-scheinberg@ski.mskcc.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ({sup 225}Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of {alpha}- and {beta}-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 {mu}Ci of the {sup 225}Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the {sup 225}Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 {+-} 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 {+-} 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 {+-} 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 {+-} 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal {alpha}-particle irradiation.

  18. Characterizing gas-particle interactions of phthalate plasticizer emitted from vinyl flooring.

    PubMed

    Benning, Jennifer L; Liu, Zhe; Tiwari, Andrea; Little, John C; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-03-19

    Phthalates are widely used as plasticizers, and improved ability to predict emissions of phthalates is of interest because of concern about their health effects. An experimental chamber was used to measure emissions of di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP) from vinyl flooring, with ammonium sulfate particles introduced to examine their influence on the emission rate and to measure the partitioning of DEHP onto airborne particles. When particles were introduced to the chamber at concentrations of 100 to 245 μg/m(3), the total (gas + particle) DEHP concentrations increased by a factor of 3 to 8; under these conditions, emissions were significantly enhanced compared to the condition without particles. The measured DEHP partition coefficient to ammonium sulfate particles with a median diameter of 45 ± 5 nm was 0.032 ± 0.003 m(3)/μg (95% confidence interval). The DEHP-particle sorption equilibration time was demonstrated to be less than 1 min. Both the partition coefficient and equilibration time agree well with predictions from the literature. This study represents the first known measurements of the particle-gas partition coefficient for DEHP. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the emission rate of DEHP is substantially enhanced in the presence of particles. The particles rapidly sorb DEHP from the gas phase, allowing more to be emitted from the source, and also appear to enhance the convective mass-transfer coefficient itself. Airborne particles can influence SVOC fate and transport in the indoor environment, and these mechanisms must be considered in evaluating exposure and human health. PMID:23410053

  19. Development of the MICROMEGAS detector for measuring the energy spectrum of alpha particles by using a 241Am source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yoon; Ham, Cheolmin; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting a particles emitted from an 241Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of a particles from the 241Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the a particle from the 241Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the a particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for a particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that a particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGAS detector for a particles under the present conditions is found to be ~97.3%.

  20. Alpha particle detection with GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Markov, A. V.; Kozhukhova, E. A.; Gazizov, I. M.; Kolin, N. G.; Merkurisov, D. I.; Boiko, V. M.; Korulin, A. V.; Zalyetin, V. M.; Pearton, S. J.; Lee, I.-H.; Dabiran, A. M.; Chow, P. P.

    2009-11-15

    Ni/GaN Schottky diode radiation detectors were fabricated on 3-mum-thick unintentionally doped n-GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and on 12-mum-thick undoped n-GaN layers prepared by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG). The reverse current of all detector structures was <10{sup -9} A for bias voltages necessary for detector operation, with the level of background donor doping of <10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. With this doping level the space charge region of the Schottky diode could be extended to the entire thickness of the films. The charge collection efficiency of the detectors was close to 100% for MOCVD and ELOG detectors for alpha-particles with range comparable to the thickness of the layer. Electrical properties and deep trap spectra were also studied. The collection efficiency decreased when the concentra-tion of deep electron traps, particularly E{sub c}-0.6 eV traps, increased in MBE grown films.

  1. Method for determining fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas using resonant nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.; Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The resonant nuclear reactions D(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 6/Li, /sup 6/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 10/B, and /sup 7/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 11/B are examined as diagnostics of fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas. Gamma rays from these resonant reactions with energies from 2.1 MeV to 9.2 MeV may be used to infer the alpha-particle population between energies of 0.4 MeV and 2.6 MeV. The ratio of these alpha-burnup reactions to the reactions T(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/He and /sup 3/He(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/Li provides a technique for the measurement of alpha confinement.

  2. Angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Severijns, N.; Golovko, V.V.; Kraev, I.S.; Phalet, T.; Belyaev, A.A.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Noga, V.I.; Erzinkyan, A.L.; Parfenova, V.P.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Herzog, P.; Tramm, C.; Filimonov, V.T.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Zotov, E.; Gurevich, G.M.; Rusakov, A.V.; Vyachin, V.N.; Zakoucky, D.

    2005-04-01

    The anisotropy in the angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei, which are among the strongest deformed {alpha} emitters, was measured. Large {alpha} anisotropies have been observed for all three nuclei. The results are compared with calculations based on {alpha}-particle tunneling through a deformed Coulomb barrier.

  3. Lung cancer risk at low doses of alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W; Katz, R; Zhang, C X

    1986-10-01

    A survey of inhabitant exposures arising from the inhalation of 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, and lung cancer mortality has been carried out in two adjacent areas in Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, designated as the "high background" and the "control" area. Annual exposure rates are 0.38 working level months (WLM) per year in the high background, and 0.16 WLM/yr in the control area. In 14 yr of continuous study, from 1970 to 1983, age-adjusted mortality rates were found to be 2.7 per 10(5) living persons of all ages in the high background area, and 2.9 per 10(5) living persons in the control area. From this data, we conclude that we are unable to determine excess lung cancers over the normal fluctuations below a cumulative exposure of 15 WLM. This conclusion is supported by lung cancer mortality data from Austrian and Finnish high-background areas. A theoretical analysis of epidemiological data on human lung cancer incidence from inhaled 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, which takes into account cell killing as competitive with malignant transformation, leads to the evaluation of a risk factor which is either a linear-exponential or a quadratic-exponential function of the alpha-particle dose. Animal lung cancer data and theoretical considerations can be supplied to support either hypothesis. Thus we conclude that at our current stage of knowledge both the linear-exponential and the quadratic-exponential extrapolation to low doses seem to be equally acceptable for Rn-induced lung cancer risk, possibly suggesting a linear-quadratic transformation function with an exponential cell-killing term, or the influence of risk-modifying factors such as repair or proliferation stimuli.

  4. Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

  5. On the approximations of the distribution function of fusion alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bilato, R. Brambilla, M.; Poli, E.

    2014-10-15

    The solution of the drift-kinetic equation for fusion-born alpha particles is derived in the limit of dominant parallel streaming, and it is related to the usual slowing-down distribution function. The typical approximations of the fast tail of fusion-born alpha particles are briefly compared and discussed. In particular, approximating the distribution function of fast-alpha particles with an “equivalent” Maxwellian is inaccurate to describe absorption of radio-frequency waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies.

  6. Alpha-emitting isotopes and chromium in a coastal California aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Jill N.; Izbicki, John A.; Murtaugh, Joseph M.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    The unadjusted 72-h gross alpha activities in water from two wells completed in marine and alluvial deposits in a coastal southern California aquifer 40 km north of San Diego were 15 and 25 picoCuries per liter (pCi/L). Although activities were below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 15 pCi/L, when adjusted for uranium activity; there is concern that new wells in the area may exceed MCLs, or that future regulations may limit water use from the wells. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data collected from the wells in 2011 (with analyses for isotopes within the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay-chains) show gross alpha activity in marine deposits is associated with decay of naturally-occurring 238U and its daughter 234U. Radon activities in marine deposits were as high as 2230 pCi/L. In contrast, gross alpha activities in overlying alluvium within the Piedra de Lumbre watershed, eroded from the nearby San Onofre Hills, were associated with decay of 232Th, including its daughter 224Ra. Radon activities in alluvium from Piedra de Lumbre of 450 pCi/L were lower than in marine deposits. Chromium VI concentrations in marine deposits were less than the California MCL of 10 μg/L (effective July 1, 2014) but δ53Cr compositions were near zero and within reported ranges for anthropogenic chromium. Alluvial deposits from the nearby Las Flores watershed, which drains a larger area having diverse geology, has low alpha activities and chromium as a result of geologic and geochemical conditions and may be more promising for future water-supply development.

  7. High concentrations of coarse particles emitted from a cattle feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Gramann, J.; Auvermann, B. W.

    2011-08-01

    Housing roughly 10 million head of cattle in the United States alone, open air cattle feedlots represent a significant but poorly constrained source of atmospheric particles. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of physical and chemical properties of particles emitted from a large representative cattle feedlot in the Southwest United States. In the summer of 2008, measurements and samplings were conducted at the upwind and downwind edges of the facility. A series of far-field measurements and samplings was also conducted 3.5 km north of the facility. Two instruments, a GRIMM Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a GRIMM Portable Aerosol Spectrometer (PAS), were used to measure particle size distributions over the range of 0.01 to 25 μm diameter. Raman microspectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of particles on a single particle basis. Volume size distributions of dust were dominated by coarse mode particles. Twenty-four hour averaged concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 μm or less) were as high as 1200 μg m-3 during the campaign. The primary constituents of the particulate matter were carbonaceous materials, such as humic acid, water soluble organics, and less soluble fatty acids, including stearic acid and tristearin. A significant fraction of the organic particles was present in internal mixtures with salts. Basic characteristics such as size distribution and composition of agricultural aerosols were found to be different than the properties of those found in urban and semi-urban aerosols. Failing to account for such differences may lead to errors in estimates of aerosol effects on local air quality, visibility, and public health.

  8. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A; Ha, S; Joshirao, P; Manchanda, V; Bak, M S; Kim, T

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ⋅ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories. PMID:26133876

  9. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A; Ha, S; Joshirao, P; Manchanda, V; Bak, M S; Kim, T

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ⋅ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  10. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S. E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Kim, T. E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  11. Environmental impact of particles emitted from Windscale Piles, 1954-7.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, A C

    1987-05-01

    During 1954-7 particles of irradiated uranium oxide were emitted from the Windscale Piles. The particles were large compared with most ambient aerosols, 85% by weight being between 10 and 100 micron diameter, and they mostly fell within a few kilometers of the works. From measurements of activity in soil in 1958 onwards, it is estimated that about 12 kg of uranium, 20 Ci of 137Cs, 18 Ci of 90Sr and 0.3 Ci of 239+240Pu were emitted. To estimate the concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in milk during the emissions, comparison is made with the fallout of fission products from bomb tests, which also began in 1954, but continued longer. It is calculated that the average level of 90Sr in milk at Seascale, 1954-7, was 36 pCi per g Ca, with higher concentrations, 100-200 pCi (g Ca)-1, in milk from farms immediately surrounding the Windscale plant. For comparison, in 1963/5 the average level of 90Sr in milk in the UK was 20-30 pCi (g Ca)-1, with 90-170 pCi (g Ca)-1 in milk from certain hill farms. Since the oxide particles were larger than those derived from bomb tests, and the conditions of deposition different, an extended review is given (Appendix 1) of the factors determining the entry of radioactive or stable contaminants from fallout into food chains. It is concluded that the oxide particles would have been less efficient in this respect than bomb fallout, mainly because their relatively large size and high density would have given impact velocities sufficient to cause them to bounce off leaves, leaving little activity on the edible herbage. For this reason, the calculations are on the safe side. PMID:3589652

  12. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium{endash}tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Duong, H.H.; Fang, J.; Fisch, N.J.; Fischer, R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heeter, R.F.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Hill, K.; Jaeger, E.F.; James, R.; Majeski, R.; Medley, S.S.; Murakami, M.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Redi, M.H.; Ruskov, E.; Spong, D.A.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Wilson, J.R.; Wong, K.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1996-05-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium{endash}tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [K. M. McGuire {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 2176 (1995)] has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Relative Biologic Effects of Low-Dose-Rate {alpha}-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Rituximab and {beta}-Emitting {sup 90}Y-Tiuexetan-Ibritumomab Versus External Beam X-Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dahle, Jostein Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biologic effects (RBE) of {alpha}-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-rituximab and of {beta}-radiation from {sup 90}Y-tiuexetan-ibritumomab (Zevalin) compared with external beam X-radiation in the Raji lymphoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Radioimmunoconjugates were administered intravenously in nude mice with Raji lymphoma xenografts at different levels of activity. Absorbed dose to tumor was estimated by separate biodistribution experiments for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and Zevalin. Tumor growth was measured two to three times per week after injection or X-radiation. Treatment-induced increase in growth delay to reach tumor volumes of 500 and 1,000 mm{sup 3}, respectively, was used as an end point. Results: The absorbed radiation dose-rate in tumor was slightly more than 0.1 Gy/d for the first week following injection of {sup 227}Th-rituximab, and thereafter gradually decreased to 0.03 Gy/d at 21 days after injection. For treatment with Zevalin the maximum dose-rate in tumor was achieved already 6 h after injection (0.2 Gy/d), and thereafter decreased to 0.01 Gy/d after 7 days. The relative biologic effect was between 2.5 and 7.2 for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and between 1 and 1.3 for Zevalin. Conclusions: Both at low doses and low-dose-rates, the {sup 227}Th-rituximab treatment was more effective per absorbed radiation dose unit than the two other treatments. The considerable effect at low doses suggests that the best way to administer low-dose-rates, {alpha}-emitting radioimmunoconjugates is via multiple injections.

  14. Microstructure damage of thin aluminum films by irradiation with alpha particles and fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Sadi, S.; Paulenova, A.; Loveland, W.D.; Watson, P.R.

    2007-07-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the microstructure damage of thin aluminum film surfaces induced by bombardment of alpha particles and fission fragments from {sup 252}Cf source. Different types of defects (dislocations lines, loops, voids, and blisters) and their complex morphologies appeared under both the beam of alpha particles and a mix of alpha particles and fission fragments. The first surface damage became clearly visible only after 250 hr irradiation of a mix of alpha particles and fission fragments (8.65 x 10{sup 8} ff/cm{sup 2} and 1.36 x 10{sup 10} {alpha}/cm{sup 2}). The number of voids and dislocation lines created on the aluminum surface were (3.8 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2} and (2.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}, respectively. Single blisters were observed with the mean diameter of (933 {+-} 22) nm and the mean height of (102 {+-} 15) nm. The first ellipsoidal dislocation loops appeared at the fluence of (1.03 x 10{sup 9} ff/cm{sup 2} and 1.62 x 10{sup 10} {alpha}/cm{sup 2}). However, these ellipsoidal loops were not seen with low energetic alpha particles at the same fluence. Our results suggest that the fission fragments might maximize large voids and dislocations and increase the degradation in depth resolution. (authors)

  15. LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub α}/T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α}/T {sub ∥p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub α} and T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α} and T {sub ∥p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

  16. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [ILUL]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [IHUH]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [IHUL]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [ILUH]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [ILUL] and [IHUL] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [IHUH] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [ILUH] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure. PMID:26937024

  17. FORMATION OF METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James

    2012-09-20

    The size, mass, luminosity, and space density of Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies observed at intermediate to high redshift agree with expectations for the properties of galaxies that formed metal-poor halo globular clusters (GCs). The low metallicity of these clusters is the result of their formation in low-mass galaxies. Metal-poor GCs could enter spiral galaxies along with their dwarf galaxy hosts, unlike metal-rich GCs, which form in the spirals themselves. Considering an initial GC mass larger than the current mass to account for multiple stellar populations, and considering the additional clusters that are likely to form with massive clusters, we estimate that each GC with a mass today greater than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} was likely to have formed among a total stellar mass {approx}> 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, a molecular mass {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, and 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} of older stars, depending on the relative gas fraction. The star formation rate would have been several M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} lasting for {approx}10{sup 7} yr, and the Ly{alpha} luminosity would have been {approx}> 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Integrating the LAE galaxy luminosity function above this minimum, considering the average escape probability for Ly{alpha} photons (25%), and then dividing by the probability that a dwarf galaxy is observed in the LAE phase (0.4%), we find agreement between the comoving space density of LAEs and the average space density of metal-poor GCs today. The local galaxy WLM, with its early starburst and old GC, could be an LAE remnant that did not get into a galaxy halo because of its remote location.

  18. Treatment of neuroblastoma meningeal carcinomatosis with intrathecal application of alpha-emitting atomic nanogenerators targeting disialo-ganglioside GD2.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; McDevitt, Michael R; Borchardt, Paul; Bergman, Ira; Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V; Scheinberg, David A

    2004-10-15

    Labeling of specific antibodies with bifunctional chelated Actinium-225 ((225)Ac; an alpha generator) allows the formation of new, highly potent and selective alpha-emitting anticancer drugs. We synthesized and evaluated a radioimmunoconjugate based on 3F8, an IgG(3) antibody that specifically binds to ganglioside GD2, which is overexpressed by many neuroectodermal tumors including neuroblastoma. The (225)Ac-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane (DOTA)-3F8 construct was evaluated for radiochemical purity and sterility, immunoreactivity, cytotoxicity in vitro, induction of apoptosis on GD2-positive cells, as well as for pharmacological biodistribution and metabolism of the (225)Ac generator and its daughters in a nude mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. The (225)Ac-3F8 showed an IC(50) of 3 Bq/ml (80 pCi/ml) on the neuroblastoma cell line, NMB7, in vitro. Apoptosis of these cells was not observed. Biodistribution in mice showed specific targeting of a subcutaneous tumor; there was redistribution of the (225)Ac daughter nuclides mainly from blood to kidneys and to small intestine. Toxicity was examined in cynomolgus monkeys. Monkeys injected with 1 to 3 doses of intrathecal (225)Ac-3F8 radioimmunoconjugate (80 to 150 kBq/kg total dose) did not show signs of toxicity based on blood chemistry, complete blood counts, or by clinical evaluations. Therapeutic efficacy of intrathecal (225)Ac-3F8 was studied in a nude rat xenograft model of meningeal carcinomatosis. The (225)Ac-3F8 treatment improved survival 2-fold from 16 to 34 days (P = 0.01). In conclusion, in vivo alpha generators targeted by 3F8 warrant additional study as a possible new approach to the treatment of carcinomatous meningitis.

  19. Treatment of neuroblastoma meningeal carcinomatosis with intrathecal application of alpha-emitting atomic nanogenerators targeting disialo-ganglioside GD2.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; McDevitt, Michael R; Borchardt, Paul; Bergman, Ira; Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V; Scheinberg, David A

    2004-10-15

    Labeling of specific antibodies with bifunctional chelated Actinium-225 ((225)Ac; an alpha generator) allows the formation of new, highly potent and selective alpha-emitting anticancer drugs. We synthesized and evaluated a radioimmunoconjugate based on 3F8, an IgG(3) antibody that specifically binds to ganglioside GD2, which is overexpressed by many neuroectodermal tumors including neuroblastoma. The (225)Ac-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane (DOTA)-3F8 construct was evaluated for radiochemical purity and sterility, immunoreactivity, cytotoxicity in vitro, induction of apoptosis on GD2-positive cells, as well as for pharmacological biodistribution and metabolism of the (225)Ac generator and its daughters in a nude mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. The (225)Ac-3F8 showed an IC(50) of 3 Bq/ml (80 pCi/ml) on the neuroblastoma cell line, NMB7, in vitro. Apoptosis of these cells was not observed. Biodistribution in mice showed specific targeting of a subcutaneous tumor; there was redistribution of the (225)Ac daughter nuclides mainly from blood to kidneys and to small intestine. Toxicity was examined in cynomolgus monkeys. Monkeys injected with 1 to 3 doses of intrathecal (225)Ac-3F8 radioimmunoconjugate (80 to 150 kBq/kg total dose) did not show signs of toxicity based on blood chemistry, complete blood counts, or by clinical evaluations. Therapeutic efficacy of intrathecal (225)Ac-3F8 was studied in a nude rat xenograft model of meningeal carcinomatosis. The (225)Ac-3F8 treatment improved survival 2-fold from 16 to 34 days (P = 0.01). In conclusion, in vivo alpha generators targeted by 3F8 warrant additional study as a possible new approach to the treatment of carcinomatous meningitis. PMID:15501978

  20. Potential for irradiation of the lens and cataract induction by incorporated alpha-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.M.; Thorne, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    Data on the uptake and retention of Ra and Pu in ocular tissues are reviewed. These data were used to calculate alpha radiation doses to the lens of the eye for patients injected with /sup 224/Ra and for individuals exposed to one annual limit on intake (ALI) per year of /sup 224/Ra, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra and /sup 239/Pu for a period of 50 y. On the basis of this analysis, it is concluded that the induction of lens opacity should not be the factor limiting intake of any radioisotope of Pu or for /sup 224/Ra or /sup 226/Ra. However, for /sup 228/Ra the dose lies within the range of doses received by /sup 224/Ra patients who have developed cataracts.

  1. Rapid screening and analysis of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in liquids using a single sample preparation procedure.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Bahman; Henitz, James B; Carter, Jennifer A

    2011-02-01

    A multifaceted radiochemical testing procedure has been developed to analyze a large number of liquid samples and measure a wide range of radionuclides in a short period of time. This method involves a single, unique and fast sample preparation procedure and allows sequential/concurrent determination of analytes with accuracy and precision. The same prepared sample can be selectively analyzed by gross alpha counting, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and alpha spectroscopy. This method is especially attractive in radiological emergency events where analytical data will be needed urgently as a basis for protective action. Given the simplicity and rapidity of the method, it may be suitable for field portable laboratories, which could save time and the cost associated with the transit of samples to a fixed laboratory. A 100 mL aliquot of sample was spiked with ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers and subjected to a chemical separation procedure using a combined BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 co-precipitation scheme. Then, the gross alpha-particle activity of the prepared sample was measured with a low-background gas-proportional counter, followed by the analysis of its photon-emitters using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with high-purity intrinsic Ge detectors. Gamma-ray determination of ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers was used to assess the chemical recoveries of BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 fractions, respectively. Selectivity of the radionuclides for co-precipitation with either BaSO4 or Fe(OH)3 components was also investigated. Alpha mass-efficiency curves were derived using ²³⁰Th and ²⁴¹Am standards as alpha-calibration sources. Various mixtures of radionuclides, including ⁵⁴Mn, ⁵⁷Co, ⁶⁰Co, ⁸⁵Sr, ⁸⁸Y, ¹⁰⁹Cd, ¹¹³Sn, ¹³⁷Cs, ¹³⁹Ce, ²⁰³Hg, ²⁰⁹Po, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²³⁰Th, ²⁴¹Am, and natural uranium were used in this study. Most were quantitatively assayed with high chemical recoveries. Alpha-isotope identification and assessment of the prepared

  2. Alpha particle transport in the presence of toroidal driftwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Huang, B.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of fusion born α particles is investigated in the presence of poloidally mode coupled ballooning type driftwaves. The onset of orbit stochasticity is understood as an overlapping of electric islands produced by the driftwaves, whose overlapping threshold is lower for the thermal particles than for the α particles (high energy particles). For the trapped particles, transport is determined by the particles' sensitive response to the fluctuation at the banana tip where the parallel velocity decreases drastically. Time dependent turbulent signals (finite ω* effects) give rise to the shift of the resonant radial locations, which again is larger for the thermal particles than the high energy particles. The transport process is influenced by the microscopic structure of the islands, which deviates from the Gaussian process. This work is supported by National Science Council of Taiwan, NSC 100-2112-M-006-021-MY3 and NCKU Top University Project.

  3. Modeling of carbonaceous particles emitted by boreal and temperature wildfires at northern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoué, David; Liousse, Catherine; Cachier, HéLèNe; Stocks, Brian J.; Goldammer, Johann G.

    2000-11-01

    For the first time, a spatial and monthly inventory has been constructed for carbonaceous particles emitted by boreal and temperate wildfires in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, with burned area data statistics, fuel load maps, fire characteristics, and particle emission factors. The time period considered is 1960-1997, and an important year-to-year variability was observed. On average, boreal and temperate vegetation fires represent 4% of global biomass burning, but during extreme years, their contribution may reach 12%, producing 9% and 20% of black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM), respectively, emitted by worldwide fires. The North American component of the boreal forest fires (Canada and Alaska) represents 4 to 122 Gg C yr-1 of BC and 0.07 to 2.4 Tg yr-1 of POM emitted, whereas the Eurasiatic component (Russia and northern Mongolia) may vary in the 16 to 474 Gg C yr-1 range for BC and between 0.3 and 9.4 Tg yr-1 for POM, with however great uncertainty. Temperate forests in conterminous United States and Europe have a much lower contribution with an average of 11 Gg C yr-1 of BC and 0.2 Tg yr-1 of POM. Grassland fires in Mongolia represent significant BC and POM sources which may reach 62 Gg C and 0.4 Tg, respectively. Finally, an annual average of BC emissions for shrubland fires in both the Mediterranean region and California is 20 Gg C yr-1, with average POM emissions of 0.1 Tg yr-1. These source maps obtained with a high spatial resolution (lox lo) can now be added to previous ones developed for other global carbonaceous aerosol sources (fossil fuel combustion, tropical biomass burning, agricultural and domestic fires) in order to provide global maps of particulate carbon emissions. Taking into account particle injection height in relation with each type of fire, our source map is a useful tool for studying the atmospheric transport and the impact of carbonaceous aerosols in three-dimensional transport and climate models.

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

  5. Downstream energetic proton and alpha particles during quasi-parallel interplanetary shock events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers the energetic particle populations in the downstream region of three quasi-parallel interplanetary shock events, which was explored using the ISEE 3 Ultra Low Energy Charge Analyzer sensor, which unambiguously identifies protons and alpha particles using the electrostatic deflection versus residual energy technique. The downstream particles were found to exhibit anisotropies due largely to convection in the solar wind. The spectral indices of the proton and the alpha-particle distribution functions were found to be remarkably constant during the downstream period, being generally insensitive to changes in particle flux levels, magnetic field direction, and solar wind densities. In two of the three events, the proton and the alpha spectra were the same throughout the entire downstream period, supporting the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory.

  6. Superconducting calorimetric alpha particle sensors for nuclear nonproliferation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Beall, James A.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Dry, Donald E.; Hastings, Elizabeth P.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Rudy, Clifford R.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2008-09-22

    Identification of trace nuclear materials is usually accomplished by alpha spectrometry. Current detectors cannot distinguish critical elements and isotopes. We have developed a detector called a microcalorimeter, which achieves a resolution of 1.06 keV for 5.3 MeV alphas, the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive measurement. With this exquisite resolution, we can unambiguously identify the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio in Pu, a critical measurement for ascertaining the intended use of nuclear material. Furthermore, we have made a direct measurement of the {sup 209}Po ground state decay.

  7. Chemical characterization of soot particles emitted by Wood-Burning Cook Stoves: A XPS and HRTEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali, Giovanni; Peralta, Oscar; Castro, Telma; Torres, Ricardo; Ruiz, Gerardo; Molina, Luisa; Saavedra, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    The morphology, microstructure, chemical composition, and electronic structure of soot particles emitted directly from biofuel cook stoves have been studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to obtain freshly emitted soot particles, copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were placed on the last two of an 8-stages MOUDI cascade impactor. The analysis of HRTEM micrographs revealed the nanostructure and the particle size of soot chain. Additionally, the morphology of soot particles was analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles sampled on the first heating stage exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df, which are present as aggregates formed by carbon ceno-spheres. The XPS survey spectrum for soot particles shows that the main particle composition is carbon. We also observed differences in the carbon/oxygen (C/O) ratio of the particles, which probably depends on the combustion process efficiency of each cook-stove analyzed. The XPS C-1s spectra show carbon with two peaks that correspond to sp2 and sp3 hybridization. Also, real-time absorption (βa) and scattering (αs) coefficients of the particles emitted by cook stoves were measured. The trend in βa and αs indicate that the cooking process has two important combustion stages which varied in its flaming strength, being vigorous in the first stage and soft in the second one.

  8. Peroxidation of the dried thin film of lipid by high-energy alpha particles from a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1984-11-01

    High-energy ..cap alpha.. particles produced a dose-dependent linear increase in different lipid peroxidation products (e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA), conjugated dienes, and hydroperoxides) in the dried thin film state. An inverse dose-rate effect was observed when the dose rate was varied by changing either the ..cap alpha..-particle fluence rate or the ..cap alpha..-particle energy. The antioxidants ..cap alpha..-tocopherol and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) suppressed the ..cap alpha..-particle-induced lipid peroxidation in the dried thin film state, and in this respect ..cap alpha..-tocopherol was found superior to BHT. It was found that ..cap alpha..-tocopherol was equally efficient in inhibiting lipid peroxidations by ..cap alpha.. particles and ultraviolet light.

  9. Targeting of Osseous Sites with Alpha-emitting Ra-223: Comparison with the Beta-emitter Sr-89 in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Fisher, Darrell R.; Roeske, John C.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2003-05-16

    The bone-seeking property of and the potential to irradiate red marrow by the alpha-particle emitter Ra-223 (t1/2 = 11.43 d) were compared to those of the beta-emitter Sr-89 (t1/2 = 50.53 d). Methods: The biodistributions of Ra-223 and Sr-89 were studied in mice. Tissue uptakes were determined at 1 h, 6 h, 1 d, 3 d, and 14 d after intravenous administration. The potential redistribution of progeny from Ra-223 located in bone was investigated. Radiation absorbed doses were calculated for soft tissues and bone. Doses were also estimated for marrow-containing cavities assuming spheric geometries. Results: We found that both Sr-89 and Ra-223 selectively concentrated on bone surfaces relative to soft tissues. The measured bone uptake of Ra-223 was slightly higher than that of Sr-89. At the 24 h time-point, the femur uptake of Ra-223 was 40.1% of the administered activity per gram tissue. The uptake in spleen and most other soft tissues was higher for Ra-223 than for Sr-89. We observed rapid clearance of Ra-223 from soft tissues within the first 24 hours, but the bone surface uptake of Ra-223 increased with time up to 24 h. Among the soft tissues, the spleen had the greatest accumulation and retention of Ra-223. The femur-to-spleen ratio increased with time, from 6.4 at 6 h to 23.7 at 3 days after injections. We found little redistribution of Ra-223 daughter products away from bone (about 2% at 6 h and less than 1% detectable at 3 d). Estimates of dose to marrow-containing cavities showed that the Ra-223 alpha-emitter might have a marrow-sparing advantage compared to beta-emitters due to high linear-energy-transfer and short alpha range targeting osteoid surfaces. The alpha-emitters irradiate a smaller fraction of the marrow-containing volumes--sparing marrow and enhancing survival of marrow cells. At the same time, the bone surfaces receives a therapeutically effective radiation dose. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that Ra-223 is a promising candidate

  10. Detection and localization of particle-emitting sources with compound-eye inspired detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2007-08-01

    We develop methods to detect and localize particle-emitting sources using detector arrays that are inspired by biological compound eyes. The sources of interest may be optical, nuclear, or cosmic; they emit particles such as visible photons, neutrons, protons, or charged particles. Our results may have wide applications to artificial vision, which can be important in robotics (robot vision) or medicine (e.g., artificial eyes for the blind); security, where the detection of nuclear materials is needed; or astronomy. This dissertation consists of three parts. First, we detect a far-field particle source using two directional detector arrays: cubic and spherical. We propose a mean-difference test (MDT) detector, analyze its statistical performance, and show that the MDT has a number of advantages over the generalized likelihood- ratio test (GLRT). Second, we localize the source by proposing a novel biologically inspired detector array, whose configuration generalizes the compound eye of insects. This array combines the advantages of compound eyes (e.g., large field-of-view) and human eyes (e.g., high angular resolution). Based on a statistical model of the array measurements, we analyze the array performance by computing the Cramérao bound (CRB) on the error in estimating the source direction. We also derive lower bounds on the mean-square angular error (MSAE) of the source localization and investigate the MSAE of two source- direction estimators. Numerical examples, including the optimal array design, are presented to further illustrate the array performance. Third, we derive a statistical angular resolution limit (ARL) on resolving two closely spaced point sources in a three-dimensional frame, which is applicable to various measurement models (e.g., radar, sonar, or astronomy). Using the asymptotic analysis of the GLRT, we derive the ARL with constraints on the probabilities of false alarm and detection. Our results give explicit analytical expression for the ARL

  11. Simulation studies on alpha-particle-driven current in tokamak reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Azumi, M.

    2008-08-01

    An asymmetry particle trapping caused by the finite banana width of alpha particles and a current produced by the resulting imbalance between transit particles with positive and negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field line (simply referred to as transit current) are numerically demonstrated by using an orbit-following Monte-Carlo code. The transit current is considerably enhanced by a collaborative effect of the finite-banana-width and a non-uniformity of the alpha particle source. The pitch-angle scattering is also very important for it. Banana-trapped particles drive a substantially negative current in the central region. Consequently, the positive transit current is degraded by the negative banana current and the net alpha current is almost flat near the plasma centre. The net alpha-driven total currents in an ITER-like normal aspect-ratio system (aspect ratio = 3.17) and in a low aspect-ratio system VECTOR (aspect ratio = 1.98) estimated with a conventional electron screening effect are about 0.4 MA and 1 MA, respectively. A low-aspect-ratio tokamak has an advantage over a normal or a large-aspect-ratio system in driving current by fusion-produced alpha particles.

  12. Influence of cell position relative to planar alpha-particle sources on survival and preneoplastic transformation of primary rat tracheal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Terzaghi-Howe, M.; Turner, J.E.; Ford, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    Rat tracheal epithelial cells exposed directly on planar {sup 210}Po sources exhibited exponential cell killing; however, no significant increase in induction of preneoplastic transformation was observed over a range of {alpha}-particle fluences (0.017-0.050 {mu}m{sup {minus}2}). In contrast, up to 10-fold increases in frequencies of preneoplastic transformants, above control levels, were observed after exposure of rat tracheal epithelial cells to similar {alpha}-particle fluences on {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am sources. Two alternative hypotheses are evaluated as an explanation for this apparent difference in the biological effect of {alpha} particles emitted from different sources: (a) possible interactions between effects produced by {alpha} particles and by low-energy photons, which occur with {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am but not with {sup 210}Po; and (b) the influence of spatial relationships between exposed cells and the surface of the planar source. The data suggest that the cell-to-source spatial relationships affect both survival and transformation markedly. 29 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Hwang, David Q.; Hovey, Jane

    1986-04-22

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  14. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R.; Cirignano, Leonard J.; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-05-15

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V{sub s} analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI{sub 2} films determined by this technique is 30{+-}5 {mu}m, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 {mu}m in PbI{sub 2}. More than 100 I-V{sub s} of PbI{sub 2} films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI{sub 2} I-V{sub s} curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V{sub s} demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI{sub 2} films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the ''surface defect'' concentration (''surface refining''), was registered after successive measurements of I-V{sub s}.

  15. A comparison of different peak shapes for deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzo, Giuseppe A.

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-particle spectrometry is a standard technique for assessing the sample content in terms of alpha-decaying isotopes. A comparison of spectral deconvolutions performed adopting different peak shape functions has been carried out and a sensitivity analysis has been performed to test for the robustness of the results. As previously observed, there is evidence that the alpha peaks are well reproduced by a Gaussian modified by a function which takes into account the prominent tailing that an alpha-particle spectrum measured by means of a silicon detector exhibits. Among the different peak shape functions considered, that proposed by G. Bortels and P. Collaers, Int. J. Rad. Appl. Instrum. A 38, pp. 831-837 (1987) is the function which provides more accurate and more robust results when the spectral resolution is high enough to make such tailing significant. Otherwise, in the case of lower resolution alpha-particle spectra, simpler peak shape functions which are characterized by a lower number of fitting parameters provide adequate results. The proposed comparison can be useful for selecting the most appropriate peak shape function when accurate spectral deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra is sought.

  16. Chemical characteristics of fine particles emitted from different gas cooking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Siao Wei; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    Gas cooking is an important indoor source of fine particles (PM 2.5). The chemical characteristics of PM 2.5 emitted from different cooking methods, namely, steaming, boiling, stir-frying, pan-frying and deep-frying were investigated in a domestic kitchen. Controlled experiments were conducted to measure the mass concentration of PM 2.5 and its chemical constituents (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals and ions) arising from these five cooking methods. To investigate the difference in particle properties of different cooking emissions, the amount and type of food, and the heat setting on the gas stove were kept constant during the entire course of the experiments. Results showed that deep-frying gave rise to the largest amount of PM 2.5 and most chemical components, followed by pan-frying, stir-frying, boiling, and steaming. Oil-based cooking methods released more organic pollutants (OC, PAHs, and organic ions) and metals, while water-based cooking methods accounted for more water-soluble (WS) ions. Their source profiles are also presented and discussed.

  17. TCAD simulation for alpha-particle spectroscopy using SIC Schottky diode.

    PubMed

    Das, Achintya; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing requirement of alpha spectroscopy in the fields context of environmental radioactive contamination, nuclear waste management, site decommissioning and decontamination. Although silicon-based alpha-particle detection technology is mature, high leakage current, low displacement threshold and radiation hardness limits the operation of the detector in harsh environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered to be excellent material for radiation detection application due to its high band gap, high displacement threshold and high thermal conductivity. In this report, an alpha-particle-induced electron-hole pair generation model for a reverse-biased n-type SiC Schottky diode has been proposed and verified using technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulations. First, the forward-biased I-V characteristics were studied to determine the diode ideality factor and compared with published experimental data. The ideality factor was found to be in the range of 1.4-1.7 for a corresponding temperature range of 300-500 K. Next, the energy-dependent, alpha-particle-induced EHP generation model parameters were optimised using transport of ions in matter (TRIM) simulation. Finally, the transient pulses generated due to alpha-particle bombardment were analysed for (1) different diode temperatures (300-500 K), (2) different incident alpha-particle energies (1-5 MeV), (3) different reverse bias voltages of the 4H-SiC-based Schottky diode (-50 to -250 V) and (4) different angles of incidence of the alpha particle (0°-70°).The above model can be extended to other (wide band-gap semiconductor) device technologies useful for radiation-sensing application.

  18. TCAD simulation for alpha-particle spectroscopy using SIC Schottky diode.

    PubMed

    Das, Achintya; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing requirement of alpha spectroscopy in the fields context of environmental radioactive contamination, nuclear waste management, site decommissioning and decontamination. Although silicon-based alpha-particle detection technology is mature, high leakage current, low displacement threshold and radiation hardness limits the operation of the detector in harsh environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered to be excellent material for radiation detection application due to its high band gap, high displacement threshold and high thermal conductivity. In this report, an alpha-particle-induced electron-hole pair generation model for a reverse-biased n-type SiC Schottky diode has been proposed and verified using technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulations. First, the forward-biased I-V characteristics were studied to determine the diode ideality factor and compared with published experimental data. The ideality factor was found to be in the range of 1.4-1.7 for a corresponding temperature range of 300-500 K. Next, the energy-dependent, alpha-particle-induced EHP generation model parameters were optimised using transport of ions in matter (TRIM) simulation. Finally, the transient pulses generated due to alpha-particle bombardment were analysed for (1) different diode temperatures (300-500 K), (2) different incident alpha-particle energies (1-5 MeV), (3) different reverse bias voltages of the 4H-SiC-based Schottky diode (-50 to -250 V) and (4) different angles of incidence of the alpha particle (0°-70°).The above model can be extended to other (wide band-gap semiconductor) device technologies useful for radiation-sensing application. PMID:25634901

  19. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 240Pu.

    PubMed

    Sibbens, G; Pommé, S; Altzitzoglou, T; García-Toraño, E; Janssen, H; Dersch, R; Ott, O; Sánchez, A Martín; Montero, M P Rubio; Loidl, M; Coron, N; de Marcillac, P; Semkow, T M

    2010-01-01

    Sources of enriched (240)Pu were prepared by vacuum evaporation on quartz substrates. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of (240)Pu was performed with high statistical accuracy using silicon detectors and with low statistical accuracy using a bolometer. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of six transitions were derived from the spectra and compared with literature values. Additionally, some alpha-particle emission probabilities were derived from gamma-ray intensity measurements with a high-purity germanium detector. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of the three main transitions at 5168.1, 5123.6 and 5021.2 keV were derived from seven aggregate spectra analysed with five different fit functions and the results were compatible with evaluated data. Two additional weak peaks at 4863.5 and 4492.0 keV were fitted separately, using the exponential of a polynomial function to represent the underlying tailing of the larger peaks. The peak at 4655 keV could not be detected by alpha-particle spectrometry, while gamma-ray spectrometry confirms that its intensity is much lower than expected from literature.

  20. Alpha Particles Play a Relatively Minor Role in Magnetized Target Fusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2002-03-15

    Two problems related to alpha particle physics in magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems are briefly discussed. First, we evaluate the pressure and density of alpha particles under the assumption that they are perfectly confined and have a classical slowing-down distribution. It turns out that because of a comparatively low plasma temperature in MTF systems, the relative pressure and density of alpha particles are more than an order of magnitude less than in fusion reactors based on ITER-type tokamaks. Therefore, one may expect that even in the extreme case of a perfect confinement of alpha particles, their presence will have a much weaker (than in the case of tokamaks) effect on plasma stability and transport. Second, we discuss the kinetics of plasma burn under the opposite extreme assumption that all the alpha particles are instantaneously lost, without leaving any energy in a plasma. It turns out that even in this case, the plasma energy yield in batch-burn systems is only weakly affected by burnout effects.

  1. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B.; Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Soare, S.; Darrow, D.; Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J.; Gorini,; Nocente, M.; and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  2. Effects of q(r) on the Alpha Particle Ripple Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; M. Diesso; R.V. Budny; S. Batha; S.J. Zweben; et al.

    1997-09-01

    An experiment was done with TFTR DT plasmas to determine the effect of the q(r) profile on the alpha particle ripple loss to the outer midplane. The alpha particle loss measurements were made using a radially movable scintillator detector 20 degrees below the outer midplane. The experimental results were compared with TF ripple loss calculations done using a Monte Carlo guiding center orbit following code, ORBIT. Although some of the experimental results are consistent with the ORBIT code modeling, the variation of the alpha loss with the q(r) profiles is not well explained by this code. Quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires a careful analysis of the limiter shadowing effect, which strongly determines the diffusion of alphas into the detector aperture.

  3. Characterizing Ice Nucleating Particles Emitted from Agricultural Activities and Natural Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suski, K. J.; Levin, E. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Soil dust and plant fragment emissions from agricultural harvesting and natural ecosystems are two potentially large, yet unquantified and largely uncharacterized, sources of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Both organic and mineral components have been shown to contribute to the ice-nucleating ability of soil dust, but apart from the likely presence of ice nucleation-active bacteria, little is known about the ice nucleating potential of plant tissues. This work aims to identify and differentiate the organic and inorganic contributions of soil and plant INP sources emitted from harvesting activities and natural landscapes. For this purpose, the CSU Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) and the Ice Spectrometer (IS) were utilized in a combination of ambient measurements and laboratory studies. Small variability and low INP numbers (< 10 L-1 at -30 °C) characterized measurements made in air over the grazed Pawnee National Grassland in Colorado, while more variable INP over croplands around the DOE-ARM SGP site in Oklahoma appear linked to regional wind, humidity, and rainfall conditions. Harvesting of milo (grain sorghum), soybean, and wheat at an experimental research farm in Kansas resulted in spikes of INPs, with wheat harvesting producing the largest INP concentrations (up to 100 L-1 at -30 °C). In-situ use of heating tubes upstream of the CFDC to deactivate organic INP showed that milo and wheat harvest emissions showed a stronger reduction of INPs at warm temperatures than soybean emissions, suggesting a larger contribution of organics to their INP activity. Further characterization of the sources and organic and inorganic contributions to terrestrially emitted INPs by comparison to laboratory studies on collected soil dust and plant samples will also be presented.

  4. Elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in exhaust particles emitted by light-duty vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Célia A; Barbosa, Cátia; Rocha, Sónia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) emitted by eight different light-duty vehicles. Exhaust samples from petrol and diesel cars (Euro 3 to Euro 5) were collected in a chassis dynamometer facility. To simulate the real-world driving conditions, three ARTEMIS cycles were followed: road, to simulate a fluid traffic flow and urban with hot and cold starts, to simulate driving conditions in cities. Samples were analysed for the water-soluble ions, for the elemental composition and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), respectively, by ion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrate and phosphate were the major water-soluble ions in the exhaust particles emitted from diesel and petrol vehicles, respectively. The amount of material emitted is affected by the vehicle age. For vehicles ≥Euro 4, most elements were below the detection limits. Sodium, with emission factors in the ranges 23.5-62.4 and 78.2-227μg km(-1), for petrol and diesel Euro 3 vehicles, respectively, was the major element. The emission factors of metallic elements indicated that diesel vehicles release three to five times more than petrol automobiles. Element emissions under urban cycles are higher than those found for on-road driving, being three or four times higher, for petrol vehicles, and two or three times, for diesel vehicles. The difference between cycles is mainly due to the high emissions for the urban cycle with hot start-up. As registered for elements, most of the PAH emissions for vehicles ≥Euro 4 were also below the detection limits. Regardless of the vehicle models or driving cycles, the two- to four-ring PAHs were always dominant. Naphthalene, with emission factors up to 925 μg km(-1), was always the most abundant PAH. The relative cancer risk associated with

  5. Elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in exhaust particles emitted by light-duty vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Célia A; Barbosa, Cátia; Rocha, Sónia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) emitted by eight different light-duty vehicles. Exhaust samples from petrol and diesel cars (Euro 3 to Euro 5) were collected in a chassis dynamometer facility. To simulate the real-world driving conditions, three ARTEMIS cycles were followed: road, to simulate a fluid traffic flow and urban with hot and cold starts, to simulate driving conditions in cities. Samples were analysed for the water-soluble ions, for the elemental composition and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), respectively, by ion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrate and phosphate were the major water-soluble ions in the exhaust particles emitted from diesel and petrol vehicles, respectively. The amount of material emitted is affected by the vehicle age. For vehicles ≥Euro 4, most elements were below the detection limits. Sodium, with emission factors in the ranges 23.5-62.4 and 78.2-227μg km(-1), for petrol and diesel Euro 3 vehicles, respectively, was the major element. The emission factors of metallic elements indicated that diesel vehicles release three to five times more than petrol automobiles. Element emissions under urban cycles are higher than those found for on-road driving, being three or four times higher, for petrol vehicles, and two or three times, for diesel vehicles. The difference between cycles is mainly due to the high emissions for the urban cycle with hot start-up. As registered for elements, most of the PAH emissions for vehicles ≥Euro 4 were also below the detection limits. Regardless of the vehicle models or driving cycles, the two- to four-ring PAHs were always dominant. Naphthalene, with emission factors up to 925 μg km(-1), was always the most abundant PAH. The relative cancer risk associated with

  6. Alpha particle condensation in {sup 12}C and nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2008-05-12

    It is shown that the large radius of the Hoyle state of {sup 12}C with a dilute density distribution in an {alpha} particle condensate can be clearly seen in the shift of the rainbow angle (therefore the Airy minimum) to a larger angle in {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering at the high energy region and prerainbow oscillations in {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C scattering at the lower energy region.

  7. EFFECTS OF PARTICLE EVAPORATION ON THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF THE EMITTING NUCLEUS FOR DEEP INELASTIC AND COMPOUND NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, S.K.; Moretto, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    A model is developed which allows one to calculate analytically the angular momentum removed, and the angular momentum misalignment created by the evaporation of light particles from an excited nucleus. The mass, temperature, and angular momentum of the emitting nucleus are explicitly considered. The formalism applies equally well to heavy ion and compound nuclear reactions.

  8. Modeling of MeV alpha particle energy transfer to lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schivell, J.; Monticello, D.A.; Fisch, N.; Rax, J.M.

    1993-10-01

    The interaction between a lower hybrid wave and a fusion alpha particle displaces the alpha particle simultaneously in space and energy. This results in coupled diffusion. Diffusion of alphas down the density gradient could lead to their transferring energy to the wave. This could, in turn, put energy into current drive. An initial analytic study was done by Fisch and Rax. Here the authors calculate numerical solutions for the alpha energy transfer and study a range of conditions that are favorable for wave amplification from alpha energy. They find that it is possible for fusion alpha particles to transfer a large fraction of their energy to the lower hybrid wave. The numerical calculation shows that the net energy transfer is not sensitive to the value of the diffusion coefficient over a wide range of practical values. An extension of this idea, the use of a lossy boundary to enhance the energy transfer, is investigated. This technique is shown to offer a large potential benefit.

  9. A study of the effects of MeV alpha particles in PE and PVDC

    SciTech Connect

    Evelyn, A.L.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R.L.; Bhat, K.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-02-01

    We have mapped and studied the effects of MeV alpha-particle bombardment in polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) and polyethylene (PE). We used 3.5 and 5.0 MeV alpha-particle incident beams and stacked polymer films to separate the contributing effects of the electronic ({var_epsilon}{sub e}) and nuclear ({var_epsilon}{sub n}) stopping powers. The electrical conductance and change in the chemical structures were measured by direct resistivity measurement, Raman microprobe, RBS and FTIR. The results indicate significant differences in the ({var_epsilon}{sub e}) and ({var_epsilon}{sub n}) effects at higher alpha-particle bombardment fluences. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dant, James T.; Richardson, Richard B.; Nie, Linda H.

    2013-05-01

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of 223Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of 223Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from 223Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, 153Sm and 89Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from 223Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from 153Sm and 89Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from 223Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and 223Ra may be a more efficient

  11. Recent outgassing from the lunar surface: The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Stefanie L.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Moore, Kurt R.; Elphic, Richard C.; Belian, Richard D.; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2005-09-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (APS) was designed to detect characteristic-energy alpha particles from the decay of Rn-222, Po-218, and Po-210 and to therefore map sites of radon release on the lunar surface. These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of U-238 hence the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. Once released, the radon spreads out by ``bouncing'' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The half-life of Rn-222 allows the gas to spread out by several hundred kilometers before it decays (depositing approximately half of the Po-218 recoil nuclides on the lunar surface) and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to several days after they occur. The long residence time of the Pb-210 precursor to Po-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 60 years. The APS found only a faint indication of Po-218 alpha particles. However, the Rn-222 alpha particle map shows that radon gas was emanating from the vicinity of craters Aristarchus and Kepler at the time of Lunar Prospector. The Po-210 alpha particle distribution reveals a variability in time and space of lunar gas release events. Po-210 and Rn-222 detections are associated with both thorium enhancements and lunar pyroclastic deposits.

  12. Evolution of trace gases and particles emitted by a chaparral fire in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Craven, J. S.; Taylor, J. W.; McMeeking, G. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Urbanski, S. P.; Wold, C. E.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Coe, H.; Alvarado, M. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2012-02-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is a major global source of trace gases and particles. Accurately representing the production and evolution of these emissions is an important goal for atmospheric chemical transport models. We measured a suite of gases and aerosols emitted from an 81 hectare prescribed fire in chaparral fuels on the central coast of California, US on 17 November 2009. We also measured physical and chemical changes that occurred in the isolated downwind plume in the first ~4 h after emission. The measurements were carried out onboard a Twin Otter aircraft outfitted with an airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (AFTIR), aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), single particle soot photometer (SP2), nephelometer, LiCor CO2 analyzer, a chemiluminescence ozone instrument, and a wing-mounted meteorological probe. Our measurements included: CO2; CO; NOx; NH3; non-methane organic compounds; organic aerosol (OA); inorganic aerosol (nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and chloride); aerosol light scattering; refractory black carbon (rBC); and ambient temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and three-dimensional wind velocity. The molar ratio of excess O3 to excess CO in the plume (ΔO3/ΔCO) increased from -5.13 (±1.13) × 10-3 to 10.2 (±2.16) × 10-2 in ~4.5 h following smoke emission. Excess acetic and formic acid (normalized to excess CO) increased by factors of 1.73 ± 0.43 and 7.34 ± 3.03 (respectively) over the same time since emission. Based on the rapid decay of C2H4 we infer an in-plume average OH concentration of 5.27 (±0.97) × 106 molec cm-3, consistent with previous studies showing elevated OH concentrations in biomass burning plumes. Ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate all increased over the course of 4 h. The observed ammonium increase was a factor of 3.90 ± 2.93 in about 4 h, but accounted for just ~36% of the gaseous ammonia lost on a molar basis. Some of the gas phase NH3 loss may have been due to condensation on, or formation of, particles

  13. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  14. Evolution of trace gases and particles emitted by a chaparral fire in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Craven, J. S.; Taylor, J. W.; McMeeking, G. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Urbanski, S. P.; Wold, C. E.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Coe, H.; Alvarado, M. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2011-08-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is a major global source of trace gases and particles. Accurately representing the production and evolution of these emissions is an important goal for atmospheric chemical transport models. We measured a suite of gases and aerosols emitted from an 81 ha prescribed fire in chaparral fuels on the central coast of California, US on 17 November 2009. We also measured post-emission chemical changes in the isolated downwind plume for ~4 h of smoke aging. The measurements were carried out on board a Twin Otter aircraft outfitted with an airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (AFTIR), aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), single particle soot photometer (SP2), nephelometer, LiCor CO2 analyzer, a chemiluminescence ozone instrument, and a wing-mounted meteorological probe. Our measurements included: CO2; CO; NOx; NH3; non-methane organic compounds; organic aerosol (OA); inorganic aerosol (nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and chloride); aerosol light scattering; refractory black carbon (rBC); and ambient temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and three-dimensional wind velocity. The molar ratio of excess O3 to excess CO in the plume (ΔO3/ΔCO) increased from -0.005 to 0.102 in 4.5 h. Excess acetic and formic acid (normalized to excess CO) increased by factors of 1.7 ± 0.4 and 7.3 ± 3.0 (respectively) over the same aging period. Based on the rapid decay of C2H4 we infer an in-plume average OH concentration of 5.3 (±1.0) × 106 molecules cm-3, consistent with previous studies showing elevated OH concentrations in biomass burning plumes. Ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate all increased with plume aging. The observed ammonium increase was a factor of 3.9 ± 2.6 in about 4 h, but accounted for just ~36 % of the gaseous ammonia lost on a molar basis. Some of the gas phase NH3 loss may have been due to condensation on, or formation of, particles below the AMS detection range. NOx was converted to PAN and particle nitrate with PAN production being

  15. Theory of energetic/alpha particle effects on magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rewoldt, G.; Colestock, P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Chen, Y.P.; Ke, F.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Bussac, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of energetic particles is shown to qualitatively modify the stability properties of ideal as well as resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in tokamaks. Specifically, we demonstrate that, consistent with highpower ICRF heating experiments in JET, high energy trapped particles can effectively stabilize the sawtooth mode, providing a possible route to stable high current tokamak operation. An alternative stabilization scheme employing barely circulating energetic particles is also proposed. Finally, we present analytical and numerical studies on the excitations of high-n MHD modes via transit resonances with circulating alpha particles. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Portable alpha spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; de la Torre Pérez, J

    2012-09-01

    Many portable devices have been designed to detect γ-rays or alpha and beta particles. Most of the α-particle detectors give the total count as a result, without identifying the radionuclides existing in the sample. The development of a device allowing rapid and straightforward α-particle spectrometry would be very useful for detecting the radioactive contents of unknown samples. This work describes the construction of a portable device using silicon semiconductor detectors designed to rapidly detect and possibly identify alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  17. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  18. Lyman Alpha-emitting Galaxies at z = 2.1: Characterizing the Progenitors of Typical Present-day Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawiser, Eric J.; Guaita, L.; Padilla, N.; Francke, H.; Bond, N. A.; Gronwall, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Sinawa, S.; Feldmeier, J. J.; MUSYC Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    We discovered a sample of 261 Lyman alpha emitting (LAE) galaxies at z=2.1 in an ultra-deep 3727A narrow-band MUSYC image of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. LAEs were selected to have rest-frame equivalent widths >20A and emission line fluxes >3.7x10-17 ergs/cm2/s, corresponding to L_Lya>1.2x1042 ergs/s. 3% of the original candidates were detected in X-rays by Chandra, and 7% were detected in the rest-frame far-UV by GALEX; these objects were eliminated to minimize contamination by AGN and low-redshift galaxies. Our sample has median rest-frame EW=40A, and only a few galaxies have rest-frame EW bigger than 200A. Our results show that the luminosity function of LAEs at z=2.1 is consistent with that of LAEs at z=3.1 but with number density a factor of 1.8+-0.3 higher. We used the rest frame UV luminosity to estimate a median star formation rate of 4 Msun/yr. Clustering analysis reveals that LAEs at z=2.1 have r0=3+-0.5 Mpc, corresponding to b=1.0+-0.2, the lowest clustering bias of any high-redshift galaxy population. This implies that z=2.1 LAEs reside in dark matter halos with masses 1010 Msun, which are the lowest-mass halos yet probed at this redshift. We used the Sheth-Tormen conditional mass function to study the descendants of these LAEs and found that their typical present-day descendants are local galaxies with sub-L* and L* luminosities, like the Milky Way. We gratefully acknowledge grant support for this research from NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  19. Gene expression profile of human lymphocytes exposed to (211)At alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Turtoi, A; Brown, I; Schläger, M; Schneeweiss, F H A

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the Whole Human Genome 44K DNA microarray assay was used for the first time to obtain gene expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes 2 h after exposure (in suspension) to 6.78 MeV mean energy alpha particles from extracellular (211)At. Lymphocytes were exposed to fluences of 0.3-9.6 x 10(6) alpha particles/cm(2) [corresponding to mean absorbed alpha-particle doses (D(alpha)) of 0.05-1.60 Gy] over 30 min. Significantly modulated expression was identified in 338 early-response genes. Up-regulated expression was evident in 183 early-response genes, while the remaining 155 were down-regulated. Over half of the up-regulated genes and 40% of the down-regulated genes had a known biological process related primarily to cell growth and maintenance and cell communication. Genes associated with cell death were found only in the up-regulated genes and those with development only in the down-regulated genes. Eight selected early-response genes that displayed a sustained up- or down-regulation (CD36, HSPA2, MS4A6A, NFIL3, IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1) were further validated in alpha-particle-irradiated lymphocytes of two human individuals using the TaqMan(R) RT-qPCR technique. The results confirmed the observed microarray gene expression patterns. The expression modulation profiles of IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1 genes demonstrated similar trends in the two individuals studied. However, no significant linear correlation between increasing relative gene expression and the alpha-particle dose was evident. The results suggest the possibility that a panel of genes that react to alpha-particle radiation does exist and that they merit further study in a greater number of individuals to determine their possible value regarding alpha-particle biodosimetry. PMID:20681779

  20. Alpha Particle Density and Energy Distributions in Tandem Mirrors Using Monte Carlo Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerns, John A.

    Alpha particles, born at 3.52 MeV, are used to maintain the ignition temperatures in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reacting plasma above 10 keV in tandem mirror reactors. The alpha energy is trans- ferred to the plasma by Coulomb collisions and, after thermalization, the alphas can accumulate in the plasma and quench the reaction. We have simulated the alpha thermalization process using a Monte-Carlo technique, in which the alpha guiding center is followed between simulated collisions and Spitzer's collision model is used for the alpha-plasma interaction. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to determine the alpha radial birth position, the alpha particle posi- tion at a collision, and the angle scatter and dispersion at a collision. The plasma is modeled as a hot reacting core, surrounded by a cold halo plasma (T (TURN) 50 eV). Alpha orbits that intersect the halo loose 90% of their energy to the halo electrons because of the halo drag, which is ten times greater than the drag in the core. The uneven drag across the alpha orbit also produces an outward, radial, guiding center drift. This drag drift is dependent on the plasma density and temperature radial profiles. We have modeled these profiles and have specifically studied a single-scale-length model, in which the density scale length (r(,pD)) equals the temperature scale length (r(,pT)), and a two-scale-length model, in which r(,pD)/r(,pT) = 1.1. Alpha energy losses to the core and halo were determined by varying the vacuum magnetic field (B(,v)), peak beta ((')(beta)), and plasma radius (r(,p)) for each profile combination. The energy losses to the halo are a function of (rho)/r(,c) where (rho) is 0.27/B(,v) 1-<(beta)(r)> (' 1/2), and r(,c) is the reacting core radius. When p/r(,c) > 0.3 for the single-scale-length study, the energy losses to the halo are greater than 40%. This occurs for (rho)/r(,c) > 0.39 for the two-scale-length study, but there is a 50% variation in the data for (rho)/r(,c) > 0.35 in this case

  1. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  2. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of ²³⁸U.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; García-Toraño, E; Marouli, M; Crespo, M T; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H

    2014-05-01

    The alpha-particle emission probabilities associated with the three main alpha transitions of (238)U were measured by high-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry. Highly enriched (238)U material was used and its isotopic composition characterised by mass spectrometry. Source production through electrodeposition was optimised to reconcile conflicting demands for good spectral resolution and statistical precision. Measurements were performed at IRMM and CIEMAT for 1-2 years in three different set-ups. A new magnet system was put into use to largely eliminate true coincidence effects with low-energy conversion electrons. Finally the accuracy and precision of the relative emission probabilities for the three transitions - 77.01 (10)%, 22.92 (10)% and 0.068 (10)%, respectively - have been improved significantly.

  3. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of ²³⁸U.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; García-Toraño, E; Marouli, M; Crespo, M T; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H

    2014-05-01

    The alpha-particle emission probabilities associated with the three main alpha transitions of (238)U were measured by high-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry. Highly enriched (238)U material was used and its isotopic composition characterised by mass spectrometry. Source production through electrodeposition was optimised to reconcile conflicting demands for good spectral resolution and statistical precision. Measurements were performed at IRMM and CIEMAT for 1-2 years in three different set-ups. A new magnet system was put into use to largely eliminate true coincidence effects with low-energy conversion electrons. Finally the accuracy and precision of the relative emission probabilities for the three transitions - 77.01 (10)%, 22.92 (10)% and 0.068 (10)%, respectively - have been improved significantly. PMID:24355304

  4. Distributions of Alpha Particles Escaping to the Wall because of Sawtooth Oscillations in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Yu.V., Zweben, S.J.

    1998-11-01

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium-tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. Namely, measurements with four detectors installed at the wall at 20°, 45°, 60°, and 90° below the midplane of the torus have shown that the alpha flux to the wall is strongly peaked at the 20° and 90° detectors and on the noise level at the 45° detector. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the "crash-induced prompt loss," i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux to the 90° and 60° detectors, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal at the 20° detector. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In addition to the integral flux, the flux of particles with given energy was calculated. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type.

  5. Alpha particle density and energy distributions in tandem mirrors using Monte-Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    We have simulated the alpha thermalization process using a Monte-Carlo technique, in which the alpha guiding center is followed between simulated collisions and Spitzer's collision model is used for the alpha-plasma interaction. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to determine the alpha radial birth position, the alpha particle position at a collision, and the angle scatter and dispersion at a collision. The plasma is modeled as a hot reacting core, surrounded by a cold halo plasma (T approx.50 eV). Alpha orbits that intersect the halo lose 90% of their energy to the halo electrons because of the halo drag, which is ten times greater than the drag in the core. The uneven drag across the alpha orbit also produces an outward, radial, guiding center drift. This drag drift is dependent on the plasma density and temperature radial profiles. We have modeled these profiles and have specifically studied a single-scale-length model, in which the density scale length (r/sub pD/) equals the temperature scale length (r/sub pT/), and a two-scale-length model, in which r/sub pD//r/sub pT/ = 1.1.

  6. A Strange Box and a Stubborn Brit: Rutherford's Experiments with Alpha Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 5 innovative experiments conducted by Rutherford in early 1900s utilizing the 30 milligrams of radium salt he personally carried from Europe to Canada in 1903. Traces his work with alpha particles from his original results which determined their nature, charge, and mass, to his technique of backscattering which helped to advance…

  7. RADON AND PROGENY ALPHA-PARTICLE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING NUCLEAR TRACK METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo; Golzarri y Moreno, Dr. Jose Ignacio; Bogard, James S

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary procedure for alpha energy analysis of radon and progeny using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alpha particle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny.

  8. Nucleon-Alpha Particle Disequilibrium and Short-Lived r-Process Radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.; Clayton, D. D.; Chellapilla, S.; The, L.-S.

    2002-01-01

    r-Process yields can be extremely sensitive to expansion parameters when a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and alpha particles is present. This may provide a natural scenario for understanding the variation of heavy and light r-process isotopes in different r-process events. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Can Bose condensation of alpha particles be observed in heavy ion collisions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of alpha particles with a concomitant phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the signature of the onset of this phenomenon are made.

  10. Production of actinium-225 for alpha particle mediated radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rose A; Malkemus, Dairin; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2005-05-01

    The initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the alpha emitter (213)Bi in killing cancer cells. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-days (225)Ac parent. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both (213)Bi, and the (225)Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. This paper describes our five years of experience in production of (225)Ac in partial support of the on-going clinical trials. A four-step chemical process, consisting of both anion and cation exchange chromatography, is utilized for routine separation of carrier-free (225)Ac from a mixture of (228)Th, (229)Th and (232)Th. The separation of Ra and Ac from Th is achieved using the marcoporous anion exchange resin MP1 in 8M HNO(3) media. Two sequential MP1/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(6) for Ra and Ac from Th. The separation of Ac from Ra is accomplished on a low cross-linking cation exchange resin AG50-X4 using 1.2M HNO(3) as eluant. Two sequential AG50/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(2) for Ac from Ra. A 60-day processing schedule has been adopted in order to reduce the processing cost and to provide the highest levels of (225)Ac possible. Over an 8-week campaign, a total of approximately 100 mCi of (225)Ac (approximately 80% of the theoretical yield) is shipped in 5-6 batches, with the first batch typically consisting of approximately 50 mCi. After the initial separation and purification of Ac, the Ra pool is re-processed on a bi-weekly schedule or as needed to provide smaller batches of (225)Ac. The averaged radioisotopic purity of the (225)Ac was 99.6 +/- 0.7% with a (225)Ra content of < or =0.6%, and an average (229)Th content of (4(-4)(+5)) x 10(-5)%.

  11. Production of actinium-225 for alpha particle mediated radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rose A; Malkemus, Dairin; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2005-05-01

    The initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the alpha emitter (213)Bi in killing cancer cells. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-days (225)Ac parent. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both (213)Bi, and the (225)Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. This paper describes our five years of experience in production of (225)Ac in partial support of the on-going clinical trials. A four-step chemical process, consisting of both anion and cation exchange chromatography, is utilized for routine separation of carrier-free (225)Ac from a mixture of (228)Th, (229)Th and (232)Th. The separation of Ra and Ac from Th is achieved using the marcoporous anion exchange resin MP1 in 8M HNO(3) media. Two sequential MP1/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(6) for Ra and Ac from Th. The separation of Ac from Ra is accomplished on a low cross-linking cation exchange resin AG50-X4 using 1.2M HNO(3) as eluant. Two sequential AG50/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(2) for Ac from Ra. A 60-day processing schedule has been adopted in order to reduce the processing cost and to provide the highest levels of (225)Ac possible. Over an 8-week campaign, a total of approximately 100 mCi of (225)Ac (approximately 80% of the theoretical yield) is shipped in 5-6 batches, with the first batch typically consisting of approximately 50 mCi. After the initial separation and purification of Ac, the Ra pool is re-processed on a bi-weekly schedule or as needed to provide smaller batches of (225)Ac. The averaged radioisotopic purity of the (225)Ac was 99.6 +/- 0.7% with a (225)Ra content of < or =0.6%, and an average (229)Th content of (4(-4)(+5)) x 10(-5)%. PMID:15763472

  12. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  13. Lung cancer risk from exposure to alpha particles and inhalation of other pollutants in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to establish a quantitative correlation between early DNA damage and cancer incidence in a way that would be helpful for assessing the carcinogenic risk of radon alone or in combination with specific indoor pollutants. Rat tracheal epithelium has been exposed in vivo to {sup 210}Po alpha particles in the presence and absence of NO{sub 2} or cigarette smoke. The major accomplishments so far are: the design and implementation of a tracheal implant to simulate radon alpha particle exposure, the measurement of DNA breaks in a small 7.0 mm segment of the trachea exposed to external x-irradiation, the measurement of the rate of repair of the x-ray induced tracheal DNA strand breaks, the measurement of DNA strand breaks following inhalation of cigarette smoke or NO{sub 2}, the measurement of tracheal DNA stand breaks following exposure to high doses {sup 210}Po alpha particle radiation, the assessment of the amount of mucous in the goblet cells and in the underlying mucous glands. So far we have been unable to detect DNA strand breaks in the tracheal epithelium as a result of exposure to NO{sub 2} cigarette smoke or {sup 210}Po alpha particles. We have developed a simple artificial' trachea consisting of rat tracheal epithelial cells growing on a basement membrane coated millipore filter. Experiments are proposed to utilize these artificial tracheas to eliminate the potential interference of increased mucous secretion and/or inflammation that can significantly affect the radiation dose from the alpha particles. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles.

  15. Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M.

    2007-06-15

    We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

  16. Many-particle decays of {alpha}-chain structures in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.

    1993-12-31

    We have searched for evidence of exotic cluster configurations in {sup 24}Mg resembling a linear chain of {alpha} particles in various many-particle final states of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C system, including {sup 1}C(O{sub 2}{sup +})+{sup 12}C(O{sub 2}{sup +}) and {sup 8}Be+{sup 16}O*(4a). Such configurations are predicted to occur by a number of different theoretical models of the structure of {sup 24}Mg. An array of highly segmented Double-Sided Silicon Strip Detectors permits detailed, high resolution reconstruction of these many-charged-particle final states.

  17. Confined alpha particle diagnostic system using an energetic He{sup 0} beam for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Shinto, K.; Isobe, M.; Nishiura, M.; Kaneko, O.; Wada, M.; Walker, C. I.; Kitajima, S.; Okamoto, A.; Sugawara, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Tanaka, N.; Aoyama, H.; Kisaki, M.

    2006-10-15

    The beam neutralization system for measurement of the spatial and velocity distributions of alpha particles of ITER plasmas was studied. As forward angle detection against the beam injection direction is required for effective neutralization, arrangement of the measurement system using possible ports in ITER configuration is proposed. The count rate of neutralized alpha particles produced by the double charge exchange interaction with energetic He{sup 0} beam particles injected is estimated. The ratios of signal to neutron-induced noise are evaluated. When a He{sup 0} beam produced by autodetachment from a 1-1.5 MeV He{sup -} beam of 10 mA is injected, the signal to noise ratio becomes greater than 1 at {rho}<0.4, even without beam modulation. Usage of a lock-in technique at the frequency of radio-frequency quadrapole accelerator will make measurement at the outer region possible.

  18. Trident: A three-pronged galaxy survey. I. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies at z ~ 2 in GOODS North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, A.; Guaita, L.; Östlin, G.; Hayes, M.; Kiaeerad, F.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Lyman alpha (Lyα) emitting galaxies (LAEs) are used to probe the distant universe and are therefore important for galaxy evolution studies and for providing clues to the nature of the epoch of reionization. However, the exact circumstances under which Lyα escapes a galaxy are still not fully understood. Aims: The Trident project is designed to simultaneously examine Lyα, Hα, and Lyman continuum emission from galaxies at redshift z ~ 2, thus linking these three aspects of ionizing radiation in galaxies. In this paper, we outline the strategy of this project and examine the properties of LAEs in the GOODS North field. Methods: We performed a narrowband LAE survey in GOODS North using existing filters and two custom made filters at the Nordic Optical Telescope with MOSCA. We use complementary broadband archival data in the field to make a careful candidate selection and perform optical to near-IR SED fitting. We also estimate far-IR luminosities by matching our candidates to detections in Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS catalogues. Results: We find a total of 25 LAE candidates, probing mainly the bright end of the LAE luminosity function with LLyα ~ 1-15 × 1042 erg s-1. They display a range of masses of ~ 0.5-50 × 109M⊙, and average ages from a few tens of Myr to 1 Gyr when assuming a constant star formation history. The majority of our candidates also show signs of recent elevated star formation. Three candidates have counterparts in the GOODS-Herschel far-IR catalogue, with luminosities consistent with ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). Conclusions: The wide range of parameters derived from our SED fitting, as well as part of our sample being detected as ULIRGs, seems to indicate that at these Lyα luminosities, LAEs do not necessarily have to be young dwarfs, and that a lack of dust is not required for Lyα to escape. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific

  19. Factors influencing the number distribution and size of the particles emitted from a modern diesel vehicle in real urban traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, C. C.; Domínguez-Sáez, A.; Rubio, J. R.; Pujadas, M.

    2012-09-01

    Particle emissions from diesel engine cars depend firstly on exhaust aftertreatment systems but the use of the vehicle becomes also crucial. In urban areas, this use depends on: transport demand, route choices, traffic density, street conditions, weather, driver behaviour and topographical characteristics of the roads. Nowadays, most diesel vehicles in urban areas across Europe are equipped with exhaust aftertreatment systems aiming to reduce the total mass of emitted particles. In comparison to earlier aftertreatment systems, the implementation of modern procedures is causing a reduction in the size of the emitted particles up to a nanometric range. The main goal of this work is the characterization of particle size and number distribution in the submicrometric range from a modern diesel vehicle emission in real traffic conditions in the city of Madrid with the purpose of assessing the actual weight of the different city parameters influencing the particle emission. In order to accomplish this objective, up to 12 on board emission measurement experiments have been performed with a Euro IV Diesel passenger car driving along a single urban circuit in Madrid City. To cover the main external factors, stretch, traffic conditions and driving directions have been considered as independent variables for this study. Assuming a proper car operating conditions, the results show that street characteristics, vehicle density and topographic features are the main factors conditioning the particle emission. Extrapolating our results, a diesel standard passenger car circulating across a city like Madrid can emit more nanoparticles per kilometre (up to 114% more in this study) at peak hour than at off peak hour. Moreover, the driving direction can also influence dramatically the emission of nanoparticles per second. This difference in the emission rate depends on the street but in our study it can be higher than 110% depending on the driving direction.

  20. Fire hose instability driven by alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Lorenzo; Hellinger, Petr; Schwartz, Steven J.; Landi, Simone

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the dynamics of fire hose parallel instability driven by anisotropic alpha particles in a plasma with typical solar wind composition (nα = 5%ne). We show, for the first time, the liner and nonlinear dynamics of the instability by means of hybrid numeric simulations, highlighting its dependence on the main plasma parameters, including the relative drift between the alphas and the main proton population. Our results confirm that the parallel fire hose instability can be efficiently excited by anisotropic distribution of the less abundant alpha particles, even when the rest of the plasma (electrons and protons) is Maxwellian. Moreover, our finding suggest that the dynamics driven by the alphas can also influence the properties of the protons. In particular the instability is found to significantly affect the evolution of the alpha-proton drift, constraining its final intensity to values smaller than the local Alfvén speed, as observed in the solar wind far from the Sun. When simulations with both species initially anisotropic are performed, we find a coexistence of the fire hose wave activity excited by both ions, leading to final stable configurations which reflect the marginal stability state of each species. As a consequence, when observed in the commonly used (β||,T⊥/T||) plane, alpha particles and protons are seen to saturate in different regions of the parameter space. This property is in very good agreement with recent solar wind in situ observations and strongly suggests that those instabilities play a role in regulating the anisotropy solar wind ions.

  1. Alpha-particle emissivity screening of materials used for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Rodbell, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU's) in semiconductor memory and logic devices continue to be a reliability issue in modern CMOS devices. SEU's result from deposited charge in the Si devices caused by the passage of ionizing radiation. With technology scaling, the device area decreases, but the critical charge required to flip bits decreases as well. The interplay between both determines how the SEU rate scales with shrinking device geometries and dimensions. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation in the device environment has to be at the Ultra-Low Alpha (ULA) activity levels, e.g. less than 2 α/khr-cm2. Most detectors have background levels that are significantly larger than that level which makes making these measurements difficult and time consuming. A new class of alpha particle detector, utilizing pulse shape discrimination, is now available which allows one to make measurements quickly with ultra-low detector background. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle measurements of materials in the ULA activity levels, in terms of calibration, radon adsorption mitigation, the time required for obtaining reasonable statistics and comparisons to other detectors.

  2. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  3. Electronic Properties of DNA-Based Schottky Barrier Diodes in Response to Alpha Particles.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nuclear radiation such as alpha particles has become an important field of research in recent history due to nuclear threats and accidents. In this context; deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) acting as an organic semiconducting material could be utilized in a metal/semiconductor Schottky junction for detecting alpha particles. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the effect of alpha irradiation on an Al/DNA/p-Si/Al Schottky diode by investigating its current-voltage characteristics. The diodes were exposed for different periods (0-20 min) of irradiation. Various diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height, series resistance, Richardson constant and saturation current were then determined using conventional, Cheung and Cheung's and Norde methods. Generally, ideality factor or n values were observed to be greater than unity, which indicates the influence of some other current transport mechanism besides thermionic processes. Results indicated ideality factor variation between 9.97 and 9.57 for irradiation times between the ranges 0 to 20 min. Increase in the series resistance with increase in irradiation time was also observed when calculated using conventional and Cheung and Cheung's methods. These responses demonstrate that changes in the electrical characteristics of the metal-semiconductor-metal diode could be further utilized as sensing elements to detect alpha particles. PMID:26007733

  4. Electronic Properties of DNA-Based Schottky Barrier Diodes in Response to Alpha Particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nuclear radiation such as alpha particles has become an important field of research in recent history due to nuclear threats and accidents. In this context; deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) acting as an organic semiconducting material could be utilized in a metal/semiconductor Schottky junction for detecting alpha particles. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the effect of alpha irradiation on an Al/DNA/p-Si/Al Schottky diode by investigating its current-voltage characteristics. The diodes were exposed for different periods (0–20 min) of irradiation. Various diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height, series resistance, Richardson constant and saturation current were then determined using conventional, Cheung and Cheung’s and Norde methods. Generally, ideality factor or n values were observed to be greater than unity, which indicates the influence of some other current transport mechanism besides thermionic processes. Results indicated ideality factor variation between 9.97 and 9.57 for irradiation times between the ranges 0 to 20 min. Increase in the series resistance with increase in irradiation time was also observed when calculated using conventional and Cheung and Cheung’s methods. These responses demonstrate that changes in the electrical characteristics of the metal-semiconductor-metal diode could be further utilized as sensing elements to detect alpha particles. PMID:26007733

  5. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  6. A Luminosity Function of Ly(alpha)-Emitting Galaxies at Z [Approx. Equal to] 4.5(Sup 1),(Sup 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Steve; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel; Wang, JunXian; Dey, Arjun; Spinrad, Hyron; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)-emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed in a campaign of Keck DEIMOS follow-up observations to candidates selected in the Large Are (LALA) narrowband imaging survey.We targeted 97 candidates for spectroscopic follow-up; by accounting for the variety of conditions under which we performed spectroscopy, we estimate a selection reliability of approx.76%. Together with our previous sample of Keck LRIS confirmations, the 59 sources confirmed herein bring the total catalog to 73 spectroscopically confirmed z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)- emitting galaxies in the [approx. equal to] 0.7 deg(exp 2) covered by the LALA imaging. As with the Keck LRIS sample, we find that a nonnegligible fraction of the co rest-frame equivalent widths (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) that exceed the maximum predicted for normal stellar populations: 17%-31%(93%confidence) of the detected galaxies show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) 12%-27% (90% confidence) show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) > 240 A. We construct a luminosity function of z [approx. equal to] 4.5 Ly(alpha) emission lines for comparison to Ly(alpha) luminosity function < 6.6. We find no significant evidence for Ly(alpha) luminosity function evolution from z [approx. equal to] 3 to z [approx. equal to] 6. This result supports the conclusion that the intergalactic me largely reionized from the local universe out to z [approx. equal to] 6.5. It is somewhat at odds with the pronounced drop in the cosmic star formation rate density recently measured between z approx. 3 an z approx. 6 in continuum-selected Lyman-break galaxies, and therefore potentially sheds light on the relationship between the two populations.

  7. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Alpha-Particle Emitters In Vivo at Low Doses

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Azure, Michael T.; Narra, Venkat R.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit α particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The 224Ra daughters 212Pb and 212Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of α and β particles in their decay to stable 208Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of 212Pb and its daughters. When 212Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters 212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D37) was 0.143 ± 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D37 for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po, was used to obtain an RBE–LET relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBEα = 4.8 − 6.1 × 10−2 LET + 1.0 × 10−3 LET2. Similarly, the dependence of RBE on α-particle energy Eα was given by RBEα=22Eα−0.73. These relationships, based on in vivo experimental data, may be valuable in predicting biological effects of α-particle emitters. PMID:8146279

  8. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  9. Performance of an in-situ alpha spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R

    2016-03-01

    Equipment was recently developed for detecting alpha particles from flat and smooth surfaces with good energy resolution at ambient air pressure. In this work, the detection efficiencies were determined using different extended-area sources emitting alpha and beta radiation and a mixed nuclide point source emitting alpha radiation. Beta particles are of importance because they can also be detected. Counts originating from alpha and beta particles are mainly at different energies, which make their separation possible. An efficiency of 0.14 was determined for an extended-area (>30cm(2)) homogeneous source emitting alpha radiation at the energy of 5-6MeV, whereas for the beta emitters the efficiencies were 0.07-0.19 depending on the beta-particle emission energies. The use of a collimator reduces the detection efficiencies by a factor of up to ten. PMID:26688356

  10. Variation in RBE for Survival of V79-4 Cells as a Function of Alpha-Particle (Helium Ion) Energy.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Bliss L; Stevens, David L; Goodhead, Dudley T; Hill, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) α particles are important with respect to the carcinogenic risk associated with human exposure to ionizing radiation, most notably to radon and its progeny. Additionally, the potential use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in radiotherapy is increasingly being explored. Within the body the emitted alpha particles slow down, traversing a number of cells with a range of energies and therefore with varying efficiencies at inducing biological response. The LET of the particle typically rises from between ~70-90 keV μm(-1) at the start of the track (depending on initial energy) to a peak of ~237 keV μm(-1) towards the end of the track, before falling again at the very end of its range. To investigate the variation in biological response with incident energy, a plutonium-238 alpha-particle irradiator was calibrated to enable studies with incident energies ranging from 4.0 MeV down to 1.1 MeV. The variation in clonogenic survival of V79-4 cells was determined as a function of incident energy, along with the relative variation in the initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) measured using the FAR assay. The clonogenic survival data also extends previously published data obtained at the Medical Research Council (MRC), Harwell using the same cells irradiated with helium ions, with energies ranging from 34.9 MeV to 5.85 MeV. These studies were performed in conjunction with cell morphology measurements on live cells enabling the determination of absorbed dose and calculation of the average LET in the cell. The results show an increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for cell inactivation with decreasing helium ion energy (increasing LET), reaching a maximum for incident energies of ~3.2 MeV and corresponding average LET of 131 keV μm(-1), above which the RBE is observed to fall at lower energies (higher LETs). The effectiveness of single alpha-particle traversals (relevant to low-dose exposure) at inducing cell

  11. Cryogenic microcalorimeter system for ultra-high resolution alpha-particle spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael W; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Croce, Mark P; Hoteling, N J; Lamont, S P; Plionis, A A; Dry, D E; Ullom, J N; Bennett, D A; Horansky, R; Kotsubo, V; Cantor, R

    2009-01-01

    Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with {approx}15 uK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis, This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha spectrometer, and will show recent results.

  12. Chemical and size characterization of particles emitted from the burning of coal and wood in rural households in Guizhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hefeng; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming; Wan, Lin; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhang, Min; Mestl, Heidi E. S.; Alnes, Line W. H.; Aunan, Kristin; Mellouki, Abdel Wahid

    2012-05-01

    Field measurements were conducted to determine indoor air particulate pollutant emissions from the burning of coal and wood, two major household fuels, in rural households in Guizhou, China. Chemical composition, particle mass and particle size distribution as well as number concentration were measured in this study. Chemical composition analysis indicates that the carbonaceous particle is dominant in the PM2.5 mass, accounting for about 41% for wood and 55% for coal. The OC/EC ratio was 10.8 for wood and 7.6 for coal. Most of the water-soluble ions were found in the 0.4-2.1 μm size fractions and dominated by ammonium and sulfate. Particle mass concentrations inversely correlate with particle total number concentrations during the sampling period. Obvious differences were observed in the evolution of particle number concentrations and size distributions between coal combustion and wood burning. Particles emitted from coal combustion were characterized by unimodal size distribution, with average peak values ranging from 70.3 to 75.7 nm during the flaming stage of the burning cycle. Particles from wood burning were characterized by a transition from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution during the same period. Average peak values in the bimodal mode were 10-20 nm (nucleation mode) and 40-50 nm (Aitken mode), whereas the average peak value in the unimodal mode was about 63 nm.

  13. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  14. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  15. New measurements of W-values for protons and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Giesen, U; Beck, J

    2014-10-01

    The increasing importance of ion beams in cancer therapy and the lack of experimental data for W-values for protons and heavy ions in air require new measurements. A new experimental set-up was developed at PTB and consistent measurements of W-values in argon, nitrogen and air for protons and alpha particles with energies from 0.7 to 3.5 MeV u(-1) at PTB, and for carbon ions between 3.6 and 7.0 MeV u(-1) at GSI were carried out. This publication concentrates on the measurements with protons and alpha particles at PTB. The experimental methods and the determination of corrections for recombination effects, beam-induced background radiation and additional effects are presented.

  16. Turbulent transport of MeV range cyclotron heated minorities as compared to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, István; Wilkie, George J.; Kazakov, Yevgen O.; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-11-01

    We study the turbulent transport of an ion cyclotron resonance heated (ICRH), MeV range minority ion species in tokamak plasmas. Such highly energetic minorities, which can be produced in the three ion minority heating scheme (Kazakov et al (2015) Nucl. Fusion 55 032001), have been proposed to be used to experimentally study the confinement properties of fast ions without the generation of fusion alphas. We compare the turbulent transport properties of ICRH ions with that of fusion born alpha particles. Our theoretical predictions indicate that care must be taken when conclusions are drawn from experimental results: while the effect of turbulence on these particles is similar in terms of transport coefficients, differences in their distribution functions—ultimately their generation processes—make the resulting turbulent fluxes different.

  17. Stability of EUV multilayer coatings to low energy alpha particles bombardment.

    PubMed

    Nardello, M; Zuppella, Paola; Polito, V; Corso, Alain Jody; Zuccon, Sara; Pelizzo, M G

    2013-11-18

    Future solar missions will investigate the Sun from very close distances and optical components are constantly exposed to low energy ions irradiation. In this work we present the results of a new experiment related to low energy alpha particles bombardments on Mo/Si multilayer optical coatings. Different multilayer samples, with and without a protecting capping layer, have been exposed to low energy alpha particles (4keV), fixing the ions fluency and varying the time of exposure in order to change the total dose accumulated. The experimental parameters have been selected considering the potential application of the coatings to future solar missions. Results show that the physical processes occurred at the uppermost interfaces can strongly damage the structure. PMID:24514344

  18. An experimental quantification of the NOX production efficiency of energetic alpha particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Cooray, Vernon; Possnert, Göran; Nyberg, Johan

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study on the production of NOX by alpha particles impact in air at atmospheric pressure is presented. A mixed radioactive source of 208Po and 209Po with an integrated activity of 9.6 MBq over a solid angle of 2π and an average alpha particle energy of 4.5 MeV was used for ionization of atmospheric air in an airtight chamber and the NOX production was measured by the chemiluminescence method. The NOX production rate is found to be about 1.2 NOX molecules per ion-pair. The NOX production efficiency per Joule of dissipated energy is calculated to be 20×1016 NOX molecules per Joule. This efficiency is comparable to that of hot laboratory sparks discharges.

  19. Signature of the N = 126 shell closure in dwell times of alpha-particle tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    Characteristic quantities such as the penetration and preformation probabilities, assault frequency and tunneling times in the tunneling description of alpha decay of heavy nuclei are explored to reveal their sensitivity to neutron numbers in the vicinity of the magic neutron number N = 126. Using realistic nuclear potentials, the sensitivity of these quantities to the parameters of the theoretical approach is also tested. An investigation of the region from N = 116 to N = 132 in Po nuclei reveals that the tunneling α particle spends the least amount of time with an N = 126 magic daughter nucleus. The shell closure at N = 126 seems to affect the behavior of the dwell times of the tunneling alpha particles and this occurs through the influence of the Q-values involved.

  20. Candidate Reactions for Mercury Detection Induced by Neutron and Alpha Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J.; Wittman, Richard S.; Schenter, Robert E.; Cooper, John A.

    2007-03-21

    This paper summarizes modeling of mercury to activated states with alpha particles, neutrons, or deuterons, and the spectral emission from the activated products. Activation can occur with a source such as 242Cf , 241Am-Be, a neutron generator, or a particle accelerator, and the activation products measured if sufficient signal is provided. Identification and measurement of mercury by prompt gamma emission, generated by bombardment with neutrons is reported. Activation product reactions of (α, xn) (d, xn) (n,γ) and (n,p) are screened as candidate reactions. Initial calculations indicate the potential use of either alpha, or 14 MeV neutron activation to assess part per billion concentrations of mercury in the gaseous phase. Ultimately, data from sample analysis of ambient conditions flue gas will be used to assess mercury detection sensitivity and specificity under typical operating conditions.

  1. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days.

  2. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  3. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Wu, L. J.; Liu, S. X.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

  4. Alpha migration through air filters: A numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Arthur H.; Daroza, Robert A.; Chang, Yun

    1991-12-01

    This theoretical study investigates the migration of alpha-emitting particles through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. As part of the study, a review of previous research relating to the alpha-migration phenomena was conducted. As a result of the literature review, a numerical model was developed to simulate the migration of alpha-emitting radionuclide aerosols through HEPA filters. This model predicts the filter performance with regard to particle penetration. It can be used to better estimate the penetration of alpha radioactive species through filter systems for environmental concerns, to aid in the use of current filter systems, and to design new filter systems.

  5. Results from the Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer: Detection of Radon-222 Over Craters Aristarchus and Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Moore, K. R.; Belian, R. D.; Maurice, S.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-11-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-218 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. We have examined APS data within +/- 45 degrees of the equator acquired during periods of low interplanetary alpha particle flux. The spectra were summed over all LP mapping cycles when the instrument was turned on (approximately 229 days over 16 months). To yield lunar alpha particle maps, we summed over a 0.2 MeV energy range centered on each of the three alpha particle energies noted above. The LP APS found only a faint indication of alpha particles resulting from the decay of polonium-218 and only a marginal detection of alpha particles from polonium-210. However, our radon-222 alpha particle map indicates that radon gas is presently emanating from the vicinity of craters Aristarchus and Kepler. The LP gamma-ray spectrometer, which effectively has significantly higher spatial resolution than the APS, identified thorium enrichments at these two craters. Thorium and uranium are both incompatible elements whose lunar surface abundances are highly correlated; thus, it is likely that the radon-222 alpha particles measured using the LP APS originate from Kepler and Aristarchus. Our detection of radon over Aristarchus is consistent with the results of the Apollo 15 APS.

  6. Light particles emitted in coincidence with evaporation residues in {sup 79}Br(930 MeV) + {sup 27}Al collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez Lomeli, E.; Dacal, A.; Ortiz, M.E.; D`Onofrio, A.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Kim, H.; Korolija, M.; Shapira, D.

    1993-10-01

    Exclusive measurements of light particles, deuterons, tritons and alphas, in coincidence with Evaporation Residues (ER), were performed at the Holified Heavy Ion Research Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the large detector array HILI (Heavy Ion Light Ion). Heavy fragments produced in the reaction (Z 35), were stopped in the Ionisation Chamber, where their energy, atomic number (Z) and position were measured. Coincident light particles, were detected in the 192 element hodoscope placed behind the chamber, where its charge (Z) and energy were measured. Also the time of flight relative to the radio frequency of the cyclotron, allowed identification of protons deuterons and tritons.

  7. Critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation in asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sogo, Takaaki; Roepke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter

    2010-09-15

    The critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation in nuclear matter with Fermi surface imbalance between protons and neutrons is determined. The in-medium four-body Schroedinger equation, generalizing the Thouless criterion of the BCS transition, is applied using a Hartree-Fock wave function for the quartet projected onto zero total momentum in matter with different chemical potentials for protons and neutrons.

  8. Redefining Relative Biological Effectiveness in the Context of the EQDX Formalism: Implications for Alpha-Particle Emitter Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Howell, Roger W.; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (αRPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, αRPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of α-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by α-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or β-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(α/β), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(α/β), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(α/β), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the α particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from

  9. Critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation within a momentum-projected mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sogo, T.; Roepke, G.; Lazauskas, R.

    2009-05-15

    {alpha}-particle (quartet) condensation in homogeneous spin-isospin symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The usual Thouless criterion for the critical temperature is extended to the quartet case. The in-medium four-body problem is strongly simplified by the use of a momentum-projected mean-field ansatz for the quartet. The self-consistent single-particle wave functions are shown and discussed for various values of the density at the critical temperature. Excellent agreement of the critical temperature with a numerical solution of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equation is obtained.

  10. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained.

  11. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained. PMID:27341133

  12. Wurtzite Gallium Nitride as a scintillator detector for alpha particles (a Geant4 simulation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, A.; Sheidaiy, M.

    2015-05-01

    Gallium Nitride has become a very popular material in electronics and optoelectronics. Because of its interesting properties, it is suitable for a large range of applications. This material also shows very good scintillation properties that make it a possible candidate for use as a charged particles scintillator detector. In this work, we simulated the scintillation and optical properties of the gallium nitride in the presence of alpha particles using Geant4. The results show that gallium nitride can be an appropriate choice for this purpose.

  13. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  14. Coinhibition of viral interferon induction by Benzo(. alpha. )pyrene in association with occupation-related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown ); Booth, J.A. ); Flowers, L. )

    1990-06-01

    Benzo({alpha})pyrene (B(a)P) in combination with coal, asbestos, silicate, or metal particles was studied for its inhibitory effects on interferon-{alpha}/{beta} induction by influenza virus in rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK{sub 2}) cell monolayers. B(a)P per se had no adverse effect on the induction process. However, when cell cultures were pretreated with B(a)P that was bioactivated by rat liver S9 homogenate, from 52 to 65% inhibition of interferon induction occurred. Significantly greater depression (coinhibition) of viral interferon induction (>83%) resulted when bioactivated B(a)P was incorporated with coal particles representative of coal rank (anthracite, bituminous, lignite, peat). Coinhibition affected by bioactivated B(a)P was coal rank-independent but any interferon inhibitory activity affected by coal particles per se was coal rank-independent. When metals (aluminum, aluminum oxide, ferric oxide, nickel, or chromium) or asbestos fibers were individually mixed with bioactivated B(a)P, coinhibition of cellular interferon synthesis also resulted which was significantly greater than that manifested by bioactivated B(a)P or particles per se. Coinhibition of interferon induction by silicates and the bioactivated hydrocarbon was not in evidence although some silicates alone partially inhibited the induction process. Viral interferon induction was inhibited in a dose-response manner by B(a)P ({+-}S9) in combination with selected particles.

  15. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  16. Electrostatic ion-acoustic-like instabilities in the solar wind with a backstreaming alpha particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, L.; Gomberoff, K.; Deutsch, A.

    2010-06-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic instabilities have been shown to occur frequently and under very different conditions in plasma with two ion beams such as the fast solar wind. These instabilities can be triggered when the phase velocity of electrostatic ion-acoustic waves propagating forward and backward relative to the interplanetary magnetic field overlaps due to the presence of a finite amplitude of circularly polarized wave. The instabilities can be triggered by waves supported by the same ion component, or by waves supported by different ion components. By assuming a beam of alpha particles moving backward relative to the external magnetic field, as observed in some events in the fast solar wind, it is shown that a very small negative drift velocity of the alpha particle beam relative to the core plasma--a few percent of the local Alfven velocity--can trigger a very rich variety of nonlinear electrostatic acousticlike instabilities. Their growth rates can be rather large and they persist for larger negative alpha particles drift velocities and temperatures.

  17. Radioluminescence of solid neodymium-doped laser materials excited by {alpha}-particles and fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Seregina, E A; Seregin, A A

    2013-02-28

    The characteristics of radioluminescence of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses under excitation by plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) {alpha}-particles, as well as by {alpha}-particles and spontaneous fission fragments of californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf), are studied. The radioluminescence branching ratios {beta}{sub ij} for the transition from the {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2} level to the {sup 2S+1}L{sub J} levels in Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals are measured. Radioluminescence from the {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} level to low-lying levels is observed. The {beta}{sub ij} ratios for transitions from the high-lying {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}D{sub 3/2}, and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels are theoretically calculated. The lifetimes of metastable levels of Nd{sup 3+} excited by {sup 252}Cf fission fragments are measured. The efficiency of the conversion of energy of {alpha}-particles and fission fragments to the energy of optical radiation of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses is determined. (active media)

  18. The local skin dose conversion coefficients of electrons, protons and alpha particles calculated using the Geant4 code.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bintuan; Dang, Bingrong; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Li, Wenjian

    2013-10-01

    The skin tissue-equivalent slab reported in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116 to calculate the localised skin dose conversion coefficients (LSDCCs) was adopted into the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4. The Geant4 code was then utilised for computation of LSDCCs due to a circular parallel beam of monoenergetic electrons, protons and alpha particles <10 MeV. The computed LSDCCs for both electrons and alpha particles are found to be in good agreement with the results using the MCNPX code of ICRP 116 data. The present work thus validates the LSDCC values for both electrons and alpha particles using the Geant4 code.

  19. Blue-Emitting Small Silica Particles Incorporating ZnSe-Based Nanocrystals Prepared by Reverse Micelle Method

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Masanori; Li, Chunliang; Yang, Ping; Murase, Norio

    2007-01-01

    ZnSe-based nanocrystals (ca. 4-5 nm in diameter) emitting in blue region (ca. 445 nm) were incorporated in spherical small silica particles (20–40 nm in diameter) by a reverse micelle method. During the preparation, alkaline solution was used to deposit the hydrolyzed alkoxide on the surface of nanocrystals. It was crucially important for this solution to include Zn2+ ions and surfactant molecules (thioglycolic acid) to preserve the spectral properties of the final silica particles. This is because these substances in the solution prevent the surface of nanocrystals from deterioration by dissolution during processing. The resultant silica particles have an emission efficiency of 16% with maintaining the photoluminescent spectral width and peak wavelength of the initial colloidal solution. PMID:18350119

  20. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

  1. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in Targeted Alpha-Particle Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

  2. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy.

  3. Benchmarking the Geant4 full system simulation of an associated alpha-particle detector for use in a D-T neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P; Cates, Joshua W; Hausladen, Paul A; Laubach, Mitchell A; Sparger, Johnathan E; Donnald, Samuel B

    2012-08-01

    The position-sensitive alpha-particle detector used to provide the starting time and initial direction of D-T neutrons in a fast-neutron imaging system was simulated with a Geant4-based Monte Carlo program. The whole detector system, which consists of a YAP:Ce scintillator, a fiber-optic faceplate, a light guide, and a position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT), was modeled, starting with incident D-T alphas. The scintillation photons, whose starting time follows the distribution of a scintillation decay curve, were produced and emitted uniformly into a solid angle of 4π along the track segments of the alpha and its secondaries. Through tracking all photons and taking into account the quantum efficiency of the photocathode, the number of photoelectrons and their time and position distributions were obtained. Using a four-corner data reconstruction formula, the flood images of the alpha detector with and without optical grease between the YAP scintillator and the fiber-optic faceplate were obtained, which show agreement with the experimental results. The reconstructed position uncertainties of incident alpha particles for both cases are 1.198 mm and 0.998 mm respectively across the sensitive area of the detector. Simulation results also show that comparing with other faceplates composed of 500 μm, 300 μm, and 100 μm fibers, the 10-μm-fiber faceplate is the best choice to build the detector for better position performance. In addition, the study of the background originating inside the D-T generator suggests that for 500-μm-thick YAP:Ce coated with 1-μm-thick aluminum, and very good signal-to-noise ratio can be expected through application of a simple threshold.

  4. Bismuth-213 and actinium-225 -- generator performance and evolving therapeutic applications of two generator-derived alpha-emitting radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Apostolidis, Christos

    2012-07-01

    The alpha emitters (225)Ac and (213)Bi are promising therapeutic radionuclides for application in targeted alpha therapy of cancer and infectious diseases. Both alpha emitters are available with high specific activity from established radionuclide generators. Their favourable chemical and physical properties have led to the conduction of a large number of preclinical studies and several clinical trials, demonstrating the feasibility, safety and therapeutic efficacy of targeted alpha therapy with (225)Ac and (213)Bi. This review describes methods for the production of (225)Ac and (213)Bi and gives an overview of (225)Ac/(213)Bi radionuclide generator systems. Selected preclinical studies are highlighted and the current clinical experience with (225)Ac and (213)Bi is summarized.

  5. Bismuth-213 and actinium-225 -- generator performance and evolving therapeutic applications of two generator-derived alpha-emitting radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Apostolidis, Christos

    2012-07-01

    The alpha emitters (225)Ac and (213)Bi are promising therapeutic radionuclides for application in targeted alpha therapy of cancer and infectious diseases. Both alpha emitters are available with high specific activity from established radionuclide generators. Their favourable chemical and physical properties have led to the conduction of a large number of preclinical studies and several clinical trials, demonstrating the feasibility, safety and therapeutic efficacy of targeted alpha therapy with (225)Ac and (213)Bi. This review describes methods for the production of (225)Ac and (213)Bi and gives an overview of (225)Ac/(213)Bi radionuclide generator systems. Selected preclinical studies are highlighted and the current clinical experience with (225)Ac and (213)Bi is summarized. PMID:22642390

  6. Effect of wood combustion conditions on the morphology of freshly emitted fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvela, T.; Tissari, J.; Sippula, O.; Kaivosoja, T.; Leskinen, J.; Virén, A.; Lähde, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    The physical and chemical properties of biomass combustion-originated particles produced under controlled conditions (efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion) were studied. Transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to study the morphology and chemical composition of the size-classified samples collected from the flue gas. In addition, online-measured particle number size distributions, chemical analyses of the PM samples, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were used to interpret the results. The particles were composed of inorganic species and carbonaceous matter. Zinc oxide particles with an average diameter of <13 nm acted as seeds for the condensation of inorganic vapours and organic material, forming ash particles with a nested structure. The outer layer was composed mainly of alkali salts. Soot and gaseous hydrocarbons were formed in high concentrations during the impaired combustion conditions. Two modes of particle size distribution were observed, with each exhibiting distinctive features. The main particle type found in the ultrafine particle size mode (<100 nm) was ash. Impairing the combustion conditions increased the release of soot and condensable organics into the PM, found mainly in the accumulation particle size mode (>100 nm). TEM observations of the size-classified samples revealed that condensed organic matter influenced the ash particle size and appearance. The soot morphology was also found to change, even after short periods of time, due to the presence of OM; changes in the primary particle diameter and the appearance of the agglomerates were observed. As external mixtures, the soot and ash particles were separated into two particle size modes, but both could be found as internally mixed from the accumulation mode. This result extends the current knowledge of particle formation in wood combustion, showing that the particle formation processes of ash and soot particles are largely

  7. Effect of particle size on hydroxyapatite crystal-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Imad; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Philippidis, Pandelis; Whelan, Linda C; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Haskard, Dorian O; Landis, R Clive

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages may promote a vicious cycle of inflammation and calcification in the vessel wall by ingesting neointimal calcific deposits (predominantly hydroxyapatite) and secreting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, itself a vascular calcifying agent. Here we have investigated whether particle size affects the proinflammatory potential of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro and whether the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway plays a role in the macrophage TNFalpha response. The particle size and nano-topography of nine different crystal preparations was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and gas sorbtion analysis. Macrophage TNFalpha secretion was inversely related to hydroxyapatite particle size (P=0.011, Spearman rank correlation test) and surface pore size (P=0.014). A necessary role for the NF-kappaB pathway was demonstrated by time-dependent I kappaB alpha degradation and sensitivity to inhibitors of I kappaB alpha degradation. To test whether smaller particles were intrinsically more bioactive, their mitogenic activity on fibroblast proliferation was examined. This showed close correlation between TNFalpha secretion and crystal-induced fibroblast proliferation (P=0.007). In conclusion, the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate macrophage TNFalpha secretion depends on NF-kappaB activation and is inversely related to particle and pore size, with crystals of 1-2 microm diameter and pore size of 10-50 A the most bioactive. Microscopic calcific deposits in early stages of atherosclerosis may therefore pose a greater inflammatory risk to the plaque than macroscopically or radiologically visible deposits in more advanced lesions.

  8. Photons and particles emitted from cold atmospheric-pressure plasma inactivate bacteria and biomolecules independently and synergistically

    PubMed Central

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Edengeiser, Eugen; Jarzina, Fabian; Brinckmann, Steffen; Steinborn, Elena; Havenith, Martina; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E.

    2013-01-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas are currently in use in medicine as surgical tools and are being evaluated for new applications, including wound treatment and cosmetic care. The disinfecting properties of plasmas are of particular interest, given the threat of antibiotic resistance to modern medicine. Plasma effluents comprise (V)UV photons and various reactive particles, such as accelerated ions and radicals, that modify biomolecules; however, a full understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie plasma-based disinfection has been lacking. Here, we investigate the antibacterial mechanisms of plasma, including the separate, additive and synergistic effects of plasma-generated (V)UV photons and particles at the cellular and molecular levels. Using scanning electron microscopy, we show that plasma-emitted particles cause physical damage to the cell envelope, whereas UV radiation does not. The lethal effects of the plasma effluent exceed the zone of physical damage. We demonstrate that both plasma-generated particles and (V)UV photons modify DNA nucleobases. The particles also induce breaks in the DNA backbone. The plasma effluent, and particularly the plasma-generated particles, also rapidly inactivate proteins in the cellular milieu. Thus, in addition to physical damage to the cellular envelope, modifications to DNA and proteins contribute to the bactericidal properties of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma. PMID:24068175

  9. Photons and particles emitted from cold atmospheric-pressure plasma inactivate bacteria and biomolecules independently and synergistically.

    PubMed

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Edengeiser, Eugen; Jarzina, Fabian; Brinckmann, Steffen; Steinborn, Elena; Havenith, Martina; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E

    2013-12-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas are currently in use in medicine as surgical tools and are being evaluated for new applications, including wound treatment and cosmetic care. The disinfecting properties of plasmas are of particular interest, given the threat of antibiotic resistance to modern medicine. Plasma effluents comprise (V)UV photons and various reactive particles, such as accelerated ions and radicals, that modify biomolecules; however, a full understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie plasma-based disinfection has been lacking. Here, we investigate the antibacterial mechanisms of plasma, including the separate, additive and synergistic effects of plasma-generated (V)UV photons and particles at the cellular and molecular levels. Using scanning electron microscopy, we show that plasma-emitted particles cause physical damage to the cell envelope, whereas UV radiation does not. The lethal effects of the plasma effluent exceed the zone of physical damage. We demonstrate that both plasma-generated particles and (V)UV photons modify DNA nucleobases. The particles also induce breaks in the DNA backbone. The plasma effluent, and particularly the plasma-generated particles, also rapidly inactivate proteins in the cellular milieu. Thus, in addition to physical damage to the cellular envelope, modifications to DNA and proteins contribute to the bactericidal properties of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  10. Alpha particles induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in primary human lymphocytes mediated through ATM.

    PubMed

    Horn, Simon; Brady, Darren; Prise, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The use of high linear energy transfer radiations in the form of carbon ions in heavy ion beam lines or alpha particles in new radionuclide treatments has increased substantially over the past decade and will continue to do so due to the favourable dose distributions they can offer versus conventional therapies. Previously it has been shown that exposure to heavy ions induces pan-nuclear phosphorylation of several DNA repair proteins such as H2AX and ATM in vitro. Here we describe similar effects of alpha particles on ex vivo irradiated primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Following alpha particle irradiation pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, but not DNA-PK and 53BP1, was observed throughout the nucleus. Inhibition of ATM, but not DNA-PK, resulted in the loss of pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in alpha particle irradiated lymphocytes. Pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX signal was rapidly lost over 24h at a much greater rate than foci loss. Surprisingly, pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX intensity was not dependent on the number of alpha particle induced double strand breaks, rather the number of alpha particles which had traversed the cell nucleus. This distinct fluence dependent damage signature of particle radiation is important in both the fields of radioprotection and clinical oncology in determining radionuclide biological dosimetry and may be indicative of patient response to new radionuclide cancer therapies.

  11. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  12. Experimental detection of alpha-particles from the radioactive decay of natural bismuth.

    PubMed

    de Marcillac, Pierre; Coron, Noël; Dambier, Gérard; Leblanc, Jacques; Moalic, Jean-Pierre

    2003-04-24

    The only naturally occurring isotope of bismuth, 209Bi, is commonly regarded as the heaviest stable isotope. But like most other heavy nuclei abundant in nature and characterized by an exceptionally long lifetime, it is metastable with respect to alpha-decay. However, the decay usually evades observation because the nuclear structure of 209Bi gives rise to an extremely low decay probability and, moreover, generates low-energy alpha-particles difficult to detect. Indeed, dedicated experiments attempting to record the alpha-decay of 209Bi in nuclear emulsions failed. However, scintillating bolometers operated at temperatures below 100 mK offer improved detection efficiency and sensitivity, whereas a broad palette of targets could be available. Here we report the successful use of this method for the unambiguous detection of 209Bi alpha-decay in bismuth germanate detectors cooled to 20 mK. We measure an energy release of 3,137 +/- 1 (statistical) +/- 2 (systematic) keV and a half-life of (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(19) yr, which are in agreement with expected values.

  13. Possible Stimulation of Nuclear alpha Decay by Superfluid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. L.

    2009-08-28

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of {sup 4}He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha decay in a situation when an alpha emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  14. Possible stimulation of nuclear alpha decay by superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Barabanov, A L

    2009-08-28

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of (4)He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha decay in a situation when an alpha emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  15. SILICON DIODE AS AN ALPHA PARTICLE DETECTOR AND SPECTROMETER FOR DIRECT FIELD MEASUREMENTS.

    PubMed

    Ören, Ünal; Nilsson, Jonas; Herrnsdorf, Lars; Rääf, Christopher L; Mattsson, Sören

    2016-09-01

    A windowless silicon (Si) diode (4 mm(2)) was evaluated as alpha particle detector and spectrometer for field measurements. It was irradiated with alpha particles from a (241)Am (2.3 kBq) and a (210)Po (9 kBq) source at source-detector distances (SDD) of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 cm. The energy resolution in terms of full width at half maximum was 281, 148 and 113 keV for SDD of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 cm, respectively. The minimum detectable activity increased from 0.08 to 0.83 Bq when the SDD increased from 0.5 to 1.8 cm. The detector has the potential for several alpha spectrometric applications, such as monitoring for wound, skin and surface contamination at nuclear fuel facilities, nuclear power plants and facilities handling radioactive waste. Other areas are environmental surveys following releases of actinides at accidents in nuclear power plants and in connection with other radiological or nuclear scenarios.

  16. SILICON DIODE AS AN ALPHA PARTICLE DETECTOR AND SPECTROMETER FOR DIRECT FIELD MEASUREMENTS.

    PubMed

    Ören, Ünal; Nilsson, Jonas; Herrnsdorf, Lars; Rääf, Christopher L; Mattsson, Sören

    2016-09-01

    A windowless silicon (Si) diode (4 mm(2)) was evaluated as alpha particle detector and spectrometer for field measurements. It was irradiated with alpha particles from a (241)Am (2.3 kBq) and a (210)Po (9 kBq) source at source-detector distances (SDD) of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 cm. The energy resolution in terms of full width at half maximum was 281, 148 and 113 keV for SDD of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 cm, respectively. The minimum detectable activity increased from 0.08 to 0.83 Bq when the SDD increased from 0.5 to 1.8 cm. The detector has the potential for several alpha spectrometric applications, such as monitoring for wound, skin and surface contamination at nuclear fuel facilities, nuclear power plants and facilities handling radioactive waste. Other areas are environmental surveys following releases of actinides at accidents in nuclear power plants and in connection with other radiological or nuclear scenarios. PMID:27103649

  17. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  18. Elemental Analysis of the Surface of Comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Lander Philae: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Schmanke, D.; Girones-Lopez, J.; Brueckner, J.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Gellert, R.; Markovski, C.

    2014-12-01

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe has reached its final target, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote exploration of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface, starting immediately examining its landing site with its scientific payload. Part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer). It will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument. It will irradiate the comet surface using Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle / X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. For 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away to the sun. After wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has been performed, including the APXS. After landing on the comet an intense initial measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS). As long as possible APXS and the other instruments will continue to measure and monitor the changes and increasing activity of the comet during its journey towards the inner region of the solar system.The project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G

  19. [Effect of surface decoration on the spectral characteristics of alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-lin; Zhong, Ju-hua; Zhang, Zhao-kui

    2003-02-01

    The alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles were equally dispersed in the solutions of stearic acid/n-hexane/chloroform by the ultrasonic method, the surfaces of the alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles were decorated by stearic acid, and the alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles decorated had very good flowage characteristic. Before alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles were decorated, the UV absorption was very strong at wavelengths shorter than 290 nm, and there was a shoulder peak at 330 nm. The absorption band edges of alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles was at 392 nm, and shifted toward blue, which was in contrast with that of bulk Fe2O3. This was caused by the quanta size effect and surface effect. IR characteristic peaks of the alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles appeared at 524.36 and 446.37 cm-1. After alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles were decorated, the absorption side moved from 392 to 896 nm, which significantly shifted to the red in contrast with that of bulk F2O3. The vibration of Fe-O bond moved from 524.36 to 521.33 cm-1 and from 446.37 to 443.34 cm-1, respectively. These were caused by the dielectric confinement effect. The relative intensity of X-ray diffraction obviously increased, and the diffraction peak size moved toward the direction of smaller diffraction angle after the alpha-Fe2O3 ultrafine particles were decorated. PMID:12939995

  20. Bremsstrahlung in {alpha} Decay Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Jentschura, U. D.; Koeck, F.; Lauer, M.; Schwalm, D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of {approx}500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the {alpha} particle and the emitted photon.

  1. Bremsstrahlung in alpha decay reexamined.

    PubMed

    Boie, H; Scheit, H; Jentschura, U D; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Milstein, A I; Terekhov, I S; Schwalm, D

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the alpha decay of (210)Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of approximately 500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the alpha particle and the emitted photon.

  2. A FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ,

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, A. J.; Wold, I. G. B.; Cowie, L. L.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a method for obtaining a flux-limited sample of Ly{alpha} emitters from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data. We show that the multiple GALEX grism images can be converted into a three-dimensional (two spatial axes and one wavelength axis) data cube. The wavelength slices may then be treated as narrowband images and searched for emission-line galaxies. For the GALEX NUV grism data, the method provides a Ly{alpha} flux-limited sample over the redshift range z = 0.67-1.16. We test the method on the Chandra Deep Field South field, where we find 28 Ly{alpha} emitters with faint continuum magnitudes (NUV > 22) that are not present in the GALEX pipeline sample. We measure the completeness by adding artificial emitters and measuring the fraction recovered. We find that we have an 80% completeness above a Ly{alpha} flux of 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We use the UV spectra and the available X-ray data and optical spectra to estimate the fraction of active galactic nuclei in the selection. We report the first detection of a giant Ly{alpha} blob at z < 1, though we find that these objects are much less common at z = 1 than at z = 3. Finally, we compute limits on the z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} luminosity function and confirm that there is a dramatic evolution in the luminosity function over the redshift range z = 0-1.

  3. Atmospheric behavior of trace elements on particles emitted from a coal-fired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondov, J. M.; Choquette, C. E.; Zoller, W. H.; Gordon, G. E.; Biermann, A. H.; Heft, R. E.

    Filter and cascade impactor samples of suspended particles were collected in-stack and at distances up to 64 km downwind in the plume of a large western coal-fired power plant equipped with both electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and venturi wet particulate scrubbers (VWS) to investigate modifications of the particulate signatures of minor and trace elements during transport. Samples were analyzed for 40 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Precipitator malfunction during the experiment caused greater than normal emission of large particles, and concentrations of As, Zn, Sb, Mo, Ga, W, U, V and Ba in near-plume particles collected on filters were enriched relative to their concentrations in stack particles by factors of 1.4 to 2.5, presumably because of sedimentation of very large particles. Selenium was enriched by up to 6-fold (plume:stack). However, enrichment of elements in the plume relative to more typical in-stack particles were insignificant for all elements except Se, which was enriched 2.3-fold. Concentrations of Se on particles in the stack and plume suggest that most of the Se vapor in stack gases became associated with aerosol particles soon after emission. Thus although significant post-emission modifications of elemental signatures of particles may occur for poorly controlled plants, little change is expected for well-controlled plants equipped with ESPs except for Se. Source signatures measured for Se must account for vapor deposition. Impactor data showed a preferential decrease in the concentrations of the above elements in submicrometer particles; suggesting that either intermodal coagulation or size selective sampling losses were important. The impactor data further suggest that enrichment-particle-size profiles for VWS emissions were not conservative during transport.

  4. Orbit-averaged drift kinetic equation for the study of alpha-particle transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.T.; Miley, G.H. . Fusion Studies Lab.); Burrell, K.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Neoclassical transport of minority suprathermal alpha particles is investigated. This paper departs from previous investigations in that (a) the banana-width ordering parameter {rho}{sub {theta}}/L is not formally restricted to be a small parameter and (b) a linearized collision operator that retains the effects of pitch-angle scattering, electron and ion drag, and speed diffusion is used. A step model approximation for the large-aspect-ratio, circular-cross-section tokamak magnetic field is adopted to simplify the orbit-averaging procedure. Assuming that the suprathermal alphas are in the banana regime, an asymptotic expansion in {tau}{sub B}/{tau}{sub S} {much lt} l is carried out.

  5. Jet Nebulization of Prostaglandin E1 During Neonatal Mechanical Ventilation: Stability, Emitted Dose and Aerosol Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Beena G.; Peterson, Jennifer; Malian, Monica; Galli, Robert; Geisor-Walter, Maria; McKinnon, Jon; Sharp, Jody; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2008-01-01

    Background We have previously reported the safety of aerosolized PGE1 in neonatal hypoxemic respiratory failure. The aim of this study is to characterize the physicochemical properties of PGE1 solution, stability, emitted dose and the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of PGE1 aerosol in a neonatal ventilator circuit. Methods PGE1 was diluted in normal saline and physicochemical properties of the solution characterized. Chemical stability and emitted dose were evaluated during jet nebulization in a neonatal conventional (CMV) or high frequency (HFV) ventilator circuit by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry method. The APSD of the PGE1 aerosol was evaluated with a six-stage cascade impactor during CMV. Results PGE1 solution in normal saline had a low viscosity (0.9818 cP) and surface tension (60.8 mN/m) making it suitable for aerosolization. Little or no degradation of PGE1 was observed in samples from aerosol condensates, the PGE1 solution infused over 24 h, or the residual solution in the nebulizer. The emitted dose of PGE1 following jet nebulization was 32–40% during CMV and 0.1% during HFV. The PGE1 aerosol had a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.4 µm and geometric standard deviation of 2.9 with 90% of particles being < 4.0 µm in size. Conclusion Nebulization of PGE1 during neonatal CMV or HFV is efficient and results in rapid nebulization without altering the chemical structure. On the basis of the physicochemical properties of PGE1 solution and the APSD of the PGE1 aerosol, one can predict predominantly alveolar deposition of aerosolized PGE1. PMID:17997106

  6. NIR-emitting molecular-based nanoparticles as new two-photon absorbing nanotools for single particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J.; Godin, A. G.; Clermont, G.; Lounis, B.; Cognet, L.; Blanchard-Desce, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to provide a green alternative to QDs for bioimaging purposes and aiming at designing bright nanoparticles combining both large one- and two-photon brightness, a bottom-up route based on the molecular engineering of dedicated red to NIR emitting dyes that spontaneously form fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) has been implemented. These fully organic nanoparticles built from original quadrupolar dyes are prepared using a simple, expeditious and green protocol that yield very small molecular-based nanoparticles (radius ~ 7 nm) suspension in water showing a nice NIR emission (λem=710 nm). These FONs typically have absorption coefficient more than two orders larger than popular NIR-emitting dyes (such as Alexa Fluor 700, Cy5.5 ….) and much larger Stokes shift values (i.e. up to over 5500 cm-1). They also show very large two-photon absorption response in the 800-1050 nm region (up to about 106 GM) of major promise for two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy. Thanks to their brightness and enhanced photostability, these FONs could be imaged as isolated nanoparticles and tracked using wide-field imaging. As such, thanks to their size and composition (absence of heavy metals), they represent highly promising alternatives to NIR-emitting QDs for use in bioimaging and single particle tracking applications. Moreover, efficient FONs coating was achieved by using a polymeric additive built from a long hydrophobic (PPO) and a short hydrophilic (PEO) segment and having a cationic head group able to interact with the highly negative surface of FONs. This electrostatically-driven interaction promotes both photoluminescence and two-photon absorption enhancement leading to an increase of two-photon brightness of about one order of magnitude. This opens the way to wide-field single particle tracking under two-photon excitation

  7. Nano-particle based scattering layers for optical efficiency enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hong-Wei; Lee, Jonghee; Hofmann, Simone; Hyun Kim, Yong; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lüssem, Björn; Wu, Chung-Chih; Leo, Karl; Gather, Malte C.

    2013-05-01

    The performance of both organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSC) depends on efficient coupling between optical far field modes and the emitting/absorbing region of the device. Current approaches towards OLEDs with efficient light-extraction often are limited to single-color emission or require expensive, non-standard substrates or top-down structuring, which reduces compatibility with large-area light sources. Here, we report on integrating solution-processed nano-particle based light-scattering films close to the active region of organic semiconductor devices. In OLEDs, these films efficiently extract light that would otherwise remain trapped in the device. Without additional external outcoupling structures, translucent white OLEDs containing these scattering films achieve luminous efficacies of 46 lm W-1 and external quantum efficiencies of 33% (both at 1000 cd m-2). These are by far the highest numbers ever reported for translucent white OLEDs and the best values in the open literature for any white device on a conventional substrate. By applying additional light-extraction structures, 62 lm W-1 and 46% EQE are reached. Besides universally enhancing light-extraction in various OLED configurations, including flexible, translucent, single-color, and white OLEDs, the nano-particle scattering film boosts the short-circuit current density in translucent organic solar cells by up to 70%.

  8. Beams of protons and alpha particles greater than approximately 30 keV/charge from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    Two beamlike particle events (30 keV/charge to 160 keV/charge) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland ultralow energy and charge analyzer on ISEE 1. These beams consist of protons as well as of alpha particles, and the spectra are generally steep and are decreasing with increasing energy. During one event the spectra of both protons and alpha particles have a maximum at approximately 65 keV/charge. During these events, the interplanetary magnetic field through the satellite position was almost tangent to the bow shock, and application of the theory of acceleration predicts acceleration of a solar wind particle up to 60 keV/nucleon in a single reflection. The observation of reflected protons as well as alpha particles has implications for the physical reflection process usually not discussed in acceleration theories.

  9. How to produce high specific activity tin-117m using alpha particle beam.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Essayan, M; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2016-09-01

    Tin-117m is an interesting radionuclide for both diagnosis and therapy, thanks to the gamma-ray and electron emissions, respectively, resulting from its decay to tin-117g. The high specific activity of tin-117m is required in many medical applications, and it can be obtained using a high energy alpha particle beam and a cadmium target. The experiments performed at the ARRONAX cyclotron (Nantes, France) using an alpha particle beam delivered at 67.4MeV provide a measurement of the excitation function of the Cd-nat(α,x)Sn-117m reaction and the produced contaminants. The Cd-116(α,3n)Sn-117m production cross section has been deduced from these experimental results using natural cadmium. Both production yield and specific activity as a function of the projectile energy have been calculated. These informations help to optimize the irradiation conditions to produce tin-117m with the required specific activity using α particles with a cadmium target.

  10. Analysis of particle-borne odorants emitted from concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xufei; Lorjaroenphon, Yaowapa; Cadwallader, Keith R; Wang, Xinlei; Zhang, Yuanhui; Lee, Jongmin

    2014-08-15

    Airborne particles are known to serve as a carrier of odors emanating from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, limited quantitative data about particle-borne odorants preclude an accurate assessment of the role of particles in odor transport. This study collected total suspended particulates (TSP) and PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) at the air exhaust of eight types of CAFOs (swine: farrowing, gestation, weaning, and finishing; poultry: manure-belt layer hen, tom turkey, chicken broiler, and cage-free layer hen; in total 20 animal buildings) in multiple seasons, and examined the variability in particle odorant composition with animal operation type, season, and particle size. Fifty-seven non-sulfur-containing odorants were identified and quantitated, including carbonyls, alcohols, acids, phenols, and nitrogen-containing compounds. They in total accounted for 2.19±1.52% TSP and 4.97±3.25% PM10 mass. Acetic acid and ethanol were most abundant but less odor-contributing than phenylacetic acid, indole, dodecanoic acid, and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, as determined by odor activity value. Particle odorant composition varied significantly with animal operation type, season, and particle size. The TSP and PM10 samples from swine gestation buildings, for example, showed distinctly different odorant compositions than those from tom turkey buildings. The summer TSP and PM10 samples contained in general lower concentrations of short-chain fatty acids but higher concentrations of long-chain fatty acids, aldehydes, and short-chain alcohols than the winter samples. Compared to TSP, PM10 samples from different types of CAFOs shared a more similar odorant composition, contained higher odorant concentrations per mass of particles, and accounted for on average 53.2% of the odor strength of their corresponding TSP samples. PMID:24863138

  11. Effects of MA 956 superalloy and alpha-alumina particles on some markers of human osteoblastic cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, A M; Martínez, M E; Martínez, P; Escudero, M L; Ruíz, J; Saldaña, L; Gómez-García, L; Fernández, L; del Valle, I; Munuera, L

    2001-01-01

    One of the problems associated with the modern biomaterials used in prostheses is osteolysis, which, although its exact origin is unknown, has been associated with wear particles. Osteoblasts seem to participate directly in this phenomenon. This paper investigates in vitro cellular response to the wear particles from the metal substrate and ceramic covering (alpha-alumina) of a new titanium yttrium aluminum alloy, MA 956, that has been proposed as a biomaterial because of its exceptional mechanical and electrochemical properties. The effect of different sizes (10 and 80 microm) of MA 956 and alpha-alumina particles on osteoblast function was studied in primary human bone cell cultures. Cells were harvested from trabecular bone fragments obtained during knee arthroplasty. Osteoblastic cell response to the particles was measured by assaying C-terminal type I procollagen (PICP), alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin secretion, with and without 1.25(OH)(2)D(3) stimulation, in the cell-conditioned medium. Both sizes of MA 956 and alpha-alumina particles decreased PICP secretion in nonstimulated osteoblastic cells, but this secretion was not affected in the cultures stimulated with 1.25(OH)(2)D(3). Only the 10 microm alpha-alumina particles inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity in 1.25(OH)(2)D(3)-stimulated and nonstimulated cultures. The rise in osteocalcin levels after 1.25(OH)(2)D(3) stimulation was lower in the presence of the 10 microm MA 956 particles than in the presence of alpha-alumina particles. Although both materials seem to have directly affected in vitro osteoblastic cell function, the increase in osteocalcin levels after 1.25(OH)(2)D(3) stimulation was lower after exposure to MA 956 particles than the increase observed after exposure to alpha-alumina particles. Therefore, it does not seem that osteocalcin stimulated bone resorption, suggesting that MA 956 would be less likely to provoke osteolysis. PMID:11077400

  12. Secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with alpha track detection for isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium-bearing particles.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used in combination with alpha track detection for the efficient analysis of uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances in environmental samples. A polycarbonate film containing particles was prepared and placed in contact with a CR-39 plastic detector. After exposure for 28 days, the detector was etched in a NaOH solution and each uranium-bearing particle was identified through observation of the alpha tracks recorded in the detector. A portion of the film containing each uranium-bearing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The films on the planchet were decomposed through plasma ashing for subsequent uranium abundance ratio analysis with SIMS. The alpha track-SIMS analysis of 10 uranium-bearing particles in a sample taken from a nuclear facility enabled n((235)U)/n((238)U) abundance ratios in the range 0.0072-0.25 to be detected, which were significantly higher than those obtained by SIMS without alpha track detection. The duration of the whole analytical process for analysis of 10 particles was about 32 days. The detection efficiency was calculated to be 27.1±6.5%, based on the analysis of the particles in uranium reference materials. The detection limits, defined as the diameter of the particle which produces alpha tracks more than one for a 28-days exposure, were estimated to be 0.8, 0.9, 1.1, 2.1 and 3.0 μm for the particles having the same uranium abundance ratios with NBL CRM U850, U500, U350, U050 and U010 reference materials, respectively. The use of alpha track detection for subsequent SIMS analysis is an inexpensive and an efficient way to measure uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances. PMID:24468381

  13. Differential Velocity between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Steinberg, John T.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high-plasma beta feature in high-latitude, high-speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high-speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high-speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large-amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high-latitude, high-speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high-speed, high-latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  14. The comparative effects of gamma radiation and in situ alpha particles on five strong-base anion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of external gamma radiation and in situ alpha particles were measured on a recently available, macroporous, strong-base polyvinylpyridine resin and on four strong-base polystyrene anion exchange resins. Each resin was irradiated in 7 M nitric acid to 1--10 megaGray of gamma radiation from external {sup 60}Co, or to 5--14 megaGray of alpha particles from sorbed {sup 238}Pu. Each irradiated resin was measured for changes in dry weight, wet volume, weak-base and strong-base chloride exchange capacities, and exchange capacities for Pu(4) from nitric acid. Alpha-induced resin damage was significantly less than that caused by an equivalent dose of gamma radiation. The polyvinylpyridine resin offers the greatest resistance to damage from gamma radiation and from alpha particles. 5 refs., 1 figs. 5 tabs.

  15. Development of a He{sup 0} Source for Confined Alpha Particle Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Kisaki, M.; Iwazaki, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Okamoto, A.; Kobuchi, T.; Shinto, K.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.; Wada, M.

    2008-03-12

    A probing He{sup 0} beam for confined alpha particle measurement using a double charge exchange process is now under development. A proof of principle experiment for ground-state He{sup 0} beam production will be performed on a test stand. Several methods are developed to measure the metastable fraction of a He{sup 0} beam. A full-size strong-focusing He{sup +} source has been constructed and sufficient beam current was achieved with a beam size tolerable to be used on ITER.

  16. Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

  17. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  18. PIXE-induced XRF by high energy protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, M.; Manfredi, G.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.

    1993-04-01

    In the past three years a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study has been conducted on the production of intense sources of monochromatic X-rays in the range 1-75 keV by bombardment of pure element targets with protons and alpha particles of tens of MeV energy. The present paper describes a dual-chamber irradiation system which has been designed and built for PIXE-induced XRF. Preliminary experimental results of analyses obtained with 20 MeV protons and a Zn primary target are shown.

  19. Beam-ion and alpha-particle effects on microinstabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.

    1983-12-01

    The analysis of electromagnetic kinetic toroidal eigenmodes for general magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria has been extended to include the effects of non-Maxwellian equilibrium distribution functions. This is necessary to properly represent the response of the hot-beam-ion species produced during neutral-beam injection heating and the response of the alpha-particle species in a thermonuclear plasma. The influence of these components on low-frequency microinstabilities is investigated for realistic cases typical of the PLT and PDX tokamak experiments.

  20. Beam--ion and alpha-particle effects on microinstabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1983-12-01

    The analysis of electromagnetic kinetic toroidal eigenmodes for general magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria has been extended to include the effects of non-Maxwellian equilibrium distribution functions. This is necessary to properly represent the response of the hot-beam--ion species produced during neutral-beam injection heating and the response of the alpha-particle species in a thermonuclear plasma. The influence of these components on low-frequency microinstabilities is investigated for realistic cases typical of the PLT and PDX tokamak experiments.

  1. Morphology and mixing state of individual freshly emitted wildfire carbonaceous particles

    PubMed Central

    China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Gorkowski, Kyle; Aiken, Allison C.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass burning is one of the largest sources of carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere, significantly affecting earth’s radiation budget and climate. Tar balls, abundant in biomass burning smoke, absorb sunlight and have highly variable optical properties, typically not accounted for in climate models. Here we analyse single biomass burning particles from the Las Conchas fire (New Mexico, 2011) using electron microscopy. We show that the relative abundance of tar balls (80%) is 10 times greater than soot particles (8%). We also report two distinct types of tar balls; one less oxidized than the other. Furthermore, the mixing of soot particles with other material affects their optical, chemical and physical properties. We quantify the morphology of soot particles and classify them into four categories: ~50% are embedded (heavily coated), ~34% are partly coated, ~12% have inclusions and~4% are bare. Inclusion of these observations should improve climate model performances. PMID:23824042

  2. Characterization and control of airborne particles emitted during production of epoxy/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cena, Lorenzo G; Peters, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    This work characterized airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratio ∼1). The particles generated during sanding were predominantly micron sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m(3) compared with those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m(3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m(3); p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  3. Trajectory of a test particle around a slowly rotating relativistic star emitting isotropic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Sok; Kim, Hongsu; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2010-04-15

    We explored the motion of test particles near slowly rotating relativistic star having a uniform luminosity. In order to derive the test particle's equations of motion, we made use of the radiation stress-energy tensor first constructed by Miller and Lamb. From the particle's trajectory obtained through the numerical integration of the equations of motion, it is found that for sufficiently high luminosity, 'suspension orbit' exists, where the test particle hovers around at uniform angular velocity in the same direction as the star's spin. Interestingly, it turned out that the radial position of the suspension orbit was determined by the luminosity and the angular momentum of the star alone and was independent of the initial positions and the specific angular momentum of the particle. Also found is that there exist not only the radiation drag but also 'radiation counter drag', which depends on the stellar radius and the angular momentum, and it is this radiation counterdrag that makes the test particle in the suspension orbit hover around at a uniform angular velocity that is greater than that induced by the Lense-Thirring effect (i.e., general relativistic dragging of inertial frame).

  4. Modification of alpha-particle emission spectrum in beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The alpha (α)-particle and neutron emission spectra in a deuterium-tritium plasma accompanied with neutral-beam-injection (NBI) heating are evaluated in a consistent way by solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equations for deuteron, triton, and α-particle simultaneously. It is shown that owing to the existence of non-Maxwellian tail component in fuel-ion distribution function due to NBI and/or nuclear elastic scattering, the generation rate of the energetic (≥4 MeV) α-particle increases significantly. When 20 MW intense deuterium beam with 1 MeV beam-injection energy is injected into an 800 m3 plasma (Te=10 keV, ne=6.2×1019 m-3), the enhancement of the fraction of the power carried by α-particles with energy above 4 (3.9) MeV to total α-particle power is almost twice (1.5 times) as much from the value for Gaussian distribution. A verification scenario for the modification of the emission spectrum by using the gamma (γ)-ray-generating B9e(α ,nγ)C12 reaction is also presented.

  5. Effects of Color Temperature and Brightness on Electroencephalogram Alpha Activity in a Polychromatic Light-emitting Diode

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Young; Ha, Ra-Yeon; Ryu, Vin; Kim, Eosu

    2013-01-01

    Objective It has been reported that working and learning efficiency might be increased through artificially controlling the color temperature and brightness of light. However, the neurological bases of these outcomes are not well established. Our study was designed to observe whether electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha frequency, as a candidate biological marker, demonstrates significant changes in response to alterations of specific light parameters. Methods Thirty-two healthy subjects performed cognitive tasks under four different polychromatic light conditions: a combination of two different levels of color temperature (2766K vs. 5918K) and brightness (300 lux vs. 600 lux). Spectrum analyses were performed on alpha frequency. Results Subjects reported that they felt more pleasant in bright conditions and more relaxed in warm color temperature conditions. Our findings indicate that alpha power increases in warm, low-light and cool, high-light conditions, and there is a significant interaction between color temperature and brightness. Conclusion EEGs might serve as a useful biological marker for further research related to the effects of polychromatic light on cognitive function. PMID:24465248

  6. Chemical characterization of freshly emitted particulate matter from aircraft exhaust using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Brem, B. T.; Ellenrieder, M.; Durdina, L.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Wang, J.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.

    2016-06-01

    Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.

  7. Chemical characterization of freshly emitted particulate matter from aircraft exhaust using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Brem, B. T.; Ellenrieder, M.; Durdina, L.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Wang, J.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.

    2016-06-01

    Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.

  8. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  9. The fine structure constant alpha: relevant for a model of a self-propelling photon and for particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl O.

    2015-09-01

    A model for a self propelling (i.e. massless) photon1 is based on oscillations of a pair of charges amounting to elementary charge divided by SQRT alpha, where alpha is the fine structure (Sommerfeld) constant. When one assumes a similar model for particles that do have rest mas (i.e. which are non- self propelling), alpha plays also a role in the rest masses of elementary particles. Indeed all fundamental elementary particle masses can be described by the alpha / beta rule2 --> m(particle) = alpha-n * betam* 27.2 eV /c2 where beta is the proton to electron mass ratio 183612 and n= 0….14, m= -1,0 or Thus, photons and particle masses are intimately related to the fine structure constant. If the latter would not have been strictly constant throughout all times, this would have had consequences for the nature of light and for all masses including those of elementary particles.

  10. Alfven waves, alpha particles, and pickup ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Past studies of the properties of Alfven waves in the solar wind have indicated that (1) the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations is almost always smaller than expected on the basis of the amplitude of the field fluctuations, even when the anisotropy of the plasma is taken into account, and (2) the alpha particles do not participate in the wave motions because they 'surf' on the waves carried by the proton fluid. Ulysses data are used to demonstrate that (1) the discrepancy between the velocity and field fluctuations is greater at high heliographic latitudes than in the ecliptic plane, and (2) the alphas do participate in the waves, being either in phase or out of phase with the proton motions depending on whether the differential flow speed between the alphas and protons is greater than or less than the 'observed' wave speed, B(sub o)(delta v squared / delta B squared)exp 1/2, as determined from the ratio of the amplitudes of the velocity and magnetic fluctuations. It is proposed that the modification of Alfven wave propagation speed is due to pressure anisotropies resulting from asymmetric distributions of interstellar pickup ions. If the proposed explanation is correct, it indicates that scattering of pickup ions onto a (bi)spherical shell may not be as complete as generally supposed.

  11. Relative biological effectiveness of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for double-strand break induction in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Anna Kristina; Stenerlöw, Bo; Jacobsson, Lars; Elmroth, Kecke

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify and to determine the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells irradiated in vitro and to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for DSB induction. The influence of the irradiation temperature on the induction of DSBs was also investigated. Human fibroblasts were irradiated as intact cells with alpha particles from (211)At, (60)Co gamma rays and X rays. The numbers and distributions of DSBs were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with fragment analysis for separation of DNA fragments in sizes 10 kbp-5.7 Mbp. A non-random distribution was found for DSB induction after irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At, while irradiation with low-LET radiation led to more random distributions. The RBEs for DSB induction were 2.1 and 3.1 for (60)Co gamma rays and X rays as the reference radiation, respectively. In the experiments studying temperature effects, nuclear monolayers were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles or (60)Co gamma rays at 2 degrees C or 37 degrees C and intact cells were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles at the same temperatures. The dose-modifying factor (DMF(temp)) for irradiation of nuclear monolayers at 37 degrees C compared with 2 degrees C was 1.7 for (211)At alpha particles and 1.6 for (60)Co gamma rays. No temperature effect was observed for intact cells irradiated with (211)At. In conclusion, irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At induced two to three times more DSB than gamma rays and X rays. PMID:17316073

  12. Observation of beam-induced changes in the polarization of Balmer-{alpha} radiation emitted following beam--tilted-foil transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, D.L.; Albridge, R.G.; Tolk, N.H.; Qi, W.; Allred, D.D.; Knight, L.V.

    1995-12-01

    Measurements of the circular polarization of Balmer-{alpha} radiation emitted by excited hydrogen atoms, following the transmission of (20--50)-keV protons through thin, tilted amorphous carbon foils, exhibit markedly unexpected behavior as a function of exposure of the foil to the proton beam. Specifically, the circular polarization changes from an initially well understood tilt-angle dependence to a behavior which, for low tilt angles, gives the {ital opposite} {ital handedness} {ital of} {ital circular} {ital polarization} from that predicted. In addition, the degree of alignment, indicated by the linear Stokes parameter {ital M}/{ital I}, is enhanced also as a function of dose. These changes in the tilt-angle dependence of the Stokes parameters have been systematically correlated with beam-induced graphitization of the foil, which is observed to occur from Raman measurements.

  13. Measurement of ion cascade energies through resolution degradation of alpha particle microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Stiehl, Gregory M.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Plionis, Alexander A.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2010-02-15

    Atomic cascades caused by ions impinging on bulk materials have remained of interest to the scientific community since their discovery by Goldstein in 1902. While considerable effort has been spent describing and, more recently, simulating these cascades, tools that can study individual events are lacking and several aspects of cascade behavior remain poorly known. These aspects include the material energies that determine cascade magnitude and the variation between cascades produced by monoenergetic ions. We have recently developed an alpha particle detector with a thermodynamic resolution near 100 eV full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and an achieved resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM for 5.3 MeV particles. The detector relies on the absorption of particles by a bulk material and a thermal change in a superconducting thermometer. The achieved resolution of this detector provides the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive technique and a factor of 8 improvement over semiconductor detectors. The exquisite resolution can be directly applied to improved measurements of fundamental nuclear decays and nuclear forensics. In addition, we propose that the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and achieved resolution is due to fluctuations in lattice damage caused by ion-induced cascades in the absorber. Hence, this new detector is capable of measuring the kinetic energy converted to lattice damage in individual atomic cascades. This capability allows new measurements of cascade dynamics; for example, we find that the ubiquitous modeling program, SRIM, significantly underestimates the lattice damage caused in bulk tin by 5.3 MeV alpha particles.

  14. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the natTi(α,x)51Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with Eα = 20.7 and Eα = 51.25 MeV, Iα = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the 72,73,75Se, 71,72,74,76,78As, and 69Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  15. Assessing the SEU resistance of CMOS latches using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Blaes, B.; Nixon, R.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of Cosmic Rays on the performance of integrated circuits (IC's) in a space environment is evident in the upset rate of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) launched in Apr. 1983. This satellite experiences a single-event-upset (SEU) per day which must be corrected from the ground. Such experience caused a redesign of the Galileo spacecraft with SEU resistant IC's. The solution to the SEU problem continues to be important as the complexity of spacecraft grows, the feature size of IC's decreases, and as space systems are designed with circuits fabricated at non-radiation hardened foundries. This paper describes an approach for verifying the susceptibility of CMOS latches to heavy-ion induced state changes. The approach utilizes alpha particles to induce the upsets in test circuits. These test circuits are standard cells that have offset voltages which sensitize the circuits to upsets. These results are then used to calculate the upsetability at operating voltages. In this study results are presented for the alpha particle upset of a six-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) cell. Then a methodology is described for the analysis of a standard-cell inverter latch.

  16. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  17. Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

  18. An improved electrostatic integrating radon monitor with the CR-39 as alpha-particle detector.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Zhuo, W; Chen, B; Zhao, C; Yi, Y; Zhang, Y

    2015-11-01

    In this study, based on the electrostatic integrating radon monitor (EIRM) developed by Iida et al., a new type of EIRM with the allyl glycol carbonate (CR-39) as alpha-particle detector was developed for outdoor radon measurements. Besides using the CR-39 to replace the cellulose nitrate film as alpha-particle detector, the electrode and the setting place of the CR-39 were also optimally designed based on the simulation results of the electric field and the detection efficiency. The calibration factor of the new EIRM was estimated to be 0.136±0.002 tracks cm(-2) (Bq m(-3) h)(-1), with the lower detection limit of 0.6 Bq m(-3) for a 2-month exposure. Furthermore, both the battery and the dry agent were also replaced to protect the environment. The results of intercomparison and field experiments showed that the performances of the new EIRM were much better than the original one. It suggests that the new type of ERIM is more suitable for large-scale and long-term outdoor radon surveys.

  19. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. PMID:27161512

  20. Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F.; Karamitros, M.; Brun, T.; Gordillo, N.; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S.; Seznec, H.

    2012-04-01

    The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a 239Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available.

  1. The evolution of energetic particles and the emitted radiation in solar flares. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward Tsang

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of accelerated particle distributions in a magnetized plasma and the resulting radiation are calculated, and the results are applied to solar flares. To study the radiation on timescales of order the particle lifetimes, the evolution of the particle distribution is determined by the use of the Fokker-Planck equation including Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirroring. Analytic solution to the equations are obtained for limiting cases such as homogeneous injection in a homogeneous plasma, and for small pitch angle. These analytic solutions are then used to place constraints on flare parameters such as density, loop length, and the injection timescale for very short implusive solar flares. For general particle distributions in arbitrary magnetic field and background density, the equation is solved numerically. The relative timing of microwaves and X-rays during individual flares is investigated. A number of possible sources for excessive microwave flux are discussed including a flattening in the electron spectrum above hard X-ray energies, thermal synchrotron emission, and trapping of electron by converging magnetic fields. Over shorter timescales, the Fokker-Planck equation is solved numerically to calculate the temporal evolution of microwaves and X-rays from nonthermal thick target models. It is shown that magnetic trapping will not account for the observed correlation of microwaves of approximately 0.15 seconds behind X-rays in flares with rapid time variation, and thus higher energy electrons must be accelerated later than lower energy electrons.

  2. Differential Effects of Alpha-Particle Radiation and X-Irradiation on Genes Associated with Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Chen, Jeremy; Kutzner, Barbara; Wilkins, Ruth C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of alpha-(α-) particle radiation and X-rays on apoptosis and associated changes in gene expression. Human monocytic cells were exposed to α-particle radiation and X-rays from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Four days postexposure, cell death was measured by flow cytometry and 84 genes related to apoptosis were analyzed using real-time PCR. On average, 33% of the cells were apoptotic at 1.5 Gy of α-particle radiation. Transcript profiling showed statistical expression of 15 genes at all three doses tested. Cells exposed to X-rays were <5% apoptotic at ~1.5 Gy and induced less than a 2-fold expression in 6 apoptotic genes at the higher doses of radiation. Among these 6 genes, Fas and TNF-α were common to the α-irradiated cells. This data suggests that α-particle radiation initiates cell death by TNF-α and Fas activation and through intermediate signalling mediators that are distinct from X-irradiated cells. PMID:22091383

  3. Gross alpha, gross beta activities and gamma emitting radionuclides composition of rainwater samples and deposition to ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, C.; Fernández, M. C.; Gordo, E.; Cañete, S.; Pérez, M.

    2011-02-01

    The radiometric composition of bulk deposition samples, collected monthly in a 5 year period (1 January 2005 until 31 December 2009) at a site located 30 m a.s.l in Málaga (4°28' 8″W; 36° 43'40″N), are analysed in this paper. Measurement of gross alpha, gross beta, artificial and natural radionuclide activity concentrations were carried out in 60 bulk deposition samples. We analysed the time series of gross alpha, gross beta 7Be, 210Pb and 40K. The specific activities of gross alpha and gross beta measured in bulk deposition material are in the range from 0.012-0.32 and 0.045-1.81 Bq l -1 and theirs mean values are: 0.11 and 0.59 Bq l -1 respectively. The activity values of 7Be and 210Pb are in the range from 0.65-8.3 and 0.05-1.32 Bq l -1 with mean values of 2.5 and 0.41 Bq l -1 respectively. The highest specific activities of 40K in bulk deposition material were recorded in connection with high altitude Saharan dust intrusion. The time variations of the different radionuclide concentrations have been discussed in relation with various meteorological factors and the mean values have been compared to those published in recent literature for other sites located at different latitudes. To study the deposition, monthly deposition data from a funnel collector were compared from 2005 to 2009.The monthly range in deposition fluxes for gross alpha varied widely (0.40-11 Bq m -2 month -1) and the average annual deposition is 21 Bq m -2 y -1. The monthly fluxes for gross beta varied (1.3-33.8 Bq m -2 month -1) and the average annual deposition is approximately 120 Bq m -2 y -1. The total annual deposition fluxes of 210Pb varied between 64.9 and 160.8 Bq m -2 y -1 with a mean of 120 Bq m -2 y -1. The annual 7Be depositional flux varied between 432 and 1204 Bq m -2 y -1 with a mean of 676 Bq m -2 y -1. Observed seasonal variations of deposition data are explained in terms of different environmental features. The atmospheric deposition fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb were

  4. Additive impacts on particle emissions from heating low emitting cooking oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouei Torkmahalleh, M.; Zhao, Y.; Hopke, P. K.; Rossner, A.; Ferro, A. R.

    2013-08-01

    The effect of five additives, including table salt, sea salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and turmeric, on the emission of PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFP) from heated cooking oil (200 °C) were studied. One hundred milligrams of the additives were added individually to either canola or soybean oil without stirring. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt reduced the PM2.5 emission of canola oil by 86% (p < 0.001), 88% (p < 0.001), and 91% (p < 0.001), respectively. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt also decreased the total particle number emissions of canola oil by 45% (p = 0.003), 52% (p = 0.001), and 53% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder showed no changes in the PM2.5 and total number emissions of canola oil. Table salt and sea salt, decreased the level of PM2.5 emissions from soybean oil by 47% (p < 0.001) and 77% (p < 0.001), respectively. No differences in the PM2.5 emissions were observed when other additives were added to soybean oil. Black pepper, sea salt, and table salt reduced the total particle number emissions from the soybean oil by 51%, 61% and 68% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder had no effect on soybean oil with respect to total particle number emissions. Our results indicate that table salt, sea salt, and black pepper can be used to reduce the particle total number and PM2.5 emissions when cooking with oil.

  5. Feasibility study on the use of polyallyldiglycol-carbonate cell dishes in TUNEL assay for alpha particle radiobiological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. F.; Yum, E. H. W.; Wan, C. K.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

    2007-08-01

    In the present work, we have studied the feasibility of a method based on polyallyldiglycol-carbonate (PADC) films to investigate the effects of alpha particles on HeLa cervix cancer cells. Thin PADC films with thickness of about 20 μm were prepared from commercially available CR-39 films by chemical etching to fabricate custom-made petri dishes for cell culture, which could accurately record alpha particle hit positions. A special method involving "base tracks" for aligning the images of cell nuclei and alpha particle hits has been proposed, so that alpha particle transversals of cell nuclei can be visually counted. Radiobiological experiments were carried out to induce DNA damages, with the TdT-mediated d UTP Nick- End Labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence method employed to detect DNA strand breaks. The staining results were investigated by flow cytometer. The preliminary results showed that more strand breaks occurred in cells hit by alpha particles with lower energies. Moreover, large TUNEL positive signals were obtained even with small percentages of cells irradiated and TUNEL signals were also obtained from non-targeted cells. These provided evidence for the bystander effect.

  6. [Characteristics of water soluble inorganic ions in fine particles emitted from coal-fired power plants].

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Ma, Zi-Zhen; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jing-Kun; Ye, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Currently, China suffers from serious pollution of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Coal-fired power plant is one of the most important sources of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. To achieve the national goals of total emission reductions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) during the 11th and 12th Five-Year Plan, most of coal-fired power plants in China have installed or will install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and flue gas denitrification (DNO(x)) systems. As a result, the secondary PM2.5, generated from gaseous pollutants in the atmosphere, would be decreased. However, the physical and chemical characteristics of PM2.5 in flue gas would be affected, and the emission of primary PM2.5 might be increased. This paper summarized the size distributions of PM2.5 and its water soluble ions emitted from coal-fired power plants, and highlighted the effects of FGD and DNO(x) on PM2.5 emission, especially on water soluble ions (such as SO4(2-), Ca2+ and NH4+) in PM2.5. Under the current condition of serious PM2.5 pollution and wide application of FGD and DNO(x), quantitative study on the effects of FGD and DNO(x) installation on emission characteristics of PM2.5 from coal-fired power plants is of great necessity.

  7. Systemic radioimmunotherapy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac directed toward the alpha subunit of the IL-2 receptor armed with the alpha-emitting radionuclides (212)Bi or (211)At.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Jon N; McGee, Edwin C; Garmestani, Kayhan; Brechbiel, Martin W; Yordanov, Alexander T; Wu, Chuanchu; Gansow, Otto A; Eckelman, William C; Bacher, John D; Flynn, Michael; Goldman, Carolyn K; MacLin, Melvin; Schwartz, Uwe P; Jackson-White, Terri; Phillip, Celeste M; Decker, Jean; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2004-04-01

    To exploit the fact that IL-2 receptors are expressed by T-cells responding to foreign antigens but not by resting T-cells, humanized anti-Tac (HAT) armed with alpha-emitting radionuclides (212)Bi and (211)At was evaluated in a cynomolgus cardiac allograft model. Control graft survival was 8.2+/- 0.5 days compared with 14.0+/-1.3 days (p<0.01) survival for monkeys treated with (212)Bi labeled HAT and 26.7+/-2.4 days survival (p<0.001 versus controls) with (211)At labeled HAT. Thus, (211)At labeled HAT may have application in organ transplantation and in treatment of IL-2 receptor expressing T-cell leukemia. PMID:15028248

  8. Neutral gas in Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG04 measured through sodium absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, A.; Östlin, G.; Hayes, M.; Fathi, K.; Schaerer, D.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Rivera-Thorsen, T.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The Lyman alpha emission line of neutral hydrogen is an important tool for finding galaxies at high redshift, thus for probing the structure of the early universe. However, the resonance nature of the line and its sensitivity to dust and neutral gas is still not fully understood. Aims: We present measurements of the velocity, covering fraction and optical depth of neutral gas in front of two well-known, local blue compact galaxies that show Lyman alpha in emission: ESO 338-IG 04 and Haro 11. We thus observationally test the hypothesis that Lyman alpha can escape through neutral gas by being Doppler shifted out of resonance. Methods: We present integral field spectroscopy, obtained with the GIRAFFE/Argus spectrograph at VLT/FLAMES in Paranal, Chile. The excellent wavelength resolution allowed us to accurately measure the velocity of the ionized and neutral gas through the Hα emission and Na D absorption, which trace the ionized medium and cold interstellar gas, respectively. We also present independent measurements from the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph that confirm our results. Results: For ESO 338-IG04 we measure no significant shift of neutral gas: the best fit velocity offset is - 15 ± 16 km s-1. For Haro 11, we see an outflow from knot B at 44 ± 13 km s-1, and infalling gas towards knot C with 32 ± 12 km s-1. Based on the relative strength of the Na D absorption lines, we estimate low covering fractions of neutral gas (down to 10%) in all three cases. Conclusions: The Na D absorption most likely occurs in dense clumps with higher column densities than the medium in which the bulk of the Ly α scattering takes place. Still, we find no strong correlation between outflowing neutral gas and strong Ly α emission. The Ly α photons from these two galaxies are therefore likely to be escaping due to a low column density and/or covering fraction. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under program IDs 083.B-0470 and 60.A

  9. NACA Physicist Studying Alpha Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    NACA Physicits studying Alpha Rays in a continuous cloud chamber. A cloud chamber is used by Lewis scientists to obtain information aimed at minimizing undesirable effects of radiation on nuclear-powered aircraft components. Here, alpha particles from a polonium source emit in a flower-like pattern at the cloud chamber's center. The particles are made visible by means of alcohol vapor diffusing from an area at room temperature to an area at minus -78 deg. Centigrade. Nuclear-powered aircraft were never developed and aircraft nuclear propulsion systems were canceled in the early 1960s.

  10. Vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy with the alpha-particle emitter 211At.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S; Eckelman, W C; Waldmann, T A; Garmestani, K; Yordanov, A T; Stabin, M G; Brechbiel, M W

    2002-06-01

    Astatine-211, an alpha-particle emitter, was employed in a model system for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy of small tumors in mouse lung to compare its performance relative to other radioisotopes in the same system. Astatine-211 was coupled to the lung blood vessel-targeting monoclonal antibody 201B with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl) succinamate linker. Biodistribution data showed that the conjugate delivered 211At to the lung (260-418% ID/g), where it remained with a biological half-time of about 30 h. BALB/c mice bearing about 100 lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 cells, each about 2000 cells in size, were treated with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B. The administered activity of 185 kBq per animal extended the life span of treated mice over untreated controls. Injections of 370 kBq, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 25-40 Gy, were necessary to eradicate all of the lung tumors. Mice receiving 740 kBq of 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B developed pulmonary fibrosis 3-4 months after treatment, as did mice treated with 3700 kBq of the alpha-particle emitter 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B in previous work. Animals that were injected with 211At bound to untargeted IgG or to glycine, as control agents, also demonstrated therapeutic effects relative to untreated controls. Control groups that received untargeted 211At required about twice as much administered activity for effective therapy as did groups with lung-targeted radioisotope. These results were not consistent with radioisotope biodistribution and dosimetry calculations that indicated that lung-targeted 211At should be at least 10-fold more efficient for lung colony therapy than 211At bound to nontargeting controls. The data showed that 211At is useful for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy because lung tumor colonies were eradicated in the mice. Work in this model system demonstrates that vascular targeting of alpha-particle emitters is an efficient therapy for small

  11. Vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy with the alpha-particle emitter 211At.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S; Eckelman, W C; Waldmann, T A; Garmestani, K; Yordanov, A T; Stabin, M G; Brechbiel, M W

    2002-06-01

    Astatine-211, an alpha-particle emitter, was employed in a model system for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy of small tumors in mouse lung to compare its performance relative to other radioisotopes in the same system. Astatine-211 was coupled to the lung blood vessel-targeting monoclonal antibody 201B with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl) succinamate linker. Biodistribution data showed that the conjugate delivered 211At to the lung (260-418% ID/g), where it remained with a biological half-time of about 30 h. BALB/c mice bearing about 100 lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 cells, each about 2000 cells in size, were treated with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B. The administered activity of 185 kBq per animal extended the life span of treated mice over untreated controls. Injections of 370 kBq, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 25-40 Gy, were necessary to eradicate all of the lung tumors. Mice receiving 740 kBq of 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B developed pulmonary fibrosis 3-4 months after treatment, as did mice treated with 3700 kBq of the alpha-particle emitter 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B in previous work. Animals that were injected with 211At bound to untargeted IgG or to glycine, as control agents, also demonstrated therapeutic effects relative to untreated controls. Control groups that received untargeted 211At required about twice as much administered activity for effective therapy as did groups with lung-targeted radioisotope. These results were not consistent with radioisotope biodistribution and dosimetry calculations that indicated that lung-targeted 211At should be at least 10-fold more efficient for lung colony therapy than 211At bound to nontargeting controls. The data showed that 211At is useful for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy because lung tumor colonies were eradicated in the mice. Work in this model system demonstrates that vascular targeting of alpha-particle emitters is an efficient therapy for small

  12. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  13. Transcriptional and Secretomic Profiling of Epidermal Cells Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Greene, Hillary Boulay; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Alpha (α)-particle emitters are probable isotopes to be used in a terrorist attack. The development of biological assessment tools to identify those who have handled these difficult to detect materials would be an asset to our current forensic capacity. In this study, for the purposes of biomarker discovery, human keratinocytes were exposed to α-particle and X-radiation (0.98 Gy/h at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 Gy) and assessed for differential gene and protein expression using microarray and Bio-Plex technology, respectively. Secretomic analysis of supernatants showed expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and PDGF-bb) to be exclusively affected in α-particle exposed cells. The highest dose of α-particle radiation modulated a total of 67 transcripts (fold change>|1.5|, (False discovery rate) FDR<0.05) in exposed cells. Several genes which responded with high expression levels (>2 fold) included KIF20A, NEFM, C7orf10, HIST1H2BD, BMP6, and HIST1H2AC. Among the high expressing genes, five (CCNB2, BUB1, NEK2, CDC20, AURKA) were also differentially expressed at the medium (1.0 Gy) dose however, these genes were unmodulated following exposure to X-irradiation. Networks of these genes clustered around tumor protein-53 and transforming growth factor-beta signaling. This study has identified some potential gene /protein responses and networks that may be validated further to confirm their specificity and potential to be signature biomarkers of α-particle exposure. PMID:23002402

  14. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  15. Combustion particles emitted during church services: implications for human respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim; BéruBé, Kelly

    2012-04-01

    Burning candles and incense generate particulate matter (PM) that produces poor indoor air quality and may cause human pulmonary problems. This study physically characterised combustion particles collected in a church during services. In addition, the emissions from five types of candles and two types of incense were investigated using a combustion chamber. The plasmid scission assay was used to determine the oxidative capacities of these church particles. The corresponding risk factor (CRf) was derived from the emission factor (Ef) and the oxidative DNA damage, and used to evaluate the relative respiratory exposure risks. Real-time PM measurements in the church during candle-incense burning services showed that the levels (91.6 μg/m(3) for PM(10); 38.9 μg/m(3) for PM(2.5)) exceeded the European Union (EU) air quality guidelines. The combustion chamber testing, using the same environmental conditions, showed that the incense Ef for both PM(10) (490.6-587.9 mg/g) and PM(2.5) (290.1-417.2 mg/g) exceeded that of candles; particularly the PM(2.5) emissions. These CRf results suggested that the exposure to significant amounts of incense PM could result in a higher risk of oxidative DNA adducts (27.4-32.8 times) than tobacco PM. The generation and subsequent inhalation of PM during church activities may therefore pose significant risks in terms of respiratory health effects. PMID:21831441

  16. Constraining the Metallicity and Escape Fraction of Two z≈3.1 Lyman-Alpha Emitting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, E. M.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J. E.; Levesque, E. M.

    2012-05-01

    We observed two z≈3.1 Lyman-α emitting galaxies (LAE) using the Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) at Gemini North, specifically looking for [OIII] 4960 & 5008Å, [OII] 3727Å, and H-β 4863Å. We detected the [OIII] doublet in both objects, determined upper limits for [OII] for both objects, and determined upper limits for H-β for one object. With the detections and upper limits we use the [OIII]/[OII] and R23 line diagnostic to attempt to constrain the metallicity and escape fraction of Ly-α. These metallicity constraints are needed to explore the behaviour of the Mass-Metallicty relation in the low-mass regime and also give insight into the star formation histories of LAE which are known to host young stellar populations. The escape fraction, when combined with an extinction correction, gives insight into the presence of neutral gas. This neutral gas is responsible for resonantly scattering any escaped Ly-α photons, increasing its optical depth to dust. For one object we constrain the metallicity to be Z≤ 0.4Z⊙ and constrain the escape fraction of Ly-α to be Fesc ≤ 30%. For the second object we are only able to constrain its escape fraction, finding 6% ≤ Fesc ≤ 40%. We would like to thank the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada for their financial support through a post-graduate fellowship.

  17. The Evolution of Ly-alpha Emitting Galaxies Between z = 2.1 and z = 3.l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall,Caryl; Wolf, Christopher; McCathran, Emily; Bond, Nicholas A.; Gawiser, Eric; Guaita, Lucia; Feldmeier, John J.; Treister, Ezequiel; Padilla, Nelson; Francke, Harold; Matkovic, Ana; Altmann, Martin; Herrera, David

    2011-01-01

    We describe the results of a new, wide-field survey for z= 3.1 Ly-alpha emission-line galaxies (LAEs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S). By using a nearly top-hat 5010 Angstrom filter and complementary broadband photometry from the MUSYC survey, we identify a complete sample of 141 objects with monochromatic fluxes brighter than 2.4E-17 ergs/cm^2/s and observers-frame equivalent widths greater than 80 Angstroms (i.e., 20 Angstroms in the rest-frame of Ly-alpha). The bright-end of this dataset is dominated by x-ray sources and foreground objects with GALEX detections, but when these interlopers are removed, we are still left with a sample of 130 LAE candidates, 39 of which have spectroscopic confirmations. This sample overlaps the set of objects found in an earlier ECDF-S survey, but due to our filter's redder bandpass, it also includes 68 previously uncataloged sources. We confirm earlier measurements of the z=3.1 LAE emission-line luminosity function, and show that an apparent anti-correlation between equivalent width and continuum brightness is likely due to the effect of correlated errors in our heteroskedastic dataset. Finally, we compare the properties of z=3.1 LAEs to LAEs found at z=2.1. We show that in the approximately 1 Gyr after z approximately 3, the LAE luminosity function evolved significantly, with L * fading by approximately 0.4 mag, the number density of sources with L greater than 1.5E42 ergs/s declining by approximately 50%, and the equivalent width scalelength contracting from 70^{+7}_{-5} Angstroms to 50^{+9}_{-6} Angstroms. When combined with literature results, our observations demonstrate that over the redshift range z approximately 0 to z approximately 4, LAEs contain less than approximately 10% of the star-formation rate density of the universe.

  18. THE EVOLUTION OF Ly{alpha}-EMITTING GALAXIES BETWEEN z = 2.1 AND z = 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Wolf, Christopher; McCathran, Emily; Matkovic, Ana; and others

    2012-01-10

    We describe the results of a new, wide-field survey for z = 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S). By using a nearly top-hat 5010 A filter and complementary broadband photometry from the MUSYC survey, we identify a complete sample of 141 objects with monochromatic fluxes brighter than 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and observers-frame equivalent widths (EWs) greater than {approx}80 A (i.e., 20 A in the rest frame of Ly{alpha}). The bright end of this data set is dominated by X-ray sources and foreground objects with Galaxy Evolution Explorer detections, but when these interlopers are removed, we are still left with a sample of 130 LAE candidates, 39 of which have spectroscopic confirmations. This sample overlaps the set of objects found in an earlier ECDF-S survey, but due to our filter's redder bandpass, it also includes 68 previously uncataloged sources. We confirm earlier measurements of the z = 3.1 LAE emission-line luminosity function and show that an apparent anticorrelation between EW and continuum brightness is likely due to the effect of correlated errors in our heteroskedastic data set. Finally, we compare the properties of z = 3.1 LAEs to LAEs found at z = 2.1. We show that in the {approx}1 Gyr after z {approx} 3, the LAE luminosity function evolved significantly, with L* fading by {approx}0.4 mag, the number density of sources with L > 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} declining by {approx}50%, and the EW scale length contracting from 70{sup +7}{sub -5} A to 50{sup +9}{sub -6} A. When combined with literature results, our observations demonstrate that over the redshift range z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 4, LAEs contain less than {approx}10% of the star formation rate density of the universe.

  19. Effect of crystal thickness and geometry on the alpha-particle resolution of CsI (Tl)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, P.; Senftle, F.E.

    1960-01-01

    The resolution of CsI(Tl) for Po210 alpha particles has been measured as a function of crystal thickness. The best resolution of a 12;-in. diam cylindrical crystal was obtained for a thickness of 0.38 mm, and the effect of thickness on the resolution is discussed. Based on the proposed model, a conical crystal was designed, which yielded a line width of 1.8% for Po 210 alpha particles with a selected photomultiplier tube. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  20. Experimental investigations of electron capture from atomic hydrogen and deuterium by alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, T.J.; Park, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    We report progress made during the period 15 September 1991--14 September 1992 on the project Experimental Investigations of Electron Capture from Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium by Alpha Particles''. In the past year we have developed reliable, narrow energy spread, high-current sources of He[sup ++] based on direct-current magentron and electron-cyclotron resonance discharges. These sources have been proven on our test bench accelerator which has been upgraded to also allow us to test atomic hydrogen effusive targets. We have thus made substantial progress toward our goal of studying single electron capture from atomic hydrogen by doubly-ionized helium. A research plan for the upcoming year is also presented.

  1. Evaluation of uncertainty components associated with alpha-particle spectrometric measurements of uranium isotopes in water.

    PubMed

    Seferinoğlu, Meryem; Dirican, Abdullah; Esra Erden, Pınar; Erçin, Demet

    2014-12-01

    Qualifications of uncertainties associated with the measurement of specific activity concentration of uranium radioisotope ((238)U) in water samples by alpha-particle spectrometry are presented. Possible sources of uncertainty are identified and quantified in the activity concentration measurements of (238)U isotope; the major source being the statistical counting uncertainty as expected. The combined relative standard uncertainty [Formula: see text] of the measurement was calculated as 1.4Bq kg(-1) (7.9%) for the investigated NPL sample. The accuracy and precision of recommended procedure were checked analysing six spiked water samples supplied from IAEA-proficiency test exercises. The results were evaluated in terms of relative bias, z-score, u-score, trueness and precision. These results show that the activity values and their uncertainties are in good agreement with recommended values.

  2. [Temperature effect correction for Chang'E-3 alpha particle X-ray spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ye; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Yang, Jia-Wei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Liu, Ya-Qing; Dong, Yi-Fan; Wu, Feng; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2012-07-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover of China's Lunar Exploration Project. The present paper introduces briefly the components of APXS, how it works and its working environment on the lunar surface. The environmental temperature effect has been studied with simulations and experiments, and the results show that the temperature of the APXS sensor will be varying during the measuring on the lunar surface. And another experiment reveals that the energy resolution becomes worse if the sensor's temperature is varying. In this paper, a correction method based on Pearson's chi-squared test is presented. The method can improve the energy resolution when the sensor's temperature is varying. We have tested the method with the spectra acquired by APXS in the temperature varying period of Temperature Cycling Test, and the results show that the method is efficient and reliable.

  3. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Tanaka, N.; Terai, K.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Tsumori, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Shinto, K.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  4. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited).

    PubMed

    Sasao, M; Kisaki, M; Kobuchi, T; Tsumori, K; Tanaka, N; Terai, K; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Kaneko, O; Shinto, K; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He(+) ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He(+) ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  5. Astatine-211-labeled radiotherapeutics: an emerging approach to targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Vaidyanathan, G

    2000-09-01

    Targeted radiotherapy or endoradiotherapy is an appealing approach to cancer treatment because of the potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to tumor while sparing normal tissues. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of alpha-particles such as the heavy halogen astatine-211 (211At) offer the exciting prospect of combining cell-specific molecular targets with radiation having a range in tissue of only a few cell diameters. Herein, the radiobiological advantages of alpha-particle targeted radiotherapy will be reviewed, and the rationale for using 211At for this purpose will be described. The chemistry of astatine is similar to that of iodine; however, there are important differences which make the synthesis and evaluation of 211At-labeled compounds more challenging. Perhaps the most successful approach that has been developed involves the astatodemetallation of tin, silicon or mercury precursors. Astatine-211 labeled agents that have been investigated for targeted radiotherapy include [211At]astatide, 211At- labeled particulates, 211At-labeled naphthoquinone derivatives, 211At-labeled methylene blue, 211At-labeled DNA precursors, meta-[211At]astatobenzylguanidine, 211At-labeled biotin conjugates, 211At-labeled bisphosphonates, and 211At-labeled antibodies and antibody fragments. The status of these 211At-labeled compounds will be discussed in terms of their labeling chemistry, cytotoxicity in cell culture, as well as their tissue distribution and therapeutic efficacy in animal models of human cancers. Finally, an update on the status of the first clinical trial with an 211At-labeled targeted therapeutic, 211At-labeled chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6, will be provided.

  6. RADIOACTIVE POSITRON EMITTER PRODUCTION BY ENERGETIC ALPHA PARTICLES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H. E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the 0.511 MeV positron-annihilation line from solar flares are used to explore the flare process in general and ion acceleration in particular. In flares, positrons are produced primarily by the decay of radioactive positron-emitting isotopes resulting from nuclear interactions of flare-accelerated ions with ambient solar material. Kozlovsky et al. provided ion-energy-dependent production cross sections for 67 positron emitters evaluated from their threshold energies (some <1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) to a GeV nucleon{sup –1}, incorporating them into a computer code for calculating positron-emitter production. Adequate cross-section measurements were available for proton reactions, but not for α-particle reactions where only crude estimates were possible. Here we re-evaluate the α-particle cross sections using new measurements and nuclear reaction codes. In typical large gamma-ray line flares, proton reactions dominate positron production, but α-particle reactions will dominate for steeper accelerated-ion spectra because of their relatively low threshold energies. With the accelerated-{sup 3}He reactions added previously, the code is now reliable for calculating positron production from any distribution of accelerated-ion energies, not just those of typical flares. We have made the code available in the online version of the Journal. We investigate which reactions, projectiles, and ion energies contribute to positron production. We calculate ratios of the annihilation-line fluence to fluences of other gamma-ray lines. Such ratios can be used in interpreting flare data and in determining which nuclear radiation is most sensitive for revealing acceleration of low-energy ions at the Sun.

  7. Alpha-quartz-induced chemokine expression by rat lung epithelial cells: effects of in vivo and in vitro particle exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, K. E.; Howard, B. W.; Carter, J. M.; Asquith, T.; Johnston, C.; Detilleux, P.; Kunkel, S. L.; Isfort, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that can play a key role in leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue injury or infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to alpha-quartz as well as other noxious particles increases chemokine gene expression in rat lung, although the cells responsible for chemokine expression and the mechanisms underlying this response have remained unclear. The present studies demonstrate that exposure of rats to alpha-quartz induced expression of mRNA for the chemokine macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in epithelial cells lining the terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts as well as macrophages and alveolar type II cells in the more distal lung. Treatment of rats with an anti-MIP-2 antiserum before alpha-quartz exposure markedly attenuated neutrophilic infiltration of the lungs demonstrating an important role for MIP-2 in alpha-quartz-induced pulmonary inflammation. In vitro exposure of primary cultures of rat alveolar type II cells or the rat alveolar type II cell line RLE-6TN to tumor necrosis factor-alpha, endotoxin, or alpha-quartz increased mRNA for MIP-2 as well as the structurally and functionally similar chemokine cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant but not the chemokine MIP-1 alpha. The alpha-quartz-induced increase in epithelial MIP-2 mRNA resulted, at least in part, from increased gene transcription and was associated with the release of active MIP-2 protein. Induction of RLE-6TN MIP-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant mRNA expression was not unique to alpha-quartz, being also increased by crocidolite asbestus fibers but not by titanium dioxide or MMVF-10 glass fibers. These findings indicate that epithelial cells contribute to chemokine expression in rat lung after exposure to alpha-quartz and potentially other noxious particles and suggest that alpha-quartz-activated MIP-2 expression in vivo results, at least in part, from a direct action of the particles on the lung epithelium. Images

  8. Collisionless current generation in the center of the tokamak plasma by an isotropic source of {alpha}-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A.; Yurchenko, E. I.

    2010-01-15

    The density of the noninductive current generated due to collisionless motion of {alpha}-particles in the tokamak magnetic field is calculated. The analysis is based on fully three-dimensional calculations of charged particle trajectories without simplifying assumptions typical for drift and neoclassical approaches. The current is calculated over the entire cross section of the plasma column, including the magnetic axis. It is shown that the current density is not a function of a magnetic surface and is strongly polarized over the poloidal angle. The current density distribution in the tokamak poloidal cross section is obtained, and the current density as a function of the safety factor, the tokamak aspect ratio, and the ratio of the particle Larmor radius on the axis to the tokamak minor radius is determined. It is shown that, when the source of {alpha}-particles is spatially nonuniform, the current density in the center of the tokamak is nonzero due to asymmetry of the phase-space boundary between trapped and passing particles. The current density scaling in the tokamak center differs from the known approximations for the bootstrap current and is sensitive to the spatial distribution of {alpha}-particles.

  9. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  10. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and molecular imaging.

  11. Effect of Drive Cycle and Gasoline Particulate Filter on the Size and Morphology of Soot Particles Emitted from a Gasoline-Direct-Injection Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Saffaripour, Meghdad; Chan, Tak W; Liu, Fengshan; Thomson, Kevin A; Smallwood, Gregory J; Kubsh, Joseph; Brezny, Rasto

    2015-10-01

    The size and morphology of particulate matter emitted from a light-duty gasoline-direct-injection (GDI) vehicle, over the FTP-75 and US06 transient drive cycles, have been characterized by transmission-electron-microscope (TEM) image analysis. To investigate the impact of gasoline particulate filters on particulate-matter emission, the results for the stock-GDI vehicle, that is, the vehicle in its original configuration, have been compared to the results for the same vehicle equipped with a catalyzed gasoline particulate filter (GPF). The stock-GDI vehicle emits graphitized fractal-like aggregates over all driving conditions. The mean projected area-equivalent diameter of these aggregates is in the 78.4-88.4 nm range and the mean diameter of primary particles varies between 24.6 and 26.6 nm. Post-GPF particles emitted over the US06 cycle appear to have an amorphous structure, and a large number of nucleation-mode particles, depicted as low-contrast ultrafine droplets, are observed in TEM images. This indicates the emission of a substantial amount of semivolatile material during the US06 cycle, most likely generated by the incomplete combustion of accumulated soot in the GPF during regeneration. The size of primary particles and soot aggregates does not vary significantly by implementing the GPF over the FTP-75 cycle; however, particles emitted by the GPF-equipped vehicle over the US06 cycle are about 20% larger than those emitted by the stock-GDI vehicle. This may be attributed to condensation of large amounts of organic material on soot aggregates. High-contrast spots, most likely solid nonvolatile cores, are observed within many of the nucleation-mode particles emitted over the US06 cycle by the GPF-equipped vehicle. These cores are either generated inside the engine or depict incipient soot particles which are partially carbonized in the exhaust line. The effect of drive cycle and the GPF on the fractal parameters of particles, such as fractal dimension and

  12. Effect of Drive Cycle and Gasoline Particulate Filter on the Size and Morphology of Soot Particles Emitted from a Gasoline-Direct-Injection Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Saffaripour, Meghdad; Chan, Tak W; Liu, Fengshan; Thomson, Kevin A; Smallwood, Gregory J; Kubsh, Joseph; Brezny, Rasto

    2015-10-01

    The size and morphology of particulate matter emitted from a light-duty gasoline-direct-injection (GDI) vehicle, over the FTP-75 and US06 transient drive cycles, have been characterized by transmission-electron-microscope (TEM) image analysis. To investigate the impact of gasoline particulate filters on particulate-matter emission, the results for the stock-GDI vehicle, that is, the vehicle in its original configuration, have been compared to the results for the same vehicle equipped with a catalyzed gasoline particulate filter (GPF). The stock-GDI vehicle emits graphitized fractal-like aggregates over all driving conditions. The mean projected area-equivalent diameter of these aggregates is in the 78.4-88.4 nm range and the mean diameter of primary particles varies between 24.6 and 26.6 nm. Post-GPF particles emitted over the US06 cycle appear to have an amorphous structure, and a large number of nucleation-mode particles, depicted as low-contrast ultrafine droplets, are observed in TEM images. This indicates the emission of a substantial amount of semivolatile material during the US06 cycle, most likely generated by the incomplete combustion of accumulated soot in the GPF during regeneration. The size of primary particles and soot aggregates does not vary significantly by implementing the GPF over the FTP-75 cycle; however, particles emitted by the GPF-equipped vehicle over the US06 cycle are about 20% larger than those emitted by the stock-GDI vehicle. This may be attributed to condensation of large amounts of organic material on soot aggregates. High-contrast spots, most likely solid nonvolatile cores, are observed within many of the nucleation-mode particles emitted over the US06 cycle by the GPF-equipped vehicle. These cores are either generated inside the engine or depict incipient soot particles which are partially carbonized in the exhaust line. The effect of drive cycle and the GPF on the fractal parameters of particles, such as fractal dimension and

  13. A Catalog of z=3.1 Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies Discovered in Narrow-band Imaging of MUSYC 1030+05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Holly; Gangolli, Nakul; Raney, Catie Ann; Walker, Jean P.; Gawiser, Eric J.; MUSYC Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of ~200 Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs) at redshift z=3.1 found in a 5015 Å narrow-band image of the MUSYC 1030+05 field. We reduced raw optical images taken with the MOSAIC II CCD camera at the CTIO 4m telescope with the IRAF MSCRED package. The reduction included the crucial steps of bias subtraction, flat-field correction, cosmic ray and satellite trail rejection, astrometric calibration, tangent plane projection, weighted stacking, and sky background removal. Our initial catalog of sources detected in the narrow-band filter contains ~20,000 sources. We used additional photometric measurements in the MUSYC broad-band filters to identify LAEs via their flux density excess in the narrow-band. This catalog of LAEs will undergo further analysis to characterize how the number density, clustering, colors, and star formation rates of LAEs vary with position and evolve with redshift.We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1055919 & PHY-1263280.

  14. Lyman alpha radiation in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    The Ly alpha line of atomic hydrogen is often a luminous component of the radiation emitted by distant galaxies. Except for those galaxies which have a substantial central source of non-stellar ionizing radiation, most of the Ly alpha radiation emitted by galaxies is generated within regions of the interstellar medium which are photoionized by starlight. Conversely, much of the energy radiated by photoionized regions is carried by the Ly alpha line. Only hot, massive stars are capable of ionizing hydrogen in the interstellar medium which surrounds them, and because such stars are necessarily short-lived, Ly alpha emission traces regions of active star formation. Researchers argue that the strength of the Ly alpha emission observed from external galaxies may be used to estimate quantitatively the dust content of the emitting region, while the Ly alpha line profile is sensitive to the presence of shock waves. Interstellar dust particles and shock waves are intimately associated with the process of star formation in two senses. First, both dust particles and shock waves owe their existence to stellar activity; second, they may both serve as agents which facilitate the formation of stars, shocks by triggering gravitational instabilities in the interstellar gas that they compress, and dust by shielding star-forming molecular clouds from the ionizing and dissociative effects of external UV radiation. By using Ly alpha observations as a probe of the dust content in diffuse gas at high redshift, we might hope to learn about the earliest epochs of star formation.

  15. Antiandrogenic activity of extracts of diesel exhaust particles emitted from diesel-engine truck under different engine loads and speeds.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Kazumasa; Kizu, Ryoichi; Toriba, Akira; Murahashi, Tsuyoshi; Mizokami, Atsushi; Burnstein, Kerry L; Klinge, Carolyn M; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2004-02-15

    To clarify the alteration of androgenic and antiandrogenic activities by diesel engine conditions, we collected diesel exhaust particles (DEP) samples emitted from a diesel-engine truck under different conditions of engine loads and vehicle speeds, and DEP extract (DEPE) samples were prepared from each. The androgenic and antiandrogenic activities of the DEPE samples were examined using a prostate specific antigen (PSA) promoter-luciferase reporter gene assay in PC3/AR human prostate cancer cells. While all DEPE samples did not exhibit androgenic effects, the antiandrogenic effects were enhanced by higher engine load but not by higher vehicle speed. In this study, significant correlations between antiandrogenic and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonistic activities were demonstrated in PC3/AR cells by 16 polycyclic aromatic compounds and beta-naphthoflavone. Yeast two-hybrid assay and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 promoter-luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the antiandrogenic constituents acting as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists and AhR agonists were increased by only the higher engine load. In conclusion, the antiandrogenic effects of DEPE samples were enhanced by a higher engine load which resulted in DEPC samples with elevated AhR agonistic and AR antagonistic activities.

  16. The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets in a pinhole camera with a regular multi-pinhole diaphragm

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, N A

    2000-08-31

    The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets using a multi-pinhole regular diaphragm is proposed. The image reconstruction technique is described. The results of the {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets obtained at the 'Iskra-4' laser facility are reported. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  18. EFFECT OF DIFFERENTIAL FLOW OF ALPHA PARTICLES ON PROTON PRESSURE ANISOTROPY INSTABILITIES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, John J.; Gary, S. Peter

    2011-11-20

    In the solar wind, when the effects of proton-proton Coulomb collisions are negligible, alpha particles usually flow faster than the protons in such a way that the differential alpha-proton flow velocity V{sub d} = V{sub {alpha}} - V{sub p} is on the order of the Alfven speed, is directed away from the Sun, and is nearly aligned with the local mean magnetic field. When this differential flow is taken into account, solutions of the hot plasma dispersion relation show that for the parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) instability driven by the proton temperature anisotropy T{sub perpendicularp} > T{sub ||p}, the maximum growth rate occurs in the + V{sub d} direction and for the parallel firehose instability driven by the opposite proton temperature anisotropy T{sub ||p} > T{sub perpendicularp}, the maximum growth rate occurs in the - V{sub d} direction. Thus, the EMIC instability preferentially generates left circularly polarized Alfven-ion-cyclotron waves propagating away from the Sun and the parallel firehose instability preferentially generates right circularly polarized magnetosonic-whistler waves propagating toward the Sun with the maximum growth rates occurring for frequencies on the order of the proton cyclotron frequency and wavenumbers on the order of the proton inertial length. Because of the Doppler shift caused by the motion of the solar wind, both types of waves are left circularly polarized in the spacecraft frame for observations taken when the local mean magnetic field is collinear with the solar wind flow velocity. Theoretical investigation of these instabilities also shows that regions of parameter space exist where the unstable waves are generated propagating unidirectionally such as, for the EMIC instability for example, when the temperature anisotropy is small |(T{sub perpendicular{sub p}}/T{sub ||{sub p}}) - 1| < 1. Taken together, the above properties can explain the origin of parallel propagating electromagnetic waves

  19. Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Plionis, Alexander A; Peterson, Dominic S; Tandon, Lav; Lamont, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid nondestructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

  20. Computation of Cosmic Ray Ionization and Dose at Mars: a Comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for Proton and Alpha Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  1. Elementary Analysis of a Cometary Surface - the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmanke, Dirk; Economou, Thanasis; Brueckner, Johannes; Gellert, Ralf; Rodionov, Daniel; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Uston, Lionel D.

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe will reach its final target in the middle of this year, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote examination of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface. It will start immediately examining the landing site with its scientific payload. A part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), it will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and its changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. It will irradiate the cometary surface with Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle/X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload were performed at regular intervals. In recent 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away from the sun. After the successful wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has to be performed, including the APXS. After the landing on the comet an intense long measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS), determined by periodical changes between measurements and forced breaks

  2. Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry

    SciTech Connect

    Schieve, L.A.; Davis, F.; Freels, S.

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. 42 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry.

    PubMed

    Schieve, L A; Davis, F; Roeske, J; Handler, A; Freels, S; Stinchcomb, T; Keane, A

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to alpha-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in the radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of alpha particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of gamma-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. PMID:9008216

  4. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-07-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments.

  5. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-01-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments. PMID:20031985

  6. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, G; Zalutsky, M R

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as 211At and 212Bi which decay by the emission of alpha-particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of 212Bi and 211At alpha-particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the beta-particles emitted by radionuclides such as 131I and 90Y, alpha-particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with 212Bi- and 211At-labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[211At]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by [3H]thymidine incorporation and by limiting dilution clonogenic assays, for human neuroblastoma cells is of the order of 1000 times higher than that of meta-[131I] iodobenzylguanidine. For meta-[211At] astatobenzylguanidine, the Do value was equivalent to only 6-7 211At atoms bound per cell. These results suggest that meta-[211At] astatobenzylguanidine might be valuable for the targeted radiotherapy of micrometastatic neuroblastomas.

  7. Radiotoxicity of Gadolinium-148 and Radium-223 in Mouse Testes: Relative Biological Effectiveness of Alpha-Particle Emitters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Goddu, S. Murty; Narra, Venkat R.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Schenter, Robert E.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit α particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of α-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy α particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by 148Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 ± 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po and 212Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE–energy relationship for α particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBEα = 9.14 − 0.510 Eα, where 3 < Eα < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific α-particle emitter 223Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 ± 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-Eα relationship to predict the biological effects of α-particle emitters in Vivo. PMID:9052681

  8. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  9. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, three things must occur in a timely manner: food and drinking water supplies must be determined to be safe to eat / drink, civilians and/or military personnel must be surveyed to ensure that they do not have external contamination, and they must be screened to ensure that significant ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides has not occurred (this paper is concerned with the latter). In the event of such a disaster, the volume of radiobioassays to be performed would be tremendous. If the event released significant levels of β- or α-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤ 50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of α-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive, and requires significant sample preparation and analysis time. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. We have demonstrated the use of paramagnetic nanoparticles as a novel class of extracting media for four α-emitting radionuclides of concern (Po, Ra, Am, and U) from chemically unmodified and pH 2 human urine. Herein the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that utilizes paramagnetic nanoparticles for the extraction of radionuclides from unmodified human urine followed by the magnetic field-induced collection of the particles for subsequent α-counting-source preparation. Additionally, we construct a versatile human dose model that determines the detector count times required to estimate internal human dose at specific protective action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method’s detection capabilities and use fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental

  10. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  11. Particle size and interfacial effects on heat transfer characteristics of water and {alpha}-SiC nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, E.; Smith, D. S.; Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Singh, D.; Routbort, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of average particle sizes on basic macroscopic properties and heat transfer performance of {alpha}-SiC/water nanofluids was investigated. The average particle sizes, calculated from the specific surface area of nanoparticles, were varied from 16 to 90 nm. Nanofluids with larger particles of the same material and volume concentration provide higher thermal conductivity and lower viscosity increases than those with smaller particles because of the smaller solid/liquid interfacial area of larger particles. It was also demonstrated that the viscosity of water-based nanofluids can be significantly decreased by pH of the suspension independently from the thermal conductivity. Heat transfer coefficients were measured and compared to the performance of base fluids as well as to nanofluids reported in the literature. Criteria for evaluation of the heat transfer performance of nanofluids are discussed and optimum directions in nanofluid development are suggested.

  12. SU-E-T-588: Optimization of Imaging Following 223Ra Administration in Targeted Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Benabdallah, N; Bernardini, M; Desbree, A; Labriolle-Vaylet, C de; Franck, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: With a growing demand of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, especially Xofigo ({sup 223}RaCl{sub 2}) which is used in the treatment of metastatic bone disease, the optimization of dosimetry becomes necessary. Indeed, in Europe, as stated on the council directive 2013/59/euratom, exposures of target volumes for radiotherapeutic purposes shall be individually planned taking into account that doses to non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable. To that aim, the possibility of imaging {sup 223}Ra was first investigated. Methods: The experiments were conducted at the Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou with an Infinia Hawkeye 4 gamma camera, equipped with a medium-energy collimator. Imaging parameters, such as sensibility, spatial resolution and energy spectrum, were determined using several physical phantoms with a source of 6 MBq of {sup 223}Ra. Bone metastases were modeled with a NEMA Body Phantom to investigate image degradation based on the concentration of {sup 223}Ra. Results: The acquired energy spectrum allowed to visualize several photon peaks: at 85, 154 and 270 keV. Camera sensitivity measured from the phantom study was 102.3 cps/MBq for the 85 keV ± 20 %, 89.9 cps/MBq for the 154 ± 20 % window and 65.4 cps/MBq for the 270 ± 10 % window. The spatial resolution (full-width at half-maximum) was respectively 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 cm for the three energy windows. SPECT/CT images of NEMA Body Phantom without and with attenuation have permitted to determine the best reconstruction parameters. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clinically relevant information from images of {sup 223}Ra. All these results will be valuable to analyze biodistribution imaging of the radiopharmaceutical in the patient body and go further in the reconstruction of patient images in order to personalize the dosimetry.

  13. Biodistributions, myelosuppression, and toxicities in mice treated with an anti-CD45 antibody labeled with the alpha-emitting radionuclides bismuth-213 or astatine-211.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Wilbur, D Scott; Hamlin, Donald K; Thakar, Monica S; Santos, Erlinda B; Fisher, Darrell R; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W; Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2009-03-15

    We previously investigated the potential of targeted radiotherapy using a bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled anti-CD45 antibody to replace total body irradiation as conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation in a canine model. Although this approach allowed sustained marrow engraftment, limited availability, high cost, and short half-life of (213)Bi induced us to investigate an alternative alpha-emitting radionuclide, astatine-211 ((211)At), for the same application. Biodistribution and toxicity studies were conducted with conjugates of the anti-murine CD45 antibody 30F11 with either (213)Bi or (211)At. Mice were injected with 2 to 50 muCi on 10 microg or 20 muCi on 2 or 40 microg of 30F11 conjugate. Biodistribution studies showed that the spleen contained the highest concentration of radioactivity, ranging from 167 +/- 23% to 417 +/- 109% injected dose/gram (% ID/g) after injection of the (211)At conjugate and 45 +/- 9% to 166 +/- 11% ID/g after injection of the (213)Bi conjugate. The higher concentrations observed for (211)At-labeled 30F11 were due to its longer half-life, which permitted better localization of isotope to the spleen before decay. (211)At was more effective at producing myelosuppression for the same quantity of injected radioactivity. All mice injected with 20 or 50 muCi (211)At, but none with the same quantities of (213)Bi, had lethal myeloablation. Severe reversible acute hepatic toxicity occurred with 50 muCi (213)Bi, but not with lower doses of (213)Bi or with any dose of (211)At. No renal toxicity occurred with either radionuclide. The data suggest that smaller quantities of (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 antibody are sufficient to achieve myelosuppression and myeloablation with less nonhematologic toxicity compared with (213)Bi-labeled antibody. PMID:19244101

  14. Biodistributions, myelosuppression, and toxicities in mice treated with an anti-CD45 antibody labeled with the alpha-emitting radionuclides bismuth-213 or astatine-211.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Wilbur, D Scott; Hamlin, Donald K; Thakar, Monica S; Santos, Erlinda B; Fisher, Darrell R; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W; Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2009-03-15

    We previously investigated the potential of targeted radiotherapy using a bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled anti-CD45 antibody to replace total body irradiation as conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation in a canine model. Although this approach allowed sustained marrow engraftment, limited availability, high cost, and short half-life of (213)Bi induced us to investigate an alternative alpha-emitting radionuclide, astatine-211 ((211)At), for the same application. Biodistribution and toxicity studies were conducted with conjugates of the anti-murine CD45 antibody 30F11 with either (213)Bi or (211)At. Mice were injected with 2 to 50 muCi on 10 microg or 20 muCi on 2 or 40 microg of 30F11 conjugate. Biodistribution studies showed that the spleen contained the highest concentration of radioactivity, ranging from 167 +/- 23% to 417 +/- 109% injected dose/gram (% ID/g) after injection of the (211)At conjugate and 45 +/- 9% to 166 +/- 11% ID/g after injection of the (213)Bi conjugate. The higher concentrations observed for (211)At-labeled 30F11 were due to its longer half-life, which permitted better localization of isotope to the spleen before decay. (211)At was more effective at producing myelosuppression for the same quantity of injected radioactivity. All mice injected with 20 or 50 muCi (211)At, but none with the same quantities of (213)Bi, had lethal myeloablation. Severe reversible acute hepatic toxicity occurred with 50 muCi (213)Bi, but not with lower doses of (213)Bi or with any dose of (211)At. No renal toxicity occurred with either radionuclide. The data suggest that smaller quantities of (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 antibody are sufficient to achieve myelosuppression and myeloablation with less nonhematologic toxicity compared with (213)Bi-labeled antibody.

  15. Instability Thresholds for Oblique Alfvén/Cyclotron Modes in the Presence of an Alpha Particle Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, D.; Chandran, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Fully-ionized helium particles are the most abundant particle species after the protons and electrons in the solar wind. Observations of alpha particles in the fast wind show that they typically drift with respect to the protons at a speed of order the Alfvén speed. Since the Alfvén speed in the solar wind decreases with increasing heliocentric distance, the alpha particles undergo a continuous deceleration process. It is thought that this deceleration results from the action of Alfvénic instabilities, which are excited if the alpha particle drift velocity (or "beam speed") and density are sufficiently large. Numerical solutions of the hot plasma dispersion relation have previously shown that the minimum speed required to excite such instabilities is significantly smaller for oblique modes with ěc k× ěc B0≠q 0 than for parallel-propagating modes with ěc k× ěc B0=0, where ěc k is the wavevector and ěc B0 is the background magnetic field. In this presentation, we explain this result using analytical theory. We derive the cold-plasma dispersion relation for oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron and fast/whistler waves in the presence of an ion beam and discuss the instability thresholds within the framework of quasilinear theory. The dispersion, polarization, energy state, and phase speed of the waves determine the instability thresholds, which are found to be in agreement with observations and nonlinear simulations. We discuss the relevance of this work to alpha particles in the solar wind and its implications as a wave excitation mechanism.; Dispersion and polarization of oblique waves with a relative drift speed of 1.1v_{mathrm A} and an angle of 45o between ěc k and ěc B0. The color coding describes the polarization of the waves (+1 is right-handed and -1 is left-handed for positive frequencies). The straight (red) lines show the cyclotron-resonance conditions for alpha particles. The (blue) dashed line represents an upper limit for unstable waves.

  16. The emission probabilities of long range alpha particles from even-even 244-252Cm isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Krishnan, Sreejith; Priyanka, B.

    2014-10-01

    The alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even 244Cm, 246Cm, 248Cm, 250Cm and 252Cm isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of the Coulomb and proximity potential with the fragments in equatorial configuration. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold reaction valley plot and by calculating the relative yield for the charge minimized fragments. In the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the 244Cm isotope, the highest yield is found for the fragment combination 110Ru+4He+130Sn, which possess near doubly magic nuclei 130Sn. For the ternary fission of 246Cm, 248Cm, 250Cm and 252Cm isotopes with 4He as the light charged particle, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination with doubly magic nuclei 132Sn as the heavier fragment. The emission probabilities and kinetic energies of long range alpha particles have been computed for the 242,244,246,248Cm isotopes and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The relative yields for the 4He accompanied ternary fission (equatorial and collinear) of 242-252Cm isotopes are compared with the corresponding yield for binary fission. The effect of deformation and orientation of fragments in the 4He accompanied ternary fission of 244-252Cm isotopes are studied. Our study reveals that the ground state deformation has as an important role in the alpha accompanied ternary fission as that of the shell effect.

  17. Sensitivity of alpha-particle-driven Alfvén eigenmodes to q-profile variation in ITER scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, P.; Figueiredo, A. C. A.; Borba, D.; Coelho, R.; Fazendeiro, L.; Ferreira, J.; Loureiro, N. F.; Nabais, F.; Pinches, S. D.; Polevoi, A. R.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2016-11-01

    A perturbative hybrid ideal-MHD/drift-kinetic approach to assess the stability of alpha-particle-driven Alfvén eigenmodes in burning plasmas is used to show that certain foreseen ITER scenarios, namely the {{I}\\text{p}}=15 MA baseline scenario with very low and broad core magnetic shear, are sensitive to small changes in the background magnetic equilibrium. Slight variations (of the order of 1% ) of the safety-factor value on axis are seen to cause large changes in the growth rate, toroidal mode number, and radial location of the most unstable eigenmodes found. The observed sensitivity is shown to proceed from the very low magnetic shear values attained throughout the plasma core, raising issues about reliable predictions of alpha-particle transport in burning plasmas.

  18. Optical Model Potential Parameters for p, d, {sup 3}He and Alpha-Particle Scattering on Lithium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Burtebayev, N.; Nassurlla, Marzhan; Nassurlla, Maulen; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Sakuta, S. B.

    2008-11-11

    Analysis of the p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles elastic scattering on the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li nuclei has been done in the framework of the optical model at the beam energies up to 72 MeV. It was shown that the account of the cluster exchange mechanism together with the potential scattering allow reproducing the experimental cross-sections in the whole angular range.

  19. Designing experimental setup and procedures for studying alpha-particle-induced adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, V. W. Y.; Lam, R. K. K.; Chong, E. Y. W.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2010-03-01

    The present work was devoted to designing the experimental setup and the associated procedures for alpha-particle-induced adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Thin PADC films with a thickness of 16 μm were fabricated and employed as support substrates for holding dechorionated zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation from the bottom through the films. Embryos were collected within 15 min when the light photoperiod began, which were then incubated and dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf). They were then irradiated at 5 hpf by alpha particles using a planar 241Am source with an activity of 0.1151 μCi for 24 s (priming dose), and subsequently at 10 hpf using the same source for 240 s (challenging dose). The levels of apoptosis in irradiated zebrafish embryos at 24 hpf were quantified through staining with the vital dye acridine orange, followed by counting the stained cells under a florescent microscope. The results revealed the presence of the adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo, and demonstrated the feasibility of the adopted experimental setup and procedures.

  20. Kerr black hole parameters in terms of the redshift/blueshift of photons emitted by geodesic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2015-08-01

    We are motivated by the recently reported dynamical evidence of stars with short orbital periods moving around the center of the Milky Way and the corresponding hypothesis about the existence of a supermassive black hole hosted at its center. In this paper we show how the mass and rotation parameters of a Kerr black hole (assuming that the putative supermassive black hole is of this type), as well as the distance that separates the black hole from the Earth, can be estimated in a relativistic way in terms of (i) the redshift and blueshift of photons that are emitted by geodesic massive particles (stars) and travel along null geodesics towards a distant observer (located at a finite distance), and (ii) the radius of these star orbits. As a concrete example and as a first step towards a full relativistic analysis of the above-mentioned star orbits around the center of our Galaxy, we consider stable equatorial circular orbits of stars and express their corresponding redshift/blueshift in terms of the metric parameters (mass and angular momentum per unit mass) and the orbital radii of both the emitter star and the distant observer. These radii are linked through the constants of motion along the null geodesics followed by photons since their emission until their detection, allowing us to get a closed expression for the orbital radius of the observer in terms of the emitter orbital radius, which is known from observations, and the black hole parameters M and a . In principle, these expressions allow one to statistically estimate the mass and rotation parameters of the Kerr black hole, and the radius of our orbit, through a Bayesian fitting, i.e., with the aid of observational data: the redshift/blueshift measured at certain points of stars' orbits and their radii, with their respective errors, a task that we hope to perform in the near future. We also point to several astrophysical phenomena, like accretion disks of rotating black holes, binary systems and active

  1. Development and characterization of an exposure platform suitable for physico-chemical, morphological and toxicological characterization of printer-emitted particles (PEPs)

    PubMed Central

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Bello, Dhimiter; Thomas, Treye; Castranova, Vincent; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    An association between laser printer use and emissions of particulate matter (PM), ozone and volatile organic compounds has been reported in recent studies. However, the detailed physico-chemical, morphological and toxicological characterization of these printer-emitted particles (PEPs) and possible incorporation of engineered nanomaterials into toner formulations remain largely unknown. In this study, a printer exposure generation system suitable for the physico-chemical, morphological, and toxicological characterization of PEPs was developed and used to assess the properties of PEPs from the use of commercially available laser printers. The system consists of a glovebox type environmental chamber for uninterrupted printer operation, real-time and time-integrated particle sampling instrumentation for the size fractionation and sampling of PEPs and an exposure chamber for inhalation toxicological studies. Eleven commonly used laser printers were evaluated and ranked based on their PM emission profiles. Results show PM peak emissions are brand independent and varied between 3000 to 1 300 000 particles/cm3, with modal diameters ranging from 49 to 208 nm, with the majority of PEPs in the nanoscale (<100 nm) size. Furthermore, it was shown that PEPs can be affected by certain operational parameters and printing conditions. The release of nanoscale particles from a nano-enabled product (printer toner) raises questions about health implications to users. The presented PEGS platform will help in assessing the toxicological profile of PEPs and the link to the physico-chemical and morphological properties of emitted PM and toner formulations. PMID:24862974

  2. Size-segregated emissions and metal content of vehicle-emitted particles as a function of mileage: Implications to population exposure.

    PubMed

    Golokhvast, Kirill S; Chernyshev, Valery V; Chaika, Vladimir V; Ugay, Sergey M; Zelinskaya, Elena V; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Sarigiannis, Denis A

    2015-10-01

    The study aims at investigating the characteristics (size distribution, active surface and metal content) of particles emitted by cars as a function of mileage using a novel methodology for characterizing particulate emissions captured by Exhaust Gas Suspension (EGS). EGS was obtained by passing the exhaust gases through a container of deionized water. EGS analysis was performed using laser granulometry, electron scanning microscopy, and high resolution mass spectrometry. Implications of the differences in key features of the emitted particles on population exposure were investigated using numerical simulation for estimating size-segregated PM deposition across human respiratory tract (HRT). It was found that vehicle mileage, age and the respective emissions class have almost no effect on the size distribution of the exhaust gas particulate released into the environment; about half of the examined vehicles with low mileage were found to release particles of aerodynamic diameter above 10 μm. The exhaust gas particulate detected in the EGS of all cars can be classified into three major size classes: (1) 0.1-5 µm - soot and ash particles, metals (Au, Pt, Pd, Ir); (2) 10-30 µm - metal (Cr, Fe, Cu, Zr, Ni) and ash particles; (3) 400-1,000 µm - metal (Fe, Cr, Pb) and ash particles. Newer vehicles with low mileage are substantial sources of soot and metal particles with median diameter of 200 nm with a higher surface area (up to 89,871.16 cm(2)/cm(3)). These tend to deposit in the lower part of the human respiratory tract.

  3. Alpha particle energy response of 1-mm-thick polycarbonate track detectors by 50 Hz-HV electrochemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, M; Ramezani, V

    2015-04-01

    The electrochemical etching (ECE) method enlarges charged particle tracks to enhance its applications in particular in health physics and radiation dosimetry. The ECE method is usually based on using a high frequency-high voltage (HF-HV) generator with 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs). The authors' recent studies on nitrogen and helium ions and alpha tracks in 1-mm-thick large-size PCTDs under a 50 Hz-HV ECE process provided promising results. In this study, alpha track efficiency and mean track diameter versus energy responses and registration energy range as well as alpha and background track shapes under three sets of 50 Hz-4, 5 and 6 kV applied field conditions have been studied and are reported. The efficiency versus alpha energy has a Bragg-type response from ∼15 keV to ∼4.5 MeV for the field conditions applied with an efficiency value of 40-50% at the Bragg peak. The results are presented and discussed.

  4. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors. PMID:27160654

  5. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-05-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors.

  6. Improve the catalytic activity of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in decomposition of ammonium perchlorate by coating amorphous carbon on their surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yifu; Liu Xinghai; Nie Jiaorong; Yu Lei; Zhong Yalan; Huang Chi

    2011-02-15

    Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value of the designed synthetic system, respectively. The sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with diameter about 25 nm on average were encapsulated into carbon shells to fabricate a novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C) through the coating experiments. The catalytic performance of the products on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which show that {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell composites have higher catalytic activity than that of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. -- Graphical abstract: The catalytic performance of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value. {yields} A novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell structured composite) has been successfully synthesized using sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as the cores and glucose as the source of carbon. {yields} The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which shows that these materials have high catalytic activity.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients.

  8. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  9. Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

  10. Simulation of the alpha particle heating and the helium ash source in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-12-15

    A guiding center orbit following code, which incorporates a set of non-singular coordinates for orbit integration, was developed and applied to investigate the alpha particle heating in an ITER-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier. It is found that a relatively large q (safety factor) value can significantly broaden the alpha heating profile in comparison with the local heating approximation; this broadening is due to the finite orbit width effects; when the orbit width is much smaller than the scale length of the alpha particle source profile, the heating profile agrees with the source profile, otherwise, the heating profile can be significantly broadened. It is also found that the stagnation particles move to the magnetic axis during the slowing-down process, thus the effect of stagnation orbits is not beneficial to the helium ash removal. The source profile of helium ash is broadened in comparison with the alpha source profile, which is similar to the heating profile.

  11. 1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ghantous, N.N. Gorelenkov, C. Kessel, F. Poli

    2013-01-30

    We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.

  12. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-03-26

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

  13. Gamma-H2AX foci in cells exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cellular effects of exposure to mixed beams of high and low linear energy transfer radiation. So far, the effects of combined exposures have mainly been assessed with clonogenic survival or cytogenetic methods, and the results are contradictory. The gamma-H2AX assay has up to now not been applied in this context, and it is a promising tool for investigating the early cellular response to mixed beam irradiation. Purpose To determine the dose response and repair kinetics of gamma-H2AX ionizing radiation-induced foci in VH10 human fibroblasts exposed to mixed beams of 241Am alpha particles and X-rays. Results VH10 human fibroblasts were irradiated with each radiation type individually or both in combination at 37°C. Foci were scored for repair kinetics 0.5, 1, 3 and 24 h after irradiation (one dose per irradiation type), and for dose response at the 1 h time point. The dose response effect of mixed beam was additive, and the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles (as compared to X-rays) was of 0.76 ± 0.52 for the total number of foci, and 2.54 ± 1.11 for large foci. The repair kinetics for total number of foci in cells exposed to mixed beam irradiation was intermediate to that of cells exposed to alpha particles and X-rays. However, for mixed beam-irradiated cells the frequency and area of large foci were initially lower than predicted and increased during the first 3 hours of repair (while the predicted number and area did not). Conclusions The repair kinetics of large foci after mixed beam exposure was significantly different from predicted based on the effect of the single dose components. The formation of large foci was delayed and they did not reach their maximum area until 1 h after irradiation. We hypothesize that the presence of low X-ray-induced damage engages the DNA repair machinery leading to a delayed DNA damage response to the more complex DNA damage induced by alpha particles. PMID:23121736

  14. Development of a He- and He0 beam source for alpha particle measurement in a burning plasma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Sasao, M; Terai, K; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Yamaoka, H; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    Proof of principle experiments of neutral helium beam production for alpha particle diagnostics was carried out on a test stand. Negative helium ions were produced in the Li charge exchange cell, in which stable and long time operation was possible. He(-) beam was accelerated to 157 keV. Finally, He(0) beam was successfully produced after the flight in the drift-tube through the auto-electron-detachment process from He(-) to He(0). A neutral beam detector using a pyroelectric device was also developed to measure He(0) beam intensity. The metastable component in the neutral helium beam was found to be less than 2%.

  15. Which radionuclide, carrier molecule and clinical indication for alpha-immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Guerard, F; Barbet, J; Chatal, J F; Kraeber-Bodere, F; Cherel, M; Haddad, F

    2015-06-01

    Beta-emitting radionuclides are not able to kill isolated tumor cells disseminated in the body, even if a high density of radiolabeled molecules can be targeted at the surface of these cells because the vast majority of emitted electrons deliver their energy outside the targeted cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides may overcome this limitation. It is thus of primary importance to test and validate the radionuclide of choice, the most appropriate carrier molecule and the most promising clinical indication. Four α-particle emitting radionuclides have been or are clinically tested in phase I studies namely 213Bi, 225Ac, 212Pb and 211At. Clinical safety has been documented and encouraging efficacy has been shown for some of them (213Bi and 211At). 211At has been the most studied and could be the most promising radionuclide but 225Ac and 212Pb are also of potential great interest. Any carrier molecule that has been labeled with β-emitting radionuclides could be labeled with alpha particle-emitting radionuclide using, for some of them, the same chelating agents. However, the physical half-life of the radionuclide should match the biological half-life of the radioconjugate or its catabolites. Finally everybody agrees, based on the quite short range of alpha particles, on the fact that the clinical indications for alpha-immunotherapy should be limited to the situation of disseminated minimal residual diseases made of small clusters of malignant cells or isolated tumor cells.

  16. Nickel-59 in Surface Layers of Lunar Basalt 74275: Implications for the Solar Alpha Particle Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, C.; Xue, S.; Ma, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Fifield, K.; Cresswell, R. G.; diTada, M. L.; Hausladen, Paul; Reedy, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    By using AMS we have profiled 59 Ni/Ni ratios in lunar basalt 74275. Activities (dpm 59 Ni/[kg Fe]) range from 120 to 10 at depths (mg/cm 2) from about 30 to 650. Modeling results hint at higher solar alpha fluxes during the last about 0.5 My than during the last approximately 1 My.

  17. Experimental investigations of electron capture from atomic hydrogen and deuterium by alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We have undertaken a program at the University of Missouri-Rolla to experimentally determine cross sections for ion-atom collisions of interest in fusion reactor development. During the last grant period, we have made measurements of total and singly-differential cross sections for the alpha double-capture reaction. He{sup ++} + He(ls{sup 2}) {yields} He({Sigma}n,{ell}) + He{sup ++}. Collisions of this type have been discussed as a basis for diagnostics in which alphas are neutralized in a single collisions either by a HeI beam or by the ablative cloud from mechanically introduced impurity pellets. We are now finishing measurements of cross sections for the alpha single capture reaction He{sup ++} + He(1s{sup 2}) {yields} He{sup +}(n) + He{sup +}(1s), and propose to study He{sup ++} + H(1s) {yields} He{sup +}(n) + H{sup +} during next year. Accurate knowledge of these cross sections is fundamental for modeling of neutral-hydrogen beam penetration in fusion plasmas as well as for spectroscopic diagnostics of alpha densities and velocity distributions, especially for the case of capture into the n = 4 state of the projectile He{sup +}. Our measurements are made using a unique collision spectrometer discussed in this paper.

  18. Simultaneous Measurements of Electrons, Protons and Alpha particles by the Electron Proton Helium Instrument aboard SOHO and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasa, Christoph; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Heber, Bernd; Klassen, Andreas; Müller-Mellin, Reinhold

    The flight spare instrument of the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN) aboard SOHO was mounted on the X-Ray observatory Chandra. Both instruments measure electrons in the energy range of 150 keV to above 10 MeV, protons and alpha-particles from 4 MeV/nucleon to above 51 MeV/nucleon in different energy channels. While SOHO is located at the Lagrangian L1-point, Chandra is on an elliptical orbit around the Earth crossing the radiation belts with an orbit period of 64 hours. Simultaneous measurements outside of the Earth's magnetosphere are available for both instruments from the launch of Chandra in 1999 to the end of 2008. This period covers half a solar cycle from maximum to the recent solar minimum period. In this presentation different particle components, like Jovian electrons, solar energetic particles and particles coming from interplanetary shock waves will be investigated. We combine SOHO and Chandra observations outside the radiation belts to compare the particle distribution at L1 and at the Earth.

  19. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  20. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific. PMID:22619631

  1. TOF-SIMS evidence of intercalated molecular gases and diffusion-limited reaction kinetics in an alpha particle-irradiated PTFE matrix.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Gregory L; Szakal, Christopher; Wetteland, Christopher J; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-02-01

    The chemical evolution of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) that is brought about by increasing levels of irradiation with alpha particles is accompanied by the emergence and proliferation of functionalized moieties. Families of reaction products specifically identified in the alpha-irradiated polymer matrix include hydride-, hydroxide-, and oxide-functionalized fluorocarbons. The data also indicate the emergence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydrazine (N2H4), but no distinct evidence suggesting the formation of perfluorinated amines, amides, or cyanogens is found. In this article we substantiate the speciation of emergent species and reveal evidence of intercalated molecular gases with which alpha particle-generated radicals may react to form the observed products. Furthermore, we present evidence to suggest that the kinetics of alpha particle-induced reaction is limited by the diffusion of radicals within the polymer matrix. That is to say, chemical additives in the polymer matrix are shown to be scavengers of H*, O*, and F* radicals and limit the rates of reaction that produce functionalized fluorocarbon moieties. Above a threshold dose of alpha particles, the concentration of radicals exceeds that of the scavenger species, and free radical diffusion commences as evidenced by a sudden increase in the yield of reaction products. Samples of PTFE were irradiated to alpha doses in the range of 10(7) to 5 x 10(10) rad with 5.5 MeV 4He2+ ions from a tandem accelerator. Residual gas analysis (RGA) was utilized to monitor the liberation of molecular gases from PTFE during alpha particle irradiation of samples in vacuum. Static time-of-flight SIMS (TOF-SIMS), equipped with a 20 keV C60+ source, was employed to probe chemical changes as a function of alpha particle irradiation. Chemical images and high-resolution mass spectra were collected in both the positive and negative polarities.

  2. Coincidences between light particles, evaporation residues, and complex fragments emitted in the reaction {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni at 500 MeV bombarding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez del Campo, J.; Shapira, D.; Chavez, E.; Ortiz, M.E.; Dacal, A.; D`Onofrio, A.; Terrasi, F.

    1996-03-01

    Light particles (protons and alphas) were measured in coincidence with complex fragments (4 < Z < 10) and evaporation residues (Z > 40) using the large detector array HILI. A {sup 58}Ni beam of 500 MeV extracted from the HHIRF tandem accelerator was used to bombard a {sup 58}Ni target of 99% enrichment. A good account of the proton and alpha spectra in coincidences with the residues can be achieved only by including in the statistical model calculation the emission of complex fragments and allowing a small emission of a dinuclear configuration formed prior to fusion. The relative kinetic energy spectra between the complex fragments and the residues show a typical Coulomb peak consistent with emission from the compound nucleus and the out of plane angular correlation shows that the emission is coplanar.

  3. Improving the output power of GaN-based light-emitting diode using Ag particles embedded within a SiO2 current blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Seong; Han, Jaecheon; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with Ag particles embedded within a SiO2 current blocking layer (CBL) are demonstrated. The Ag particles varied from 100 to 250 nm in size, and had a density of ∼3.8 × 108 cm-2. The transmittances obtained from GaN/sapphire and Ag particles/GaN/sapphire were 75 and 66% at 450 nm, respectively. The LEDs (chip size: 1000 × 1000 μm2) fabricated with ITO-only, ITO/SiO2 CBL, and ITO/Ag particles/SiO2 CBL showed forward-bias voltages of 3.05, 3.25 and 3.1 V at 20 mA, respectively. The LEDs with the ITO/Ag particles/SiO2 CBL yielded 11.9 and 7.0% higher light output powers (at 20 mA) than the LEDs with the ITO-only and ITO/SiO2 CBL, respectively. The improved output power is explained by the combined effects of the improved extraction and current spreading.

  4. Helium measurements simulating alpha-particle diagnostics by the pellet charge exchange in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Goncharov, P.; Veschev, E.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; ,

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to investigate the confinement of α particle, which is produced by the nuclear reaction in ITER or fusion reactor. The pellet charge exchange measurement (PCX) is one of the most powerful methods because it can directly provide the profile of α particle energy spectra in plasma. In Large Helical Device (LHD), it is possible to confine the high energetic particle (helium) accelerated by using the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICH). Therefore it is possible to perform the simulation experiment of α particle diagnostic in LHD.

  5. Transcriptional Response of Human Cells to Microbeam Irradiation with 2.1 MeV Alpha Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Spitta, L.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Greif, K. D.; Giesen, U.

    Within the next decades an increasing number of human beings in space will be simultaneously exposed to different stimuli especially microgravity and radiation To assess the risks for humans during long-duration space missions the complex interplay of these parameters at the cellular level must be understood Cellular stress protection responses lead to increased transcription of several genes via modulation of transcription factors Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappa B NF- kappa B pathway as a possible anti-apoptotic route represents such an important cellular stress response A screening assay for detection of NF- kappa B-dependent gene activation using the destabilized variant of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein d2EGFP as reporter protein had been developed It consists of Human Embryonic Kidney HEK 293 Cells stably transfected with a receptor-reporter-construct carrying d2EGFP under the control of a NF- kappa B response element Clones positive for Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha TNF- alpha inducible d2EGFP expression were selected as cellular reporters Irradiation was performed either with X-rays 150 kV 19 mA at DLR Cologne or with 2 1 MeV alpha particles LET sim 160 keV mu m at PTB Braunschweig After irradiation the following biological endpoints were determined i cell survival via the colony forming ability test ii time-dependent activation of NF- kappa B dependent d2EGFP gene expression using flow cytometry iii quantitative RT-PCR

  6. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Li, Y. K.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2015-06-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits, and analysed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometres in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should be assessed.

  7. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Li, Y.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2014-11-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits and analyzed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometers in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should to be assessed.

  8. Saturation of a floating potential of an electron emitting electrode with increased electron emission: A one-dimensional kinetic model and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.

    2012-01-15

    A bounded plasma system is studied by a one-dimensional kinetic model and particle-in-cell computer simulation using the XPDP1 code. Three particle species are injected into the system from a planar source, which are the singly charged positive ions and the cool and the hot electrons. All the particle species are injected with half-Maxwellian velocity distributions with different temperatures. From the collector, the emitted electrons are injected, also with a half-Maxwellian velocity distribution, but with a much lower temperature than the cool electrons. As electron emission from the collector is increased, the floating potential of the collector increases also until the boundary of space charge limited emission is achieved. In the simulation, the emission can be increased further and it turns out that the floating potential of the collector remains constant in spite of the increased electron emission. The model on the other hand is valid only up to the boundary of space charge limited emission. The predictions of that limit and of the respective floating potential of the collector by the model are in very good agreement with the simulation. As the criterion for comparison of the model and the simulations propose the matching of the potential, electric field, and density profiles obtained from the simulation and from the numerical solution of the Poisson equation. The matching of potential and electric field profiles is usually almost perfect. On the other hand, the numerical solutions of the Poisson equation give larger ion density at the source and emitted electron density at the collector than obtained from the simulation, but the matching of the particle densities around the inflection point of the potential between the model and the simulation is excellent for all 4 particle species. The same is valid also for the hot electron density at the source. If the potentials and the electric fields are read from the simulation and inserted into the model equations

  9. Development and characterization of an exposure platform suitable for physico-chemical, morphological and toxicological characterization of printer-emitted particles (PEPs).

    PubMed

    Pirela, Sandra V; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Bello, Dhimiter; Thomas, Treye; Castranova, Vincent; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-06-01

    An association between laser printer use and emissions of particulate matter (PM), ozone and volatile organic compounds has been reported in recent studies. However, the detailed physico-chemical, morphological and toxicological characterization of these printer-emitted particles (PEPs) and possible incorporation of engineered nanomaterials into toner formulations remain largely unknown. In this study, a printer exposure generation system suitable for the physico-chemical, morphological, and toxicological characterization of PEPs was developed and used to assess the properties of PEPs from the use of commercially available laser printers. The system consists of a glovebox type environmental chamber for uninterrupted printer operation, real-time and time-integrated particle sampling instrumentation for the size fractionation and sampling of PEPs and an exposure chamber for inhalation toxicological studies. Eleven commonly used laser printers were evaluated and ranked based on their PM emission profiles. Results show PM peak emissions are brand independent and varied between 3000 to 1 300 000 particles/cm³, with modal diameters ranging from 49 to 208 nm, with the majority of PEPs in the nanoscale (<100 nm) size. Furthermore, it was shown that PEPs can be affected by certain operational parameters and printing conditions. The release of nanoscale particles from a nano-enabled product (printer toner) raises questions about health implications to users. The presented PEGS platform will help in assessing the toxicological profile of PEPs and the link to the physico-chemical and morphological properties of emitted PM and toner formulations.

  10. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    2015-06-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate {Q}{flow} at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\lt {r}{crit}, and the rotational force controls the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\gt {r}{crit}, where {r}{crit}≃ 2.5 {AU} in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane. We find that {Q}{flow} is positive at r\\lt {r}{crit} and {Q}{flow}=0 at r≥slant {r}{crit}, consistent with the previous finding that the rotational force does not lead to a release of energy. We compare the value of {Q}{flow} at r\\lt {r}{crit} with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted {Q}p and {Q}α , deduced from in situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that {Q}{flow} exceeds {Q}α at r\\lt 1 {AU}, and that {Q}{flow}/{Q}p decreases with increasing distance from the Sun from a value of about one at r = 0.29–0.42 AU to about 1/4 at 1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at r\\lt {r}{crit} makes an important contribution to the heating of the fast solar wind. We also discuss the implications of the alpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  11. Comparison of PHITS, GEANT4, and HIBRAC simulations of depth-dependent yields of β(+)-emitting nuclei during therapeutic particle irradiation to measured data.

    PubMed

    Rohling, Heide; Sihver, Lembit; Priegnitz, Marlen; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Fiedler, Fine

    2013-09-21

    For quality assurance in particle therapy, a non-invasive, in vivo range verification is highly desired. Particle therapy positron-emission-tomography (PT-PET) is the only clinically proven method up to now for this purpose. It makes use of the β(+)-activity produced during the irradiation by the nuclear fragmentation processes between the therapeutic beam and the irradiated tissue. Since a direct comparison of β(+)-activity and dose is not feasible, a simulation of the expected β(+)-activity distribution is required. For this reason it is essential to have a quantitatively reliable code for the simulation of the yields of the β(+)-emitting nuclei at every position of the beam path. In this paper results of the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation codes PHITS, GEANT4, and the one-dimensional deterministic simulation code HIBRAC are compared to measurements of the yields of the most abundant β(+)-emitting nuclei for carbon, lithium, helium, and proton beams. In general, PHITS underestimates the yields of positron-emitters. With GEANT4 the overall most accurate results are obtained. HIBRAC and GEANT4 provide comparable results for carbon and proton beams. HIBRAC is considered as a good candidate for the implementation to clinical routine PT-PET.

  12. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  13. Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University

    SciTech Connect

    Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Scorza, S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.

    2013-08-08

    Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm{sup 2} or 1800 cm{sup 2} counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of {sup 210}Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing {sup 222}Rn progenies from the samples.

  14. Morphology and Chemical Composition of soot particles emitted by Wood-burning Cook-Stoves: a HRTEM, XPS and Elastic backscattering Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali-Sandoval, G. A., Sr.; Castro, T.; Peralta, O.; De la Cruz, W.; Días, J.; Amelines, O.; Rivera-Hernández, M.; Varela, A.; Muñoz-Muñoz, F.; Policroniades, R.; Murillo, G.; Moreno, E.

    2014-12-01

    The morphology, microstructure and the chemical composition on surface of soot particles were studied by using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and elastic backscattering spectrometry. In order to obtain freshly soot particles emitted by home-made wood-burning cook stoves, copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were placed on the last two of an 8-stages MOUDI cascade impactor. The analysis of HRTEM micrographs revealed the nanostructure and the particle size of soot particles. The XPS survey spectra show a large carbon peak around 285 eV and the oxygen signal at 533 eV. Some differences observed in the carbon/oxygen (C/O) ratio of the particles probably depend on the combustion process efficiency of each cook-stove analyzed. The C-1s XPS spectra show an asymmetric broad peak and other with low intensity that corresponds to sp2 and sp3hybridization, which were fitted with a convolution using Gaussian functions. Elastic backscattering technique allows a chemical elemental analysis of samples and confirms the presence of C, O and Si observed by XPS. Additionally, the morphological properties of soot aggregates were analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df. Also, real-time absorption (σabs) and scattering (σsct) coefficients of fine (with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 µm) soot particles were measured. The trend in σabs and σsct indicate that the cooking process has two important combustion stages which varied in its flaming strength, being vigorous in the first stage and soft in the second one.

  15. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Radiation emitted by a beam of particles crossing an inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol'tsov, A. V.; Serov, Alexander V.

    1995-03-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the time dependence of the spatial distribution of particles injected perpendicular to the direction of propagation of a linearly polarised inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave and reflected by this wave. It is shown that such reflection modulates the particle density in a beam which is homogeneous at injection. Stimulated emission of radiation from a ribbon electron beam reflected by a wave is considered. The spectral—angular and polarisation characteristics of such radiation are investigated.

  16. Numerical Study of the Ripple Resonance Diffusion of Alpha Particles in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimata, Hideyuki; Tani, Keiji; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Tobita, Kenji; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji; Shimada, Ryuichi

    The energy dependence of the diffusion coefficients of α particles in rippled fields of tokamaks is numerically investigated with an orbit-following Monte Carlo code. The diffusion coefficients are enhanced around the ripple resonance energy while they are not so much enhanced in the neighborhood of it. Consequently, they have a local minimum near the resonance energy, and hence they have an M-shaped energy dependence. Ripple resonance is caused by a radial change of the toroidal precession of banana particles, and creates islands in (Nφ, ψ) phase space. Since particles outside the separatrix are the main contributors to diffusion enhancement, the M-shaped energy dependence is explained by the co-existence of open and closed orbits in the phase space. Ripple resonance diffusion is dominant for fusion-produced α particles since the resonance energy width occupies a large portion of the energy range in their slowing-down processes.

  17. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.A.; Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

  18. Analysis of particulates for very light elements by forward scattering of alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, G.W.

    1980-09-01

    PIXE analysis is limited to elements heavier than sodium. A technique has been developed for obtaining quantitative information about the levels of elements hydrogen through flourine by forward scattering of 18 MeV alphas, and may be obtained simultaneously with PIXE. Using substrate thicknesses less than 1 mg/cm/sup 2/, sensitivities from 2.7 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ for hydrogen to 124 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ for carbon, may be obtained after corrections, with determinations accurate to +- 15%, in 200 second irradiation times. Substantial corrections must be made.

  19. Cross-sections for Balmer-alpha excitation in heavy-particle collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y.K.

    1982-08-01

    Doppler shifted and unshifted Balmer-alpha radiation has been observed in the absolute sense for energetic H/sup +/, H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/ ions incident on molecular hydrogen by the method of decay inside the target within the energy range of 20 keV to 150 keV. Most of the measurements were based on single-collision conditions, but a simple thick-target experiment has been tried for the case of dissociative excitation of the target molecules by H atoms.

  20. Effects of fresh lubricant oils on particle emissions emitted by a modern gasoline direct injection passenger car.

    PubMed

    Pirjola, Liisa; Karjalainen, Panu; Heikkilä, Juha; Saari, Sampo; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Kulmala, Kari; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2015-03-17

    Particle emissions from a modern turbocharged gasoline direct injection passenger car equipped with a three-way catalyst and an exhaust gas recirculation system were studied while the vehicle was running on low-sulfur gasoline and, consecutively, with five different lubrication oils. Exhaust particle number concentration, size distribution, and volatility were determined both at laboratory and on-road conditions. The results indicated that the choice of lubricant affected particle emissions both during the cold start and warm driving cycles. However, the contribution of engine oil depended on driving conditions being higher during acceleration and steady state driving than during deceleration. The highest emission factors were found with two oils that had the highest metal content. The results indicate that a 10% decrease in the Zn content of engine oils is linked with an 11-13% decrease to the nonvolatile particle number emissions in steady driving conditions and a 5% decrease over the New European Driving Cycle. The effect of lubricant on volatile particles was even higher, on the order of 20%. PMID:25679531

  1. Effects of fresh lubricant oils on particle emissions emitted by a modern gasoline direct injection passenger car.

    PubMed

    Pirjola, Liisa; Karjalainen, Panu; Heikkilä, Juha; Saari, Sampo; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Kulmala, Kari; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2015-03-17

    Particle emissions from a modern turbocharged gasoline direct injection passenger car equipped with a three-way catalyst and an exhaust gas recirculation system were studied while the vehicle was running on low-sulfur gasoline and, consecutively, with five different lubrication oils. Exhaust particle number concentration, size distribution, and volatility were determined both at laboratory and on-road conditions. The results indicated that the choice of lubricant affected particle emissions both during the cold start and warm driving cycles. However, the contribution of engine oil depended on driving conditions being higher during acceleration and steady state driving than during deceleration. The highest emission factors were found with two oils that had the highest metal content. The results indicate that a 10% decrease in the Zn content of engine oils is linked with an 11-13% decrease to the nonvolatile particle number emissions in steady driving conditions and a 5% decrease over the New European Driving Cycle. The effect of lubricant on volatile particles was even higher, on the order of 20%.

  2. Development of an alpha/beta/gamma detector for radiation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-11-15

    For radiation monitoring at the site of nuclear power plant accidents such as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles are needed because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. We developed a radiation detector that can simultaneously monitor alpha and beta particles and gamma photons for radiation monitoring. The detector consists of three-layered scintillators optically coupled to each other and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: 2.4 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol.% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol.% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. By using pulse shape discrimination, the count rates of these layers can be separated. With individual irradiation of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons, the count rate of the first layer represented the alpha particles, the second layer represented the beta particles, and the third layer represented the gamma photons. Even with simultaneous irradiation of the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons, these three types of radiation can be individually monitored using correction for the gamma detection efficiency of the second and third layers. Our developed alpha, beta, and gamma detector is simple and will be useful for radiation monitoring, especially at nuclear power plant accident sites or other applications where the simultaneous measurements of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons are required.

  3. A comparative study of the number and mass of fine particles emitted with diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Md. Nurun; Brown, Richard J.; Ristovski, Zoran; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-09-01

    The current investigation reports on diesel particulate matter emissions, with special interest in fine particles from the combustion of two base fuels. The base fuels selected were diesel fuel and marine gas oil (MGO). The experiments were conducted with a four-stroke, six-cylinder, direct injection diesel engine. The results showed that the fine particle number emissions measured by both SMPS and ELPI were higher with MGO compared to diesel fuel. It was observed that the fine particle number emissions with the two base fuels were quantitatively different but qualitatively similar. The gravimetric (mass basis) measurement also showed higher total particulate matter (TPM) emissions with the MGO. The smoke emissions, which were part of TPM, were also higher for the MGO. No significant changes in the mass flow rate of fuel and the brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were observed between the two base fuels.

  4. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1) Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study examined alpha (α-) particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1) for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure. PMID:23097634

  5. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  6. Basic principles approach for studying nonlinear Alfven wave-alpha particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model and a numerical procedure are presented which give a kinetic nonlinear description of the Alfven-wave instabilities driven by the source of energetic particles in a plasma. The steady-state and bursting nonlinear scenarios predicted by the analytical theory are verified in the test numerical simulation of the bump-on-tail instability. A mathematical similarity between the bump-on-tail problem for plasma waves and the Alfven wave problem gives a guideline for the interpretation of the bursts in the wave energy and fast particle losses observed in the tokamak experiments with neutral beam injection.

  7. Exclusive experiment on nuclei with backward emitted particles by electron-nucleus collision in {approximately} 10 GeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.; Takagi, F.

    1994-04-01

    Since the evidence of strong cross section in proton-nucleus backward scattering was presented in the early of 1970 years, this phenomena have been interested from the point of view to be related to information on the short range correlation between nucleons or on high momentum components of the wave function of the nucleus. In the analysis of the first experiment on protons from the carbon target under bombardment by 1.5-5.7 GeV protons, indications are found of an effect analogous to scaling in high-energy interactions of elementary particles with protons. Moreover it is found that the function f(p{sup 2})/{sigma}{sub tot}, which describes the spectra of the protons and deuterons emitted backward from nuclei in the laboratory system, does not depend on the energy and the type of the incident particle or on the atomic number of the target nucleus. In the following experiments the spectra of the protons emitted from the nuclei C, Al, Ti, Cu, Cd and Pb were measured in the inclusive reactions with incident particles of negative pions (1.55-6.2 GeV/c) and protons (6.2-9.0 GeV/C). The cross section f is described by f = E/p{sup 2} d{sup 2}{sigma}/dpd{Omega} = C exp ({minus}Bp{sup 2}), where p is the momentum of hadron. The function f depends linearly on the atomic weight A of the target nuclei. The slope parameter B is independent of the target nucleus and of the sort and energy of the bombarding particles. The invariant cross section {rho} = f/{sigma}{sub tot} is also described by exponential A{sub 0} exp ({minus}A{sub 1p}{sup 2}), where p becomes independent of energy at initial particle energies {ge} 1.5 GeV for C nucleus and {ge} 5 GeV for the heaviest of the investigated Pb nuclei.

  8. Synthesis of alpha-MoTe2 nanorods via annealing Te-seeded amorphous MoTe2 particles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Longhui; Wei, Yun; Pol, Vilas G; Gedanken, Aharon

    2004-09-20

    Semiconductor alpha-MoTe2 nanorods have been synthesized by annealing Te-seeded particles of an amorphous MoTe2 intermediate. This intermediate is prepared by a solution reaction between Mo(CO)6 and elemental Te in diphenylmethane. The as-synthesized products were characterized by structural, compositional, and morphological techniques of X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, selected area energy dispersive spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results of the annealing process are MoTe2 nanorods with diameters of 50-200 nm and lengths ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 microm. Here, the rodlike structure of MoTe2 is reported for the first time, and added to the list as one kind of new morphology of MoTe2 nanomaterials. A mechanism for the formation of the nanorods is proposed. The sandwich-layered structure of Te-Mo-Te and the similarity in the structure between hexagonal alpha-MoTe2 and hexagonal Te are responsible for the formation of nanorods of MoTe2. PMID:15360257

  9. Determination of oxygen in silicon and carbide by activation with 27.2 meV alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgolenko, A. P.; Kornienko, N. D.; Lithovchenko, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Si sample was polished on one side, and on the other side Ni was applied chemically and soldered with Pb to a water cooled Cu substrate. Optical quartz standard was fixed from the other side. Si carbide samples were soldered to a substrated with In. The prepared samples were irradiated in a cyclotron with a 27.2 MeV alpha particle beam. The layers were removed from the Si and Si carbide samples by grinding and the positron activity of F-18(t sub 1/2 110 min) was measured by using a gamma, gamma coincidence spectrometer with two NaI(TI) crystals. For analysis of Si carbide, the activity decay curve of the samples was recorded to find the contribution of the positron activity of Cu-65(t sub 1/2 12.9 hr) which formed from Ni impurity on irradiation.

  10. High-repetition CO{sub 2} laser for collective Thomson scattering diagnostic of {alpha} particles in burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, T.; Kawano, Y.; Kusama, Y.; Sugie, T.; Miura, Y.; Koseki, R.; Kawahara, Y.

    2006-10-15

    A high-repetition and high-energy transversely excited atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser for a collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic has been developed to establish a diagnostic method of confined {alpha} particles in burning plasmas. To excite a single-transverse and single-longitudinal mode, a continuous wave seed laser was injected to an unstable resonator with a cavity length of {approx}4.4 m. Pulse energy of 10 J with a repetition rate of 10 Hz has been achieved in the single-mode operation. Pulse energies of 18 J with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and 36 J with single shot operation have also been achieved in the multimode operation. These results give a prospect for the CTS diagnostic on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which requires single-mode energy of 20 J with repetition rate of 40 Hz.

  11. Anisotropic alpha emission from on-line separated isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.; Vandeplassche, D.; van Walle, E.; Severijns, N.; Vanneste, L.

    1986-05-05

    A systematic on-line nuclear-orientation study of heavy isotopes using anisotropic ..cap alpha.. emission is reported for the first time. The anisotrophies recorded for /sup 199/At, /sup 201/At, and /sup 203/At are remarkably pronounced and strongly varying. At lower neutron number the ..cap alpha.. particles are more preferentially emitted perpendicularly to the nuclear-spin direction. This may be interpreted in terms of the high sensitivity of the ..cap alpha..-emission probability to changes in the nuclear shape.

  12. Characterization of spatial impact of particles emitted from a cement material production facility on outdoor particle deposition in the surrounding community.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Fan, Zhihua; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Stern, Alan H; Lioy, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution of a facility that processes steel production slag into raw material for cement production to local outdoor particle deposition in Camden, NJ. A dry deposition sampler that can house four 37-mm quartz fiber filters was developed and used for the collection of atmospheric particle deposits. Two rounds of particle collection (3-4 weeks each) were conducted in 8-11 locations 200-800 m downwind of the facility. Background samples were concurrently collected in a remote area located -2 km upwind from the facility. In addition, duplicate surface wipe samples were collected side-by-side from each of the 13 locations within the same sampling area during the first deposition sampling period. One composite source material sample was also collected from a pile stored in the facility. Both the bulk of the source material and the < 38 microm fraction subsample were analyzed to obtain the elemental source profile. The particle deposition flux in the study area was higher (24-83 mg/m2 x day) than at the background sites (13-17 mg/m2day). The concentration of Ca, a major element in the cement source production material, was found to exponentially decrease with increasing downwind distance from the facility (P < 0.05). The ratio of Ca/Al, an indicator of Ca enrichment due to anthropogenic sources in a given sample, showed a similar trend. These observations suggest a significant contribution of the facility to the local particle deposition. The contribution of the facility to outdoor deposited particle mass was further estimated by three independent models using the measurements obtained from this study. The estimated contributions to particle deposition in the study area were 1.8-7.4% from the regression analysis of the Ca concentration in particle deposition samples against the distance from the facility, 0-11% from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source-receptor model, and 7

  13. Complex aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to mixed beams of (241)Am alpha particles and X-rays.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Elina; Deperas-Kaminska, Marta; Brehwens, Karl; Haghdoost, Siamak; Czub, Joanna; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2013-08-30

    Modern radiotherapy treatment modalities are associated with undesired out-of-field exposure to complex mixed beams of high and low energy transfer (LET) radiation that can give rise to secondary cancers. The biological effectiveness of mixed beams is not known. The aim of the investigation was the analysis of chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles. Using a dedicated exposure facility PBL were exposed to increasing doses of alpha particles (from (241)Am), X-rays and a mixture of both. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed in chromosomes 2, 8 and 14 using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The found and expected frequencies of simple and complex aberrations were compared. Simple aberrations showed linear dose-response relationships with doses. A higher than expected frequency of simple aberrations was only observed after the highest mixed beam dose. A linear-quadratic dose response curve for complex aberrations was observed after mixed-beam exposure. Higher than expected frequencies of complex aberrations were observed for the two highest doses. Both the linear-quadratic dose-response relationship and the calculation of expected frequencies show that exposure of PBL to mixed beams of high and low LET radiation leads to a higher than expected frequency of complex-type aberrations. Because chromosomal changes are associated with cancer induction this result may imply that the cancer risk of exposure to mixed beams in radiation oncology may be higher than expected based on the additive action of the individual dose components.

  14. Evaluation of Melt-Grown, ZnO Single Crystals for Use as Alpha-Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S; Giles, N. C.; Yang, Xiaocheng; Wall, R. Andrew; Ucer, Burak; Williams, Richard T.; Wisniewski, Dariusz J; Boatner, Lynn A; Rengarajan, Varatharajan; Nause, Jeff E; Nemeth, Bell

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of the scintillation properties of zinc-oxide-based scintillators, several melt-grown, ZnO single crystals have been characterized using -particle excitation, infrared reflectance, and room temperature photoluminescence. The crystals, grown by Cermet, Inc. using a pressurized melt growth process, were doped with Group 1 elements (Li), Group 2 elements (Mg), Group 3 elements (Ga, In) and Lanthanides (Gd, Er, Tm). The goals of these studies are to better understand the scintillation mechanisms associated with various members of the ZnO scintillator family and to then use this knowledge to improve the radiation detection capabilities of ZnO-based scintillators. One application for which ZnO is particularly well suited as a scintillator is as the associated particle detector in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator. Application requirements include the exclusion of organic materials, outstanding timing resolution, and high radiation resistance. ZnO(Ga) and ZnO(In) have demonstrated fast (sub-nanosecond) decay times with relatively low light yields, and ZnO(Ga) has been used in a powder form as the associated particle detector for a D-T neutron generator. Four promising candidate materials, ZnO, ZnO:Ga, ZnO:In,Li, and ZnO:Er,Li, were identified in this study. These four samples demonstrated sub-nanosecond decay times and alpha particle excited luminescence comparable to BC-400 fast plastic scintillator. The ZnO:Mg,Ga, ZnO:Gd, and ZnO:Li samples demonstrated appreciable slow (microsecond) decay components that would be incompatible with high-counting-rate applications.

  15. Scenarios for the nonlinear evolution of alpha particle induced Alfven wave instability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, Huanchun.

    1992-03-01

    Various nonlinear scenarios are given for the evolution of energetic particles that are slowing down in a background plasma and simultaneously causing instability of the background plasma waves. If the background damping is sufficiently weak, a steady-state wave is established as described by Berk and Breizman. For larger background damping rate pulsations develop. Saturation occurs when the wave amplitude rises to where the wave trapping frequency equals the growth rate. The wave then damps due to the small background dissipation present and a relatively long quiet interval exists between bursts while the free energy of the distribution is refilled by classical transport. In this scenario the anomalous energy loss of energetic particles due to diffusion is small compared to the classical collisional energy exchange with the background plasma. However, if at the trapping frequency, the wave amplitude is large enough to cause orbit stochasticity, a phase space explosion'' occurs where the wave amplitudes rise to higher levels which leads to rapid loss of energetic particles.

  16. Scenarios for the nonlinear evolution of alpha particle induced Alfven wave instability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, Huanchun

    1992-03-01

    Various nonlinear scenarios are given for the evolution of energetic particles that are slowing down in a background plasma and simultaneously causing instability of the background plasma waves. If the background damping is sufficiently weak, a steady-state wave is established as described by Berk and Breizman. For larger background damping rate pulsations develop. Saturation occurs when the wave amplitude rises to where the wave trapping frequency equals the growth rate. The wave then damps due to the small background dissipation present and a relatively long quiet interval exists between bursts while the free energy of the distribution is refilled by classical transport. In this scenario the anomalous energy loss of energetic particles due to diffusion is small compared to the classical collisional energy exchange with the background plasma. However, if at the trapping frequency, the wave amplitude is large enough to cause orbit stochasticity, a phase space ``explosion`` occurs where the wave amplitudes rise to higher levels which leads to rapid loss of energetic particles.

  17. A new real-time method for determining particles' sphericity and density: application to secondary organic aerosol formed by ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan

    2008-11-01

    Particle volumes are most often obtained by measuring particle mobility size distributions and assuming that the particles are spherical. Particle volumes are then converted to mass loads by using particle densities that are commonly estimated from measured mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters, assuming that the particles are spherical. For aspherical particles, these assumptions can introduce significant errors. We present in this work a new method that can be applied to any particle system to determine in real time whether the particles are spherical or not. We use our second-generation single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) to measure with extremely high precision the vacuum aerodynamic size distributions of particles that are classified by differential mobility analyzer and demonstrate that the line shape of these vacuum aerodynamic size distributions provide a way to unambiguously distinguish between spherical and aspherical particles. Moreover, the very same experimental system is used to obtain the size, density, composition, and dynamic shape factors of individual particles. We present an application of this method to secondary organic aerosols that are formed as a result of ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence and absence of an OH scavenger and find these particles to be spherical with densities of 1.198 +/- 0.004 and 1.213 +/- 0.003 g cm(-3), respectively.

  18. A new real-time method for determining particles' sphericity and density: application to secondary organic aerosol formed by ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan

    2008-11-01

    Particle volumes are most often obtained by measuring particle mobility size distributions and assuming that the particles are spherical. Particle volumes are then converted to mass loads by using particle densities that are commonly estimated from measured mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters, assuming that the particles are spherical. For aspherical particles, these assumptions can introduce significant errors. We present in this work a new method that can be applied to any particle system to determine in real time whether the particles are spherical or not. We use our second-generation single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) to measure with extremely high precision the vacuum aerodynamic size distributions of particles that are classified by differential mobility analyzer and demonstrate that the line shape of these vacuum aerodynamic size distributions provide a way to unambiguously distinguish between spherical and aspherical particles. Moreover, the very same experimental system is used to obtain the size, density, composition, and dynamic shape factors of individual particles. We present an application of this method to secondary organic aerosols that are formed as a result of ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence and absence of an OH scavenger and find these particles to be spherical with densities of 1.198 +/- 0.004 and 1.213 +/- 0.003 g cm(-3), respectively. PMID:19031898

  19. The biological effectiveness of radon-progeny alpha particles. II. Oncogenic transformation as a function of linear energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; Marino, S.A.; Brenner, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have established an association between exposure to radon and carcinoma of the lung. However, based on data for either lung cancer in uranium miners exposed to radon or bronchial epithelial carcinomas in Japanese A-bomb survivors, it has not been possible to assign estimates of risk of lung cancer for the general population exposed to radon in their homes. Based on past success with the excellent quantitative properties of the C3H 10T1/2 in vitro oncogenic transformation assay system, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for radiation-induced transformation for charged particles of defined LET has been determined. As the LET of the radiation was increased, the rate of induction of oncogenic transformation increased and the RBE{sub m} approached 20. At higher LETs, RBE dropped precipitously. The rapid drop in effectiveness for {alpha} particles with LETs between 120 and 265 KeV/{mu}m implies a lower quality factor than the 20-25 currently considered appropriate when estimating lung cancer mortality. 29 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Targeting Aberrant DNA double strand break repair in triple negative breast cancer with alpha particle emitter radiolabeled anti-EGFR antibody

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Hedayati, Mohammad; Hobbs, Robert F.; Shao, Chunbo; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Sgouros, George

    2013-01-01

    The higher potential efficacy of alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lies in the 3 to 8-fold greater biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles relative to photon or beta-particle radiation. This greater RBE, however, also applies to normal tissue, thereby reducing the potential advantage of high RBE. Since alpha particles typically cause DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), targeting tumors that are defective in DSB repair effectively increases the RBE, yielding a secondary, RBE-based differentiation between tumor and normal tissue that is complementary to conventional, receptor-mediated tumor targeting. In some triple negative breast cancers (TNBC, ER−/PR−/HER-2−), germline mutation in BRCA-1, a key gene in homologous recombination (HR) DSB repair, predisposes patients to early onset of breast cancer. These patients have few treatment options once the cancer has metastasized. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of alpha particle emitter, 213Bi labeled anti-EGFR antibody, Cetuximab, in BRCA-1 defective TNBC. 213Bi-Cetuximab was found to be significantly more effective in the BRCA-1 mutated TNBC cell line HCC1937 than BRCA-1 competent TNBC cell MDA-MB-231. siRNA knockdown of BRCA-1 or DNA-PKcs, a key gene in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway, also sensitized TNBC cells to 213Bi-Cetuximab. Furthermore, the small molecule inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, NU7441, sensitized BRCA-1 competent TNBC cells to alpha particle radiation. Immunofluorescent staining of γH2AX foci and comet assay confirmed that enhanced RBE is caused by impaired DSB repair. These data offer a novel strategy for enhancing conventional receptor-mediated targeting with an additional, potentially synergistic radiobiological targeting that could be applied to TNBC. PMID:23873849

  1. TASTRAK spectroscopy of polonium-210 alpha-particle activity at bone surfaces: Evidence for a concentrated surface deposit less than 3 {mu}m deep

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, P.L.; Henshaw, D.L.; Keitch, P.A.; Allen, J.E.; Fews, A.P.

    1994-10-01

    The technique of {alpha}-particle spectroscopy by CR-39 type TASTRAK plastic has been used to study the depth distribution of natural {alpha}-particle emitters at the surface of human bone. The predominant component of this {alpha}-particle activity was {sup 210}Po supported by {sup 210}Pb, although a smaller activity of {sup 226}Ra was also detected. Autopsy samples of human femur and cranium were obtained from subjects age 63 to 86. Both cortical and trabecular surfaces were analyzed. The results indicate that {sup 210}Pb-supported {sup 210}Po is concentrated at the surfaces of human bone from elderly subjects, in a narrow band 3 {mu}m deep or less, by a factor of about four. As a result, the {alpha}-particle dose to the nuclei of cells lining bone surfaces is around 1.8 times greater than that calculated for a uniform volume distribution. Polonium-210 activity indicates the distribution of {sup 210}Pb, and of stable lead, received by continuous intake throughout life at a very low level. A persistent bone surface concentration of lead and other osteotropic metals may be associated with the hypermineralized layer about 1 {mu}m thick which occurs at the surface of resting bone mineral. 31 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The anthropogenic magnetic particles contain in indoor dust as markers of pollution emitted by different outside sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Iga; Górka-Kostrubiec, Beata

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to explain the impact of magnetic particles originated from different external sources of pollution on the air quality inside apartments. We used the indoor dust as an indicator of air pollution inside apartments. For the study, a small town was chosen, in which dominated the local sources of pollution: (1) vehicle traffic (in the city center), (2) local heating plant, (3) individual households (in the suburbs) and (4) re-emission of soil particles from the contaminated post-industrial area. In each of four areas were selected several private apartments as a sampling points. Dust samples were collected by the owners of apartments from the floor surface using vacuum cleaners in the same time period (September 2014). The concentration-dependent magnetic parameters (magnetic susceptibility - and magnetization MS) were used to determine the level of the magnetic pollution of the indoor dust. The properties of magnetic particles (mineralogy, domain structure and grain size), and their chemical composition were used to describe and identify the source of air pollution inside the apartments. Generally, the results showed that in each of studied areas were observed flats with both: very high and low values of parameters depending on the concentration of magnetic particles. The biggest differences between the areas were visible in mineralogy of magnetic fraction of pollution. The research of apartments exposed to pollution generated by vehicle traffic (located in the city center) show a wide range of values χ (75-1021 -10-8 m3kg-1) and MS (35-656 -10-3 Am2kg-1). These differences were due to the high contribution of pure iron to magnetic fraction of pollution. Detailed analysis of the M (T) curves revealed two magnetic transitions: first at a temperature Tc = 585oC for magnetite and the second at Tc = 760oC for pure iron. For the dust samples from the city center the high values of χ and MS well correlated with high level of anthropogenic elements

  3. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Benaben, P.; Breuil, P.; Peskov, V.

    2008-02-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 104). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but

  4. Readout cross-talk for alpha-particle measurements in a pixelated sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Krapohl, D.; Fröjdh, E.; Thungström, G.

    2015-05-01

    Simulations in Medici are performed to quantify crosstalk and charge sharing in a hybrid pixelated silicon detector. Crosstalk and charge sharing degrades the spatial and spectral resolution of single photon processing X-ray imaging systems. For typical medical X-ray imaging applications, the process is dominated by charge sharing between the pixels in the sensor. For heavier particles each impact generates a large amount of charge and the simulation seems to over predict the charge collection efficiency. This indicates that some type of non modelled degradation of the charge transport efficiency exists, like the plasma effect where the plasma might shield the generated charges from the electric field and hence distorts the charge transport process. Based on the simulations it can be reasoned that saturation of the amplifiers in the Timepix system might generate crosstalk that increases the charge spread measured from ion impact on the sensor.

  5. Final Scientific/Technical Report, DE-FG02-08ER41561: "Lyman-alpha Emitting Galaxies at 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Gawiser

    2010-03-19

    Lyman Alpha Emitting (LAE) galaxies are a powerful tracer of large scale structure, making them an excellent probe of baryonic acoustic oscillations, which constrain the expansion history of the universe and hence the nature of the dark energy. The HETDEX Stage III dark energy experiment will utilize LAEs for this purpose, and they are under consideration as a tracer of structure for Stage IV ground- and space-based dark energy missions. Our successful investigation of LAEs at z=2.1 and z=3.1 now provides the best information on the number density and clustering bias of these galaxies over the redshift range that HETDEX will study. Connecting these star-forming galaxies to their host dark matter halos represents a major increase in scientific understanding, as we can now proceed with confidence in studying the spatial distribution of significantly larger samples. Our data also provided an empirical test of the Lyman Alpha Tomography technique, which has proven effective and can now be used to design future experiments to probe dark energy and dark matter properties.

  6. X-ray luminescence spectra of graded-gap Al xGa 1- xAs structures irradiated by alpha particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilėnas, A.; Požela, J.; Požela, K.; Jucienė, V.; Dapkus, L.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of 241Am alpha particle irradiation on X-ray luminescence spectra of the graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs structures of different thicknesses is investigated. It is observed that the integral X-ray luminescence intensity of nonirradiated thin (15 μm) structure is 1.4 times less than that in the thick (32 μm) structure, and this difference increases to 3 times after 3×1010 cm-2 dose of irradiation by alpha particle. The X-ray luminescence intensity of the energy hν<1.5 eV of thin nonirradiated structure is about 7 times less than that in thick one. The internal graded-gap electric field Fgg is responsible of that large difference, because it shifts the X-ray generated carriers to the narrow-gap surface with great nonradiative surface recombination rate. The alpha particle irradiation increases nonradiative recombination rate and causes a decrease of the X-ray luminescence intensity of all spectra lines in the thin (15 μm) detector. The most significant drop in X-ray luminescence efficiency is observed from the region at narrow-gap surface after the initial stage (109 cm-2 dose) of alpha particle irradiation. In the 32 μm thick detector, the luminescence intensity of the energy hν=1.8 eV does not change up to 2×1010 cm-2 of alpha particle irradiation dose. That means the high irradiation hardness of the thick graded-gap X-ray detector with optical response.

  7. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy-How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    PubMed

    de Kruijff, Robin M; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Denkova, Antonia G

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  8. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy—How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    PubMed Central

    de Kruijff, Robin M.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Denkova, Antonia G.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  9. Computation of cosmic ray ionization and dose at Mars. I: A comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for proton and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  10. Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schery, Stephen D., Wasiolek, Piotr; Rodgers, John

    1999-06-01

    Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

  11. Numerical simulation of emitted particle characteristics and airway deposition distribution of Symbicort(®) Turbuhaler(®) dry powder fixed combination aerosol drug.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Árpád; Jókay, Ágnes; Balásházy, Imre; Füri, Péter; Müller, Veronika; Tomisa, Gábor; Horváth, Alpár

    2016-10-10

    One of the most widespread dry powder fixed combinations used in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management is Symbicort(®) Turbuhaler(®). The aim of this study was to simulate the deposition distribution of both components of this drug within the airways based on realistic airflow measurements. Breathing parameters of 25 healthy adults (11 females and 14 males) were acquired while inhaling through Turbuhaler(®). Individual specific emitted doses and particle size distributions of Symbicort(®) Turbuhaler(®) were determined. A self-developed particle deposition model was adapted and validated to simulate the deposition of budesonide (inhaled corticosteroid; ICS) and formoterol (long acting β2 agonist; LABA) in the upper airways and lungs of the healthy volunteers. Based on current simulations the emitted doses varied between 50.4% and 92.5% of the metered dose for the ICS, and between 38% and 96.1% in case of LABA component depending on the individual inhalation flow rate. This variability induced a notable inter-individual spread of the deposited lung doses (mean: 33.6%, range: 20.4%-48.8% for budesonide and mean: 29.8%, range: 16.4%-42.9% for formoterol). Significant inter-gender differences were also observed. Average lung dose of budesonide was 29.2% of the metered dose for females and 37% for males, while formoterol deposited with 26.4% efficiency for females and 32.5% for males. Present results also highlighted the importance of breath-holding after inhalation of the drug. About a half of the total lung deposition occurred during breath-hold at 9.6s average breath-hold time. Calculated depositions confirmed appropriate lung deposition of Symbicort(®) Turbuhaler(®) for both genders, however more effort for optimal inhalation technique is advised for persons with low vital capacity. This study demonstrated the possibility of personalized prediction of airway deposition of aerosol drugs by numerical simulations. The methodology

  12. Alpha particle spectroscopy — A useful tool for the investigation of spent nuclear fuel from high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbold, M.

    1984-06-01

    For more than a decade, alpha particle spectrometry of spent nuclear fuel has been used at the Kernforschungsanlage Jülich (KFA) in the field of research for the German high temperature reactor (HTR). Techniques used for the preparation of samples for alpha spectrometry have included deposition from aqueous solutions of spent fuel, annealing of fuel particles in an oven and the evaporation of fuel material by a laser beam. The resulting sources are very thin but of low activity and the alpha spectrometry data obtained from them must be evaluated with sophisticated computer codes to achieve the required accuracy. Measurements have been made on high and low enriched uranium fuel and on a variety of parameters relevant to the fuel cycle. In this paper the source preparation and data evaluation techniques will be discussed together with the results obtained to data, i.e. production of alpha active actinide isotopes, correlations between actinide isotopes and fission products, build up and transmutation of actinides during burn-up of HTR fuel, diffusion coefficients of actinides for fuel particle kernels and coating materials. All these KFA results have helped to establish the basis for the design, licensing and operation of HTR power plants, including reprocessing and waste management.

  13. Development of optical monitor of alpha radiations based on CR-39.

    PubMed

    Joshirao, Pranav M; Shin, Jae Won; Vyas, Chirag K; Kulkarni, Atul D; Kim, Hojoong; Kim, Taesung; Hong, Seung-Woo; Manchanda, Vijay K

    2013-11-01

    Fukushima accident has highlighted the need to intensify efforts to develop sensitive detectors to monitor the release of alpha emitting radionuclides in the environment caused by the meltdown of the discharged spent fuel. Conventionally, proportional counting, scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry are employed to assay the alpha emitting radionuclides but these techniques are difficult to be configured for online operations. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) offer an alternative off line sensitive technique to measure alpha emitters as well as fissile radionuclides at ultra-trace level in the environment. Recently, our group has reported the first ever attempt to use reflectance based fiber optic sensor (FOS) to quantify the alpha radiations emitted from (232)Th. In the present work, an effort has been made to develop an online FOS to monitor alpha radiations emitted from (241)Am source employing CR-39 as detector. Here, we report the optical response of CR-39 (on exposure to alpha radiations) employing techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Reflectance Spectroscopy. In the present work GEANT4 simulation of transport of alpha particles in the detector has also been carried out. Simulation includes validation test wherein the projected ranges of alpha particles in the air, polystyrene and CR-39 were calculated and were found to agree with the literature values. An attempt has been further made to compute the fluence as a function of the incidence angle and incidence energy of alphas. There was an excellent correlation in experimentally observed track density with the simulated fluence. The present work offers a novel approach to design an online CR-39 based fiber optic sensor (CRFOS) to measure the release of nanogram quantity of (241)Am in the environment.

  14. Design of a neutron-TPC prototype and its performance evaluation based on an alpha-particle test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng; Li, Yu-Lan; Niu, Li-Bo; Li, Jin; Deng, Zhi; He, Li; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Lei; Fu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yuan-Jing

    2015-08-01

    A neutron-TPC (nTPC) is being developed for use as a fast neutron spectrometer in the fields of nuclear physics, nuclear reactor operation monitoring, and thermo-nuclear fusion plasma diagnostics. An nTPC prototype based on a GEM-TPC (Time Projection Chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier amplification) has been assembled and tested using argon-hydrocarbon mixture as the working gas. By measuring the energy deposition of the recoil proton in the sensitive volume and the angle of the proton track, the incident neutron energy can be deduced. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to analyze the parameters affecting the energy resolution of the nTPC, and gave an optimized resolution under ideal conditions. An alpha particle experiment was performed to verify its feasibility, and to characterize its performance, including energy resolution and spatial resolution. Based on the experimental measurement and analysis, the energy resolution (FWHM) of the nTPC prototype is predicted to be better than 3.2% for 5 MeV incident neutrons, meeting the performance requirement (FWHM<5%) for the nTPC prototype.

  15. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  16. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-02-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ("bystander") cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined.

  17. Cell growth kinetics of the human cell line Colo-205 irradiated with photons and astatine-211 alpha-particles.

    PubMed

    Palm, S; Andersson, H; Bäck, T; Claesson, I; Delle, U; Hultborn, R; Jacobsson, L; Köpf, I; Lindegren, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell growth kinetics following Astatine-211 (211At, alpha-particle emitter) and photon irradiation were studied for the human colorectal cell line Colo-205. A growth assay using 96-well plates was chosen. The growth kinetics could be simulated by assuming certain fractions of cells with various proliferative capacities, i.e. from none up to 5 cell doublings, in addition to the defined survivors with remaining unlimited clonogenic capacity. No significant difference in cell growth characteristics was seen between 211At and photon irradiation. The cell doubling time, as calculated from the increment in optical density, was compared with the results from BrdU experiments in the early phases of growth (Tpot = 18.5 +/- 0.6 h for LDR (low dose rate) photon irradiated and 20.3 +/- 0.8 hours for sham-irradiated cells 40-45 hours post-irradiation) confirming the transient accelerated growth of irradiated cells. No statistically significant difference in growth was found between LDR, MDR (medium dose rate) and HDR (high dose rate) photon irradiation.

  18. A global Mars dust composition refined by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeff A.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, John L.; King, Penelope L.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Clark, Benton C.; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott J. V.; Minitti, Michelle E.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Thompson, Lucy M.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Elliott, Beverley E.; Desouza, Elstan

    2016-01-01

    Modern Martian dust is similar in composition to the global soil unit and bulk basaltic Mars crust, but it is enriched in S and Cl. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover analyzed air fall dust on the science observation tray (o-tray) in Gale Crater to determine dust oxide compositions. The o-tray dust has the highest concentrations of SO3 and Cl measured in Mars dust (SO3 8.3%; Cl 1.1 wt %). The molar S/Cl in the dust (3.35 ± 0.34) is consistent with previous studies of Martian dust and soils (S/Cl = 3.7 ± 0.7). Fe is also elevated ~25% over average Mars soils and the bulk crust. These enrichments link air fall dust with the S-, Cl-, and Fe-rich X-ray amorphous component of Gale Crater soil. Dust and soil have the same S/Cl, constraining the surface concentrations of S and Cl on a global scale.

  19. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOEpatents

    Steadman, P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure is disclosed. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. 4 figs.

  20. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOEpatents

    Steadman, Peter; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure.